The Chung Collection

Chung Logo

The Chung Collection

C.Y.A. annual [booklet] Chinese Youth Association of Victoria, B.C. 1940

Item Metadata

Download

Media
chungtext-1.0356414.pdf
Metadata
JSON: chungtext-1.0356414.json
JSON-LD: chungtext-1.0356414-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): chungtext-1.0356414-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: chungtext-1.0356414-rdf.json
Turtle: chungtext-1.0356414-turtle.txt
N-Triples: chungtext-1.0356414-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: chungtext-1.0356414-source.json
Full Text
chungtext-1.0356414-fulltext.txt
Citation
chungtext-1.0356414.ris

Full Text

 C Y. A.
ANNUAL
1939-40 T^	
For Your Parties or Picnics
Use I . J
Old English Beverages
QUALITY PRODUCE
Fort and Elanshard Street. Ph. E 5642
ltt;i'l
ran Xh !«>   ~t - ^
1 % ft t'~
1
=»i .€=
=»j€===5^
SUN LIFE OF CANADA
HOTEL WESTH01ME
1417 Government Street Victoria, B.C.
Fhone E 1151-2-3
Manager, Prop.,
J. DOUGLAS K. A. RAY
Single Rcoms   -   Suites
Fully Modern
Reason ble Rates
Modern Equpiped
Studio for
Making Portraits
for Passports.
Copying All
Kinds of Photos,
Documents, etc.
4<e0
Each
KODAK PRINTS
(ALL SIZES)
The Best At Any Price
WHY PAY MORE?
4©o
Each
JUS-RITE PHOTOS LTD.
Authorized Dealers for The Canadian Kodak Co.
714 YATES STREET VICTORIA, B.C.
 v se         v te  tt  v. v
We Sell
Cameras,
Films,
Frames,
Prnting Papers,
Chemicals,
Movie Supplies 	
Ii
i
r
C. Y^Af ANNUAL
J&- ■  -
YE AR
1939-40
DEDICATION
 —^—».♦. «—a»
To those who have
labored to advance
the purpose of
the Association,
. this annual is
respectfully dedicated.
^       I   ■  ■  ■    ■ V-
1
M
Publjsh^by the Chipe^e Youth Association ot
' VICTORIA B. CT
ik,
PAGE    NO,   1 If
I   I
f
ft
h
ff.      fr     J:      I
GENERALISSIMO CHIANG KAI-SHEK
sssH   ii,   i    a*S
y —**.     -. ..*     ■ .        H  »
p*aa wo  a. 	
	
fe FOREWORD
This issue of the C.Y.A. Annual is presented with the view to giving
members and friends of the Association as a fit souvenir of the activities of the
organization during the first year. The literary efforts contained within the
covers of this Annual, with a few exceptions, have been contributed by the
members themselves. The editors feel deeply gratified for the close co-operation given by the members and editorial staff in the publication of this Annual.
->«*«r
EDITORIAL   STAFF
English Editors...
TCftl'
Alfred Wong
John W. Gung
"Ruth Leung
Leslie Wong
Chinese Editors..
Adyejusipg...
# fi it
SJSaviIHO.
draaJ aafraȣ
Roy Mah
Bentinn Lamb
C. K. Lee
I Harry Lim
John G. Bong
Tommy Quon
Eric Joe
"James Chow
Mary Bong
Rebecca Leimfr
Treasurers..
Ping Quon
'Douglas Sam
Circulation-
Roger Lee
John Mar
[ Herbert Chan
Harris Lee
f*A«c   mo.   a I	
$. I
1939 C.Y.A. EXECUTIVE
I
man
ENGLISH
SECRETARY
John W. Gung
■>**~**~«*»M*r«*'
GENERAL
CHAIRMAN
Roy Mah
mmm
TREASURER
Eric Joe
PA6E    NO.    4
m
CHINESE
SECRETARY
Bentinn Lamb 	
	
	
it
1939 C.Y.A. EXECUTIVE
4 AiMft-t £-*dWhfc»-a#*
-«a-
Frank Mar
CHAIRMAN COMMITTEE
ft sac      «#**■     *?»«
Leslie Wong Rog'er'Lee John   Bong
Roy Mali
Leslie   Wong Publication
gKB&   JKg§9
iJiitthew Bong  Music
|     •' "   . •        a:      .   '.a',   J
imt& .   •  . '     ■•••■•   ■   ..'-jfti
CONVENORS
-John W/ Gung Publicity
Roy Mah   Education
C.Y.A. DEtEGATES>n'
a    . .    -.;,.„-      ■   ::   ra ;.rV^Mdfl
at 81$ JBmffi
Philip Nip  Organizer
George Lowe  Sports
^ iH i§>
Mary Bong
ft It 4 t *■'■*
DISTRICT REPRESENTATIVES
Vancouver—Thomas Wong West Kootenay—Robert Lowe
lis) ^c*
w
i
¥<a«    mmm   ©as
Ping Quon     Bentinn Lamb    F^ank Mar
Josephine Wong   Ida Chan
EXECUTIVE ^0MMITTEE
Leslie Wong      Roger Lee
wkm    mm%-    mux
George Lowe Douglas Sam      Philip Nipp
mffiM    mm    mmm
a.ti
John Bong
(Ml
Eric Joe
x£BJ§
Roy Mah
man
John W. Gung I
*M
Thomas Wong Robert Lowe   Mary Bong    David Yuen Rebecca Leung  Matthew Bong
9>AG«b< .NO^c.JK- I
 „■
	
rarans	
561
/«SI OPEN ilTTERTO THE CHINESE YOUTH
You are the potential defenders of China, in her sacred war of resistance to maintain National independence. This gallant .struggle, carried on by the youth in China, demands your
assistance. It is vitally necessary»ttiat you shoura hot for one moment forget your important
dut^p ithis crucial hour upon which hang^tju^^ation's fate. The heroic deeds performed by
our^lpflffithers and sisters<j»fpur homeland have been mentioned before, and the fact should be
known and reiterated that every drop of blood and every pound of flesh given up by them
are done so with the hope of building up a free and democratic country for us to live in.
Therefore we should be conscious of their heroic sacrifice and try to match it with our own
courage and determination.
MM. tkitifi     II^M'ii^^        ^^^111^^
It was wfifrh'the above realization that the C.Y.A. was organized. Through the efforts of
a half-dozen ardent youths the foundation of the present organization was laid. JPuring its
early days, thisJ-froup encountered n^anx obstacles, but the undaunted spirits of the members
overcame these and emerged victorious. Since its birth, the C.Y.A. has done a good deal of
work, but I hope you will nojif think that you have finished with your duty. Instead, you
must prepare yourself for greater tasks ahead. The difficulties you have gone through are
small compared with those to corner Therefore you/must be prepared for greater sacrifices.
Our brothers and sisters in China have demonstrated to us that they can endure hardships.
So also must you. Show them that you can do as much as they. You are going through the
present ordeala<m5 order to lay the foundation for the future happiness and welfare of our
country. Keep in mind that you are the future masters of China. Always be conscious of this
fact, and keep on increasing 3pur efforts towards China's cause.
During the past year, the C.Y.A. not only achieved many successful projects, but also
made several app&als for pffina*s cause. As a result, it has gained the wholehearted support
and sympathy of the Chinese Community and the Canadian people. I have no doubt that in
the near future the organization will map out a definite programme of a constructive nature
upon which we may base our actions. The help and support of every member will be
required to carry on the good woxk of helping China to a final victory, thereby laying the
foundation for peace and democracy throughout the worra.
■ a   .WMof      iMatlSt
ROY MAH, General Chairman, C.Y.A.
touQ ^nm
L»AOK   NO.   • = 'B
C3Y. A   ANKUAHflREPORT
By Bentinn Lamb and Roy Mah
C.   y.   A.    y\±aAapaAd.t?
HISTORY OF THE C.Y.A.
i -€feina is. awakened! Mafv/ng a cultural background ex-
t^adjng liaqkover 5,000 years, the sleeping lion of the
Far Bast has suddenly been awakened by the roaring of
Lqu Chow Chao (iVfirco PolcWrtttge). Now, over 450
nintibns of the fmest and>$urest are fighting shoulder to
^JitMfder, eithcPJih.t&c jffrittfciines or behind, to resj^t the
enemy's ruth}e^a?inyasiion, and to establish an everlasting
order in the Orient.
In this 4ark moment of our history, how could we, the
Overseas Chinese Youth, ignore the valiant struggle of
our brothers in China, and leaVe Our country to its fate?
We must follow in the footsteps of the C.Y.C., which two
yette agr/wakijorganifccdfe hi aft. patriotic endeavour, but
which was.unable to make very much headway because
ci.unfavourable circumstances.
Until, and when China has entered into the third phase
of her struggle, she obviously requires much more physical and moral strength to answer this malicious attack
by the enemy. So it was that arfew ardent youth took the
opportunity at tfoe- Dr. Grant Lathe reception meeting to
organize a .permanent central youth body to assist the
h: me country m whatever way possible. This move was
welcomed by the Victoria youth, who pledged their loyal
wholehearted support. Thus was born the organization
known as the Chinese Youth Association.
Time has passed very quickly since the inception of the
C.Y.A., and today we are celebrating our first annive. sary.
THE WORK OF THE C.Y.A.
What have we accomplished during the past yea-?    The
following report is a general review of our activities:
1. Field Activities—Last year, s- mpathetic friends of
the Chinese people organized an Embargo Conference
wfcffch was held in Victoria. We not only sent delegates
to this Conference, but also took part in the parade that
followed, through the main streets around the heart of the
city. As a consequence, the C.Y.A. has gained considerable attention from the Canadian public.    Delegates were
also sent to the Pacific Northwest Embargo Conference,
the Victoria Youth Parliament, and the B. C. Youth Con-
g!§ess$ and at each and every conclave considerable success was reported. Unfortunately, however, financial
oifficulties prevented our sending representatives to the
Pacific Coast Embargo Conference at San Francisco, and
to the Canadian Youth Congress at Winnipeg, but we did
send our greetings, wishing them success. Many prominent Victoria citizens attended our reception tea for Miss
Loh Tsei, who spoke of the gallant struggle of China and
the r'uthlessness of the enemy. The audience was visibly
m'ved, and expressed its sympathy. Thus have we
gained a victory in the matter of individual diplomacy.
From time to time, there appeared in local English
papers many sympathetic opinions towards China's cause.
Also, there were some unfounded stories which could
casliv lead the public to misunderstand China's position.
The C.Y.A. wrote the press and corrected these misleading statements. Besides this, the organization has often
s"nt representatives to various local groups to speak on
the meaning of China's struggle. On July 7th, the day
on which we commemorate China's second anniversary
of he- war, the C.Y.A.'s West Kootenay representative,
Robert Lowe spoke over Station CJAT at Trail on behalf
of our organization.
The local picketing of scran iron removal has resounded all over America, for Victoria is one of the few
cities which has successfully prevented the scrap from
being exported Thus the members of our organization
have helped tn fill another page of glorious history for
%hr /Overseas; Chinese Youth. ^
2. Assisting China—The C.Y.A. has taken upon itself
the important task of raising funds for the suffering
children and refugee students in China. Also, whenever
there was a charity fund to be raised by our Senior organization, the co-operation of the C.Y.A. members was un-
sHntingly g:ven. Outstanding of these affairs was the
Rice Bowl F^stivd. In this event, we not only mobilized practically all the members to help in various
departments, but some of our members have occupied
itriuttrtafit position^ m1 the campaign.
Activities—During the past year our organization has
held thirteen g'XW} meetings, twenty-six executive meetings, four social functions, and five emergency meetings.
At each meeting the main topic of discussion centred on
national salvation. The membership of the C.Y.A. is
composed of Chinese youth—boys and girls—ranging in
ages from 20 to 30 years. The Association now has an
encouraging membership of over seventy. We are still
a long way from achieving our objective, that of uniting
in one group all the Chinese youth organization in Victoria to serve our country, which is the aim of the Association : The problems of improving the Chinese youth's
standard of living is an unexplored field of prime importance yet to be approached. We are optimistic in feeling
Mat every member will give his fullest co-operation in
the coming year towards greater achievents and accom-
. plishments.    Let us work together to achieve this end.
PAGE   MO   7. CONCERNING    LEISURE
By Frank Paulding
It seems rather incongruous for the West to advise the
Eastconcerning leisure.' One of my personal admirations is for the way the East has gathered to its heart the
meaning of living in a metaphysical or philosophical
sense* particularly applied to the use of leisure time.
! Hiring the last Great War a Hindu philosopher, in talking to Canadian soldiers, said this: "The West stands
for action, and the East for contemplation. What the
Rast needs is more action and the West more contemplation." Let lis then contemplate leisure from three
aspects:    Background, problems, and possibilities.
The Background of Leisure—Every individual possesses an instinctive urge for self-expression, "a place in
the sun." the appreciation and recognition of his fellows.
This cannot generally be secured in working hours, except
in rare instances, chiefly because men are forced to work
and because of the monotony of many tasks in a mechanistic civilization. Therefore the majority must satisfy
this biological urge in leisure hours. The wider recognition of this fact is essential to individual happiness and
well-being, and is also of great importance to the community. Would our young people waste time in superficial things if they knew their life-long happiness and
social usefulness depended on a fruitful use of leisure
hours ?
The Problems of Leisure—These are many, but two
are outstanding. The first of these deals with the importance of participation. So many people today enjoy
leisure vicariously, i.e., through the activities of others—
in radio, screen, sport, or anything else. It has been said
that the world is tending to be a race of armchair occupants even in youth. There is nothing like doing the
thing yourself—then the value of growth, skill, self-
expression are yours. Never mind if you are a dub—
better be that and develop your personality than see or
hear the finest efforts of someone else. The second
problem is related to the first, it is commercialization.
The bill America—and elsewhere—pays for recreation is
enormous, and brings a whole train of problems. Note
the tendency for the highly skilled to take over sole representation in sport, radio, screen or anything else. The
weakest not only go to the wall—they are never seen
again because they do not make money for a promoter.
You will not do a thing for yourself because somebody
paid to do it does it better. Also commercial interests
are not usually concerned with ethics—only money-
making, and that is not always in the best interests of the
community. The moral is obvious—join in the game—
and keep commercialization out—if you wish every individual to benefit from leisure hours.
The Possibilities of Leisure—It is necessary for human
being to strive if they wish to realize their duty. We
need to work hard at our chosen means of livelihood.
But we need relaxation and recreation, and leisure is to
provide that. So there is a balance. Just as all work
and no play makes Jack a dull boy, so all play and no
work would make him a foolish one. Leisure should be
utilized to fit us, physically, mentally, and spiritually for
the tasks of life. It should, therefore, be suited to the
individual, it should be recreative, i.e., build and refresh
him for the next day, and it should be creative, i.e., with
challenging, original, inspiring, and fellowship factors.
In conclusion, the question might be asked, "Where
can such a programme be found." The answer is obvious
—a ready-made programme would defeat its own ends.
Work to make a programme and you achieve results.
Work with others whenever you can, for socializing,
friendship, and growth values. Look to the arts, to play,
to sport, to study and, perhaps more than all, to serve
others, and you will grow rich in living. Do not imagine
your way, especially at first, will be easy—there are so
many temptations to take the ready-made way, to let
"George";do it, and to listen to critics. Stay with it-
be the captain of your own soul, and you will realize the
abundant life of a well-filled leisure.
Editor's Note:—
^J;rank Pausing »* general secretary of the local Y.M.C.A., and is also a prominent leader in the community.
cen the most popular centre for many of our youths in their leisure hours.    Gym  Sports,  Camera
asketball and Swimming are the most favored.
*A««    9*0    •• $w-	
VICTORIA   AND, A   SPORTS   ARENA
By Robert L#we
*•*<
RO) .«! 1
-DISTRICT  "REPRESENTATIVE
T^'.i b. e.
oU.4 L*
. "The Mountain Magicians]' oHave you e^jftp. heard of
them? No, they're not a grojp of mythical \vijferds from
the "Arabian Nights"—nor arc they some fancy characters from Grimm's or Andersen's delightful tales.
"Th Mountain Magicians" aire tlie famous aggregation
of hockev players from Trail,»Btttsih Columbia, who^-sJast
winter after a sensational taur ollfiurop-fe, brought the
woxld's amateur hockey chajmpionship ba£Wfco British
fiblutnbM' for the second timi in the last threie^eajs, the
K!nib«i4ifp49f«iEWniters being their honored predecessors
in 1937. In the world tournamefft,"*,^e**,^a^Smoke
Eaters-^-official name of the "Mountain Magicians"-—
astouned spectators and opjiosmg teams-uUlikeu^ ram-
*mJjlg It?;fW>"?oalSf fa* the pight^gamt? .schedule, wfrjlp nn)y 3
soiHtasy'p'u/ck was>ah&|toj;fkki its wa^htt^the Trail web-
tfmg,lfrotn their opponents!    That's an example of the
calibre of hockey as played in the West Kootenay Hockey
League, one of the finest aaibbest organized^eaguea^nta
all Canagp.1^
Ice Hdckfey is Canada's national winter pastime, "fit's
the most fascinating and exciting sport to watch or play.
Unfortunately Victoria possesses no ice skating rink.
That is one o£ >the main reasons: forMaaly choosing of
HbCtbey as the topic of my contribution to the initial edition of the C.Y.A. Annual.
Emblematic of amateur ice hockey isupremacy in Brit
ish Columbia is the Savage Cup, posted in the 1912-13
hockey season.  /Since then it has been won by various
teams in different cities, including Vancouver, New Westminster, Rossland, Kimberiey, Nelson, and Trail. The
Trail Smoke Eaters first captured the coveted trophy in
the 1926-27 season, and to this day it has never left the
realm of the West Kootenay Hockey League. Strange
though it may seem, Victoria has never actually won the
cup—yet the man who posted it, Mr. Savage, was a resident of Victoria! The donor placed the trophy in the
hands of the 1912-13 Victoria Y.M.C.A. team to defend.
The old Victoria Arena was the scene of the first Savage
Cup. series. Initial challengers for the prize were the
•boys of the Vancouver Rowing Club team. The Main-
landers won the series and became the first claimants
of the trophy. Since that' time the cup has been competed for every winter, and has been the prime provocative, for the promotion of the puck-chasing pastime
throughout British Columbia. Though it has travelled
through many towns since its inauguration, it has never
returned to the capital city, the place of its origin.
A fact to which some people may term as "amazing" is
that here in the westernmost province of Canada, home of
the world-famous Kimberiey Dynamiters and Trail
Smoke Eaters, the capital city, Victoria, hasn't even an
ice arena! Victoria sport fans have to cross the straits
to Vancouver on the Mainland to enjoy the thrills and
excitement of a hocjteyjbattle!
In practically every town in the Dominion where there
I is an ice arena, organized juvenile and midget hockey are
supervised for the benefit of the youngsters. Thus it
stands to reason that when the young folks of Victoria
read in newspapers and magazines of how the fortunate
chaps in other towns and cities are enjoying this fascinating and healthful sport, they can hardly be blamed if they
feel that they are being cheated of Canada's national
'pastime.
Over a year now has faded away into history since the
Victoria Youth Council meeting in November, 1938, when
representatives of twenty-seven various youth organizations unanimously endorsed proposals for the building of
a combined .civic centre and sports arena in the capital
city. But because of miscellaneous obstacles, the building of the sports arena still remains merely a subject of
controversial discussion. For the sake of a progressive
Victoria, let's all continue to assist with unabated efforts
in every way possible to convert this vision of the civic
centre and sports arena into a gilded reality!
PACE    NO.    0 VICTORY   ASSURED
By Joh^^.tBong
China has entered into her third phase of the Sino-
Japanese war. Followers of the far-eastern conflict will
realize the significance of her plans for ultimate victory
oveT the aggressors is fe&r. ^ec^mftig a realty.
For matter of reference I will briefly saiamarize the
vital demdbpntentsi since the L# f^ow>fK#i incident of
Jllty 7, 1937.
Outward warfare flared in earnest on July 7, 1937,
with China rising united as Japanese forces plundered and
murdered from village to village the innocent farmers,
titeeto''wives and children. It was then t¥at China-nton
her first battle, not because of her.stfifngth.. but because
Japan blundered and iunderestimated, the Chinese. She
exposed the cruel, villainous militarists that
shrouded the smooth diplomatic propagandas. The
cold-blooded truth QO^ilal
not^e hidden from tWjnr,
ternational reporters stationed at the scene of
battle.
In turn Madame Chiang
pleaded to the civilized
WOfld for help and sympathy for her suffering
people. Refugees poured
into international settlements. Their plight was
pitMble, and their suffering was.ja shocfaeven to
caJlpused Occidentals who
had seen China rise and
turn through half a century of unstabilized government, flood and tarn-'
ine.
Britain allotted mij^on^
to alleviate the refugees'
suffering. The international Red Cross folloWec?
suitr/and: numewJfH other
sources poured their expressions of sympathies
in large sums to China's
pleas.
China    had    won    her
st vft*tof*f <hen.
sands with her recounting of her personal experiences;
and her eloquence was lauded by all listeners. Canadians praised her for the great sacrifice which she has
g!vLn for the welfare of her country and people.
Other noted visitors were Dr. Tso, leading educationalist ; Miss Yaching Lee, aviatrix j and His Worship the
Bishop of Nanking.
The fall of Shanghai, after 88 days of pitched warfare,
"marked the rapid retreat of China's armed forces from
the coastal cities. The reasons were obvious; to evade
the large naval guns and the easy access of supplies of
enemy forces and planes. The gradual retreat into the
hinterlands soon began to take its toll on the attackers.
From one Japanese to
four Chinese, it has now
changed to two Japanese
to one Chinese. This withdrawal to the mountainous terrain marked the
second phase of China's
pre-planned tactics.
Outstanding     victories
were   the   battle   at   Tai
Er   Chiwang  in   On   Fei
province; Chang Sa, Wan
Nam   province,   and   the
present struggle in Northern Canton.    Japan's war
machine today is bogged
down, worn out, and disillusioned.
! Behind the bartleticIBsi
the     scattered     guerrilla
units, China's youth* such
,-^rs- JViiss Loh Tsei, F. Y.
Young,     and     numerous
university    students,   are
pouring   their   talents
>&&& energy  towards  the
new developments of industries, schools and agriculture.    The   recent   issues of current magazines
such   as   "Life/**    Asia,"
and "China Today" give
^men and girls.    One hundred and seventy thousand
ieeay families in Tokyo alone ,is_'dependent on  public
JAPAN GAINS LITTLE IN YEAR—After making little. progress amp>De> news of ChinaJa han
in CUina last year, Japan sends her armies* surging into south China limited   resources   in   the
early in 1910, driv^g from Canton and Nanning (heavy arrows), reconstruction.
. Man shows territory gained in the two and a half years of war, high-      ™   , .      *
Victtti* .feting  ckJwU^ of thfi afi^paip, and rotits'imtfkte-tDd India over   ,.T?da^'   ®  Japan   qger
tftst^be   Orient,   re^^fi^t^/m^Hsom^me ja^^suppiies for China's 2,000,000 men in arms. third   of   a11  lobs   (other
many prominent Chinese than farmers) is "held by
speakers,  who  gave   first-rcahd  descriptions   of  China's
heroic struggle agaihsY^ne^nemy.    Dr.  Grant  Lathe,
delegate of the €knz&tiWMh\ith Congress, ^reported on
his? personal obsei^at*oiWfiBrChina;and.-^ave a description
of the guerilla warfare.    Dr.  Robert M.e.Clure, leading
worker and organizer of the  Red Cross of the United
Church of Canada, gave outstanding examples of giier-
rilla victories, and the1 'gigantic task StSffglthe Red Cfoss
Workers, particularly regarding the need of medicines
and surgical supplies.
Miss Loh Tsei. that vivacious heroine, thrilled thou-
support.
mHterSLfy
The European war has raised the cost of raw
thus lowering the export value.    The'sucfden
oliapgrhfTMcrf' cabinets and shakenups reveal  the non-con1
licence of its rules, ai$ rAmerieft -|hasr.refused to /ren#s*
herTrace Treaty of 1911.
Victory for China is assured. Democracv for China will
brtffeace for .Canada and the w*wrid, Foat-hundtedrand
fifty million peace-loving Chinese are a potential
li!Sngth for good-will-, good trade, and world progress.
PACK    NO.    lO Gasoline - Oils - Grease
Expert Tore Service
GEORGE BONE
616 PAN OCR A AVE.
PH. E7832
A. P. Slade (Victoria) Ltd.
WHOLESALE FRUIT
and VEGETABLES
I   535 Yates Street
Ph. C4164
■w »■ ■
SCENE OF  PICKETING
Beiittna   La       at its corner ol
Yale* and Wharf Streets.   On FH»
day aod Saturday,  :\«g*i*i  I! a*4
12, we Joincdl v* ?h »%'mnathetar pp|f*!
Kaatialions wdhii     %u»i t>e4 the Wiesl
in a of sMtsa. j  non woit de*!****. •  for
Japanese ships at Seattle.
CltmasJnff a loan straggle on the
Pacinc Coast, tbr action taken na»
Mx-cesftful in pre v« mis*, fm'ttwr SJS>
ports leav.-a-: Victor *a l«> aid fW
airyreeoor.
 H"'-1  "■■"    4 9i —        'tt «*|
WHOLESALE PAPER
Bags   -   Towels   •   Twines   -   Stationery
and Janitor Supplies
COLLISON'S LTD.
560 YATES STREET
PH. E7611
=*=
^e*=
MEN!
Come mi Set THESE SPRING SUITS
A  I He D'sp'ay of Sanart Styles
Drcbles,    Singles*   Soon   Lacaa
NEW GREENS RICH BLUBS
aa i Other Shades
$25 $27.50    ^- $29.50
PRICE AND SMITH LTD.
614 VATES CTREET
t*A«c  tec-  it —
—
SOCIAL   ACTIVITIES
By Ruth Leung
mm%
"From social intercourse are derived seme
( f the highest enjoyments of life ; where there
is a free interchange of sentiment the mind
acquires new ideas, and by a frequent exercise
of its powers, the understanding gains fresh
vigor."
—Addison.
^>ac\a\  QarV\&/\r\a o{ /A fa.  ar\A /Ar^. Y<m and   \-\ay^fat/A  La
ho
Although the C Y.A. lias devoted its efforts mainly to
the acquisition of funds and Red Cross supplies for the
needy in the far east, social-educational activities have
not been neglected.
To promote friendly relationships and 'better understanding among members, and to install their minds
with a knowledge of current affairs, four socials, and two
dances were held during the past year. E\ -ry Wednesday evening, the clubroom is opened to those who seek
ping-pong or reading for pastimes. Newspapers, magazines, and books on Sino-Japancse relationships are made
available to members.
At the informal "get-together" games, quiz, and
dancing provide ample entertainment for all. Prominent
among these gatherings was the one held at the. home of
Mr. and Mrs. Yan and Hayward Lee early in November.
Rev. Ivan Wong, pastor of the Chinese United Church
in  Vancouver, honored the Association  with  his atlen-
'Where Friends Meet and Eat"
PANAMA CAFE
IGS
* * I
I    14C7 Government St. Phone G 2652
Victoria, B.C.
dance.    In his inspiring talk, he stressed the importance
of neatness  in  appearance,  progressiveness  in  life and
work, honesty in endeavour and modes:y in ace mplish-
ments, so that youths may be credible ambassadors of-
the Chinese people.
Under the capable guidance of Miss Mabel Chan, the
Association sponsored two dances; one held on Valentine's Day, the other on December 26, to cc'abrate the
C.Y.A.'s first anniversary, ilighlight of the Valentine
Dance was a speech given by Mr. Nigel Morgan, president of the Victoria Youth Council. Social successes of
the year 1939-40 were climaxed by the First Anniversary
Dance held at the Oak Bay Ballroom on Boxing Day.
A large gathering of members and friends danced to
the melodic tunes of Gus Micheaun's Orchestra until the
wee small hours of the morning. Featured in the. evening's programme were exhibition dances—"Tango" and
"Boomps-a-Daisy," given by the guest artists, Miss
Geraldine Paterson and Mr. Andre Marquis.
Ccmpliments of    .    .
— THE —
Square Deal Shoe Repairs
1224 BROAD ST. VICTORIA, B.C.
PAGE    NO    12 	
	
F*€    ■    ■     *=
A MESSAGE TO THE CHINESE YOUTH
For more than two years now you have been valiantly
carrying on the fight in your native land against the
advance of Fascist aggression, not only your fight, but
ours as well. In the face of overwhelming odds, united
and stronger than ever before, you are holding your own.
Realizing with what courage and self sacrifice you
fight for the preservation of the measure of Democracy,
the freedom and the justice, which we enjoy after the
struggles of bygone years, may we express our deepest
admiration for the work you are doing. We join with
you to oust Japanese Imperialism from China, confident
in the victory of the Chinese people.
With victory will follow the rebuilding of your great
nation—democratic in all respects. In the work of reconstruction we know all your people will have an important part to play. May we also be ready then to
assist in that great task which lies ahead. For your victory
will be ours—the threat of Japanese Imperialism in
the Pacific will be removed. In return, therefore, it is
only just that we repay the debt we owe to the courageous spirit of your people in every possible way.
We extend cordial greetings to you and trust that in
the coming year much happiness and successful achievement will be yours and that an even greater friendship
and good-will will help develop between you and yours
and all Democratic, peace-loving peoples of the world.
Sincerely,
Per Lillian Cooper.
VICTORIA AND DISTRICT YOUTH COUNCIL,
PASS    NO.   13 WHAT OF THE  FUTURE?
By John W. Gung
What is the future of the Canadian-born Chinese ? Are
therefany opportunities opened for him in Canada.
That is the foremost question in the minds of the Chinese
youths today who were born and educated in Canada.
Some, of course, cherish the hope of returning to the
Motherland to serve her need, but a larger number will
never see China. For those whose parents do not take
them' back in childhood to receive a Chinese education,
their future lies in Canada. They will be educated here,
earn their living here, get married and lead their social
and family life here. The problem of these Canadian
Chinese youths is how is this to be done to the best
advantage to themselves and to the community. We all
know that the Chinese community is fast diminishing.
The elders are returning to China or if they do not return,
they invariably will, in the course of time, complete, their
allotted time in this world. Therefore in a score or so
years from now, the whole situation will be on the
shoulders of the young. How will this burden affect
them? The present situation of the Canadian-born Chinese is far from satisfactory. As children, both at school
and in the playground they are quite able to win their
way about and are at no disadvantage. But their advantages cease as soon as they step out of school. Economically the door of opportunity is practically closed to
them. Socially the child has been under two different
cultures and has developed a dual personality. His
thoughts, his speech, and his behavior are different from
his parents. And for this he pays the price of mental
conflict and of social mal-adjustment both among the
Chinese and Canadian peoples.
This is perhaps the most serious feature of the whole
problem. Being Canadianized at school, the child has
raised a slight barrier of difference and alienation between his family and himself. The influence of environment on the growing mind makes this unavoidable. You
cannot blame the Chinese Canadian for this difference.
He is born in an environment far different from that of
his parents. His thought, speech and emotions are developed in the social recognized manner of his group.
The Chinese Canadian youth belongs to two groups.
Along which group is he to develop ? Generally he attempts both and succeeds in neither. Not fully in accord at home and not fully accepted abroad, he feels at a
disadvantage with both groups. This is bad for his self-
respect, and the resultant inferiority feeling is the blame
for the failure of a number of youths to fulfil the bright
promise of earlier days. Through no fault of his own,
the Chinese Canadian has been placed in the unenviable
position generally reserved for the Eurasian.
Then there is the problem regarding national. Chinese Canadians may or may not have the opportunity of
seeing and serving China and sharing her national life.
Thenagain the Chinese Canadian youth has rooted in him
a sense of injustice towards the country in which he was
born and lived. This is aggravated by the fact that
though these youths must keep her laws and pay her
taxes, they are not given a share in determining her
destiny by vote.
How are these difficulties of the Chinese Canadians to
be met? Briefly, one thing must be overcome before the
Chinese Canadian can attain equality and rights which
are rightfully theirs. That is racial prejudice. It is the
foremost barrier the Chinese Canadian must faces No
| matter what his abilities are, no matter what his attainments in school or in everyday life, he is debarred from
positions of importance where orders are given. A few
types of manual labor are opened to him only where
there are no dangers of conflict with his fellow Canadians. •
Prejudice deeply rooted is hard to break down. But
sooner or later it must break down and the Chinese
Canadian youth who has the ability will come to his own.
He must in the meantime, prepare himself for such a
time, even though it seems a long way off.
Full advantage should be taj^en of all cultural opportunities by the young Chinese Canadian, such as study
groups and clubs. It has been diffcult for the majority
of the Chinese Canadians to become familiar with the
better sort of Canadian home life, which represents the
i>best in Canadian civilization. Thus, until the bars of
intolerance and prejudice are broken down, only theji the
nosition of the Chinese Canadian youth will be made
better.
Editor's Note.—In the article by J. W. Gung, he states
well the'Chinese Canadians have a dark outlook with
regard to their school and labor equality problem, but
has omitted mention of the privileges enjoyed by jfihem.
Chinese have education privileges as enjoyed by the
Canadians : they have freedom of religion; and justice and
equality before the law. They also have a certain aniount
of commercial freedom. Thus the factors are concen-
trated on these three problems: Social, labor, andjcom-
merce.
n ¥n F- Y- Young, China delegate to World's Youth
' Congress, m an address to the C.Y.A. stated that "When
Unna has regained her national integrity, she can,
through economic barter with Canada, readjust the
standing of the Chinese Canadians to a closer balance
with the white people."
FACE    NO    14 fa
w
n
ffi
2
u
fa
2
<
<
W
CQ
w
2
fa
ff—1
H
H
<
fa
fa
ffi
9
O
fa
u
S
CO
ffi
H H O
ffi
CO
fa
2
3
<
fa
fa
Q
H
2
fa
z
fa
fa
>
O
o
CO
2
fa
Q
fa
<
O
*X
fa
<
fa
o
a    z
H
CO
fa
«i«
fa p
fa
02
ffi w
fa
fa fa
Q O
co fa
HZ
ffiO
OS
fa J
H <
-'< s
£« ffi
feffio
fa H H
fa u u
CO
o   5
~        fa
2      0
«-•    . 2
•^ cj fa
°°2
Q Q ffi
>
fa
O
<
.>
fa fa
fa co
ffi fa
OO
^ < w
►J cj fa ,
O ^ « '
3      M    ^    ^
mows
f*   M   H4
M   2   H   fa
O < ffi u
fa
fa
CO
<
o. o
N to * m *
2 -J
o p,
fa CO
CO
fa a
fa ^
2°
2 55
ffi fa
CO
2
fa
Q
fa
<
H co
ffi H
s «
OO
fa H
fa ffi
< fa
H fa
2
O
<
fa
fa
o
2 W
ffi  M
a<
E^
fa co
O W
<fa
fa <->
w 5
co Q
fa o
oo
ffi o
ft
fa
P
>
2
I
ffi   "
Sfa
°5
u ^
faH
j£o
j Hfa
ffi 2 ^
ffi ffi co
h  N  co  * »«   O
MttC    NO    15 SPORTS
By Bill Lowe
C T*\. C 5°^ ^°' CUompionj
Sports has taken a toe-hold in the Chinese Community
and there ll every indication for it to expand further. In
recent years the Chinese youths of the city has fielded
many teams in as many diversified lines of sports. Old
and young alike follow these teams with enthusiasm.
Competitions were not entirely centred in Victoria.
| ■ ants have travelled Up-Island and to the Mainland to
play outside opponents. They have entertained and
| -•- rd teams from across the border and elsewhere. The
following is a summary of the sports actively engaged in
\>\ local Chinese teams:
Basketball—Basketball has the greatest following
among local Chinese. Since 1931 the local Chinese youths
have itelded many strong quintettes in Senior "B," Intermedials **B," and Junior divisions. And since then have
garnered many championships. The Victoria Chinese
Community is proud of these young athletes.
Last season, in their first year in senior company, the
Chinese  Student's Senior "B" team won the  Victoria
mpionship in  their division by defeating the West
I      ad squad in a two-game, total points play-off.    There
they went on to defeat a Duncan quintette to annex the
I Island title.
However, against a tall team from Port Alberni, the
|      a the ht.me-and-home series, and the  Van-
! title, to their opponents.   The rivals were
tike David and  Goliath,  with  the   Port  Alberni  team
| •   . - ■ ing above their smaller Chinese opponents.
The following are members of the team: George Lowe
(captain),  Chuck  Nip,  Duncan   Lee,   Ben  Mar,  Allan
Chan, Wallace Lee, Herbert Chan and Walter Lee.
Softball—Running through their opponents like wildfire the Chinese Recreational Club's football team copped
the 1939 Victoria Senior "D" title in sensational style.
They beat their opponents 15 out of the 18 scheduled
games, and made the title race a strictly one-club affair.
It was the first time in the city's sport history that a
local Chinese team made off with the city championship
playing against strong Canadian opponents.
Members of the team are as follows: Victor Lang
(Manager), Percy Lim (captain), Duncan Lee, Bill
Lowe, Dennis Wong, Harvey Lim, Edward Fong, Phillip Eng, George Lowe, Harry Chow, Paul Leung, Roland Lee and Roy Ngai.
Soccer—During the Easter holidays a team from the
Mun Keong Chinese School, Vancouver, invaded Victoria
and engaged the C.R.C. soccer team in an exhibition
soccor match. This-game was fought to a 2 to 2 draw,
with the local lads making a splendid showing against
their more experienced opponents from  the Mainland.
The return match was played on the Mainland at the j
Con Jones' enclosure, with the Victoria boys emerging
in an upset victory by the score of 2 to 1.   In this game
the Victoria team showed vast improvement over their
previous engagement, and certainly deserved their win.
Tennis—Lack of public tennis courts in Victoria was
the only obstacle preventing a larger number of Chinese
youths from participating in this summer sport. At
present about thirty boys play in the widely scattered
private courts of the city. No championship games
were played because of the scarcity of courts. However,
those turning out showed fine games and some have possibilities of becoming good players.
A Victoria boy—18-year-old Ken Lee—won the Vancouver City public courts championship. He is ranked
as the Number 2 boy player in Western Canada by the
Canadian Lawn Tennis Association—a high honour to
this youth.
So the problem now is to have more public tennis
courts to enable more youths to participate in this excellent pastime.
Table Tennis—This is also a favourite pastime among I
the Chinese youths.   This Winter a Chinese ping pong
league will be formed, and organizations wishing to enter the league may do so by getting in touch with Bill|
I-owe, 1928 Government Street.
!*«••   No.    16 	
^^■■■i
Victoria's Leading Hardware Store
Radios Electrical Appliances Washers
Frigidaires Furniture Sporting Goods
Ship Chandlery
•
McLennan, McFeely & Prior Limited
1400 GOVERNMENT STREET
PHONE Gllll
RETREADING AND RECAPPING
Let Us Retread or Recap Your Tires.
We Have the Most Up-to-Date Tire Shop in British Columbia.
We Guarantee Our Work—Truck or Passenger Tires.
Trade in Your Worn Tires on New Ones.
i^tboJ
PHONE E9111
DOUGI^S TIRE SERVICE
Recapping Centre
Government Street at Herald Street
VICTORIA UNITY PRODUCE
LTD.
ft I
% M $w
ft A ffi ft* i
1 1
0^
ft#l*lf
1
i % *
1*1111
$
547-549
CORMORANT
STREET                                 PH. G3414
WING JANG LUNG CO.
IMPORTERS
Chinese Curios . . . Art . . . Linen
Novelties . . . Tea . . . Ginger
China and Brassware
1411 Government St.
Victoria, B.C.
n r* * * *
DON MEE CO.
538 Fisgard St. Ph. E 1032
VICTORIA; B.C.
Specializing in
CHOP SUEY - PRIED RICE
NOODLES
We Solicit Your Patronage
     im     ■    ^
i m. m. m *
ft ^ m m it
r»i «n /h m w
m m m j% »
ta & s s- %
# -# Is n #
$ at ^ » n
■bj ta «fc «■ *
-COMPLIMENTS-
-OF-
YUEN FAT
Company
•
WHOLESALE
•Fruits Vegetables
•
1633 Government Street
Victoria, B.C. JUL Ph.G 3844
h
■MN
4
Pare   No.    17 THE ADVENTURE OF  MULAN
English Hanslation by Lin U-Young
The authorship of the original poem is unknown. Some ventured that it was by Mulan herself who lived some time
in the first half of the sixth century A.D., probably earlier; the fact that the poem applied Mulan herself as the narrator
no doubt led to the belief of her authorship, though it is highly improbable. However, Mulan was great enough as an
unparalleled young woman in her filial piety and devotion, and in her extraordinary unfeminine courage without proclaiming for her a literary genius. Short of the latter, there would never have been a poetic masterpiece such as the
original of the present translation. The poem has been for many centuries vibrating on the lips of every Chinese who
read her poetry at all. The present translator sought only to reproduce the spirit of the original, while he has taken
much liberty in the composition of verse form and in the application of language. If he succeeds ever so humbly in
reproducing the quaint, pathetic and yet unimpassioned and lightsome touch of. the original and that if in his tampering with such immortal gem of poetry he has not committed anything to its dishonor, he would indeed beam with
secret happiness.—Translator's note. &&tMi
Rattle, rattle, whence all this rattling sound?
See, the spindle revolving round and round,
As Mulan sat spinning by the door;
And often one hears not this rattling noise,
But the maiden's uneasy, sighing voice,
As Mulan sat spinning by the door!
"Oh maid, tell us, why are you sighing so?
"What secret sorrow that others may not know,
"Afflicts both sharp and cruel your heart ?
"Oh maiden do tell us what are your cares."
My. sigh in gs are not common to my years, [
Nor such as oft besiege a youthful heart.
1      1      i
Last night an imperial despatch came:
The Emperor a new war did proclaim, j
Twelve volumes of martial service call,
Each volume listed my father's name;
But alas my father is old and lame,
And he has no grown-up son at all    .    ^Jf~
And I have no elder brother to bear
Arms for him in the bitter field of warj
9    1 i 1
What are we to do, what are we to do?
Like a spark the thought into my bosom flew:
A warrior garb my maiden form I'll hide,
In my father's place the battle steed to ride.
To the east of town, to the west of town,
To the south and to the north and up and down,
I ran to buy my warrior equip    .   „:■■:$
I bought a steed, I bought a lengthy whip.
i        i        1
At morn I left my paternal walls,
At even I slept by the River's-side,
Where I heard not my good parents' calls.
But only sounds of the eastering tide;
At dawn we cross'd the Yellow River bridge,
At sundown we reached the Black Stream ridge.
Where I heard not my dear parents' calls. \.
Bu| only the neighings of steeds of the North;
League after league we marched briskly fnrtnfP
''Mountains like meltmg shadow^ behind us fled,
Far-off clouds loom'd large as our coursers sped.
i i i
Ami3[S$0w and mud and haill flight and day,
JTntx)u^n devious paths we wend our rugged way
Across platband woods and sands, day and night,
•Mc&i smarming bees in a maddening flight,
We rode into the frosty fields of war.
Leafless trees crack as the north""wrnd wails,
While the heatless sun cast a chilly glare
On our glittering swords and battered mails.
|        i        i
Wara&Vs a hundred battles fought and died,
Anguish of pain 'twas only death to hide,
The battle drum ceases o'er the si|^nt <$ead,
The last Tartar horde to the desert flecfcv1
Survivors whom Fortune alone did shield
From kissing the frozen gore-drench'd field,
Afm- ten biker years may at last return
%$ the .southern sun and honors to earn;
i$fjjneward our weary coursers are driven
As we returned to see the Son of Heaven.
try . i 1 1
The Prince sitting at his glorious court;
JIhe.warriors ai^oach'd Jiim one hy.nn»,-~
And were reward'd as suit their merits won;
Hie gracious Prince then from this throne
\% *   «  at hlgh favor would P^ase my heart \
r^o*^ffiba/i4ai&; nor honor do I want
But let it please Your Majesty to grant
A camel to take a wandering boy
Back to the scenes of his childhood joy."
TwYiT5' ffhei; and m'othe<r ha've Earned
sstefw?Hke a gh^has retu™ed>
ToZel7, ™ >ltermS ^eps they did come
to greet a wandering warrior home-
I^hT r" haS heard the «ews
Mv Sf     [u     feVvaitil« ^ the ^or;
t»rothcrwW his U for use,
122 ^avd it at the fatten lamb and boar'
**•*    NO    18 .
I opened my east bed chamber dpojTvV
I discard'd my uniform on the floor,
And put on my old-time silken dress,
I plaited my hairs with many a tress
And adorned them with flower and gold;
On coming out of my bower    .    .    .   behold
The astonishment of my warrior mate
Wni8ljourneyed with me and shared my fate
Through*Wind arffllfrost of twelve hectic year,
UnsW^efeffig' I was a maiden fair! '
As when the busy feet of a male hare
With pursuit intent or'in fleeing fared,
While the eyes of the female of the pair
With utter distraction blindly glared,
So side by side we ran in war's mad whirl,
Who then was mindful Mulan was a girl?
/      /      /
|£AVE VOU  A  HOBBY?
By John W. Gung
Havfeiyou a worthwhile hobby? Perhaps you have and perhaps you haven't. Perhaps you collect things like sea-
shells, buttons,!old coins or stamps-. But what is the object of your collection? Unless you plan to be a novelty
dealer, none will do you much good. The dictionary defines the word hobby as "something in which one takes extravagant interest." To merit such interest, a hobby should be of some tangible worth, and such a worth to you could
only be in the line of vocational interjeshi;u
Nearly all of us have some idea of what we like to do after we leave school. This makes the choice of a hobby
comparatively simple. We usually like to do one thing more than any other, and a hobby can easily be developed into
a career if one isMrruly int* earnest.
Hobbies are generally one of three types., the acquiringat present seemed to be the most popular, and the cre'ati
of knowledge in any subject, the acquiring of things, whichng of things (handicrafts). Some of these, especially in the
collecting field, are expensive. - But, fortunately, interest and expensive in a hobby are not in the ratio to the amount
of money spent.    One caBngeiiiasr^reifiitideal of enjoyment reading about airplanes without having rode in one.-
The best way to start a hobby,is,first.to study it. In this respect, the libraries are treasure houses. For books
have been written on practically every conceivable line of interest. Know your hobby—it may be playing a musical instrument, stamp' collecting, photography, or others too numerous to mention here,.. Ride hard, and you will never
hat?#fttnoi>hing to do"! 9$b$i
IB     Nothing keeps a man from knowledge and wfedom likfe thinking he has both.   Sir W. Temple.
Better to be alone.in the world, and utterly friendless,', than  to  have sham- friends and no sympathy.
r*Thackeray. BP5?
Cleverness, talents, '"elegant manners, graceful speech, and winsome ways, are nothing unless theyjj
are protectecJHkjr the slp&ld of \finifn/^-W
Censure and criticism never hurt anybody. If false, they cannot harm you,-unless you are wanting i
iii, character;: and if true, they show a man. his weak points, and forewarn him against failure and troubled
ill-Gladstone. *
In the choice of;a profession independence should count more than wealth. >, 1
ft    The genuinffvpeace .lovers s^Jjioni find it nec^bsary tonight.
Page   No.    19 A DEDICATION TO THE CHINESE AIR FORCE
By Douglas Sam
The Japanese undeclared war on China has enriched
the annals of Chinese valor with many deeds of unequalled bravery. The manhood of our country has set
new standards of constancy and courage for our race.
The air and land bear witness to their prowess.
The air force especially has given hundreds of examples
of splendid courage and devotion. Our pilots, most of
them mere youths, have shown heroic dash and skill
against the more experience"? Japanese fliers. Coolness
in danger, chivalry in combat, self-sacrifice in need; these
were the characteristics which marked our aviators.
For the past twenty-five years, Japan has been playing
war games on an ever-increasing and tensing scale. And
war games invariably called upon the air service and the
''flying killers" to play their roles. The Imperial Japanese Army and Naval Air Forces had been brought into
action to destroy opening Chinese civilian population,
hospitals, and all Chinese cultural centres.
These are some of the major air 'operations. In
August, 1937, the Japanese0 srtart'er(l long range daylight
bombing on Nanking, Hankow, and other Chinese air
force ba&es throughout the area, with a group of fifty-two
Type 96, 200 m.p.h. modern twin-engined bombers.
Their base was at the Island of Formosa, and they flew
to Nanking'artd back in loose three-plane formations,
unescorted by pursuits. A squadron of Chinese pursuits
attacked a squadron of these modern Japanese planes near
Cheyung, and in combat lasting but three minutes, shot
down six Jap bombers without the loss of a single Chinese
plane.
After five days of bombardment, these daylight raids
HOYLE-BROWN
Wholesale
TOBACCO and CONFECTIONERY
L   1206 Wharf Street
Ph. E9131   £
were abandoned as too costly an operation, and night
bombing was started. Few Chinese pilots had flown
much at night, and none had had any experience in finding bombers in darkness. Yet, only five days after the
night raids started, the Chinese pursuits again destroyed
the bombers. One Chinese ace downed three modern
high-speed bombers in one raid. In only twelve days of
operations, the Japanese lost forty-four of their original
fifty-two bombers. Then all Japanese bombing operations were temporarily suspended.
In February, 1939, the Chinese were equipped with
some new Russian pursuits, the Chato, Mosca types;
and also with some new British Gloster Gladiators. On
April 29, the enemy raided Hankow by daylight, with
twenty-four bombing planes, supported by twenty-one
pursuits. The Chinese airmen intercepted them, shot
down nine planes, and themselves suffered seven planes
lost. In another raid, fifteen Jap planes, escorted by
twenty-four fast pursuits, made another raid on Hankow.
An armada of thirty-five Chinese planes took to the air,
and downed twenty-one of the* enemy planes. Our loss
this time was nine ships. Since then, more than 1,500
Japanesewarplanes have been shot down in;dog fights
with our planes. Many of our fighters have fallen before
the Japanese machine-gun bullets.
It is to these fliers that I rai&e my hand in proud salu&d
They have gone, and yet they leave behind undying
stories and immortal names. They will live forever as a
tribute of the best and noblest of our nation. Their
example will inspire countless generations yet to come
with love of honor, contempt of danger, and pride of race.
That is the dauntless spirit of New China on Wings.
&~*^9m	
Victoria Box & Paper Ltd.
1202 WHARF STREET
PH. El
1193
(fftl-f g)
Page   No.    20 	
	
; !
MONtAGUE
Greenhouses
SHELBOURfJE'-ST.   1
*\%%1&M  1
Square Deal Fuel
COAL and WOOD
MUSIC ...
Your  Needs in  Music Can  Be
Supplied By Us
Cut  Greens  and  Ferns
.  . .  Carnations  .  .  .
Floral Supplies
Prompt Delivery
•
622 Herald St.
•
Your Business Will Be
Appreciated By
P. E. GEORGE & SON
Albion 61-M
Phone E. 5707
il
713 Pandora St.    Ph. E 4421
IN APPRECIATION
The editorial staff of the Annual and members of the Victoria Chinese
Youth Association wishes to take this opportunity to thank Miss Mabel Chan
and Mr. Fun Lee for their assistance and co-operation during the past year.
Although as yet they are not members of the Association they have set aside
other duties and have devoted much time towards functions of the Association.
We deeply appreciate theff kind help.
AN APPRECIATION AND AN APPEAL
In producing this issue of the Victoria Chinese Youth Association Annual, the committee in charge acknowledges
the valuable assistance from the many quarters, and they especially wish to thank the merchants of Victoria who have
purchased advertising space in our publication and to those who have contributed help in the form of money.
We are sure the members and readers will show their appreciation, in a tangible way, by favoring these advertisers
with their patronage and recommending these merchants toothers.
Compliments of   .   . ^^
OLYMPIA OYSTERS
HOUSE
t   Specializing in— Sea Foods
jbC^STER SOUP
FRIED OYSTERS
Open till Midnight
1419 Broad Street                    Victoria, B.C.
VANCOUVER ISLAND PLATING CO. LTD.
Special   .   .   .                 English Chromium
•
Gold,   Silver,   Nickel,
Bronze,   Copper   and
General Repair Work
•
1009 Blanshard St     Ph. G 5434
Page   No.    21 3I2UM
3U0ATOOM
THE "TOLSANG" ARE DIFFERENT
By Thomas Wong
ho§4 aofloaa^a i
At prc.-eiu the compound word "Chinese-Canadian" or
"Tolsang" is full of irony.    Many Canadians do not realize the  signicant differences  between  the  immigrant |
Chinese and the Canadian-born Chinese.   The "Tolsang"
are educated in Canadian  institutions, many of them
graduating from the universities.    They are extroverts,
into everything offering mental "and physical outlets, and j
they are, under the principle of "Jus Soli," citizens of j
Canada.    But are we?    Here is an important question!
If we are truly citizens of Canada, why do we not have
the franchise that is enjoyed by citizens? We differ
from our immigrant parents in our own ways of thinking
because of our Canadian education. We differ from the
white people in appearance, and by racial antipathies.
These are factors which contribute to the fierce group
consciousness and to the intense gregariousness of the
"Tolsang." Because of racial prejudices the Chinese are
forced into a much lower standard of living, which in
turn lowers the purchasing power of the average Chinese,
thus reducing the revenues of the Canadians ; revenues of
great importance, especially at the present time when
Canada is at war.
' There are Canadians who insist that the Chinese are
not ready for the franchise, because the Chinese-Canadian
does not possess the full knowledge of the Canadian government, but this is whimsical. After all, are not the
**ToIsangs" educated in Canadian institutions, where they
learn and study the government and other political
sciences?
True, we may not know enough of the government of
Canada, but we do know thai many laws existing in
Canada'are tinged with "Hitlerism." and t mean "Hit-
lerism" that the Allies are trying to subjugate over in
Europe* In support of this statement, I refer to the
existing municipal laws in some" cities prohibiting Orientals from building homes in certain residential districts;
to laws in engineering, in the bar. and pharmacy, laws
which are by no means
ic, but rather similar to     this end
actions passed in Germany to suppress the Jews. Also,
there are laws regarding fishing, civic and government
works, and the teaching profression, which are not to the
advantage of the "Tolsang."
Some Canadians contend that .if the Chinese were enfranchised, they would abuse this privilege. This stand
seems to be rather unfair since no precedent has been set,
by which a comparison can be made. British Columbia
is the only province in Canada that discriminates, because
of toe large Oriental population. But the other provinces
granting the franchise have had no difficulties with the
Chinese, as they vote as individuals rather than as a
"bloc," as some people may suspect.
There is consolation for the "Tolsang," however, in that
they know many of the Canadians of higher education,
namely, the teachers, professors, judges, and many others,
understand and sympathize with the advocation of the
Chinese youths. In fact, many of them realize that the
average "Tolsang" rate a higher I.Q. than the average
Canadian:, and partly because of this, they are in favor of
granting the franchise to the Chinese youths. After all,
it is true, that less crimes are committed by the "Tolsang"
in proportion to the Canadian population. They also
know that the "Tolsang" are striving for a higher standard of living than that which heretofore they have enjoyed. Surely as citizens of Canada the "Tolsang" are of
some significance in the welfare of the nation.
Briefly, then, in order to attain full privileges of Canadian citizens, our Chinese youths must have a Concerted
jaction. Groups could be formed to discuss the matters
confronting us, invitations extended to parliament members and prominent public-spirited citizens to speak on
this important subject. Always we should be striving
for a closer relationship between the "Tolsang" and the
je*/jMte people. In closing, may I invite you, the Victoria
"Tolsang," to join our Victoria Chinese Youth Association, if you are not already a member, and help us achieve
Page   No.   22 tjrv/.'.
|jN THE LIGHTER VEIN
To win fair and square gives a deep satisfaction. To lose gracefully is
an art.—Mary Chiu, Vancouver C.T.C. Annual.
' 'Tis easier said than done," is what they say, you know.
At its 3,543rd concert at Carnegie Hall, the Philharmonic Society admitted
the solo saxophone to esthetic respectability.—New York Times.
It certainly took the Society a long time to recognize Sax Appeal.
1      f      1
Billy, who is studying dramatics, says he is taking a special course on
Electrocution, which is. he says, the study of voice and speech.
Guess Bill wants to electrify his audience before he rolls them in the aisles.
1      1      1
In recognition of his many articles on silk stockings in the C.Y.A. Bulletins, J W. G. was nominated "Inspector of the SEE-THAT-THE-GIRLS-
DON'T-WEAR-SILK-STOCKINGS Club."
Starting at the bottom of the ladder, J. W. G.?
111
To go through life with a smile is sanity.—Marie Tempest.
They say that people mentally unbalanced usually have a smile on theii
faces, too.
111
Canning of food was originated by Appert, a Paris chef, in 1790, when he
bottled foods and placed them in boiling water.—Farm and Ranch Review.
Because of him, women today can play bridge all afternoon and then rush
home to prepare a "ready-in-five-minutes-meal."
—From ANOTHER.
if Chan Horne (tlf'J*
ii it     c|o TKe WanuJactunenA £i\z IWunance Co.,     ffi |J \
P p 103-106 (Pembentcm (fcuddinq m J lU
§ 1 <Vlctonia W C.     Tei QancSen. 7032 S Ifc ^
m. ft & m m m w n. & m it =£ m. iu ff «• » * m 1 j&
©miiswfliSBr^^^ + ^li**^^*    5S
ft It * S » Z M 3 TC^ftAitolii* w
Page   No.    23 *«#**.   i ®#+l£f$jft&*M
H
iifc * -#.: * 11 s
c
PBBBR !<3! }
^
4
k£j&
4 m
i*
i
**-
A
<$
\
I
1
pi
i
1    oW*---
Hr
IK.
1
■1*
1
hni
-»r
tf
*
A
mmtrnm cumm of leitm kern Madamed Chiang Kai
wm\ of hands raind by the Victoria CYA for orphan
1
Shek
and
I'
IP
and the Minister of Education Chin Up Fu acknowledging
Student relief in China.
£ 4ft  $  &  ft #  ft #
i It * f i I * *
ft * iai m h -* ft *
(>ur C.Y.A. delegates, Roy Mah
Iftr  the   Ftr^t   Brhish   Co '
FTlirhish   Co-
it   \ ;mcouver, 1
further
ent, and social legislation.
ing 	
m~
Members Participating in
the Embargo Parade.
At an Informal Reception
for Miss Loh Tsei.
YKTOtU « fHtNfSf • tneTH
*R,,5 SUPPORTS EMRAMO
-*£
Ml
*tfti
Farewell Gathering for the Chinese Youth
Representatives from the World Youth
Congress.   F. Young, F. N. Chan,
F. Nip.
i*ftttt+i
wmw
Chinese Banquet in Honor of
Dr. Grant Lathe. * 111 I *■ *
4
AUTA<3Wh5-
* "7	
	
m* 4^ t i #$] **im
Lee Wah & Co.
Watchmaker and Jeweler
1601 Government Street        Victoria, B.C.
B   £   M   tt   *   ft   «   «
m * .<* n ft. s a §j
"M  B   &  W  &  &   K  to
With the Compliments tt
DIGGON - HIBBEN  LTD.
Phone
G8194
1210 GOVT. ST.   VICTORIA, B.C.   \
Printers  -   Engraver* -   Stationers
Booksellers
Office Furniture
LOY SING CO.
Meat Market
m m &
554 Fisgard Street
Phone E 9934
MORLEY CO.
&
mm
P.O. Box 1164 552 Fisgard St.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Victoria Bakery Co. Ltd.
BREAD   •   CAKES   •   PASTRIES
Best Price in Town
1317 Government St. Victoria, B. C.
NORTH QUADRA FLORISTS
A. D. BALLANTYNE
Phone E 0221 North Quadra St.
m
n
J rV LjmK  Lj&liciovjs V.Kow
yAairx
-  * *   *
JS
MANDARIN
CHOP SUEY
602 FISGARD STREET
Cor. Government St.   -   Phone
G7533
VICTORIA, B.C.
Look for the NEON SIGN   ::   Courteous Service
*** ft I & ft 141 ***
WAY SANG YUEN, WAT KEE & CO
1620 Government St. Phone E 2022
P.O. Box 1142 Mr Victoria, B. C
•
* >' TT 1»<
«
J1
£
m
ffi
H
£
*
*D
2
f
3^
*
ft
i
iff—.
SawiLSONieE co. ltd.
03 A H23l^li*»'^^^
HkirsFrosted Fresh Peas and Strawberries
»  )S H I  I ; %
536 HERALD STRBjET
sate
E3911
PHILIP CHAN
Representing
Remington Rand Limited'
^typewriters
* •*!
Portables as low** as  1 Oc a day
Call for  Demonstration
•
1407 Government St.   Ph. G 2652 ' 	
:,-JK
n
0
c
y>
*
tO|H
0       "^
i
0
xh
ft
ft ©It
ffi r *£
¥ g s
# ffi ffi
^ 'IH' *
as w m & a w a
ik w «*# w ax
m-:&0. tilt
ft ffi ffillffiffiffi £
fa
"•Ml   tft
.S3
S3
ffi
ft ft
1T
m
m& 3p r
« *tt
i ^ H ^#e #; <£
k«■ ^ ft mm**
Xil
E3
^1 !$'«;
»
Si
tt
§11 i
^ "^ is
gij
♦Bo
ffi
a
i
i
A if ****
ffi US s *
m 1SS
'fMK'JS tt
ii m m ffi
« * p x
IF A $ A
£8 ■ Klf *
1
i
|i
if
it
ffi
m
,i ID ffi ffi
>i" "fM ^ "v
5^3
+ n
I
•5R
X
& §t
$ i
tt ®
& P
T 133
ffi
&tt
mm
ffi IB
It
i  4£
II
«:#
as
?3-
3£L
®
MIS
3: ¥
^ n>m}
it  *
&
7 tR
tt
m.
m
mm
ran*
ifi tt
its
n
J6
tt
i
Si)
flit
ISC
ffl
I
ft
31(1 §0
ft & JUf
ft «"J
T ?!I     #
■ft » * Jfc
ffi ft} f &
g £ n n
B fir m •
» 4t fe
mm-
&%&
* m tt
If » «d
# * *
£ # TH
fIX
■ & &
mm       a
*§ I m    tt
'■■'-     a/..,    -.
1
§
t
3F      »
1
i
ffi
g
fcwii ft ft
wffi ffi ffi
r R R ffl
ffl as as a
ttft ft ffi
gmfi fflitt
JKIfe-.ft'«C
*W* ffi &
ASH
$«$ jw m
i>m ± •
«■■■ *»*•■» tt
■■•* Ji 5i
a
0  3?a
n ft
Jt
« IS
a ft
T tt
95
aft ft ft
at tn in ffi
•& % s m
m ffl ffl £
#■ r r i&
ffi g& it B
tttttt*
a fl1 *
IS ft * B
& -# * *
» in * ^
a; ft ft -
•^ tt tt s
ffi I * |
i   If
tt
I5J
tt
a* tt
m k
B
I
i
n
I
!
ft tt
ft ffi ft ft m
ffi - ffi ffi
£■©■»■«
■ffi tt ffl m
ft & ft at
i
is
ft »
ffi m
mm
ffi iu
11ft
^ §**- tt H5c tt tt     fci
tt
I
A
PP
f
a*
m
ft
ffi
Of' » S^
I»l SR SD tt
^r tt a tt
m a ft i
m ft
^ ffi
ft    i?
ffi      R
a    as
ft
ffi
I
1
i»l
•  B
tt
^1
ft
tt
it
1^
I
Z
fij
.•at
IB
as
m
tt 	
tt
1
lit *i
» ra m »
llli
tt ^ ^ in
% ® ffi it
IS *fc "* A
SJi 3ft ft tr
» »  #
r tt e
SAB
tttttt
ft *> *
3fc •   P
Ik   i HP
& tt
tt-ai »
» ff A
tttt-IS
fB tb ff
ffi a m
K tt IS
tt
in
iu
R
#
1
at
$
ffl
tt
± 1
i ft
T ffi
.ff H
J* ff
£ ffi
» «I5
ft I
f
m
m &
tt ii
& ®
ff 9
tt *
tt «
* IS
? m
56 J: ft *
ft
T
1 Dt
ffl
fill
tt
«r ft
■« ffi
T "ID
1  M
Jt
*
tt
A
*w3
k ft aa
tt ffl*
i* fl£ £
' IR-
ff & ■
ft £ft  »
■a n i
• tt M
* tt
* %
M I
tt ft
9       St
ffi &
it ft
tt ffi
ff-ff
%. m
> tt
« #
ft s
ffl !
ia
ȣ -
ff tf
» &
a m
w tt
tt »
-it- ut
■ffl £
f$ ft
tt m
ft »
* tt
I us
ft m
ffi*
ffl !
tt SI
# le
* *ffi
' ffi
A ¥
■ •
* Jt
IE US
% t
if
^ A
> &
ft i
(Pi tt
1 i
IE 7
5*C »
ilT
ii
*? SI
ii $Bft fcfi
tt ft ffl A
i§ £ B ffi
1 K
« ffl
ft
ffi
IK
*
*
■i-:
ft
A
T
5
3
9 tt
• A     9
3*1 b3  •
« ft
» fn
ft tt
ffi tt
ff A
if ff
tt ff
tt      $&
R
ffl £
R tt
tt ff
tt *
* j
lft US
35 f
ffi w
g tt
m •
IE
lit
E
I
aft
Se a:
ft? -ft
tt
■fr4
•if":
ff
1
B
T
!
ffi
t
fl*
111
!
m
#
l
mx
2 *
ft a
ffi ^
ft     M
3J5
■ffl
ffi ff
tt !*]
ffi is
Ii •
tt tt
BpH   T
!  IB
I ^
tts #
x m tt
tttt$
» n ^
IE « «t»
ft T tt
m i in
ft 111 tt
ffl B &
iS tt *£
£ a "*
a m t
tt £ !
tt hU fc
tt B US
f£ * Bm.
H• tt ^ ' IK *tt
> B^ 1 £ii
* i£ • ft tt
Hi II IS tt
3g * # A •
IM 4h£ m.       tt ff
•  ^
Wft
ff *
it ill
£ tt
- &
1® *
/h ^
* ft
tt H
JK El
tt •
tttt
ft ■
tt  »    '
ff ft S
» » ff
Jt
^ m
•   T tt
ft * *
t
^1
tt ff
tt «
tt !
ff tt *!
^ |  Jt
I tt *
# ff ft
tt T it
tt e £
ft fi %
a s #
I # tt
tt     #. ©I
A f&
¥
ff
«
*
1
■
B
tt
tt
tig
it
ff
tt ^
fr.#
D
ffi ffi
ft ff
ffl S
tt
*   ♦
ff ft
R -
s §
$f T
T
ft *
ffl ft
x ffl
fl tt
T ff * %
tt ff
B   «
& B
ifn +
ft B
ft i w
♦tiff A
- B
w IS
>    »
+ ft
% ffl
a m
m »
at &
i i
pf-n
B   •
&
\h
B ff ff
j& j% ^
m # ff
mm it
t m a
$j ? «f
tt m »s
ft g **>
tt ft ffi
^ ^ tt
ff & ff
>  - J*
f i
4-H  » ^
» jp£ "?»
ff ff ff
tt ft ft
B  W ia
A A a
tt fi tt
tt ©J
a m
m& m
nfc J:
■* ¥■ £
.,tR ff
TSS
■ •       nH
S ft _t
** 8*
-ft -
1.3
# ff 9
^ ^
ffi tH ^
ff tt
ft ttff
ff ff
^ft  »
ft ft
Hi I ffc
ffl ffl
ffi ^ ft
A®
R "ft ff
tt m
tt ff JBd
tt tt
f*~#f|
iff
ff *l T
'£s
tH Ui ft
tt x m
mm'■-
ttm a**.., vM*yL
<F   to
+
ffl
ffl
58
m
ft
+
A
I
ft
tt
mm
IB
I
.
Iff *.*»v	
-
1
Jt
*
4a
*
A
II
H * *
Jt. **'
J3
•frl-
i
* a *
■* Jtm
ji
* 5 ±
lfft^5c 7C
ff-fc z
w -
ff nu
#
tt * £
7C ff Jiff
A
m{ii
H-
7C
*
■Hi
■£ **£
ii §
"*6 %
tt ffi
* a n
ff -   ii
fill
Sfc
fill
-t tt
afcj&s*:
■^ ff ff,
ff - r
* 7C +
tt % 0
% *"t? 7C
E A
*fiU
A
1Ul
ft
it ii
ff ff
n -
i" t
31 H
***
3l
fill
ii ii
ff ff
A
A      fill
fill
-t
a m
n ft
m ff ff
ff-A
IS ± ^
tt O *
^ ffl -fc
i   -i» *•
A
|
SEJ    £»*     a&»
B
ffi *
ff *
tt* *
»  & 0
ff-# Jt
ft 2 3
ii — $P
ft li ifi
& & m
ft «
a
ff
ff 4$m
m ® a
2 ff £
A
9
* A
tt ii
'ff:
ft
i
!
'F # $*.
ff ff 2
;■* & g
Sff 5c <©»
2 A tt
i&*b *
It &
$ ff
St »  ffl
aft
£• A
HI ft
w £
2 2
zm
s ff
# A
tt
•
ff *.'   *
IE
ft
6*
in II ff
1
i
B
ff
%
m
A
* m
m
ffl f« &
15] 'fr ft
If ifij fa
ffi «ff:
ff B   »
+ ffi
ffi ff
I
#1
i
i
i 	
	
^^^^^^^»
III
* #ffl !•   £ *g
« m ff w. m m
mmmmff a
a isj^f m ffi m
|isffffff
ad pi n « * »
« ff.4 mmmzw
ffi m £§* ^ *
£.& R
ft • iffi
ffl tt ft
ff :§: ffi
«-«A
Wff *
¥ A »
a tt ff
2  »  ft
fit* ffl
mm
ifi
^ ape ?«>i l*«
m tt tt
1 mm
a ff &
m m i
mmm
m ff *
P x ff
-R A ft
'"ff t|- ffl
IF » 9f
ff aSc tt
feff +
'M** x *
mz » *
ft $ ff i
ft a % i
a i m gij
e ff fe> %
« ff ■ ^ a
it wi
m 4 p
¥ ff iii
ff *g-ff
*t & «
tt
tt
B
B
tt
ft
£1
mi
ffii
ff
ffi
ft
m
*tti
3ci4ff"
gg
m
at
IS
* ff
tt
ffi
7F
■4
»
tt
51
IS
ft-
9
>F
9
ffi*
3qj.*tt«if!
ic ff •
ff ffl *
ft 'It
ffl &
■mi
3ff<8J
tt tt
'ffSff
a a
ff H
ff *
« p
ia m
it a
tt ff
4fc *
Si ff
® &
m n
mm
m n
ff
ft
*
ff
■^
m
S£
tt
ff
X
ff
u*s ■ n ff »
ffj ©tt
is p
I
it
15:i
KJffff
.•w-.tsge
tt JR fl'J
ff ff *
mm &
mm®.
vt^ w
& » '
*r » su
5 tt
5fc1fl!
mi
mm
■ff'*liV
tt
16 —.
@ ffi
i tfc
A
A
K
ff
tt
ffl
lit
gi
ff
i n
# ff
mm
a »
&£
fife ^
ff ^r
Iff %
ff ff
-51 ft
I
&
PP
•
tt
ffi
lift
Pil
ii
w ff ff ffi* e - i5i
it ff % * ili
|fc   |
tt« »as*t    #
1 A A£? US » W     ?fc
4M
m %. m •mm as,
ft ff x £ ff ff »  - ff
tt >*ff >l> ff  ff  tt ff
it ff tt 5ff "ft Iff ff
tflEJ
ei ff * ! n®t.m~ z
-1EiaitffM*m
ffi ffi nt % & ff m A
ffl ff » A ff — ff * ff
pi ar —»n m » a
*|I'8J
& W ffi tt "W « - tt 1
1
-. mmw, ff -w ff
9'% sifrAiie
n
3** tt.ffff He ff
•Ifcf!
a *o m ff ff * ttii w *
ft
•
B tt ff >l> »  & m
^W"^a«m^mft
9$
tt-ffl"^  ff sCfr IE ft
utiJuftiiUKanna
*
IS H 121 * £ m tt
a   » * ff T * B   : ft
'ffpt
% i -ii ' ff m m
e. ffi ^ > > to ^ — tt
w
• ff — &j ai fsiff
i® at a a it tt ii ff
"%w%
§1) Ul S * "* @,*rj
P; Ij
A ffi » ff ff 1 A A ff
*8ff
ff ft ffjgtfe&.nis
tt S *g "# A fife 1  jlnl
~
JffF
# J* * 3B:^ tt III
If
#«itff"#ffBffg
*
? w ff ^ *&. £
t3j
l> ffi IS » El 5fc tt ff ff
¥
£ %3t* ff ff %
nr ffl m A A 1 fife If tt
ft
i
Jfc ff ff ff  »^ ft
w ff tt"# tt ff ff * ff
^ ? *&6t BAte
» 2ff3F#ff1UL<frM-
1
tt-.ff* * tt'lffjg
*fftif#*ff*l»W j
A ? ff&flli   :fc
ff it tt ff     "R
ts ff    #i ff El    ff
# *    a ipf a    I
ff ea a mmm ff *
* ff S «  »  A i K
• isi in ff S it
ffs ft nm tt ft ff tit
4,
* a«» tt ft ff 9
ffffffffi&^FffPP
a
i-*:*;ffK £ #'ff
ifc i **» ff ff » ff
t
2.S X ff £ tt
* * ff ff m a ff »
to
tt tt ff 4 W ff
ili'llift
m
ff ff fliiff ¥ #
*^ ff ffl     tt ft : K
ff
A m*W ffl ffi
• m ff    * ff ff ff
m
* t & ff m *
fl
» tt   ft i »At
w
• & « ^ ff i*
i
m ff    ff ff ff gs
-h
tt
ki m > ff tt ff
n
ii i*    ff tt £ ff
ff:
£*iff « tt in i
« ••    a >i> $ ffi
£
*ih la - sft
tt 0f      ^ "ffi  » &
f
Iff.ftJ* •  ffl
ff Ii      ^  »  ff *
X
ff H ffl ff      ff
a * * ft   ¥
»* ff    ff ffi m @
' ff    ffi ff ff m
ff
& st m »     tt
« ff    ff ^ m tt
«
* » ff ti    A
ff ff    ff ff s «
tS
2 ffl W ff     ff
^F4^      •   R   '' ff
4
- Sell ft
ff ff      ff tt Jfff   • TSS       5 # t * t »    it mm m
ff if tt tt
ff n a       m ft tt Si • »    ft ff ± t
ff ffi - A r:  »   nBS*JoegfcfifeAfflEi3@£*gZ:
tt ff ffl ff 1 3£ Ttl7IlJttfflBIi)]^2«,
ft   ft  ff   £
S
ft flf ff £
BR
IT T A It A a » ft • «IJ]KEl^2ffElft*
T ff A * ff
gnk$i&ffl£ffi-<nwtm®mmm.&m®\m
•
#IM|
^##tt»t«Ei»iii»ft«j»ft»m »ff
s j? * i£
'    5   ^   !fc
HE 5i5 ffb  t-
*# ff   '   p
^ tt » -ffttft*Alf;prffAffiff • AA
ffl «*■ m ® tt * ffl ii ff tt » lT>*TAfflt
m g Ti'-iiiiPiiaAttiJi^ft-iittSffiEi
*
£ f* ff  ' $ •  A tt W **» ii Se ff » ff # a
*
tt 16 ff T-          ffllbAftA^FSffi5t&A
* « ff -g
ff ff #5
& *E tti
4 ff #n
ii
jp i tt ff it • si © ■ ff tt ^ ^ * tt m ff
■
fffft^ff        <ff W ff ff Jfc QJEff ff ff 5 X
»  ff It U§          Wi  »   '  K ? 41iS§
a ff m m       *flsff*«Aff*»5«i
'tI
tt iff £ ff         ft'ffffffffttffiAttff
ffl #  > ff           » ff ffl A ffi W - fl ffl ff tt
ff « ft tt
<~
s I * s
a
A ffi * ffi          Mfittttffffffff^ff*
fflff r»
■
A
ff»ta^        # ft is tt ifc » »e tt to ffi a
a it ff »
3£ ft ft #          »J   » i? MA W 7  *  Si P! *£
T * ff -
■
ff ff ff »          ^IlieflHAISlS
ff ffff-ei
ff « ff ff * *•  '  * :        ff£#WJl€»J*tttt
I ^ j*ff
»wt5icff*ffff       ff2fffi«mii)g
9
jn  ff  It tt
f ff ff P
ffi • * i taffl*eff^H»^ftaJift^A?ii
ffi
. ftffBffffefMrf:»»^*«t » i n-
ff £ »  tt ff
^+3Ei^iBifl AA * ff ft  1 *m *
ft
%mw i
ffA«-ff^»ff«*4^R*ff*ff35Mffi
1 to ffc *
2 1® » f a
iUffg^ttf&a » ttff*  ill * T ff «
ff
ffi»tt^fcftffff«tf»Sffi»ff**tt*
* AM tf
^^2ElfflfflW^W*ttjemtiaitJSfflT
Jefc.
ff ff ff ff
it a 11 » tt « ii mff a tt a a a 2 a s
"F ff ff tt ff
* tt ff tt m n * ff ff :;•: ff ff ff ! i i@2
m
ff 'ff # #
tt
"T ttffi ffi
2 * ffi ff
_L.
fa ff ff f ffi ff % tt tt     ffi »   » * ff tt I'J tt
9
T^
tt#*«#rBffi*iff      55ftKftSEfffe-
ffi
A1«fiffil#»      flf^HR&ff^aREl
aatt^lEg^Mff    » *• « « «a- a » # «
»   » ff ff
i a*3 ff
* a tt ff 5? H IT  ' ff   ? if R * 7 » B ff ff
ff
i 1S ^ /f
lAii
ff «2 »
gMlt^' #flfe^    nil * nit* mmm
fftfBBMftfffftt       >  tt ' S ff ffi ff tt 7
»fc'ffJElff!#fflfl     «Bff«A»«W
A
ft
ff @ ^ff
miUMMM &m.%m    ^mmmmu n i
*$*r * ff
fit * iS ff » & ff ^ *       I   • ff ff ff • A M
IS iff ttff fe^-' 	
n
A
ft
tt
4 tt
& A
ff £
ff B
ff iff
%    I
tt 2.
a 2*.
tt
^2
i tt
ISA
If
I
ff
*
*
tt
ft B   —
ffi sa *€
€ tt
ff ff
m ¥
ff ffl
ff tt
ffi A
£
An
A
tt •
M A
b ' %
- ff-'-ffr ?r
f ff » 3c
ff
ff
m
f fl
a i
ff ffi
ft £
tt ff
* •
» ft
'9
fi ff
ff ft
3c *f
ttft
ff e
ft tt
ft A
tt 4
a as
4
iU
pi
SI #1
\«Mtt-
it Wi
tt
X
ft
o
i
si
ff
1
tt
ff tt
ft ff
ffl
$1
tt
X
iiati
x %
o     J®
#   ffl
ff   Ii
fife •
fflff
i
«
A
tt
ai ff ff ff
i
it
o UJ
ff 2
ff lft
.1 ff
ff f
ff ff
tt
O
IS
fife
ffl
si
«
ff
¥ 1
ffl ffi
ff •
& El ff «
ff i
tt °
w ax
# ff
m £
HI ff
B ff
o
HI /X
ffl ff
ff •
m e
tt i
m I
ff III ff
tt ff
M. ff
a m
o
ft
tt
S ff
X ff
ff
tt a
ff ff
ff ff
• ft
ft ■«
ff ff ff 8* ff
a 1
ff    o
ft M
a *
ff *
fftt
i ■
ii
SI £
■ff 19
ff a
■£ n
tt *
mm
ff ff
1 ii
ffl £
5 tt
ff a
6 K
£ 1
m ft
as.
tt i
ff tt
«I
ff ff
fF I
4k ffi
ff ff
j I
f& B
fife ff
ffltt
ft m
^.
.•it
IB
1
lit
i
tt
a
tt
?e
ffi    $
*tt #
£6
tt
ff ff.-tt 2
w
El • M
o
#
95 tt tt ft #
A # ff ffl
ff
o      g    ^
ff
ff ^ W ff tt
HI tt ff
ff «
El ffl It
s
ff
*r» ff
o
ff ff 9
ff
B
ff
i
iii
m
£ «tt
»
fit
m
¥ b i
ff
1
ffl ff is
*F
ffl ° ff
tt
ffl ffi
Hi ff
i  El
S
tt
1
tt
BO    °
ft  ff
ff ft
mm.
ff ff
ff*r
1 ®
• ff
& j&
ffi] ff
■» ff
ff tt
"ffl »
» tt
I m
® &
ff    o
« a
I *
tt 1
w
a ff
^ ff
tttt
in*
tt ff
A tt
AW
ff ¥
ff ff
ff £•
ff *
it 2
fife ff
ffi a
tt ff
^ s
i&ff
■ ff
± s
« W
fftt
• ffi
s tt
ff ff-
* ffi
I I
* a
tt ff
* Bfe
ff ff
% It
mm
ff *
o tt
ff «
tt £
fib I
ffl A
ff ^
- ^F ff
^ffl
ff ff
11
fffi
•  ff
*Kff
ff
i*tt
L"-""    o
tt ft
a ff
& 58
II
ff *
Ji& IS
ffl tt
» 1
11 ff
IS ff
ffi ff * 	
	
	
	
m a
m ff
m m
2 ff
tt ^
o     tt
tt °
a a
m a
ff *
^F ft
ff *£
ii ff
ff ff ff
ff #
m. A
ffl ■*■
ff 2
tt • Tiff m ¥
m
%
ff
ff
4U
a *
ffl ff
Ik i
• ffl
m ff it
Kff ff
•    ff  ffl
I m tt
a ff 1
ft Aff
tt ^ ff
I 2 tt
S ff ff
I tt
wx
ffl °
ttff
ff ft
ft ff
fflff
ff ff
si ff
ffl  tt »   £5 f£
fit a    # m /F
iff fS ± ff tt ft tt
p ff * tt ff ^ w
ff
ti
ffl
ff
ff • tt « a
XEL
El
W
iS. ff
1®  -
1 ff
fflff
tt >F
m m
ffi
#
tt
ff
o
ff
Hi
ff
I
ff ff
a tt
19 ffl
4
ft
tt
*$!
I
5:
w
tt
i
o
ff
7
tt
ffi
31
IE
i
tt
m
ff
ff
El
w
«f
tt
ff
ff
IS
#   6J
m#
» §*
tt m
m >
U ff
tt«
• ffl
ff ff
ff ff
s »
ff /L
i a
« A
ff L~
tt •
c ff
tt Jt
m ffi
o     o
ft
ffl
*r
El
ff
ft
it
tx
ff R
£ ff
tt »
ff fi]
s r
ff »
ff *
ff #
a •
m ei
El £
ff fife
* ffl
m ffl
HI °
* ff
ff ff
* a
ff 1
I i ff
« a tt
5J ff $
ff ff tt
ft ^#J
iff ftn ff
tt ff •
IIS
» ff *
ft • ffl
ff tt H
0 ff °
PI «
—   «
♦    ff
T iff
ff tt
ft W
ft 3t
Iff I?
4 E
ttm
• ff
ffi Ml
m ff
tt ff
ft tt
o      ft
ff tt
ff
1
Ifi]
tt
ff IE
ff 4?
R a £D
ff
=£ ff
ff ff
ff
ff
» ?
tt
ff
1
ff
5£
ff tt
«P ff
ff t"t
o o
#F? A
)Pfff
ff B
fi m
• &
a ff
tt x
•* ff
ff«
R8 ff
11
ff 7
ff tt
-ff
SJffi
^ •
°    45*
#ff l£
>i> ft
|H
ff ff
ff a
ff
ff
ff
«f
tt
25C
ff
+
ff ff
ff #
ff tt
ff ff
• *
tt ffi
9 tt
iff
ff A
ft 0
• _h
m i
&^
w ff
aft
tt ffi
i i
* i
# a
ffi M
k m
mm
ff ff
» ff
it •
ffi-n
A PI
tt ^
* ffl
ffi ff
j®.
ft? ff ffi
B
lift
52-
ff ft
tt ff
Aff
• ffl
El *
ff 93
ff Wl
m ff
* R
-h tt
tt ff
ff ■
tt
ff ft
ft C
ff °
Ii ff
• a v in
si* s a
ff m ffi ff
b *
ff 3
35 •
?J fi
fiff
I  ffl
£ I
ff ff
ff
ff
ff
-*»
I ff
ffl^.
*§i Z ff ff
ff     tt ff • ffi £ a tt
^   a »i • ■ tt •
ff     ffXfifcffi *&ffW
sal ff    • a r^ ft ff * s
n4 X A ff m ' m
m t«i -« £ *ffia^iB
ffl ffl X ffl 5C 11 ff
* ff
ff
ff
ff*
ff ff
u m
m ffi
^ «
tt tt
ff tt
©j ff
o      o
tt£
^F *
Si
♦
I
f
i
i
Hi*
ft
«
ft
T
61
ft
ft
±
W
w
.1 I
	
ft
ff
ft
ft
ff
t
a
ft
ff
T B
fl &
ff ff
ff
7
^ ffi
£g
jE*
3c ^
£ A
tt ft
pI ff
ffl
tt tt
i ^
tttt
ff ^c
ft ff
S ft
ffl ff
tt
s &
^ ffi
£ B
A
ft:
ffl
I
ft
ff
ffi
2
ff
i
I
%
I
ff
1
ff
1—    H»J
j   E ft
SFffi ffl
4 % #
A
I
ff 1
: A
4 •
2 ff
ff ft
ff #
ft #
B B*J
ff
no
tn
ff g
&«&
ff?
I   T
a
m
x
tt 	
	
to
x
it
tt
ff ffi
M •
mum
B
tt
tt
ffi
ff «
ff 15
•tt ffi
iff tt
ft
f*f
ff
ff
lilt
IS
ft
us
A
tt
7
ffi
ff
tt ffi a
i* ff
ff ff
^F f ij
ff *
* m
i e
tt B
£ tt
# Hf
ff it
m. ffl
/v ff
« * tt
•  ff tt
% ff Hi
a is »
ff #* i»
H i: £
ff SR ff
k I m
ff ffi ff
flfe   ■   ff
ft 1® &
'SKA
& B
ff fftt
ft -n n
«r ft 1
£ & •
ft g tt
ff £ tt
ft # ffi
ff tt £
tt
ffl £
It ffi
B  •
ff'.tf
A ff
mx
r *
n ff
% tt
1 ff
» •
mm
# ff
- %
•83 ft
B ^
ff S
ft £
te ffi
5E
I
ft
tt S
ffi tt
I ff
ia tt
ff ffi
T> £
ff »
% ift
ft ff
A ffl
tt A
ff
I IK
ft 2
1 a
ffi a
ii ffi
ff £
•       >
|
ff
ff
ff
#
tt
HI lb f>)
ffi ff
ft A
iff BJ
£ IS
ft It
ff ft
ff ff
W ff
M'ff
ff it
ffi •
> Jfjf
ffi ft
X A
ff fl
*5c st
1H E&
tt
ffi a
I
ttX
tt
• n
ti"
as i
I  1
A ff
1 ff
ff   :   tt
t
3a.
tt is
M ffi
* «
HiJ ff
ff »
tt ft
It3 ft
»|> »
ffi X
* it
m £
ff
7
ft •
ff «n
ff ff
gc *
ff ffi
ff ffl
ff tt
PRX     M
*   1
ff 2_
ff tt
ff m
*e ff
tt ff
t«
*®
5f
ff
ffl
I IB.
-ft
tt
a
^ m ^
ff :
p
A
ff ff
I B
ff
ft
&
tt
A
£
ffl
M.
m
ff
7
ft
1
tt
ff
vF
ff
ff A
3ff|j&.
BS ff
cp    f
7   ffi
4 &
3a ff
-S ff
A ff
I 7
ff »
ffl ff
m m
& m
m m
M »
£ ff
ffi *
m ff
m
&
1
f
ff
Ml
Hi
$
tt
A
¥ ff
A (ftl
ff
■'iff
ff n
ff   f&J
ft
ff ^F
tt ii it
t . »
ffi M ffi
jg ^ ^F
ff A ff
'   ifi.   »   ff
E *F it i«
1 * M A
ff £.*ff ff
mm k &
ia ff ff #f
ffl # « »
± m #. W
mm m a
* tt » ff
^E tt » a*
M ft @ &
ff •& ff a?
«L ^ ff   »
ff flt-tt SI
» » ^ n
ffi X Wc Wi
T> ft ff'ff
ff ^ » A
ff * ff ff
^ i& ff -a
tt *F ff »
ffif^
ft«
ff tt
4| M  »
— ffl g|
ffff ff
®C ff ff
ff ff '
SSc 7 «
»  ■ ffl
ff- a
2 org
^^ ff
'ff*? »
7 f^fS^
•   ff ^e
ff «l ^F
s ff.i«r
ff
tt
a tt
ff ?
g «
ff *
& n
M -it
ff m
$$-ft
us ffi
A   :
ff m
ft
ffi
fBJ
ffl
m ffl
* A
tt M tt »   »
ff
ff
ti
ft
311
ff
ft
7i]
s
is ff ft-
tt tt
ffi £
•&«<
B»-ff}1
Inlffi ffr
-it tt
H   «
A3? en
x fa
ft^f
ff fi »
«-;7 SL
ff f# ft
ff # A
ff & ff
$ SB tt
i£rtt ^
A tt#
ff 1
tt x m
» fit
ffi ff
m ff
ff ff
ff *
ff *s
bJc H£
£ ff
A ff
ff 8§
tt tt
ffa ei a ft
ffi   *t.r»   fl- tt   »
■«'■* ft  »  £ ff
ff b s ff ffi a
iSif•   »
w ff .sfeff in ^
ff t ff ff ff m
* ff ii ^ & i
ff Agft*?£ T ff
ff $  »itA & ff
» ff 3ii*M if
ff1
4fc
*&? ft
ff ff II
AC   55
ffi
ff tt
ff
ff
El
_Lft
7
rttff^
7 A
£ 7
tt
tt W
ff •
W ff
fa m
ff tt
"»■•••;>■
A ft
• ^
BS A
% ff
If 	
1
»m
*fl*
M ff
ft ff
fi ^ *
fff -^i ^ SI ^
i£ # )B ii A m
¥ « ^ ^ m^t
"^ #
■s* £ H ff
iiil..
■ •#£    mm fa
-; ff   * ff ff H
I      SS3
ff    JjjfSc *
i a.    m «*s
• ff■    4 ffi x
2      El Xtgff
& » ff ff
*      ft ft .   R
•  — 14 ff
PI gfc ff » ffi 2 *
a ffi 4*
ff * ffi ftn J| H ff
ff »*) 2 m
nff a ff &*sff
JL *$ 83 ft
#
1  JlfclS* ff *  »  2
He If] » ff
H
» m # & ff * 2
m m ff m
1
* ffi f& S[ ^ * ff
'*• * s ■
K II  • ff B ff »
ff « H *
Si
■55 tt      l^l^t
»   » t!( ff
*
fl n     >%ii
**ffff
1
*
* *#   m^ 2 fi
m ff ff it
¥
IE ffl    m t * if
* # w*
fil
^ •    uni'
ffl fl ¥#
/y
i«    » ft « ff
ff » » e
N$
lit *      2 - ff H
a e* * m
3H
ff £    ff ¥ ' ff
n m»-
«
<v
x w     a + ff II
ffi » ff ¥
W
ft ff       » ff 7i »
g * ^ £
*
*
tit
»  ■»      Jit "g ff3*
b *& » •
a:
* ff     & fl ff 1
£#* #
1
i i   je. 2 « «...
Ki It *
ii
4s
i
ff * ff H ft
illtft
$
18
ff fl ff tt X
2 ff 11 ff Jn *
ff Tl "£ -g ff
•  ant
2 Sft ff * ff
*ff 2 X ii
ff; 1 flu n •
II
la) f^ 35  »  *
•g A fg » H
''
*M fl ffi SI
> & 55 H ff
n £• » ff ff
*§ >i> fl ff 1$
» ft ii] £ m
jtt »   ' H tn
flij ^ * ff ■
» ff-<ff ff ff
>fc S ff w ^
>i> ffg n fl
tlt^f
» Ufa ^ A
si] * US 2 X
ff £ ff A ff
iff
ff H ff m ft'
S2#t:
s
I
»fis»
ff "S2^ ff
IE ¥ 2 * m
2 * ff » 19:
* flu pf =g &
13 ff ff ft »
p
"51 A ffl # ffi
ff "B • fl* ■
ff * »   » #
* * ft fl- w
*ff ff * it
ff a ff ff w
»    '  B# K ff
ff ff A ¥ #■
& ff * % X
£ ff Jft ff jE —!*l^ I^B
#11
ft
fl
if
ft
I
ft
«
=fi
* 1
ff w
«ff
f
ff
1
ff
I
A
ff
I
#^ff*-Hiff*
X ttffff = tt ffl*
ftftSKffffftff*
I  -MS ff ff MB
&mwi ff ^ & » «
«s&i--&ff
SK     2 fi Stiff    - *ff
x  i -ffi,
ft ff a
ffi m*ff
ff ttff
i
W& ff
tt fl ft
ii ff #
tit A flD
•   * X
s ft
in »
fflff
ff
£
ff
A
ip
HE
is£ ¥
ff — m.
ff *£ff
ffl £ '
g   fl #1
am®
* * ff
*iff US
ft? 35 ffl
& fl '
ff tt
H X
ff ffi
¥ '.
•BJ fft
JMI
W ff
ff #ff
•ff. 4 A
« ffi ff
Jfi r   •
1& iE #
l ff - IB.
& & m
ax x
ff 3c  •
a *$ m
S 5jc
r ff
ff ff $s
& ffl ill
Jit
» * #
a ^ m
X ¥ .*
ffi T #
lie » ff
ft ff
"»#*
*   >
ff ^
T $
§ 1
«•«
ff tt
#■ ^
ff IB
» tt »
ff ff "Hi
mmm
-t "ff-ff.
-t • I
| =£ I
&w. ??
? ff *
ff ff >
ffl fl#
ff ffi 8>1
* • ff
ff S £
flff I
%¥ St
tt ' ^
B flu ff
■ a «;
» ^ E9
fft ff * w
ffi
* US
ff m
-i »
- I
# ff
fl
I *
fl- ff
m ff
x &
ft-
Lai
ff 1
I iff
ff &
ffl X
a # ii
B T
tt *
P ff
ff ft
m m
ft x
ff
I
c
J
A
T
&
1
|? 7G
J§ ft
X *
ft iE
tt s*
IK ff
ft ff
^ it ff
A £ ff
ffcSs ffl
2 ^ ffi
«l£l] *
filff ff
» ff ±
ff ff ff
£ -fr 2
ff ff ff
ff tt 1
iiUS ^
2 ff ff
ft ff ^
m - ff
i #*
It-;* '
ff ■* ff
fi tt
ff ff
m M 'R
ii 0 ife
III
as tt A
X A-ff
i « ff
H "^ ffl
jfc JftJr
m tt ff
iff m a
ff i* »
m ffi ff
■« ei m
iff ff ff
& ffl m
» mm
BIJ ff
W ff
H ft
*•£
M S
* ff
Sfl
HB X
tt ft
*ltt
& IS
• ff
A
If
»     BET
ff g
tt ff
ff m
m ffl
± it
im fi
m tt
HE .Iff
i ff
ffi ff
Ei ¥
ff  »
ffi II
tit
ffi I
H If
£ ff
ffi^
if 5a
i »
m
B
si)
ff
ffl
ff
fl I
-fc
«— ^
.ff # *
fit ff.ff
tt # ff
(11$
W X tt
ff £K
T I
» ffi
151 8§
ff ffi
§
fr tt
tt a
s: fi ii
ff iff   »
m m m
1$ Sm H
mm tt
ff i m
•   AS ¥
L.   3^     P.
J as e
5»     A     [ffl
JUilSlI
i$ ffi ff
•jffi A tt
H-ff X
m $■ #
¥ «■*
fiffff-
ft.* A
tt
Hi
An A     £ t| t§
ic * fft £ Ai*
■ft
m h
1 &
I T
T
US ff
ft ffl
a m
tt*s
@& ±
m
■Jfe   <nn
ffl*?
tt 3
i I
ff *
4?
m
ff P
ffff
tt ik
ff *
ff g ffi
MR X
H   I
'J? tt "ft ■ ff
* A
5] ft
ffl
ids
In
a a
«* $
ff   •   'If M3
h   *& i
*Di   m ff
ff - i m
m ff
i jfi
ia m
A   IS
ff *
«J Si
• *
ft
A £
ff tt
rtf
fln
ff
A^
ff «
i a
* ±
« 2
ff ff
#1f
A •
ff A
* i
ff ®
M ff
ftai
** A
:ff ff
fln *
i *
ff •       it
it * n —
as :# I t
ft -^ In]   »
ff *l ^ ffl
^ ffi ffi [n]
»  A
m. m
fi
Ha
in ff
ff s
« tt
tt ff
ii
ff A
I ff;
51 *.
IB
?
r^
1
rK
i
#
i
A
P
I
m
i
j§
I
ft
IS
ft
ra 	
51
*e«
M.
7 * Tl tt
* ffi J ft
ff a ® *
E tt ii
A I
m *
aift *
tt i« ff ^
(fl ^ m
# If
mil
• • #
ffl T @
ffi J M
iil
ff IS $&
# ff »
tt »  »l
• ft ^
a a ir
>H —* $L
mmm
■m m tt
% s »
tt
m
ff
5
s •91
li« ft
tt &
8 11
®.  Btl —
Si] X
fi] i
si ^
£
nl> W
fl #
It f ii
Bfl
%
¥
tt s tt fl a
ft ft
p ^
> *
ffi *&
7k.
m
ffl
% -
if u -
m m i
a fl a
fl!
J
'!> ft
i &
*
tt *
tt
K * E 415
£ T m fl*
ff @ ffl
tt in * T
* 1ft m e
a * ft us
a tt ***
'  fr BK K&
ffl m m tt
1ft ft # Ii
w ' m m
4 a nt*. i m
ffi ai =£
us
1»J 5fc $J
Ei Bg S?
m. ffi a
«
i
m m
fl fa:
tt '
ft
# T i&
s ^
fl"}
ff
tt
tt ffl
«f ff
ff'*$£
ft   I
1ft E
»
tt M
H ffi
» ft
ft 1i ffi
ft .* S
s • I
"^ "I 13
Sit
fit tt
ff a e
& 1
■* it
n *
Bfl
tttt
«■ ffi
mm
tt *
ff •
Ira
m
W T
tt •
MA
& i
tt *
tt *
X £
ftff
I   ¥
m m
mm
m tt
ff
4 ft
i *
* IPS
ffi n
**
ft
JUT*
p a
ff
I fl]
i
ft
S tt
f
in'He
w ^ ■ --
HONG SING
& SONS
FINE SHOE REPAIRS
At Reasonable Prices
jut #;* n
1428 Government Street
Victoria, B.C.
ORRICO
Greenhouses
SHELBOURNE   STREET
%9mmi'
*******
ALBION 34-W
Ph. G 4570      Victoria, BC
Chungking Cow
CHINESE NOVELTIES
1501 Government Street
(Cot, Pandora)
CANADA CAFE
A*
to
BEST STEAKS AND CHOPS IN TOWN
1626 Government Street
Victoria* B.C.
*WN
gP
»*»>& jr^ffitt ****# y  51 & \7
Stt«rf«   «***n   «m«tt J     ^J   fl   A
534-6 FISGARD STREET VICTORIA, B.C.
Compliments of . . .
| Pioneer Fruit & Vegetable Co.  Ltd.
100% Canadian Capital
WHOLESALE
•
Government at Cormorant St.
Phone G 7108 Night G 4982
ft   8
Alk iaieeiAe Horn
WAHL-EVERSHARP
AIRLINER  PEN
other DOB Ml ife© wotio—
a "git FIWnT pole*
Use this pen for oOfS
or for aaoetka. ■ «* geS
■■■■■ to daaaaoi,
f«*dta«Maraowm
the poUt to too
akodaViif fee
point a hau'r br*44t^ap_orJ
and you "Jii" tJT
nil nf TitiaaifL
bouoht it! You eaol
SfwcOsmtT ol the poiBtYoa ou
rogvlate th* mk flat*.
Aa* treat*a omho II hat the
faawwl Safety jafc *o¥lOa   !■■
late cap   Uead  br tb*   United
Airlines* S*e wa reoeeee. WaaJ»
nvei sharp Is tb* penecs ptt wot
iiififtiiiaa
ft+lirSMlSx i
n
i.l¥ ff
m   St
It   st
A
<*
tt
§*>
ncr
HI«I If
n^a
a   as ^»
Ifffl
i  »
is
i
i
£	
«  n
M >3 if
z
m
m
m
?
H1A3
£
ill
X
ft
%
AD
»*vi3
IOH2 5
*
3|
fr®
:*«** + ■»*■ Jt"BB"*E«"**"*#ja^***W«BB«4»«^«i:«** —
	
MODERN SHOE CO.
Comsr YATES and GOVERNMENT ST.
£
dm        «
1 f
w
New Studio
*
* ft Hat
780 FORT STREET
G3821
r~
*# *
i r
£
I
Tuck Lung Hong Kee
j    5£6 Fisgard Street P.O. Box 1134
j VICTORIA, B.C
C. C. M. and ENGLISH
BICYCLES
Tires . .. Lamps ... Accessories ... Repairs    j
Joycycles . . . Wagons . . . and Tiring Fitted    i
I
We Thank Our Many Friends
B* J. SMITH
Opp. The Bay Phone G 7234    j
iSiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitniiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiixisiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii.iiiiiiiiiiii^    ajiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiniiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiiig
For . . .
Popular Priced
MEN'S WEAR
PRITCHARD'S
MEN'S WEAR
1227-1229 Government Street
f
* * i *
PHONE E 5831
541 FISGARD ST.        VICTORIA, B.C
nilllllinHUII(UI!inHIIHIIIIIIIIUUIII!IIIIUIIUIIiliimiIIUHIIIIIIIl!IIIIIHUUIHIIIIIIIIIIII!lini^     ^UlIIIIIIIIIIHIHIIIIIIIIIinilllllllllllllHIIIIIIlllHllllllllliUniimiHIIllllllllllimillllllllllllltlfF-
If China Interests You
Read
THE CHINA MONTHLY
(New Official Organ)
Subscription - per year $1.00
order from - Chinese Youth Assn. Victoria B. C
Compliments of...
Dickson Coffee
and Tea
521 Bastion St.     Ph. G 1194 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.chungtext.1-0356414/manifest

Comment

Related Items