The Chung Collection

Chung Logo

The Chung Collection

[Sessional Papers] [Government of British Columbia] Apr 30, 1883

Item Metadata

Download

Media
chungtext-1.0356509.pdf
Metadata
JSON: chungtext-1.0356509.json
JSON-LD: chungtext-1.0356509-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): chungtext-1.0356509-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: chungtext-1.0356509-rdf.json
Turtle: chungtext-1.0356509-turtle.txt
N-Triples: chungtext-1.0356509-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: chungtext-1.0356509-source.json
Full Text
chungtext-1.0356509-fulltext.txt
Citation
chungtext-1.0356509.ris

Full Text

 CANADA.
Return.  To an address of the House
of Commons, dated 23rd April, 1883;-
For copies of ail Correspondence
of recent date between the Government
of the .Dominion, and the uovernment
of British Columbia, and all Orders
in Council on the subject of
immigration into that Province.
(n.p., n.d.)  3 p.  caption-title.
46 victoria,  oessionax papers (No. 93.)
A. 1883  46 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No. 93.)       \J ,      A.
1883
RETURN
(93)
To an Address of the House op Commons, dated 23rd April, 1883;—For
Copies of all Correspondence of recent date between the Government of
the Dominion, and the Government of British Columbia, and all Orders-
in Council on the subject of Immigration into that Province.
By Command,
HECTOR L. LANGEVIN,
Department of the Seoretary of State, Acting Secretary of State.
26th April, 1883.
Government House, Victoria, 10th March, 1883.
Sir,—I have the honor to enclose herewith a copy of a Report of my Executive-
Council approved by me on the 9th day of March, 1883, upon the subject of the necessity which exists of attempting to attract a desirable class of white labor into this
Province, and further seeking'the co-operation and assistance of the Dominion Government to carry out a comprehensive scheme of immigration. The Report goes
somewhat fully into the subject, setting out the causes which have hitherto tended to
interfere with the immigration of a desirable laboring class to this Province, the consequent introduction of numbers of Chinese to perform indispensable work—the
consequent detrimental effect upon the Province of the presence of so large a number
of Chinese; and that the true interests of the Province and Dominion alike demand
an attempt to ensure tho carrying out of the large public works now in hand by
means of free white labor so that the vast expenditure thereon may be retained in
the country and utilized for its further development.
The subject is one of so great importance to British Columbia, that I earnestly
express the hope that it may receive immediate consideration by the Dominion Government, and that the assistance asked for being granted us, we may shortly see a
scheme of immigration inaugurated which shall meet the requirements of so pressing
a necessity.
I have the honor to be, Sir, your obedient servant,
CLBMBKT F. CORNWALL, Lieutenant Governor.
Hon. Secretary of State.
Copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honorable the Executive Council, approved by-
Sis Honor the Lieutenant Governor, the 9th day of March, 1883.
The Committee of Council, having had under consideration the subject of bringing a desirable class of white labor into the Province, and the question of obtaining
assistance from the Dominion Government to carry out a comprehensive scheme of
immigration, report:—
1. That British Columbia has, during all the years since Confederation, contributed towards the Federal revenue much more largely, in proportion to population,
than the other Provinces, and yet has never participated in any of the appropriations
made from time to time by the Dominion Parliament for the promotion of immigration.
2. That owing to remoteness from centres of emigration, paucity of population,
and inadequacy of revenue available for the purpose of carrying out an immigration
93—1 46 Victoria,
Sessional Papers (No. 93)
A. 188S
scheme, this Province stands more in need of, and has a stronger claim upon the
Dominion for aid than any of the other Provinces. WmmM
3 That the prosecution of largo public works has created a demand for labor
for which no adequate supply existed in the country, and the consequence has been
the influx of hordes of Chinese to supply the want. ,
4 That the presence of this semi-slave labor is most prejudicial to the best interests 'of the country, and constitutional disability-alone prevents the Legislature
applving stringent remedies. jpgi . .
5. That it is in the true interests alike of the Province and the Dominion that
the extensive public works should be carried on by means of free white labor, in
order that the vast expenditures thereon may, as far as possible, be retained in the
country, and utilized for the purpose of promoting the development of its varied
natural resources and industries, and building up prosperous and happy communities
within its borders. I
6. That in order that these objects may be attained, and the Chinese evil
remedied, it is of the utmost importance that a comprehensive and well digested
scheme of immigration be inaugurated with all practicable dispatch.
7. That inasmuch as it would be altogether beyond the capacity of this Province
to carry out such a scheme, it is necessary to seek that substantial Federal assistance,
which, for the foregoing reasons, British Columbia is entitled to expect at the hands
of the Dominion Parliament.
8. That it is, therefore recommended that application be mado to the Dominion
Government to grant fifty thousand dollars ($50,000), this Province contributing a
like sum, towards organizing and carrying out a comprehensive and vigorous scheme
Of immigration.
The Committee advise that this minute be approved, and a copy forwarded to
the Honorable the Secretary of State for Canada.
Certified,
JNO. ROBSON, Provincial Secretary and Clerk Ex. Council.
Certified Copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honorable the Privy C'Hncilfar
Canada, approved by His Excellency the Governor General, on the 9th April.
1883.
The Committee of the Privy Council have had under consideration a despatch
dated 10th March, 1883, from the Lieutenant-Governor of British Colnmbia, transmitting a Minute of his Executive Council, dated 9th. March, 1883, soiling forth the
necessity which exists of attempting to attract a desirable class of white labor into
that Province, and further seeking the co-operation and assistance of the Dominion
Government to carry out a comprehensive scheme of Immigration.
The Minister of Agriculture, to whom the despatch and enclosures were referred,
reports as follows: -—
1st. The report of the Executive Council sets forth that the Province of British
'Columbia, during all the years since Confederation, has contributed to the Federal
revenues much more largely in proportion to population, than the other Provinces,
and yet has never participated in any of the appropriations made from time to timo
}>y the Dominion Parliament for the promotion of Immigration.
The Minister thinks it is well to point out that there is an apparent inaccuracy
of fact in this statement. The Dominion Parliament did, during the Sessions of 1872
and 1873, vote a grant of 870,000 in aid of the Provinces for the encouragement of
Immigration, as requested by delegates from the Provinces at an Immigration conference held in the fall of 1871 in the Department of Agriculture. Out of this appropriation a grant of $5,000 in each of the years named, was apportioned and paid to
the Province of British Columbia. That apportionment was at the time considered
to be fairly liberal to British Columbia, in view of the then populations of the respective
Provinces and their respective claims upon an immigration vote of this nature.
2 16 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (Na&3)
A. 1883
The object had in view in asking Parliament to pass such vote was to encourage
and assist the several Provinces to put into effect a practical and effective immigration policy, and, in point of fact, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick, did make
considerable appropriations from their own revenues to promote immigration.
The Minister, without enquiring into tbe efforts in this respect, which British
Columbia has made in the past on its own behalf, recognises that the considerable
exertions which it now proposes to make, calls for special consideration of the par*
ticular circumstances of its position at tho present time.
The Dominion vote in aid was not again recommended to Parliament by the
Administration in 1874, nor subsequently, notwithstanding argent representations
from some of the Provinces at that time.
The Minister farther thinks it proper to point oat that in all the general info
mation which has been published by the Department of Agriculture, or diffused bj
agents or lecturers, as full and particular prominence has been given to British
Columbia as to any other single Province of the Dominion.
2nd. The report of the Executive Council also sets forth that owing to remoteness
from centres of emigration, paucity of population and inadequacy of revenue avail*
able for the purpose of carrying out an immigration scheme, the Province of British
Columbia stands more in need of, and has a stronger claim upon the Dominion for aid
than any of the other Provinces, and further, that tho prosecution of largo public
works has created a demand for labor for which no adequate supply has existed in the
country, the consequence having been an influx of hordes of Chinese.
The Minister,,while admitting the particular claims of that Province for consideration, desires to point out that the measures which have been taken by the Dominion
Government, and which have received the support of the Parliament of Canada-
measures involving a very large expenditure of capital—have not only been of a
-Character to lead up to a large immigration of white (as distinguished from Chinese)
settlers, but, in fact, absolutely necessary as a preliminary to any considerable movement of this nature, for the reason that British Columbia has required a direct means
of communication by railway in order to facilitate and cheapen intercourse between the
•" emigration centres " referred to, and the admittedly vast resources of that Province
awaiting both industrial and commercial development.
, 3rd. The report of the Executive Council further states that the pressuro of the
"" semi-slave labor" which has flowed in to meet the wants for the construction of
public works is most prejudicial to the best interests of the country.
On this the Minister remarks that the most effective possible way to meet the
•evil referred to, if evil it really be, will be found in the completion of the public works
in question, by opening up easy communication with the "emigration centre*."
4th. The report of the Executive Council sets forth, that the extensive public
works in progress should be carried on by means of free white labor in order that the
large expenditure thereon may be retained as far as possible in the country and
•utilized for tho purpose of promoting the development of its various industries and
resources.
On this point the Minister finds, in view of the faot of the contrants for each
public works having been already let, that the Government would be oalle I upon to
assume a most serious responsibility if it attempted to supply the contractors with
any particular kind of labor, and especially considering the farther fact ihat the estimates for the contracts wore made upon a calculation of the then existing condition of
the labor market.
5th. The report of the Exeoutive Council also sets forth that a well digested
-scheme of immigration should be inaugurated with all practicable dispatch to remedy
the evil referred to, and offers, in the event of the Dominion-Government contributing
a sum of 850,000 for suoh purpose, that the Province of British Columbia will contribute a like sum.
Instead of accepting this precise form of proposition, the Minister is of opinion,
in view of the early completion of the railway works in progress, that it is in the
interest of the whole Dominion to adopt a particular and energetia policy to promote
3
93—1J 46 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No. 93.)
A. 1883
immieration to the Province of British Columbia, and that the advantages and
resources of that Province as a field for immigration and the investment of capital
should be fully and particularly set forth in a carefully prepared and authoritative
pamphlet, which should be very widely circulated in the United Kingdom and on
the Continent of Europe (it being translated into the languages of those countries
which are the chief " centres of emigration.") He, the Minister, has in fact taken
the necessary steps to have such pamphlet prepared in his Department, and advises
that for one year, in order to establish a nucleus of settlement, a sum of 810 (as a
bonus) should be allowed to each adult immigrant of sixteen years of age and over,
either male or female, from the United Kingdom or the continent of Europe, upon
settlement in British Columbia, in view of the particular and exceptionally difficult
circumstances of that Province in relation to immigration, a system of selection and
checks should be put into effect through the European agency of the Department of
Agriculture to secure the proper carrying out of the intention of giving the bonus
of 010 as above stated.
6th. The Minister recommends that the agreement arrived at by the Immigration
Conference of 1871, to establish an Immigration Office at Victoria, B.C., should be
put into effect, and that a vote be submitted to Parliament during the present Session
for that purpose! The duties pertaining to such office would be the care of immigrants
arriving in British Columbia, and in this relation the Minister suggests that it the
Government of that Province would, at this point, come to assist in the common
object of the placing of immigrants, after arriving, a duty which is essentially provincial, as well in view of the terms of the " Union Act" as agreements at conferences
between the Dominkm Government and the Governments of the Provinces, an important facility would be provided, which would tend greatly to increase the stream of
immigration. The Agent to be appointed by the Dominion Government might, in
this connection, in the same way as in the other Provinces, act as the Agent of the
Provincial Government in affording those facilities to immigrants which belong to
the Provincial Governments. •
The Committee concur in the foregoing report of the Minister of Agriculture,
and recommend that a despatch based upon this Minute, when approved, be transmitted to His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia in answer to his
despatch above cited, and as setting forth the immigration policy to be adopted in
the particular circumstances of that Province.
JOHN J. McGEE, Clerk Privy Council.
Department Secretary op State, 16th April, 1883.
Sir,,—I have the honor to acquaint you, for the information of your Government,
that His Excellency the Governor General has had under consideration in Council
your despatch dated 10th of March, 1883, transmitting a Minute of your Executive
Council, dated the 9th of that month, setting forth the necessity which exists of
attempting to attraet a desirable class of white labor into the Province of British
Columbia, and further seeking the co-operation and assistance of the Dominion Government to carry out a comprehensive scheme of immigration.
I have now to state, that His Excellency is advised as follows:—
1st. The Report of your Executive Council sets forth that the Province of British
Columbia, during all the years since Confederation, has contributed to the Federal
revenues much more largely in proportion to population than the other Provinces,
and yet has never participated in any of the appropriations made, from time to time,,
by the Dominion Parliament for the promotion of immigration.
It is considered well to point out that there is an apparent inaccuracy of fact in
this statement.
The Dominion Parliament did, during the Sessions of 1872 and 1873, vote a grant
of 670,000 in aid of the Provinces for the encouragement of immigration, as requested 46 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No. 93.) •
A. 1883
by delegates from the Provinces, at an immigration conference held in the fall of
1571, in the Department of Agriculture.
Out of this appropriation a grant of $5,000 in each of the years named was
apportioned and paid to the Province of British Columbia.
That apportionment was at the time considered to be fairly liberal to British
Columbia, in view of the then populations of the respective Provinces and their
respective claims upon an immigration vote of this nature.
The object had in view in asking Parliament to pass such vote was to encourage
and assist the several Provinces to put into effect a practical and effective immigration policy, and, in point of fact, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick did make considerable appropriations from their own revenues to promote immigration.:
Without enquiring into the efforts in this respect which British Columbia has
mado in the past in its own behalf, it is recognized that the considerable exertions
which it now proposes to make call for special consideration of the particular circumstances of its position at the present time.
ThejDominion vote in aid was not again recommended to Parliament by the
Administration in' 1874, nor subsequently, notwithstanding urgent representations
from some of the Provinces at that time. It is further thought proper to point out
that in all the general information which has been published by the Department of
Agriculture, or diffused by agents or lecturers, as full and particular prominence has
been given to British Columbia as to any other single Province of the Dominion.
2nd. The report of your Executive Council sets forth that owing to the remoteness
from " centres of immigration " paucity of population aiid inadequacy dt revenue
available for the purpose of carrying out an immigration scheme, the P^ovinee of
British Columbia Btands more in need of, and has a stronger c -im upon the Dominion
ffir aid than any of the otiier Provinces ; and further, that tho prosecution of large
public works has created a demand for labor for which no adequate supply has existed
in tijevcountry, the consequence having been an influx of hordes of Chinese^ '
^Thile admitting the particular,claim of that Province for consideration,it is to be
pointed out that the measures which have been taken by the Dominion Government,
and which have received the support of the Parliament of Canada, nieasures involving
S^very large expenditure of capital, have not only been of a character to lead up to a
large immigration of white (as aistinguishedrfrom Chinese) settlers, but in fact absolutely necessary as a preliminary to any considerable movement, of this nature for
ifce reason that British Columbia has required a direct means of comraunicatiten by
railway in order to facilitate and cheapen intercourse between * the " immigjratiMk,
centres" referred to, and the-admittedly vast resources of that Province awaiting both
industrial and commercial developments.
3. The Report of your Executive Council farther states the pressure of the "semi-
slaves' labor," which has flowed in to meet the wants for the construction ef public
works, is most prejudicial to the best interests of the country.
On this it is to be remarked that the most effective possible way to meet the
evil referred to, if evil it really be, will be found in the completion of the public
works in question by opening up a. communication with the " immigration centres."
4. The Report of your Executive Council sets forth that the extensive public
works in progress should be carried on by means of free white labor, in order that
the large expenditure thereon may bo retained, as far as possible, in the country, and
utilized for the purpose of promoting the development of its various industries and
resources.
On this point it is found, in view of the fact of the contracts for such public
works having been already let, that the Government would be called upon to assume
a most serious responsibility if it attempted to supply the contractors with any particular kind of labor, and especially considering the further faet that the estimates
for the oontraet were made upon a calculation of the then existing conditions of the
labor market.
5. The Report of your Exeoutive Council also sets forth, that a well digested
scheme of
immigration
should be
augurated
with all practicable despatch to 46 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No. 98.)
A. 1885
remedy the evils referred to, and offers, in the event of the Dominion Government
contributing a sum of $50,000 for such purpose, that the Province of British Columbia
will contribute a like sum.
Instead of accepting this precise form of proposition, His Excellency is advised
in view of the early completion of the railway works in progress, that it is in tho
ipterest of the whole Dominion to adopt a particular and energetic policy to promote immigration to the Province of British Coltfmbia, and that the advantages and
resources of that Province as a field for immigration and the investment of capital,
should be fully and particularly set forth in a carefully prepared and authoritative
pamphlet, which should be very widely circulated in the United Kingdom and on
the Continent of Europe (it being translated into the languages of those countries
which are the chief centres of immigration).
The necessary steps have, in fact, been taken to have such a pamphlet prepared
in the Department of Agriculture, and His Excellency is advised that for one year,
in order to establish a nucleus of settlement, a sum often dollars as a bonus should
be allowed to each adult immigrant of sixteen years of age and over, either male or
female, from the United Kingdom or the continent of Europe.
Upon settlement in British Columbia, in view of the particular and exceptionally
difficult circumstances of that Province in relation to immigration, a system of selections and checks should be put into effect through the European agency of the
Department of Agriculture to secure the proper carrying out of the intention of
giving the bonus of ten dollars as above stated.
6. His Excellency is advised that the agreement arrived at by the Immigration Conference of 1811 to establish an Immigration Office at Victoria, British
Columbia, should be put into effect, and that a vo;e be submitted to Parliament
during the present Session for that purpose.
The duties pertaining to such office would be the care of immigrants arriving in
British Columbia; and in this relation it is suggested that if the Government of that
Province would, at this point, come to assist in the common object of placing immigrants, after arriving, a duty which is essentially provincial, as well as in view of
the terms of the Union Act, as agreements at Conferences between the Dominion
Government and the Governments of the Provinces, an important facility would be
provided, which would tend greatly to increase the stream of immigration.
The Agent to be appointed by the Dominion Government might in *this
connection, in the ,same way as in the other Provinces, act as the Agent of the
Provincial Government in affording those facilities to immigrants, which belong to
Provincial Government.
I have the honor to be, Sir, your obedient servant,
HECTOR L. LANGEVIN, Acting Secretary of State.
Hon. Lieutenant-Governor, British Columbia, Victoria. 46 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No. 93.)
A. 1883
KETURN
(93a.)
To an Address of the House of Commons, dated 23rd February, 1883 ;—
For all Correspondence between the Government of British Columbia
and the Dominion Government, respecting Immigration to British
Columbia; also all Correspondence on the question of Chinese Immigration.
By Command,
HECTOR L. LANGETOJ,
Department of the Secretary of State, Acting Secretary of State.
30th April, 1883. j
By Telegraph from Victoria, B.C., 24th April, 1880.
Legislature unanimously requests your Government to pass an A "t this Session^
similar in principle to the Chinese Immigrants Regulation Act, 1877.   Mr. De
Cosmos has the Act referred to.
J. C. Aikins, Secretary of State. F. K. "WILLIAMS, Speaker.
Government House, Victoria, 17th May, 1880.
Sir,—I have the honor to enclose you herewith a copy of a Minu:e of my Executive Council, dated the 12th instant, requesting that the views of th« Legislative
Assembly of this Province expressed in certain resolutions, recited in said Minute,
passed on the 21st and 22nd ultimos, relative to the resti i-'ion of the Chinese immigration and the imposition of taxes upon them, be carried out to the fullest extent
possible.
1 have also the honor to enclose nine printed copies of an Act of the Queensland
Legislature, entitled : " An Act to regulate the Immigration of Chinc-e and to make
provision against their becoming a charge upon the Colony."
I have the honor to be, Sir, your obedient servant,
Secretary of State. A. W. RICHARDS, Lieutenant Governor.
Copt of a Report of a Committee of the Honorable the Executive Council, approved by His
Excellency the Lieutenant Governor, on 12th day of May, 1880.
The Committee of Council advise that the following Resolutions passed by the
Legislative Assembly respectively, on the 21st and 22nd days of April, 1880, relative*
to the restriction of Chinese Immigration, and the imposition of taxes upon them,.
viz.:—
I Whereas the Legislative Assembly of Queensland, Australia, passed an Act intituled: 'The Chinese Immigrants Regulation Act of 1877,' which has received the
assent of the Imperial Government, the principles of which if made law by the Parliament of Canada, would beneficially regulate the immigration of Chinese into this
Province.
Be it therefore resolved, that the Government of the Dominion of Canada be
be respectfully requested by this Legislative Assembly by telegram from the Honorable the Speaker, to cause an Act similar in principle to the 'Chinese Immigrants 46 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No. 93.)
A. 1883
Regulation Act, 1877,' of Queensland, Australia, to become law daring the present
Session of the Parliament of Canada,"
Whereas the payment of taxes and licenses is evaded by the Chinese population,
and whereas an Act has been passed in Queensland, Australia, and assented to by the
Imperial Government to the effect hereinafter mentioned.
Be itthorefore resolved, that the Governmentrof the Dominion of Canada be
requested by this House to cause a Bill to be passed empowering the Province of
British Columbia to pass an Act to the following effect:—
1. The sum payable by Chinese for a free miner's certificate shall be fifteen
dollars, and for a business license shall be double the rates levied under the various
Licenses, Ordinances and Acts of the Provinces for each year during which the Bame
is to be in force.
And no free miner's certificate or business license shall hereafter be issued to'any
such Chinese except on payment of such sums as aforesaid respectively.
2. Any Chinese who shall bo found mining or carrying on business on any gold
field, not having in his possession a free miners certificate or business license lawfully
issued to him;
Any person who shall, on any gold field, employ in mining any Chinese who has
not in his possession a free miner's certificate lawfully issued to him;
Shall on conviction thereof, forfeit and pay a sum not exceeding twenty-five
dollars, and in default of immediate payment the amount of such penalty shall be
levied by distress and sale of the goods and chattels of the offender, and in default of
such distress, or if sufficient distress be not found, the offender shall be liable to be
imprisoned, with or without hard labor, for any period not exceeding three months.
3. In any prosecution for any offence against the provisions of this Act, the averment in the information that any persons named therein had not in his possession
at the time of the alleged offence a free miner's certificate or business license Iawfmfjh
issued to him, shall be sufficient proof that such person had not such free miner's
certificate or business license, unless the defendant shall prove the contrary.
4. Any information for any offence against this Act, may be heard and deter*
mined by any two Justices of the Peace, and any such Justices may hear and
determine the same, in a summary manner at any place where any offender shall be
found within the limits of any gold field.
5. No Chinese shall be entitled to be naturalized.
6. This Act shall be styled and may be cited as the "Chinese Tax Act," be forwarded to the Dominion Government, with a respectful request that the views of the
Assembly be carried oat to the fullest extent possible.
Certified,
THOS. BASIL HUMPHREY, Clerk Executive Council.  .   ■ ..   .    ■ ■   .
. . .      ^.     .    ■„■,..,-    ■ ■ -        -

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.chungtext.1-0356509/manifest

Comment

Related Items