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Third copies, June 1978 Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1978

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Full Text

 BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "6", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
CP Bail
V Holland
■■■ aget
Manager
20 June 1978.
File No. 577
Mr. D.C. Courville
Property Representative
Technical Services
Marathon Realty Co. Ltd.
200 Granville St.
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Courville:
Reference your letter 13 June, File RE 6528/1 re fence constructed
on CP Lot 2 Plan 12588, Swartz Bay.
Copy of lease attached to yours above is returned for clarification regarding taxes.  CP Rail BCCSS pays the taxes on properties
leased at Swartz Bay and it is not our desire to have the Lessee
pay for their portion.  This action is taken on the same basis
as the annual rent charge, that of benefits accruing to BCCSS and
good corporate neighbour aspect.
Please advise your concurrence.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
CAA'BB
PLSJNfTIAL & PASS
Mgr. Traff/Sates
"V"
J tPS   CMO MTL
CPR BCCSS VCR ..;„...
-..:.■ -../:■.. ;-■■ ."'-"*' .  ''•'' . .-..■:
VANCOUVER 20 JUNE/78    *
.J BALFOUR
C/0 P I GEORGES
MONTREAL QUE
RE CONVERSION PSGR CABINS MERCATOR ONE FOLLOWING COMMENTS ARE
OFFERED/STEELWORK WOULD BE DONE BY OUTSIDE CONTRACTORS.
INTERIOR DESIGN AND WORK SUCH AS 'MARINITE' BULKHEAD AND
FINISHING WORK POSSIBLY CARRIED OUT BY OUR MACHINE SHOP STAFF
WHICH WE WOULD PROBABLY HAVE TO INCREASE BY 3 MEN. WORK WOULD
BE CARRIED'OUT UNDER SUPERVISION AND OVER PERIOD OF 3 TO 4
MONTHS MINIMUM.  ,;      .,.'■'"■   ~
y
AT PRESENT NO PRICES AVAILABLE FOR 'MARINITE' BULKHEAD MATERIAL
WHICH IS EXPENSIVE. s -A
c"^"\-":■]:-.': "'"■ :. V : .       ^.•:/x/
WITHOUT CHANCE OF MAKING THIS AN IN-DEPTH STUDY FOR ESTIMATES I,
WOULD PREDICT ATlTHIS EARLY STAGE THAT WE ARE LOOKING AT A COST
IN EXCESS OF 350*000 FOR CONVERSION AND MY ESTIMATE WOULD BE IN
REGION   OF   400   TO  425*000   DLRS.
BCC32. .•
M W HOLLAND
MGR BCCSS 5 ;'..'-
* '
CPS CMO, MTL
CPR  BCCSS   VCR
2 CPRall
Internal Correspondence
B
Date   VANCOUVER, 20 June 1978. File? AGR.5.ILWU,
From   M.W. Holland
To   Mr. P.I. Georges
Asst. General Manager
Coastal Marine Operations
Montreal, Que.
Reference the contract between BCCSS and the ILWU representing
employees in the BCCSS Shop, expiry date 31 January 1978.
Company and Union representatives met in this office 15 June,
and the Union, led by the new President, Bob Peebles, has requested clarification of the COLA clause contained in the last
contract.
Mr. Emile G. Bjarnason, an economist with the ILWU, was present
at the meeting and he quoted from the attached CCH documents,
"Canadian Temporary Economic Controls" dated 30 December 1977
and 26 January 1978, to support the Union claim that the COLA
clause should in fact have been implemented.
Messrs. Samosinski and Timpson had a brief conversation on this
matter 16 June, but I would appreciate your direction before Bob
Peebles is contacted regarding further meetings.
An early reply would be appreciated.
(fj>
Form 102-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
PET'BB
cc.  Mr. J.T. Sparrow, Manager, Labour Relations, Montreal, Que.
Mr. P.E. Timpson, Asst. Supervisor, Labour Relations, Vancouver, B.C.
Your File BCC.010.18.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
J 	
TELEX
VANCOUVER, B.C., 20 JUNE 1978
L. BRETON
MONTREAL, QUE.
PLS ADVISE BRIAN TANSY HAVE CHECKED PATRICIA AND BOB DICKSON IS NOT
ON BOARD SHIP NOR ANTICIPATED AT SKAGWAY    BCC-30
R.R. REID , *        ":
ASST. MGR.,.- BCCSS    :
RRR'BB - ■ ;.;•'.
s CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER,   20 June  1978. File:     T-78-69
From R.R.   Reid
To Mr. R.A. Ferguson
Regional Managerr
Public Relations & Advertising
Vancouver, B.C.
Kindly refer to your letter dated 14 June 1978, File 2.2.8., re
Canada Week celebration.
"Princess Patricia" and "Princess of Vancouver" will be dressed
25 June through 1 July.
Other than foregoing, nothing else is contemplated.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
cc.  Mr. A.N. Cairns - Will you please issue instructions to
Masters, "Princess Patricia" and "Princess
of Vancouver" in celebration of Canada week
25 June through 1 July, to have respective
vessels dressed during that week.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
m
<g|£)   Form  102-R ■r-.."r^ . '"""".
CPRail
Internal Correi
idence
m
Date  VANCOUVER, 20 June 1978. File:  336
From  R'R- Reid
Jo Mr. A. McDermott, Manager
Insurance & Fire Protection
Montreal, Que.
Acknowledging receipt of your letter dated 15 June 1978, File
MC&I-R-45-12.
Officers of our Department of Investigation drive the Purser
from the "Princess Patricia" upon arrival Vancouver, Pier "B",
to Wharf Ticket Office at Pier A-3 and return.  Additionally,
the Officers escort the Purser off the ship to the car, into
and out of the Wharf Ticket Office, and back on to the "Patricia."
There is no change in this arrangement.
Assumption suggested in the fourth paragraph of your letter is
correct, in that the last paragraph of my letter shown as #3,
should have read "Princess of Vancouver."
Thank you for the coverage arranged with respect to currency in
care of Purser, "Princess Patricia" and "Princess of Vancouver."
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
(g|) Form 102-R Internal Correspondence
m
Date    VANCOUVER, 20 June 1978. File:  14118 A-l
From    R-R- Reid
j0    N.D. Mullins, Esq.
Regional Counsel  v
Vancouver, B.C.
Attention:  B.W. Hoeschen, Esq.
RE:  PRINCESS VICTORIA, INC.
Kindly refer to your letter dated 15 November 1977, File 10403,
and previous correspondence, in connection with captioned
heading.
Secretary, Canadian Pacific Ltd., has asked for the actual
effective date the Princess Victoria, Inc. closed down by
permitting registration to lapse.
Will you kindly enable me to reply.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
(g2) Form 102-R
y BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
.'/Holland
imager'
? Reid
20 June. 1978.
' Manager
file Wo.  T-78-69
J*t. Feten. Ouo&kz, APR
AdveAtulng ManageA
Ca.Y\a.dian Government O^lce oft TouAlim
Ottawa, OntaAlo.
K1A 0H6
Dean. Wl.  Cua&ke-
I have received youA letteA dated 14 Jane. 1978 AegaAdlng CGOT/
Sayeu Marketing Ltd. presentation at the Holiday Inn,
Vancouver,  2 Jane 1978.
As 1 was In attendance, at the. presentation, together with Wl.
R.V.  VeJULey, Sale* Representative, BCCSS, and discussed with
you. the. Indefinite status oft oar future In Alaska chixislng, T
faeel you know that we cannot commit ourselves to any programme
at the moment.
1 was very Impressed with the approach made to tourism at the
2 Jane meeting, and am hopeful ofi knowing very shortly whether
on not we will be a part o& It.
Yours very tnxxly,
R.R.  REW
Asst.  Manager,
RRR'BB
B.C.C.S.S, ...........V.
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, June 20, 1978 Filer T-78-10
From   r.d. Pelley
To  Mr. R.R. Reid
Tour Operator Update Re. "Princess Patricia" Sailings
Have contacted all tour operators holding space on our September
sailings who have not as yet paid deposits.
1. Sunset Travel, September 4 - Will be receiving deposit cheque
or total release of space (which can be utilized immediately)
by Monday, June 26. Will advise you of progress.
2. P. Lawson Travel, September 12 - Have released all space which
is utilized by our wait list and guaranteed assignment.
3. Pioneer Tours, September 20 - Have requested and will be receiving a cheque for deposit of total assignment. Sales are
progressing very well.
4. Pacific Tours, September 20 - Have released total assignment
of space. Eleven cabins will be utilized immediately.
5. Burkes World Wide Travel, September 20 - Holding five rooms.
Have asked for deposit and will receive an update from Al
Copeland Thursday this week. .
6. May's Tours, September 20 - Have received cheques to date
totalling $2,400 for deposits. Manager advises 12 rooms sold.
Will be calling next week for further-update.
L<
r
m
Form 102-R Page 2
Mr. R.R. Reid
June 20, 1978
7. Western Tours, September 20 - Have requested deposit for
their assignment of 13 rooms.
8.
9.
Budget travelT September 28 - Have requested and will receive a deposit cheque for their assignment of 23 rooms.
They advise total allotment will be sold.
Wayfarer, September 28 - Deposit requested,
warded shortly.
Will be for-
10. Vagabond Travel, September 28 - To date have received $1,200
as deposits from Vagabond. Hugh Bond will be assessing his
assignment Monday, June 26 at which time he will contact re
release of some space.
11• Have not contacted Midnite Sun as Mr. Clarkson Smith has
advised he would prefer to deal with you.
As mentioned in my last report, full payments and deposits for
earlier sailings are up to date. I will be monitoring all
September sailings very closely until we are sure that all space
has been fully utilized.
Sales Representative
Js.u.C/.o.o.
RDP:gg
cc: Mr. M.W. Holland CPRall ' FO
Internal Correspondence [|jj|
Date  VANCOUVER, June 20, 1978 File:    M-001
From  J.D. Finnie
jo Mr. J. Ferguson
As I will be on A.J^eoming "Ju^e 24, kindly extend an invitation
to the following gentlemen to join us for lunch on board the
"Princess Patricia" 1230 ^MT, July 18, 1978.
(X:g)   Form 102-R
M.W. Holland
J.D. Finnie
J. Ferguson
B. Tate
Lyle MacLean - Johnston' Terminals Ltd.
Harvey Taylor - "
Jay MacAuley - "
Peter Jones - Crown Zellerbach
Laverne Prozny - Sidney Freight
Rod Zeigler - MacDonald's Consolidated
Norm Engemoen - "
Denis Jones - Crown Zellerbach
Manager Sales & Traffic
JDF:gg
'■     ■ ■
/ CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, June 20, 1978
From   T. King
To   Mr. M.W. Holland
With regards to the conversion of passenger cabins on the "Mercator
One." Steelwork would be done by outside contractors. Interior design and work such as "marinite" bulkhead and finishing work possibly
carried out by our machine shop staff, which we would probably have
to increase by three men. Work would be carried out under supervision
and over a period of three to four months minimum.
At present, no prices are available for "marinite" bulkhead material,
which is expensive.
Without the chanpe of making this an in-depth study for estimates,
I would predict at this early stage that we are looking at a cost
in excess of $350,000 for conversion, and my estimate would be in
the region of $400 to $425,000.
More information, material and time t^ould be necessary to give a
closer and more realistic figure.
Superintendent Engineer
B.C.C.S.S.
TK:gg
Form 102-R
4 BC Coast Steamship Sen/ice
Pier-B". Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
W Holland
:-,' Reid
Manager
€P
June 20, 1978
File: T-78-40
Mr. Andrew G. Eakins
14 Landsdowhe Gardens
Pointe Claire, Quebec
H9S 5B9
Dear Mr. Eakins:
I have received your letter of June 9th, 1978 in connection
with employment aboard our cruise vessel.
As I explained to your father on board the "Princess Patricia," certain people will return to school at the end of the
summer and quite likely a number of additional staff will
have to be hired to fill the vacancies. It is our policy,
however, that anyone joining our ships must start off in the
position of porter and work his way up to waiter.
I am afraid that by late August until the end of the season
(last sailing September 28) only porter jobs will be available.
Should this be suitable and an opening occurs, we would be
pleased to have you as part of our crew.
At your earliest opportunity you should forward us your
telephone number.
Yours truly,
A. Meijer
Catering Superintendent
AM:gg
V \
}\ ■ — — —. 4    ---
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, June 19th. 1978
From  M.W. Holland
To  The Master
"Princess of Vancouver"
Pier A-3
Vancouver, B.C.
File: T-78-30-162
I have attached a photostatic copy of inquiry I forwarded to
the 3rd officer of your vessel on June 12th.1978 and his subsequent reply of June 13th.1978.
I have taken the liberty of attaching two further letters,
one from Canada Safeway and the other from our Nanaimo Terminal
indicating that at least the mate on the Nanaimo side was
aware of the occurrence. Consequently, Mr. Foulkes' reply
is not satisfactory in this instance.
I would appreciate it if you would personally investigate
this matter and determine why this apparent damage was not
reported to this office. Any other information that you
may be able to supply, such as the names of. the seamen on
duty at each terminal during respective loading and unloading
procedure, will be appreciated.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg
Attachmentt
*%'*!   Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
m
Date  VANCOUVER, June 19th. 1978
From  M.W. Holland
To  Mr. A. McDennott
Manager
Insurance & Fire Protection
Canadian Pacific Limited
Montreal, P.Q.
File* 562
Form 102-R
Re. Your File MC & I-B-8 of June l6th,1978 Concerning Seaspan
Doris Charter Party
I enclose a photostatic copy of Charter Party dated April 1st.
1978 showing signatures Mr. K. Campbell, Vice-President and
Mr. J.C. Ames, Secretary for Canadian Pacific Limited witnessing seal being affixed to document*
I regret the delay in answering your initial letter and will
forward opinion of Law Department when it is received.
A copy of Charter Party was forwarded to Mr. W.C. Sylander on
this date.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg
Enclosure
J CPRall
Internal Corresi
Date   VANCOUVER, June 19th. 1978
From  M.W. Holland
To  Mr. W.C. Sylander
General Claims Agent
Canadian Pacific Limited
Vancouver, B.C.
File: X-77-14-12
(gg) Form 102-R
In letter of January 20th.1978 to this office, Mr. A. McDermott
requested that you be furnished with a copy of Charter Party
Agreement between Aqua Transportation (Seaspan) and Canadian
Pacific Limited dated April 1st.1978.
I now enclose a copy for records.
Manager
B.C.u.S.o.
AJM:gg
Enclosure
J ■'NHolland
iger
R field
Manager
' BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier-R". Vancouver. BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
File: X-77-14-12
June 19th.1978
Law Department
Canadian Pacific Limited
Suite 138, Granville Square
200 Granville Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Attention: Mr. W.F. Murray
Dear Sirs:
Re. Charter Party; April 1st.1975 between Canadian Pacific
Limited and Aqua Transportation Limited	
I have received a request from Mr. A. McDermott, Manager,
Insurance &>Fire Protection, Canadian Pacific Ltd., Montreal,
P.Q. as follows:
I should also like you to obtain an expression of
opinion from our Law Department regarding Section
7 (b). If the provisions of Section 7 (b) go beyond the ambit of our undertaking to Aqua in respect of cargo then you have an uninsured exposure.
It would appear from the words at the end of the
section reading "...save and except any claims,
demands, liens of other liability whatsoever,
which may arise due to the act, neglect, default
of Aqua, the vessel owners, officers, crew of
sub—contractors" that B.C.C.S.S. could be held
liable for losses and liability as a result of
Acts of God and acts of third parties.
.../2 Page 2
Law Department
June 19th.1978
I have attached a photostatic copy of the Charter Party
Agreement that Mr. McDermott refers to and would appreciate
receiving an opinion at your earliest as to whether the provisions of Section 7 (b) leave us liable beyond the intended
scope of the undertaking.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg
Attachment ■v Holland
iR&ld
'.'anag-'i
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier B", Vancouver. BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04 507684
fe! (604) 665-2507 or 665 2508
June 20, 1978
Johnston and Johnston
P.O. Box 871
New Westminster, B.C.
V3L 4S8
Attention: Mr. Metzler
Gentlemen:
Enclosed please find Credit Application concerning the movement of your units between Vancouver and Vancouver Island.
We look forward to being of service to you.
Yours truly,
J.D. Finnie
Manager Sales & Traffic
JDF:gg
Enclosure
bec: Mr. 0. Robison
Mr. J. Ferguson - Understand Mr. Tate has made arrangements to protect the movement of this
'.'traffic." You are aware that this
could result in Johnston and Johnston
shipping with us on a regular basis.
Mr. V. Jones
J '/ Holland
RBld
■ ■ i-Mgw
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier B'. Vancouver. eC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604)665-25070' 665-2508
CPflafJ
June 19th.1978
File: T-78-30-157
Mr. Ian Blaney
Blaney Agencies Ltd.
920 Douglas Street
Victoria, B.C.
Dear Ian:
I have attached a copy of damage report completed by Mr.
Bryan Tate, Senior Traffic Supervisor, Vancouver indicating
damage sustained to right landing leg of JTL 2718 on June
8th. 1978. The damage is such that it is similar to damage
caused by the leg contacting the ramp while loading.
Would you please determine if Wharfinger has any knowledge
of this damage occurring during or previous to the loading
operation at Swartz Bay.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg
bcc: The Master, "Carrier Princess" - Would you please
supply any information you may have on this occurrence. CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date     VANCOUVER,   June  20,   1978
From     M.W.  Holland
To     Mr.   N.D.  Mullins
Law Department
Vancouver
File  127559
(m
Form 102-R
Re:  Alexander S. MOFFAT, #017-127559,
deceased May 10, 1978	
Enclosed herewith is completed Form P.R.3 and copy of Certificate
Death in connection with the above mentioned.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
JB
/, BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
/Holland
Reid
: '.imager
June 20, 1978
File:  366967
Chief
Immigration Records
Department of Manpower & Immigration
Ottawa, Ontario
Dear Sir:
It is a condition of employment that all new entrants into
Canadian Pacific service supply adequate proof of age.
In the absence of a Certificate of Birth, it will be appreciated
if you would kindly confirm Mr. S.F. Chan's date of birth as
August 12, 1929, according to your records.
The enclosed "Record of Entry into Canada" form gives as much
detail as the applicant is able to provide and we hope that
from this you will be able to locate this employee's immigration
record.
Thanking you in anticipation of your kind co-operation.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date     VANCOUVER,  June  20,   1978 File:     576
From     M.W".  Holland
To     Mr.   N.W.   Patteson
Manager
Payroll Accounting
Montreal
Enclosed herewith   is  completed Form CER-1  for Per-Olof OLCEN,
#494387,   Roll  955.
(£s|)   Form 102-R
Manager,   B.C.C.S.S.
JB
■ BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135. Telex 04-507684
N Holland
? Reid
• Manager
June  19,   197J
File:     606
Blaney Agencies  Ltd.
920 Douglas  Street
Victoria,  B.C.
V8W 2T6
Gentlemen:
Reference to insurance coverage for cash handled at
Swartz Bay by Blaney Agencies Ltd.
Guardian Insurance Company of Canada Policy No. 99792
will expire on July 15, 1978, and it will be appreciated
if you would obtain and let me have certified evidence of
renewal of this policy at least one week before expiry date,
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB Date
From
Form 102A-R
raj
Internal Correspondence
VANCOUVER,   19 June  1978.
R.R. Reid
File:  78.529.V.
jQ   Mr. R.A. Ferguson
Regional Manager
Public Relations & Advertising
Vancouver, B.C.
Reference conversation concerning Girl Guide presentation on board
the "Princess of Vancouver," herewith copy of newspaper picture.
Do you wish other picutres?
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Mgr. Traff/feales
r
i »,^4»5'S.Ti:as»aKB«ii-xsa«.. . waasas^
CPRail "     , - ffpi
Internal Correspondence mSi
Dale  VANCOUVER, June 19, 1978
From  H.L. Hudson
To  Chief Steward, "Princess Patricia"
It would be greatly appreciated if you would kindly try to find
one man's brown suede shoe lost by Mr. T.F. Turner in Room 220.
Please make sure that, if it is found, it is sent to this office
on the'Patricia's" next arrival in Vancouver on June 24th.
Office Manager
r
S.
;
(|» Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Corresi
Date   VANCOUVER, June 19, 1978
From   J.D. Finnie
To  O.R. Robison
Vancouver
File: 608
(g|) Form 102-R
Kindly invoice Imperial Oil
Distribution Terminal
3232 Underbill
Burnaby, B.C.
Attention: Mr. A. Cleaver
for movement of one lube oil truck via the "Carrier Princess"
17 June 1978, total amount $900.00.
Manager Traffic & Sales
JDF:gg
cc: V. Jones CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date     VANCOUVER, 19 June 1978
From     J.D. Finnie
To    o.R. Robison
Vancouver
File: 60S
Kindly invoice Gulf Oil Canada Ltd.
Supply & Distribution
Burnaby Marketing Terminal
Barnet Highway, Burnaby
Attention: Mr. J. Lowrie
■<-
for movement of one lube oil truck via the "Trailer Princess"
19 June 1978, total amount $900.00.
Manager Traffic & Sales
JDF:gg
cc: V. Jones
(gP Form 102-R
4 ■ .•.-. ! ..;-. a   ■-..-..■■.   i     ■  '.,...      ..-.-....--..      ...   ,.-.. ■:■ .■       ,     . . .
SSK323Sr^r~
CPRaal
Internal Correspondence
m
Date  VANCOUVER, June 19, 1978 File: T-78-1014D
From  J.W. McCowatt
To  Master, T.E.V. "Princess Patricia"
Chief Engineer,       "
K. Bourgeau, Machine Shop Foreman
Survey T.E.V. "Princess Patricia"
Attached is a copy/of the Inspector's report May 11th, 1978
which is self-explanatory.
When convenient kindly advise on the action taken concerning
your respective departments so we are in a position to reply
to the Department of Insurance and Fire Protection, Montreal.
Should no action be required, in your opinion, please explain
your reasons why.
Asst. Supt. Engineer
B.O.C.o.o.
JWM:gg
Attachment
.
(gg) Form 102-R W Holland
H Reid
Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "6", Vancouver. BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel 1604) 665-2507 or 665 2508
June 19, 1978
Johnston and Johnston
P.O. Box 871
New Westminster, B.C.
V3L 4S8
Attention: Mr. Metzler
Gentlemen:
Enclosed please find Credit Application concerning the movement of your units between Vancouver and Vancouver Island.
We look forward to being of service to you.
Yours truly,
J.D. Finnie
Manager Sales & Traffic
JDF:gg
Enclosure
cc: Mr. 0. Robison
Mr. J. Ferguson - Understand Mr. Tate has made arrangements to protect the movement of this
"traffic." You are aware that this
could result in Johnston and Johnston
shipping with us on a regular basis.
Mr. V. Jones ■:■./■.■..--■.■.'i'.i;.. .i-;-...- ,
CPRall
Internal Correspondence
IE!
~/
Date   VANCOUVER, June 19,  1978
From   J.D. Finnie
To Mr. M.W. Holland
Re: Seaspan Contract
As you are aware, the "Seaspan Doris" in addition to serving
the B.C.C.S. also serves Crofton Monday - Wednesday - Friday.
I have learned that B.C. Forest Products are in dispute with.
C.P. Rail over switching charges and are seriously considering loading/unloading Crofton traffic at the BN slip. This
will mean an additional 30" steaming time from A-3 to the BN
or 60" per day. Also the BN slip is not all tidal, and the
BN must cross CN-CP lines to reach the slip, thereby encountering, .delays. .
If this occurs, it is doubtful that the "Seaspan Doris" will
be able to maintain current, schedule for B.C.C.S. I do not
see any safeguards for us in the agreement with Seaspan.
As a matter of information, I have informed Gerry Bates of
these developments.
Manager Traffic & Sales
JDF:gg
cc:    Mr. V. Jones
o
Form 102-R
u Internal Correspondence
m
Date VANCOUVER,   June 20,   1978
From J.D. Finnie
To Mr. M.W. Holland
Further to meeting in your office 0900 June 15.
As requested* enclosed is copy of letter forwarded to Mr. Jones
with respect to Hostling service Vancouver Terminal. The changes
and suggested changes were brought about from meetingST with
Messrs. Aitken, Ferguson, Finnie and with the Hostling Contractors.
I should mention that a formal agreement has been drawn up and is
in the process of being returned from the Lav; Department. A copy
will be supplied to you as soon as it is received.
Manager Traffic & Sales
JDF:gg
cc:  Mr. V. Jones
|p Fo
rm 102-R
J /
Internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER,  June 20,   1978
From     J.D.  Finnie
To    Memorandum
V. Jones
Phoned Zeb MacMillan, Sealand, Thursday June 15. Informed him
I was tied up most of Friday, and he advised me he was not
available the week of June 17. We then discussed at length our
proposal:
1. B.CIC.S. Proposal
Devise a fast Ro/Ro vessel ("Carrier Princess") carrying
47 - 40 foot containers on chassis (highway units 8'6" wide
containers 81 wide, therefore loading 6 containers wide on
"Carrier Princess" not critical) making two round trips per
weekend leaving Vancouver 10 K and Seattle 2300 K Saturday
and Sunday.
Unloading to be performed by B.C.C.S, Terminal Staff thereby
regular B.C.C.S. Tariff to apply at Vancouver.
Mr..MacMillan stated that present Sealand facility located on
RN property and they had considerable investment in the buildings and loading/unloading ramps. He further stated that
present rail service was^ overnight and was tailored to their
operation line. Rail routes were also considered attractive.
The only traffic Sealand would consider is the overflow from
the rail service currently trucked between Seattle and Vancouver. This represents 5-25 trailers per week.
...2
Qgg) Form 102-R ■f
Page 2
■ ■ ■
Memorandum
June 20, 1978
Service would
further
be
complicated
for
following
reasons:
1. Current Sealand operation at Glen Drive is Teamster. If
"Sea Containers" were brought in by water, no doubt the
longshoremen would claim jurisdiction. This would involve
the destuffing and stuffing clause of the Longshore Agreement
for goods within the 50 mile radius. This could lead to a
jurisdictional dispute between the longshoremen,and Teamsters
with respect to current B.C.C.S. operation at Pier A-l A-3.
We should be constantly alert to this possibility.
2. The fact that B.C.C.S. through its Northland affiliation is
now a member of the B.C.M.C.A. is a further complication.
For this one reason alone I .-.do not believe it would be prudent
to try to handle Sealand Containers through B.C.C.S.
3. Mr, MacMillan mentioned that he is desirous of meeting with
Mr. Holland to discuss areas of mutual concern and if North-
land/Sealand could enter into a business relationship, it
\30uld be handled by longshoremen and the precedent would be
set.
In conclusion I advised Mr. MacMillan I would speak to Mr.
Holland and ask him to present a hypothetical situation similar
to what is outlined above to the B.C.M.C.A. for its reaction.
Manager Traffic•& Sales
JDF:gg
cc: Mr., M.W. Holland - Further to our conversation
Mr. D«, Hall
J CPRall Wj*
Internal Correspondence 8^3
Date   VANCOUVER, June 20, 1978 File:  608
From   J.D. Finnie
To   Mr. O.R. Robison
Vancouver
Re:  Discount Offered Grassick Transport for Movement of Their
Trailers between Vancouver-Swartz Bay and Vancouver-Nanaimo
Effective immediately this discount is suspended until further
notice.
Manager Traffice & Sales
JDF:gg ......
cc: Mr, V. Jones
Mr, M.W, Holland
Mr, C.A. Aitken - Pleas;e advise what our policy will be
for collection of this account.
@) Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B",Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
./Holland
■lager
H Reid
' Manager
June 19, 1978
File-  118421
Mr. J.D. Southern
#401 -- 1044 Balmoral
Victoria, B.C.
V8T 1A8
Dear Mr. Southern:
Re:  Mrs. Feme E. SOUTHERN,
deceased May 28, 1978
We have been advised by our Montreal Office that
Mrs. Southern's April 1978 cheque remains outstanding.
We will, therefore, appreciate receiving this cheque
at your earliest convenience, as it now forms part of
the estate.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date     VANCOUVER, June 19, 1978
From     M.W. Holland
To    Mr, R. Granger
Manager, Benefits
Montreal
File:  137749
...
Re:  Miss J.M. DIXON, #P-137749, Roll 955,
S.I.N. 701-377-954
Miss J.M. Dixon has elected to retire on pension voluntarily
effective July 1, 1978, and the following documents are enclosed:
-- completed form P.F.37
-- completed form P.F.2
-- completed form TDl
Manager,   B.C.C.S.S.
JB
o
Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
■* Holland June   19,   1978
)ger
Reid File:     511-R
' Manager
Mr. Joseph N. Emmons
2428 Virgo Drive
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80906
U. S. A.
Dear Mr. Emmons:
We have received your letter of May 26, concerning the
disposition of the "Princess Patricia's" silverware and
other items which could be classified as souvenirs.
If the ship is sold, it may be a condition of sale that
all the items you mentioned remain with the vessel in
which case we will not be able to dispose of any of them.
If they do not remain with the ship, it is the Company's
policy to have them handled by a special department of
Canadian Pacific called "Bygones."
You may wish to get in touch with them at a later date and
you should write to:   Mr. O.S.A. Lavalle'e
Corporate Archivist
Canadian Pacific Ltd.
Room 506
Windsor Station
Montreal, Quebec
The sentiments expressed in your letter with regard to the
retirement of the "Princess Patricia" are appreciated and
are shared by all employees of this department, as well as
by many members of the general public.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
HLH/jb .;..:.      , ■:-...!.■. ■.
CPRail
B
Date     VANCOUVER,   June   19,   1978
prom     M.W.  Holland
jo     Mrs. P. Tseng
Corporate Librarian
Montreal
File:  T-78-209
(jjg) Form 102-R
Kindly arrange renewal to the "Marine Digest" for a period of
one year, per renewal reminder attached.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB
4 BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
!W Holland
inager
RReid
ist Manager
June 19, 1978
File:  350964
Chief
Immigration Records
Department of Manpower & Immigration
Ottawa, Ontario
Dear Sir:
It is a condition of employment that all new entrants into
Canadian Pacific service supply adequate proof of age.
In the absence of a Certificate of Birth, it will be appreciated
if you would kindly confirm Mr. S.F. Chan's date of birth as
November 18, 1931, according to your records.
The enclosed "Record of Entry into Canada" form gives as much
detail as the applicant is able to provide and we hope that
from this you will be able to locate this employee's immigration
record.
Thanking you in anticipation of your kind co-operation.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER, June 19, 1978
From     M.W. Holland
To    Mr. R. Granger
Montreal
File: 494277
El
Enclosed herewith is original Certificate of Birth for #494277,
James Meade THORNE, S.I.N. 702-066-119.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
VALUE #051-92-15
JB
(gp Form 102-R
4 /Holland.
- >.ger
IReid
Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
16 June 1978.
File No. 257
Mrs. Vera Olson
California Folder Distributors
2403 - 2nd Ave. N.
Seattle, Washington 98109.
Dear Mrs. Olson:
Herewith signed Service Order covering distribution of our
CP Ferry folders from June to December 1978.
Yours very truly,
R.R. REID
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
BB
Mgr. Traff/Sales '/Holland
! Reid
: Managsr
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
16 June 1978.
Tile Ho.   78.ALA.521.T.
Mr.  £ Mrs. V.W. Tustlan-Wotts
#607 -  11135 - 83rd Avenue
Edmonton, AlheAta.
T6G 2C6
Dear Mr.  6 Mrs. T us tlan-Watts■
I have walXed a fieio saltings to see li the lost earring showed
ap, bat regret that nothing has been faound either in Cabin 326
on. around the ship.
Sometimes small iXems hide themselves In the most unusual
places, and should we {Ind the missing earring we will malt It
oii to you right away.
With best wishes,
yours very truly,
R.R. REW
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB /Holland
Reid
'.-.wager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
)P Bail
16 June 1978.
File No. 78.ALA.521.D.
Mr. & Mrs. R.W. De Jean
24 St. Georges, #408
Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec.
H9X 1J5
Dear Mr. & Mrs. De Jean:
Many thanks for your letter of 6 June regarding your recent
cruise aboard the "Princess Patricia," which is much appreciated.
We here at the B.C. Coast Steamship Service, who are so heavily
involved in the operation of this vessel, share the sentiments
you have expressed.  Unfortunately, as in many phases of business,
machinery does become expensive to maintain, particularly in
light of conditions imposed by regulatory bodies.  It is with
considerable concern and regret that we look at this as the
last season for the "Patricia," but in our efforts to be responsible in our decision-making processes, we are faced with
these circumstances.
There are many people such as you, who have obviously shared in
the comforts and grace of the "Princess Patricia," and we do
receive considerable gratification from the fact that she has
served the West Coast of B.C. and Alaska so well over these many
years.  While I can make no commitment at this time, we would
like to see a replacement for the vessel in these waters, and
hopefully, one which would serve in much the same fashion you
experienced on board the "Patricia."
I thank you again for the time you have taken in writing us, as
it is letters such as yours that not only make the efforts of the
Operating Department so worthwhile, but help in our appraisal of
future plans.
Yours very truly.
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB CP Rail
Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, 16 June 1978.
From    M.W. Holland
To   Memorandum
Mr. A.N. Cairns
File:  0-104
Attached is memorandum from Mr. E.J. Agar regarding the unloading
of paper from the barge "Lakelse," scheduled for 10 July.
Per our earlier discussion, would you kindly take this matter up
with Mr. Schmitt and make the necessary arrangements, if possible,
for us to handle this movement through Pier B-C.  I am, of course,
assuming the related charges will not make such a movement prohibitive from our standpoint.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
cc.  Messrs. V. Jones
N. Wood
J.D. Finnie
File 0-104 refers.
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
©
Form  102-R I
vliForm 102A-R
Date    VANCOUVER,   16 June  1978. File:     655-C
From    M.W.   Holland
To    Mr. P.I. Georges
Asst. ;General Manager
Coastal Marine Operations
Montreal, Que.
Attached is copy of a report prepared by Mr. King of his inspection
of the "Mercator One" at Shelburne, N.S. during the period 17-19
May 1978.
The report is self-explanatory, but should you have any further
questions, please advise.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
MWH'BB
~ro-'
h)H 'Vf^P
;-V"-;- '
vV"A ;if *'S «^^T«9 Date    VANCOUVER, 16 June 1978.
From    M.W. Holland
To
Mr. P.I. Georges
Asst. General Manager
Coastal Marine Operations
Montreal, Que.
File:  AGR.2.SIU.
As you are aware, the agreement with Canadian Pacific (BCCSS)
and the Seafarers' International Union was accepted and
ratified as of 25 April 1978.
It would be appreciated if you would endeavour to determine
the position of this agreement with respect to presentation
and review by the A.I.B.
1>)Form 102A-R
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
J SSESi
■Holland
? Raid
Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B". Vancouver. BC   V6C 2R3
Telex04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
I
June 16, 197S
File: T-78-10
Woodruff World Travel, Inc.
201 University Boulevard
Denver, Colorado 80206
U.S.A.
Gentlemen:
Your cheque No. 52875 addressed to Canadian Pacific Ltd. is
returned herewith. Vie have gone to the trouble of phoning
the various departments in Canadian Pacific regarding this
booking for Lt. Col. Ralph B. Boulton, and they are not aware
of same.
Similarly, we have phoned departments of Canadian National
but to no avail.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg
Enclosure .^_^ai;^«iS.ra*i^^.*v a.,--.-,, ■. ..-
.  ... ■   ■...■..<,..-.■ ■:...,,--■■...,    ..    -   ■
V\Vi%^^U
CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, June 16, 1978
From    A. Meijer
To    Chief Steward
"PRINCESS PATRICIA"
Please be advised that as of the June 24, 1978 sailing, the
following changes in schedule will be effectives
Bell Boy #1 - Starting Time 1000 hours
Bartender Vancouver - Starting Time 0939 hours
Night Saloon Steward - Vancouver only
1900 - 2400
0400 - 0700
Head Saloon Steward and Saloonman - Juneau only
0645 - 1Q45    —
1200 - 1500
1730 ~ 1800
B
Catering Superintendent
AM:gg
©> Form 102"R Internal Correspondence
\m
Date VANCOUVER, June 16, 1978 File: T-78-67
From A.N. Cairns
To Master, "Carrier Princess"
"Carrier Princess" scheduled rail service to Nanaimo is cancelled for Monday, 19 June only, and the vessel will operate
as follows -
Remain at layover berth until "Princess of Vancouver"
clears A-3 at 1230 then load Lube oil vehicle for
servicing MV GREAT RIVER at Pacific Elevator #2 returning A-3 on completion for scheduled 1730 sailing
Stirartz Bay.
Marine
cc: Mr. C.A. Aitken
Mr,. J.D. Finnie
Chief Engineer, "Carrier Princess"
Master, "Princess of Vancouver"
Mr. Robison, Vancouver
Mr. Robinson, Nanaimo
Traffic Supervisor
Sliptender A-3
O
Form 102-R
.-..-.■ .■■  . . BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B", Vancouver. BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604)665-2507 or 665-2508
7 Holland
:Reid File:    T-78-134
'Manager
June 16, 197S
Mrs. R.M. Moffat
3402 - 20 A Street
Vernon, B.C.
V1T 4E9
Dear Mrs. toffat:
With reference to your letter of May 28th, please be advised
that your husband's navy blue wool turtleneck sweater has
been turned in to us at the lost and found.
Please advise us as to how you would like to have it returned.
If you wish, we will return it to you by mail at our expense.
Yours very truly,
H.L. Hudson
Office Manager
HLH:gg CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, June 16, 1978
From  M.W. Holland
To  Mr. A. McDermott
Montreal
File:  T-77-14-11
Further concerning mishap at Nanaimo Terminal November 11, 1977,
when the "Princess of Vancouver" listed to starboard and damaged
29 facing planks on the starboard horseshoe.
Referring particularly to our letter dated May 31, to the Division
Engineer, footnote to you, we have now been advised that Western
Canada Steel invoice in the amount of $379.62 was indeed applicable
to the incident; as this was for replacement of spikes that had been
supplied from stock to repair the damage.
The Division Engineer's letter of June 9, is attached.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
cc:
Mr.
W.W.  Hocking,   Vancouver
fig)   Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2P3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
■/ r
'Holland
15 June 1978.
Reid
Manager'
Vile Mo.   176
Mr. S. Gordon Phillips
Management Consultant
Phillips £ Associates
10-17 JoUlett Crescen
Winnipeg, Manitoba.
R3K 0M9.
M.
Vear Mr. Phillips^
Regret I have not acknowledged receipt o& the announcement
o& the establishment o£ your Management Consulting practice,
which was ^omwarded to me under date 19 April 1978.
1 have made note o£ the expertise which you oUer, and should
we be In a position to requiAe any Management directives In
a £leld related to our services here on the West Coast, I would
certainly be willing to. give your good £iAm our consideration.
I thank you far Including us In those to whom you circulated
your announcement, and wish you the best oi lack In your iatxxre
endeavours .
Yoars very truly,
M.W. HQLLAUV
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
t&tf'BB CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date  VANCOUVER, 15 June 1978. File:  562
pr0m  M.W. Holland
To  Mr. B.D. Margetts
General Manager
Coastal Marine Operations
Montreal, Que.
The attached memorandum is in reference to yours dated 15 May
1978, File 103-12-11, regarding the Seaspan contract.
I believe you have spoken with Mr. Jones and Mr. Finnie, who
are to offer incentive rates for shippers on the NEVI service.
I would assume it will take a couple of months to determine
the effect of this action, but in the interim, the service
will continue to be reviewed in light of current traffic
patterns.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
cC. Mr. V. Jones
Mr. J.D. Finnie
O
Form 102-R Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, 15 June 1978.
From   M.W. Holland
To Mr. W.F. Wright
Claims Agent
BCCS - Northland Service
Vancouver. B.C.
File J  C-330
Would you kindly provide me with monthly claims reports for
March and April, and May if available, at your earliest
convenience.
I^Form 102A-R
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
"—■■ -■■ ■*--: ~.-J -tf'..-"---w—j Internal Correspondence
Dat3  VANCOUVER, 15 June 1978.
From  M.W. Holland
g Mr. A. McDefmott, Manager
surance & Fire Protection
Montreal, Que.
File: X-77-11-1
This refers to your letter of 23 May 1978 re damages arising
out of the derailment at Nanaimo of Tank Cars CGTX 63828 and
CGTX 63523 on 5 November 1977, while being discharged from
the "Trailer Princess."
The BCCS Service accepts responsibility for this mishap in light
of the circumstances outlined in your letter of 2 March, and you
are requested to process claims in the appropriate manner.
Should you have any further questions, kindly advise this office.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
cc.  Mr. H.L. MacAulay
Supt., Vancouver Division
Vancouver, B.C.
be.  Should you have any questions directed to you on this matter which,
as we have accepted responsibility as outlined above, should be
directed to us, kindly advise.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
■g) Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier -B". Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
'.'Holland
CPRall
15 June  1978.
Reid
■■■^ger File No.   L-210
Labour Data
Canada Department of Labour
Ottawa, Ontario.
K1A 0J2
Gentlemen:
This refers to your Files 504 9 004 01 and 504 9 008 02, dated
16 December 1978 (?) and 16 May 1978 respectively, in connection
with Northland Navigation Co. Ltd.'s agreement with the Canadian
Merchant Service Guild (covering Masters, Mates, etc.), which
terminated 31 December 1977.
Please be advised that effective 1 January 1978, Canadian Pacific
Limited BCCS Service assumed under a lease arrangement, responsibility for the operation of the former Northland Navigation
Co. Ltd. between Vancouver and Kitimat.
A new agreement has not been reached at this time, but when this
has been achieved we will forward you a copy of the completed
agreement.
Should you have any further questions, kindly contact the
undersigned.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB.
be.  Mr. P.E. Timpson
Asst. Supervisor, Labour Relations
Vancouver, B.C. Internal Correspondence
m
Date    VANCOUVER, 15 June 1978. File: L-104
From    M.W. Holland
To    Mr. D.J. Murray
Terminal Manager
BCCS - Northland Service
Kitimat, B.C.
This refers to your memorandum of 17 April 1978, regarding the
distrubiton of the mechanics' hours in application to the
Ryder Lease and Rental Trucks.
Would you kindly provide me with a status report on this subject.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
'f$fa   Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, 15 June 1978. File;  L-104
From  M.W. Holland
To  Memorandum to File
Re the attached.
In the first paragraph, the 36-month lease has been reduced to
30 months, with a basis.at $315.00 rather than $255.00.
With respect to the penultimate paragraph, the trailer 12f x 26f
has proved to be unsuitable for the Northland operation and is
to be returned to the CTEC Company at their convenience.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
cc.  Mr. E.J. Agar
Terminal Manager
BCCS - Northland Service
Vancouver, B.C.
Kindly advise me the current status of this piece of
equipment.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
(Sp Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
WHolland -15  June   1978.
toer
<Reid File No.  T-78-40
'.'onager
Mr. Kelvin P.B. Hall
7257 - 140th St.
Surrey, B.C.
V3W 5J6
Dear Mr. Hall:
Your letter of 30 May outlining your business experience, over
what I must assume to be the past few years, has been forwarded to me for consideration.
I fully appreciate the overall experience which is accounted
for by your review of the areas in which you have been involved,
but regret that at this time we do not have a position open
which would be appropriate.  However, I would like to take the
liberty of placing your letter on our file, to be considered
should a suitable position come available.
I thank you for the interest you have shown in writing to us,
and wish you luck in finding employment which will prove to be
both challenging and personally rewarding.
Yours very truly.
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
be.  Mr. W.H. Clark
Personnel Supervisor
Van couver, B.C.
Your File EMP-H refers, your turndown of 31 May "1978.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S, CPRall WjA
Internal Correspondence m^$
Date VANCOUVER,   15 June 1978. Files     0-102
From M.W.  Holland
To Mr.  V.   Jones        '■'•-
BCCS - Northland Service
Vancouver, B.C.
This is further to your letter to Mr. D. Ward, General Manager,
Coast Ferries Ltd. regarding the proposed movement of a barge
between Vancouver and Bella Bella.
As I am unaware as to how you planned to move this barge from
an operational standpoint, and the costs which you have determined
would be incurred, I would appreciate being so advised.  I am
led to believe that our quote is approximately $700.00 higher than
our competitor's, and in light of this, I would suggest we should
look at our costs for future quotes in detail.
I would also appreciate an estimate of what this would do to our
scheduling, as we are already encountering delays which are causing
M. & S. and our customers considerable hardship.
jfc
lg> FO
rm 102-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
. as
1 II
al Correi
on&ence
Date      VANCOUVER, 15 June 1978.
From     M-w- Holland ..
7o  Memorandum
Mr. T. King
File: E-003
This is further to your memorandum of 20 April regarding spare
engine parts available for purchase at $7,500.00.
Are you now in a position to advise me that you have completed
your survey of this equipment, and provide me with your
recommendation.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
fStiFotm 102A-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, 15 June 1978.
From   M.W. Holland
File:  T-78-10
To  Memorandum
Mr. R.R. Reid
Please provide me with your comments with respect to the performance of Skip Griffiths' tourist services in Prince Rupert
the last two trips.
As we discussed earlier, this service should be terminated if
it is not attaining a high standard, as it only leads to complaints
and embarrassment to the "Princess Patricia" personnel.
Your handwritten comments on the attached would be sufficient.
H
Manager,   B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
fe   Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Li
Date  VANCOUVER, 15 June 1978.
from  M-W. Holland
To  Mr. E.J. Agar
Terminal Manager
BCCS - Northland Service
Vancouver, B.C.
File: P-001
In future, would you kindly advise this office direct, of the
on-hire and off-hire of the "Island Commander" until notified
otherwise.
Further, it would be appreciated if you would ensure that your
Daily Position Reports on the Northland equipment are forwarded
to this office as soon as possible.  To date I have found that
they have been arriving in groups; i.e., three or four at a
time, and if you would ensure they are forwarded from your office
I will ensure they are sent directly into this office upon
receipt.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
cc.  Mr. H.L. Hudson - Please note the above and ensure adherence
thereto.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
g) Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
,V Holland
< Fleid
wanagei
•15 June 1978.
File No. 452
Mrs. K.O'Sullivan
c/o "Princess Patricia"
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mrs. 0'Sullivan:
Attached please find copy of contract respecting 1978 Alaska
cruise season by the "Princess Patricia" and your operation
of the Gift Shop on board ship.
Please note that for the remainder of sailings throughout the
year, if an Assistant is required it will be necessary for you
to conform x^ith Item 4.03 on Page 6.
Yours very truly.
R.R. REID
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
cc.  Mr. M.W. Holland ^-■^.s;-^^^,^*^.*:^^^^;-!. ,;.^ ..... .„.-
Date
From
©Form 102-R
CPRall • -77
Internal Correspondence \f wS(
VANCOUVER, 15 June 1978. File:  M-001
R.R. Reid
j0   Chief Steward
"Princess Patricia" .
On the authority of Manager, BCCSS, there will be three occasions
during the current Alaska cruise season when luncheon will be required on board ship, under the auspices of Mr. Victor Jones, for
BCCS-Northland Service purposes.  The dates are June 16th, July
18th, and August 11th.
Luncheons will not exceed 25 guests and Company representatives.
Use of ship's liquor cocktail facilities is requested in Haidaway
Room from 1230 to 1300, with luncheon being served sharp at 1300
in the usual manner.
It will be appreciated if you will kindly oblige, noting that
should there be any downward variance in numbers, you will be
advised by Prince Rupert on each occasion.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
cc.  Purser, "Princess Patricia"
>
Mr. V. Jones - It is customary that crew attending luncheon
receive gratuities on the basis of $1.00 per visitor and
representative.  This is shared with, gailey cooks; therefore,
suggest that you arrange to give the Chief or Second Steward
$25.00 on each occasion, which can be an expense account item,
Mr. M.W. Holland
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S. / W Holland
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
CPRaii
n Jane 1978.
.9Reid Tile No. T-78-10
Manager
Mr.. Watt UJbnatalnen
TV Program Director.
Skeena Broadcasters Ltd.
4625 lazelle Avenae
Terrace, B. C.
V8G 1S4
Dear Mr. Llunatalnen-
Thank yoa kindly &or your, letter, o& 7 Jane, respecting the
possibility ofa going on board the "Princess Patricia1' while.
In Prince Rupert to Interview the Master, other crew member**,
and possibly some o& the passengers, In connection with the
last year o^ operation o^ the "Princess Patricia."
Because o^ oar Identification with Prince Rupert,  I leel It would
be only jilting that an opportunity be a^orded yoa lor the par-
pose explained In your letter., and will be pleased to arrange on
whichever, date yoa desire.    Please let me know In advance, In
order that I can advise yoa whether tlie regulaji crew will be on
board ship on that particular occasion.
Again, thank yoa ^or your Interest In the "Princess Patricia."
Vouas very truly,
R.R.  REM
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
be.    Mr.  R.A.  Terguson - Copy oh Mr. Lilmatainen's letter attached
£or your Information.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S. Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
i Holland
Raid
1
CP^ail
l
75 June 1978.
Tile No. T-78-10
Miss Judy Paul
Music Director
Schoenbar Junior High School
Ketchikan, Alaska.
Dear Miss Poult
It was Indeed a pleasare to read over the May 17th Issue ol
the Alaska Ketclvikan Dally News and to See the prominence
given the "Princess Patricia,'' In particular the manner In
which yoa welcomed the ship wilh the Schoenbar Junior High
School. Eighth Grade Band.
Both your verbal welcome to the passengers and your music
were very much enjoyed by passengers and crew alike, and
consider It most jilting on this, the planned last year lor
the operation ol the "Princess Patricia."
On behall ol Senior Management I wish to thank yoa lor the
courtesy extended the "Princess Patricia" on that occasion.
Youas very truly,
R.R. REID
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
be.    Mr.  Len Laarance, President
Alaska Pacllic Marine,  Inc.
P.O.  Box 6081
Ketchikan,  Alaska 99901.
Mr. O.W. Hanger
General Manager
Nortiiem Bus Co. £ Ketchikan
Sightseeing
Box 490, Ketchikan, Alaska 99901. BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (664) 665-2507 or 665-2508
W Holland
■-agor
B Reid
:.' Manage
June 15.1978
File: T-78-30-79
WITHOUT PREJUDICE
Mr. Gerald Mairs
Mairs Transport Ltd.
976 Adair Avenue
Coquitlam, B.C.
V3J 6Z9
Dear Mr. Mairs:
Your letter of April 28th.1978 concerning alleged damage to
trailer No. 117 on or about April 18th.1978 has been received.
I note in your letter that the trailer had been placed in
your shops for replacement of landing legs on or about April
10th.1978. During preliminary investigation of this claim
prior to trailer being removed from our lot at 0830 hours,
April 19th.1978, a survey of the damage noting potential
cause was made* This survey indicates that damage was due
primarily to the fact that the weld holding the landing leg
to the I-beam undercarriage of the unit had given way.
I know from observation that the majority of your units
carry construction-type materials that constitute a "legal
load," and it is felt that the considerable weight coupled
with an insufficient weld were the main contributors to the
alleged damage.
As you are no doubt aware, we handle similar traffic from
other shippers (notably Domans and Johnston Terminals) that
approximated the type of loads on your units, and we have
not had similar claims from them.
.../2 Page 2
Mr. Gerald Mairs
June 15, 1978
The other two trailers that you mention as receiving damage
on April 19 and April 20th.1978 (T-130 and T-206) do not
help to support your claim. Alleged damage to all units
occurred on successive days, April 18th, 19th, and 20th.
1978 at a time, when I understand, you had approximately
five drivers from the mainland transferred temporarily to
the Island due to increased traffic. Further, there is no
common factor to any of these units as far as B.C. Coast
Steamships is concerned. A check of the records indicates
that each unit was transported on a different vessel and
each was handled by a different hostler on this side.
In summary, the alleged damage sustained to the landing
legs of unit Nos. T-130 and T-206 is not compatible with
the type of damage that would be sustained by simply dropping the units. The fact that both legs were bent back
seems to support the contention that this would occur from
forward motion (eg. engaging fifth-wheel pin and pulling
forward on unit prior to connecting air hoses, or a clearance
problem). The alleged damage to Unit T-117 seems to be a
direct result of a mechanical failure rather than mishandling
on our part.
Since our investigation has not resulted in any information
that would support your claim, I have no alternative but to
deny it.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, June 15.1978 File:    606
From M.W. Holland
To  Mr. H.S. Harriman
Manager, Revenue Accounting
CP. Raxl
Windsor Station
Montreal, P.Q.
B.C.C.S.S. Ticket Stock
The following tickets were passed over to the Canadian Pacific
Law Department, Vancouver," B.C. for possible use in a legal
proceeding:
BCS 1
BCS 5 x 4
BCS 5 x 10
No. 72001
No. 455201
No. 486000
Would you please amend your records to show the above tickets
are no longer in the B.C.C.S.S. Ticket Stock Bureau.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg
bcc: Mr. E.R. Mead
Agency Auditor
Box 43 - CP. Rail
Vancouver, B.C.
for your information
P  Fo
rm 102-R W Holland
,-o.gst
g Reid
" 'Janagsr
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier' 0", Vancouver. BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
June 15, 1978
File: T-78-10
Mrs. Willie Ulich, Manager
Glacier International Travel
167 North Main
Kalispell, Montana 59901
U.S.A.
Dear Mrs. Illich:
Thank you very much for your notice announcing the opening
of your new agency. I would like to wish you success with
your new venture and offer my assitance regarding Canadian
Pacific's Alaska cruises.
Enclosed you vail find supply of our 1978 "Princess Patricia" brochure. I regret we are unable to supply you with
posters because our present supply is exhausted. With this
letter your agency name will be added to our current mailing list.
Looking forward to hearing from you again.
Yours truly,
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
►RDP:gg
Enclosures •v
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver. BC    V5C2R3
Telex04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
iW Holland
.- inager
1 R Reid
' .st Manager
June 15, 1978
File:    T-78-10
T-79-10
Mr. Robert B. Nagel, President
Edmonton Executive Coach Tours
3027 - 130 Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta T5A 3M1
Dear Mr. Nagel:
It was indeed a pleasure to meet both you and your wife on
your recent trip to Vancouver. I enjoyed our conversation
regarding the possibility of executive coach tours promoting Alaska cruises with Canadian Pacific.
I was very impressed with the information sheet you were
kind enough to enclose with your letter. It appears that
you give your clients very expert and professional attention.
We both agree that if Canadian Pacific will be operating
a ship in 1979, it would be a great benefit for your tour
escorts to go on a familiarization cruise. I therefore
would like to register your request for a cruise during
the month of September and contact you regarding the availability. Presently we are experiencing a very successful
booking period, and it would appear that chances of a fam-
tour are limited As discussed, our allowance for such a
cruise is 50 percent off minimum fare with cabins assigned
on or near date of sailing.
.../2 Mr. Robert B. Nagel
Page 2
June 15, 1978
Thank you very much for considering Canadian Pacific Alaska
cruises as a possible tour package. I will keep you advised
as to our planned operations for 1979, Looking forward to
hearing from you soon.
Yours .truly,
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
RDP:gg ■■   ■■. ■-■■     ■■•.   -'..- ■    "     ■■   ■■:.■   .
iWHolland
iager
'RReid
-.: Manager
. •.«-.--—
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier-'B.", Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
Imli
June 15, 1978
File: T-78-69
Ms. Beverly Probe
Anik Travel Ltd.
Northgate Mall
Albert at Ninth Avenue North
Regina, Saskatchewan
S4R 3C4
Dear Ms. Probe:
Thank you very much for your letter of May 27th regarding
refund for your co-op ads of March 11, 17, 18, 20, and 21.
When you invoice was received it was forwarded immediately
to our Accounting Department for payment. At this time we
find it should be processed shortly. You should expect
payment very soon.
If you do not receive your cheque within a short period of
time, please contact me again.
Yours truly,
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
RDP:gg BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
: W Holland
:"? Reid
■: Manager
File No. T-78-40
June 15, 1978
Mr. Christophe Bonnieux
R.R. 2 - Columbia Beach
Site 220
Parksville, B.C. VOR 2S0
Dear Mr. Bonnieux:
Thank you for your recent letter, in which you expressed interest
in working on this.Company's vessels.
I regret to advise that this year's crew requirements have been
fully met, and there is little or no chance of our being able to
employ you.
Due to the fact that our cruise vessel will be retired at the end
of the current season, all of our employees who previously worked
on the "Princess Patricia," have exercised their rights under
Union regulations to return to work for the ship's last season,
possibly out of sentiment; however, the prevalent unemployment
situation undoubtedly has some bearing on this matter.
In addition, we have applications made some months ago from a
number of people who must receive consideration for positions that
may arise through illness or leave of absence.
We appreciate your interest in Canadian Pacific, and hope you will
be successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours very trulys
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
. W Holland
'RRsid
'•it Manager
File No.   T-78-40
June 15, 1978
Mr. Michael Produniuk
723 Herbert Avenue " .
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R2L 1G3
Dear Mr. Rroduniuk:
Thank you for your recent letter, in which you expressed interest
in working on this.Company's vessels.
I regret to advise that this year's crew requirements have been
fully met, and there is little or no chance of our being able to
employ you.
Due to the fact that our cruise vessel will be retired at the end
of the current season, all of our employees who previously worked
on the "Princess Patricia," have exercised their rights under
Union regulations to return to work for the ship's last season,
possibly out of sentiment; however, the prevalent unemployment
situation undoubtedly has some bearing on this matter.
In addition, we have applications made some months ago from a
number of people who must receive consideration for positions that
may arise through illness or leave of absence.
We appreciate your interest in Canadian Pacific, and hope you will
be successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
eg BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier :'B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
?P Bail
^Holland
■i Reid
Manager File   No.     T~78-40
June 15, 1978
Ms. Leslie Heron
728 Miller Avenue
Victoria, B.C.
V8Z 308
Dear Ms. Heron:
Thank you for your recent letter, in which you expressed i.nterest
in working on this.Company's vessels.
I regret to advise that this year's crew requirements have been
fully met, and there is little or no chance of our being able to
employ you.
Due to the fact that our cruise vessel will be retired at the end
of the current season, all of our employees who previously worked
on the "Princess Patricia," have exercised their rights under
Union regulations to return to work for the ship's last season,
possibly out of sentiment; however, the prevalent unemployment
situation undoubtedly has some bearing on this matter.
In addition, we have applications made some months ago from a
number of people who must receive consideration for positions that
may arise through illness or leave of absence.
We appreciate your interest in Canadian Pacific, and hope you will
be successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg CPBall
Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER,  June  15,   1978
From   M.W.  Holland
To   Mr. Jim Agar
Northland Navigation
Vancouver
File:  P-300
It is approved to send Capt. Pedersen to Kitiraat in relief of
G. Ash, as per your letter.
Capt. Pedersen may, upon application to this office, obtain a
cash advance for expenses during the period.
All expenditures must be accounted for on C.P. Rail Form 140
and submitted to this office.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc:  Mr. W. W. Hocking, Vancouver
ANC/jb
i>
Form 102-R CPRall
ernal Correspondence
rg
Date   VANCOUVER,   June  15,   1978 File:     T-78-23
From   A.N.   Cairns
To Mr. K.N. Ho
2nd Officer
CARRIER PRINCESS
Your request for annual vacation November 6 - 26, 1978, is
approved.
Marine Superintendent,
B.C.C.S.S.
ANC/jb
cc•     Mr.   W.M.   Kazulin,  Vancouver
(£|P   Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
a
Date  VANCOUVER, June 15, 1978
From  M.W. Holland
To  Mr. Jim Agar
Northland Navigation
Vancouver
File:  T-78-69
I am enclosing photostat copies of this Department's proposed
listing for the Marine Directory.
It is our intention to have the details of the Northland Service
listed also and will appreciate you adding same to the enclosed
copies and returning them to this office as soon as possible.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
IP f°
rm 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
W Holland
< Reid
'.'onager
June 15, 1978
File: 309484
Mr. A.H. Jensen
1475 Boundary Crescent
Nanaimo, B.C.
V9J 2N9
Dear Mr. Jensen:
Attached herewith is a copy of a memorandum dated June 9,
from Sun Life of Canada, which is self-explanatory.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
JB Internal Correspondence
B
Date     VANCOUVER, June 15, 1978
From      M.W. Holland
File:  494297
To      Mr. N.W. Patteson
Manager, Payroll Accounting
Montreal
Re: W.E. BLAND, #494297, S.I.N. 705-501-732, Roll 958,
 deceased June 2, 1978        .      ^_
With reference to the above, it will be appreciated if you
would forward to this office a statement of earnings for
estate income tax purposes, in order that we may forward
same on to the Solicitors.
The last tax entry was made Period 12.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB
(22> Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
1W Holland
14 June 1978.
' wager
RReid
,s,*. Manager
Tile No.  511-R
Manager
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Asst. Mgr.
Marine Supt.
Supt. Engr.
Asst. Supt. Engr.
Lieut.  l/.M. Douglas
3rd Battalion
Princess Patricians Canadian
Light Jnlantry
Work Point Barracks
Victoria, B. C.
VOS 1B0
Dear Sir-
Catering Supt.
Terminals Supt.
Deptl. Analyst
Office Mgr.
Account.
Sales Repr.
Mgr. Traff/Saies
jF
m?^™
&L
This has reference to oar recent telephone conversation, and
also receipt ol the Inlormatlon with which yoa obliged me.
Please rest assured that your request will be looked upon
lavoarably, and when the tone comes to dispose ol the "Princess
Patricia" and her artllacts, we will keep you In mind lor some
token Irom the ship.
yours very truly,
R.R. PEW
Asst.  Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
W Holland
: Reid
Vanager
■14 June 1978.
Vile No. 1-78-10
Miss lora J. Becvar
8889 S.W.  Becker Drive
Portland, Oregon 97223.
Dear: Miss Becvar:
Thank you very much lor your letter ol 10 June.
We will look lorward to seeing yoa on board the "Princess
Patricia" 14 Jane, as will HarAy Burchill and others on
the ship.
11 there Is anything we can do lor you while In Vancouver,
please do not hesitate to let as know.
yours very truly,
R.R.  PEW
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
j BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
•/Holland
! Reid
l.'anager
14 June 1978.
Pile No.   78. ALA. 511.0.
Mrs. Olive Vincent
OL WAy Tours
P.O.  Box 383
San Luis Obispo,  Calllornla 93406.
Dear Olive'-
11 was certainly a pleasure seeing you and meeting Wayne en.
route your bus lour, and hope that the good weatixer continued
with you.
I am now enclosing receipt Porm 599 lor a total charge ol $70.00
Canadian lands, and will be pleased 11, at your convenience,
yoa will kindly arrange lor a bank dralt In Canadian lands In
this amount.
Looking lorward to seeing yoa In the loll,
yours very truly,
P.P. PEW
Asst. Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
mHolland ■ 14 June 1978.
rger
^nlger file No. AGP.3.BPAC.S.SEN.
Mr. J. A. Poster
Local Chairman
Brotherhood ol Pailway, Airline S
Steamship Clerks
811 Beach Drive
Nanaimo, B.C.
Dear Mr.  Poster:
This will acknowledge receipt ol your letter dated 13 June,
with which were enclosed copies ol your letteAS ol 19 April
and  23 May.
Mr. Meljer Is presently on board the "Princess Patricia," and
upon his return this matter will be reviewed with him, and a
reply will be lorthcomlng therealter, with an explanation
that hopelully will preclude lurther steps In the grievance
procedure.
yours very truly,
R.R. PEW
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
cc.    Mr. R. Welch
Mr. G. Grekul
Ms. A. Williamson
This has relerence to Mr.. Poster's letter ol 13 June, also
his letteAS ol 29 April and 13 May 1978.
Asst.  Manager,  B.C.C.S.S. W Holland
I Reid
Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
14 June 1978.
Pile No.  78. ALA. 511. J.
Mr.  & Mrs. David A. Jordan
Apt.   1001,  1010 Bellevue St.
West Vancouver, B.C.
V7V 1B8.
Dear Mr.  £ Mrs. Jordan;
This will conllnm my conversation with Mrs. Jordan yesterday
alternoon, ollerlng Cabin 104 on the August 19th sailing ol
the "Princess Patricia." to Skagway, Alaska and return, lor
which the applicable rate Is $1810.00, plus $14.00 pier
charges, totalling 1844.00.    Should a cancellation occur on
an earlier sailing we will let yoa know.
Literature respecting oar cruise Is enclosed,  Irom which yoa
can determine   location ol the cabin, also pertinent Inlorma-
tlon pertaining to the "Princess Patricia."
11 Cabin 104 Is acceptable to both ol you, it will be appreciated
11 you will lorward a deposit ol $100.00, In order that space
may be dellnitely held lor yoa, with balance ol payment to lollow
by the middle oI July.
We are looking lorward to having yoa on board ship, and at any
time when the "Patricia" is In port yoa leel yoa would like to
look at the accommodation, please let me know and I will be
pleased to take you on board.
yours very truly,
R.R.  PEW
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB TELEX
VANCOUVER, B.C., 14 JUNE 1978
File:  T-78-150
J.D. MASON 05-24725
montreal, que.
pls Arrange cash advance 200.00 favour w shaver frt sales rep bccs-northland
vancouver a/c business expenses to be accounted for   bcc-17
m.w. holland
MGR.,   BCCSS -■ r - •■ %>■ %-;:.., .
cc.     Mr.  W.W.  Hocking
BB
3
I BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Te!ex04-507684
'T
# Holland
*
t&ger
XReld
Manager
File No.   T-78-40
June 14, 1978
Miss D.A. Clarke
Apt. 504, 1686 West 12th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.
V6j 2E4
Dear Miss Clarke:
Thank you for your recent letter, in which you expressed interest
in working on this Company's vessels.
I regret to advise that this year's crew requirements have been
fully met, and there is little or no chance of our being able to
employ you.
Due to the fact that our cruise vessel will be retired at the end
of the current season, all of our employees who previously worked
on the "Princess Patricia," have exercised their rights under
Union regulations to return to work for the ship's last season,
possibly out of sentiment; however, the prevalent unemployment
situation undoubtedly has some bearing on this matter.
In addition, vre have applications made some months ago from a
number of people who must receive consideration for positions that
may arise through illness or leave of absence.
We appreciate your interest in Canadian Pacific, and hope you will
be successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours very truly.
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.
HLH:gg
S.S. BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex04-507684
•71 Holland
rager
R Reid
■ Manager'
File No. T-78--40
June 14, 1978
Ms. Marilyn MacDonald . .
R.R. #1, Whycocomagh
Inverness County, Nova Scotia
BOE 3M3
Dear Ms. MacDonald:
Thank you for your recent letter, in which you expressed interest
in working on this Company's vessels.
I regret to advise that this year's crew requirements have been
fully met, and there is little or no chance of our being able to
employ you.
Due to the fact that our cruise vessel will be retired at the end
of the current season, all of our employees who previously worked
on the "Princess Patricia," have exercised their rights under
Union regulations to return to work for the ship's last season,
possibly out of sentiment; however, the prevalent unemployment
situation undoubtedly has some bearing on this matter.
In addition, we have applications made some months ago from a
number of people who must receive consideration for positions that
may arise through illness or leave of absence.
We appreciate your interest in Canadian Pacific, and hope you will
be successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg
J Pier "S", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
': W Holland
--agar
R Reid
..' Manager
File No. T-78-40
June 14, 1978
Ms. Sharon Weick
960 11th Avenue East
Prince Rupert, B.C.
V8J 2W8
Dear Ms. Weick:
Thank you for your recent letter, in which you expressed interest
in working on this.Company's vessels.
I regret to advise that this year's crew requirements have been
fully met, and there is little or no chance of our being able to
employ you.
Due to the fact that our cruise vessel will be retired at the end
of the current season, all of our employees who previously worked
on the "Princess Patricia," have exercised their rights under
Union regulations to return to \rork for the ship's last season,
possibly out of sentiment; however, the prevalent unemployment
situation undoubtedly has some bearing on this matter.
In addition, we have applications made some months ago from a
number of people who must receive consideration for positions that
may arise through illness or leave of absence.
We appreciate your interest in Canadian Pacific, and hope'you will
be successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
Uw Holland
V onager
I RReid
..' Manager
File No. T-78-40
June 14, 1978
Mr. Allen Risham
R.R. #4 Paret Road
Kelowna, B.C.
V1Y 7R3 "
Dear Mr. Risham:
Thank you for your recent letter, in which you expressed interest
in working on this Company's vessels.
I regret to advise that this year's crew requirements have been
fully met, and there is little or no chance of our being able to
employ you.
Due to the fact that our cruise vessel will be retired at the end
of the current season, all of our employees who previously worked
on the "Princess Patricia," have exercised their rights under
Union regulations to return to work for the ship's last season,
possibly out of sentiment; however, the prevalent unemployment
situation undoubtedly has some bearing on this matter.
In addition, we have applications made some months ago from a
number of people who must receive consideration for positions that
may arise through illness or leave of absence.
We appreciate your interest in Canadian Pacific, and hope you will
be successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg
J cpm&ii
Date        VANCOUVER, June 14, 1978
From        M.W. Holland
7b   The Editor
CP Rail News
Public Relations & Advertising Dept,
Windsor Station
Montreal
It will be appreciated if you would arrange to-have 50 copies
of the "CP. Rail News" forwarded to our Northland office at
the following address:
CP. Rail/Northland
2285 Commissioner Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V5L IA9
Manager, B.C.C S.S.
cc:  Mr. V. Jones, Northland, Vancouver
Please arrange to have sufficient copies of CP. Rail
News forwarded to Kitimat and Prince Rupert.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB
WbForm 102-H
J „i.^i^.;:-i^<u*K.;-w.i.«i>-.-.
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, June 14, 1978
From    r.d. Pelley
To    Mr. R.R. Reid
Update Regarding Tour Operators' Progress "Princess. Patricia"
There have been no significant changes since myllast report
of June 7» We have received final payments from all tour operators for sailings up to and including July 18. For all
sailings ©f,September, tour operators have been contacted and
have been asked for deposits on space held. I have also impressed upon them the importance of releasing space to us as
soon as possible due to the fact that our wait lists for the
September sailings are becoming quite long.
Some operators that are of concern to us:
1* Travel and Transport - July 26. Have received deposit for
their allotment of 16 rooms. Group progressing well. Ex-"
pect to utilize all cabins.
2* Midnite Sun - August 3* Have received deposit for their
allotment of 23 cabins.
3* Carol Tours - August 19 and 27. Have obtained releases of
5 and 4 rooms respectively, now leaving them with assignment of 12 and 14 for which we will be receiving a deposit
cheque (Number 13215). Will be able to utilize present
assignment.
B
,../2
(Form 102-R '
Page 2
Mr. R.R. Reid
June 14, 1978
Considering the overall picture, I am able to see that final
payments and deposits are on an up-to-date basis as far as the
end of August, with the exception of Midnite Sun, for August
27» Special effort is being made to bring remaining deposits
up to a current status.
-M^km
Sales Representative
cc: Mr. M.W.'Holland
J :W Holland
■ mager
RReid
:' Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B". Vancouver.BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
June 14, 1978
File: T-78-69
Mr. Hugh Bond, Manager
Vagabond Travel
130 - 2nd Avenue West
Qualicum, B.C. VOR 2T0
Dear Hugh:
As per our discussion, enclosed please find three copies of
photo-ready ads.
Please decide which one would best suit your needs, and then
contact me and advise me the name of the newspaper you will
be using as well as number of insertions, etc.
I am sorry for the delay encountered. Hope to hear from
you soon.
Yours truly,
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
RDP:gg
Enclosures
J »Form 102-R
CPBail
Interna
esi
m
Date   VANCOUVER, June 14,  1978
From   R.R. Reid
To Mr. Victor Jones
Northland
We have been receiving letters from Northland strictly relating
to B.C.C.S.S. subjects but bearing Northland file numbers. It
will.."be appreciated if you will use B.C.C.S.S. file numbers in
these instances and copy of our index is enclosed for this purpose.
In addition, no file numbers whatsoever are being used by the
Kitimat office, and perhaps you will kindly send them a copy
of Northland file index with instructions to utilize same.
Assistant Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg
Enclosure
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
W Holland
IBeld
' Var.ager
June 14, 1978
File: 456282
Seafarer's International Union
837 Homer Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 2W3
Gentlemen:
Concerning S.I.U. member Jack J. MORANS, who died
February 26, 1978.
I am enclosing Form BA-6 which was received from the
U.S. Railroad Retirement Board and as we do not have
an address for his next of kin (it should be noted that
certain credits are available to the next of kin from
U.S. Social Security), perhaps you will be kind enough
to forward this form to the person concerned, if known,
and advise them accordingly.
On the Form BA-6 the center portion would relate to
the above, which shows creditable compensation of
$2,315.19.
Yours very truly,
H.L. HUDSON
Office Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
WW Holland
•'anager
RReld
-.' Manager
June 14, 1978
File:  390598
Mr. P.I. Callahan
1066 Harwood Street, Apt. #209
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Callahan:
Reference my note concerning your election to now become
a contributor to the Canadian Pacific Limited Pension Plan.
As we have not received the original Form 017RO to date,
enclosed herewith is a further form for your completion
and will appreciate you giving this matter your immediate
attention.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
W Holland
'anager
RReid
srf Manager
June  14,   1978
File:     393864
Mr.   E.  Lott
4069 Departure  Bay Road
Nanaimo,   B.C.
V9T 1C6
Dear Mr.   Lott:
Under the new provisions of the Canadian Pacific Limited
Pension Plan, you may now elect to become a contributor,
as per circular attached.
Please  complete  the enclosed Form 017RO and return  to  this
office at your earliest convenience.       "■•""■.'
Yours  truly,
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
JB
/ BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
'W Holland
■yager
<RReid
$sl Manager
June 14, 1978
File:  422874
Mr. J.A. Wildin
#3 -- 3961 Bond Street
Burnaby, B.C.
V5H 1E7
Dear Mr. Wildin:
Under the new provisions of the Canadian Pacific Limited
Pension Plan, you may now elect to become a contributor,
as per circular attached.
Please complete the enclosed Form 017RO and return to this
office at your earliest convenience.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB Internal Correspondence ^
Date   VANCOUVER, 14 June 1978 File: 494098 (I)
From       M.W. Holland
To       W.C. Sylander
Vancouver
Re: Your letter of 8 June 1978, file 78/5
David John TUSKOVICH, Barman,
Injured ring and little fingers of left hand,
26 May 1978	
Attached are copies of statements from I. Wesley and
D.J. Tuskovich. Neither Mr. Wesley nor Mr. Tuskovich returned
to this office to sign these statements.
Also attached is copy of summation. Both employees have since
voluntarily resigned from the service.
Statement from Chox? Man On V7ill be forwarded to you when received.
<X)Form 102-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
GP
J CPRall
Internal Correspondence
m
Date       VANCOUVER, 14 June 1978
From       M.W. Holland
To   Man On Chow
Chief Cook
"PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER"
File: 494098 (I)
Re: Altercation between Porter, Isaiah Wesley and Bartender,
David Tuskovich, 1830, 26 May 1978	
Please submit to this office, as soon as possible, your brief
written version of the altercation between Mr. Wesley and
Mr. Tuskovich. This information is required by our Claims
Department.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
GP
rjOForrn 102-R
/ CPRall
Internal Correspondence
B
Date       VANCOUVER, 14 June 1978                  File: 343858 (I)
From       M.W. Holland
To       W.C Sylander
Vancouver
■
-
Re: Your letter of 30 May 1978, file 78/5, Edward R.
ROBERTS, Jr. Engineer, Right leg iniury, 20 May 1978
I
All dogs are tethered in a designated area on the main
deck. The owner was not identified as passengers proceed
to the passenger area leaving their dogs unattended.
The reason for the dog biting Mr. Roberts is not known.
\ ■
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
GP
V.
'.■■'.     ■                   .     ,
.
■'■.
?bForm 102-R
	
■
■  ■ -•■-:■■—-    ,.■-.;■•"'■,■■;;..-■;.-.■■-.■:■ •*-■- ■ -
L.
\   "- ■
/
■"-■
• Date   VANCOUVER,   13 June  1978.
From   R.R.  Reid
To   Mr. A. McDermott, Manager
Insurance & Fire Protection
Montreal, Que.
File: 336
Reference your letter 24 May 1978, File MO-L-2-1 under heading
"Princess Patricia" & "Princess Marguerite."
Invoice is returned with the request that you kindly arrange
payment.
•,VForm 102A-R
Asst.  Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
Mgr. Traff/Sales
Account. ^7
Sales Repr. I jftPuAf/. tf.
Mar. Traff Aai«
<*r
SN^   *W^    (   j(jj^ CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER, 13 June 1978.
From     R#Ro Reid
T°     Mr. A. McDermott, Manager
Insurance & Fire Protection
Montreal, Que.
File: 336
Reference your memo of 5 June 1978, File MO-L-2-1,
No developments to date.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
cc.  Ms. N. Cartwright
Coastal Marine Operations
Montreal, Que.
>jForm 102A-R oc; coast steamship service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CPRail
/Holland
1 Reid
Wanner
73 Jane 197S.
Tile Mo. T-69-10
Mr.  Les Rimes
2392 Haywood Avenue
West Vancouver,  B.C.
V7V 1X7
Vear Mr. Rimes
Many thanks lor the excellent coverage given the "Princess
Patricia" In C.U. Quarterly, Vol.  1 tio.  1,  1978.
It was nice talking to yoa on the phone and will keep In
touch.
With best regards,
Yours very tAaly,
R.R.  REIP
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
J
—— BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CPRail
■Holland
Reid
'■'wager
.13 June 1978.
Vile Ho.  77. ALA. 521.T.
Mr. Harold Beerll
c/o Travel Pace, Inc.
P.O. Box 727
Arlington Heights, Illinois 60006.
Vear Mr. Beerll'.
This will acknowledge receipt ol outstanding payments against
H.S.T-. cheque Ho. 2154, which Is now returned herewith.
There still remains an amount ol $2,3^7.23, which represents
a balance Irom payment received; viz., Travel Pace Cheque 2154
In the amount ol $10,800.00 In association with the attached
billing lor those who travelled on the July 26,  7977 cruise.
We trust this amount will be lortlicomlng shortly In total
settlement.
We sincerely regret the problems which yoa mentioned In your
letter ol 22 April, and we hope that these have now been
resolved.
Yours very truly,
R.R.  RETP
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
Mfc-RED MAIL
be.    Mr. M.W. Byrnes
Sales Manager, Central U.S.
CP AlA, 233 North Michigan Ave.
Chicago,  Illinois 60601.
Attention Ms.  Kathy Lallerty.
We do appreciate the time taken
In attempting to recover W.S.F.
cheque which Travel Pace, Inc. used
In partial payment ol their July 26,
7977 Alaska cruise.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S. ^-^_ .~.*^*±x^ ■..
OForm 102-R
Internal Correspondence
m
File:  434
Date VANCOUVER, 13 June 1978.
From   M.W. Holland
To   Memorandum
Mr. W.W. Hocking
Attached you will find a completed Advance Registration form
for the Marine Transit Association Management Symposium to
be held in Seattle, October 31-November 4, 1978.
Would you kindly arrange for a U.S. voucher covering the
registration costs for myself and Mrs. Holland, to be drawn
and forwarded from this office to the Conference Chairman.
The applicable fees are for a non-member before September 1,
1978 ($120.00) and for a non-member's spouse ($90.00), for
a total of $210.00 U.S.  The cheque should be made payable to
the Marine Transit Association.
Further, would you please take the same action with respect to
Mr. A.N. Cairns and Mrs. Cairns.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
cc. Mr. A.N. Cairns
y Date
From
VANCOUVER, 13 June 1978.
M.W. Holland
File:  655-0
j0   Mr. B.D. Margetts
General Manager
Coastal Marine Operations
Montreal, Que.
Attached is copy of invoice received from Mr,
is self-explanatory.
R.E. Kusler, which
As it was my understanding we were only going down to carry on
discussions with respect to the marketing of the "Mercator," and
that no arrangements had been made with respect to remuneration
that would be forthcoming, your comments on the attached are
requested.
;.r?t)Form 102A-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
J Internal Correspondence ^J
Date     VANCOUVER, 13 June 1978. File:  C-330
From     M.W. Holland
To     Memorandum
Mr. Walter Wright
Claims Agent
BCCS - Northland Service
Vancouver, B.C.
I have had presented to me for payment, voucher for $1549.79
covering Damage Claim 2488.
I believe our claim number is 11189.
While I have sent this payment for processing, would you kindly
provide me with a report on the background surrounding the
occurrence resulting in this claim.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
lOForm 102-R Internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER, 13 June 1978.
From    M.W. Holland
To    Memorandum
Mr. Walter Wright
Claims Agent
BCCS - Northland Service
Vancouver, B.C.
File:  E-016R
I am in receipt of your weekly Ryder Tractor report from Kitimat,
B.C.
I would appreciate if you would extend the form to show not only
the weekly mileages, but a monthly to-date figure, as I believe
it is on this basis that we pay the rental on these vehicles.
Should you have any difficulty in this, kindly advise and I will
give you further assistance.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
/ 1 Reid
Vlanagi
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
CP Bali
VHolland 13 June 1978.
File No. 231
Mr. W.M. Rousselet
Second Steward
"Princess Patricia"
Dear Bill:
Attached you will find a cheque from the Suggestion Bureau
which reflects their appreciation of your suggestion re
placing a notice to read "Place ladder here," which has
been implemented on the sideboard of the upper bunks on board
the "Princess Patricia," where applicable.
Also enclosed is a Company pin for your personal use.
I would like to take this opportunity to express appreciation
on behalf of BCCSS Management for the initiative and interest
you have shown in submitting this idea to the Bureau for its
consideration.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
W Holland
CPRail
13 June 1978.
RReid File No.   78. ALA. 521.N.
■ Manager
Mr.  Paul Nanton, Director
Clarke,  Irwin & Company Limited
3765  Cadboro Bay Road
Victoria,  B.C.
Dear Mr.  Nanton:
Please accept my sincere thanks for sending us your written
sentiments with respect to your recent cruise aboard the
"Princess Patricia," and your comments regarding the distinctive
characteristics of the vessel.
We here at the B.C. Coast Steamship Service, who are so heavily
involved in the operation of this vessel, share many of the
sentiments you have expressed, and are in total agreement with
your opinion as to the value of "certain elegance and old-fashioned
service." Unfortunately, as in many phases of business, machinery
does become expensive to maintain, particularly in light of conditions imposed by regulatory bodies.  It is with considerable
concern and regret that we look at this as the last season for the
"Patricia," but in our efforts to be responsible in our decisionmaking processes, we are faced with these circumstances.
There are many people such as you and your wife who have obviously
shared in the comforts and grace of the "Princess Patricia," and
we do receive considerable gratification from the fact that she
has served the West Coast of B.C. and Alaska so well over these
many years.  While I can make no commitment at this time, we would
like to see a replacement for the vessel in these waters, and hopefully, one which would serve in much the same fashion as you experienced on board the "Patricia."
I thank you again for the time you have taken, as it is such letters
as yours which not only make the efforts of the Operating Department
so worthwhile, but do help in our appraisal of future plans.
Yours very truly,
J
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB Pier "B", Vancouver, BU    V6U 2H3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CP
JWHolland 13 June  1978.
'»«•« File No. T-78-10
;■ Manager
3
Mr. A. Elworthy
General Manager
B.C. Steamship (1975) Co. Ltd.
254 Belleville St.
Victoria, B.C.
Dear Mr. Elworthy:
The attached is forwarded to you at the request of Mr. Glen
Chestnut, with whom I met on 9 June.
Should I be able to be of assistance with any matters pertaining to the "Princess Patricia" at any time, kindly advise.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
y TELEX
N. CARTWRIGHT
MONTREAL, QUE.
VANCOUVER, B.C., 13 JUNE 1978
—  "File: * T-78-69
AD BUD TEN THOUS DLRS SHOULD COVER REMAINING 1978 EXPENSES
BCC-,14 ' ;:y'::  :•'       ',: ^"\
R.-R. REID "
ASST. MGR., BCCSS
RRR'BB
'"J^H 'WW *"».«i
y ■JlfaWaiii.wi™-■ -w../ ii-'.-.,
T^rTI^-Vln^TTii
TELEX •'■ '      VANCOUVER/*B.C,"13~ JUNE  1978.
v ■ File:    78.ALA.521.J. ' :
B.D.  MARGETTS (
MONTREAL,  QUE. \- ,
JOPLIN REGRET ALL I CATEGORY  CABINS UNDER DEPOSIT OR PAID SEPT
4-28.INC WILL.WATCH FOR CANCELLATION ANd" ADVISE -    '  BCC- l{>.
R.R..REID
■ASST." MGR. .'BCCSS
RRR'BB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
'/Holland
! Reid
Manager
June 13, 1978
File:  T-78-1032
Miss P. Chrisman
435 W. 57th Street
New York, New York
U. S. A.
10019
Dear Miss Chrisman:
We have received your letter of June 4, enquiring concerning
a passenger who entered the United States from Canada on one
of our vessels in 1925.
I very much regret that we do not have such records available
today.  If, as you say, the information is required for passport
purposes, I suggest you try the U.S. Immigration Office in
Seattle; address as follows:
U.S. Government
Department of Immigration
and Naturalization
815 Airport Way South
Seattle, Washington
Sorry I cannot assist you further in this regard.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C CS.S.
HLH/jb CPRail W£
Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, June 13, 1978
From     H.L. Hudson
To     Mr. R.R. Reid
Electronic Calculators
We have been quoted $131.50 for repairs to Wharf Ticket
Office calculator^ We can get a new one for little more!
A» McPherson has requested a more sophisticated machine
for his work, which will cost in the area of $200. The
one he is presently using actually belongs to the "Pat."
Will you kindly let me have your approval to purchase,
or otherwise?
)Form 102-R
Office Manager
HLH:gg
y I W Holland
■ ager
R Reid
s; Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
%&!P nail
June 13, 1978
Mr. C.G. Brodie-Brockwell
Lindsay Power Squadron
67 Victoria Avenue North
Lindsay, Ontario
K9V 4G6
Dear Mr. Brodie-Brockwell:
As per your request of February 18th, you will receive under
separate cover one copy of our film "Alaska Diary" for your
17th annual dinner.
I feel this film will be very entertaining and should bring
back many fond memories to those who havabeen to Alaska, and
it certainly will whet the appetite of those who are thinking of going.
Wishing you much success with your dinner.
Yours truly,
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
RDP:gg CPRall
Internal Correspondence
a
Date VANCOUVER, June 13,  1978
From A. Meijer
To Mr. A.J. McPherson
File: 164
While loading a shipment of beer on Thursday, May 11 for the
"Princess Pat," a skid was accidentally dropped, resulting
in a loss of 46 dozen beer, which either were broken or unacceptable for consumption.
Vancouver Harbour Supplies was obliged to pay Customs Excise
Tax on 41*40 gallons of beer.
The following to be charged to Casco Stevedoring in charge
of Loading Stores:
46 dozen beer @ $3.75 dozen = $172.50
Excise Tax 41«40 gallons @ $0.42 gallon =  17.39
Total   $189.89
Catering Superintendent
AM:gg
K) Form 102-R
WVi.HW'.,..''"*.".'*... ...-^ 1 w,.^M.,w.|.-F4».^.!;i;,y3tm^?!?«
/ J
HB9I
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex. 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
W Holland
-> Reid
: '.'onager
File: T-78-30
June 12th.1978
Cloverdale Paint & Chemicals Ltd.
695O King George Highway
Surrey, B.C. V3W 4Z1
Attention: Mr. Rod Hamagami
Dear Sirs:
Ret Your letters of April 5th.l978 and May 25th.l978j
Damage to tanker-trailer unit on or about March
3rd. 1976.	
I have attached copy of Bill of Lading covering your tanker
from Vancouver to Nanaimo at 2300 hours of March 3rd.l976
aboard the vessel "Doris Yorke." It would seem that you
have incorrectly placed your claim on the B.C. Coast Steamship Company. This Bill of Lading indicates that the driver
accompanied the unit. Consequently, he should be familiar
with any incident alleged to have occurred.
Since the driver failed to notify us of any such occurrence,
I must assume that the unit was in good order at the time of
delivery, and any damage sustained occurred after the time
of delivery while in the possession and care of Suburban
Express.
As a matter of interest, claims on this company must be
made by the shipper (i.e. Suburban Express) who paid assessed
charges and in any case not later than three days following
delivery.
While I can sympathize with your plight, any recourse you
may have lies with Suburban Express, who apparently failed
to adequately protect your interests in.this matter.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg
Enclosure Statement of Account
Releve de compte
CPServices
B
Please address
payment to
Faire  remise a
Statement Number
Releve N°
20650-9
r
"i
Suburban Express
621 Clafcke Road.
Mo.
Mois,
Day
Jour
31  71    76
Year
Annee
Customer Cods
Ref. Client
.      Coquitlam BC
I— V3J 3X9
Please use this
number on oil
correspondence.
Veuitlez rappeler
ce numero dans
toute correspondance.
Credit   agreement   calls   for'  payment  of   account   within   7
days of account date.
Les   conditions   du   credit   prevoient   un   reglement  dans   les
7 jours.
Reference
Pro.
N° d'ordre
Waybill
Feuille de
route
Car
Wagon
Shipper
Expediteur
Consignee
Destinataire
Station
Number
Gare N°
Amount
Montant
c
c
c
Charges bet
March 1st
een Vancouyv
o 7th incl
and Nanaimo frbm
i si ve, attuned
69.75
U exc&pJfon is token  to
billed,   p I e os «   re m M
according to y»ur r«c&fd%
and Endlcafa reo$an{$) tor
oe(jusfm0rtf(s)    *n    thta ■
Sp*2t«-
devoir.
prime*   des
ruanf     ct/x
ini&cfuez-en .
.an" tSans cat
Vows crayaz
C
c
c
a
Please  make  cheque  payable  to  Canadian  Pacific  for this  amount  and return  o cop/ of this
statement to ensure proper credit to your account.
Veuillez libeifer un cheque de ce montant au nom du Carta die n Pacifique et retourner une copie
de  ce  releve afin que  le paiement soit bien credite  a  votre compte.
y
i
Total BRITISH COLUMBIA COAST SERVICE
STRAIGHT BILL OF L^DING-NOT NEGOTIABLE
FORM   BCS   5X5
Rail
131222
FROM Van TO Han VESSEL S*I3«
Good for transportation of vehide(s) or trailer(s) indicated below VIA
J   Princess  of Vancouver }[   |   Barge j    ]   With   Driver
TIME
DATES;
\y\  Without   Driver
QUANTITY
TYPE
WEIGHT  OR
FOOTAGE
SERIAL No.(S) OR  LICENSE No.(S)
RATE
TOTAL
AUTO OR
SMALL  UNIT
N/A
TRUCK
,
TRAILER
40*
C "5 n v e r a a 1 s   Ta ri3 c
fi o   n n
SEMITRAILER
' T      ft
11 .. / h .
OTHER
VEHICLE
CASH
V
Charge  to  Shipper
TOTAL
/■rt     *f <r?
C.O.D.
Charge  to  Consignee
if Unit(s) Unaccompanied, or Credit Transaction, Cor
Consigned to 	
nplete Following'
NOTICE  TO   SHIPPERS  LIMITATION  OF   LIABILITY
The vehicle for which this bill of lading is issued shall  be received,  held,              the  carrier  shall   be  entitled   to  the  benefit  of  Title   46,   U.S.C.A..   Sections
■        handled,   carried   and   delivered   by   CANADIAN  PACIFIC  LIMITED, here-               181   to  186.  inclusive,  and to the  benefit of all  laws  of  Canada granting  the
inafter   called   the   "Carrier",   suhject   to   the   following   terms   and   conditions.               carrier exemption from or limitation of'liability.
?lCL!:\0S<i  £onta.ined   in   th.c hCarrie/'s   current   tariffs    (which   are   hereby   in-         3.   Thjs  hin  of  |ading  doe5  noi constitute a receipt for any equipment or goods
SKS   ?tA   ,L    i.n      *  a          a«e   nhe   sa.m?   \ircl anU   effect -as   "   thfi   same              of a"y *>"<•  lcft '" or on  said vehicle, and in  no event shall  the Carrier be
were   severally,   fully   and   specifically   set   forth   herein)    not   in   conflict there-               liable for any loss,  damage or delay in connection therewith.
1. The   Carrier  shall   be  entitled   to   all   the   rights   and   immunities   which   are        4"   The  Carrier  shall   have   the   benefit  of  all   applicable   laws   granting   to   stiip
contained    in    the   Canadian    Water   Carriage   of    Goods    Act    1936   or   the               owners exoneration from or limitation of liability.
Carriage  of   Goods   by  Sea  Act  of  the   United   States  of  America,   whichever        5-   The  terms  and  conditions  hereof shall  apply to any  liability of the  Carrier
Act    may    he    applicable,    and    as    a    condition    precedent    to    recovery    of               which   may   arise   prior  to   the   loading   on   and   subsequent   to   the   discharge
judgment  against   the   Carrier,   notice   of   loss   of  or   damage   or   delay  to  the               from  the ship.
said vehicle   must  be  given  and  suit  brought as  required   by  said  applicable        6.   The person(s)   using this  hill of lading
Act.   provided,   however,   that   in   no  event  shall   the   Carrier  or  the   Carrier's               assumc(s)   all   risk  of  loss  or  injury  to                            -  .     ^^    ^
officers,  agents  or employees  be or  become  liable  lor any  loss  of  or  damage              person   or   property   caused   by   or   in-                    >y/   *"-^ "                                  j
or delay to  or in  connection  with  said  vehicle  in  an   amount  exceeding  SIOO               cidcntal   to   the   dangers   of   navigation.            ,-^^x^r              M  +              _^
unless   a   higher   value   is   declared   and   inserted   heroin   and   extra   charges              even   though   such   dangers   arise   as   a                   / ™    •       w js^O"**^
based on such  higher values are  paid.                                                                                                 result   of   the    negligence   of   the   ship-                                               jm
2. Nothing   in   this   bill  of   lading  shall  operate  to   limit  or  deprive  the  carrier             owner's servants or otherwise howsoever.                MGR   MARINeZ/OPERATIONS
of any statutory protection  of exemption  from or limitation  of  liability,  and        7.   This bill of lading is non-negotiable.                                              "
•
COPY
NUMBER
Copy   1.   Purser                                           Copy  4.  Audit  Office
OFFICE
DATER
3
In
3.  Billing                                                     6. Agent
dicate  if  space  reserved —
%■ CANADIAN PACIFIC LIMITED
BRITISH COLUMBIA COAST STEAMSHIP SERVICES
BILL OF LADING - NOT NEGOTIABLE
Received subject to the B.C.C.S. tariff in effect on the date of issue of this Bill of Lading, the type of vehicle described below in apparent good order and condition,
except as noted (contents and condition of contents unknown), marked, consigned and destined as indicated below, which Canadian Pacific Limited, hereinafter
called the "Carrier" agrees to transport to its usual place of delivery at the said destination. It is agreed that every service to be performed hereunder shall be subject
to all the conditions, whether printed or written, herein contained (including the conditions below) which shall govern alt relations whatsoever between the shipper,
consignee, receiver and owner of the vehicle, and the Carrier, master and ship.
WjUti
1.
SHIPPER
ADDRESS
s^.
i2
i£s
%
fhU
CONSIGNEE
ADDRESS
jgy gu R. £ A d   M- Pftrc£
hJ/Q/y) i *A $
NIT NO.
OLfcV^£ >>r9A£
LENGTH
tfv
WIDTH
OVERHANG
CHARGES
WITH DRIVER
WITHOUT DRIVER
CHARGE TO -
CASH □ CREDIT □
FROM
jBLbd
j-
Mjl
VESSEL
/JH
TIME
DATE
UP I       /fa&AS    3
NOTICE TO SHIPPERS LI
t. Thii Bill of Lading is subject to the provisions of the Rules as applied by the Carriage of Goods by Water Act,
R.S.C. 1970, C.15, or the Carriage of Goods by Sea Act of the United States of America, whichever Act may
be applicable. As a condition precedent to the making of any claim or the recovery of any loss or judgement
a-j-iinst the Carrier, notice of toss of or damage or delay to the vehicle must be made in writing to the Carrier,
and any suit brought as required under the rules of the said applicable Act. In no event shall the Carrier or
the Carrier's officers, servants or ag«nts be or become liable for any loss of or damage or delay to or in connection with the said vehicle in an amount exceeding S500 unless a higher value is declared and inserted herein,
and the extra charges based on such higher value are paid.
2. (Slothing in this Bill of Lading shall operate to limit or deprive the carrier of any statutory protection of exemption from or limitation of liability, and tha carrier shall be entitled to the benefit of Title 46, U.S.C.A., Sections 1ST to 186, inclusive, and to the benefit of all laws of Canada granting the carrier exemption from or
MITATION OF LIABILITY
limitation/of liability.
3. This Bill or Lading does not constitute a receipt for any equipment or goods of any kind left in or on said
vehicle, and in no event shall the Carrier be liable for any loss, damage or delay in connection therewith.
«. The Carrier shall have the benefit of atf applicable laws granting to ship owners exonerations from or limitation
of liability.
5. The terms and conditions hereof shall apply lo any liability of the Carrier which may arise prior to the loading on and subsequent to the discharge from Tie ship.
c. The person (s) using this Bill of Lading assuye(s) all risk of loss or injury to person or property caused by or
incidental to the dangers of navigation. e-Jn though such dangers arise as a result of the negligence of the
ship owner's servants or otherw*-,* howsoeT
7. This Bill of Lading is non-negotiable.
^
^Jzt
SHIPPER'S SIGNATU,
CARRIER'S SIGNATURf
tifflfe CLOVERDALE PAINT & CHEMICALS LTD.
6950   KING   GEORGE   HWY.,   SURREY.   B.C.,   CANADA      V3W   4Z1    TELEPHONE   (604)   596-6261
May 25, 1978
British Columbia Coastal Steamship Services
200 Granville Street
Vancouver BC V6C 223
Attention: A. Mcpherson
Bear Mr. Mcpherson:
As per our telephone conversation of May 23, the details
regarding the dates and times in which our trailer unit
was transported by your carrier are indicated on the
attached report. Remaining particulars of our claim are
explained in our letter to you dated April 5.
Can you please review this claim and advise  us of your
findings at your earliest convenience. Your co-operation
in this matter will be very much appreciated. Thankyou.
Rod Hamagami
— Credit Stipervisor
/t& CuZ^ bfrC^- IttfT&C sQASt>t4^<?kj7Cc,.
V 05h?/?2~ 1620"%**— ^c^hL.4hJo •
B.C. CC
BRANCHES   COVERING   BRITISH   COLUMBIA   AND   ALBERTA PHONE:  298-1616 y
f/i
(///
/,-.'
DRIVER
TRUCK ND
DATE
/ DAILY   TRUCK   REPORT
SUBURBAN   EXPRESS
621  CLARKE ROAD
COQUITLAM, B.C.   V3J 3X9
■^OFFICE USE ONLY
<t%^4
2S2Z
LBS.
~LBS.
"lbs.
~LBS.
PICKED UP
INTERPLANT
DELIVERED
TOTAL
*
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WORK DONE BY HOURLY RATE
HRS;
\
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OFFICE USE ONLY//"OFFICE USE ONLY
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SHIPPER-
777 ~—'■—7^	
CONSIGNEE
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DESCRIPTION
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April 5, 1978
British Columbia Coastal Steamship Service
Pier B and C
Foot of Granville Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Gentlemen:
Re:  Claim $226.44
For several months now, we have been trying to
resolve the matter of an outstanding claim with
regard to damage done to our trailer unit during
movement from Surrey to Vancouver Island.  The
unit, which contained some six thousand gallons
of product, was picked up at our warehouse by
Suburban Express and delivered to your yard.  The
unit at that time, as we confirmed, was in good
order.  When it was picked up in Nanaimo, however,
it was found that it had apparently been "dropped"
and it was virtually impossible to retract the
front support legs.  Following deliveries, it was
necessary for the unit to be delivered to Columbia
Trailer Company Limited for repairs and we have
attached their invoice for this service.
Originally, we had sought satisfaction from CP.
Transport but as you will note from the letter
from Mr. A. E. Beveridge it is apparent that in
fact this claim should have been referred to you.
We trust you will investigate this matter at your
earliest opportunity and forward payment for the
damages incurred.
Yours vfery truly,
WDA:aw
Ends.
W. D. Andrew
Credit Manager What \tfa& 3af-e<rfs^*^^i>g^t
(Xfl+idfotfy*
Was
royovMl pv»*ovio
Mr-. CLOVERDALE PAINT & CHEMICALS LTD.
6950   KING   GEORGE   HWY..   SURREY.   B.C..   CANADA       V3W   4Z1    TELEPHONE   (604)   596-6261
Q)£fiEllwein
APR 121978
r
April   5,   1978 MANAGER
B C. COAST STEAMSHIP SERVI0g
VANCOUVER, B.C.	
British Columbia Coastal Steamship Service
Pier B and C
Foot of Granville Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Gentlemen:
Re:  Claim  $226.44
For several months now, we have been trying to
resolve the matter of an outstanding claim with
regard to damage done to our trailer unit during
movement from Surrey to Vancouver Island.  The
unit, which contained some six thousand gallons
of product, was picked up at our warehouse by
Suburban Express and delivered to your yard.  The
unit at that time, as we confirmed, was in good
order.  When it was picked up in Nanaimo, however,
it was found that it had apparently been "dropped"
and it was virtually impossible to retract the
front support legs.  Following deliveries, it wasy*
necessary for the unit to be delivered to Columbia"
Trailer Company Limited for repairs and we have
attached their invoice for this service.
Originally, we had sought satisfaction from C.P.
Transport but as you will note from the letter
from Mr. A. E. Beveridge it is apparent that in
fact this claim should have been referred to you*
We trust you will investigate this matter at your
earliest opportunity and forward payment for the
damages incurred.
Yours very truly,
WDA:aw
Ends.
Wl
W.   D.   Andr
Credit Manager
BRANCHES   COVERING   BRITISH   COLUMBIA   AND   ALBERTA ?■   vxi  V
X
44 West Pender St.,
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 1E7
January 9, 1978.
File C 1007-C
Cloverdale Paint & Chemicals Ltd.,
6950 King George Highway,
Surrey, B.C.
V3W 4Z1
Attention:  Mr. W.D. Andrew
Dear Sirs,
Kindly refer to your letter of November 10, 1977?
concerning contra debit of our account amounting to
$226.44.
In view of your letter, the complete file was once
again referred to our Manager, Accident and Safety.
The original reason for his declination of your claim
was due to our inability to establish responsibility
through the records of our Company.
Prom the contents of your letter we are now able to
confirm that C.P. Transport was not involved in the
handling of your unit. The trailer appears to have
been transported by another carrier from your plant
in Surrey and turned over to B.C.C.S.S. in Vancouver.
Your claim therefore should not have been referred
to C.P. Transport but should be directed to the
British Columbia Coast Steamship Service, Pier B-C,
Vancouver, B.C.
Your cheque No. 10901 therefore, is returned for
cancellation and will you please arrange full payment
of our account amounting to $  237.90.
Yours truly,
A.E. Beveridge
o^\
AEB/dc.
Att.
Supervisor, Credit & Collections.
Ln-ot-s0- <> ° INVOICE
tofiR
1 ° 19?fr
ISLER CO. LT
3625 BRIGHTON AVE., BURNABY, B.C.    V5A 3H5    /     PHONE: 939-7331
TELEX  043-54776
SOLD TO
Cloverdale Paint& Chemicals Ltd.
6950 King George Highway
Surrey, B. C.
Terras:  Net 30 Days
DATE
March 12/76
OUR   ORDER   NO.
13336
YOUR ORDER  NO.
PROV.   TAX   NO.
Materials:  As par attached Invoice No. 35203
Labour to:
1. Repair landing gear legs.
2. Repair lights.
5% B. C. Tax on $10.66
Federal Sales Tax Included.
Thank you for the opportunity to be of service to you
o?
,o h ° °
JScTS'
"y? No.
'—"S"   i'.o-
\
\ .	
<$
XJJ-Z*     i /
f.   *  U>
A^  ! y '
1  r ;    -•    ~y i
ALL  CLAIMS  FOR   SHORTAGES  OR  DEFECTS   IN  MERCHANDISE  MUST   BE  MADE
woi-riwr: within  is DAYS OF SHIPMENT OF GOODS AS LISTED ON THIS  INVOiC /
CPRail
Infernal
ence
IS
Date
From
To
VANCOUVER, 12 July 1978..
M.W. Holland
Memorandum for File:
File:  310
Spoke with. Frank Celko, General Manager, CPT, who advised in
line with conversations in early 1978 they have gone ahead and
are having constructed two units specifically designed for use
In our Yard at Vancouver, and these "vehicles have been custom made
to ensure maximum efficiency in the hostling operations in the
Yard, and that delivery expected the latter part of July.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
cc.  Mr. C.A. Aitken -
Would you please review the proposed
agreement with Johnston Terminals for
hostling services and provide "me with
your recommended changes in light of this
situation.
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
I <s>
Form  102-R ■■   ■
1
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Dats     VANCOUVER, 12 July 1978. File:  161
From     B.D. Margetts
j0    Mr. P.A. Nepveu
Vice-President, Finance & Accounting
Montreal, Que.
In past years you have approved funds for the Browndale Society,
a Richmond-based charitable organization involved with emotionally
handicapped children.
This year Browndale have approached us for an amount of $1500.00
for their summer camps, and would appreciate your consideration of
this request.
If you are agreeable, would ask that you make the necessary approach
to the office of the Vice-President, CP Rail.
tEl
:Jg) Form 102-R
General Manager
Coastal Marine Operations
BB
f '
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, July 12th, 1973
From   M. W. Holland
To   F. W. Barham
Divisional Manager
Accident Claims & Safety
Filet T-7S-30-148
Re. Your File: 83-199-4. Trailer No. 500517
No confusion has occurred as suggested in your letter of July
11th, 1973.
Trailer No. 500517 as stated in letter of July 7th, 1978 and
during telephone conversation of June 1st, 1978 with Mr. J.
Klemovich is shov.n damaged from top to bottom of right front
bulkhead on Nanaimo yard check of 1430 hours, May 10th, 1978.
Since damage was noted while in your Nanaimo yard prior to
loading, we cannot accept liability.
Manager, B. C. C, S. S,
AJMjgg
(gp Form 102-R '/Holland
1 Reid
Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
July 12, 1973
File: T-78-40
Mr. Randall Rickard
1530 Mcllvane Drive
Maryville, Tennessee 37301
U. S. A.
Dear Mr. Rickard:
This will acknowledge receipt of your letter regarding employment on our cruise vessel, the "Princess Patricia."
We are strictly a coastal operation, and in accordance with
the Shipping Act, we can hire only Canadian citizens or
Landed Immigrants. It is suggested that you try one of the
larger cruise lines, such as Princess Cruises, which operates
out of Los Angeles.
Sorry we cannot be of more assistance, but thank you for
your interest in Canadian Pacific.
Yours very truly,
Manager
B* C 0. o. o.
gg - .*,..-*.^**+**>-^->**<-.. jii«^:..
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, July 12,  1973 File:    606
From   m. w. Holland
To   Mr. H. S. Harriman
Manager Revenue Accounting
C. P. Rail
Windsor Station
Montreal, P. Q.
TICKET STOCK B. C. C. S. S.
The following tickets have been received from the printer's on
this date and added to B. C. C. S. S. stock:
BCS 11 Nos. 11001 through 16000 (Total 5f000).
1
©
Form 102-R
Manager
B» C» Co S. S.
AJM:gg TELEX
VANCOUVER,  B.C.,   12 JUNE  1978
Flle-     AGR.l.CMSG.GEN,
P.I.   GEORGES
MONTREAL,  QUE.
CONV DATE GUILD LETTER RECEIVED  28 APR ADVICE GIVEN TO ACCOUNTING AND
CAPT DAVIS WAS WRITTEN 2 MAY ACKNOWLEDGING AND ADVISING WE WILL ACT
IN ACCORD WITH DIRECTIVE STOP FAIRWEATHER SUMMER STUDENT AT NORTHLAND
BCC-9     • . ■•: -"■
R.R.   REID
ASST.  MGR.,   BCCSS
RRR'BB
^~nr-mtmlttm>m
V Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, 12 June 1978. File: T-78-10
From  M.W. Holland
j0  Mr. B.D. Margetts
Montreal, Que.
The attached is for your information.
Please be assured that Richard is making every effort to limit
our exposure of assigned space to these tour operators, and I
will forward you copies of his interim reports, which are prepared weekly.  It is appreciated there are a couple of weak spots
on the attached list, but they are being attended to at this time.
;"t)Forrn 102A-R
torn
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
MWH'BB Pier "8". Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
/Holland
CP^aii
■12 June 1978.
Reid File No.  AGR.3.BRAC.S.GEN.
•.•onager
Mr.  R.  Welch
System General Chairman
Brotherhood of Railway, Airline &
Steamship Clerks
401 Dominion Building
207 West Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 1H7
Dear Mr. Welch:
This refers to your letter of 16 May 1978, File: Lodge #526,
Princess Patricia, regarding position of News Stand Attendant
on board the "Princess Patricia."
Your comments are noted, and Union dues, etc., will be handled
in accord with past practice; i.e., payment will be made during
the current season.
This is an area where I would appreciate further discussion with
you and would be willing to meet at a time convenient to you for
this purpose.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
be.  Mr. R.R. Reid
Mr. A.   Meijer r
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
W Holland
. agm
R Reid
■ Manager
File: T-73-30-89
June 14th, I9?8
Mr. W.G. Sutherland
Manager, Rail Division
Seaspan International
10 Perriberton Avenue
North Vancouver, B.C.
77? 2R1
Dear' Mr, Sutherland:
I have a claim for damages to Kairs trailer Ho. 118 ex Vancouver 2400 hours to Nanaimo, April 25thc1973. Dan-age was
sustained to a number of sheets of gyproc it was carrying.
The inference in the claim is that damage occurred either
while loading or discharging when C.P.T. Unit No. 4510?
scraped the Mairs .unit.
Vtould you please confirm vhether this occurred during the
loading or discharging process.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg
s/ CPRail
VIA AIRMAIL O.C.S.
3
Date    VANCOUVER, June 12, 1978
From   M.I:J. Holland
To   Mr. A. McDermott
Manager
Fire & Insurance Protection
Canadian Pacific Ltd.
Windsor Station
Montreal,
p 0
File: 1-100
Attached you will find "Work Order" Hire Agreement presently
being utilised between BCCS/Northland and Island—Sea Marine
Ltd, when tug "Island Commander" is being used in our service.
This per your telex request of this date.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg
Attachment
;£|) Form 102-R
I BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B". Vancouver. BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2608
W Holland
i   i.jef
H Reid
Manager
June 8th, 1973
File: 73R3F.100
Mrs, A. Skirrov:
3805 China Creek Road
Port Alberni, B.C.
V9Y IRS
Dear Mrs. Skirrow:
I appreciate the time you took to reply to my letter of
June 5th,1978. It is only when customers, such as yourself, point out deficiencies in our service that ve are
able to effectively eliminate them.
The incorrect information that you received is regrettable, and I apologize for any inconvenience it may have
caused you.
I have enclosed a money order in the amount of $8,00,
and I trust this will satisfactorily conclude this matter.
Again, I apologize for the inconvenience but look forward
to your continued patronage.
Sincerely,
Manager, B.C.C.S*
AJM:gg
Enclosure CPRail
Internal Correspondence
L4
Date   VANCOUVEE, May 29th,  1978
From  M.W. Holland
To Mr. H.S. Harriman
Manager, Revenue Accounting
C.P. Rail
Windsor Station
Re. Attached PT59, Mr. R.A. Wigmore
File: 78Ref.075
Please note that ticket BCS 5x10 No, 467523 was refunded at
this office although it was purchased at the Famous Artists
Ticket Centre of the Hudson's Bay Company, 674 Granville
Street, Vancouver, B.C.
As Famous Artists is entitled to a commission on sale of
these tickets, I would appreciate your reclaiming the commission upon settlement with them.
Manager,
B.C.C.S.^.,
AJM:gg
>2) Form 102-R
■•-r>;-^™^ .    .- ..
;ETAIN this copy for follow-up
EXEMPLAIRE JAUNE A CONSERVER POUR SUIVRE L'AFFAIRE
Canadian Pacific
Canadien Pacifique
Message
From:                                                                                                                                               Department
De:                 M.W.   Holland                                                                                                   Service
Send To:
A:              Third Officer
Date                                      .                        _     .
June 14th.1973
"Princess of Vancouver"
Subject
0bjet: .     File T-73-3O-I62
Trailer Damage, MacDonald's (Safeway) F115 & F-I96
The above noted units were carried aboard the "Princess of Vancouver" ex
VancoTayer,0400. hoursjJune 8frh.l97&.  _  -..'       __.
I have a report of damage to these units indicating F~H5 struck the
reefer_unit on Frl.9.6.either during the loading or d^charging^peratign.
Damage consists of dents to the reefer unit on F-19& and broken clearance
lights _pn the. rear of F-115* . " •  )zi -
Would you please determine if this occurred while loading or otherwise.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJMtgg
Use lower portion for reply.
Utiiiser la section du bas pour r^ponara
Reply from
Reponse de
Date
(To Originate: Hand or typewrite message. Remove yellow copy
(follow-up copy) and forward balance of set.
To Reply:   Write reply, snap set - retain white
original and return pink copy.
Save envelop© typing: Fold form at arrows if* n p p ifl / fin g ./TJ./» Pour repondre: Ecrivezvotre r6ponse, detacher conservez
For use in #9 or #10 window envelope. ™ r^iCZiGiUJ.I I hG;ll I U I'original blancet retournez I'exemplaire rose.
POUT Ecrivez k la main ou a la machine. Detachez Texemplaire jaune. conservez-le pour suivre I'affaire. et envoyez les autres exemplaires.
envoyer:   Evitez de taper des enveloppes: Pliez aux fleches. et utilisez des enveloppes a fenetres no 9 et no 10.
Avoid verbal instructions use a
Evitez les instructions verbales, utilisez un
iSP/EIE/D/ME/mO BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver. BC    V6C2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
;•'/ Holland
. Reid
'.'imager
June 12, 1978
File:  137749
"REGISTERED"
Miss J.M. Dixon
#302 -- 350 Douglas Street
Victoria, B.C.
V8V 2P5
Dear Marj:
With reference to your application for voluntary retirement,
I am enclosing Forms P.F.2 and TDl for your signature and
will appreciate you returning these as soon as possible in
order to keep your pension as high as possible.
I stated a retirement date of July 1, 1978, for as you know,
you have been off the payroll some time and will not get
pension credit for that period.  As you are no doubt aware,
pension is based on your average earnings over the last five
years.
By coincidence, I received a letter from the Pensions & Benefits
Department in Montreal, which gives an estimate of the Canadian
earned portion of your pension.  A copy of this letter is
enclosed.
Please telephone me and discuss the advisability of taking the
"level option."
So far as the U.S. portion is concerned, Mrs. Iris Case of the
U.S. Railroad Retirement Board will be in Vancouver at the
U.S. Consulate (1199 West Hastings St.) between 9:00 a.m. and
12 noon on June 15, and you should make an effort to see her
about your U.S. pension, as she only comes to Vancouver once a
month.
Yours very truly,
H.L. HUDSON
Office Manager
B.C.C S.S.
P.S.  You have 12 days 1978 vacation due you and I will put this
on the payroll as soon as I get the signed forms back.
I am also enclosing wage cheques for period 05, 06 and 08.
HLH/jb W Holland
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier^B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
June  12,   1978
(tReld File:     127559
* Manager
Mr.  H.   Tyson
1400 Mount Douglas Cross Road
Victoria, B.C.
V8X 3H4
Dear Mr. Tyson:
Re:  Alexander S. MOFFAT, #017-127559,
deceased May 10, 1978	
Reference your letter of May 18, addressed to Mr. John Bonet,
Beneficiaries Records, Montreal, concerning the above.
It will be appreciated if you would have Mrs. Moffat complete
the enclosed Form P.R.3 and return to this office.  If Mrs. Moffat
is able to locate her husband's Long Service Pass, please return
same to this office also in order that a new pass may be issued
in her name.
Returned herewith is the Certificate of Death.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date      VANCOUVER, June 12, 1978 File:  494245
From      M.W. Holland
To      Mr. N.W. Patteson
Manager, Payroll Accounting
Montreal
Re:  I. WESLEY, #494245. Roll 955. S.I.N. 464-980-937
Bond has been paid up in full (period 12) with extra $62.52
non-recurring deduction.
Please forward bond to this office.
Form PDB2 has been submitteddate.
H
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
JB
g) Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
B
Date       VANCOUVER, 12 June 1978
Fro/7?   M.W. Holland
j0       W.M. Rousselet
2nd Officer
"PRINCESS PATRICIA"
File: 494222 (I)
•»;■'
Re:  Robert Victor WICKETT. 494222, injured on 1 June 1978
Please advise this office is advised if Mr. Wickett loses
time or attends a doctor account this injury.
)Form 102-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
GP
WWfHWWJBJWnwe1
ffynij^yjruigjjp  ■..■■. ■.■■'■■ ."1"imi, ,>m.iM.f>m*.v>m!':m^±>^^ '    tym. Date    VANCOUVER, 12 June 1978. File:  T-78-69
From    M.W. Holland
To    Ms. Noreen Cartwright
Montreal, Que.
This refers to your memorandum of 5 June 1978, File 103-34-1, re
1978 ad budget.
Mr. Margetts was asking about the status of the Alaska ad budget
just last week, and it would be appreciated if you could give
him an update at your earliest convenience.
I believe Mr. Pelley and Mr. Reid are analyzing the forecasted
expenses in this area for the Year 1978.
If we can be of any further assistance to yous kindly advise.
(_§K_!>Form 102-R
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BBMr<   RiR>   Re.d
cc.    Mr.  R.D. Pelley PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Manager
Asst. Mgr.
Marine Supt.
1
Supt. Engr.
Office Mgr
__
Account.
Sates Repr. ^Utf Cl-M/:
T
_T
Mgr. Traff/Sales
r < »
News Summary
News and views on topics of
current interest prepared by Public Relations
and Advertising Department
Vol. 34 No. 23   June 9, 1978
Aviation
14
Railway
5
Business & Finance
17
Shipping
15
Highway
16
Telecommunications
17
Pipeline
16
Tourism & Travel
17
CP RAIL GRAIN MOVEMENTS UP 8 PER CENT
Grain shipments by rail to the Lakehead and West Coast ports are
running well ahead of last year. CP Rail delivered 89,418 carloads
to Thunder Bay and 49,288 carloads to Vancouver between last Aug. 1
and May 31, an increase of 8 per cent over the previous crop year.
Page 5
U.S. RAIL-CAR SHORTAGE
Railroads in the U.S. are so short of boxcars to move grain that a
black market in grain cars is developing. The traffic manager of
Illinois Grain Corp. says: "Cars are going for about $250 under
the table; it's no longer a grain market; it's a car market."
Page 12
23,000 CANADIAN BOXCARS IN U.S.
One reason why there's a shortage of boxcars to move Canadian grain
to the export market is that there are some 23,000 Canadian-owned
boxcars in the U.S. The president of the CTC says that this is
some 13,000 more boxcars than is usual at this time of the year.
Page 7
TRENDS AND TOPICS
A Canadian ship-yard launches the M.V. Arctic, the world's first
bulk-freighter with ice-breaking capabilities. It is the prototype
for vessels capable of developing the Arctic's mineral wealth.
Page 15
The U.S. Petroleum Industry Research Foundation says the cost of
the Alaska natural gas pipeline would be $14-billion, $4-billion
above previous estimates, which could cause additional delays.
Page 16
Some packaged sandwiches sold on Amtrak trains could present a
possible danger of botulism poisoning if not handled properly,
according to officials of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
Page 12
Canadian Pacific NEWS IN BRIEF
AN ERA ENDS FOR WINDSOR STATION
MONTREAL - When VIA eventually takes over trans-continental passenger
services, it will start all Vancouver-bound trains from Central Station,
a move that will end the historic role that Windsor Station and its predecessor played in "the national dream."
Windsor Station has had trans-continental trains operating from it for
86 years. Trans-continental trains have been operated by CP from Montreal
for 92 years -- a long tradition of national rail transportation.
(Montreal Star, June 6)
* * *
INDIANS TO BLOCKADE CP RAIL LINE AGAIN
CRANBROOK - St. Mary's Indian Band Chief Clements said June 1 band members will again blockade a CP Rail branch line cutting through reserve
land in an attempt to spur action for compensation on lands lost when ■
the line was constructed.
(Vancouver Sun, June 2)
•k   -k   -k
LORMETERM LNG IS SEEKING TIME FOR GAS PROJECT
OTTAWA - Lorneterm LNG Ltd., a unit of Tenneco Inc. of Houston, has
asked the National Energy Board for a postponement of up to two years in
construction of a liquefied natural gas terminal at Lorneville, N.B.,
because of delays in obtaining the necessary U.S. approval. .
(Dow Jones - Toronto Globe and Mail)
* * *
LABOR CITES DANGER TO GRAIN MARKETS
OTTAWA - Canada will lose its foreign grain markets if the federal
government "doesn't smarten up" and make sure the grain is delivered
to waiting ships, Henry Kancs, head of the grain workers' union, said
June 2.
(Winnipeg Free Press, June 3}
HALL CONCILIATOR IN DISPUTE
* * *•
OTTAWA - Emmett Hall, a former Supreme Court of Canada Justice, has
been named by Labor Minister John Munro to act as conciliation commissioner in a contract dispute in the West Coast grain industry.
(Winnipeg Free Press, June 3)
* * * INFLATION EXPECTED TO DROP TO FOUR PER CENT A YEAR
OTTAWA - William MacKness of Pitfield Mackay Ross Ltd. expects the
month-to-month inflation rate will decline to an annual rate of about
four per cent by the fourth quarter of 1979.
However, he says "even with recent sales tax reductions, consumer prices
will continue to increase at a rate of about eight per cent to the
fall of this year." Therefore, a sustained deceleration is expected to
persist through 1979.
(Ottawa Journal, June 5)
* * *
GOVERNMENT-LABOR NEAR BIG 'BREAKTHROUGH'1
OTTAWA - The federal Government, business and labor are "on the thresh-
hold of a major breakthrough to consultation at the national level,"
Labor Minister John Munro said June 5.
Mr. Munro said he is encouraged because he sees labor-management cooperation "developing on a scale we have never witnessed in Canada."
(Ottawa Journal, June 5)
* * *
MANY CANADIANS WILL RETIRE BEFORE AGE 65, GALLUP POLL INDICATES
OTTAWA - Despite recent legislative trends by government to end compulsory retirement at age 65, many Canadians intend to retire before
that age, according to a poll conducted by The Canadian Institute of
Public Opinion.
(Ottawa Citizen, June 3)
* * *
SEAWAY.PACT ACCEPTED
OTTAWA - St. Lawrence Seaway workers have narrowly voted to accept
an across-the-board wage increase of 41 cents an hour in a one-year
contract, a spokesman for the Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and General Workers said June 1.
(Montreal Gazette, June 2)
* * *
BUSINESSMEN TOLD ITS UP TO THEM TO CREATE JOBS
TORONTO - Finance Minister Jean Chretien told the meeting of the Canadian Manufacturers Association that the federal Government has decided
that the task of creating jobs is best done by the private sector.
He said industry, not government, could put people to work on a permanent basis.
(Toronto Star, June 6)
* * k 4
WHELAN UNVEILS GRAIN SCHEME
OTTAWA - Two programs totalling $15-mi11 ion to assist in construction of
feed grain storage facilities at inland elevators were announced here
June 6 by Agriculture Minister Eugene Whelan.
(Winnipeg Free Press, June 7)
* * *
RAIL CARS STILL UP IN AIR
VANCOUVER - Transport Minister Lang has announced that a consultant will
be appointed before July to study if rail car utilization can be made
more effective. The study will allow Ottawa to postpone any decision on
ordering expensive new rolling stock, probably until well after the
country has gone to the polls. Surely the two-year Hall Commission's
recommendations on line abandonment had to consider some assessment of
railway car utilization.
(Vancouver Province, June 7)
HERBICIDES ATTACKED
* * *
VANCOUVER - Residents in the Bowser and Horn Lake areas, about 60 kilometres north of Nanaimo, are alarmed at B.C. Hydro and CP Rail plans to
use the chemical herbicide, Tordon 10K, near their homes.
(Vancouver Sun, June 6)
* * *
RAIL BRIDGES NEED ALARMS, JURY CLAIMS
TORONTO - Railway bridges in Ontario Parks and Conservation Areas should
be equipped with alarms that sound automatically when a train approaches,
a Corners' Jury has urged. The inquest was into the death of a Metro
area boy killed last September on a CN bridge by a GO Train.
(Toronto Daily Star, June 7)
* * *
ZINC METAL PRICES UP
TORONTO - Several Canadian companies June 6 increased zinc metal prices.
Texasgulf Inc., Cominco Ltd., Noranda Sales Corp. and Hudson Bay Mining
& Smelting Co. all increased their United States prices by two cents a
pound. Texasgulf also increased its Canadian prices by 3.5 cents.
(Montreal Gazette, June 7)
* * *
WANTS OIL PORT
OTTAWA - The New Brunswick government has proposed that an oil port be
built at Saint John with connections to an underground strategic oil
storage site 40 miles away and a pipeline to Montreal via Portland, Me.
The terminal and pipeline could also be used to supply crude oil to
future refineries in New England with reduced environmental risks and
lower costs, the provincial government told the National Energy Board.
(Montreal Star, June 8) RAILWAY
RAIL GRAIN MOVEMENTS NEAR RECORD YEARS
WINNIPEG - Grain shipments by rail from Western Canada to the Lakehead
and West Coast ports are running well ahead of last year.
As of May 31, with two months left in the 1977-78 crop year, more than
66 million bushels of grain had been moved by Canada's railways to export positions. This ranks as the third highest level of rail shipments
for the 10-month period in recent years.
CP Rail delivered a total of 89,418 carloads of grain to Thunder Bay and
49,288 carloads to Vancouver between last Aug. 1 and May 31, an increase
of eight per cent over the previous crop year.
J. W. Malcolm, vice-president for CP Rail's Prairie Region, said this
year's performance had been achieved despite extremely difficult circumstances that hampered movements during the winter. "There were some
line blockages that put the mainline to Vancouver out of operation for
varying periods of time and heavy snows and storms on the Prairies tied
up some branch!ine operations for as long as four weeks," he said.
"Such conditions prevented us from exceeding former records, but so did
the fact that the demand for rail movement did not come in the fall,
when we could have moved more, but in the winter when weather makes
sustained movements of heavy volumes impossible. In all the circumstances, it is gratifying to have come as close as we have to those all-
time records."
Grain shipments are expected to continue at a high level during the last
two months of the crop year, which are traditionally a peak period for
grain movements.
Additional cars are being supplied for grain service, but the numbers
available depend on demand for moving other commodities. Up to 500
additional boxcars, released from other commodity services, are being
assigned by CP Rail to the grain movement. As demand for potash shipments eases, about 300 covered hopper cars are also being transferred to
grain service, but this is happening a little later than in previous
years.
One of the factors that has influenced the railways' efficiency in moving grain has been the introduction of covered hopper cars into the
grain fleet. The steel hopper car carries an average of 86 tonnes of
grain, compared with an average of 56.5 tonnes for boxcars.
As the proportion of hopper cars in the total fleet has increased over
the years, so has the average volume of grain per car. CP Rail cars
carried an average of 2,200 bushels in 1971-72, but the average this
year has exceeded 2,640 bushels. •     J
Thus it can be seen that the railways' capacity to move grain cannot
be measured by the number of cars in the grain fleet. Two covered
hopper cars hold as much grain as three boxcars, but can move more in
a given period of time because they can be loaded and unloaded more
quickly.
It was this that helped CP Rail move almost as many bushels in the
first 10 months of the crop year (95 per cent) as in 1971-72 with
only 83 per cent as many carloads. The 1971-72 crop year holds the
record for both numbers of cars and bushels of grain moved by the
railways.
(CP Rail News Release, June 2)
* * *
LANG DEFENDS SYSTEM FOR TRANSPORTING GRAIN
CALGARY - Rail transport of a billion bushels of export grain is in the
immediate future, Otto Lang, Transport Minister, said May 31 in Calgary.
At the National Transportation Week dinner, Lang took a positive approach to Canada's grain-handling system, putting down its critics by
saying the system is having one of its best years in history. He looked
to private industry to support the government in its decision to transform Canadian National Railways and Air Canada into profit-motivated
business operations.
He said it was unfair to transport rivals for the national railway and
airline to keep relying on an endless supply of tax dollars to bankroll
their operations.
(Calgary Herald, June 1)
* * *
700 CARS ON ORDER
HALIFAX - The Hawker Siddeley Canada Ltd. car works at Trenton, N.S.,
has received orders for 700 covered hopper cars valued at about $26-
million, vice-president Len Corey of the company, announced June 1.
Five hundred cars are being purchased for the Saskatchewan Potash Corp.
through CGTX, a Canadian leasing company partly-owned by Hawker Siddeley, and the remaining 200 are in addition to an order announced earlier for 200 cars being"purchased through North American Leasing of
Canada.
(Montreal Gazette, June 2)
* * *
CN ADDS HOPPER CARS
WINNIPEG - CN on June 2 assigned an additional 180 hopper cars to assist
grain movement from Manitoba and Saskatchewan to Thunder Bay. A spokesman for the railway said a total of 320 cars had gone into grain service
since May 30.
(Montreal Gazette, June 2)
* * * HUGE GRAIN CROP STRANDED BY TRANSPORTATION SHORTAGE
OTTAWA - One reason why there's shortage of boxcars to move a huge crop
of grain to the export market is that there are some 23,000 Canadian-
owned boxcars in the United States.
Edgar Benson, president of the Canadian Transport Commission, told the
Commons Transport Committee June 1 this is some 13,000 more than usual.
The larger number of Canadian cars in the U.S. was caused this year by
a large flow of Canadian goods sold there.
He said the only way to get the cars back quickly -- if pleas to the
U.S. lines didn't do the trick -- was to have the external affairs department deal with its counterpart in Washington.
Don Mazankowski (PC-Vegreville) also told the Commons June 1 that the
transportation snafu could affect Canada's future ability to compete for
grain sales abroad. He said delays and tie-ups caused by the outmoded
Prairie rail system has resulted "in the loss of our reputation as a
reliable grain supplier."
Mr. Mazankowski noted that 19 ships are waiting idle at Vancouver "because of insufficient supplies of grain due to the shortage of railway
hopper and box cars." Only seven of 26 ships in the west coast port are
loading grain, he said.
(CP - Montreal Star, June 2)
* * *
NDP FEARS GRAIN SALES IN JEOPARDY
OTTAWA - Canadian grain farmers are in danger of losing sales this fall
to China and Russia because its grain transportation system is taxed
to the limits of its capacity, Saskatchewan New Democrat Les Benjamin
warned the commons June 5.
Reports from the United States Department of Agriculture received in
Ottawa revealed that the Americans expect that by November both the
Soviet Union and China will be looking for more grain supplies, Mr.
Benjamin said.
(Ottawa Journal , June 6)
* * *
'CRISIS' MEETING IS SET TO DISCUSS GRAIN TIE-UPS
WINNIPEG - The squeaky wheel in Canada's grain industry is about to be
greased — politically and figuratively.
The senior transportation committee of the Canadian Wheat Board will
meet here June 8 to discuss the "grain transportation crisis in Canada",
according to telegrams sent to industry officials.
(Winnipeg Tribune, June 6)
* * * LANG ANNOUNCED GRAIN TRANSPORT STUDY
OTTAWA - Transport Minister Otto Lang announced June 5 an immediate
special investigation into Prairie grain handling and transportation
facilities.
An independent analyst with proven experience and expertise in the rail
industry is to head the investigation, which is to ensure maximum
advantage is taken of Canadian grain selling opportunities and that
demurrage costs are minimized.
(Winnipeg Free Press, June 6)
TRUCK TRANSPORT PREFERRED OVER RAIL
OTTAWA - Western and Eastern Canadian producers are blasting their way
into the rich central Canadian market because of their preference for
truck transport over rail freight service, says John Magee, chairman
for the CTC Motor Vehicle Committee.
Mr. Magee said the ability of trucking firms to make fast, positive,
on-time deliveries has been a key to their success.
* * *
(Vancouver Sun, June 1)
FREIGHT RATES
VANCOUVER - North American railways would die without freight rate
discrimination, says Rod Latimer, CN Rail Senior Executive Officer.
At a National Transportation Week dinner in Vancouver May 30, he
said "railway pricing is essentially a value-of-service system which
must take into account factors other than cost when they differentiate
between value of services to various parties."
(Vancouver Sun, June 1)
* * *
FRAINE HONORED
VANCOUVER - Jack Fraine, chairman of the board of the BCR, has been
named B.C. Transportation Man of the Year.
Mr. Fraine began his 46-year career with CP Rail in 1927, retiring in 1974
as senior vice-president responsible for operations, maintenance and
marketing for the Pacific Region. He was elected chairman of the BCR
in 1976.
(Vancouver Sun, June 1)
* * * CPCS SIGNS CONTRACT WITH COSTA RICAN RR
MONTREAL - A Canadian group of companies led by Canadian Pacific Consulting Services Ltd. has signed contracts with the Costa Rican Railway
for the rehabilitation of the railway in the Atlantic zone, principally
to facilitate the export of bananas.
Under the contracts, Canadian Pacific Consulting Services (CPCS) will be
the coordinator and project manager for the renovation of 110 kilometres
of track running south-east from Costa Rica's major banana producing
areas to the port of Limon on the Caribbean coast. Work will begin in
1978 and will be completed in two years' time.
Western Bridge Division of Canron Ltd. is the prime contractor for the
construction of a new 430-metre bridge where the railway crosses the
Chirripo River. Other Canadian companies participating with CPCS and
Western Bridge include Sydney Steel Corp., Pandrol Canada Ltd., Abex
Corp., and Canron Ltd. Rail group.
Value of the contracts, awarded after bidding in international competition, is more than $20-million and is financed by the Canadian Export
Development Corporation and a consortium of Canadian banks led by The
Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce.
Initial contact between the Costa Rican Railway and the Canadian consortium was arranged by the Canadian government's Department of Industry, Trade and Commerce.
The railway is an essential transport link in moving bananas, which is
one of Costa Rica's major exports. The renovated track and new bridge
will contribute to increased efficiency, reliability and capacity of the
railway and will allow producers to expand the banana- growing areas.
The contracts represent the largest export project undertaken to date by
a consortium of companies in the Canadian railway and railway-supply
industries and is indicative of Canada's technological ability in planning high-volume bulk-commodity railway systems.
CPCS, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Canadian Pacific Limited, has provided international consulting services in the fields of transportation
and economics to government agencies and commercial enterprises in more
than 40 countries on five continents.
(Canadian Pacific News Release, June 2)
* * *
RAIL LINK KILLED
VICTORIA - Dave Barrett said May 31 that Premier Bennett's statement
that Americans must provide the bulk of financial support for a rail
link between B.C. and Alaska has effectively killed BCR's Dease Lake
extension.
(Vancouver Province, June 1)
* * * 10
GRAIN CAR SHORTAGE PUT AT 44,578 A DAY; AAR, ICC SEE LITTLE RELIEF IN
SIGHT
WASHINGTON, D.C. - The nation's railroads are experiencing an average
daily grain car shortage of 44,578 cars.
The shortage has been termed the worst in history by an Agriculture
Department official, and John R. Michael, of the Interstate Commerce
Commission's Railroad Service Board, told Traffic World that the shortage will "probably last the balance of the year."
Mr. Michael said that in the week of May 6 the railroads were short --
on an average daily basis -- 12,587 grain boxcars and 31,991 grain-
covered hoppers. The overall shortage, on a daily basis, for all kinds
of cars in that same time-period was 60,426 cars.
A spokesman for the American Farm Bureau laid the "blame" for the car
shortages on a combination of factors. Chuck Fields, assistant director
of national affairs for the Farm Bureau, and a transportation specialist, said an analysis of the shortage must start with "a bad railroad
situation" as to equipment and track. This, he added, has been compounded by two severe winters in a row, a two-to-three-week delay in
opening the Mississippi River system to barge traffic and a late opening
of Great Lakes ports.
He said that there is more grain in storage now than probably any time
in recent history and that grain is now moving due to increasing prices.
The prices are edging upward due to increased foreign purchases by the
Russians and Chinese and a massive drought in Brazil.
Mr. Fields also said the increased use of hoppers in the growing western
coal market and the slowness of the eastern lines in returning cars is
further complicating the picture. He added that barge and truck grain
rates are climbing, as they normally do in peak seasons, and added that
if the railroads were deregulated on agricultural rates, as is their
competition, there would probably be more cars available.
(Traffic World, May 29)
* * *
RAIL SERVICE IN U.S. WORSE UNDER CONRAIL
WASHINGTON - Rail freight service in the eastern U.S. continued to deteriorate under Conrail and the federally planned northeastern railroad probably will need significantly more money, the U.S. Railway Association
said last weekend.
The report said Conrail was unable to "provide consistent reliable service"
and failed "to keep sufficient locomotives in service to move the tonnage
offered." As a result, shippers became dissatisfied and took their business
to other carriers, the report said.
The USRA study said significantly more federal funding might be needed,
perhaps $3.8-billion.
(Montreal Gazette, June 6)
* * * 11
DISCORD ON THE UNITY EXPRESS
OTTAWA - The team of Ottawa entrepreneurs who got Canada's Discovery
Train rolling pulled out of the operation in disgust June 5.
"The latest of Ottawa travelling road shows may carry the message of
national unity but it will do little to get Canadians involved in what
was originally conceived as a national happening," says John VanToch of
the National Discovery Foundation.
One by one each of the original ideas was smothered, he said, "until the
train we'd expected to get on the road for $3.3-million had escalated to
a $20-million extravaganza."
(Ottawa Citizen, June 6)
* * *
RAIL USE INCREASING
CALGARY - There is a substantial increase in rail transportation in
Western Canada, a direct contrast to the decline in the rest of the
country, Charles F. Armstrong, vice-president of CN, said May 31.
Mr. Armstrong told a mid-year outlook conference in Calgary that CN, on
its main mountain routes, is handling 20 million tons of freight a year,
an increase of 100 per cent over the traffic level 10 years ago.
"This kind of increase is being brought about to a large extent by increased movement of resource products to export position," Mr. Armstrong
said. There is also the continuing movement of export grain, forest
products and the new petro-chemical traffic generated by Alberta's oil
resources, he said. This trend will continue, Mr. Armstrong predicted.
(Calgary Albertan, June 1)
* * *
RAILWAY SHOWS RISE IN REVENUES
VANCOUVER - Carloadings and revenues for British Columbia Railway reached record levels in 1977, while the operating loss also showed an improvement over the previous year, the Crown corporation said May 31 in
its annual report.
Loadings totalled 152,597, 28-per-cent higher than 1976 loadings of
119,480. Net tonnage hauled totalled 8,283,169, up from 6,800,934 in
1976.
The corporation said the record performance was the result of improved
market conditions for forest products, improved track conditions and the
absence of work stoppages on the railway.
The railway's net loss for 1977, after interest and other charges, was
$58.3-million, compared with $53.4-million in 1976.
(CP - Lethbridge Herald, May 31)
* * * 12
AMTRAK SANDWICHES POSE POSSIBLE BOTULISM DANGER
WASHINGTON - Some packaged sandwiches sold on Amtrak trains could present a possible danger of botulism poisoning if not handled properly,
according to officials of the Food and Drug Administration.
The sandwiches, which are treated with nitrogen to remove most of the
oxygen from the package in order to preserve the contents longer, can
become a fertile growth area for botulism toxin if they are not refrigerated and otherwise handled properly, according to internal FDA documents obtained by The Washington Post.
Last month, Amtrak began using the sandwiches nationwide. Amtrak officials said they expect to purchase about four million of the sandwiches a year eventually.
(Washington Post, June 2)
* * *
THE RAIL-CAR SHORTAGE IS GOING NATIONWIDE
NEW YORK - A severe rail-car shortage is causing costly delays for grain
shippers amid reports that a black market in grain cars is developing.
But the shortage has spread beyond the grain belt, and with the U.S.
fleet of railroad cars still shrinking, there is no end in sight.
The biggest problem is in the grain-producing regions, where railroads
are being pressed to handle two harvests at once: the new winter wheat
crop and last year's grain crop, which farmers held to get higher prices.
Now, with exports booming, prices are up, and the grain is moving.
Rogers P. Freedlund, traffic manager of Illinois Grain Corp., says the
situation is serious. "We are seeing very little improvement," he says.
"The Illinois Central Gulf RR has a three-car allotment per month for
each grain elevator on their line, which is much too low to meet demand.'
Mr. Freedlund acknowledges the black market. "Cars are going for about
$250 under the table," he charges. "It's no longer a grain market; now,
it's a car market. Operators can make a 30<J>per-bu. additional profit
these days if they can just get their grain shipped."
Midwestern railroads agree that the situation is tight. "We are short
of everything -- freight cars, locomotives, and people," John H. Lloyd,
vice-chairman and chief executive officer of the Missouri Pacific RR,
told shareholders at the annual meeting last week.
Says Richard C. Grayson, president of St. Louis-San Francisco Ry.:
"There isn't a railroad in the country today with enough freight cars to
meet the grain demand. Even lumber and coal shipments are having
trouble."
(Business Week, June 12)
* * * 13
CANADIAN CARLOADINGS
For Week Ending
May 21, 1978
Change from Simi
Period, 1977
lar
Percentage
Change
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
68,850
4,202,362
7,235
(   11,951)
( 1,124,685)
(      25)
(14.8)
(21.1)
( 0.3)
Total for Year to
May 21, 1978
Change From Simi
Period, 1977
lar
Percentage
Change
Carloads
Volume (Tons
Piggyback
)
1,376,637
85,460,066
148,017
(   71,924)
( 6,428,112)
1,627
( 5.0)
( 7.0)
1.1
PIGGYBACK LOADINGS
For Month Ending
April, 1978
Change from Simi
Period, 1977
lar
Percentage
Change
Containers -
Trailers
Carloads   12,063
Carloads   21,121
510
575
4.4
2.8
Containers -
Trailers
Tons
Tons
481,973
505,985
33,167
12,019
9.6
2.4
Total for Year to
April, 1978
Change from Simi
Period, 1977
lar
Percentage
Change
Containers -
Trailers
Carloads   46,023
Carloads   80,177
920
1,536
2.0
2.0
Containers -
Trailers
Tons
Tons
1,882,595
1,972,459
107,836
82,893
6.1
4.4
U.S. CARLOADINGS
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
Piggyback
( ) decrease
For Week Ending
May 27, 1978
496,351
18.4 billion
Total for Year to
May 27, 1978
8,880,991
333.8 billion
Total for Year to
May 20, 1978
697,055
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
3,291
1.2 billion
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
(  512,972)
4.9 billion
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
70,771
Percentage
Change
0.7
6.6
Percentage
Change
( 5.5)
1.5
Percentage
Change
11.3
* * * 14
AVIATION
ECONOMY SQUEEZES OUT FIRST-CLASS SEATS
WINNIPEG - Increased demand for economy seats oh Canadian airlines has
forced Air Canada and CP Air to reduce the number of first-class seats
on domestic flights.
Airline spokesmen said June 5 that although demand for first-class still
exists, more economy seats provide greater revenue for the airlines.
(Winnipeg Free Press, June 6)
* * *
PACIFIC WESTERN AIRLINES MAKES FORMAL OFFER FOR TRANSAIR MINORITY SHARES
CALGARY - Pacific Western Airlines, an Alberta government-owned regional
airline, has formally made its previously-announced $1.75 a share offer
for the minority shares of Transair Ltd., a Winnipeg-based regional carrier. The offer will expire Sept. 29 unless extended by Pacific Western.
Previously, Pacific Western purchased 72.9 per cent of the outstanding
shares of Transair from a group of controlling shareholders at a price
of $1.75 a share.
(Canadian Dow Jones, June 2)
* * *
U.S.-BOUND? DOUBLE YOUR MONEY BACK IF BUMPED
OTTAWA - Canadian air travellers 'bumped' from reserved seats on U.S.
-bound flights could receive as much as $400 compensation under new
U.S. rules which take effect this fall.
The rules, issued this week by the Civil Aeronautics Board, could mean
a free round-trip for bumped passengers who are more than two hours
late reaching their destination.
(Ottawa Journal, June 3)
* * *
SOME PILOTS 'BREAK THE NO-FRENCH RULE*
OTTAWA - Commercial airline pilots occasionally are using French in
Quebec in conversation with controllers, thus breaking a controversial
federal government regulation, Walter McLeish, director-general of
civil aeronautics for the ministry of transport in Ottawa, said June 1.
"We are aware that there have been uses of French in the terminal area
at Quebec City by pilots flying under Instrument Flight Rules (IFR),
but our view is that as long as this situation is still before the
courts, we will not take action against anyone," Mr. McLeish said.
(Montreal Gazette, June 2)
* * * . 1
15
SENIORITY SNAG AFFECTS TRANSAIR, PWA
WINNIPEG - The 3,100 employees of Transair Ltd., and Pacific Western
Airlines Ltd. of Calgary may end up having the largest say as to when
the two regional air carriers can be merged.
Officials of the Alberta government-owned PWA said June 1 no application for merger would go to the Canadian Transport Commission until
various employee organizations had settled key issues such as seniority integration.
(Winnipeg Tribune, June 2)
WHOLESALE AIR TRAVEL OPERATION HAS CLOSED
WINNIPEG - The introduction of low-cost domestic night flights by Air
Canada and CP Air has been a major factor in the closure of Sunglow
Holidays of Winnipeg, a wholesale travel operation.
(Winnipeg Tribune, June 6)
* * *
SHIPPING
ICEBREAKER TO LOAD GRAIN, METAL
ST. CATHARINES,.Ont. - The M.V. Arctic, the world's first bulk-freighter
with ice-breaking capabilities, will be on its way to Toledo, Ohio, this
week to take on a cargo of grain for Europe.
The $38-million ship will also collect a load of lead-zinc from Nanisivik
Mines on Baffin Island, about 100 kilometres east of Resolute, N.W.T.
This cargo will be unloaded at Antwerp, Belgium and Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Officials of Transport Canada have said the ship is a prototype for ships
which Ottawa and the shipping industry expect will open up the mineral
trade in the far North.
(Montreal Gazette, June 6)
* * *
SELL PORT, SAYS MP
OTTAWA - A Conservative has suggested that the government consider selling the port of Churchill, Man., to the western provinces for $1.
Cecil Smith, Conservative MP for the area, said June 5 the government
could do that if it is not interested in upgrading the grain-handling
facilities of the port. Mr. Smith has waged a long campaign in the
Commons to get greater use of his home city for grain shipments.
(Montreal Star, June 6)
* * * 16
HIGHWAY
OPPONENTS SAY UPS KILLS OFF ITS COMPETITION THEN RAISES PRICES
TORONTO - When the Ontario Highway Transport Board hands down its decision next month it could give a U.S. parcel service giant that has
wiped out its competition in the U.S. and West Germany the chance to
do the same thing here.
What it means for United parcel service is the right to give next-
day service between cities in Canada.
What it means for the Post Office, CN and CP Express, bus companies
and large and small delivery firms, is cut-throat competition from a
competitor that could drive them out of business and eventually corner a large part of the Ontario market, as it has done in the U.S.
and abroad.
(Toronto Star, June 5)
ONTARIO AGAINST RELAXING SUNDAY TRUCKING LIMITS
OTTAWA - Ontario is fighting an attempt to open highways to Sunday trucking.
D. W. Burtnick, senior counsel with the ministry of transport and communications, told a committee of the Canadian Transport Commission reviewing the Lord's Day Act that companies with their own trucks should
be kept off the roads on Sunday.
Only trucking firms which hire their services to the general
public should be eligible for CTC exemptions to operate on Sunday,
said Mr. Burtnick.
(Ottawa Journal, June 6)
PIPELINE
* * *
ALASKA LINE IS STUM3LING
MONTREAL - The Petroleum Industry Research Foundation in New York last
month put the figure right on the line. The industry-financed- research
group estimated the cost of the mammoth 4,800-mile Alaska natural gas
pipeline would be $14-billion (U.S.)
Only last September, when the U.S. and Canada finally agreed on the
broad terms of the project, the total cost was put at $10-billion.
Mow there is rising concern in the oil industry, and among some transmission companies and distributors on the American side, that diffi- ♦ %
17
culties will so extend the delays that they question the project as
it now stands.
One well-known Canadian oilman now puts the chances of a go-ahead in
the next year or so at 40 to 60 against, partly on the argument the
latest cost-estimates and problems in gas-pricing regulations in the
U.S. bring into play a whole new range of forces of supply and economics.
(Montreal Star, June 3)
* * *
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
REGULATING THE REGULATORS
VANCOUVER - In a long-overdue reform, telecommunications companies seeking rate increases will have to pay the costs of public interest groups
opposing them.
The new rules announced by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) apply to B.C. Tel, Bell Canada, CNCP Telecommunications and Telesat Canada.
* * *
(Vancouver Province, May 29)
TOURISM & TRAVEL
90TH BIRTHDAY FOR BANFF SPRINGS
BANFF - The Banff Springs Hotel celebrated its 90th anniversary during
the weekend of June 2nd to 4th.
In the spring of 1888, Banff welcomed, to the famous Siding 29 (Banff
Train Station), hundreds of tourists eager to be the first to set foot
into the newly-completed Banff Springs Hotel. Nestled above one of the
most picturesque valleys of the Canadian Rockies, the Canadian Pacific
hotel began a tourist trade which still, flourishes throughout the small
town of Banff.
* * *
(Banff Crag & Canyon, May 25)
BUSINESS & FINANCE
ARDLEY COAL FIELDS BIGGER, RICHER NEW SURVEY DISCLOSES
CALGARY - The Ardley coal field, long regarded as rich in Prairie coal
reserves, may be emerging as a prime site for a coal-fired generating
station for electrical power.
Fording Coal Ltd., of Calgary which controls about 95 per cent of the
coal properties in the field about 17 miles east of Red Deer, has
stepped up exploration work in the past two years.
(Red Deer Advocate, May 30)
* * * i  »
18
MINIMUM WAGE IS HIGH ENOUGH, PRICE TELLS MLAs
WINNIPEG - Labor Minister Norma Price says the government does not intend to raise the minimum wage until "the economy gets back on a sound
track again."
She told the Legislature's committee on supply, the minimum wage rate,
which has remained at $2.95 an hour for 21 months, is "high enough at
the moment."
(Winnipeg Free Press, June 7)
* * *
U.S. ZINC TARIFF THREAT LIFTED
WASHINGTON - There was good news for Canadian zinc producers from the
U.S. International Trade Commission last week.
The threat of new, punitive tariffs for Canadian and other zinc imports
was lifted in a key decision by the ITC. The commission told the U.S.
zinc industry that whatever the reason for its current troubles, imports
were not the culprit. The U.S. industry has been seeking higher tariffs
on imports above a certain level on the grounds that imports are causing,
or threatening to cause, serious injury at home.
(Financial Post, June 10)
* * *
ALGOMA STEEL PRICE UP
SAULT STE. MARIE, Ont. - Algoma Steel Corp. announced June 5 a price
increase of $18 a ton for structural steel shapes other than wide-
flange beams. The new price is $13.40 a hundred pounds, up from $12.50.
(Montreal Gazette, June 6)
* * *
CENTRE MAY COST MORE FOR LESS
VANCOUVER - Vancouver's proposed trade convention centre will be more
expensive and less grandiose, according to project Director Gordon Shrum.
He said the $25-million project cost announced May 29 would cover only
certain developments on Pier B-C.
(Vancouver Province, June 5)
* * *
IS B.C. GIVING BIRTH TO A WHITE ELEPHANT?
VANCOUVER - As Vancouver and the B.C. Government plunge into plans for
a convention centre, many convention facilities in North America are
being labelled white elephants, as vicious competition for convention
business and development of such facilities spring up throughout Canada
and U.S.
(Vancouver Province, June 5)   News Summary
News and views on topics of
current interest prepared by Public Relations
and Advertising Department
Vol. 34 No. 24
June 16, 1978
Aviation
25
Pipeline
Business & Finance
29
Railway
Highway
26
Shipping
22
5
23
RAIL IMPROVEMENTS COST $550-MILLI0N
Canada's railways and the federal Government are spending more than
$550-million this year alone to upgrade and expand railways' facilities and equipment to improve efficiency and effectiveness in the
transportation of raw materials and finished products.
Page
CP RAIL TO SPEND $163-MILLI0N
CP Rail announces it expects to spend $163-mi11 ion for the construction of new track, equipment and shop facilities across Canada in
1978, $32-million more than last year. The major portion -- $44-
million -- will be for installations in B.C. and Alberta.
Page
FASTER GRAIN TRANSPORT SOUGHT
Seven-day loading and unloading will be looked at for the West
Coast as part of a major search of the transport system for ways
to speed up export grain shipment. The proposal would require cooperation of all sections of the grain transportation system.
Page 15
TRENDS AND TOPICS
Transport Minister Otto Lang says the federal Government will be
buying more hopper cars for grain movement and also may participate
financially in repairing boxcars for use in grain transportation.
Page 20
A research paper reports that much of Ontario's pulp and paper industry is obsolete in regard to technology and pollution-control and
requires governmental financial aid for modernization capital.
Page 29
Unless the International Air Transport Association can agree to a
radical change in format in a special meeting June 30, experts fear
it may fall apart, resulting in cut-throat airline competition.
Page 26
Canadian Pacific RAILWAY SEEKS TITLE FOR BLOCKADED LAND
LETHBRIDGE - CP Rail has asked the federal Government to give the corporation title to land through St. Mary's Reserve where Kootenay Indians
have set up a blockade. CP Rail wrote to Indian Affairs Minister Hugh
Faulkner requesting an order-in-council for title to the right-of-way,
says Bob Ferguson of Canadian Pacific's British Columbia public relations office. Courts would then arbitrate a settlement to compensate the
Kootenay for land ruined when Canadian Pacific built a railway spur
through the reserve about 10 kilometres north of Cranbrook in 1969.
(Lethbridge Herald, June 7)
* * *
GRAIN FIRMS PLAN TO ENTER CONSORTIUM ON PORT STUDY
EDMONTON - Spokesmen for four Western grain companies have indicated
their organisations will agree to enter a consortium proposed by Alberta
Wheat Pool to prepare a feasibility study on building and operating a
grain terminal at Prince Rupert, B.C.
(The Western Producer, June 8)
* * *
PANCANADIAN ANNOUNCES PLANS FOR $25-MILLI0N HEAD OFFICE
CALGARY - PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd. will take up most of the space in a
gleaming new office tower across from the Palliser Hotel. The 28-
storey, eight-sided structure will be named PanCanadian Plaza, and when
finished in 1980 will serve as headquarters for PanCanadian's domestic
and world-wide operations.
(Calgary Herald, June 12)
* * *
HYDROCARBON ENERGY WON'T LAST
CALGARY - R. W. Campbell, chairman of the board of PanCanadian Petroleum,
said that exploration within the Alberta oil and gas industry is on a
high that should continue at least through the 1980s. He said the days
of unrestricted energy comsumption are over, but "we still have enough
to keep things comfortable." He said PanCanadian's main trust will
continue to focus on Alberta, with increased activity predicted for both
B.C. and Saskatchewan. More than half the company's oil production is
sold in the heavy oil market (primarily asphalt and some fuel oil) and
it is anticipated that the market demand for this type of oil will
continue.
(Calgary Herald, June 12)
* * *
PANELISTS DISAGREE ON RAIL CONSOLIDATION
WINNIPEG - A panel of experts discussed on June 12 the possibility of
one national railway through nationalization of CP Rail or denationalization of Canadian National Railways as a possible transportation
system efficiency move, but the CP Rail panelist didn't find either proposition economically nor philosophically attractive. R. J. Shepp,
of CP Rail, Winnipeg, told an afternoon session at the annual meeting of
the Canadian Transportation Research Forum that he is aware of no support for the one-railway concept in studies done to date by private
researchers or government.
(Winnipeg Free Press, June 13)
* * *
MURTA FEARS GRAIN LOADING TIE-UP AT PORTS MAY COST $30-MILLI0N
WINNIPEG - The cost of keeping ships waiting to load grain at Canadian
ports will reach record high proportions, perhaps as much as $30-million
this year, Jack Murta, MP-Lisgar, said in Winnipeg on June 12.
(Winnipeg Free Press, June 13)
* * *
COAL MINE COMPANIES FACE DOUBLE CHARGES
VICTORIA - Coal companies face double rental and lease charges, stiffer
work requirements and a fixed percentage royalty (3.5 per cent of the
net minehead value of coal sold) under amendments to the Coal Act introduced June 9 in the B.C. Legislature.
(Vancouver Province, June 10)
* * *
TOP GRAIN-HAULING CRUNCH EVER TO GET WORSE BEFORE IT IMPROVES, EXPERTS
SAY
CHICAGO - What's already the worst grain-hauling crunch in U.S. history
will get worse before its gets better, experts say. Railroads currently
are running about 25,000 rail cars a day short of customers' needs and
some buyers have been waiting since April for wheat, corn, soybeans and
other commodities. There is a particularly acute shortage of jumbo covered hopper cars, which have replaced boxcars as the main rail vehicle
for transporting grain.
(Wall Street Journal, June 15)
* * *
TRANSPORT AGENCY CLAIMS FIRST SUCCESS IN RAIL TRACK CONSOLIDATION IN
MIDWEST
WASHINGTON - The Transportation Department is claiming its first success
in arranging Midwest railroad track-consolidation projects, which officials hope will begin to ease the financial distress of struggling lines
in the region. The department's railroad experts iiave arranged four
tentative agreements between two beleaguered lines — the Chicago,
Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific, which is in reorganization under federal
bankruptcy law, and the Chicago & North Western. If made final, the
accords could be the forerunners ~ federal planners hope -- of many
joint ventures that would pare excess track capacity in the Midwest and
reduce losses of the weaker roads in the region.
(Wall Street Journal, June 15)
* * * 4
BRITISH AIRWAYS BIDS FOR A 3-CLASS SERVICE ON NEW YORK RUNS
LONDON - British Airways said it is contemplating a three-class service
between London and New York next year. The system, subject to government approval, would change the cabin configuration of wide-bodied
planes to a first-class compartment, a club class behind it and a discount
fare section in the remainder of the plane.
(Wall Street Journal, June 15)
* * *
BERING STRAIT GAS LINE STUDIED
OTTAWA - A Calgary firm, with support from three major pipeline companies,
is studying the feasibility of shipping natural gas by pipeline from the
Soviet Union to North American markets. Spokesmen for Lorcan Ltd. say
planning still is in the early stages.
(Montreal Gazette, June 15)
* * *
NEW HUMAN RIGHTS ACT RILES TRUCKERS
WINNIPEG - Canada's trucking industry is so upset with the federal
Government's handling of labor matters that it is on the brink of insisting that Ottawa transfer its powers over labor relations in trucking to
the provinces.
(Winnipeg Free Press, June 10)
* * *
FULL GRAIN CARS GREET CLARK IN VANCOUVER
VANCOUVER - Hundreds of grain-stuffed railway cars confronted Opposition
Leader Joe Clark at Vancouver harbor on June 9 as he attempted to press
his claim that export shipments are falling behind because there aren't
enough cars hauling Prairie grain to the Coast. Grain officials at the
Alberta Wheat Terminal here said more than 100 federal Government hopper
cars were pulled into the terminal hours before Clark arrived during a
tour designed to draw attention to what his party calls a critical
shortage of grain cars.
(Winnipeg Tribune, June 10)
* * *
CN'S GOAL IS PROFIT
WINNIPEG - CN's profit-oriented management team faces a significant
challenge over the next five years, according to Rod Latimer, vice-
president and senior executive officer of CN Rail. Mr. Latimer told the
13th annual meeting of the Canadian Transportation Research Forum, being
held here, that CN will need about $2.5-billion of investment capital
over the next five years.
(Winnipeg Tribune, June 12)
* * * RAILWAY
GRAIN RATE POLICY IRKS RAILMEN
MONTREAL - Canada's two major railways want more money for hauling
Prairie export grain to market. The federal government agrees -- but
the railways won't get it during "these days of fiscal restraint."
The railways feel they are losing too much money in the hauling of the
grain because the rate-level today is the same as it was about 80 years
ago. Moving bumper crops means bumper losses for the railways.
And although they understand the government's "fiscal restraints" the
railways nonetheless are keeping up the pressure for higher compensation
for their losses on grain. The railways' pleas obviously are not falling
on deaf government ears. The government has spent more than $250-
million on 8,000 new covered hopper cars to carry the grain.
And the government has also compensated the railways through other subsidies for the unprofitable operation of branch lines required in the
public interest in Western Canada, and will likely spend a total of
about $600-million in the next several years on improvements of the
branch-line facilities. These lines and equipment had been neglected
over the years because the railways did not think it was economically
justifiable to look after them properly.
Grain and grain products carried under the Crow's Nest Agreement rates
(which were set in 1897) account for 24.6 per cent of the ton-miles but
for only 6.3 per cent of the revenues.
Opposition parties, the railways and some transport department officials
say the only reason the government won't raise the rates is because of
its political consequences in an area where Liberal seats are hard to
come by. But Transport Minister Otto Lang says it is merely a matter of
economics. "I agree the railways need more money to move the grain,"
says Mr. Lang. "But we don't have the dollars."
Mr. Lang told The Star that "what we have done, instead, is the most important job of beginning the work of rehabilitating the rail lines."
Keith Campbell, vice-president of Canadian Pacific Ltd. and senior executive officer of CP Rail, discussed the government's branch-line
rehabilitation program. "People think of the branch-line rehabilitation
program as a great windfall for the railways. It is not. It's a band-
aid. It's a palliative, not a cure."
Dealing with the government's delay in compensating the railways, Mr.
Campbell added: "We have been led to the brink of expectancy so frequently in recent years that we are becoming just a little bit jaded,
particularly in the light of recent comments by the minister of transport ... on the question of fiscal restraints.
"We would prefer to have a subsidy paid directly to the producer on
grain. We would charge normal commercial rates for moving the grain.
Then the real cost of transporting grain would be brought out into the
open. "This way, the farmer would have a choice. He would have a tradeoff
between hauling his grain a few miles to a branch-line point where we
load just a few cars a week, which is very  expensive railroading. Or he
could haul it perhaps 25 miles where we could load full trains of grain
and move them with great efficiency and at much less cost. We'd all
share in the savings."
Mr. Campbell said that in 1977 CP Rail achieved its highest level of net
after-tax earnings in its nearly 100-year history. The figure totalled
$54.8-million. "But even at that, our return-on-investment was less
than seven per cent. Obviously, no one is going to start up a new business or invest his money in an existing enterprise to earn less than
seven per cent. You can buy Canada Savings Bonds that get more than
eight per cent. And there are many other investments that are more attractive."
Mr. Campbell said the railways -- the same situation applies to CN
Rail -- will not become commercially viable until the grain question is
resolved.
Robert Bandeen, president and chief executive officer of Canadian National Railways, said the three major things that are hurting the CN
financial position are losses on Prairie grain handling, losses in
providing Newfoundland with a transportation system, and losses in its
Montreal railway service. "If these three factors would be removed,
we'd be able to operate profitably while providing good transportation
services."
He said the charges for the movement of grain would have to be increased
by about three times what they now are to prevent losses. The rates now
are about one-half a cent a ton-mile.
Dr. Bandeen is working hard to get CN on a profitable course, and he
appears to be succeeding. The railway recorded a net income of $28-
million last year, up from $11.8-mi11 ion in the previous year. Compared
with total investment, he feels this figure is extremely low. Federal
legislation which in effect wiped out $808-mil1ion of CN's debt owed to
the government by turning the debt into government-held common shares
will go a long way toward helping Dr. Bandeen achieve his goal. Many
members of Parliament still remembered a previous CN recapitalization
program which took place in 1952, and Conservative members especially
expressed fear that the government legislation would encourage CN to go
out on a spending spree.
Ian D. Sinclair, chairman and chief executive officer of Canadian Pacific Ltd., said: "Well, I suppose I could go to history and say that
this is the third time that they (CN) have converted debt into equity.
The other two times we went on to greater achievements and I can see no
reason why history wouldn't repeat itself. I wouldn't worry about it.
We like competition and if it's run by a government so much the better."
(Montreal Star, June 13)
* * * RAILWAY OVERHAUL COSTS $550-MILLION
MONTREAL - Canada's railways and the federal government are spending
more than $550-million this year alone to upgrade and expand their
facilities and equipment to move freight to various markets.
Right across Canada, railway work crews are moving into place for a
major improvement program that will sharpen railway efficiency and
effectiveness in transporting raw materials and finished products.
Railway tracks, yards, bridges, signal systems and other facilities are
being repaired and replaced in what is shaping up as a major drive by
the railways to handle more traffic with greater efficiency.
Orders for new diesel locomotives and freight cars are picking up --
with direct benefits for Canada's railway equipment industry.
The $100-mi11 ion federal program is enabling the rehabilitation of 2,100
miles of Prairie rail line throughout Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta
to speed up the movement of grain.
The agreement between the federal government and the railways provides
for a continuing program of rehabilitation of branch-line track in the
Prairie provinces that could last another six or seven years and cost
more than $500-million.
The work involves bank widening, drainage improvements, replacement of
ties on all lines as well as a start on rail replacement where the present rails are too light to carry fully-loaded hopper cars.
Bridges and culverts also are being repaired or upgraded where necessary.
This will permit a more widespread utilization of hopper cars and, in
most cases, will enable trains to operate at a speed of 30 miles an hour
in a year-round service.
Some of the biggest work being done by the railways is in the improvement of freight handling through the Rockies. New double-track facilities are being built and sidings are being expanded to handle the longer
trains.
Of the $163-mil1 ion being spent this year by CP Rail -- it was $131-
million in 1977 -- about $44-million will go toward improving fixed
installations in Alberta and British Columbia. About $26-million will
be spent in Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario west of the Lakehead.
About $29-million will be spent elsewhere in Ontario and $17-mi11 ion in
Quebec and the Atlantic provinces.
(Montreal Star, June 12)
* * * FOREIGN GRAIN SHIPS RIDE AT ANCHOR DUE TO RAILWAY BOTTLENECKS
VANCOUVER - Twenty ocean freighters, riding at anchor sometimes more
than three weeks to take on cargos of Canadian wheat and barley, have
become part of the city's seascape this spring.
Lined up because Canada sold more grain than it should have known it
could move from elevators to ports, the motley English Bay fleet has
become a political saltlick with three key elements.
One is concern that the delays could tarnish Canada's image as the
world's second largest grain merchant. Of the 20 grain ships riding at
anchor last week, seven are owned by the government of the People's
Republic of China and three are from Japan.
China is loading its largest purchase of Canadian wheat in five years,
having bought more than 20 per cent of the total exports. But it is
feared in the West that Canada has already lost potential sales to China
because it can't deliver and load more wheat.
"The People's Republic is now buying wheat in the United States and
paying more money than it would under our contracts because we can't
move the grain," Hugh Horner, Alberta's Transport Minister, said.
"All our customers are particularly sensitive to late deliveries. They
have only limited storage capacity. If they don't get their grain on
time, they're going to have shut down their flour mills. Then they will
look elsewhere for their grain."
Secondly, the ships waiting at Vancouver have become a tangible symbol
for critics of the federal Liberal Government's agricultural and transportation policies.
The Alberta Conservative Government has been leading the campaign for a
new national grain-marketing strategy, demanding seats for the Prairie
Provinces on the federally-appointed Canadian Wheat Board.
Alberta is particularly concerned about the erosion of Western European
markets, the degree of dependence on Chinese and Russian sales and the
need for measures to compete for and develop new long-term markets.
Flowing from that is the third element of this season's delays -- the
new initiative to build a second grain terminal at Prince Rupert.
Alberta Premier Peter Lougheed flew to Prince Rupert last month to look
at sites. Alberta is prepared to dip into its $3-billion Heritage Fund,
if necessary, to get a $100-mi11 ion terminal built.
About a year ago, when the Canadian Wheat Board was planning export
deliveries, it decided to shoot for a record level of shipments of
Western grain and flour. Partly at the urging of Otto Lang, the federal
Cabinet minister responsible for the Wheat Board, it abandoned its normal caution of reserving a safe buffer between the amount of contracted deliveries and the realistic capacity of the rail system to move
the grain. "We decided to go for broke," one senior official said.
In December, the CP Rail mainline to the coast was blocked for more than
a week by a derailment. In February, with clearing crews dynamiting
massive snowdrifts from prairie lines, it was obvious that the decision
to go for broke was going to cost the farmers a fortune.
The tight schedule of deliveries — to give the farmers the fattest
possible pay cheques in what likely will be a federal election year --
will cost an estimated $17-mi11 ion in demurrage fees charged by ship
owners for delays in loading their vessels. Last year's demurrage fees
were about $2-million. This year, Canada could break the record $17-
million run up during the long strike four years ago.
Mr. Lang has said he encouraged the Wheat Board to drop its cushion of
30 to 50 million bushels of grain, a normal winter safeguard against
disruptions in the rail system.
The minister's logic is that even though the decision may end up costing
farmers $17-mi11 ion in demurrage fees, the sale of that 40-mi11 ion-
bushel cushion will generate an additional $180-mi11 ion in income.
Demurrage, in his eyes, becomes simply a 10-per-cent penalty.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, June 9)
* * *
CP RAIL EXPECTS TO SPEND $163-MILLI0N FOR TRACK, EQUIPMENT AND SHOP
FACILITIES
MONTREAL - CP Rail expects to spend $163-million for the construction of
new track, equipment and shop facilities across Canada in 1978. Last
year the company spent $131-mi 11 ion on new facilities and equipment.
The 1978 program calls for approximately $44-million to be spent on
fixed installations in the provinces of Alberta and British Columbia,
$26-million in Saskatchewan, Manitoba and that part of Ontario west of
the Lakehead, $29-million elsewhere in Ontario and $17-mi11 ion in Quebec
and the Atlantic provinces.
Purchase of motive power, rolling stock and maintenance equipment, which
will operate throughout CP Rail's system, accounts for $40-million.
So far, some $20-million of the $163-mi11 ion has been spent across the
country with most of the remainder to be spent during the summer and
early fall months when railway construction work is normally at its
peak. The program will provide employment with CP Rail during the summer months for approximately 450 men in the Pacific region, 550 men on
the Prairies, 400 in Ontario and 200 in Quebec and the Maritimes. 10
The largest single expenditure -- $39-million -- will be for rail. Of
this, $35-million will be spent to install 300 miles of new track on the
mainline and $4-million will go to relay 114 miles of track and siding
with reusable rail removed from other locations.
Another major expenditure -- approximately $22-million — will be for
new track ties. The company plans to replace 1.7 million of its nearly
70 million ties. Another $4-million will be spent to lay new ballast on
approximately 650 miles of rail line.
Construction of bridges and culverts will cost $6.5-million while double-
tracking projects in the mountains of British Columbia will account for
another $10-mil1 ion.
New radio communications equipment will cost $1.4-million.
The rest of the program, accounting for approximately $40-million, is
for a variety of shop construction programs, machinery acquisitions,
yard upgrading, siding construction, safety equipment and signal systems.
(CP Rail News Release, June 9)
* * *
CN RAIL, CP RAIL TO SPEND $157-MILLI0N ON BOTTLENECKS
REGINA - CN Rail and CP Rail will be spending about $157-million in 1978
on loosening up Rocky Mountain bottlenecks that plagued grain movement
last winter, company spokesmen say.
CP Rail will be spending $137-million constructing a second main track
with a reduced grade at four sites in the mountains. The four construction locations are at the points of steepest grade on the main CP Rail
line to the West Coast.
CN Rail is spending $19.6-million of its $71.2-million budget for double-
tracking and siding improvement on its mountain region which includes
British Columbia, Alberta and a small part of Saskatchewan.
In an outline of their projects, CP Rail officials said the four sections of steep westward ascending grades to be improved have held up rail
traffic because of reduced train speed and tonnage limits. The problem
with the CP Rail line from Calgary to Vancouver is the capacity is not
uniform. The areas of high capacity are not being used to the fullest
because trains can only be as large as the weakest points allow, says CP
Rail.
Until a few years ago, when tonnages were less, the restrictions could
be accommodated but now projections show that traffic demands will soon
exceed capacity at the restricting points, say the CP Rail officials.
The work at the four sites ~ Notch Hill, Clanwilliam, Beaver and Stephen -- will require the construction of a second main track with a reduced grade totalling about 40 miles. At each location the new track
will be used for westward movement and the existing track will be used
for eastbound trains. 11
From west to east along the mainline CP Rail will be working at:
-- NOTCH HILL (11 miles) and Clanwilliam (4.5 miles). Construction is
underway at both sites at an estimated cost of $25-million.
-- BEAVER (about 19 miles). Engineering work is being done in preparation for an application to the Canadian Transport Commission for
approval. Estimated cost, more than $100-mi11 ion.
-- LAKE LOUISE-STEPHEN (5.5 miles). Application filed with Canadian
Transport Commission Jan. 25, 1978, for approval. Estimated cost,
$12-million.
CN Rail is building sidings in the Fraser Canyon and the North Thompson
region to allow for more two-way traffic. CN Rail is not planning any
double tracking in the mountains in the near future, said Alex Rennie,
public affairs officer with CN Rail.
The main bottlenecks in the CN Rail system are west of Edmonton and east
of Vancouver and CN Rail is planning to expand facilities at both points.
Mr. Rennie said there is another potential bottleneck west of Jasper.
Environmental and engineering studies are being carried out to convert
sections of the British Columbia south line and the former Grand Trunk
Pacific route in that area into double tracking to relieve the congestion. At present the double tracking is not needed but it will be made
available as traffic increases, Mr. Rennie said.
The double tracking from Bissell to Spruce Grove west of Edmonton will
add 12 miles of second track by late fall.
(The Western Producer, June 1)
* * *
VANCOUVER RAIL TERMINAL EFFICIENCY IMPROVED
VANCOUVER - The first phase of a $2.5-million experimental computer project to improve efficiency of rail terminal operations is on stream in
the Greater Vancouver area.
CP Rail and Transport Canada's Research and Development Centre (TDC) are
now using CP Rail's trackage and yards in and around Vancouver as a
testing ground for the new Yard Activity Reporting and Decision Systems -- YARDS.
The program was initiated in late 1972 to develop, implement and evaluate a computerized local freight car management information and control
system. It is designed to reduce rail yard congestion, expedite rail
car movements and improve car utilization.
Initial development and implementation are now complete, and during 1978
CP Rail will be providing TDC with tri-monthly car movement data, after
which future uses of the system will be studied. 12
"The system is being pioneered in Vancouver with enough flexibility in
design to be adapted to terminal areas of other railways as well as CP
Rail's," says J. D. Bromley, Vice-President, Pacific Region. "It will
also be possible to expand the system in the future to allow direct
computer inquiries from customers and to interconnect with other systems
used in Vancouver area traffic management."
The visible portion of YARDS comprises 33 video-display computer terminals and 20 high-speed teleprinters at key CP Rail points in the Vancouver area, all linked with the railway's nationwide information system
computers in Montreal.
YARDS replaces a manual card-inventory system where changes in each
car's status are recorded on color-coded cards which are moved on boards
whenever the car moves within the area.
Vancouver was chosen as the test location because it is one of CP Rail's
largest and most spread-out terminal areas and handles a large volume of
cars. In its Vancouver terminal, CP Rail handles some 3,500 cars a day.
The area comprises 161 miles of trackage including 19 yards with a total
of 430 tracks.
There are three major control areas -- the Coquitlam classification yard
and repair facilities, New Westminster, and downtown Vancouver including
Burrard Inlet waterfront. Throughout the terminal there are a number of
industrial areas, port bulk and general cargo facilities and interchanges
with other railways.
"A high percentage of car time is spent in terminals," says George
Coles, Coquitlam General Yardmaster and YARDS implementation supervisor.
"The faster processing of documents associated with car movements, plus
the control and management information features, are expected to produce
a five-per-cent reduction in the average time a car spends in the terminal
area. Reduced terminal time and better car utilization are in turn reflected in car availability and customer service."
While the company's national information computer system can trace a car
and its status to any station, terminal or train on CP Rail trackage in
Canada, it does not provide the detail for operations within a terminal.
Using the YARDS system, supervisors in the terminal can gain immediate
access to such information as:
-- CAR location by yard, track and location on track.
-- INVENTORY of empty and loaded cars at any location or group of
locations.
-- STATUS of cars requiring repair.
-- MOVEMENT records of individual cars or groups of cars.
Each time a car moves or its status changes in any way, the supervisor
at the nearest computer terminal inputs the information to the computer
data bank and the change is reflected in all subsequent information requested of the computer.
(CP Rail News Release, May 18)
* * * 13
RAIL CARS STILL UP IN AIR
VANCOUVER - The federal government is engaging in what looks like a delaying tactic to avoid paying out up to $200-million on new rail cars to
speed export grain deliveries.
Since 1972, Ottawa has bought 8,000 hopper cars to transport grain because the country's two major railways won't supply replacement equipment. The stinginess of CN and CP Rail results from Ottawa's retention
of money-losing rail tariffs for the movement of grain for export.
U.S. economist Carl Snavely, who probed railway losses on grain traffic
for the government, found that CN and CP Rail suffered a gross deficit
of $139.1-mi 11 ion in 1974, well below the loss figure claimed by the
railways but greater than the loss for the rails counter-claimed by the
three Prairie provinces. Mr. Snavely later revised his figures to
conclude that gross losses to the railways in 1976 probably amounted to
$180-million. Even higher losses are inevitable, as the railways face
increasing operating costs but unchanging tariffs.
The last batch of 2,000 government hopper cars cost Ottawa $77.5-mill-
ion. The Canadian Wheat Board has called for a further 4,000 cars
which, because of inflation, will likely cost more than double that
price.
The need for additional cars is obvious. Between them CN and CP Rail
had 13,319 cars of their own in grain service, but because of retirements due to age, the fleet is shrinking rapidly. According to the
wheat board, by 1980 only 8,124 railway cars will be available for
grain. This reduced number would be performing only a minor part of the
annual crop movement, because of the much higher productivity rate
achieved with modern government-owned rolling stock.
Transport Minister Otto Lang has just announced that a consultant will
be appointed before July to study rail car utilization and assess
whether existing rolling stock can be used to better effect.
A spokesman in Mr. Lang's office said the consultant may conclude that
additional government cars are needed if traffic demands are to be met.
The spokesman said the study will be completed in a matter of months,
though no precise timetable has been agreed.
According to the spokesman in Mr. Lang's office, the consultant will be
required to look at a range of railway operating practices to spot opportunities for improvement, including port delivery arrangements in
Vancouver and the scope for increased interchange of cars between CN and
CP Rail.
■
In looking at thousands of miles of prairie branchline the commissioners
could not have been unaware of railway car utilization. Surely no recommendation could be made as to the line abandonment or retention unless there was some assessment of the soundness or otherwise of existing
work practices? 14
If the Hall report did not make satisfactory recommendations on operating practices, those who set terms of reference are likely at fault.
But the Lang office spokesman did not see it this way. He described the
new study as a useful continuation of the work begun by Hall.
(Vancouver Province, June 7)
* * *
MOVING GRAIN FROM THE PRAIRIES LANG'S ALBATROSS
VANCOUVER - Are the country's two major railways to blame for all those
ships out there in Vancouver harbor? Federal Transport Minister Otto
Lang may think so. Or, he may hope so.
In 1972, the federal government started building the specialty cars for
grain, the yellow-and-orange hopper cars that one can see at almost
every railway crossing. So far 8,000 were built at an average cost of
more than $30,000 and loaned free to the railways provided that the
railways maintain them and used them only for agricultural products. In
the yards they're sometimes called Trudeau cars.
Despite this investment of $255-million in taxpayers' money, the capacity of the new cars has barely kept up with that lost through retirement of the old.
Despite the reluctance to make capital investments for grain transportation, once the cars are loaded and on the tracks the railways have always moved it. The two companies bring from 2,500 to 3,000 cars into
Vancouver weekly -- that's the equivalent of two to three trains loaded
with nothing but grain, seven days a week.
"If it's there to be hauled, we will haul it," said John Patterson, CP
Rail's western operations manager. "There's a matter of pride here,
too. We've hauled more than half this country's grain since 1885."
But the Canadian Wheat Board might like the railways to move 3,500 cars
per week to Vancouver, Mr. Patterson said. However, this amount would
plug the elevators, he claimed, which are near their operating capacity.
(Vancouver Sun, June 6)
* * *
MOORE HEADS DELEGATION TO GRAIN MARKETING MEET
EDMONTON - Representatives of provincial farm organizations and producers at large will be members of Alberta's delegation to a meeting on
western grain marketing in Saskatoon on June 16.
Premier Peter Lougheed told the Alberta legislature that Agriculture
Minister Marvin Moore, an active producer, will lead the delegation to
meet with federal representatives, including Otto Lang, the minister
responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board. 15
Transportation Minister Dr. Hugh Horner revealed there have been discussions between Alberta and the governments of Saskatchewan and Manitoba on the proposal to build a new grain handling terminal at Prince
Rupert. Alberta is willing to play the role of banker for the project
that could cost up to $100-million.
However, the other two prairie governments told Dr. Horner they are not
interested in buying any equity in the project. The B.C. provincial
government would consider becoming a minority equity holder, depending
on the site chosen for the terminal.
Alberta and B.C. did agree to finance a study of the Casey Point site
for the terminal. The federal government favors a site on Ridley Island
and is making a feasibility study of it.
The Alberta Wheat Pool, Saskatchewan Wheat Pool, Manitoba Pool Elevators, Cargill Grain Co. Ltd., Pioneer Grain and United Grain Growers
also agree to a feasibility study of the proposal.
The Alberta Wheat Pool turned down an earlier proposition by the Alberta
government to contribute one-third of the cost from the Heritage Trust
Fund with the Pool and Cargill putting up the other two-thirds. Now it
appears the province would only make loan capital available to a consortium of grain companies. However, the nature and extent of the
province's participation is still not clear.
Dr. Horner had said he wanted the Alberta Pool to form the consortium in
about a month, or the government would begin to consider all alternatives.
(The Western Producer, June 1)
* * *
FASTER GRAIN TRANSPORT SOUGHT
SASKATOON - Seven-day loading and unloading will be looked at for the
West Coast as part of a major search of the transport system for ways to
speed up export grain shipment, Transport Minister Otto Lang said June
2.
The minister said he will seek co-operation from all parts of the system
including elevator companies, unions, and railways to put agility into
getting wheat from the Prairies to foreign buyers.
Among big problems in the seven-day loading scheme will be getting an
agreement from several unions controlling access the ports, he indicated.
Longshoremen and grain handlers will be asked to include in their contracts five-day staggered work weeks that would allow the system to operate Saturdays and Sundays without creating excessive costs for the
firms involved, said Mr. Lang. 16
A second problem is that ships sometimes are not anxious to take on
grain during weekends because there seems to be a tradition among
sailors to spend weekends ashore in Vancouver, Mr. Lang said.
The minister forecast a record of about 850 million export bushels of
wheat sold by July 31, the end of the current crop year. He further
predicted that he will reach his "magic billion bushels" figure by 1982.
To reach the target, Mr. Lang said the government has been "looking at
the question of getting more hopper cars as well as rebuilding some boxcars."
(Saskatoon Star-Phoenix, June 3)
* * *
CLARK 'WILL MOVE GRAIN'
WALDHEIM, Sask. - Joe Clark has promised Prairie farmers that a Progressive Conservative government would get stalled grain shipments
moving to Western ports by subsidizing railway shipping costs.
Mr. Clark said grain isn't moving because railways make more money
hauling such things as potash and automobiles. But railway companies
would divert cars back to the grain trade, Mr. Clark argued, if they
were paid money-making rates -- the type suggested in a 1977 Royal
Commission report by former chief justice Emmett Hall.
Mr. Hall suggested the government subsidize the difference between
profitable grain shipping rates and current rates, which were fixed by
law during the early days of Confederation of 12 cents a bushel.
Mr. Clark visited the town as part of a three-day Western tour designed
to draw attention to problems in the grain shipping system.
(CP - Montreal Star, June 9)
* * *
RAIL CAR ANNOUNCEMENT
REGINA - The Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan June 1 announced that it
plans to increase its rail car fleet by 500 cars. The cars will be
manufactured by Canadian General Transit Company Ltd. in Trenton, Nova
Scotia.
In announcing the increase, David Dombowsky, president of the provincial
Crown corporation, said that the addition to the leased car fleet was
essential to ensure that PCS would be able to provide reliable service
to its North American customers.
(News Release: Government of Saskatchewan, June 1)
* * * 17
VIA HAS TO LIVE WITH WHITE ELEPHANT
CALGARY - VIA Rail President Frank Roberts would dearly love to rid the
new Crown corporation of trains like The Canadian but knows politics
would never let it happen.
"Our transcontinental services are uneconomic," Mr. Roberts said.  "But
if VIA suggested they disappear, I say we'd better look for the nearest
yardarm to be hanged from."
From locomotives to observation car, The Canadian is obsolete, a holdover from another age in which it was one of the finest examples of
passenger train technology. But that was 25 years ago, and now, with
only 30 per cent of its seats filled, the train attempts to attract
passengers averaging only 64 km/h on its 4,833-kilometre trek across the
nation.
The Canadian is an example, considered by some one of the worst, of what
railway passenger service in this country has become. The trains are
old, and all lose money -- the federal government has paid out almost
$1-bi11 ion in subsidies since 1972 to keep the trains running.
VIA believes new trains, capable of 200 km/h on present roadbeds, can
lure travellers away from their automobiles, which now account for 92
per cent of inter-city traffic between cities less than 800 kilometres
apart. But the trains may have a hard time reaching their potential.
Current track and signalling systems for freight trains are incompatible
with high-speed operations and would restrict trains to only 145 km/h.
Mr. Roberts argues that, while speed is important, it is only one facet
of competitive service. Better schedules, faster reservations and
closer integration with bus and air modes will be major factors in
attracting passengers back to the rails, he said.
He said the United States projects petroleum shortages by 1985 will affect automobile use. Seeking a fuel-efficient alternative, the U.S.
government has decided to invest heavily in Amtrak, the American equivalent of VIA Rail, he said.
Mr. Roberts and other VIA executives are meeting with provincial governments to determine which services could be expanded and better integrated with bus and airlines.
(Calgary Herald, June 5)
* * *
CN GRAIN DELIVERIES UP
SASKATOON - CN Rail says that to May 31 it handled 145,500 carloads of
grain which were unloaded at Vancouver, Prince Rupert, Churchill, Man.,
and Thunder Bay.
The company says the total represents 51 per cent of all grain unloaded
during the 10-month period ending May 31. The railway says more than
9,800 more CN cars were unloaded than during the 1976-77 crop year.
(Montreal Gazette, June 13)
* * * 18
RAIL WORKERS SHOCKED BY JOB NEWS
HAMILTON - Employees of the Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway are
shocked and dismayed after being told their jobs are going to be abolished by September 30, a union spokesman said June 8.
The functions of the departments are being absorbed by CP Rail which
purchased the TH&B Railway in April, 1977, for $6.5-million. "In all
there are 42 job functions at the TH&B, a quarter of them in Welland,
that are being moved to Toronto," said Jack Berry, regional manager of
public relations. "For the people concerned, they will all be offered
similar employment in Toronto."
(Hamilton Spectator, June 9)
* * *
NO AID SET FOR GRAIN DEMURRAGE
WINNIPEG - Because of the current grain transportation tie-up, Western
Canada's 51,000 farmers will likely have to bear record demurrage costs
without any special assistance from the federal Government, Otto Lang,
minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board, says.
Rather than compensating farmers for demurrage costs, Ottawa is concentrating on speeding up the delivery of grain to export customers. Wheat
Board officials are currently conferring with the railways to determine
whether some of their potash cars can be shifted over to grain. The
federal Cabinet will soon be considering the Wheat Board's request that
the Government purchase 4,000 new grain hopper cars to accelerate the
export movement.
"The Cabinet has not yet made a final decision, but it is obvious that
we will be buying more cars. Before we do, however, we want to come to
a pretty precise judgment about the number of cars that are required."
(Toronto Globe and Mail, June 14)
* * *
INDIANS VOW TO BLOCK CP RAIL LINE AGAIN
CRANBR00K - The St. Mary's Indian band June 8 took down the barrier they
had erected on the CP Rail line which crosses reserve lands near here.
Band administrator Lloyd Lezard warned, however, that it could be set up
again at any time. Mr. Lezard said the band will only give CP Rail a
few hours' notice when it next blocks the line.
The barrier was set up June 6 in a dispute over erosion of about 80
acres of reserve land along the St. Mary's River. The band says the
erosion was caused by breakup of a dike built by the railway about 10
years ago. The dike has not been replaced. The band says CP Rail is
responsible and has demanded 2,500 acres as compensation.
(Vancouver Sun, June 9)
* * * 19
NEW VIA FARES CUT TRAVEL COSTS
MONTREAL - VIA Rail Canada reports that its new fares will be introduced
June 15 on passenger trains operated by both CN and CP Rail.
VIA announced the common fare structure June 9 after reaching agreement
with CP Rail.
VIA, which reached agreement several weeks ago with CN, said the new
fares would reduce the cost of travel on CP Rail trains by about 13 per
cent. The fare structure also includes low-cost "incentive" rates,
which are designed to encourage rail travel at off-peak times.
The "incentive" fares include:
-- ROUND-trip excursion rates, at 1-1/3 the basic one-way fare, available at off-peak times between any points served by the two railways.
-- GROUP rates for parties of two to six adults, seven to 29, and 30
or more.
-- SENIOR citizens will travel at one-third of basic one-way rates.
-- A series of five VIA passes will permit unrestricted travel in
specified territories for varying periods of time.
Sample fares include: Montreal to Vancouver, $120 one-way basic, and
$160 round-trip excursion (formerly $139 basic one-way CP Rail fare):
Montreal-Saint John, N.B., $31 one-way basic, $41 round-trip excursion
(formerly $37.75 one-way basic CP Rail fare).
(Montreal Star, June 10)
* * *
TRAIN DU NORD TO RUN THROUGHOUT SUMMER
MONTREAL - Fans of the P'tit train du nord have won a double victory in
their struggle to force CP Rail to improve its rail services to the
Laurentians.
The Canadian Transport Commission June 9 ordered CP Rail to continue its
regular Friday night northbound and Sunday night southbound service between Montreal and Mont Laurier.
The CTC has also ordered CP Rail to run "an experimental" service to
Label!e, one that will provide round trips on both Saturdays and Sundays
from July 1 to Oct. 8, and between Dec. 9 and March 18.
The experimental train is, in effect, a continuation of the special
train that conservationists, the provincial government and the tourist
industry had leased from CP Rail last winter. CP Rail ran it on weekends on a contract basis.
The experimental train soon became known as the P'tit train du nord, a
revival of the 1940s train that took skiers to the Laurentians before
the highway network into the area was fully developed.
(Montreal Star, June 10)
* * * 20
GRAIN HAZARD REPORT TIP FOR GOVERNMENT
WINNIPEG - A task force on fire and explosions in Canada's grain handling system will complete its report in November, with the federal government expected to incorporate many of its recommendations into new
directives for the industry.
Michael R. Thompson, chairman of the Canadian Grain Handling Association's two-month-old task force, said here on June 7 his group will hold
three more seminars in Eastern Canada before moving into an intense
evaluation of its research.
(Winnipeg Tribune, June 8)
* * *
U.S. RAILROADS ORDER 10,000 MORE CARS
WASHINGTON - More than 10,000 freight cars were ordered in April, bringing the total for the year so far to almost double that of the first
four months of 1977, the Association of American Railroads and the
American Railway Car Institute reported June 7.
A total of 10,258 cars were ordered in April
April of last year and 4,350 in March, 1978.
of this year, 31,326 cars have been ordered,
the comparable period of last year.
compared with 4,179 in
For the first four months
compared with 15,676 for
(News Release: Association of American Railroads, June 7)
* * *
LANG SAYS GOVERNMENT TO BUY MORE HOPPER CARS
WINNIPEG - Transport Minister Otto Lang said June 13 that the federal
government will be buying more hopper cars for grain movement, but declined to say how many or when.
Mr. Lang told a news conference that the government also likely will
participate financially in repairing boxcars for use in grain transportation.
The minister provided more detail on the proposed study of current grain
movement troubles, saying it would be spearheaded by a consulting firm
aided by about 12 advisory personnel. He said the appointment should be
made by the end of June and a final report submitted within 10 months.
He reiterated the fact that despite all the problems being encountered,
Canada still will move a record amount of grain this year.
(Canadian Press, June 13)
* * * 21
HALL SAYS CROW'S NEST PASS RATES FUNDAMENTAL FOR UNITY
OTTAWA - Continuing Crow's Nest Pass rates for Prairie grain shipments
is fundamental to national unity, Justice Emmett Hall said June 13.
The only alternative to those fixed rates the railways can charge for
handling grain is to load the cost on the backs of the growers, a stiff
penalty for being located far from ports, Justice Hall said at the Commons Transport Committee.
He was commenting during a 3i-hour appearance to answer questions about
government action on the report on grain handling prepared by the commission he headed.
While Justice Hall was before the committee, Transport Minister Otto
Lang announced more details about a technical analysis of western grain
transportation. Mr. Lang said he hopes to announce by the end of June
the appointment of an independent analyst who would produce recommendations about improving co-operation among the railways, the grain companies and the Canadian Wheat Board.
(Canadian Press, June 13)
•Ar * *
ICC APPROVES $600-MILLI0N RAIL FREIGHT RATE BOOST
WASHINGTON, D.C. - The nation's railroads were granted approximately
$660-million in annual freight-rate increases by the Interstate Commerce
Commission June 7, but only after the commission cut back a requested
seven-per-cent increase on coal shipments to four per cent. Increases
on shipments of other commodities will average 3.7 per cent.
The regulatory agency delayed the effective date of the increases from
June 7 to June 17, a move the industry claims will mean $20-million of
lost revenues.
(Washington Post, June 8)
* * *
CANADIAN CARLOADINGS
For 10 Days Enc
May 31, 1978
ling
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
91,915
5,601,650
9,357
(   14,553)
( 1,336,612)
622
(13.7)
(19.3)
7.1
Total for Year
May 31, 1978
to
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
1,468,675
91,074,125
157,374
(   86,354)
( 7,752,315)
2,249
( 5.6)
( 7.8)
1.4 22
U.S. CARLOADINGS
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
Piggyback
( ) decrease
For Week Ending
June 3, 1978
449,452
16.4 billion
Total for Year to
June 3, 1978
9,330,658
348.2 billion
Total for Year to
May 27, 1978
733,957
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
8,557
1.2 billion
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
(  504,180)
4.2 billion
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
75,109
Percentage
Change
1.9
8.3
Percentage
Change
( 5.1)
1.2
Percentage
Change
11.4
* * *
P I P E L I
ALASKA PIPE SIZE BOOSTED
OTTAWA - Canada and the United States have exchanged diplomatic notes to
change the 1977 northern gas pipeline agreement to include costs for the
56-inch-diameter pipe that the National Energy Board decided should be
used between Whitehorse, Y.T., and Caroline Junction, Alta.
The notes would increase the filed estimated cost for the Canadian portions of the pipeline by roughly $100-million more than allowed for in
the original agreement, as a result of the substitution of 56-inch pipe
for 54-inch pipe.
Even with the extra $100-million, the 56-inch system would be cheaper
than the U.S.-preferred 48-inch, higher-pressure line that would have
cost an estimated $4.4-billion under the treaty.
The filed costs had to be changed because under the Canada-U.S. pipeline
agreement, the level of American subsidy for a Whitehorse-Dawson lateral
will depend on how successful Canada is in keeping costs in Canada
within 135 per cent of the approved, filed costs in the agreement.
The Canadian choice of the 56-inch pipe had originally been controversial, because it effectively prevented any U.S. steel mills from competing for pipe business for the Canadian sections of the pipeline.
The updated costs under that agreement do not reflect the estimated
$500-million increase in costs that will almost certainly result from
longer-than-expected delays in the United States, where such key ingredients as the U.S. gas pricing system for Alaskan gas still must be resolved before the arranging of financing and other matters can proceed
on both sides of the border.
(Montreal Star. June 9) 23
SHIPPING
SEAWAY OFFICIALS FACE WESTERN GRAIN DECLINE
REGINA - St. Lawrence Seaway Authority officials are facing the prospect
of a gradual decline in the amount of western Canadian grain moving
through the Great Lakes system each year on the way to export markets.
But they think substantial increases in American grain moving through
the Seaway will more than make up for the reduction in Canadian volume.
"Our long-term forecasts are that grain will continue to be one of our
biggest commodities," George Sainsbury, Seaway director of economics and
planning, said. "And we look to U.S. grain as a more dynamic factor
than Canadian grain."
Last year, grain made up about 38 per cent of the volume moved through
the Seaway. The Canadian-American ratio is about 60-40.
Mr. Sainsbury said the ratio will gradually tip toward the American
side. The reasons he said, are many. The trend in Canadian grain movement is to shift exports from the East Coast to the West Coast and in
the next few years, new terminal facilities will be built in British
Columbia to increase the amount of export. Mr. Sainsbury said that will
simply return the West Coast to its traditional position as a major part
of the grain export trade. But it will also reduce the importance of
Thunder Bay and the Seaway.
At the same time, he said, several factors are at work in the United
States which could lead to increased Seaway use for American grain. He
said proposals now in Congress to impose a fee for use of inland waterways in the U.S. will make the Mississippi River system less attractive.
There is also a growing world market for hard wheat and American grain
farmers in the Seaway area will likely be meeting more of that demand,
he said.
Finally, proposals for greater use of icebreakers and other technological improvements for the Seaway could extend its shipping season into
January and make it more convenient for American exporters with contracts to fill these in the winter, said Mr. Sainsbury.
However, even with increased volumes of American grain, the Seaway Authority official said shipments of Canadian grain through Thunder Bay and
the Seaway will continue to be an important factor for the health of the
waterway.
Last year, the Seaway recorded its largest-ever total commodity volume,
in large part because huge volumes of grain shipped. This year, Seaway
officials predict a decline in business of about five per cent, to 116.4
million tonnes total commodity shipping from 122.5 million tonnes in
1977. 24
Mr. Sainsbury said a reduction in U.S. imports of steel and iron, a
reduction in iron ore moving from Labrador to the U.S., and possible
problems getting supplies of western grain in late summer are all expected to contribute to the decline in volume.
He said increased freight tolls which went into effect this year will
not be a major factor. "It has been our contention that the traffic
will not be affected by the tolls because they are such a small part of
the total costs of moving these goods," he said.
Effective this year, tolls went up about 50 per cent, including a hike
in grain tolls to 65 cents a tonne from 40 cents. Next year and the
year after, they will increase again by about 25 per cent.
(The Western Producer, June 1)
* * *
GRAIN BOTTLENECK THREAT TO SHIP LINES
MONTREAL - If Canada does not solve the problem of the current bottleneck in grain shipments, the country's marine industry may be severely
threatened, warns T. Norman Hall, chairman of the Dominion Marine Association.
What particularly galls the shipping executives in eastern Canada is
that the cause of the trouble is far beyond their sphere of influence.
The reason that the grain is not getting to the staging area at Thunder
Bay and from there to the deep seas ports is a railway problem and there
is a natural suspicion among the maritime community that there is more
than a dash of politics concerned.
Grain is shipped under old rates known as the Crow's Nest Rates when it
is carried on the rails. The Crow's Nest Rates are an artificially-low
set of tariffs laid down by government regulation. While the railways
do honor the rates, they would naturally prefer to ship more profitable
goods such as potash which are not governed by the same restrictions.
(Montreal Gazette, June 13)
* * *
GROWTH PROPOSAL CRITICISED
VANCOUVER - Public hearings on the proposed expansion of Roberts Bank
will probably be held in August, according to the Federal Environmental
Assessment Panel.
Last fall, the panel asked for responses to a report prepared by the
National Harbors Board (Port of Vancouver) on the environmental impact
assessment of Roberts Bank expansion. The report, written by Beak
Hinton Consultants Ltd. of Vancouver, recommended partial expansion of
Roberts Bank and construction of a new port at Ridley Island near Prince
Rupert.
(Vancouver Sun, June 8)
* * * 25
CHURCHILL PORT HOPING FOR MEMORABLE YEAR
WINNIPEG - Churchill seaport may be in for one of the greatest seasons
of its more than 50-year history in terms of grain through-put and
capital expenditures.
Port Manager Theophil Lauzon said that 35 grain tankers will likely dock
at Churchill during this summer, handling an estimated 700,000 tons of
barley.
The 700,000 tons of barley translates into about 35 million bushels,
which will be the largest amount in terms of bulk grain shipments ever
handled in a single season. On top of this, there are two million
bushels of wheat and one million bushels of barley already in the
elevator waiting to be shipped.
(Winnipeg Free Press, June 9)
* * *
AVIATION
CP AIR LOWERS CALIFORNIA AIR FARES
VANCOUVER - CP Air said June 7 it will lower first-class fares on its
Canada-California flights, effective June 12, in an attempt to attract
more customers to higher-priced seats.
The carrier said in a news release that cuts will range from 15 to 19
per cent from major Western Canada cities, 10 per cent from Toronto and
Montreal, and nine per cent from Ottawa.
CP Air said the reductions are an effort by the airline to maintain its
competitive position on trans-border flights. Reductions also will apply for Canada-bound travellers on flights originating in California,
the airline said.
(Ottawa Citizen, June 8)
* * *
BRITISH AIR SAYS IT WILL LEAVE IATA UNLESS LOW FARES SET
LONDON - British Airways, the U.K. government-owned carrier, threatened
to pull out of the International Air Transport Association fare-setting
organization if major reforms aren't adopted.
Ross Stainton, the carrier's chief executive officer, warned in a
company publication that without greater flexibility to establish low
fares on major routes, "I personally would have great difficulty in
recommending to my colleagues on the board that we should remain members
on the present terms."
IATA is encountering increasing dissension from its members, partly as a
result of the sharp competition on transatlantic routes set off by Laker
Airways. Pan American World Airways has already voiced dissatisfaction
with membership in the fare-setting and trade organization.
(Wall Street Journal, June 9)
* * * 26
CUT-THROAT AIR FARE WAR LOOMING
LONDON - The powerful International Air Transport Association (IATA) --
the body which regulates air fares -- may be on the verge of collapse.
Unless IATA can agree to radical changes in format during the special
general meeting set for June 30 at Montreal, experts fear the association may fall apart, resulting in fierce, cut-throat competition among
airlines.
Behind the upheaval is the spectre of the low-cost, walk-on operation of
Skytrain, inaugurated by Sir Freddie Laker, the avowed enemy of IATA who
received his knighthood in the Queen's birthday honors list.
Laker's New York-London cut-rate passenger operation has forced many
airlines to make an urgent review of their current and long-term markets.
The conclusion of British Airways, says Ross Stainton, deputy chairman
of British Airways, is that "low fares are here to stay and we have to
change our way of doing things to reflect that fact."
IATA's cumbersome fares machinery has been under strain for years. External criticism has focussed on its restrictive policies. Internally,
there have been complaints that the principle of unanimous decisions
makes it unworkable.
A working party set up in Madrid last November has drawn up a report to
go before the 113 members of IATA at the Montreal meeting.
Two points in the report are "fundamental," Mr. Stainton says. One
allows for a two-tier membership; the other proposes the right of an
individual airline to decide its own fares without unanimous approval
from IATA.
If the proposals are accepted, it would go a long way to remove the
"cartel" label hung on the association by Laker.
Under the two-tier concept, those carriers which want to argue about
fares could do so without involving airlines which merely want to belong
to a technical trade association.
* * *
(Ottawa Journal, June 10)
HIGHWAY
CANPAR BROADENING COVERAGE THROUGHOUT SOUTHERN ONTARIO
TORONTO - Canpar, the door-to-door parcel delivery service developed by
CP Express, announced June 9 that it has opened five new operations centres in Ontario and plans to open two more this summer.
The openings at Scarborough, Barrie, Lindsay, Thamesville and Walkerton
will be followed by others in the Pembroke and Prescott areas. 27
"With completion of this program of expansion, Canpar will have 16 package-handling centres in Southern Ontario and Canpar service will be
available to all Southern Ontario urban and rural areas," says W. M.
Riley, vice-president of CP Express.
Canpar service was expanded into Northern Ontario in May when the
Ontario Northland Transportation Co. started making Canpar deliveries in
its service area. Concurrently, Canpar announced that it will begin to
open its own package-handling centres in Northern Ontario this year, the
first three of these to be at Sault Ste. Marie, Sudbury and North Bay.
"To implement initial phases of these expansion programs, Canpar will
take delivery of a further 70 highway and street delivery vehicles and
hire approximately 100 drivers and terminal staff," said Mr. Riley.
The Canpar service is handling more than 81,000 parcels a week, making
more than 55,000 pick-up and delivery calls across Canada. A year ago,
traffic volume was running at the 20,000 parcel-a-week level.
Canpar began operations with one terminal in Metropolitan Toronto (Islington) in November, 1976. By the end of 1977, Canpar had opened
operations centres in Montreal, Vancouver, Ottawa, Halifax, Hamilton,
Windsor, London, Kitchener, St. Catharines, Kingston and Belleville.
Other facilities are being considered for opening in Western Canada and
Quebec over the next few months, joining a second facility at Montreal
and new handling centres at Calgary and Winnipeg that opened this spring.
Canpar provides fast, reliable surface delivery of parcels under 70 lbs.
across Canada at rates generally lower than those for fourth-class mail.
The service is provided to regular subscribing customers who receive a
call from a Canpar truck five days a week for a $5 weekly fee.
Growth of the service is proceeding on an orderly basis as vehicle
acquisitions, terminal and handling centre expansions, and staff levels
increase in accord with demand levels.
(News Release: Canpar, June 9)
* * *
EXPRESSAIR LAUNCHED BY CP EXPRESS
TORONTO - Expressair, a new air-expedited parcel delivery service developed by CP Express, began operations in Metropolitan Toronto and Miss-
issauga June 12.
Three categories of service will be offered by Expressair for the movement of packages to eight urban areas across Canada and, in co-operation
with Federal Express, to 130 cities in the United States.
"Initially, parcel pick-up service will be available only in Metropolitan Toronto and Mississauga but expansion to Montreal will follow
within a few weeks and to other cities in the months ahead," says John
Sanderson, director of marketing for CP Express. 28
Canadian points to be served from Toronto in the preliminary phase of
Expressair operations are Montreal, Thunder Bay, Winnipeg, Regina,
Saskatoon, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver. Points in the United States
to be served include all major continental business centres and 10,000
smaller ones.
Each of the three Expressair service categories is fitted to a particular market requirement based on weight, dimension and time-sensitivity.
They are:
-- REGULAR AIR SERVICE - providing second-day delivery to a destination
in Canada, and second- or third-day delivery to U.S. points for
parcels picked up by the end of the business day in Metropolitan
Toronto or Mississauga. This service handles shipments up to 300
lbs. in weight. No individual item can weigh more than 70 lbs.
Rate for moving a 3-1b. parcel from Toronto to Vancouver is $10.65;
to Tulsa, $23.81. Rates increase by the pound.
-- PRIORITY AIR SERVICE - to Canadian points, offering before-noon
delivery the following day for parcels picked up before the close
of the business day; and to U.S. points for delivery by noon of the
second day. This service specializes in parcels of 70 lbs. or
less. Rate for moving a 3-1b. parcel from Toronto to Vancouver is
$12, to Tulsa, $36.14. Rates increase by the pound.
-- KIL0-PAC - for packages of one kilogram (2.2 lbs.) or less, shipped
in a 39.5 cm. x 30.5 cm (15i in. x 12 in.) plasticized, waterproof
envelope provided by Expressair. Kilopac packages picked up by the
end of the business day in Toronto will be delivered by noon the
following day in Canadian destinations, by noon the second day or
earlier in all U.S. points served. The Kilo-pac rate is $11 to all
Canadian points served, $26.50 to all U.S. points.
Rates for all three services to the U.S. destinations include customs
clearance and brokerage fees.
A fleet of Expressair pick-up and delivery vehicles in red, white and
blue livery have been assigned to handle customer service in Metropolitan Toronto and Mississauga.
Federal Express of Memphis, Tenn., operates 78 terminals in the United
States and its fleet of jets and delivery vehicles provide 2.5 million
miles of point-to-point parcel express service. The company carries approximately 5 million parcels annually.
(CP Express News Release, June 12)
* * * 29
BUSINESS & FINANCE
CANADIAN PACIFIC DECLARES DIVIDENDS
MONTREAL - A dividend of 50 cents per share on the outstanding $5 par
value ordinary capital stock was declared June 12 by the board of directors of Canadian Pacific Limited, with 25 cents per share of the
dividend being the proceeds of a dividend from Canadian Pacific Investments Limited.
The dividend is payable in Canadian funds on July 28, 1978, to shareholders of record at the close of business on June 27, 1978.
The board of directors also declared a dividend of 36.25 cents per share
on the outstanding 7_t-per-cent cumulative redeemable preferred shares,
Series A. The dividend is payable in Canadian funds on July 28, 1978,
to shareholders of record at the close of business on June 27, 1978.
At the same meeting, the directors declared a dividend of two per cent
on the outstanding four-per-cent preference stock payable on July 28,
1978, to stockholders of record at the close of business on June 27,
1978.
(Canadian Pacific News Release, June 12)
* * *
HELP REQUIRED BY PAPER MILLS
THUNDER BAY - The Ontario government, the ministry of labor and especially the pulp and paper industry must act immediately to sustain the
province's pulp and paper industry if it is to be healthy in the 1980s,
a government discussion paper says.
The paper, known as "Status and Outlook of the Ontario Pulp and Paper
Industry" is produced by the ministry of natural resources and concludes
that the industry needs considerable remodelling -- a total of $245-
million annually for modernization and pollution control. These costs
are significantly higher than the $170-million which has been spent
annually in recent years, and adds the discussion paper, it is unlikely
that the industry can finance the increase on its own.
The paper says much of the capital plant and equipment in Ontario mills
is obsolete, one of the factors which contributes to a lower productivity in mills here, as compared to their competition in the United States.
As well, costly pollution-control equipment, largely to control air
emissions and suspended solids, place a further financial burden estimated at $107-mil1 ion annually for the next five years if provincial
environmental standards are to be met.
The discussion paper, a compilation of recent industry studies and
reports, notes that the cost of delivering wood to the mills has increased 60 per cent in the past five years. Responsible for this increase are higher stumpage fees, wage rates, increased cost of road
construction, logging equipment and fuel and the longer transportation
distances. r
30
The Times-News also reported that a ministry of natural resources discussion paper on the pulp and paper industry in Ontario has given minister
Frank Miller new faith in the viability of the industry.
Mr. Miller said that while he initially feared that the entire industry
would have to be rebuilt, it was now clear that extensive remodelling
would be enough to bring outdated plants into a competitive position.
Although the government may help out financially with pollution abatement, Mr. Miller said, the onus for remodelling will fall on the industry. Crucial also to continued viability are "realistic wage-demands
that don't damage our competitive position in regard to the United
States," said the minister. U.S. mills are more productive than their
Ontario counter-parts (by as much as 20 per cent) and their wages, as
well, are 15-per-cent lower.
The paper concludes that it's unlikely industry will be able to finance
this increase on its own. Mr. Miller said that although the Ontario
government would not get involved in the "socialistic" way Quebec had,
"it's possible that since the government is asking for pollution control
that we may help out."
Operating costs in in the industry have doubled in the past five years,
the paper notes, and attributes a higher cost of wood as one major
reason. Inflation, higher stumpage rates, and increased labor, equipment and road construction costs as well as longer hauling distances,
have all contributed. Ontario has the highest delivered wood costs in
North America.
While pollution control may completely outdate some mills, "it is unlikely that an entirely new capacity will be built in Ontario in the
next five years."
When questioned on the degree of government involvement, Mr. Miller said
it would have to depend on what the industry and cabinet were prepared
to accept. He said his five-year plan was "totally debatable. If
industry needs more time, we'll discuss that." There was no point in
blaming the industry for sins committed in the past, he added, "because
we've been changing the rules and we hit them hard when their earnings
were down."
(Chronicle Journal, May 16)
* * *
WORLD FOOD EXPERT RATES CANADA, U.S. BEST GRAIN SOURCES
WASHINGTON - Canada and the U.S. have become the only major areas of the
world capable of producing a reliable, expanding volume of grain for export, the World Bank's agricultural director said June 7.
Montague Yudelman said in a report, Asia and Africa since 1934-38 have
moved from positions as small net exporters to importers of 40 million
tons of grain annually.
He said grain exports from North America grew to more than 90 million
tons in the mid-1970s from about five million tons in the mid-1930s,
and now account for well over half of global grain trade. "On present
trends, this growing concentration of export supplies will continue," he
said.
(Winnipeg Tribune, June 8)
* * * CPRail
Internal Correspondence
_____%
Date  VANCOUVER, June 9, 1978 File:  1-104
Fro/77 M.W. Holland
To Mr. A. McDermott
Manager
Insurance & Fire Protection
Canadian Pacific Limited
Windsor Station
Montreal, P.Q.
Re Your File S-BN-7, May 8th, 1978, BCCS-Northland Service
The matter concerning accident of February 20th, 1978 at Kitimat
Terminal has been substantially concluded.  Peterbilt tractor
No. 110 was repaired immediately and subsequently the building
has also been repaired.  All bills were to be sent directly to
I.C.B.C. by the companies making the repairs.
The Peterbilt had a $250 deductible portion for which we have
not been billed by I.C.B.C. but expect that it will be received
shortly.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
AJM:gg
) Form 102-R
Tfy/Lm. (v\C^. JSII0J
Date  VANCOUVER, June 9, 1978
From M.W. Holland
To  Mr. A. McDermott
Manager
Insurance & Fire Protection.
C.P. Rail
Windsor Station
Montreal, Quebec
Chartered Barge "EMPIRE 40"
File.  1-104
Attached you will find completed Standard Club Application form
for the above as requested in your File S-B1.-3 of June 5thv  1978.
Since Standard Club has requested that this be entered as an addition to the main fleet, I would appreciate your advice as to
whether or not it is necessary to advise Marsh & MacLennan of
this development, as they may wish to also include it as part
of our fleet.  Should you consider this necessary, would you
please take the necessary action advising me.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJMrgg
bcc: Mr. V. Jones - for your information.
(*^)Form 102-R _.
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B", Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
*W Holland
€P Bail
R Reid
File:    P-306
.' Manager
June  8th,   1978
Law Department
Canadian Pacific Limited
Suite 138, Granville Square
200 Granville Street
Vancouver, B.C.  V6C 2R3
Attention: Mr. W.F. Murray
Dear Sirs:
Re. Your File:  B.C.C.S.S. 589, Worker's Compensation Assess-
ment, Northland Companies	
In reply to your letter of May 1st, 1978 and attached copy of
Mr. Sylander's letter of April 14th, 1978, to you I offer the
following.
It seems apparent that the Worker's Compensation Board has
slotted the Northland group of employees in Class 10, arid our
choice only involves whether or not we wish to have a subclass created for these employees apart from B.C.C.S.S.  As
you pointed out in your letter, this course of action does
not appear to be necessary.  It is my understanding that the
$150,000 (or 3% of Gross Operating Revenues) limit placed on
overhead expenses in the lease agreement applies specifically
to "indirect" overhead expenses [(eg. light, heat, etc.)J 1
Consequently, it would seem that payouts in the event of an \
injury claim by a BCCS-Northland employee would be directly 1
traceable to that employee and would constitute a "direct'__^_____
expense not subject to the limitation.  In addition, it has
been my understanding that the Board has been reluctant in
the past to create sub-classes within subsidiaries or leaseholds of the same company whether requested for accounting
purposes or otherwise.
72 Page 2
Law Department
June 9, 1978
Thus, it appears that the best course of action to take is
to have these employees included in Class 10 without creating
any further sub-class apart from B.C.C.S.S and to have all
Employee Accident Reports channelled through Mr. Sylander's
office as is presently done with the B.C.C.S.S. and other
Canadian Pacific companies.  Under this system, B.C.C.S.S.
obtains relevant information concerning any bodily injury
and forwards it to Mr. Sylander's office.  If further investigation is warranted, Mr. Sylander takes whatever action
he deems necessary.
I believe this will now allow Mr. Sylander to progress this
matter further with the Worker's Compensation Board.
Yours very truly.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
AJM:gg :>W Holland
■ '-t~.agsr
IRReld
■sr Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B",Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665 -2507 or 665-2503
fail!
June 9th, 1978
File:  78REF102
Budget Travel Ltd.
641 Johnson Street
Victoria, B.C.
V8W 1M7
Attention:  (Mrs.) Jacqueline Shoffner
Gentlemen:
Re. Mr. and Mrs. George Allen, Cabin 223, May 15th, 1978
As per your request of June 6th, I enclose the original
note from J.L. Heffernan, M.D.., concerning Mrs. Allen.
Should you require anything further, please do not hesitate
to contact me.
Sincerely,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR:gg
Enclosure Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, June 9, 1978
From  j.w. McCowatt
To  Master - "Princess of Vancouver"
Chief Engineer - "Princess of Vancouver"
Chief Steward - "Princess of Vancouver"
This is to advise that Mr. R. Reid of our company has made
arrangements with Mr. W.G. "Scottie" Starks to travel on the
above ship and show a film on Air Respiration.
The film will be shown July 7th on the 12:30 trip.
Mr. Starks will return on the midnight trip July 8th, but the
film will not be shown at this time.
Kindly show Mr. Starks our usual courtesy and have as many of
the ship's personnel attend as possible.
Would the Chief Engineer request the ship's electrician to
ensure the correct power supply is available at the showing
location.
It has also been agreed to issue a return O.C.S. pass in favour
of Mr. Starks for services rendered.  Would Mr. Hudson please
forward same to Supervisor, First Aid, 11th Floor, Granville
Square.
__________ 4
a) Form 102-R
Asst.   Supt.   Eng.
JWM:gg
cc:     Mr.  W.G.   Starks
Mr.  H.  Hudson Internal Correspondence
m
Date   VANCOUVER, June 9, 1978 File:  T-78-99A
Fro/77 R.R. Reid
To  Master, "Princess of Vancouver"
Purser, "
Chief Steward,    "
We are pleased to attach to each of you gentlemen letter
received from Mrs. Pamela Taylor concerning their recent
outing on board the "Princess of Vancouver."
We do appreciate the courtesy shown by your respective officers and departments to the patients from the Louis
Brier Home.
SpForm 102-R
Assistant Manager
J_5>_<*v_j*o*v_i •
RRR:gg
I
J .. WHolland
Manager
. R Reid
■ ■: Manager
_  ..    ..UC.-..   .!   .dlM.III/.O.IVI..
Pier'B", Vancouver.BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2503
June 9, 1978
File:  T-78-99-A
Ms. Pamela Taylor
Louis Brier Home
1055 West 41st Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.  V6M 1W9
Dear Ms. Taylor:
Again many thanks for your letter of May 31st concerning
the outing by patients from the Louis Brier Home.
We are pleased that the weather co-operated and that everyone had a good time.
Yours truly,
R.R.   Reid
Assistant Manager
_D  •     __      _■  e   O   •   __>  c
RRR:gg BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B",Vancouver.BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665 2508
€P Bail
WW Holland
-• inaget
-RReid
■  >. Manager
June 9, 1978
File:  T-78-99A
Ms. Ida F. Elliott
Suite #107
3330 East 4th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.  V5M 1L8
Dear Ms. Elliott:
Thank you kindly for writing to us concerning the annual
outing by patients from the Louis Brier Home.
It must be very difficult to arrange satisfactory outings
for these people, and I am pleased to learn that they do
have an enjoyable time on Nanaimo sailings with us.
Yours truly,
R.R. Reid
Assistant Manager
D. t . Li J.Uc
RRR:gg W Holland
.-ager
R Reid
' Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B", Vancouver.BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
ra,_
June 9, 1978
United Airlines
P.O. Box 45-270A
Detroit, MI 48255
U.S.A.
Gentlemen:
We are returning billing with request that it be directed
for payment to Mr. R.E. Weitzel, 4921 - 5th Avenue, Delta,
B.C., in view of the fact that this was at passenger's
convenience.
Yours truly,
R.R. Reid
Assistant Manager
-D _  _ c  _■ tj  __> C L_> •
Enclosure BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier^B". Vancouver. BC    V6C2R3
■Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2503
_i;
■W Holland
RReid
: 'Manager
June 9,   1978
Mr. D. Fraser MacLean, Manager
Ventra Travel Services Ltd.
1836 West 5th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.  V6J 1P3
Dear Fraser:
Attached please find billing covering the B.C. Telephone
Pioneers Day excursion June 6th.
As I presume the 198 fares covered your escort, please
deduct $4 from the total shown, and at your convenience
remit to my attention the amount of $1,233.50.
Trusting that all went well.
Yours truly,
R.R. Reid
Assistant Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
RRR:gg
Enclosure BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver. BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
•  .
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
«
(' W Holland
■imager
l R Reid
CP Hail
'■ s: Manager
June 9,   1978
Mr. Ed Sweeney
Captain Cook Bicentennial Committee
1117 Wharf Street
Victoria, B.C.
V8W 2Z2
Dear Mr. Sweeney:
It's not often I find myself in a position of having to
admit to being embarrassed, but through the good services
of Clay Williams, a Captain Cook Bicentennial flag was
made available to us for flying on the "Princess Patricia."
Representative of Canada's remaining cruise fleet, we naturally are proud to fly this flag, but I feel that outright
purchase or donation is more appropriate, and my purpose
in writing to you is to ask if you will kindly furnish me
with an address to which we can make a donation, whether
or not it is yours, or another associated with the Bicentennial Committee.
Yours truly,
R.R. Reid
Assistant Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
RRR:gg CPRail WTg.
Internal Correspondence
Dats  VANCOUVER, June 9, 1978 File:  14118 A-l
From  R*R- Reid
Jo Miss M. Irvine
General Administrative Clerk
Coastal Marine Operations, Montreal
With reference to your letter of May 18, File 103-30(a), reference to your request for the actual effective date that Princess
Victoria, Inc. closed down.
Please be advised that under date of March 14, 1975, we wrote
to Mr. Richard Sprague as per photostat attached.  Under date
of March 21, 1975, Mr. A. Graham, Law Department, Vancouver,
wrote Mr. Sprague as per photostat attached, and it would have
to be accepted that this period of time would have to be classified as the effective date of commencement of lapse of registration.
Should this not be sufficient, please advise further.
(Form 102-R
Assistant Manager
i___-_t_i_>«_-<.
RRR:gg
Enclosures CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, June 5, 1978
From  A.J. McPherson
File: 164-1
■■  '
■
^ __<__   _
^__i  '
_*___.   ^1
-
To  Mr. J.D. Finnie
Traffic Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
It has become increasingly apparent that some action regarding
the protection of refrigeration units on trailers must be taken.
In recent weeks I have received several calls from C.P. Transport indicating that they intend to claim for alleged damage
to refrigeration units.
On a review of other claims for damage to these units, I noted
that the minimum claim is approximately $1,000-  In view of the
potential for large claims, it would seem reasonable for us to
request the motor transport shipper to take at least minimal
measures to protect the refrigeration unit.
Since my discussion with you several weeks ago, I have obtained
pictures of Capital Freightways units showing protective bars
they have installed to cut down on damage to these units.
During our recent discussion, you pointed out that these bars
had reduced the incidence of damage to these units, and I wonder why we could not request the other shippers to follow
Capital's lead (in particular, C.P.T., who are involved in 90%
of all claims for refrigeration unit damage).  Should this be
met with refusal, I suggest that our liability would be reduced
somewhat.
Incidentally, I spoke verbally to John Ferguson, Terminal Manager,
Vancouver, and requested that in case of damage being noted on
refrigeration units that the report show both the trailer number
and the unit number.  I would appreciate your ensuring that .!.
this has been relayed to all traffic supervisors involved.
Departmental Analyst
AJM:gg
bcc:     M.W.  Holland
(Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B". Vancouver. BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04 -507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
IP Rail
M W Holland
Manager
RRReld
'•.ss. Manager
File:  78REF099
June 5th, 1978
Mr. John Riga
Passenger Agent/Tours
3, Place Ville Marie
Montreal, P.Q.
H3B 2E3
Dear Mr. Riga:
Attached you will find Miscellaneous Charges Order BCS17
No. 02791, value $100 C.F. covering excess payment received
on your MCO 018-4010-540-789 (value $985.00).  Alaska cruise
ticket BCS 11/08858 (value $885.00) was previously forwarded
to you in favour Mr. and Mrs. L. Marchand (Cabin 106, June
28th, 1978, Skagway to Vancouver).
It will be necessary for you to issue cheque to above client
taking credit in your agency report to head office for BCS17
No. 02791. Settlement will be made by them through Manager,
Revenue Accounting, C.P. Rail, Montreal.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg
Attachment Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, June 9, 1978
From  A.N. Cairns
To   Mr. M.W. Holland
Re your inquiry with respect to the period "Island Commander"
was on dock for maintenance and repairs at B.C. Marine, Capt.
Higgs, prior to taking the boat out of service ascertained
from us that there would not be any requirement for use of
the tug during the period on dock.
It therefore must be assumed that the tug was available for
our use, and we are responsible for the daily charge rate of
$805 during the docking time as per mutual understanding.
It also may be noted, the understanding for commitment of the
tug to us is leased on 26 days per month usage.
Marine Superintendent
ANC:gg
5)Form 102-R CPRail Wji
Internal Correspondence mHH
Date       VANCOUVER, 9 June 1978 File: 606
From        M.W. Holland
To   H.S. Harriman
Manager, Revenue Accounting
C.P. Rail
Windsor Station
Montreal
Attached you will find the following tickets for cancellation:
BCS 5 x 10 No. 194804 ($ 8.50) issued Nanaimo 06/26/74
BCS 5 x 10 No. 213879 ($14.00) issued Nanaimo 11/14/74
BCS 5 x 10 No. 198551 ($ 8.00) issued Nanaimo 11/18/74
BCS 5 x 10 No. 234960 ($ 6.00) issued Nanaimo 11/18/74
BCS 5 x 10 No. 222586 ($10.00) issued Nanaimo 11/20/74
BCS 5 x 4 No. 199524 ($ 3.00) issued Nanaimo 03/13/76
BCS 5 x 4 No. 353343 ($ 2.00) issued Vancouver 09/22/77
All of the above represent "unclaimed" transportation and to
date no one has made a claim on them.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
AJM'GP
)Form 102-R . ...v.. ■.,-.. I ..,_...__■'
CPRail
m
Date        VANCOUVER, 9 June 1978
Fro/77   M.W. Holland
To        R. Lehman
2nd Steward
"PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER"
File: 494286 (I)
Re: Buck CHAMBERLAND. 494286, injured on 4 June 1978, 2115
Please ensure this office is advised if Mr. Chamberland
loses time or attends a doctor account this injury.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
GP
*'_> Form 102-R
i _ •
CPRail W£
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER,  9 June  1978 File:   484451  (I)
Fro/77 M.W.  Holland
To T. Irvine
Chief Steward
"PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER"
Re:  Janice Edith ILOTT. 484451, injured on 4 June 1978, 1730
Please ensure this office is advis ed if Miss Ilott attends
a doctor or loses time account this injury.
(Form 102-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
GP /
internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, June 8, 1978
From   J-W. McCowatt
To  Master, M.S. "TRAILER PRINCESS"
Chief Engineer, M.S. "TRAILER PRINCESS"
I
f|g) Form 102-R
Arrangements are confirmed to have the above vessel off Dry-
dock No. 1, Burrard Dry Dock, on Monday, June 12th, 1978 at
0700.
Engineers will work two shifts, and a cook is required.
No personnel from the Deck Department are required while the
vessel is in drydock.
Anticipate that the vessel will leave the drydock on Friday
P.M. June 16 or before.
Asst. Supt. Eng.
_[_>__••  _< » O - O •
JWMrgg
J CPRail
Internal Corresp
m
Date  VANCOUVER, June 8, 1978 File:  T-78-10
Fro/77 R.R. Reid
To  Mr. H.S. Harriman
Montreal
Due to severe complaints regarding the sightseeing bus trip
in Prince Rupert on May 29th by cruise passengers who sailed
from Vancouver on the May 23rd sailing of the "Princess Patricia," Purser was obliged to refund 25 full fares.  As the tour
coupons had been collected by the bus driver and the manager
of the sightseeing firm was out of town, tickets were not available to the Purser prior to sailing from Prince Rupert that
date.
Accordingly, Purser was required to make a cash disbursement
for refund purposes.  Subsequently, the Manager of the Haida
Coachways was contacted by the writer requesting the return
of the tickets to Purser and the -following tickets were given
to the Purser at Prince Rupert June 6:
BCS 1, #*s 67899/900, 67914/15, 67921/28, 67938/39, 67945/56,
67956/59 and 67970/72.
As Purser's trip report for the May 23rd voyage together with
his balance sheet for the same period was mailed to you May
31st, he cancelled the tickets, deducting them from the Prince
Rupert bus sales for the following sailing May 31st, thereby
reimbursing himself for the cash outlay.
It will be appreciated if you will accept report accordingly
under the circumstances.
Assistant Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR:gg
(Form 102-R *#
CPRail
Internal Corresponds
Date  VANCOUVER,   June  8,   1978
Fro/77 A.N.   Cairns
To  Mr.  M.W.  Holland
CI
File:     P-500
(Form 102-R
Inspected ramp at Construction Aggregates property in New Westminster on Monday 5 June in company with C. Aitken.
The ramp is in skeleton form with no decking, is of light-scantlings and a SWL of somewhere in the order of 20-25 tons and is
valued at approximately $25,000.  The general condition of the
steel is good, but the frame has been either dropped, struck
by a barge, or whatever and is racked as a result.  There is
evidence of repairs having been made to the side members, and
there are three or four broken welds probably due to the racking.
My opinion is that the costs anticipated to put this ramp back
into operation would be excessive and therefore do not recommend further consideration.
Another ramp similar in configuration to the barge ramp we have
recently purchased is available from Pe Ben Industries in Delta,
and while a thorough survey was not made, it appears to be in
average condition, and is as follows:  50' x 12' 30 Ton SWL
with an asking price of $35,000.
Also sited in Delta was a new ramp frame 50' x 18'—45 SWL
without fittings available at approximately $18,000.  This unit
has excellent potential but again the costs to complete and
fit would be considerable, and there is the limitation of length.
Marine Superintendent
ANC:gg
J CPRail
Internal Correspondence
EB
Date VANCOUVER,  June 8,   1978
fro/77 R.R- Reid
To  Mr. D.S. Collings
Superintendent Passenger Services
File:  606
This will acknowledge receipt of your letter dated May 24
File 3-10/78-A concerning the withdrawal of rail tickets from
the Nanaimo Wharf Ticket Office.
Arrangements as suggested have been made, and I appreciate
the'advice given us in this respect.
Assistant Manager
_D * _< • _< e O   • O *
RRR:gg
_J_)Form 102-R
J_,J ..-M-U*.,*. »>■,-*.
I ... WHolland
< maget
1 f. f? e/d
SI Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B'.Vancouver.BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
June 8,   1978
Mr. Clay Williams
824 West 20th Street
North Vancouver,B.C.
V7P 2B4
Dear Clay:
Thank you again for the courtesy of the "Princess Patricia"
pictures and of course for your continuing interest in the
ship and the many ways of placing her into service.
We have had a good look on board ship and our General Foreman, together with his experts, have concluded that to
display the pictures on the ship could cause damage to
bulkheads or panelling and also possibly the back of your
picture frames.
For this reason we regretfully decided that they should be
returned because of the work involved and the value of the
pictures.
I will have them wrapped and packaged and arrange their
delivery, again with regret.
Yours truly,
R.R. Reid
Assistant Manager
_D-_n.-**0-_->*
RRR:gg CPRail W%
Internal Correspondence 3^A
Date   VANCOUVER, June 8, 1978 File:  78.ALA.521.C
From  r.r. Reid
To  Master, "Princess Patricia"
Mr. Keith Campbell, Vice President and Senior Executive Officer
of Canadian Pacific Ltd., together with Mrs. Campbell, will
make the round trip July 10th "Princess Patricia" cruise, occupying Cabin 225.  We have extended the courtesy of your table
to Mr. and Mrs. Campbell and will advise later which sitting
they prefer.
It will be appreciated if you will kindly extend every courtesy
to Mr. and Mrs. Campbell en route the cruise in your usual fine
manner.
Assistant Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR:gg
cc:  Purser, "Princess Patricia" - Kindly note remarks to Master.
It will be appreciated if you will kindly assist Mr. and Mrs.
Campbell en route the cruise in any manner you deem consistent with their position.  Also inquire if they are interested
in making any of the available shore excursions.  They may
possibly prefer the atmosphere of being with other passengers; however, where possible it will be appreciated if a
private car can be made available to them.  Under separate
cover we are requesting complementary White Pass and Yukon
Rail tickets for the Lake Bennett tour.
...12
(Form 102-R _-
Page 2
Master, "Princess Patricia"
June 8, 1978
Chief Steward: Will you kindly arrange for a bottle of champagne on ice together with a tray of canapes to be available
in cabin No. 225 no later than 1800 on July 10th.  It will
also be appreciated if you will arrange for a complementary
bar to be set up in Cabin 225, insuring that adequate mix is
available from time to time. As soon as we are advised of the
sitting Mr. and Mrs. Campbell prefer at the Master's table*
we will request protection.  It will be appreciated if you
otherwise will accord special attention en route as may be
deemed necessary.
Chief Engineer:  It will be appreciated if you will kindly
approach Mr. Campbell, inviting him to take a tour below decks
at your convenience.
Mr. and Mrs. T. Haswell: For your information.
Stewardess: For your information. '.
bcc:  Mr. R.E. Ferguson:  For your private information.
bcc: Mr. A. Schmidt, Superintendent, Investigation Department:
For your personal information.
bcc:  Mr. J.D. Bromley:  For your personal information.
V BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
mv Holland
- ''tiger
IRReid
5S? Manager
June 9, 1978
File:  T-78-99
Mr. J. Watts
#5 -- 1599 Pemberton Avenue
North Vancouver, B.C.
V7P 2S5
Dear Mr. Watts:
This will acknowledge receipt of your letter dated May 29,
in which you complained about the condition of our vessel
the "Princess of Vancouver."
I am indeed sorry that you did not find your trip pleasurable
but you are assured that we do everything possible to keep
the ship as clean as a virtual 24 hour day, seven day a week
operation will allow.
Yours truly,
A. MEIJER
Catering Supt.
B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
J Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, June 9, 1978
Fro/77 M.W. Holland
To   B.C.C.S.S. Personnel
Files
240
L-108
Re:
Instructions for Leased Vehicles
The attached instructions should be carefully read and followed.
In general, these provide guidelines for the care and use of the
leased vehicle that differ little from those that a reasonably
careful and prudent individual would exercise in the operation of
his own personal vehicle.
Please acknowledge your receipt and understanding of these instructions
and be guided accordingly.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AM/jb
K_. Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier-B". Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
.fW Holland
■i ■ ager
~rlReV June  8,   1978
n Manager
File:     507
Captain E.W. Richards
President
Southeastern Alaska Pilots' Association
P.O. Box 6100
Ketchikan, AK 99901
U.S.A.
Dear Captain Richards:
This will acknowledge receipt of your letter of May 30 with
thanks.
As indicated in my telephone inquiry, we are presently contemplating a replacement for the "Princess Patricia," but no
definite decision has been made as yet.  My concern was the
degree of additional expense involved in attempting to place
into service a foreign bottom but operated by a Canadian firm
with Canadian crew.
When a final decision is made, we will let you have full particulars; however, the additional expense with pilotage may
preclude the possibility of our continuing in Alaska service.
Yours truly,
R.R. Reid
Assistant Manager
B.C.C.S.o.
RRR:gg
cc:  Mr. Len Laurence, President
Alaska Pacific Marine, Inc. ,/'
v/ s
Internal Correspondence
Date      VANCOUVER,   June  7,   1978
Fro/n      M.W.  Holland
To     Mr. W.R. Jones
General Paymaster
Montreal
File:  409
Reference your letter of May 31, file 44-50-33, concerning lost
period 07 wage cheque #A134-502 in the amount of $525.15 drawn
in favour of A.S. Fraser.
Returned herewith is Declaration form together with signed receipt
form #599.  The Declaration form completed indicates the loss of
period 08 wage cheque and we have taken the liberty of changing
this to period 07, as per conversation, as this was the cheque in
question and not period 08.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
(Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
_!
Date VANCOUVER,  June 7,   1978
Fro/77 B.D.  Margetts
To Mr.   Keith Campbell
File:  78.ALA.521.C
While in Vancouver I took the liberty of having your cruise
tickets issued for the July 10th sailing of the "Princess
Patricia" to Skagway, Alaska and return.  Accordingly, I am
pleased to enclose BCS 11 Number 09103 covering Cabin 225 in
favor of Mrs. Campbell and yourself on this sailing.  The rate
charged is on the basis of 50% of the minimum cruise fare applicable to the July 10th sailing (.50 x $690.00 x 2) $690.00
plus port charges ($12.00 x 2) $24.00 total $714.00.  In connection with this rate, I require both Mrs. Campbell's and
your B.C.C.S.S. pass number to endorse on the cruise tickets
and for my Vancouver office ticket records. At your convenience,
may I have cheque in the amount of $714.00, or if you prefer,
C.P. credit card may be used.
Also enclosed with your cruise tickets are the following:
1. Immigration questionnaires, which we request Mrs. Campbell
and you complete prior to sailing July 10th, from which
the Purser completes Immigration documentation required
by U.S. Immigration officers boarding the "Princess Patricia"
at Ketchikan, Alaska, the first U.S. port of call.  Forms
will be collected when completed.
2. Optional shore excursions.  Purser will contact you in
advance of port arrival and arrange complimentary tours
for those you desire to take.
.../I
•3 Form 102-R Page 2
Mr. Keith Campbell
June 7, 1978
3. Daily cruise bulletin outlining points of interest en route
the cruise and "Patricia" facts.
4. Baggage labels.
5. Incidental information.
The Master of the "Princess Patricia" extends the courtesy of
his table to you.  Will you please consider which meal sitting
you prefer, as there will be two sittings:
Breakfast
Lunch
Dinner
1st Sitting
0800
1230
1800
2nd Sitting
0845
1330
1900
Because of the early arrival at Ketchikan, Skagway, Juneau,
and Vancouver, the breakfast hour is advanced by three-quarters
of an hour.  Breakfast may be taken in your cabin.  Use the
call button to summon __» boy to arrange.
Dt£(
Depending upon your personal commitments, I would be pleased
to have you review the B.C.C.S.S./Northland operations and meet
the Vancouver staff either during July 10th or on your return.
Will you let me know if this is convenient to permit arrangements
to be made.
I would also like to offer the facilities of my department to
assist Mrs. Campbell and you on arrival Vancouver, also to and
from the "Princess Patricia," if you will let me know your '
travel plans when finalized.
Baggage can be left with our Vancouver office during the day;
however, if you are being driven down by friends ater 1800,
73 Page 3
Mr. Keith Campbell
June 7, 1978
the driver should proceed to the foot of Burrard Street North,
turn left on causeway, and at bottom of incline make a sharp
left turn, proceeding parallel to train tracks to lower entrance
to Pier B, making a half left turn into Pier B, and proceeding
to ship's side North End of Pier, where stewards are available
to receive your baggage.
Embarkation commences at 1800 July 10th with sailing at 2030.
While stewards are not on duty until 1800, the facilities of
your cabin can be made available to you anytime during the afternoon.  Dinner is not served on sailing night but evening
buffet, usually available at 2230 in the Dining Room, is advanced
to 2130.
As I imagine you will have guests on board prior to sailing,
we will arrange to have a:tray of canapes and Champagne placed
in your cabin at 1800.
Dress is very informal.  There are two occasions when the ladies
like to "dress up." The first night out, the Master hosts his
Champagne Party, held in the forward observation lounge one-
half hour prior to each dinner sitting, and on Prince Rupert
night, 2nd last night, Captain's Dinner and Masquerade Ball
is held.  At other times pant suits, slacks, shirts, etc. are
most acceptable.  On the two occasions previously mentioned, gentlemen may wear business suits, co-ordinates, etc.  At other
times sports attire or that which is most comfortable.  Be sure
to include comfortable walking shoes and bring along a warm
jacket, as it can be cool on deck when off the Glaciers.  It
is also advisable to pack light rainwear of some kind, as it
is possible to encounter showers ashore in Alaska, and because
of the exchange rate, carry U.S. traveller's cheques for U.S.
purchases.
../4 Page 4
Mr. Keith Campbell
June 7, 1978
There will be many opportunities to take pictures, and the
Purser can give you suggestions for interesting pictures.
Take along your field glasses for viewing wild life ashore
and in the air, mountain scenery, whales, and the many other
"at-the-moment" sights.
As a guide for tipping, it is suggested that you consider your
room steward, waiter, bell boy, and Stewardess if her services
are required.  For steward and waiter, $1.50 per person per
day or $20-25 for each.  Bell service, 15% at time of service.
While steward and waiter are the same throughout the cruise,
Bell Boys are not.  For Stewardess service $10.00.  Settlement, other than Bell Boys, is usually made on the last morning.
While the Master is the Commanding Officer of the vessel, the
Purser is in charge of the "Inside" operations, and should be
contacted for any assistance, or special arrangements en route
your cruise.
Wishing you an enjoyable "Patricia" experience.
General Manager
Coastal Marine Operations
RRR:gg
J CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER,   June  7,   1978
Fro/77   A.N.   Cairns
To   Mas ter
Chief Engineer
Purser
Chief Steward
Mas ter
Chief Engineer
Purser
Chief Steward
Master
Chief Engineer
Master
Chief Engineer
Files:
T-78-37
S.O.
"Princess Patricia"
"Princess of Vancouver"
"Carrier Princess'
"Trailer Princess"
UNIFORMS
Kindly ensure that officers under your jurisdication are aware of
the following:
As uniform entitlement comes due, officers in the Purser, Deck,
Steward and Engineer Departments will order uniforms from
Messrs. G. Campbell in the usual manner, indicating on Form 175
material option as follows:
(A) #7524 Barathea (Black)  18 oz.
(B) #8040 Serge   (Black)  14 oz.
Material choice as in the past, with the employee paying the
additional cost difference for barathea.
c t • £-
S) Form 102-R - 2
Uniforms of the "Battle Dress" cut are also approved, same
materials as above, with rank epaulettes included, and may be
ordered in lieu of the regular cut for use as follows:
"Princess Patricia" -- All officers standard uniform cut only
permitted.
"Princess of Vancouver"  )
"Carrier Princess"       )     Standard or "Battle Dress"
"Trailer Princess"       )     allowed.
NOTE:  Existing navy blue uniforms may be worn until due date
for new uniform entitlement.
CAPS
Uniform cap model 733G is approved for B.C.C.S.S. officers.
Marine Superintendent
B.C.C.S.S.
cc:  Mr. H.I. Williams, Vancouver
Mr. R. Gavin, Vancouver
Mr. W.W. Hocking, Vancouver
Gordon Campbell Ltd., 78 E. 2nd Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
ANC/jb CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, June 7, 1978
Filej 336
Fro/77
To
R.R. Reid
Mr. A. McDermott
Manager, Insurance and Fire Protection
With reference to your letter of May 26 File MC&I-R-45-12.
In answer to the questions raised in your letter, kindly be
advised of the following:
1. An estimate of the amount of cash the Purser of the "Princess Patricia" is likely to take to the Vancouver Ticket
Office from each trip would average approximately $15,000.
2. The amount of cash likely to be in care of the Purser of
the "Princess Patricia" during each cruise would be approximately $10,000.  Insofar as the $10,000 for crew's
wages is concerned, this amount is remitted back on the
same day in the form of wage cheques with any residue in
cash.  This amount of money is not carried during the cruise,
wage settlement arrangement being that cheques are given
out and cashed on arrival morning.   "."•■'
3. The amount of cash receipts likely to be deposited by the
Purser of the "Princess Patricia" is approximately $1,000.
The change picked up by return is usually about $250 once
a week.
Assistant Manager
X5*_ltt(__*OL_C     ■_>»
RRR:gg
Form 102-R
i*W8_ oi_, uoas; oieamsrup service
Pier'B". Vancouver. BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
W Holland
r-ager
R Reid
_: Manager
June 7, 1978
File:  ALA.78.T
Mr. R.M. "£oporoski
St. Michael's College
University of Toronto
81 St. Mary Street
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1J4
Dear Mr. Toporoski:
This will acknowledge receipt of your letter of June 2 with
which was enclosed your cheque for $1,734 payment of accommodation held in your behalf and your mother's, July 2nd
sailing of the "Princess Patricia."
The "Princess Patricia" is registered in Victoria, B.C.
and flies the Canadian flag and would suggest that in the
foreseeable future there will be no change.
Under separate cover tickets are being prepared for mailing
and will be en route shortly.  I am, however, writing in
advance of your tickets in answer to your letter.
We are looking forward to having you on board ship and trust
that your cruise with us will be both enjoyable and memorable.
Yours truly,
R.R. Reid
Assistant Manager
_[_>-_'-_■- o • _J •
RRR:gg Internal Correspondence
_i
Date   VANCOUVER, June 7, 1978
Fro/77 M.W. Holland
To   Miss Beverly Bussell
Please note I have been invited by Seaspan International Ltd.
to participate in a fishing trip commencing August 13th and
terminating the morning of August 17.
Would you please make the appropriate notation in your date
books.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH:gg
cc: Miss L. Taylor
_r
(Form 102-R
J Internal Correspondence
_i
Date VANCOUVER,   June  7,   1978
From R.R. Reid
File:  78.ALA.521.C
To  Mr. B.D. Margetts
Montreal
We require Mr. and Mrs. Campbell's B.C.C.S.S. Pass numbers.
Please endorse them on ticket 09103 in Endorsation Box and
advise me for recording on Audit portion.
If C.P. credit card is used, please endorse C.P.C.C. number
in squares below C.P. credit charge voucher #018772, date
above, and name below that.  Have Mr. Campbell sign opposite
X, give him the top or customer's copy, and send me the remaining intact coupons.
Assistant Manager
Jd*-)_iL>*__>»__> •
RRR:gg
(Form 102-R
J -*♦
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER,   June  6,   1978
Fro/77  R.R.   Reid
To Mr.  M.W.  Holland
Re:     "Mercator I"
File:  655-C
Following our visit with Mr. Kusler in Seattle last week, we
have today received summary of our discussion with him, together with preliminary summarization of direction he suggests,
a new ship might be employed.  Copy of Mr. Kusler's report is
attached excepting cruise brochures which will be retained in
this office for working purpbses.
I many respects Mr. Kusler has not told us anything we did not
already know, but I believe we both agree that we are going
to have to pay for any additional contacts, suggestions, and
leads on a one-to-one basis.  It is my personal feeling that
Mr. Kusler may well be living in the past and can not contribute too much assistance to us.
In discussion with Mr. Margetts this afternoon, I apprised him
Of the fact that Mr. Huisman was not available for early part
of this week but that I had contacted Richard Ludwig on the
belief that he was directly concerned with the information which
was forwarded to Mr. Huisman concerning "Mercator I," and it
proved to be correct.
It would appear in principal C.P. Air is interested in a Mexican involvement, and in advance of any general discussion with
them, it would appear they would suggest seven-day cyle, and
this is as far as they have progressed to this point in time.
...12
rSpForm 102-R Page 2
Mr. M.W. Holland
June 6, 1978
I have not had any imput from Westow as yet concerning the
information forwarded to them.
Assistant Manager
D^Li,-«.0-->-
RRR:gg
J. CPRail •.       . Yf/\
Internal Correspondence l__fl
Date   VANCOUVER, June 6, 1978
Fro/77 M.W. Holland
To  Memorandum for the File
I received a phone call from Mr. R. Peebles of the I.L.W.U.
requesting a meeting to open discussions on revision to the
current contract of I.L.W.U. membership at Northland.
A date has been tentatively set for 10 a.m., June 15, and
to be confirmed early in the week of June 12.
All parties will be kept advised of the results of this
meeting.
©Form 102-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH:gg
cc:  Mr. P.E. Timpson
Mr. P.I. Georges
[ W Holland
IReid
■ Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
June 6, 1978
File: 456745
Seafarer's International Union
837 Homer Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 2W3
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Sales Repr.
Mgr. Traff/Sales
T&£/<\.    fV\rh£,
T.
^r
Gentlemen:
Re:  Kenneth A. FERGUSON, Able Seaman
Attached herewith is a letter dated June 4, received from
the 2nd Officer, "Princess of Vancouver", concerning
Mr. Ferguson, which is self-explanatory.
It will be appreciated if Mr. Ferguson were not despatched
to B.C. Coast Steamship Service/Northland in the future.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8". Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
CPBaii
/Holland June  5»   1978
Reid File:     118421
■ 'atager
Mr. J.D. Southern
#401 — 1044 Balmoral
Victoria, B.C.
V8T 1A8
Dear Mr. Southern:
Further to your telephone call to this office May 5, concerning
the demise of your mother, Mrs. Feme E. Southern.
Please complete the enclosed Form P.R.3 and return to this
office, together with a copy of the Certificate of Death.
If Mrs. Southern was in possession of a Long Service Pass, will
appreciate same being returned to this office for cancellation.
You will no doubt be hearing from our Montreal Office in the near
future, in the event that there are any survivor benefits due the
estate.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
Mr. R. Granger, Montreal
Mr. N.D. Mullins, Law Dept., Vancouver
cc
Further my telex JB-55 of June 5, 1978, concerning
Mrs. F.E. Southern, S-017-118421, who died May 28, 197.
Mr. J.D. Southern is the Executor of the estate.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
W Holland
n Reid
■Manager June   6,   1978
File:     T-78-10
Alderman Tom Thompson
The Corporation of the Village of Alert Bay
P.O. Box 28
Alert Bay, B.C.
VON 1A0
Dear Alderman Thompson:
Thank you kindly for your letter of May 11th, 1978 advising
of your "Patricia Day" plans and for the courtesy that this
extends to the ship.
I regret the delay in acknowledging receipt of your letter,
resulting from the time taken to obtain information on the
"Patricia's" former Masters.  This information, together
with "Princess Patricia" facts, are attached.
Mr. M.W. Holland, Manager, B.C.C.S.S., will be on board
the September 3rd Alert Bay arrival and is looking forward
to the day's activities.  I will write you later on to advise how much longer we can hold the ship in Alert Bay on
the 3rd of September.  Meanwhile again, we appreciate the
courtesy of your arrangements.
Yours truly,
R.R. Reid
Assistant Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
RRR:gg
Attachments
J y
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B".Vancouver,BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
m W Holland
' rager
R R Reid
'•-.' Manager
June 6,   1978
Pile:    77.527.T
REGISTERED MAIL
Mr. HoJiold Beertl
c/o Travel Pace., Inc.
P.O. Box 727
Arlington Heights,  1L   60006
U.S.A.
Dear Mr.  Beerll:
This will acknowledge receipt ol outstanding payments agal.nst
W.S.F.  cheque. No.  2154, which Is now returned herewith.
TheAe stilt remains an amount ol $2,387.23 which. represents
a balance Irom payment fie.ceA.ved viz Travel Pace cheque 2754
In the amount ol $10,800 In association with the attached
bitting lor those who travelled on the July 26,   7977 cruise.
We trust this amount wilt be. lorthcomlng shortly -In total
s ettlement.
We si.nceh.ely regret the problems which you mentioned In
your letter ol April 22, and we hope, that these, have now
been resolved. We would appreciate the outstanding paid
to the settlement ol your W.S.F. cheque, as we one. natu-.
rally reluctant to take. legal action with an employee, ol
the travel agents Industry, but yo.u will, appreciate the
pressure that -is being put on us by our Audit Department
lor llnal settlement.
Sours very truly,
R.R.  Reid
Assistant Manager
PRP:gg
Enclosure
bcc:    Mr. M.W.  Byrnes,  CP Air, Attention Ms.  Kathy LaUerty -
We do appreciate the time taken In attempting to recover W.S.F.  cheque which Travel Pace,  Inc.  used In
partial payment ol their July 26,   1977 Alaska cruise.
Trust your relations with this llrm are stilt amicable
as I understand they are one ol your better customer.
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
W Holland
■ag-tr
% Reid
:-• Manager
June 6,  1978
Pile No.  78. 527. P
Mrs. Roberta Poole
CP Air Operations Centre
1 McConachle Way
Richmond,  B.C.
Vear Mrs.  Poole:
This will conl-irm our telephone conversation this morning
regarding the June 24th "Princess Patricia" Alaska cruise.
Enclosed please llnd passage ticket covering Stateroom 275
Issued on behall ol your husband and yoursell, together
with Immigration questionnaire, baggage tags, dally bulletin, and details ol shore excursions.
The charges respecting this accommodation are $690 plus
port charge ol $24 totalling $714.
Should there be any questions concerning the enclosures,
please do not hesitate to call me.
yours very truly,
R.R.  Reid
Assistant Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
■__
sures
J CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date   VANCOUVER,  June 6,   1978 File:     78.ALA.521.H
From  R.R.  Reid
To   Purser, "Princess Patricia"
Mr. and Mrs. G. Arnold Hart—"Princess Patricia" June 24,
Vancouver-Skagway Return	
Mr. G. Arnold Hart, Chairman of the Bank of Montreal, accompanied
by Mrs. Hart, occupying Cabin 225, will be making the June 24th
Alaska Cruise.  It will be appreciated if you will accord Mr. and
Mrs. Hart special attention en route the cruise.
Where possible, private automobile may be required ashore and I
ask that you oblige this request.
Assistant Manager
RRR:gg
cc:  Chief Steward:  Please arrange to place Mr. and Mrs. Hart
at Master's table second sitting and place tray of canapes
and bottle imported champagne on ice in Cabin 225 together
with %  dozen glasses at Company's request.
Master: Kindly note foregoing and at your convenience
extend Mr. and Mrs. Hart courtesy of the Bridge.
Chief Engineer:. For your information.  Should Mr. Hart be
interested in viewing below decks, will you kindly oblige
at your convenience.
S)Form 102-R
■ - »..f._i__gp '
7 Internal Correspondence
_i
Date  VANCOUVER, June 6, 1978
fro/77 R.R- Reid
To  Chief Steward, "PRINCESS PATRICIA"
File:     78.ALA.521.G
Form 102-R
Mr. J.L. Gibson of the B.C. Gibson Family, occupying Cabin 222,
travelling with Dr. and Mrs. D.M. King, Cabin 334, are making
the June 24th cruise.
Mr. and Mrs. Gibson spent their honeymoon on board the "Princess
Louise" some 40 years ago and are returning to the "Princess
Patricia" for their 40th anniversary, which is June 29th.
It is desired that this party be accommodated at a table for
four by a window on second sitting, and we wish a bottle of
imported champagne be placed in Cabin 222 June 24th, together
with tray of canapes and a dozen glasses at Company's courtesy.
Will you also arrange suitable acknowledgement of their 40th
anniversary in the usual manner.
Undoubtedly there will be other requests for anniversary champagne, but please watch requests and if so, arrange to deliver
bottle of champagne to Cabin 222 at 5:00 P.M. June 29th, otherwise to their table at our courtesy, that evening.
Assistant Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
RRR:gg
cc:  Purser:  Please accord this party every assistance en route
cruise.
Master: Please note foregoing and extend courtesy of the
bridge at your convenience.
Chief Engineer:  For your information.
.. ...~,_.,^_
/ CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER,    -June 6,   1978
From  R.R.  Reid
To  Ms. Noreen Cartwright
Montreal
File:  T-78-69
Enclosed please find copy of a C.G.O.T. Sayers marketing concept
for the 1979 and all 1978 U.S. markets.  The subject is most interesting and feel we should look seriously at this concept should
we continue in Alaska cruising and the possibility of other areas
following the completion of the 1978 Alaska cruise season by the
"Princess Patricia."
May I have your comments please.
Assistant Manager
Do _ e O . U . O ;.
RRR:gg
Enclosure
(Form 102-R C.P.   RAIL
B.C.C.S.S.
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
DATE ^/ r^^\j>
~7^
R.R.   REI
A.N.   CAIRNS
t. king-r-f^C,
J.W. MCCOWATT
A. MEIJER
C.A.   AITKEN M
J.D.   FINNIE   ^""'
WjW___JEI_CKING     </f~
J^CK_MARSHALL '/
_N
M.G. VMAl.ABANAN
T.   SWH.NKY
L.   YORKE
A.J.   MCPHERSON
R. D.   PELLEY
B.H.  BUSSELL
J.C.   BEEBE
G.   GAZDAG
B.C.   THOM
B.J.   KUSCH-
G.   PETERS
L.S.   WORDEN
M.   KEEGAN   7y/(
_. &#~
PLEASE NOTE THE ATTACHED/FOLLOWING AND INITIAL OPPOSITE YOUR NAME.
H.L. HUDSON
OFFICE MANAGER
/M~- '/Holland
! Reid
'■'anager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
up Ran
June 5, 1978
File: T-79-69
Mr. Fred S. Colthorpe
Manager, Accommodation Services
Tourism British Columbia
1117 Wharf Street
Victoria, B.C.
V8W 2Z2
Dear Sir:
Reference your letter of May 30,
ferry service to be shown in the
Tourist Accommodation Directory.
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Mgr. Traff/feales
T^"" •<•?<;.€,
-?&6«Vp/
i
concerning details of our
next printing of the B.C.
This will confirm that the entry is correct, as shown.
Please note the attachment for Queen Charlotte City is not
part of our operation and is returned herewith.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb (Form 102-R
Internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER,  June  5,   1978 File:     494199
Fro/77     M.W.  Holland
To     Mr. R. Lemay
Pension Benefits Records
Room 158, Windsor Station
Montreal
Reference to telephone call to your office date concerning
pension status code indicated on Form PDB1 for Lori C. TAGGART,
#494199, S.I.N. 716-631-767.
Miss Taggart started with this Department June 20, 1977, in a
non-scheduledposition and was laid off October 1, 1977.  During
this time, she did not contribute to the Company Pension Plan.
This employee is now in a scheduled position and Form 017(b) was
submitted May 18, 1978.  Please change pension status code to
show "P" (contributor).
Manager, B.C.C.S.S. Internal Correspondence
L<
Date  VANCOUVER,   June 5,   1978
Fro/77   R.R.   Reid
To Mr. W.J. Comerford
Manager, Customer and Agency Accounts
Montreal, Quebec
New Toronto Travel Services Inc.
File: ALA.521.77
With reference to your letter of May 5, File 7999-1207, attached
hereto are copies of letters received from Mr. N.A. Chalmers, Q.C.,
Regional Counsel, C.p. Law Department, Toronto, Ontario to bring
you up to date on action against this firm.
Assistant Manager
Ij •   _■ «   __ __>*__><.
RRR:gg
Attachments
,
(Form 102-R Internal Correspondence
m
Date VANCOUVER,   June 5,   1978 File:     77-521-T
Fro/77 R.R.   Reid
To Mr. W.J. Comerford
Manager, Customer and Agency Accounts
Montreal, Quebec
For your information, we have now received an additional payment
in the amount of $2,000 against Travel Pace Incorporated N.S.F.
cheque. With this payment, Travel Pace's N.S.F. cheque has been
settled.  However, there remains outstanding in this file because
of additional ticketing from the original group travelling in
1977 an amount of $2,387.23, which we are still attempting to
recover and will advise subsequently.
The amount of $2,000 has been taken into account period ending
May 31.
Assistant Manager
RRR:gg
(Form 102-R Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, June 5, 1978 File:  78.ALA.521.0
Fro/77 R.R. Reid
To   Purser, "PRINCESS PATRICIA"
Chief Steward, "PRINCESS PATRICIA"
Master, "PRINCESS PATRICIA"
Chief Engineer, "PRINCESS PATRICIA"
Mr. and Mrs. F.W. Oram, Cabin 221,
Mr. and Mrs. H. Hanson, Cabin 223 - July 2nd Sailing, T.E.V.
"PRINCESS PATRICIA" to Skagway, Alaska and Return	
Mrs. F.W. Oram, sister of Mr. Keith Campbell, Vice President
and Senior Executive Officer of Canadian Pacific Ltd., together
with Mr. Oram and their friends Mr. and Mrs. H. Hanson, occupying respectively Cabins. 221 and 223, will sail on the July
2nd round-trip cruise to Skagway, Alaska and return.  In view
of the importance of this group, it is requested that you kindly
arrange special attention en route according particularly Mr.
and Mrs. Oram every courtesy.
It will be appreciated if you will look in on the Orams from
time to time and after arrangements with the Master, assist
them to the bridge periodically throughout their journey.
Any other courtesies ashore will also be appreciated, especially
if after determining which shore excursions the two couples
may desire if you arrange complementary shore excursions on
their behalf.
Chief Steward:  Mr. and Mrs. Oram and Mr. and Mrs. Hanson prefer to be at a table for four by the window and will appreciate
if on the July 2nd sailing you arrange accordingly.  Any other
courtesies extended Mr. and Mrs. Oram and Mr. and Mrs. Hanson
en route their cruise by you or your department will be appreciated.
©Form 102-R
.11 Page 2
"PRINCESS PATRICIA'
June 5, 1978
Master - Kindly note foregoing to Purser and to Chief Steward.
It will be appreciated if you will kindly extend this important
party courtesy of the bridge from time to time, and otherwise
assist them throught their journey.  For your private information, Mr. Keith Campbell at the present time will be taking
the July 10th sailing.
Chief Engineer - For your information, should there be an op-*o
portunity to accord the Orams and the Hansons a private tour
of the Engine Room, it will be appreciated.
Assistant Manager
B*C*C*S*S*
RRR:gg BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier-B". Vancouver. BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (60-1) 665-2507 or 665-2508
CP Rah
I W Holland
i-agtr
RReid
_■■ Manager
June 5th, 1978
File:  78 REF 100
Mrs. A. Skirrow
3805 China Creek Road
Port Alberni, B.C.
V9Y 1R8
Dear Mrs. Skirrow:
Your "Application for Refund" dated May 23rd, 1978 has been referred to me for handling.
As you can no doubt appreciate, prior to authorizing that such
a refund claim be paid, I am obliged to determine the reasons
for its occurrence.  With this in mind, I would appreciate your
reply to the following itemized questions:
1. When you arrived at the dock in Nanaimo to board the 0830
hours sailing May 20th, 1978, did you report to anyone there
that only the driver and one passenger were in the motor-
home, whereas your ticketing read driver and two passengers
(total three adults)?
2. Same questions as in 1 but for your return trip Monday, May
22nd, 1978, 1230 hours.
It seems that it would have been a simple matter to exchange your
tickets for ones reading correctly at either of the terminals
rather than make an application for refund in this manner, and
I would appreciate knowing if this occurred due to an oversight
on the part of one or more of my employees.
An early reply would be appreciated.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg IW Holland
rag<;r
R Reid
-■ Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B",Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
lei (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
June 5, 1978
File: 655-C
Mr. John C. Yashuk
U.S. Public Health Service
1015 North American Way, Room 107
Miami, Florida 33132
U.S.A.
Dear Mr. Yashuk:
It would be appreciated if you will kindly forward copy of the
most recent sanitation and health report for the T.S.M.V. "Mercator One," formerly M/S "Regina Maris."
Yours truly,
R.R. Reid
Assistant Manager
.D«._<_,_'_>->i.Oc.
RRR:gg CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, June 5, 1978 File:  160
Fro/77 A.N. Ca irns
To   Master, "PRINCESS PATRICIA"
I am advised by the Superintendent, Marine Crews, Minister of
Transport, that when perusing articles, it is noted that relieving Masters are not, in all cases, signing "Articles of
Agreement" as Master.
To preclude this oversight and to maintain continuity of identity as Master, Aricles will be signed by each Master in command,
_@
Marine Superintendent
ANC:gg
cc: Master, "PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER'
"    "CARRIER PRINCESS"
"    "TRAILER PRINCESS"
"    "OCEAN PRINCE II"
"    "NORTHLAND FURY"
Mr. J. Agar
>'DForm 102-R MW Holland
.'■nagor
RRReld
-, 5. Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
P:er"B", Vancouver. BC   V6C2RZ
Telex 04 507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
June 5, 1978
File: T-78-49E
Mrs. H.J. Murray
#407 - 1550 Richmond Road
Victoria, B.C.
Dear Mrs. Murray:
We are enclosing with pleasure your annual B.C. Coast Steamship
Service pass in your favour, good until the end of 1978.
Please note that pass should be signed on the back before using.
Yours truly,
H.L. Hudson
Office Manager
HLH:gg
Enclosure ? W Holland
;,'_9_.
R R Reid
5 • Manager
oC coast steamship Service
Pier'B". Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
June 5,   1978
File:     T-78-49E
Mrs. P. D. Billcock
5685 Patricia Bay Highway
R.R. No. 5
Victoria, B.C.
V8Y 1T3
Dear Mrs. Billcock:
We are enclosing with pleasure your annual B.U-^-Coast Steamship
Service pass in your favour, good unti__~_t_e end of 1978.
Please note that pass should be signed on the back before using.
Yours truly,
H.L. Hudson
Office Manager
HLH:gg
Enclosure
.
___ : W Holland
-.-agar
RReld
S. Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier-B'',Vancouver.BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
June 5, 1978
File:  T-78-49E
Mrs. R.E. Barnett
279 Pine Street
Nanaimo, B.C.
Dear Mrs. Barnett:
We are enclosing with pleasure your annual B.C. Coast Steamship
Service pass in your favour, good until the end of 1978.
Please note that pass should be signed on the back before using.
Yours truly,
H.L. Hudson
Office Manager
HLH:gg
Enclosure BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2503
9 Flail
i W Holland
.ir.ager
TflReW
.' Manager
June 5,   1978
Vile:    78. ALA. 527. G
Mr. G.L.  Gibson
Gibson Brothers
1831 Marine Building
355 Burrard Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Gibson:
I am very pleased to enclose Alaska transportation lor the June
14th "Princess Patricia" Alaska cruise.    Together wltlt transportation, please llnd baggage labels,  dally cruise bulletins, details
ol shore excursion, and U.S. Immigration questionnaire.    The
latter lorm will be required by Purser prior to departure Irom
Vancouver.    This Information assists clearance at Ketchikan when
U.S.  Immigration and Customs oHlclals board the "Patricia" as
the l-irst U.S. port ol call.
Arrangements have been made lor the second meal sitting and have
requested a table lor lour by a window.
The balance ol your cruise cost   totals $2,419, and we will be
pleased II you wilt kindly lorward the check lor this amount at
your convenience.
Although we are enjoying excellent weather up north, It Is advisable that you take along a warm jacket lor being on deck near
the glaciers or should weather be cloudy.    It Is also advised to
take some light rain wear, as Invariably you will encounter some
showers en route your Alaska cruise when ashore.
We look lorward to having you on board ship.
yours very truly,
R.R. Reid
Assistant Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
KKK*QQ
EncZoA uAe, raj
Internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER, June 2, 1978
Fro/7? M.W. Holland
To     Mr. W.C. Sylander
General Claims
Vancouver
File:  164
K)Forrn 102-R
Will you kindly handle the attached letter dated May 23, 1978,
from Mr. J. Coles, which would appear to amount to a claims
matter.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
Account.
Sales Repr.
■ --)_■<_ 46.
Mgr. Traff/feales
75-A*\_/n6_
_1
£_2/
fa'
^r
______
/ CPRail
Internal Correspondence
3
Date     VANCOUVER, June 2, 1978
Fro/77  A. Meijer
To     M.W. Holland
B.C.C.S.S./NORTHLAND
MEALS SERVED ON VESSELS
REPORT:  #2
APRIL, 1978
AVERAGE
MARCH, 1978
Average
CARRIER PRINCESS - Servings
- Amount
1,079
3,203.
2.96
Servings
Amount
1,171
3,212.59
2.74
TRAILER PRINCESS - Servings
- Amount
636
1,407.
2.21
Servings
Amount
644
1,867.42
2.90
OCEAN PRINCE    - Servings
- Amount
471
1,786.
3.79
Servings
Amount
560
1,547.04
2.76
NORTHLAND FURY  - Servings
- Amount
TOTAL SERVINGS
305
552.
1.80
Servings
Amount
262
904.26
3.45
2,491
2,637
TOTAL AMOUNT
6,948.-
2.69
7,531.31
2.86
Catering Supt.
JJ m  vJeVJoOaOe
cc: Mr. W.W. Hocking
Form 102-R
AM/jb W Holland
iger
rReld
Manager
BC Coast Steamship service
Pier'B", Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2503
June 2, 1978
File:  T-78-49E
Mrs. C.A. Bennett
Apt. 302, 900 Jervis Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mrs. Bennett:
We are enclosing with pleasure your annual B.C. Coast Steamship
Service pass in your favour, good until the end of 1978.
Please note that pass should be signed on the back before using.
Yours truly,
H.L. Hudson
Office Manager
HLH:gg
Enclosure CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, June 2, 1978
From A.N. Cairns
j0   Master
"PRINCESS PATRICIA"
a
The attached letter from Transport Canada is self-explanatory,
and your attention to this matter is requested.
Marine Superintendent
B.C.C.S.S.
ANC:gg
cc:  Master, "PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER"
Master, "CARRIER PRINCESS"
Master, "TRAILER PRINCESS"
Master, "OCEAN PRINCE"
Master, "NORTHLAND FURY"
Mr. J. Agar, Northland
IForm 102-R File:   T 78 -   35
Internal Correspondence
Date        Vancouver, B.C., June 2, 1978
From        W.W. Hocking
To        Mr. H.S. Harriman
Manager, Revenue Accounting
Montreal P.Q.
Your file: AF 700201
Employment of vessels and car ferry for the month of May 1978
are as follows:
Princess of Vancouver
Caxrier Princess
May 1-31
May 1-5, 8-10, 12, 15-19, 23-26,
29-31.
Seaspan Doris•
Trailer Princess
May 25
May 6,11, 13, 20, 27
Box car carryings on the Vancouver-Nanaimo route were as follows:
LOADS    EMPTIES(inc O.C.S.) TOTAL
Princess of Vancouver        589       307 896
Carrier Princess            281       337 618
Seaspan Doris                 1 1
Trailer Princess             82        85 167
953
729
1,682
Box car carryings on the Vancouver-Elk Falls (Duncan Bay) portion
of the Beaver Cove service were 15 loads, 21 empties, for a total
of 36.
(Form 102-R
Accountant, B.C.C.S.S. ____. ____.<
___
:f4
*•*
File: T 78 - 35
Date       Vancouver, B.C: June 2, 1978
From       W.W. Hocking
To  Mr. H.S. Harriman
Manager, Hevenue Accounting
Montreal, P.Q.
Your File: PD-B/5-1
Allocation of the above revenues to "Trucks & Trailers" for the
month of May 1978.
There were 12 unaccompanied autos carried on the Vaneouver-Nanaimo
run and they should be credited to "Drive- _i Autos" for the Princess
of Vancouver in the amount of $  300.
Revenue credited to "Trucks and Trailers" is as follows:
Vaneouver-Nanaimo Car Ferry (of Vancouver)
Other Vessels
.ss 9%
33%
56°/o
Carrier Princess
Seaspan Doris
100%
The Swartz Bay route carried 75 unaccompanied autos for a credit
of $2306 to "Drive-On Autos".
Seaspan Doris also performed on the Vancouver-Kelsey Bay-Elk Falls-
Beaver Cove service, May 6/7, 13/14, 20/21, 27/28. Included were
26 unaccompanied autos for a total credit of S 2912 to
"Drive-On Autos".
Accountant, B.C.C.S.S,
S) Form 102-R ...
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, June 1, 1978 File:  100
Fro/77 R.R. Reid
To   Mr. A.E. Schmidt
Superintendent, Investigation
Confirming telephone conversation this morning with Staff Sergeant
McCarthy.  Banking arrangements for the Vancouver Wharf Ticket
Office have been changed, requiring deposits now to be made to
the Bank of Montreal, Granville Square, resulting in cancellation
of Loomis pickup.
It will be appreciated if you will kindly arrange for escort
on a Monday to Friday basis, excluding holidays, from Vancouver
Wharf Ticket Office, Pier A-3, at approximately 2:30 p.m. to
Bank of Montreal in Granville Square and return.
Assistant Manager
_D ■ vj » vj ■ _>•__> _.
RRR:ge
cc:  Mr. 0. Robison
^
£_?)Form 102-R
I
V CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, June 1, 1978
From  A«_M. McPherson
File:  L-203
V
To  Mr. P.E. Timpson
Assistant Supervisor
Labour Relations
Vancouver, B.C.
Re:  Mr. J.T. Sparrow's File 103.15.3, May 18, 1978
The following is in reply to itemized questions concerning S.I.U.
proposals at Northland:
1) (a)  Cost of work gloves -
If supplied through B.C.C.S.S. Stores:
Leather— $2.50/pair
Cotton — $0.80/pair
(b)  Carpet in Cabins
Materials
Cost of carpeting — $15 to $16 per square yard
.      Average size of room — 6 square yards
Number of rooms involved — 3
Miscellaneous Materials — $12.00
Therefore, total materials cost:
($16 x 6 x 3) + $12 = $300
Labour Cost
(i)  If just cutting and laying carpet is involved,
it can be down in one day (8 hours).
(ii)  If mouldings and baseboards required, it will
be a two-day (16 hour) job.
On basis (ii) the following cost will apply
assuming work can be done by I.L.W.U. employee
assigned to Northland shops:
./2
(Form 102-R
J Mr. P.E. Timpson
Ml
-2-
June
1
, 1978
16 hours @ $9.
Other payroll
45 straight time
costs & assessments
$151.
46.
20
88
$198.
08
Therefore, total cost to install carpeting in 3
S.I.U. cabins will be approximately $500.
2) In comparison with other costwise agreements, the $13 per
day allowance is favorable.
The Council of Marine Carriers representing most of tow-
boat operations increased their allowance from $12.00 to
$13.00 effective October 1st, 1977.
The S.I.U. recently recommended in a contract with the B.C.
Steamship Corporation (representing "Princess Marguerite")
an increase from $10.00 to $12.00 for meal, allowance, but
members did not ratify.
The B.C. Marine Workers (B.C. Ferry Corporation) now pays
as follows:
Breakfast - $4.25
Lunch    - -5.00
Dinner   - 8.50
but this cannot be considered representative of this cost.
3) Galley employees currently supply their own uniforms as and
when required.  It is difficult; to judge how often replacements are required, as employees supplying their own' uniforms
do not necessarily make a change as often as they could or
should.  If we were to supply uniforms, it is likely that
a change may be requested daily.
Under the present system at B.C. Coast, Canadian Linen Supply
Co. supply five pairs of shirts and pants per employee.
Regular pickup for cleaning are made and charges (including
rental) are as follows for cleaning:
...13 Mr. P.E. Timpson
-2-
June 1, 1978
Shirts:    79c less 15% = $.6715
Pants:   $1.19 less 15% = $1.0115
An average of one clean pair each two days cost per month
would be:
30.4
x (.6715 + 1.0115) = $25.58/month
It does not appear to be to our advantage to change the
present system.
4) At the moment, for the vessel "OCEAN PRINCE" (S.I.U. manned),
there are four extra meals served per week.  Assuming we
align with the CM.C. , the cost would be:
4 x 1.90 = $7.60 per week
up to October 1st, 1978, when it would be escalated to:
4 x $2.10 = $8.40 per week
Departmental Analyst
.[_>•__„• __)•__)•
AJM:gg »   *
' W Holland
■■ agar
t. Reid
./ Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier _", Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
€P Rail
June 1,   1978
Vile No.   78.CHA.529.lfl.
pls. mn
fi_nager
Mar
!____
F^arine Supt.
Sup*. Engr.
sups.
Catering Sup!.
Terminals Supt
£
: Depth Analyst
QWice Mgr.
Account.
Sales Repr.
Mgr. Traffz-ales
w
_E
itht
__1
7"__«La\ . /»i<!./2..
^
Mt.  P.  Kenneth Brown
Executive 0Ulcer
Westminster County Real Estate Board
15483 -   104th Avenue
Surrey, 8. C.
I/3T 4W4
Vear Mr.  Brown:
We have conllrmed Irom Purser,  "Princess ol Vancouver," that there
are no outstanding charges with relerence to the special charter
ol the "Princess ol Vancouver" on May 27 to Howe Sound and return.
Guarantee covers the number ol agf>4£_ passengers travelling as we
did not charge the committee members lor tlielr passage.    I understand also that charges were collected on board ship lor the
liquor consumed during the cruise} therelore, no charges remain
outstanding.
We were very pleased to see the change In weather lor the departure
ol the cruise and understand that It "attended you lor the entire
duration.,  We are hopelul that all delegates who were able to go on
the cruise had an ejoy able time and appreciation ol some ol the
scenery, which they were able to enjoy during the daylight hours
remaining at the beginning ol youn. cmlIsc.
With best regards,
__%_____#
\ u
R.R.  REW
Asst. Manager,
RRR:gg
B.C.C.S.S. CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, June 1st, 1978
Fro/7? M.W. Holland
File:  231
To Mr. J.M. Mann
Co-ordinator, Work improvement, Montreal
M/V "PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER" Chain Locker
Employee Suggestion //S-30432
Mr. W.D. Robinson #482087
In reference to the above suggestion, the following are reasons
for rejection.
1.
3.
The suggestion refers to "a shoulder-high handrail."  This
is not agreed to because the "shoulder height" varies as
the chain fills up the chain locker, and this height would
vary as the chain came in.
The anchors in this ship have not been used this year to
date; therefore, they are not frequently used.
Finally, since there are half pipes about 2_" diameter the
full length of both chain lockers on the ship's side spaced
about a foot apart, it is felt that they fully cover as a
substitute for handrails and the variable factor of "shoulder
height" is also covered.
In conclusion, this suggestion will have to be rejected due to
the cost of installing these handrails, which do not make any
difference to the danger hazards while hand-stowing the anchor
cables when they are being weighed
for Manager B.C.C.S.S.
JWMcC:gg
§5)Forrri 102-R
J GP^ail
. rn tICorr® \ mnden t -
77]
1x1
_  '"
Date  VANCOUVER, June 1, 1978
From  A.N. Cairns
To  Mr. J. Ferguson
Public Relations
C.P. Rail
File:  P-1276
It is requested a small article be inserted in C.P. Rail News
in resepct to Capt. H.J. Murray:
Capt. Harry J. Murray
Retired as Master "Princess Patricia" 1 January 1969.
Commenced service with B.C.C.S. June 1923.
Passed away 28 February 1978 having served in all ships of
B.C.C.S. in all capacities from Seaman to Master.
Capt. Murray was cremated and his ashes scattered at Mansons
Deep from the deck "Princess Patricia" Sunday, 14 May 1978.
Several former shipmates and friends were present, and the
eulogy was given by Capt. C.S. Robson.
Marine Superintendent.
iV
_s
'OForm 102-R CPRmi
Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, June 1, 1978
Fro/77 R.R. Reid
To   Chief Steward, "PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER"
File No,
78.529SP
B.C. Telephone Pioneers Day Excursion "Princess of Vancouver"
12:30 p.m. sailing June 6 Vancouver to Nanaimo and Return
There will be approximately 250 employees of the B.C. Telephone
Pioneers travelling on the June 6, 12:30 p.m. sailing to Nanaimo
returning and from same day 4 p.m. sailing to Vancouver.  Will
you please block off the forward observation room for this group's
exclusive use and arrange to set up smorgasbord for luncheon
serving in that area under the direction of Mr. Meijer.  Passengers will hold individual tickets issued by Ventra Travel covering
a passage portion, luncheon coupon, and an identification coupon
which will permit them to go ashore at Nanaimo if desired.  Value
of the meal will be $2.25.  Will you please arrange to notify
this office of number of lunches taken for billing purposes.  No
members of the group will actually pay for luncheon taken on board
ship.  Any additional courtesies that may be extended  this group
will be appreciated.
Assistant Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
)Form 102-R
RRR:gg
cc:  Purser, P.O.V. - Please note that group's expenditure for
passage will be at the rate of $4 each set Nanaimo return
senior citizen basis. ' Please confirm to this office numbers
travelling for billing purposes and request that you obtain
master ticket from the Vancouver Wharf Ticket Office for
numbers travelling.
Master, P.O.V. - For your information.
Chief Engineer, P.O.V. - For your information.
...12
1
J -2-
cc:  Mr. 0. Robison,  Vancouver - Please note comments on to
Chief Steward and Purser.
Mr. E. Robinson, Nanaimo - For your information, and
should any assistance be requested by this party while
in Nanaimo.
Mr. A. Meijer
Mr. C. Aitken
1 ■ J*
(*
CPRail
internal Correspondence
Date
VANCOUVER,   June   1,   1978
From
M.W.  Holland
To
Mr.   R.  Granger
Montreal
Re:     John S.  McKie,   #17-127708,
deceased March  6,   1978
File:  127708
Reference your P.F.130/1 dated May 19, 1978, concerning the
above mentioned.
As requested, returned herewith is the March, 1978, cheque
#019-138 in the amount of $247.72.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
JB
E___S____SM_.
M
)
■■:-.
J si
Dafe VANCOUVER,  31 July 1978.
From R.R.  Reid
To Mr.   C.A.  Aitken
Vancouver,  B.C.
File No.  T-420
_**?!. Form 102A-R
Please note the attached Terminal Notice issued by Don Murray,
and his  suggestion.
Will you please arrange,  provided you concur,  advising.
Asst.  Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
RRR'BB
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Mk-mager
Asst. Mgr.
Marine Supt.
Supt. Engr.
\ssi. Supt. Engr.
Catering Supt.
Terminals Supt.
Deptl. Analyst
Office Mgr.
Account.
Sales Repr. I&0P0 t/fiS/jf
Mgr. Traff/feales
r
ftWY*
^7F
/__     a/g/??
I ",--•) -;■ j.••■ ______ CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, 31 July 1978. File: 336
From  R.R. Reid
To  Mr. A. McDermott
Montreal, Que.
"PRINCESS PATRICIA"
Please refer to your letter of 25 July 1978, File M0-L-2-1.
With the return of invoice #293121, will you please arrange payment as required, and will appreciate it if you will kindly
arrange payment of all such invoices in the future, without first
forwarding them to us as suggested.
f|g)   Form 102-R
Asst.  Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
/ CPRail
Internal
Date   VANCOUVER,   31  July  1978.
From   R.R.   Reid
To  Mr.   C.A.  Aitken
Vancouver,  B.C.
File:  E-001
Please refer to Don Murray's letter of 13 July, regarding "Locker
Freight", and advise your recommendations.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
cc.  Mr. D.J. Murray, Kitimat, B.C.
Mr. E.J. Agar, Vancouver.
Mr. N. Wood, Vancouver.
(gP Form 102-R CPRail
Date  VANCOUVER,   31 July  1978. File:     78.ALA.521.L.
From  r.r.   Reid
To  Mr. P.I. Georges
Asst. General Manager
Coastal Marine Operations
Montreal, Que.
Reference your letter dated 19 July, File 111, to Mrs. M.E.
Lever.
There is no reason why Mrs. Lever should have been refused Andres
Richelieu champagne, as it is available for sale on the "Patricia."
We have made changes in the wine list on your suggestion, and as
some of the imported wines are not available to us this year, we
introduced California wines, which are selling well, in their
place.
This is the first instance brought to our attention where a
definite request for a Canadian wine has been given such prominence,
as very little call is given Canadian wines as you well know.
Should revision in the wine list be made later on, we might try
a Canadian wine to test its reception.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
<S> Fo
rm 102-R r^
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CP Bail
M W Holland
I    Manager
RRReid
31  July  1978.
4_sr Manager
File No.   T-79-10-D
(<
Mr. Bob Berto
Office Manager
Southeast Stevedoring Corp.
P.O. Box 1411
Ketchikan, Alaska 99901.
Dear Bob:
Thanks for your information on "Universe" and "Vera Cruz"
schedule changes.
Yes, I believe our friends at Glacier Bay know of our desire
to co-operate with them, and they have always been of tremendous
assistance to us.
Best regards.
R.R. REID
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB t                V
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
CP flail
W Holland
tnSQBt
fl Reid
St Manager
31 July 1978.
File No.   T-78-10
Mr.   Tom Ritter
Superintendent
Glacier Bay National Monument
P.O.   Box  1089
Juneau, Alaska 99801.
Dear Mr. Ritter:
Attached please find log from the "Princess Patricia" for the
July 18th cruise.
Still looking for cancellations and will advise.
Best regards.
R.R. REID
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "fi", Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
OP Bail
__1
aw Holland
Manager
RRReid
■Ass' Manager
31 July 1978.
File No. T-78-10
Mr. Bob Berto
Office Manager
Southeast Stevedoring Corp.
P.O. Box 8080
Ketchikan, Alaska 99901.
Dear Bob:
Thank you for your letter 19 July 1978, and attachments.
The information requested by Tom Ritter has been made available
to him, also log extract on a continuing basis.
We are not in a position as yet to confirm our 1979 plans, but
will let you know as soon as possible.
Regards.
R.R. REID
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB WtViHolland
'.i. nag? r
RRReld
■',.', s: Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B", Vancouver. BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel(604)665-2507 or 665 2503
31 July 1978.
File No. 78.ALA.521.G.
Mr. John L. Gibson
Gibson Bros. Industries Ltd.
1831 Marine Building
355 Burrard St.
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Gibson:
In the absence of Mr. Holland on annual vacation, I am pleased
to acknowledge on his behalf, receipt of your letter dated 24
July concerning your "Princess Patricia" June 24th Alaska cruise.
We appreciate very much your taking the time to write to us and
your comments will be passed along to those concerned.
It isn't often we have the privilege of "aiding and abetting" a
40th wedding anniversary of a previous cruise, and the crew on
board the "Patricia" were as interested in the occasion as were
Mrs. Gibson and yourself.
Hope we can offer you a cruise on your 50th!
Yours very truly,
R.R.   REID
Asst.  Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
be. Master )  c   of Mr> Glbsonis letter is attached.
Purser )
1. . ,  „ ,  :  Thank you for your assistance.
Chief Steward )
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S, TELEX
VANCOUVER, B.C., 31 JULY 1978
B.D. MARGETTS
BCCSKNORTHLAND SERVICE
VANCOUVER, B.C.
P.I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE.
MET WITH MR MURRAY FRI 28 JULY AND AGAIN WITH MESSRS MURRAY AND FRANCIS
SUN 30 JULY AND IN LIGHT OF CONVERSATIONS REGARDING MR FRANCIS' REPORT
AND HIS IMMINENT RETURN TO TORONTO I WILL RETURN VANC THIS DATE AND BE
IN OFFICE TUES 1 AUGUST FOR SOLE PURPOSE OF MEETING WITH INDIVIDUALS
RESPONSIBLE FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF RECOMMENDATION AND WILL RECOMMENCE
HOLIDAYS WED 2 AUGUST ORIGINAL MARGETTS COPY GEORGES BCC-7
M.W. HOLLAND
MGR., BCCSS
MWH'BB
Sill* CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, 31 July 1978.
From  M.W. Holland
To  Messrs. T. King
C.A. Aitken
E.J. Agar
N. Wood
Have had preliminary discussions with Mr. D.W. Francis re his
recommendations on implementation of new procedures in the
Northland Service, in light of his imminent return to Toronto,
and he will be in my office Tuesday, 1 August, for the sole
purpose of reviewing with each of you his recommendations and
the areas which affect your specific Departments.
Accordingly, you are requested to make yourselves available in
my office at 0830, 1 August, at which time we will commence our
discussions.  It is realized that Tuesday is a barge day, and
we will take whatever action necessary to ensure that consideration is given to this fact.
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
Dictated by M.W.  Holland
S)   Form  102-R
©  Fo
F M W Holland
RRReld File:     78.EEF.195
' i SI Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
UP Hal! WK4
____.■<• i
July 28th, 1978
Horizon Holidays of Canada Ltd.
Horizon House
37 Maitland Street
Toronto, Ontario
M4Y 2R9
Attention: Mr. John Copus
Dear John:
I have received the correspondence you sent relating to
Barbara C. Ulmer, a "no show" for Tour 1110 on July 18th,
1978, in which you requested refund consideration and
would like to bring your attention to one point.
I have attached a copy of the letter that Miss Ulmer sent
to you and have taken the liberty of underlining the portion in the second paragraph reading: "When I booked my
vacation I paid for cancellation protection..." If Miss
Ulmer paid for this as stated, it would appear that her
claim should be directed to the company booking her insurance policy and not to B.C. Coast Steamship.
Our intention in claims of this nature is that a party
already under strain (due to illness, etcetera) should not
be subjected to further hardship by being denied a refund. Consequently, it has been our practice to refund
that portion not covered by the cancellation policy provided we are given insurance company's reason for denial
accompanied by copy of policy agreement.
I would appreciate hearing from you regarding our stand
at your earliest convenience.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg
Attachment CPRail
Date    VANCOUVER, July 28,  1978
From   r.d. Pelley
To   W.W. Hocking
Files: T-78-10
Passenger's file
Would you please arrange a voucher for $4.50 Canadian funds
in favour of:
Mr. Kenneth M. Workman
R.R. #2
Woodlawn, Ontario
koa 3m
Upon disembarkation of the "Princess Patricia" July 26 A.M.,
Mr. Workman retrieved his luggage, of which one suitcase was
smeared with grease. He accidentally brushed against it,
leaving a stain on his clothing.
I advised Mr. Workman to forward a copy of the dry cleaning
bill for which he would be reimbursed.
Thank you.
Sales Representative
i_5. C.O.b.o.
RDP:gg
Enclosure
(__£__)
Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, July 28, 1978
From    R.D. Pelley
To    W.W. Hocking
Files. T-78-10
Passenger's file
Would you please arrange a voucher for $10.92 payable in
Canadian funds in favour of
Mr, John P. Drayton
51 Cobham Crescent
Toronto, Ontario M4A IV?
When making his Alaska reservation, Mr. Drayton requested his
call to be billed collect; hovrever, as per attached, he was
charged personally for it.
The Draytons are confirmed and have paid for their round trip
cruise in the Princess Patricia, September 20 sailing.
Thank you.
I
Sales Representative
X.»U_.C_G,0«
RDP:gg
Enclosure
fi'ft)   Form  102-R
© -
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B".Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
CPRail
I M W Holland
1   ■ '.** _jer
TRReid
July 28th,  1978
' -st Manager
File:    T-78-30-188
.'73
^a
Inter-City Express Ltd. ;
2655 Dollarton Highway
North Vancouver, B.C.
V7H 1B1
Attention: Mr. A.C. Hayes
Dear Sirs:
As you discussed with Mr. Jim Finnie, the damage (tear) to
the tarpaulin on trailer ICX 407 on or about July 5th, 19?8,
will now be considered for settlement.
After my initial refusal of this claim on July 7th, 1978,
the Master of the vessel supplied information pinpointing
the location of damage. Unfortunately, since the vessel
was under charter to us, it takes about three weeks for
this information to be returned to us through the other
company.
I understand your total claim to mend the tarp is only $18,
and if you will forward this bill to us, we vail process
accordingly.
Yours very truly,
Manager
__>.(/.C.O.Q.
AJM:gg
bcc: Mr. F.W. Barham - As per our telephone converstaion
of this date. When payment has been made, we will be
looking to you for reimbursement. BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
W Holland
,'1 Reid
" Manager
July 28th, 1978
Our File:  T-78-30-5
Your File: 78-43B
Fir A
WITHOUT PREJUDICE
Johnston Terminals Ltd,
P.O. Box 5300
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 4B6
Attention: Mr, L, Harbin
K.V.A. Claims Department
Dear Sirs:
It is true that there seems to be a conflict of information
regarding this matter, but it appears obvious that Mr, Munro's
statements stand alone against all the other statements furnished.
At the time of the accident, Mr. Munro stated that he was at
fault, but subsequently changed is stance on it. Under the
circumstances, it does not seem appropriate or fair to adjust
this claim downwards to a 50/50 split, and I will appreciate
receiving your settlement for the full amount of the claim
at your earliest convenience.
Yours very truly,
Manager
jb.O.Co.o.
AJM:gg c
Internal Correspondence
„___>4
Date   VANCOUVER, July 31, 1978
From   R.D. Pelley
To   R.R, Reid
Files: T-78-10
78.REF.091
Re: July 2 Sailing "Princess Patricia"
Cancellation: Mrs. D. Hatcher __. Mrs. B. Lyngar, Cabin #138
On the morning of June 30, Mr, D, Hatcher telephoned this office
making above cancellation and requesting refund,
Mr. Hatcher stated per letter attached, that Mrs. Lyngar had
taken ill while vacationing in' Banff prior to joining the "Patricia," Without consulting a physician, the ladies drove home
to Sun City, Arizona.
At the time of our conversation, Mrs, Lyngar still had not received medical attention, Mr, Hatcher was advised by me to
have a doctor attend, to her and forward a medical certificate
and letter requesting refund.
It 1-ras made clear that all the facts v.'ould have to be considered
to determine if refund is due.
The ladies did not have traveller's insurance.
Sales Representative
B.C.CS.S,
RDP.gg
@) Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, July 31, 1978
From  M.W. Holland
To  2nd Officer
File:  AGR.2.SIU.SEN.
PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER
CARRIER PRINCESS
TRAILER PRINCESS
PRINCESS PATRICIA
S. Form 102-R
For your information and distribution on your vessel, enclosed
herewith are copies of the Seniority Roster for "Uncertificated
Ratings in the Deck Department", effective August 1, 1978.
Kindly display a copy of the list on the bulletin board for a
period of 90 days from date of receipt and advise this office
if anybody contests their position.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc:  Mr. A.N. Cairns
JB 1
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date
VANCOUVER,   July 31,
1978                                                File:     AG
From
M.W.   Holland
To
CHIEF ENGINEER
PRINCESS  OF VANCOUVER
CARRIER PRINCESS
TRAILER PRINCESS
PRINCESS  PATRICIA
For your  information
and distribution on your vessel,   e
AGR.2.SIU.SEN.
herewith are copies of the Seniority Roster for "Uncertificated
Ratings in the Engineroom Department", effective August 1, 1978.
Kindly display a copy of the list on the bulletin board for a
period of 90 days from date of receipt and advise this office
if anybody contests their position .
Manager, B.C.C.S.S
cc:  Mr. T. King
Mr. J. McCowatt
JB
(g|) Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier^B".Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
? W Holland
Vage.
IR Reid
ssi Manager
July 31,   1978
File:       AGR.2.SIU.SEN.
Mr.  A.P. Poole
Vice-President
Pacific Area
Seafarer's International Union
837 Homer Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Poole:
Enclosed herewith are two copies of the Seniority Roster
for "Uncertificated Ratings in the Deck Department" and
two copies of the Seniority Roster for "Uncertificated
Ratings in the Engineroom Department", effective August 1, 1978,
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date
From
To
VANCOUVER, 31 July 1978
M.W. Holland
O.R. Robison, Vancouver
E. Robinson, Nanaimo
Purser, "Princess of Vancouver"
Purser, "Princess Patricia"
Miss B.C. Thorn
File: T-78-39
Effective immediately United States funds to be accepted at
127. premium.
Sterling travellers cheques are to be accepted at $2.12 to
the pound. Do not accept travellers cheques negotiable only
in sterling area.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
GP
(?» Form 102-R
r Internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER, July 28, 1978
From     M.W. Holland
To     Mr. H.I. Williams
Purchasing Agent
Vancouver
File:  560
Reference to telephone conversation between Mr. E. Moakes and
Mr. A.N. Cairns.
This will confirm our acceptance of Davis Trading and Supply Co. _
offer to purchase 28 Buoyant Apparatus Units (ex "Princess of
Vancouver" declared redundant) at $15.00 each.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
ANC/'jb
PL3. INITIAL & PASS
/?^f_j\
Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER,   July 28,   1978
From   j.   w.   McCowatt
To   A.   J.   Drew
Chief Engineer
"Princess of Vancouver"
With reference to Crew Overtime Sheet for R. G. Brereton,
Employee No. 494220, one hour overtime claimed during regular
hours on duty "assist elec. on Port Capstan."
This would appear to be his regular duty; therefore, this
claim is reduced by the amount stated.
Asst.   Supt.   Eng
D.   u.  i.   .  J.b.
JWM:gg
cc:     W.   Kazulin
(gp   Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
'A
MW Holland
Manager
R R Reid
^s.sf Manager
July 25th, 1978
Our File:  77.REF.552
Your File;  210-008475
Calladine & Baldry Limited
75 The Don Way West
Don Mills, Ontario M3C 2E9
Attention:  Mr. Robert Reeves
Vice-President, Finance.
Dear Sir:
We have received your refund inquiry of July 12th, 1978 (copy
attached) but our investigation does not indicate any monies
are due your company.
The original booking for Miss I. Harrower and Mrs. R. Wood
was accepted by Lucas & King Travel, Hamilton, Ontario and
MCO No. 018-4010-233-544 (value $200) was to be forwarded to
this office as a deposit.  When this MCO was not received,
several calls were placed to a Mrs. Dinah Gatto, C.T.C., on
June 13th and 14th, 1977 requesting that deposit be sent immediately or reservation would be cancelled.  On June 20th,
1977 a letter (copy attached) was received at this office with
MCO No. 018-4010-233-549 (value $1,575.20) attached.  The P.S.
at the bottom of this letter is not correct, as it is incumbent on you as issuer to apply to CP Air for refund.  Notwithstanding, our staff did make an effort to have CP Air send a
cheque to cover lost MCO.  The result was a cheque in the
amount of $170, which was subsequently returned  to CP Air
as it was not for full value.
The second MCO (value $1,575.20) was exactly $200 short of
full payment of $1,775.20.  A cheque or MCO to cover the
$200 was requested from Lucas & King but instead Cheque No.
77611 dated July 5th, 1977 (value $1,399.20) was sent.  This
cheque was remitted to our bank and a refund in the amount
of $1,199.20 was processed.
/2 Calladine & Baldry Limited -2- July 28, 1978
Attached you will find copies of our money orders (M1930959
through M1930963 inclusive) issued to cover this amount.  I
have contacted our Treasurer's office, and they are checking
to determine if and when these money orders were cashed.
This procedure will likely take some time before the bank
can supply photocopies.  It is unfortunate that your Mrs.
Carole Cross, mentioned in your July 12th, 1978 letter,
could not take the above money order numbers as requested
and check your bank deposit slips for early August, 1977,
When copies are received, or otherwise, I will contact you
with further information.
Yours very truly,
Manager
JDb v_. o _>_>—*_>__>«
AJM:gg
Attachments
J From
To
Internal Correspondence
____________^
Date     VANCOUVER, July 28, 1978
R.R. Reid
r
Mr. N.D. Mullens, Q.C., Esq.
Law Department
Vancouver
In connection with the acquisition of Northland Navigation
Company, 1st January 1978, with lease of all terminals equipment, tugs and barges, we have business offering between Vancouver (from Northland terminal) and Ketchikan, Alaska in
which the tug "Ocean Prince II" has a tow Tuesday, August 1
for the Ketchikan Pulp Mill, Ketchikan, Alaska.
Customs broker Kenneth Sampson in Ketchikan advises in this
connection "Ocean Prince II" would be admissible under U.S.
Customs Bond 98-0001377-10, under which the "Princess Patricia"
is operated in Alaskan waters, provided proof of C.P. Limited's
acquisition of Northland Navigation Company in letter form is
available on board the "Ocean Prince II" upon arrival Ketchikan
attesting to our financial responsibility.
It will be appreciated if you will issue letter suitable for
this purpose or provide us with necessary wording if same can
be written under the signature of Manager, B.C.C.S.S., provided
this meets with your approval.
It will be appreciated if you will kindly oblige.
Assistant Manager
RRR:gg
Form 102-R QUESTIONNAIRE RESPONSES
June 8th, 1978
Total Questionnaires:  162
Canada 1
09; 67
.3%
U.S. 50;
30.9%
B.C.
73 -
66.9%
Maryland
15 -
30.0%
Ontario
17 -
15.6%
Montana
6 -
12.0%
Alberta
7 -
6.4%
Texas
12 -
24.0%
Sask,
4 -
3.7%
Maine
2 -
4.0%
Manitoba
4 -
3.7%
Calif.
2 -
4 D0%
Quebec
4 -
3.7%
Alaska
N.H.
1 —
2.0%
Alabama
1 -
ii
Virginia
1 -
ii
Indiana
1 -
ii
New Mex.
1 -
ii
Arizona
1 -
it
Michigan
1 -
ii
Penn.
1 -
ii
Hawaii
1 -
ii
Iowa
1 -
ii
Oregon
1 -
ii
New York
1 -
ii
Total Passengers
Foreign 3; 1.8%
South Africa 1 - 33.3%
West Germany 1 - 33.3%
England     1-33.3%
My age group is.
0-20
0
21 - 30
1
.6%
31 - 40
4
2.5%
41 - 50
10
6.2%
51 - 65
50
30.8%
65+
87
53.7%
Reject
10
162
6.2%
100.0%
respons
es -2-
My Family Income/Year Range is:
Under $5,000
$5,000 - 9,999
$10,000 - 14,999
$15,000 - 19,999
$20,000 - 24,999
$25,000 +
Reject*
*gave no response
at all
1
.6%
28
17.3%
25
15.4%
16
9.9%
23
14.2%
31
19.1%
38
23.5%
162
100.0%
responses
My main reason for a cruise to Alaska is
Relaxation
92
Scenery
134
Meet New Friends
18
Shore Excursions
29
Other
32
Reject
2
30
0%
43
.6%
5
9%
9
4%
10
4%
7%
307
100.0%
This is
my
cruise wi
th
the
Pat
First
150
92.6%
Second
7
4.4%
Third
1
.6%
Other
2
1.2%
Reject
2
1.2%
Total Responses
162
100.0%
I received space within past:
Month
18
11.1%
2-3 months
62
38.3%
4-5 months
51
31.5%
6+ months
27
16.7%
Reject
4
2.4%
Total Responses
162
100.0%
J Manager
PUS. INITIAL & PASS
Asst. Mgr.
Account.
Sales Repr.
Mgr. Tratf/feales News Summary
News and views on topics of
current interest prepared by Public Relations
and Advertising Department
Vol. 34 No. 30   July 28, 1978
Aviation
Business & Finance
Labor
17
23
19
Railway
Shipping
Tourism & Travel
5
14
22
GRAIN SHIPPING "GROWING PAINS"
Canada's troubles in grain shipping is seen as "growing pains" that
will soon be over. Transport Minister Otto Lang says the main cause
is intense pressure on a system not currently designed to move close
to 800 million bushels in a smooth flow.
Page
MAJOR GRAIN TERMINAL EXPANSION "INEVITABLE"
Barring an unforeseen collapse of Canada's grain crops or world
markets, the grain industry will have to embark on another major
expansion of its export terminal facilities within the next decade,-
especially as a result of rising sales to Pacific Rim countries.
Page 14
COAL SLURRY BILL DEFEATED
Following the defeat of a bill to grant U.S. coal slurry pipelines
the right of eminent domain to construct pipelines under railroad
rights-of-way, the president of the Association of American Railroads says the industry can meet the growing demand for coal.
Page 11
TRENDS AND TOPICS
With wage settlements averaging 6.7%, the loss in real income
generated by current 9%  inflation is making union members determined not to let their economic position slip any further.
Page 19
A Texas-based hotel chain which specializes in low-cost hotels in
U.S. cities is planning to set up a similar operation in Canada,
and is negotiating for properties in five major cities.
Page 22
Air Canada's ground service workers threaten to stage rotating
strikes if the airline doesn't make a satisfactory contract offer.
The union wants an 18% increase; the airline has offered 12%.
Page 19
Canadian Pacific 2
NEWS IN BRIEF
PARCEL FIRM SKIRTS GROWTH CURBS, PLANS SERVICE ALONG HIGHWAY 17
TORONTO - Less than a month after United Parcel Service Canada Ltd. was
denied permission to expand its territory using truck delivery, the company has announced plans to extend its service to North Bay, Sudbury and
other communities on Highway 17 east from Espanola -- this time using
cars. UPS president Glenn C. Smith says the company is also seeking
Supreme Court of Ontario permission to appeal the Ontario Highway Transport Board's controversial ruling denying the company's application to
deliver parcels by commercial truck in Ontario areas north to Kenora,
east and southwest to Quebec and into the United States.
(Globe and Mail, July 26)
* * *
THE HIGH COST OF STAGNATION
OTTAWA - The costs of Canada's economic stagnation are becoming increasingly apparent, but its full dimensions have not been grasped. One of
its harmful efforts is the cost of supporting the unemployed. A tentative estimate of these expenses, borne by the federal Government alone,
is $7.9-billion for 1978.
(Ottawa Citizen, July 21)
k   k   k
RAILWAY BATTLE BREWS
ST. JOHN'S, Nfld. - John Crosbie, Progressive Conservative Member of
Parliament for St. John's West, said July 21 he has learned from reliable sources that the Sullivan Commission into Transportation in Newfoundland recommends abandonment of the island's rail services.
(Winnipeg Tribune, July 22)
* k   k
U.S.-CANADIAN ANALYSTS TO STUDY GRAIN TRANSPORT
WINNIPEG - IBI Limited of Toronto-Vancouver and Booz-Allen & Hamilton
Inc. of Bethesda, Maryland, have been commissioned to carry out an operations analysis of the western grain transportation system. Federal
Transport Minister Otto Lang announced July 21 that IBI Limited would
work primarily on analyzing inland grain gathering, port operation and
grain movement co-ordination. The U.S. firm would do an overall analysis of rail car allocation and other logistics, he said.
(Winnipeg Free Press, July 22)
* * *
CANADIAN PACIFIC CHARGED IN OIL SPILL
VANCOUVER - Environment Canada said Canadian Pacific and CP Transport
were charged July 19 with polluting the False Creek inlet on May 17.
The spill occurred because an oil separator was over-taxed. Mechanical
failure was probably not the cause.
(Vancouver Sun, July 21) f
89-PASSENGER CAR ADDED TO ESQUIMALT & NANAIMO RAILWAY
VANCOUVER - An 89-seat car will be added to the E&N Railway service between Victoria and Courtenay, CP Rail announced July 21.
(Vancouver Sun, July 22)
* * *
SAINT MARY'S INDIANS CLEAR RAIL BLOCKADE
VANCOUVER - Train service resumed last week in Crowsnest Pass following
removal of a blockade by members of Saint Mary's Indian band. The
blockade was removed following agreement in principle between the Indian
band and CP Rail concerning replacement of land the Indians say has been
eroded by the Saint Mary's River as a result of a 1971 diversion by CP
Rail. Details of the agreement were not available. Industry spokesmen
in the area were relieved that planned layoffs would not have to be
carried out.
(Vancouver Sun, July 22)
* * *
INDIANS WIN BATTLE WITH CPR
CRANBROOK, B.C. - The St. Mary's Indian Band appears to have won an unqualified victory in their battle with the Iron Horse. Canadian Pacific
and the federal Government will share the cost of meeting the band's
claim for 2,800 acres of land. CP Rail has agreed to turn over immediately 334 acres to the band.
(Vancouver Province, July 25)
* * *
CHURCHILL PORT OFFICIALS EXPECTING BUMPER SHIPPING SEASON
CHURCHILL, Man. - The bustle of the 1978 shipping season is about to
burst on Canada's northernmost port, freed from the grip of ice for the
short summer months, and officials are expecting a bumper year. The
first two CN grain trains have arrived from the south along the only
land link to the Hudson Bay facility, and the first ship is expected on
July 26.
(CP - Winnipeg Free Press, July 25)
* * *
BURLINGTON ROAD ORDERS $250-MILLI0N OF RAILCARS, GEAR
ST PAUL - Burlington Northern Inc. said it ordered 253 locomotives,
1,825 freight cars and other railroad equipment at a cost of $250-
million to handle increased coal, grain and other traffic. The company
said the cost includes $217-mi11 ion of orders authorized as part of a
1979 capital-expenditure program. Burlington Northern said the freight-
car orders include 1,000 large covered-hopper cars to be delivered in
August, 1979, in time for the fall grain harvest.
(Wall Street Journal, July 25)
* * * 4
UNION REJECTS CP AIR OFFER
VANCOUVER - CP Air machinists across the country have voted 70 per cent
to reject the airline's contract offer of a 14.75-per-cent wage increase.
Union officials said July 25 they will seek further meetings with the
company.
(Vancouver Sun, July 26)
* * *
ISLAND RAIL SERVICE EXTENDED
VICTORIA - Passenger service on the Esquimau and Nanaimo Railway will
be extended to seven days a week on an experimental basis beginning Aug.
6, CP Rail said Aug. 26. It will resume regular Monday to Saturday
service Sept. 10, but if there is enough demand, a new schedule could
remain in effect until later in the fall. A second passenger Dayliner
is scheduled to start on the run July 28.
(Vancouver Province, July 27)
* * *
SENATOR SUGGESTS WHEAT BOARD BUY CARS AND RUN OWN TRAINS
REGINA - The solution to the current problem in grain transportaiton is
for the Canadian Wheat Board to obtain more cars and run its own trains,
according to Hazen Argue, chairman of the Senate agriculture committee.
Mr. Argue said the Wheat Board should be allowed to increase its car
fleet to 16,000 cars from the present 8,000, and should be allowed to
handle the distribution of the cars. Mr. Argue said he was expressing a
personal opinion and not that of his committee.
(Regina Leader-Post, July 22)
* * *
WHEAT BOARD ESTIMATES 9,000 MORE CARS NEEDED
REGINA - Despite an expected near-record movement of Canadian grain to
export points this crop year, the Canadian Wheat Board estimates 9,000
more railways cars are needed to bolster the grain car fleet.  A spokesman for the Canadian Wheat Board in Winnipeg said the federal government
has been told an addition 4,000 new hopper cars plus 5,000 rehabilitated
boxcars are required to meet present grain movement needs. When the
crop year ends July 31, 1978, there will be an estimated 20,800 cars
permanently assigned to the operational Canadian grain movement fleet.
However the Wheat Board spokesman said the grain car fleet has been
dwindling rapidly, with an estimated 2,000 boxcars going out of service
last year and a further 1,000 expected to be lost by the end of the
current calendar year. To provide the required 9,000 additional cars,
an investment of $159-million to $175-million would be necessary.
(Regina Leader-Post, July 22)
* * * RAILWAY
GRAIN TRANSPORT TROUBLES SAID TO BE "GROWING PAINS"
REGINA - Canada's grain transportation system has been subjected to some
biting criticism in recent weeks, as grim stories continue to circulate
about boxcar and hopper car shortages, irregular deliveries of grain to
export terminals, and ships lying at anchor at Vancouver generating
heavy demurrage charges because the terminals can't bring them alongside
and load them.
The consensus, however, among grain organizations, Canadian Wheat Board
officials and government spokesmen, is that the system is experiencing
severe "growing pains" that will soon be over.
"The system is now being pushed to the limit," says Transport Minister
Otto Lang. "We are trying to move every bushel we can sell. In a situation like this, anything can cause a temporary delay, but I still
don't think we have a serious problem." Mr. Lang, who is responsible
for the Canadian Wheat Board, says the main cause of the recent disruption is intense pressure on a system not designed to move close to 800
million bushels in a smooth flow.
"Our plans for upgrading the system are now well underway," he says, .
"including double tracking and the expansion of terminal facilities,
particularly at Vancouver and Prince Rupert. Within four years, I am
confident we'll have a system capable of handling 900 million or a
billion bushels."
In the meantime, the wheat board, the railways and the terminal operators seem to be doing the best they can with what they have. Mr. Lang is
especially concerned about an attempt in some quarters to make the
railways the "goat" for the present situation. "They have been saying
that the CNR and CP Rail have been dragging their feet in a play to
hasten a decision on the Hall Report's proposal for compensatory grain
rates over and above the Crowsnest Pass rate," the minister says. "This
is not a fair accusation, and the railways are right to deny it vehemently."
A consistent theme throughout the controversy has been that it hasn't
been possible to have enough grain cars in the right place at the right
time, at either end of the system and in between. What about the efficiency of the export point terminals?
Henry Kancs, secretary of the Grain Workers Union at Vancouver, says
rail deliveries at the terminals don't dovetail with terminal staff work
schedules. Grain shouldn't be handled, as now on the basis of a 12- or
16-hour work-day five days a week, he says, but around the clock seven
days a week.  The extra payroll cost would be less than the demurrage
charges for idle ships.
Is Mr. Lang, as the responsible minister, to blame? "The system has
been improving steadily, with good co-operation from all participants in
it," he says. "What we need is more time to make the system improvements to which the government is committed."
(Editorial: Regina Leader-Post, July 15)
* * * 6
ALL-POWERFUL COMMISSIONER NEEDED FOR GRAIN?
VANCOUVER - More than 20 years ago, then-industry minister C. D. Howe
appointed a transport commissioner with broad powers to oversee, and if
necessary order around, all those who took part in getting Canadian
grain to export points.
When the grain movement crisis of the day was over in 1956, the office
was abolished, in part because it was considered too authoritarian. Now
there is a body of opinion within the grain and related industries that
such a powerful office is needed again to help overcome some modern-day
grain transportation problems.
"We need someone who has the legislated right to tell the grain companies, railroads, unions or anybody else who is involved with the grain
business what has to be done to get the crop to market," says Henry
Kancs, secretary-treasurer of the Vancouver-based Grain Workers Union.
The idea received guarded support from several grain company and federal
government officials interviewed. However, most were unwilling to
publicly support the idea because it might appear to be an attack on the
Canadian Wheat Board.
The issue of streamlining the system or "solving" the transportation
problems in grain handling is a touchy one in the industry. It has become a sensitive political issue this year and many officials interviewed were unhappy with what they considered "simplistic" proposals
from "one-day experts" such as politicians and the media. "The solutions," said Saskatchewan Wheat Pool Vancouver Terminal Manager J. A.
Loney, "are long-term ones. There are no quick answers."
Among proposals for improvement offered by government, industry, union
and port officials in Vancouver, Thunder Bay and Prince Rupert were:
— MORE cleaning and drying of grain on the Prairies.
-- FASTER cleaning at the terminals. In Thunder Bay, Saskatchewan
Wheat Pool is trying "one-pass cleaning" in Terminal 4 to reduce cleaning time by sending grain through the cleaners once
instead of twice.
-- REDUCE the number of grades. Alberta Wheat Pool Vancouver Terminal
Manager Gary Dewar complained that over 100 grades come through,
each requiring different storage bins, and when protein grading
starts, more grades will be added.
-- BETTER efforts by the Wheat Board to send to the terminals the
grain that is needed.
-- REDUCE the amount of damp and tough grain being delivered from the
country. Excessive amounts have slowed down terminal operations
this summer and both producers and the Wheat Board are blamed
for the sudden influx.
— PROVIDE more rail cars, especially hopper cars which unload almost as
quickly as boxcars and carry 50 per cent more grain. — WORK toward one common expiry date for all grain industry and railway union contracts. The idea was supported by the Hall Commission and has been promoted by the Grain Workers Union.
-- IN Thunder Bay, grain movement within the city to the appropriate
terminals is often delayed because of congestion on the tracks.
There have been proposals for a construction project to streamline the rail lines within the harbor area.
-- FORCE the railways to make better use of the grain-carrying capacity they have by using more unit trains or single-grade trains.
The long-term debate over the Crowsnest Pass freight rate also
enters into the picture when some port officials and the Palliser
Wheat Growers argue more "financial incentive" to the railways
to carry grain would help.
-- UNITED Grain Growers President Mac Runciman has suggested grain-
handling companies take over from the Wheat Board responsibility
for arranging boxcar service to the country elevators.
(The Western Producer, July 20)
* * *
ECONOMIST MCEACHERN ESTIMATES THE CROW RATE COSTS ALBERTA AGRICULTURE
ABOUT $1-BILLION A YEAR
WINNIPEG - The heat is on the Holy Crow. A report commissioned by the
Alberta Cattle Commission claims the Crows Nest Statutory Rate on feed
grain now costs the Alberta economy between $700-million and $1-billion
annually.
The report, called Retention of the Crow Rate and the Alberta Livestock
Economy, is by Dr. Gordon McEachern, head of the prestigious Agricultural Economics Research Council of Canada. Mr. McEachern is one of
Canada's most distinguished agricultural economists, and the report's 13
conclusions have already caused a great deal of comment among government,
grain and livestock people on the Prairies.
His report is the most ambitious attempt by Alberta livestock interests
to document the damage they feel is being dealt by Crow. The gap between the real cost of hauling grain to the railroads has grown enormously in the past few years, yet the cost to the farmer is exactly the
same as it was on September 1, 1899, still 26 cents a hundredweight from
Calgary to the Lakehead.
It's the belief of the ACC transportation committee that the rate is, in
reality, a subsidy to grain producers applied to shipping costs. The
true cost, says Mr. McEachern, is actually 3.5 to four times higher.
Cheap transportation makes it economical for farmers to ship their grain
to export terminals in Vancouver and Thunder Bay, applying artificial
pressure to the price of a bushel of barley that stays home to feed an
Alberta steer. 8
For the first time, Mr. McEachern's report provides a realistic assessment of how much more cattle feeding does cost because of the Crow rate.
Using a complex series of calculations, Mr. McEachern comes up with a
potential figure of $12.80 per ton over the "natural level." This
breaks down to 6.41 cents per pound of gain. On a 450-pound steer fed
to 1,000 pounds, the additional cost per head is $35.25 in 1978.
The report points out that in 1977, the actual difference is cost between U.S. and Alberta cattle feeding was three cents a pound, or
$16.50 a head. "Such an amount can substantially effect the profit-
or-loss situation of cattlemen and significantly alter their competitive
position," the report says.
Even worse, as the true costs of transportation continue to rise at
eight per cent a year while the statutory rate stays the same, what Mr.
McEachern calls the "Crow Gap" can only increase annually. If Crow is
retained, he believes, it will cost Alberta farmers 2/5 of a cent a
pound more a year, and in eight years the annual losses to Alberta will
double and triple in 15 years.
(Free Press Report on Farming, July, 1978)
* * *
CONTROLS WANTED ON RAILWAY LANDS
VICTORIA - The Capital Regional District Planning Committee recommended
July 14 the rezoning of all railway rights-of-way in the district for
transportation use.
Committee chairman Murray Glazier wants to ensure tight control of
future use of the property when the railways sell it. If the CRD board
agrees and amends its official plan, developers will have to apply to
the district for rezoning.
Now if railway land is sold, the zoning of the nearest property is
generally applied.
Mr. Glazier would also like to see pedestrian walkways or bike paths on
the CN and E&N rights-of-way.
(Victoria Times, July 15)
* * *
U.K. RAILWAY PENSION FUND PUTS ITS MONEY IN ART OBJECTS
LONDON - British Rail's pension fund has been investing about $10-
million a year of its income in the past four years on about 800 works
of art.
Like most of their counterparts, the British Rail pension fund managers
became increasingly discouraged in 1974 by the near impossibility of
maintaining the value of employee pension contributions through conventional investments, such as stocks and bonds, in an era of extremely
high inflation. The fund has hired a former employee of the famed Sotheby's auction
house to manage its art purchases and retains Sotheby's as advisors.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, July 22)
* * *
RAILROAD POLICE: UNIFIED TRAINING?
BRISTOL, Conn. - With one commodity -- motor vehicles — accounting for
half, total losses from robbery, theft, and pilferage in 1977 were
$16.2-mi11 ion. Such Cause-7 losses accounted for 5.8 percent of overall L&D payout last year, compared with 5.2 per cent in 1976.
That's one reason why shippers and rail claims personnel should be happy
to learn that an effort is underway to make railroad police work more
effective, through unification of training programs for railroad police.
An ad hoc committee of railroad training officers is working on a unification plan to be presented at a meeting in Chicago Aug. 8-10. They
will be aiming at reducing duplication in training programs and, therefore, training costs, with emphasis on in-service rather than basic
training.
(Railway Age, July 10)
* * *
NEW ENGLAND RAIL STUDY ANNOUNCED
BRISTOL, Conn. - The U.S. Railway Association and the New England Regional Commission have agreed to undertake a study of the rail system in
New England.
The study will examine present and future traffic flow, rail markets,
and competition from trucks in the region. In addition, the study will
consider a number of alternatives to the present rail system, including
consolidation, mergers, and joint use of facilities. It also will look
at the cost and feasibility of public ownership of the right-of-way.
The New England Regional Commission is a joint federal-state organization made up of the governors of the six New England states and a
federal co-chairman appointed by the President.
(Railway Age, July 10)
* * *
STUDIES BACK RAIL LINK TO ALASKA
BRISTOL, Conn. - State and provincial leaders who met in Anchorage, Alaska, May 30 to discuss construction of a transcontinental rail link
agreed that they had done about all they could, and further work on the
line would require the active support of the U.S. and Canadian federal
governments. 10
Yet optimism about the project was greatly increased by a detailed marketing study presented at the Alaska/Canada Rail Conference by the
British Columbia Railway. The new study predicted as much as 10 million
tons would move along the new rail line by the year 2000, while it would
take only three million tons to generate rates that would be competitive
with present-day shipping alternatives.
An estimated 1,100 miles of new rail line, including 297 in Alaska and
560 in the Yukon, would be required to link Fairbanks, the northern terminus of the Alaska Railroad, with the existing Canadian rail system.
Estimated cost of construction is $1-mi 11 ion to $1.2-mi11 ion per mile.
A survey of the Alaska portion of the route, which would generally follow the Alaska Highway, is nearly completed, according to Ronald S.
Walt, transportation development specialist for the State of Alaska.
Mr. Walt told Railway Age that aerial photography and field checks had
determined the route covers "very  good rail building terrain, with some
long, straight runs."
British Columbia has conducted 13 studies since 1968 on possible rail
extensions, British Columbia Premier Michael Bennett said at the conference. He pointed out that British Columbia has built 900 miles of
railway in 20 years to provide access to resource areas, watching the
cost per mile escalate from $175,000 to $l-mi11 ion just since 1970. A
planned extension to Dease Lake has been cut short pending a Royal
Commission inquiry on the benefits of the line to the province.
Arthur Pearson, commissioner of the Yukon Territory, said his main
priority was not a transcontinental railway but resource railroads to
the coast. "Just as with the gas line, we won't take a position until
we see a definite proposal," he said of the line that would link Alaska
with the lower 48 States.
An international task force formed as a result of the Anchorage rail
conference will meet this summer, probably in August, to assemble data
and prepare a presentation to the Canadian and U.S. federal governments.
(Railway Age, July 10)
* * *
TRAFFIC SURGE COULD PUSH CAPITAL OUTLAYS
BRISTOL, Conn. - After turning in their worst first-quarter performance
in history, the railroads have experienced a dramatic turnaround in the
second quarter and appear to be headed for a year that will set new records in revenue ton-miles, operating revenues and capital outlays ~
though not, unfortunately, in net income.
The Northeast, with its perennial economic malaise and sloppy service
patterns, continues to be a soft spot in the picture. But there is
solid optimism in the West and South; where the chief problems right now
are car and power shortages. 11
The continuing low rate-of-return on the invested railroad dollar also
worries industry economists, some of whom fear that a number of railroad
managers, after so many lean years, are no longer sufficiently profit-
oriented. "Somehow we've got to get some leverage on the bottom line or
we're never going to be able to sustain this level of investment," says
one.
(Railway Age, July 10)
* * *
COAL SLURRY PIPELINE BILL REJECTED BY WIDE MARGIN
WASHINGTON - The House on July 19 defeated by a vote of 246-161, a bill
that would have granted federal eminent domain to builders of coal
slurry pipelines, enabling them to construct pipelines under railroad
rights-of-way.
In a statement issued following the vote, AAR President William H. Demp-
sey said the railroad industry was "gratified" that H. R. 1609, the Coal
Pipeline Act, was defeated because it "did not believe the bill to be in
the best national interest from either an environmental, energy or
economic point of view."
The AAR president said the railroads are confident that they can continue
to meet the growing demand for coal as a primary energy source. "We
view today's vote as an important step toward creating a national transportation policy framework in which railroads can move full speed ahead
in gearing up for the expanded coal production which the nation must
achieve if it is to reduce its reliance on dwindling oil supplies."
(Information Letter: Association of American Railroads, July 19)
k   k   k
RAIL RATE SETTING MAY END IF ICC STOPS APPROVALS
WASHINGTON - The Interstate Commerce Commission threatened to stop
approving the agreements used by regional railroad groups to set freight
rates.
If the ICC discontinues such approvals, it will remove the immunity from
antitrust prosecution conveyed by its sanction, effectively ending the
industry's joint rate-fixing method. The ICC has been granting approvals for a quarter of a century to Eastern, Western and Southern rail-
rate groups.
(Wall Street Journal, July 24)
* * *
SEABOARD FILES PROTEST
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - Seaboard Coast Line Industries has protested the
continued purchase of its stock by Southern Pacific Co. The two railroad holding companies had engaged in merger talks, but Seaboard broke
off discussions May 17. 12
Thomas Rice, Seaboard chairman emeritus, says Seaboard has asked the
Interstate Commerce Commission to block further purchases in view of
Southern Pacific's continued efforts to buy Seaboard stock after that
date.
(Montreal Gazette, July 25)
* * *
FREIGHT CAR SCHEDULING ENTERS NEW ERA
ST. LOUIS, Mo. - For generations, railroad men have dreamed of devising
a system that would enable them to keep constant tabs on individual
freight cars and their destinations.
Controlling hundreds of freight cars in sprawling rail systems -- with
their labyrinthine switching yards, thousands of miles of track and
countless destinations -- has been the most elusive of railroad problems. But now, in what is being been called the largest commercial
application of computer technology in the country, Missouri Pacific
Railroad Co. flipped the switch July 9 on an electronic communications
network that most industry observers agree is the harbinger of the
solution to the problem of rail car scheduling.
St. Louis-based Missouri Pacific said its new computerized car scheduling system is the most recent phase in a $45-million freight car control
project it is developing with financial help from the Federal Railroad
Administration.
More than 300 computer specialists have been working for 10 years to
develop interlocking pieces.of the Transportation Control System (TSC),
which provides MoPac management with reports on the movement of trains
and cars, handles car orders from shippers, instantly spits out advance
switching instructions to rail yard personnel and even prints waybills
and bills of lading.
(St. Louis Post Dispatch, July 9)
* * *
BOXCARS IN U.S. UPSET NFU
Regina - The National Farmers' Union (NFU) says some Canadian boxcars,
desperately needed to move a backlog of Canadian grain, are being used
in the United States to haul U.S. grain to export terminals.
Lloyd Stanhope of Moosemin, Sask., a national director of the NFU, said
about 3,000 Canadian railway company cars, including 600 boxcars, were
seen by the NFU between July 5 and July 9 during a flight along about
2,400 kilometres of U.S. railway line near the Canadian border.
Mr. Stanhope said that of these 600 boxcars, some were loading grain at
U.S. elevators -- some within 10 kilometres of the border.
(CP - Winnipeg Free press, July 24)
* * * 13
CANADIAN CARLOADINGS
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
Piggyback
( ) decrease
For Week Ending
July 15, 1978 -
458,654
17.1 billion
Total for Year to
July 15, 1978
12,141,308
451.6 billion
Total for Year to
July 8, 1978
939,937
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
11,042
1.2 billion
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
(  440,470)
11.2 billion
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
96,945
Percentage
Change
2.5
7.6
Percentage
Change
( 3.5)
2.5
Percentage
Change
11.5
For Week Ending
July 14, 1978
Change from Simi
Period, 1977
lar
Percentage
Change
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
68,342
4,302,484
7,168
(   9,770)
(  861,212)
(     126)
(12.5)
(16.7)
( 1-7)
Total for Year to
July 14, 1978
Change from Simi
Period, 1977
lar
Percentage
Change
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
1,905,177
117,917,652
203,529
(  156,929)
(14,192,714)
3,195
( 7.6)
(10.7)
1.6
For Week Ending
July 7, 1978
Change from Simi
Period, 1977
lar
Percentage
Change
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
62,061
3,943,135
6,366
(   10,838)
(  972,738)
(      57)
(14.9)
(19.8)
( 0.9)
Total for Year to
July 7, 1978
Change from Simi
Period, 1977
lar
Percentage
Change
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
1,835,384
113,588,290
196,357
(  148,610)
(13,358,380)
3,317
( 7.5)
(10.5)
1.7
U.S. CARLOADINGS
* * * 14
SHIPPING
MAJOR TERMINAL EXPANSION 'INEVITABLE' WITHIN DECADE
WINNIPEG - Barring an unforeseen collapse of Canada's grain crops or
world markets, the country's grain industry will have to embark on another major expansion of its export terminal facilities within the next
decade.
That judgment is shared by most grain industry officials and many in
government, based on Canadian Wheat Board predictions of increasing
sales and a shift in export emphasis from the Atlantic to Pacific coast.
However, deciding where and when to build is not a simple exercise. A
combination of intercity rivalry, federal-provincial politicking and
grain industry self-interest are at work to help shape the final decisions. On top of that are economic considerations. Hundreds of millions
of dollars are involved and the grain industry has been reluctant to
commit itself until it is certain the optimistic predictions are justified.
Although events appear to be moving quickly now, it could be several
years before the future shape of the expansion is clear.
Most of the new sales are to Pacific Rim areas like the Peoples' Republic of China, Japan and Indochina which are more economically served
from West Coast ports. By 1985, the board predicts West Coast shipments
of grain will increase by over 40 per cent, and the current east-west
split of 60-40 will be reversed.
This westward switch has some major implications for the existing grain
terminal industry, largely built before the 1930s when sales of grain
were mainly to Europe. The result is that Thunder Bay on the Great
Lakes has grain terminals with a storage and workhouse capacity of more
than 80 million bushels. Vancouver and Prince Rupert terminals total
25.75 million bushels of capacity now and expansion projects underway
will raise that to over 35 million bushels by the end of the decade.
Thunder Bay appears to be over-built and currently under-used while West
Coast facilities are inadequate to handle expected future loads. This
prospect has led to pressure and active intervention by representatives
of federal, Alberta and British Columbia governments to encourage industry expansion on the West Coast. However, there the issues cloud up.
Lobbying efforts by the three cities which could be affected are aimed
at influencing any government or industry decision. The small coastal
northern B.C. city of Prince Rupert is the clear leader in this field.
A civic committee has been campaigning for years to have the current
2.25 million bushel government terminal sold to private interests and
expanded. It argues the port is being under-used although it is a natural gateway to the new markets.
Meanwhile, Thunder Bay officials are looking nervously at their underused grain facilities and preparing to launch a lobbying campaign to try
to get new investment in the city. 15
In Vancouver, grain is less important to the city's economy, although it
is one of the biggest volume commodities using the port.
The port is proposing development of Roberts Bank, 25 miles south of the
city, as a major bulk-commodity-handling facility.
(The Western Producer, July 20)
* * *
ITF TO STUDY PACT WITH CP SHIPPING GROUP
LONDON, Eng. - The International Transport Workers Federation (ITF) is
to set up a working party to examine an agreement between British
seafaring unions and the Bermudan shipping offshoot of the giant Canadian Pacific group.
The agreement covers crews, who are all members of British unions, working on 32 vessels flying the Bermudan flag and owned by CP (Bermuda)
Ltd. The Bermudan flag was designated by the ITF as a "flag of convenience" in 1974 and since then ships flying it have faced the threat of
industrial action by ITF affiliates pressing for ITF "blue certificate"
agreements to cover crew conditions and wages.
The agreement, though, between the British unions and CP (Bermuda) Ltd.
was thought by the British unions to be acceptable to the ITF. It is
designed to replace the blue certificate showing that although wages and
conditions are subject to National Maritime Board agreements they reach
the standard of ITF rates.
(Lloyd's List, July 5)
* * *
ITF 'IS DAMAGING BRITISH SHIPPING'
LONDON, Eng. - The International Transport Workers Federation July 18
was accused of "damaging" the British shipping industry following industrial action by their Scandinavian affiliates against two UK-managed
foreign-flag ships.
Graham Turnbull, Chairman of the General Council of British Shipping's
industrial relations policy committee, said in London that he believed
the ITF policies were dominated by the Scandinavian unions who were
trying to force other maritime nations' rates up to make their own position less uncompetitive. And he suggested that forces outside the free
world were involved in ITF industrial action.
Mr. Turnbull said the true interests of all who earn their living in the
shipping industry were under attack from the ITF. He continued that an
increasing number of British companies were taking on the management of
non-UK flag ships. A move, he said, which was good for business and
provided jobs for officers and ratings. 16
But, he added, there had been two occasions recently when such ships,
although paying exactly the same rates that apply throughout the companies' UK fleets, had been blockaded in Finland by unions because the
rates of pay did not match up to the ITF rates.
(Lloyd's List, July 19)
* * *
BETTER DAYS FOR ST. LAWRENCE SEAWAY?
MASSENA, N.Y., and OTTAWA - The troubled St. Lawrence Seaway is finally
beginning to shake off its reputation as a white elephant.
U.S. and Canadian officials who jointly administer the 2,432-mile-long
inland shipping route feel that a stormy period of financial woes is
ending.
The reasons for optimism:
-- MOUNTING TRAFFIC. Ships using the waterway carried a record 63.3
million tons of cargo in 1977. While forecasts for 1978 are not
that high, volume still will far exceed 50 million tons a year,
a projection made two decades ago.
.
— LARGER REVENUES. Restructuring of the debt load plus the first
boost in tolls since the waterway opened 19 years ago may put
operations in the black.
-- A LONGER SHIPPING SEASON. Efforts are underway to keep the Seaway
open 11 months a year. Presently, ships use it for only about
8i months.
When the waterway opened, most people thought it was sure to be a
success. But before long, troubles cropped up, including a slower-
than-expected buildup of traffic. The biggest headache, however, has
been money. Says Paul Normandeau, president of the Canadian arm of the
operation: "The Seaway has been called a white elephant because it was
never permitted to earn enough to pay interest or capital costs."
Then, Ottawa proposed, and Washington agreed, to double toll rates and
apply them to the Welland Canal as well as to the Montreal-Lake Ontario
section of the Seaway. This section has five Canadian- and two American-administered locks. Until then, only lock fees had been collected
on the Welland Canal. The new toll schedule is designed to cover operating costs and depreciation, and yield a modest surplus.
By 1980, when the new rates are to be completely phased in, tolls for a
typical grain ship will have risen to $17,500 from the $10,900 paid in
1977. For an ore carrier, fees will climb from $12,300 to $27,000. 17
Shipping interests contend that the higher rates will discourage traffic, but 90 per cent of the traffic is bulk cargo -- wheat, iron ore and
coal. No other means of transportation can move such large quantities
at so low a cost. Experts claim that a ton of bulk cargo can be carried
from Chicago to Europe via the Seaway for less than it costs to move it
overland to an East Coast port.
The next goal is to increase usage of the waterway to the 80 million
tons projected for 1990. Bigger ships should help. There were nearly
20 per cent fewer transits in record-setting 1977 than there were in
1960, even though the volume carried was three times greater.
Streamlining lock operations, including the use of shunter tugs, is another answer. But what stirs the most excitement are efforts to lengthen the April-December shipping season. By using gate heaters, air bubblers, ice booms and icebreakers, officials hope to keep shipping lanes
open for 11 months within the next five to 10 years. Total cost is estimated at 500 million dollars, about 70 per cent of it for channel
dredging in the Montreal-Lake Ontario section.
The advantages of a longer season are continuity of service, greater
utilization of ships, reduced stockpiling of cargo, and lower inventory
charges.
•k    .. ..
(U.S. News & World Report, July 31)
AVIATION
SOARING IN-FLIGHT MAGAZINES DESIGNED FOR BUSINESSMEN
TORONTO - In-flight magazines in Canada are becoming the fastest-growing
segment of the print industry with advertising volumes up 145 per cent
in the first five months of 1978, compared with a year earlier.
The improvement basically stems from Air Canada's in-flight publication,
Enroute, although Canadian Pacific Ltd. recently launched its own
magazine, Kan'at'a. It is being used as an in-flight journal by CP Air
and as a hotel room publication by CP Hotels.
Air Media publishes and acts as advertising representative for both
publications and is looking to regional airlines to launch their own
magazines so that it can work with them too.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, July 26)
* * *
ICELANDIC PLANS $149.50 U.S.-T0-EUR0PE AIR FARE
NEW YORK - Icelandic Airlines, the pioneer of low fares to Europe, said
it is lowering the price and ending all restrictions on its New York-to-
Luxembourg flight, effective Sept. 15.
The price, subject to government approval, will drop to $149.50. A
round-trip purchased in the U.S. will cost $299. The carrier's lowest
current fare to Europe is $180 one way.
(Wall Street Journal, July 26)
* * * 18
PWA HOPES TO GET EAST-WEST SERVICE
SASKATOON - Pacific Western Airlines could be offering east-west scheduled passenger flights from here by next April, PWA vice-president Dave
Jaycox said.
Mr. Jaycox said the airline hopes to have completed its merger with
Transair Ltd. of Winnipeg by next April and to receive approval to cease
operating Transair's current routes east of Winnipeg.
He said that will clear the way for PWA to move into Saskatoon with an
expanded complement of Boeing-737 aircraft.
PWA's plan to operate flights linking Winnipeg, Saskatoon and Edmonton
as well as Winnipeg, Regina and Calgary, received Canadian Transport
Commission (CTC) approval in March. PWA will also offer flights from
Saskatoon to Calgary and from Regina to Edmonton.
(Calgary Herald, July 19)
* * *
AIR CANADA CHOOSES CALGARY
CALGARY - Calgary has been chosen as the site for a new Air Canada inflight service base.
H. D. Laing, Air Canada's vice-president for the western region, said
July 18 the decision to locate the airline facility in Calgary was made
as a result of the rapid growth and development of business in Alberta.
"As a result of this growth," he said, "Air Canada's traffic pattern and
assignment of aircraft has made the setting up of a flight attendant's
base a feasible proposition."
The new base will be located at the Calgary International Airport and
initially will be home for 100 flight attendants. By mid-1979, that
number is expected to rise to 250 attendants.
(Calgary Herald, July 18)
* * *
CAB APPROVES RISES IN RATES FOR CARGO ON PACIFIC ROUTES
WASHINGTON - The Civil Aeronautics Board has approved cargo rate increases for routes over the north and central Pacific, but encouraged
airlines to undercut the new rate levels.
The increases, which were proposed by the International Air Transport
Association, the group of airlines with world routes, included boosts of
two per cent to six per cent for general commodities and increases
ranging from 11 per cent to 33 per cent for special items. They can
take effect as soon as the carriers file the proposed increases.
(Wall Street Journal, July 24)
* * * 19
LABOR
AIRLINE STAFF SET ROTATING STRIKES
MONTREAL - Air Canada's 7,500 ground service workers will stage rotating
strikes next month if the airline doesn't make a satisfactory contract
offer, a union official said July 24.
Barry Shaw, chief negotiator for the International Association of Machinists, said that strike action was authorized by 83 per cent of the workers who voted across the country over the last two weeks. The workers
have been without a contract since April 2.
The strike threat comes at a rough time for Air Canada's harassed labor-
relations specialists, who are also negotiating with the 500 employees
at the company's Winnipeg finance department, 1,500 pilots and 2,700
flight attendants, and will open talks shortly with 2,300 ticket agents.
The Canadian Press also reported on July 26 that negotiators for Air
Canada and its 7,500 ground-service employees received a federal conciliator's report July 25, clearing the way for planned rotating strikes
next week, a union official said.
Barry Shaw, chief negotiator for the International Association of Machinists, said that the first 24-hour walkout could come as early as Aug.
1. The workers can legally strike seven days after both parties have
received the report.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, July 26)
* * *
RAILMEN FEAR MORE LAYOFFS
HAMILTON, Ont. - Anxious employees of the Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo
Railway want CP Rail to tell them what other bad news is coming down the
track.
The workers are upset by announced layoffs of more than 60 employees
since CP Rail took over the TH&B in April, 1977. A federation of unions
for the workers has requested a meeting with CP Rail officials to have
the new owners outline the future for TH&B employees.
The workers want CP Rail to remove "the fear of the unknown" by outlining the future of the TH&B, the federation said.
(Hamilton Spectator, July 17)
* * *
UNIONS SCORN SIX-PER-CENT WAGE RISE, BURN FOR MORE
TORONTO - A summer of discontent has burst across the country as a dozen
major unions are launching a concerted offensive against the government's recommended limit on wage increases of six per cent. 20
With first-quarter wage settlements averaging 6.7 per cent and second-
quarter patterns expected to be not much higher, the loss in real income
generated by current nine-per-cent inflation is making union members
fiercely reluctant to let their economic position slip any further.
Unions with any degree of bargaining strength appear unwilling to settle
for anything less than the inflation rate and many are now tabling demands for one-year wage raises of 10 to 15 per cent.
(Financial Post, July 29)
* * *
GRAIN HANDLERS ACCEPT CONTRACT
VANCOUVER - British Columbia grain handlers have voted to accept a one-
year contract with the grain-handling companies.
The 600 members of the Grain Workers Union voted 75 per cent in favor of
accepting recommendations by conciliation commissioner Emmett Hall,
giving them a wage increase of 50 cents an hour, subject to approval by
the Anti-Inflation Board.
(Montreal Gazette, July 25)
* * *
RAILROADS, FOUR UNIONS AGREE TENTATIVELY ON 39-MONTH PACT
WASHINGTON - Four unions representing more than 140,000 rail workers
have agreed tentatively with the nation's major railroads on a 39-month
contract calling for wage and cost-of-living increases of as much as 35
per cent, railroad bargainers said.
As expected, the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, the United Transportation Union and the Sheet Metal Workers were among the unions reaching the agreement. The Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employes had
been expected to settle soon, but that union said recently it was still
"evaluating" the tentative pact. The Brotherhood of Railroad Signalmen,
which hadn't been expected to settle with the other three, did.
Management negotiators still must sell the agreement to nine other
unions. The biggest of those -- the Brotherhood of Railway and Airline
Clerks — has already indicated that it wants an arrangement providing
for about the same overall percentage increase, but with more money
coming in wages and less in cost-of-living increases.
(Wall Street Journal, July 24)
* * *
CRUCIAL ALG0MA TALKS MAY AFFECT JOBS OF 25,000 IN STEEL INDUSTRY
TORONTO - A settlement or strike next week that could involve 25,000
workers in the bellwether basic steel industry is in the balance with
negotiations at a crucial stage. 21
Bargaining teams for Algoma Steel Corp. at Sault Ste. Marie and the Soo
local of the United Steelworkers of America returned home July 24 from
meetings in Toronto as the union prepared for a meeting of its 7,700
members July 26 that could decide the fate of the bargaining. In Toronto, the Steel Co. of Canada and union negotiators for the firm's
17,500 employees accelerated the pace of their bargaining as time began
running out for a settlement and a ratification vote before the expiry
of the contracts at the end of the July 31 working day.
Although the details in the welter of offers and counter-proposals were
kept within the confines of the negotiating teams, one fact emerged: the
cost-of-living escalator formula that has kept the wages of steel union
members in the basic steel industry tied closely to the increases in the
Consumer Price Index has been retained. The issue confronting the negotiators is how much more the union can gain both in wages and other
improvements, including pensions.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, July 25)
* * *
FIRM OFFERS SEMINARS ON HOW TO BEAT UNIONS
OTTAWA - A United States management consultant firm is holding seminars
in Ontario to show employers ways of beating out the unions.
The firm, Advanced Management Research, gives three-day courses on how
companies in the province can nip potential union organization in the
bud and deal with it once it surfaces.
AMR says many large companies in Ontario — including top manufacturing
firms -- are signing up for the first seminar in Toronto, Aug. 15.
(Ottawa Journal, July 22)
* * *
BRITAIN HEADS TO PERMANENT WAGE CONTROLS
LONDON - Britain appears as though it may be entering a new economic and
political era of permanent, non-statutory wage controls.
The Labor government of Prime Minister James Callaghan has just unveiled
what is described as Phase Four of its long-term economic policy and it
calls for average wage settlements over the next year of only five per
cent.
But more significantly, the Callaghan administration is looking beyond
a year of five per cent to a long-term policy of co-operation between
government, labor and industry which, in the words of one headline writer, means "pay curbs forever."
(Montreal Gazette, July 26)
* * * 22
TOURISM & TRAVEL
TEXAS HOTEL CHAIN GAMBLES ON CANADA
MONTREAL - A family on the move through Canada has a major problem in
the larger of our cities -- finding a hotel room at a price which won't
beggar the budget.
Unlike European cities, or the majority of U.S. urban centres, Canada
suffers from a shortage of plain simple accommodation in the downtown
areas. The sort of pension, bed and breakfast or modified motel you can
find elsewhere is a rarity here.
Now a Texas-based hotel chain is out to change all that. Rodeway Inns
of America runs the sort of small hotel where families stay, minor entertainers put up for a few weeks and a business executive lives in for
a while during a transfer from another city.
Recently they announced that they were forming a Canadian subsidiary, R-
I Inns of Canada Ltd. and have entered into negotiations for properties
in Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver. They already
have a property in Montreal.
Company president Frank Walker wants to licence more small hotels in the
chain to give the sort of modest but clean accommodation that has
characterized his operation in the U.S.
"One series of 15 hotels in Texas is doing over 90-per-cent occupancy,"
he says. "And that is on a year-round basis."
Montreal hotels have trouble getting above the 70-per-cent mark as a
group. A few manage to fill more than 80 per cent of their rooms during
the tourist season but in general, a level of above 90 per cent is
unheard-of as an annual average. The chain offers its rooms in the $22-
a-night class. Hotels are owned by individuals and the chain handles
the reservations, quality control and gives a degree of uniformity.
Mr. Walker is now looking for a Canadian hotelier to run the operation,
which will be Toronto-based.
(Montreal Gazette, July 22)
* * *
BETTER PROFIT OUTLOOK IS FORECAST FOR HOTELS
TORONTO - The hotel industry in North America is reaching a levelling-
out period in one of its regular peak-and-valley cycles and can look
forward to a resumption of profitability, according to J. Howard Lammons,
president of the International Association of Holiday Inns.
Hotel room rates in the 1970s have not kept pace with inflation, he
said. Consequently, the sale of food and beverages, which can be priced
in line with inflationary increases, has had to contribute a growing
percentage of hotel revenue.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, July 21)
* * * 23
BUSINESS & FINANCE
POTASH SALES SEEN EASING
WINNIPEG - Following a bumper year for overseas sales of Saskatchewan
potash, industry officials are looking toward a levelling off in overseas demand during the current year which started July 1.
Figures recently show that sales of Saskatchewan potash in areas outside
North America rose by 45 per cent to 1.6 million short tons during the
1977-78 sales year. The overseas export record of 1.8-million short
tons was set in 1974-75.
Rod Heath, a spokesman for Canpotex in Toronto, said that the company
expects overseas sales to be down slightly in 1978-79, basically because
of the firm's big growth year last year.
(Winnipeg Free Press, July 21)
• * * *
PANCANADIAN TO ASSESS COAL GASIFICATION
CALGARY - PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd., in partnership with the city of
Medicine Hat and the Alberta government, has awarded a $200,000 contract
to Fluor Canada Ltd. to study the feasibility of the gasification of
coal deposits in the Medicine Hat area of southeast Alberta.
The study will provide a process scheme, capital and operating cost estimates and economic sensitivity analysis to produce 350 btu gas from
coal.
PanCanadian stressed the study is designed to provide data on a time
frame when such a project might be economically feasible with a view to
using the gas possibly in petrochemical manufacture.
(Oilweek, July 10)
* * *
IMPERIAL MOVES TO CALGARY
OTTAWA - Imperial Oil Ltd. of Toronto has decided to move its exploration, production and new energy resources development departments to Calgary, to be closer to the geographical centre of Western Canada's oil
and gas boom.
The decision could be the first step towards the eventual creation of a
separate energy exploration and development division of Imperial Oil,
headquartered in Calgary.
It is part of a pattern of moves by energy companies to move senior
executives and management functions from Toronto to Calgary, in recognition of the growing importance of the West in all aspects of
energy.
(Calgary Albertan, July 20)
* * * 24
LOWER ZINC PRICES PUT PRESSURE ON COMINCO DIVIDENDS
TORONTO - Cominco Ltd. of Vancouver, its profit continuing to be depressed by lower zinc prices, still faces pressure on its annual dividend
rate, analysts say. Although costs are rising, zinc prices are not
expected to increase during 1978 over the 1977 level.
Cominco reduced its annual dividend last month to $2 a share from $2.30,
which was established with the payment of a semi-annual dividend of $1
on June 23. Most analysts expect that 1978 profit will decline to between $2 and $2.50 a share from the $3.43 earned in 1977.
For the first six months, Cominco profit dropped to $26.1-million or
$1.37 a share from $37.8-million or $2.11 a share in the 1977 period.
Lower zinc prices and deliveries and higher unit costs because of reduced operating rates at zinc plants more than offset higher prices and
demand for lead and gold. First-half sales rose to $460.3-million from
$408.2-mi11 ion.
In the first-half report, M. N. Anderson, president, said the continuing
weakness in the world zinc market contributed significantly to the
profit decrease.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, July 26)
* * *
DOMINION BRIDGE PROFIT GAINS
MONTREAL - Net earnings of Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd. amounted to $14.9-
million or $1.40 a share for the first six months this year, up from
$13.6-million or $1.27 a share in the year earlier period, the firm reported July 25.
Sales totalled $416-million compared with $253-million. All figures are
expressed in U.S. funds. The report noted that the 1977 period results
have been restated to reflect the conversion of financial statements to
U.S. currency.
The company said approximately 95 per cent of its earnings in the latest
half-year were produced by U.S. and international operations. K. S.
Barclay, chairman and chief executive officer, said he is still projecting new sales and earnings records for 1978.
(Montreal Gazette, July 26)
* * * y
GROWTH FORECASTS FOR GNP GLOOMY
OTTAWA - Recent economic forecasts for growth in real Gross National
Product range from three to 3.9 per cent -- well below the Government's
targeted range of 4.5 to five per cent.
(Ottawa Journal, July 26)
* * * Internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER, July 27, 1978
From    M.W. Holland
To    Mr. 0. Robison
Agent
Wharf Ticket Office
Vancouver
File:  606
Re.  Lost Ticket Bonds & Refund Applications in
 favour Mr. Jay Walton and Marjorie Curtis
Would you please have attached forms properly completed prior
to returning them to this office for handling.
In both instances, your signature is missing and "Statement of
Selling Agent" has not been completed.  There are also other
portions of these forms that will have to be completed.
Your prompt attention to this matter will be appreciated.
r_3. INITIAL & PASS
Form 102-R
Manager,  B.C.C.S S
AM/jb CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, July 27, 1978
From    M.W. Holland
To    Mr. E. Robinson
Terminal Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
Nanaimo
File:  606
Mr. 0. Robison
Agent
Wharf Ticket Office
Vancouver
Would you please bulletin the following tickets as lost:
BCS 5 x 10     Nos. 468094 - 095   (Value $18.00 each);
BCS 5 x 10     No.  468595;
BCS 10        No.  144563  (issued Calgary, Alberta).
If any of these tickets should be presented for refund, do not
honour such request.
It will be appreciated if you would check all cash refunds made
at your agency since July 1, 1978, to determine if any of the
above have been refunded, advising.
!
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc:  Mr. L. Camsusa, Depot Ticket Agent, Vancouver
AM/jb
(gp Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER,   July  27,   1978
From   M.W.  Holland
File:     77.REF.552
To   Mr. P.E. LeFeuvre
Asst. Treasurer, Banking
Toronto, Ontario
Re:  Agent Number 51085, Personal Money Order Sales
Our Daily Recapitulation Form 1177 of August 2nd, 1977 (total
$10,995.27) reported sale of C.I.B.C. money orders M1930941
through M1931002 inclusive.
I have just received a request from travel agency for proof
that the following money orders reported in above have actually
been cashed:
M1930959 through M1930963 inclusive with total value
$1,199.20 Canadian Funds.
Would you please supply at your earliest convenience photocopies
of the above so that I may reply to the above query.
Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg
(|g) Form 102-R O   Form 102-R
CPRail
lernai Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER,   July 27,   1978
From     R. R.   Reid
To    Mr. N.D. Mullens, Q.C., Esq.
Law Department
Vancouver
In connection with the acquisition of Northland Navigation
Company, 1st January 1978, with lease of all terminals equipment, tugs and barges, we have business offering between Vancouver (from Northland terminal) and Ketchikan, Alaska in . .     ^ ff/f &
which the tug "Ocean Prince II" has a tow Tuesday, August 1
for the Ketchikan Pulp Mill, Ketchikan, Alaska.
Customs broker Kenneth Sampson in Ketchikan advises in connection with proof of financial responsibility covering this
tow, they will accept Canadian Pacific Limited Certificate of
Financial Responsibility No. 98-0001377-10, under which the
"Princess Patricia" is operated in Alaskan waters, provided
proof of C.P. Limited's acquisition of Northland Navigation
Company in letter form is available on board the "Ocean Prince
II" upon arrival Ketchikan.
It will be appreciated if you will issue letter suitable for
this purpose or provide us with necessary wording if same can
be written under the signature of Manager, B.C.C.S.S., provided
this meets with your approval.
It will be appreciated if you will kindly oblige.
Assistant Manager
___>• V_*» \J •  O «■ O i.
RRR:gg I
CPRail
internal Correspondence
Date
From
To
File:     X-78-14-5
VANCOUVER, July 26» 1978
M.W. Holland
Mr.  P.  Georges
Montreal
r.    <-    BM..r'. description of the circumstances
ZSZtZZr-iEZ PaS ia    setting down on the outer
______  of the Wrangell dock July 4,   1978.
Kepairs have no„ heen effected at an a^^Lse ^nder
__._°_;0oUrt:htL«nle"n_1oraLo_moaationS„h-Stanoa.
is as follows:
Kefund to Mr. » Mrs. Eugene Pit,, *- f 7,^75.00 U.S.
. Refund to G.L. Latten, Room 231, O^O.OU V
Completed copies of refund application foMs are attached and
will be sent to Mr. McDermott.
•*??_. Form 102-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S
Mr. A. McDermott, Montreal
cc
revenue  is
In the event that the loss o,: passenger ^»^
recoverable,   copies of  the  reruna
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
•HLH/jb
PL3. INITIAL & PASS
Sales Repr. _ ^^% f/tf/ yf <
Mgr. Traff/Sales
X BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
M W Holland
'Manager
RRReid
4ss. Manager
July 26,   1978
File:     AGR.1.CMSG.GEN.
Capt.   J.E.S.   Bragg
Business Representative
Canadian Merchant Service Guild
Western Branch
230 West Broadway
Vancouver, B.C.
V5Y 1P7
Dear Capt. Bragg:
In accordance with Article 5-11 of the Agreement, enclosed
herewith is current "Leave List" for Deck and Engine Officers.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB ..
-   -    ■
CPRail
Date    VANCOUVER,   July  26,   1978
From   M.W.  Holland
To   Master
"Princess of Vancouver"
Re: Dairyland Trailer Shipped Nightly (except. Saturday) on you..)
 Vessel ex Vancouver 2000k Sailing	
Due to the hot weather the customer is experiencing loss of contents in the trailer because of current regulations requiring the
trailer's refri_fgeration unit to be shut down after placement on
board your vessel.
Effective immediately for the balance of the summer this trailer
will be loaded last on the stern of the vessel and the reefer is
not to be shut off.
This action is necessary to protect this traffic and will be re-
cinded as soon as the weather permits the trailer contents to be
shipped with the reefer in the off position.
Manager
JDF:gg
(gg) Form 102-R internal Correspondence
Date       Vancouver, B.C., July 26, 1978
From       W.W. Hocking
To       Mr. P.I. Georges,
Assistant General Manager,
Coastal Marine Operations,
Montreal, P.Q.
Reference your inquiry of Northland G. & A. expenditures,
office equipment and supplies, January to May compared to
Plan. The following items have contributed to this increase:
1. charges from Promotion and Advertising amounting to
$3018 (four items details attached).
2. Two invoices from I.B.M. amounting to $2046 (copies
attached).
3. Computer rental has been charged for six months in five
month period. This is a G. & A. overcharge and not
operating expense. Correction will be made in July G. & A.
Accountant, B.C.C.S.S.
cc: Mr. Victor Jones
.Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, July 26th, 1978
From   A. J. McPherson
To   Memorandum
Estimated Passengers Gross Fare Revenues for July 26th,
1978 sailing "T.E.V. Princess Patricia" as follows:
215 Roundtrip; 89 Northbound;
85 Southbound
Equivalent 302 Roundtrip
Gross Fare Revenue:  $279,243.
Departmental Analyst
AJM:gg
© Fo
rm 102-R Dt_ i^LJ.ioi otuciiiisitip oei u;., _;
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
W Holland
~: Reid
l Manager
CPRail
July 25,   1978
File:     511-R
Mr.   J.A.   Tames
#903  --  2167 Bellevue Avenue
West Vancouver,  B.C.
V7V  1C2
Dear Mr.   Tames:
Manager
Asst. Mgr,
PL3. INITIAL & PASS
Marine Supt.
Supt. Engr.
Asst. Supt Engr.
Account
Sales Repr.
Mgr. Traff/feales
Jf^r ><$~<t^j?
z
LAX>
l\\\H>
ou
will already have
in which he advised you that he did not have any momentos on
hand from B.C. Coast.
Our vessel the "Princess Patricia" will be taken out of service
at the end of its current cruise season, but the ship is not up
for sale, as yet.  Accordingly, there are no artifacts available
at the present time.  If, and when, the vessel is sold, it may
be a condition of sale that it be sold with all its fittings and
furnishings included, in which case no "souvenir items will be
available to anybody.
In view of your interest in this Company's marine operation over
many years, we will keep your letter on file in the event some
items become available,when your request will receive further
consideration.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb 4
4
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CPRail
W Holland
July 25,   1978
1 Reid
Manager
File:     T-78-40
Ms. Melody Anne Stewart
513 — 12th Street
P.O. Box 2038
Paso Robles, California 93446
U. S. A.
Dear Ms. Stewart:
This will acknowledge receipt of your letter dated July 18,
regarding employment on this Company's vessels.
We are strictly a coastal operation and in accordance with
the Shipping Act, we can hire only Canadian citizens or
landed immigrants.  It is suggested that you try one of the
larger cruise lines, such as Princess Cruises, which operates
out of Los Angeles.
Sorry we cannot be of more assistance, but thank you for your
interest in Canadian Pacific.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb • CPRail
Internal Correspondence
M
Date      VANCOUVER, July 25, 1978
From      M.W. Holland
To      Mr. P.E. Le Feuvre
Assistant Treasurer, Banking
Toronto
File:  334
Concerning exchange telexes regarding authorization being given
to our Agent and Assistant Agent at Vancouver Wharf Ticket Office
to cash emergent vouchers.
Two specimen signature cards are attached, completed as required.
They are for the following:
O.R. Robison -- Agent
J.R. Hughes  -- Assistant Agent
The location of the Bank of Montreal where these vouchers are
cashed is:  Suite 67 - 200 Granville St., Vancouver, B.C. V6C 1S4
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
cc:  Mr. J.L. Rochon, Data Centre, Vancouver
(Sp Form 102-R •//Holland
fl Reid
' Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
July 25, 1978
File:  164
Canadian National Railways
P.O. Box 8100
Montreal, Quebec
H3C 3N4
Dear Sirs:
Re:  Claim No. 57-22279V-9986
Your statement of July 10, 1978, addressed to our Claims &
Insurance Department in Montreal has been forwarded to us.
As this claim has already been turned down, we are returning
the statement and attachments herewith.
It is not incumbent upon us to check the vehicles for missing
parts and it could have been missing prior to loading on our
chartered vessel.
In any event, we would entertain an approach only from the
shipper named on the bill of lading, in this instance Canadian
Auto Carriers Ltd.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, July 25, 1978
From   R.R. Reid
To   Purser
PRINCESS PATRICIA
File:  T-78-53
Alaska Reservation Desk
-- All Note
Attached please find Investigation Department report concerning
an alleged theft of money which is self-explanatory.
It is best that Purser's Office be locked at all times when
unoccupied, as is usually the case.  When shore staff go on
board ship for departure boarding duties, their files etc.
should be kept in their possession until Purser is on duty.
Assistant Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
RRR/jb
©
Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
M
Date     VANCOUVER, July 25, 1978
From     M.W. Holland
To    Mr. A. McDermott
Montreal
File:  P-306
In your letter of July 4, 1978, concerning injury to B.C.C.S.S./
Northland employee R.P. Waddell, you advised the following:
"You are aware that the protection and indemnity cover
in the Standard Club does not provide crew injury
coverage."
Will you kindly advise whether you recommend such coverage for
Northland employees and what the cost would be to provide same.
B.C.C.S.S./Northland Service have 28 ship and 54 shore employees,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
(gg) Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
\TA
Date    VANCOUVER,   July 25,   1978 File:     T-78-33
From     R.R.   Reid
To    Chief Steward
PRINCESS PATRICIA
Mr. B.D. Margetts accompanied by his sons Trevor (12) and Scott (9)
are taking the August 3 Alaska cruise occupying Cabin #215.
Mr. Margetts is presently planning to leave the cruise at Juneau
on August 8, and it is requested that the boys be looked after
to Vancouver.
Will you please arrange second meal sittings at Master's table
and also set up a bar in Mr. Margett's cabin, together with ice,
mixes and a bottle of champagne.  Please ensure that all liquor
is removed from the cabin upon Mr. Margett's disembarkation at
Juneau.
Please extend every courtesy and assistance enroute the cruise.
(f!P For™ 102-R
Assistant Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
cc:  Purser, "Princess Patricia"
Please offer every assistance enroute and arrange complimentary
shore excursions as required,including Lake Bennett W.P. & Y.
Master, "Princess Patricia"
For your information and guidance.
Chief Engineer, "Princess Patricia"
For your information.
Stewardess, "Princess Patricia"
It will be appreciated if you will assist in keeping an eye on
the boys.
RRR/jb
___ BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
/Holland
wger
IReid
■ Manager
CPRail
July 25, 1978
File:  354664
Sun Life of Canada
200D --338 Broadway Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3C 0T3
Dear Sirs:
Re:  G.J RIES, Emp.No. 354664, S.I.N. 702-729-831
Enclosed herewith is doctor's further report in connection
with the above mentioned employee.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB Internal Correspondence
m
Date    VANCOUVER, July 24, 1978
From    M.W. Holland
To   Mr. R. Granger
Montreal
File:  137749
}•
Re:  Miss J.M. Dixon, #P-137749. S.I.N. 701-377-954
Reference your PF-62 of July 10, file 166659, concerning the
above mentioned.
Returned herewith is completed Form P.F.39.
Manager,   B.C.C.S.S,
JB
PL3. INITIAL & PASS
Manager
Asst. Mgr.
Marine Supt.
Supt. Engr.
Asst. Supt. Engr.
Catering Supt.
Terminals Supt.
Deptl. Analyst
Office Mgr.
Account.
Sales Repr.
Mgr. Traff/Sales
/In-  j\\il
*fX'/
O
z
n
*
, ml
-itifZfAdf.
(gg)   Form 102-R Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
H Reid
' Manager
wHolland .     July 24,   1978
File:     T-78-1032
Health and Welfare Canada
Regional Office
Box 1177
Victoria, B.C.
V8W 2V2
ATTENTION:  Regional Director of
 Old Age Security
Dear Sirs:
Reference your letter of July 6, 1978, file 9-P-713-087-617,
concerning application for Old Age Security pension by
Mrs. A. Ruth Rogers.
Our records indicate that the "Princess Louise" made its
initial trip from Vancouver to Skagway and return May 20 to
May 28, 1922.  Kindly note that the voyage originated out of.
Vancouver and not Seattle; however, prior to going into
northern service the "Princess Louise" operated a short time
in local service between Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle but
I am unable to advise the exact date on which the vessel would
have made her last local trip from Seattle to Vancouver.
It is regretted that passenger lists are not available for the
year 1922, but trusting the foregoing information may be of
some assistance to Mrs. Rogers concerning proof of residence
in Canada.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH'jb BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
IWHolland July 24, 1978
'aoager
SEX* File:  127559
Mr. H. Tyson
1400 Mount Douglas Cross Road
Victoria, B.C.
V8X 3H4
Dear Mr. Tyson:
Re:  Alexander S. MOFFAT, deceased May 10, 1978
It will be appreciated if you would kindly advise if
Mrs. Moffat has now received advice from the U.S. Railroad
Retirement Board concerning survivor benefits.
If Mrs. Moffat has received this notice, will appreciate
a copy being forwarded to this office.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB Manager
tic uoasi bteamsnip service
Pier"B",Vancouver.BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
tWHolland July 24,   1978
' mager
RReid
File:     164
Mrs. C. McGhie
R.R. #3 Cedar Road
Ladysmith, B.C.
VOR 2E0
Dear Mrs. McGhie:
Thank you for your letter of July 10, advising us of the
unfortunate circumstances in which you sustained paint
damage to your blue jeans while travelling on our vessel
the "Princess of Vancouver."
We very much regret the inconvenience caused you and enclose
money order in the amount of $27.25 to cover the cost of
cleaning and replacement.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH'jb CPRail
internal Correspondence
m
Date      VANCOUVER, July 24, 1978
From     M.W. Holland
To     Mr. P. Georges
Montreal
File:  579
Reference your letter of July 17, file 109, concerning the
Post-Secondary Recruitment Summary forms.
No persons in this category have been employed during 1978
in either B.C.C.S.S. or Northland.  Forms are returned
herewith completed accordingly.
Qgp   Form 102-R
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
1
...-.- -.;..,    ■*. CPRail
Dale    VANCOUVER, July 24, 1978
From    M.W. Holland
j0    O.R. Robison, Vancouver
E. Robinson, Nanaimo
Purser, "Princess of Vancouver'
Purser, "Princess Patricia"
Miss B.C. Thorn
File:     T-78-37
'
©
Form 102-R
Effective immediately Sterling Travellers Cheques are to be
accepted at $2.11 to the Pound.
Do not accept Sterling Travellers Cheques negotiable only in
Sterling area.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
gg •-    _t__kSi** . :..
■        ■■ .■;..■.■,.;.._:■ .■ . .    I    I ■        ,.
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
\m
F
Date   VANCOUVER, July 24, 1978
From   N. Cartwright
To   Miss Marj Irvine
Montreal
File: T-78-10
(B
Form 102-R
Re:  1978 Passenger Immigration Forms
In addition to the analysis both you and Lynda are doing on the
1978 passenger tickets, I would appreciate if you could analyse
the immigration forms by sailing as quickly as possible to extract the following information:
Origin
U.S.   :
State:
Canada :
Provide:
Foreign:
Total Passengers of U.S. Origin.
Determine the states from which passengers originated and provide totals for each.
Total Passengers of Canadian Origin.
Provide total breakdown of originating province of
passengers.
All non-Canadian, non-U.S. Passengers.
Provide the total number and the individual numbers
from each foreign country.
Sex
Male
Female
Provide total number in each category.
Occupation
Retired
Not Retired
I am only interested in these two areas,
determine between the two categories.
Try your best to
...12 t,
Miss Marj Irvine
-2-
July 24, 1978
4. Age
0-9
10-19
20-29
30-39
40-49
50-59
60-64
65-70
70-74
75-80
80+
Provide the number of passengers who fall in each of the
above age groups.
5. Marital Status
Single
Married
Widow/Widower
Please provide breakdown by category and provide a total
count for each category.
In all cases the total number of persons counted in items 1
through 5 should equal the total number of questionnaires for
a particular sailing.
I am forwarding the immigration forms for the three May cruises
and three June cruises.  As you are nearly finished these advise
me and I will forward July immigration forms.
I
Senior Analyst
NC:gg tiu Coast Steamship service
Pier^'B",Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
■ /Holland
i Reid
' Manager
July 24, 1978
File:  78.ALA.521
Mr. Dan M. Millar
Senior Travel Consultant
Featherstone Travel Service Ltd.
734 Yates Street
Victoria, B.C.
V8W 1L4
Dear Mr. Millar:
Thank you for taking the time to write us concerning your
clients Mrs. Turner and Mrs. Peden, who travelled on the
May 31st "Princess Patricia" Alaska cruise.  We are pleased
to pass your comments along to the ship's crew, who appreciate receiving letters of this nature.
At the same time I am very pleased to read your comments respecting our reservation staff, of whom we are justly proud.
I sometimes marvel at how they are able to keep their "cool,"
but as they work as a team, one seems to support the other
when the "dog" days appear.
Again, many thanks for your comments and for your continued
support of the "Princess Patricia."
Yours truly,
R.R. Reid
Assistant Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
RRR:gg CPI
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, July 24, 1978 T-78-30-201
From   M.W. Holland
To   Master
M.V. "Carrier Princess"
Vancouver, B.C.
Trailer Damage, CP Transport 42003, July 14th, 1978
I have a claim for damage to the above trailer carried aboard
your vessel, July 14, 1978, 1330 hours.from Nanaimo to Vancouver.
Damage consists of a six-inch gash to the right front bulkhead.
Red paint flakes are evident in the damaged area.
Would you please have the officers on duty in Nanaimo (during
loading) and the duty officer in Vancouver (during unloading)
supply any information they may have on this damage.
Manager
___>»L_'«Vj.O*l>.
AJM:gg
J
f|g) Form 102-R
■  ■■ .        -: .    . ............... . . ..■-,.■
CPRail
Internal Correspondent
Date   VANCOUVER, July 24, 1978 File:  527
From   A.N. Cairns
To   Master - "Princess Patricia"
"Princess of Vancouver"
"Trailer Princess"
"Carrier Princess"
Enclosed is Radio Licence for your vessel issued on April 1,
1978.
Kindly arrange to have same posted in the appropriate place.
Marine Superintendent^ /
ANC:gg
Enclosures
(y|0   Form 102-R Coastal Marine Operations
Windsor Station, Montreal, Quebec   H3C 3E4
Tel (514)861-6811,Ext2009.Telex055-60112
n.iargetts
-.•'.' Manager
CPRail
July 24th,  1978
Tile:    78. ALA. 521
Mr. Vorcy McGee
2575 Sea View
Victoria, B.C.
V8H 1K9
Dear Mr. McGee--
In connection with your "Princess Patricia" September .2
Alaska cruise, we have been endeavoring ior some time to
Secure an "I" category cabin firam cancellation faor you.
Mr. Keith Campbell, when vlsltng Vancouver recently, asked
me l{f there was anything 7 could do to assist you.    I have
been watching your reservation listing ior the. past hew
days but wish to advise that the situation presently remains the same.    There are eight deluxe stat.er.ooms In the
"I" category but alt have been pruchased.
Please be advised that you are prominently listed &or a
cancellation, and you wULl be notified Immediately li this
occurs.
Sours truly,
General Manager,
CoastoX Marine Operations
WR:gg .
bcc    Mr.  Keith Campbell - We are watching the situation
closely ior any cancellation. W Holland
R Reid
-' Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
July 24, 1978
File:  T-78-134
Mrs. W.D. Keplinger
4524 - 17th Avenue S.E.
Lacey, Washington 98503
U.S.A.
Dear Mrs. Keplinger:
Please find under separate cover the following articles which
were found in your Room No. 106 on the July 2 sailing of the
"Princess Patricia":
1 bottle prescription pills
1 roll film
1 jewellery box with brooch and necklace
We hope you will find everything in satisfactory order.
Yours truly,
Manager
_D _■ \_j *•  V_v » O •__> .
gg .. .  ■-       ....   ..:...■■■...■...
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, July 24, 1978 File:  T-78-33
From   R.R. Reid
To  Mr. D.S. Collings
Special Attention - Trevor (12) and Scott (9) Margetts
Trevor and Scott Margetts, sons of Mr. B.D. Margetts, General
Manager Coastal Marine Operations, will leave Vancouver Train
2, The Canadian, Friday, August 11th, occupying Upper 3 Car
262 en route Montreal and will travel unaccompanied.
Rail passes and sleeping car ticket, will be held by Trevor and
Scott, and they will be brought down to the station.
Will you kindly arrange for the boys to be looked after en route
Montreal.
m
Assistant Manager
RRR:gg
cc:     Mr.   B.D.  Margetts
r-'^f.   Form 102-R
(gP i:..^&*iito<li&&i3K*^*£**:**v- :*^a«iafcji-i»^ :-..       .    I ._j^_aat__dw&_a»._:ii.
CPRail
internal Correspondence
m
Date    VANCOUVER, July 24th, 1978 File:  X-77-14-12
From   M.W. Holland
To   Mr. A. McDermott
Manager, Insurance & Fire Protection-
Canadian Pacific Limited
Windsor Station
Montreal, P.Q.
• Re: Your File: MC & I-B-8, January 20th, 1978
Seaspan Doris-Duncan Bay
December 11th, 1977-Damage
to Rail Cars and Mill Track
Further to my letter of June 19ths 1978, I now attach copy of
opinion received from Legal Department which is self-explanatory.
£?|) Form 102-R
Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg
Enclosure
. __ . . .        -•■■■- --...-  ■■■       ■ -
■ ■        ■■
1 t
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
3!
Date
VANCOUVER,  July 24,   1978                                   File:     T-78-100
*'
From
R.R.   Reid
To
Master,  "Princess Patricia"
August   19,   1978 Vancouver,  B.C.   arrival T.E.V."Princess Patricia"
©
Form 102-R
Due to conflict with "Sun Princess," "Veendam," and "Vera Cruz"
arrivals together with "Princess Patricia," Saturday, August 19th,
will you kindly arrange
1. To arrive Vancouver by 0830, August 19th, for immediate discharge of baggage, with passengers to follow on clearance by
Customs as soon thereafter as possible.
2. Arrange to move to permit Vera Cruz access to her berth (approximately 1000 and depart 1700), North West side Pier B.
Last June 24th the "Patricia" did not move to facilitate Vera
Cruz's arrival across her bow to her berth, which necessitated
numerous engine maneuverings, delaying baggage off-loading and
passenger disembarkation.  As a result, we have been asked to
ensure cooperation on August 19th. Will you kindly oblige.
Assistant Manager
_D«v>*\>*o«_!>t.
RRR:gg
cc:  Purser - "Princess Patricia":  For your information and
guidance.
Chief Steward - For your guidance.
Chief Engineer - For your guidance.
Mr. A. Meijer - For your information. BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B",Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
W Holland
■ iger
■! Reid
' Manager
CPRail
File:  T-78-10D
July 24, 1978
Dr. Les Shepard, Coordinator
Wrangell Visitors Bureau
Box 1171
Wrangell, Alaska 99929
U.S.A.
Dear Dr. Shepard:
I wish to acknowledge receipt of your letter of July 12, 1978
concerning the tourist program which the City of Wrangell presents to visiting cruise ships.
We have mentioned from time to time what a rigid schedule our
"Princess Patricia" follows, mainly predicated by tides in
Wrangell Narrows. We also have indicated that 1978 will be
the last year for our cruise ship "Princess Patricia." While
we have a study with regards to the possibility of replacing
the "Princess Patricia," nothing definite has been finalized,
and although we have requested berthing for a vessel in 1979,
we are not in a position as yet to state conclusively what our
plans will be.
We do appreciate the interest and cooperation shown CP Rail
Alaska cruises and are hopeful in continuing the Alaska service,
but until such time as our future plans are confirmed, we can
make no commitment regarding what schedule our cruise ship
will follow.
We sincerely thank you for your information and will be in
touch with you in the future.
Yours truly,
R.R. Reid
Assistant Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR:gg BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
1W Holland
'v^ager
? R Reid
;s( Manager
File:  T-89-99
July .25, 1978
Mrs. Hildegard Coleridge
8045 - 16th Avenue
Burnaby, B.C.
Dear Mrs. Coleridge:
I wish to acknowledge receipt of your letter of July 15 concerning your recent day excursion to Nanaimo and having your
car towed away while you were on board the "Princess of Vanc-
couver."
Unfortunately our Ticket Office was not aware of the fact
that you had parked your automobile on our property, and an
investigation with our Ticket Office indicates that where
you parked your car was blocking loading operations of the
"Princess of Vancouver" and holding up the railway engine
which was used in handling the rail cars of the "Princess of
Vancouver." Without any knowledge as to why the automobile
was parked where it was and due to the delay in loading the
"Princess of Vancouver," the railway Yard Office arranged
for your automobile to be towed away.
We naturally regret this action, but you can see it was necessary.  Parking at Pier A-3 is very limited, and the Ticket
Office will suggest areas where cars may be parked upon request
of passengers.  We do respectfully suggest in the future that
you contact our Ticket Office for identification of parking
areas.
Yours truly,
R.R. Reid
Assistant Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
RRR:gg _£_«____ ~~...   £____■__-«     -.
internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, 21 July 1978.
From   j#w. McCowatt
r° Capt. J.R. Hudson
Master
"Princess Patricia"
File:     T-78-10
With reference to the Department of Health, Education and Welfare
letter 9 June 1978, a copy is enclosed with report form attached,
for your information.
Asst.   Supt.   Engineer
JWM'BB
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Manager
Asst. Mgr.
Marine Supt.
Supt. Engr.
Asst. Supt. Engr.
Catering Supt.
Terminals Supt.
Deptl. Analyst
Office Mgr.
Account.
Mgr. Traff/Sales
Sales Repr. if&PpijLtbi"
oikfjn
p**\> net,    ^r
Form 102-R 8C Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
W Holland
■?{7sr
* Reid
' Manager
21  July  1978.
File No.   78.ALA.521.M.
Mrs. Grace Mcintosh
302 - 2180 Haltain
Victoria, B.C.
V8R 2L9
Dear Mrs. Mcintosh:
I. am very pleased to enclose Alaska transportation issued on your
behalf and Mrs. Annett's covering Stateroom 120 on the August 27th
sailing of the "Princess Patricia," for which the total charge is
$1764.00 or $882.00 each.
In addition, please find enclosed baggage labels, Daily Cruise
Bulletin, and information on shore excursions. A request for meal
sittings is also enclosed, and would appreciate your advising on
the form sitting you desire, and returning to me.  United States
Immigration questionnaire is enclosed, and would ask that this
form be completed prior to your arrival at the "Princess Patricia,"
where it will be uplifted from you prior to sailing.
We are very happy that you and Mrs. Annett will be on board ship
on August 27th, and know you will have an enjoyable cruise with
us.  Our cruise is most informal, and would suggest that you bring
along comfortable clothing, including good walking shoes.  You
may wish to bring a long dress for the Captain's Cocktail Party,
which is the evening of the first day out from Vancouver, and also
for the Captain's Dinner.  A good warm sxv-eater and jacket are
advisable, should weather prove cool or cloudy while off the
glaciers.
It will be appreciated if you will kindly forward your cheque at
your convenience, to the address on this letter, and if you prefer
to use CP credit card or Master Charge, please let me know.
With best regards.
R.R. REID
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB .■ —i.»_i,-.^-_-
CPRail
Date  VANCOUVER, 21 July 1978. File: 105
From  R«R* Reid
To  Mr. B.N. Smith
Supervisor, Traffic
CP Transport
Vancouver, B.C.
This will acknowledge receipt of your letter of 19 July, File
33-4-5, respecting our agreement covering the hostling work
performed by CP Transport at Swartz Bay on our behalf.
We are in agreement with your request for increase in rate
commencing 1 August 1978, of $2805.00 from the present monthly
rate of $2595.00.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
be.  Mr. C.A. Aitken - Confirming our conversation that John Ferguson
indicates from Blaney that CP performance has
vastly improved, both in equipment and manpower,
and also that Jim Finnie concurs in rate increase.
Mr. J.D. Finnie
Mr. J.M. Ferguson
Mr. CE. Blaney, 920 Douglas St., Victoria,
B.C.
O
Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 21 July 1978.
From C.A. Aitken
To Memorandum
Mr. V. Jones
File:  L-022
A.J. McPherson and myself visited Peter Wilson of J.S.
Fisheries Ltd. re lease arrangement at Prince Rupert.
MacMillan
We discussed all areas of our property, and his requirements are
as follows:
No. 1 priority is Main Shed, which he would like to strengthen,
having made a recent survey themselves, in order to affix labelling
machinery and stack pallet loads of canned fish.
No. 2 priority would be the leasing of South Shed, in which he would
store gill nets and MT cans plus a winch installed on the dock to
handle the unloading of nets from vessels to dock to shed.
These two items would give us free access to open area of dock at all times,
and 24 hours notice to clear water face of dock.
No. 3 priority would be acquisition of whole area for their use and the
water face of dock would be used for finger wharves to facilitate tie-up
of fishing fleet.
As was stated, No. 1 term should be two years 10 months definite, in
line with lease arrangement with Northland, and should contain options
to renew in line with Department of Highway options we presently hold.
No. 2 short term would be acceptable (one year)
at one year with their exclusive use.
No. 3 could work out
Please advise your position on the Main Shed area at this time, as
J.S. MacMillan Fisheries would appreciate an early conclusion to this
matter.  It is our intention to make the lease payments retroactive
to 1 March 1978, at the increased rate.  Without the benefit of a
(gp Form 102-R
:.:■,■■,.-■:. ■:-r*F*-trvr&*. - 2 -
long-term lease that guarantees MacMillan Fisheries residency,
they are not able to utilize the shed area to its maximum (dock
must be strengthened in certain areas), and yet we still intend to
charge the full increased rate.
I would appreciate an early reply to this matter, that will permit
me to proceed with a leasehold draft from our Law Department..
buOu^L
Terifiii
CAA'BB
s Superintendent
cc.    Mr.  A.J.  McPherson MW Holland
'■rage.
°.RReid
_;■•;.. Manager
rei (tjU4) bW-J / 3b, I elex 04-507684
CPRail
.21 July 1978.
File No. L-210
Mr. Alan H. Portigal, Director
Research & Planning Branch
Ministry of Labour
Province of British Columbia
Parliament Buildings
Victoria, B.C.
V8V 1X4
Dear Sir:
This has reference to your letter of 6 July 1978, addressed to
Northland Navigation Co. Ltd., Vancouver, B.C., requesting
copy of current agreement between Northland Navigation Co. Ltd.
and Canadian Merchant Service Guild.
ii r_.t_J-i.iic_.ui- oeivic. <au__xu.
u will find copy of agreement which is now open and
eing renegotiated.
Attached you win una copy i
currently being renegotiated
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
BB TELEX
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,   21  JULY  1978
P.E.   LEFEUVRE 06-22057
TORONTO,   ONT.
RE W.SAILES.   CHEQUE AMOUNT  294.25 TO YOU TODAY UNDER VALUE
D51-92-23. BCC-95
W.W.   HOCKING ' : ..'/•'
ACCOUNTANT BCCSS
WWH'BB
n
.                  ■ - ■■ rs •Mm^i
I
."**..-,■;
*;* •'-_____
.;.';.''    .  ,
r *■ -
;  ;■ J
1
. ■ „.'■■:;■
' -
1
'  '.;     .'    >'  .   , '  _
$9
...  ■-._■    ,'i... TELEX
VANCOUVER, B.C., 21 JULY 1978.
File: L-210
P.I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE.
MEETING WITH CMSG NORTHLAND SERVICES YESTERDAY WAS PROGRESSIVE. MAIN CONCERN
APPEARS MONEY. FIRST YEAR DOES NOT SEEM PROBLEM BUT SECOND YEAR DOES. SOME
OTHER MINOR MATTERS SUCH AS RECOGNITION NOT EMPLOYING NON-UNION TUGS STILL
CONTENTIOUS BUT DO NOT APPEAR INSURMOUNTABLE. NEXT MEETING WILL BE HELD SOMETIME
NEXT WEEK DATE TO BE CONFIRMED.  BCC-94
R.R. REID
ASST. MGR., BCCSS
cc.  Mr. B.D. Margetts
^ *'&««____ CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date   VANCOUVER, 21 July 1978. File:  78.ALA.521.G.
From   R.R. Reid
To  Mr. R.C. Gilmore
Vice-President, Marketing & Sales
Room 319, Windsor Station
Montreal, Que.
Dear Mr. Gilmore:
I am pleased to enclose cruise transportation and other documents
pertaining to your August 11th "Princess Patricia" Alaska cruise.
BCS 11 No. 10700 covers cabin accommodation on behalf of Mrs.
Gilmore and yourself in Room 221.  In payment of this transportation, CP Credit Card Charge Voucher 010778 is enclosed, and will
appreciate if you will kindly sign same on signature line, retaining the first portion for your records, returning remainder to
this office.
Additionally we enclose advice concerning the two meal sittings,
and will be pleased if you will indicate whether you desire the
first or the second sitting, in order that prior arrangements may
be made on your behalf.  We would like to extend the courtesy of
the Master's table, unless for any reason you desire to be accommodated at another officer's table, or with friends who might be
travelling on the same sailing.
Details of shore excursions available en route the cruise are
enclosed, and would suggest that the highlight tours are Ketchikan,
Skagway and Juneau.  Our call at Wrangell provides time for walking
around the village and to Shakes Island to see the Indian longhouse.
If you are interested in ceremonial Indian dances and costumes,
then the Alert Bay side trip is worthy of consideration.
Baggage tags and Alaska Cruise Daily Bulletin are also enclosed,
and should you require additional labels we will appreciate hearing from you.
*) Form 102-R - 2
Lastly, United States Immigration information memoranda are
required to be completed prior to departure of the vessel from
Vancouver.  We therefore respectfully request that Mrs. Gilmore
and yourself complete the forms, which will be uplifted from you
on board the "Patricia" sailing night.
Embarkation commences at 6:00 p.m. local city time, with sailing
at 8:30 p.m. Dinner is not served on departure evening, but the
evening buffet usually held at 10:30 p.m. is advanced to 9:30 p.m.
You will find that the "Princess Patricia" cruise is most informal,
and would suggest that your dress be arranged accordingly.  Leisure
clothing is most acceptable, with business suit or sports jacket
and slacks being suitable for dinner and the Captain's Dinner.
Mrs. Gilmore may wish to bring along a long dress for the Captain's
Cocktail party held evening of the first day out of Vancouver, and
the Captain's Dinner.  Good walking shoes are advisable, and as
weather is changeable, would suggest you bring along a heavy
sweater or a good warm jacket for being out on deck, particularly
when off the glaciers, should weather be cloudy, cool or damp.
Your cruise fare includes all meal service and evening buffet, but
does not include gratuities, side trips, or bar expenses.  As a
guide for gratuities we recommend $3.00 a day for your Room Steward
and Dining Room Waiter.  If bell service is required, approximately
15% of the charge at time of service.  Should Stewardess be required en route, depending on the nature of the service, $10.00
at the end of the cruise.  Envelopes are available at Purser's
office and suggest payment of gratuities be made prior to arrival
in Vancouver.
Due to the fluctuation in exchange and the wide variance between
U.S. and Canadian currency, we suggest you provide yourself with
U.S. funds for purchases in U.S. cities.
If there is any further information we can supply you with, please
do not hesitate to let me know.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B". Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
I
•.'/Holland
i.e.
71 Reid
Manager
CPRail
21 July 1978.
Mr. W. Sailes
1736 Hope Road
North Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Sailes:
This will acknowledge receipt of your cheque of today's date
in the amount of $294.25 to replace previous cheque of 26
October 1977, which has apparently been lost.
This is to advise that if the original cheque turns up it
will be returned to you.  In the event it is cashed you will
be refunded the full amount.
Yours very truly,
VALUE
D51-92-23
A.N. CAIRNS
Marine Superintendent
WWH'BB
cc.  Mr. W.W. Hocking
Mr. P.E. LeFeuvre
Cheque attached.
- Attention Mr. D. MacDonald.
Marine Superintendent CPRail
Internal Corresponden
Date   VANCOUVER,   21  July  1978.
From   R.R.   Reid
To  Mr. H.L. MacAuley
Supt., Vancouver Division
Vancouver, B.C.
File:  T-78-99
I have received memorandum from Terminal Manager, Pier A-3, regarding
your call to him 11 July concerning your comments on BCCS Service.
Investigation into the circumstances indicates that on the morning
of 10 July one of the Ticket Sellers was absent account illness, a
second one was required to be on board the "Princess Patricia"
that morning for paying of crew, leaving our Pier A-3 Wharf Ticket
Office very shorthanded.  The girls in the background are reservation
personnel and are not qualified to sell tickets.  This combination
led to a slow-down in the handling of our clients on that date,
coupled with the fact that our Agent, Mr. 0. Robison, was on holidays
and Acting Agent Hughes was involved in a financial matter that
morning, which took priority.
However, your point is well taken and we have brought to the
attention of both Agent and Acting Agent that they must be more
aware of the handling of passenger lines, particularly when weather
is inclement.
The matter with regard to automobile line-up is under the jurisdiction of our Investigation Department and has been taken up with
them.
Insofar as the paving of Pier A-3 area is concerned, we have to
have this done when we can get it done, particularly when there
are potholes which could cause a serious traffic hazard, both
from commercial units and passenger automobiles.  This is a matter
over which we sometimes have no control.
As far as automobile parking is concerned, it has never been the
authorization of this Department that cars may be parked in the
Pier A-3 area, due to the restricted space, and find this is something that has been permitted by the Wharf Ticket Office and will
be looked into further, as it has already caused us problems from
m
Form 102-R - 2 -
a different aspect.
We certainly appreciate your comments concerning our operation,
and would like to receive them on any occasion.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB ..
be.  Mr. J.M. Ferguson
Mr. 0. Robison
I would like to speak to both you gentlemen as soon as it is
convenient for you to see me.
Mr.C.A. Aitken - Previous conversation.  As you will be on
annual vacation, will speak to you upon
your return.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
- .     . ■.    ■■<
-.    I     .
Internal Correspondence
m
Date   VANCOUVER, July 21st, 1978 File: I-10O
From  M. W. Holland
To  Mr. A. McDermott, Manager
Insurance & Fire Protection
Canadian Pacific Limited .'•'•■
Windsor Station
Montreal, P.Q.
Re. Your File S-BN-3, June 16th, 1978
I have attached copy of reply received from Law Department concerning limitation of liability that I believe is self-explanatory.
The comments in your letter, suggesting that any chartered vessel
should be protected up to same limits as any vessel in fleet are
noted. Since any vessel on which there is a long-term charter
(more than six months) is normally required to be placed under
provisions of fleet insurance, the only area on which I should
comment is that for occasional-use charter of vessels.
When such chartered vessel is reported to Standard Club, coverage
up to $210 per registered ton is provided on pro rata basis. Likewise, notification to Marsh & McLennan provides us with value of
Hull & Machinery and excess P, and I. up to hull value of vessel
declared. If excess P, and I. above value of vessel is required,
it would have to be requested at time of notification and would
result in a higher quotation.
I
.../2
(3P Form 102-R
... .  ., . . ■
J Mr, A. McDermott
-2-
July 21, 1978
I understand that it is unusual for excess P. and I, to be provided above the hull value of the chartered vessel and in view
of the Law Department's remarks, it does not seem necessary to
provide further coverage unless the combined value of the P, and
I. through the Standard Club plus the excess P, and I, was less
than the 3100 gold francs per ton.
There are charter arrangements (eg, charter-of tug on other
than bare-boat charter with owner responsible for insurance)
.where we would be wise to consider additional insurance where
our liability, as charterers, is unlimited if it can be shown
we are at fault or in possession of information that places fault
with us.
Other than the above, I would suggest insurance arrangements on
chartered vessels remain as they now are.
Manager
_3*U»L> »0»b a
AJMrgg
Attachment W Holland
? Reid
Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B",Vancouver,BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
July 21st, 1978
File: 78.RSF.174
Travel Team, Inc.
3115 Tighman Street
Allentown, PA 1810/+
U. S. A.
Dear Sirs:
The attached money order ($2.60 Canadian Funds) represents
exchange credit at 10fy  on your cheque 2362 in payment vehicle and passage tickets from Vancouver to Nanaimo in
favour of Mr. and Mrs, C. Miller and Mir,. and Mrs. Ben Sussman,
I believe that one of the above parties vail be calling
in to yon.r office for this refund when they return from
their vacation.
Yours very truly,
Manager
ij.O.u.o,^/*
AJM:gg
Attachment CPRail
Internal
Date    VANCOUVER, July 21, 1973
From   M. W. Holland
To   Mr. 0. Robison
Agent, B.C.C.S.S.
Vancouver Wharf Ticket Office
File:  7S.R3F.173
Would you please supply a list to this office of all "Senior
Citizen" ticket numbers sold on June 30th, 1978.
Would you also check all cash refunds (Form PT50) made since
July 1st, I978 and determine if any of the numbers on the a-
bove requested list appear thereon. If you have refunded any,
I would like details (name, address) of the party receiving
cash.
Your early attention to this will be appreciated.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM.gg
(gg) Form 102-R
r - ....    ...
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, July 20th, 1978 File: 78.Ref.171
From   M. W. Holland
To  Mr. B« R. Dickson
Depot Ticket Agent
C. P. Rail
Calgary, Alberta
Application for Refund, Mr. Jay A. Lydiatt
Attached you will find PT59 in favour of above indicating lost
ticket BCS10, No. 144563, allegedly issued at your office.
Would you please complete "Statement of Selling Agent" and indicate carspace, sailing time, and date this ticket was to cover,
and then return to me for further handling.
m
Manager
B,   0,   0,   D.   o«
AJM.gg
0'2)   Form 102-R CPRail
Date   VANCOUVER,  July 21,   1978
From   R.D. Pelley
To   Mr. R.R. Reid
Files: T-7&-69 AVA
T-79-10
Have received a call from Larry Beck of Anchorage. He has advised tentative plans for _Ba&ds to Alaska show, A rough outline
is as follows:        UirsAfy
February 20
February 25
March 4-9
March 15 & 16
March 19 & 20
March 22 & 23
March 26 * 28
April 1,2 & 3
April 7
April 8
April 13
Houston, Texas
St. Petersburg, Florida
Sarasota, Florida
Ft. Myers, Florida
Pompano Beach, Florida
Fort Worth, Texas
Dallas, Texas
Other cities in the Texas area have not
been confirmed as yet
Phoenix, Arizona
Tuscon, Arizona
San Diego, California
Orange County, California
Long Beach, California
San Francisco, California (Bay Area)
Portland, Oregon
Seattle, Washington
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Chicago, Illinois
This will give us a rough idea as far as timing is concerned.
.. ./2
(£g) Form 102-R Mr. R.R. Reid
-2-
July 21, 1978
I have also questioned Larry about our Modulex. He still hasn't
located it as yet, but should know before our trip to Seattle -on
the 27th of this month.
Sales Representative
__>.(_►»O.o.o.
RDPjgg
cc: Ms. Noreen Cartwright Ass
, Maeii a Supi
■ •
—u
k
fi
ii
_ s
1
&&gk
<
w News Summary
News and views on topics of
current interest prepared by Public Relations
and Advertising Department
Vol. 34 No. 29
July 21, 1978
Aviation
Business & Finance
Highway
Labor
23
26
20
18
Pipeline
Railway
Research
Shipping
17
5
26
22
CP RAIL TO SPEND $30-MILLI0N IN B.C.
Over $30-million worth of new construction, repair and replacement
work is being carried out this year by CP Rail in British Columbia.
Of the total, more than $10-million is being spent on mainline capacity improvement projects designed to reduce steep railway grades.
Page 5
NEW CP RAIL TUNNEL AT ROGERS PASS?
CP Rail is thinking of digging a tunnel under the existing Connaught
Tunnel at Rogers Pass in B.C. as part of an estimated $100-million
project to double-track and reduce the grade on its mainline between
Calgary and Vancouver. It hopes to make a decision by next year.
Page 8
FLYING THE SKIES OF THE FUTURE
At a cost of $1.2-billion, United Airlines orders 30 Boeing 767s,
twin-engined, wide-bodied planes that exist only as models in a wind
tunnel. The new plane, designed to fill the gap between long-range
jumbos and short-range feeder planes, will be in the air by 1982.
Page 23
TRENDS AND TOPICS
The U.S. House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee voices
disapproval of a bill that would give the right of eminent domain to coal slurry pipeline operators.
Page 18
In the face of a threatened postal strike in the U.S., the Pentagon announces it is ready to provide troops to deliver the mail
if President Jimmy Carter declares a national emergency.
A proposal to reduce semi-trailer lengths in 25 States has drawn
sharp criticism from the American Trucking Associations. The legislation would reduce semi-trailer lengths from 45 to 40 feet.
Page 18
Page 22
Canadian Pacific r
2
NEWS IN BRIEF
SOME FIRMS WILL ESCAPE FRENCH LAW
MONTREAL - Quebec will not impose French as the working language of a
head office here -- provided more than 50 per cent of the company's revenues come from outside the province. But in return for the privilege
of working in English, head offices must agree to increase the use of
French in their Quebec business ~ or risk losing their special status.
That is the crux of the long-awaited proposals for head office language
regulations, released July 19 by Cultural Affairs Minister Camille
Laurin and Bernard Landry, minister of state for economic development.
Subject to cabinet approval, they are to be integrated into Bill 101,
the Charter of the French Language.
(Montreal Gazette, July 20)
* * *
B.C. FIGHTS TO SAVE OLD RAIL LINE
VANCOUVER - The B.C. government is planning a three-part objection to
the abandonment of the 264 kilometres of railway line between Penticton
and Midway, although much of the trackage has been unused since 1973.
Provincial demands for retention of the line will be heard at a public
hearing in Penticton, on Aug. 15, called by the Canadian Transport
Commission.
(Vancouver Province, July 18)
* '* *
INDIANS BLOCK B.C. RAIL LINE; UNION FEARS MANY LAYOFFS
CRANBROOK, B.C. - The United Steelworkers of America union has called on
the federal and British Columbia governments to intervene in a dispute
between CP Rail and the St. Mary's Indian band, which has blocked a rail
line in southeastern B.C. The band has blocked the line and surrounding
area to back demands for compensation for erosion of reserve land, which
it says occurred because of a change in routing of CP Rail lines. About
150 members of the band have halted almost all east-west railway traffic
over the Crowsnest Pass by erecting a plywood barrier on the 30-metre
stretch of the line which passes through the reserve.
(CP - Montreal Gazette, July 20)
* * *
OUTLOOK STAYS GLOOMY, SAYS CONFERENCE BOARD
OTTAWA - Prospects for the next 18 months are that economic growth will
become even more sluggish because consumer demand is weak, the Conference Board in Canada said July 19.
(Montreal Gazette, July 20)
* * * OPERATING PACT CALLED IMMINENT FOR VIA RAIL PASSENGER SERVICE
TORONTO - With only two major fences still to clear, VIA Rail Canada
Inc. is now close to assuming full management of inter-city rail passenger services in Canada, says Garth Campbell, vice-president, marketing. Still to be settled are operating contracts with the two major
railways, CP Rail and CN. Conclusion of the operating agreement, "a
major contract involving hundreds of millions of dollars a year," is
imminent, said Mr. Campbell. "And when that's concluded we can pick a
date for transfer of employees."
(Toronto Globe and Mail, July 19)
* * *
RAIL LINE REPORT
OTTAWA - Transport Minister Otto Lang has released details of the Prairie
Rail Action Committee's recommendations affecting the Harney-Carman-
Mi ami area of southern Manitoba. It was recommended that the CN Carman
subdivision between Carman Junction and Graysville remain to the year
2000, and that the lines be upgraded at a cost of $10.8-million.
(Winnipeg Tribune, July 15)
* * *
VIA OFFERS CN, CP RAIL INCENTIVES
MONTREAL - Getting the trains to run on time has never been easy, but
VIA Rail Canada Inc. thinks it may have a formula. The operating agreements VIA expects to sign within a few days with CN and CP Rail will
contain an incentive scheme rewarding the railways with bonuses for good
on-time performance, but penalizing them if the trains often run late.
(Winnipeg Tribune, July 17)
* * *
FEDERAL CIVIL SERVANTS MOVE TO HULL
OTTAWA - For 15,000 federal public servants, the feared, resented,
resisted, even welcomed move from Ottawa to Hull is a reality. For some
in the city they left behind, the economic jolt is already severe, but
it will be years before the full cost is known.
(Ottawa Journal, July 15)
* * *
CUTS A SAFETY THREAT ~ CONTROLLERS
OTTAWA - The federal Government's proposal to cut some air traffic
control services as an economic measure will jeopardize the safety of
airline passengers, the Canadian Air Traffic Control Association said
July 14. Association President Jim Livingston said he has been assured
by transport department officials that no controllers will lose their
jobs.
(Ottawa Citizen, July 15)
* * * ALBERTA WARNS CONSORTIUM ON GRAIN TERMINAL
LETHBRIDGE - Any delays by a consortium of grain companies in development
of an export terminal at Prince Rupert will bring the Alberta government
back into the picture with a different consortium, says Alberta transportation minister Hugh Horner.
(Vancouver Province, July 17)
* * *
CHEAP FARE TO TORONTO MAY BE HERE TO STAY
OTTAWA - A discount air fare between Ottawa and Toronto's Mai ton Airport
could be here to stay. Great Lakes Airlines' special summer offer of a
week-day $56 return fare has been so successful that some form of discount fare will be offered after Sept. 15, the cut-off date for the
airline's "super-summer saver," Paul McKnight, the director of marketing, said July 17.
(Ottawa Journal, July 18)
* * *
ICC ESTABLISHES CLASS III CATEGORY
WASHINGTON - A Class III railroad classification has been designated by
the Interstate Commerce Commission, effective Jan. 1, 1978. It includes
all railroads with annual operating revenues of $10-mi11 ion or less.
(Information Letter, Association of American Railroads, July 6)
* * *
LANG TO NAME ANALYST
OTTAWA - The appointment of a transportation analyst to study the rail
movement of Prairie grain likely will be announced next week, a spokesman for Transport Minister Otto Lang said July 19.
(CP - Winnipeg Free Press, July 20)
* *. *
THERE'LL BE NO BEDS ON CANADIAN PLANES
VANCOUVER - A spokesman for Canadian airlines says they do not plan to
follow Japan Air Lines' decision to provide beds in first-class lounge
areas of their Boeing 747 aircraft. Jim McKeachie, of CP Air, said that
although his company is watching JAL's changes with interest, it has
already converted all its first-class lounges to economic seats and has
no plans of putting in beds.
(Ottawa Citizen, July 20)
* * * RAILWAY
CP RAIL SPENDING $30-MILLI0N IN B.C.
VANCOUVER - Over $30-million worth of new construction, repair and replacement work is being carried out this year by CP Rail in British
Columbia.
Of the total, more than $10-million is being spent on mainline capacity
improvement projects designed to reduce steep railway grades. Between
Revelstoke and Clanwilliam (4.5 miles), approximately $4-million is
being spent on land clearing, swamp drainage, excavation and grading to
reduce the existing 1.8-per-cent grade for westbound trains to one per
cent. When completed late next year, CP Rail will have spent about $11-
million on this section of track.
An 11-mile stretch between Tappen and Notch Hill, near Salmon Arm, will
see about $6-million being spent this year -- most of which will be devoted for land acquisition and construction of overpass bridges. Scheduled for completion in October, 1979, this project is estimated to cost
the railway $14-million.
The railway is also spending $750,000 on preliminary studies for the
construction of an eight-mile tunnel under the existing five-mile Con-
naught Tunnel. This particular project, likely to cost in excess of
$100-million, involves elimination of the steepest grade (2.2 per cent)
on the CP Rail system.
A fourth project, involving some 5.5 miles of new track between Lake
Louise, Alta., and Stephen, B.C., is currently awaiting approval from
the Canadian Transport Commission. This project is estimated to cost
about $14-million.
By late July, the first train is expected to move over CP Rail's new $3-
million Mountain Creek bridge near Rogers Pass. Work this year involved
pouring of concrete decks and installation of ballast, rail and bridge
approaches.
On the railway's Kootenay division between Fort Steele and Golden, more
than $3-million is being spent on the laying of 22 miles of new continuous welded rail. Also on the Kootenay division, major tie replacement
programs, worth about $500,000, include 15,000 new ties installed between Nelson and Proctor and 20,000 new ties between Nelson and Cas-
tlegar.
On the Revelstoke division between Kamloops and Field, the railway is
installing eight miles of new rail ($1.1-million), 9.5 miles of relay
rail ($860,000), 23.4 miles of new ballast ($700,000) and over 97,000
new ties ($1.2-million). Last April, division personnel at Revelstoke
moved into a new $1.5-million station/office facility.
In the Vancouver area, $635,000 is being spent to increase handling capacity at Coquitlam yard by constructing new trackage and extending some
existing yard track. And on the railway's Canyon division between Coquitlam and Kami oops, the
following work has either been completed or will be complete by year's
end:
-- REPLACEMENT and repair of bridges at Ruskin and Mission at a total
cost of $1.1-mi 11 ion.
-- 21.5 MILES of new rail between Mission and Pitt River at a cost of
$3.4-million.
-- 77,000 NEW TRACK ties between Kami oops and Mission at a cost of
$1.2-million.
-- CONTINUING rock stabilization program at 15 locations along the
Fraser Canyon and Thompson River. Total cost in 1978 is $670,000.
The railway has also completed construction of a 12.5-mile stretch of
track in the Crowsnest Pass area between McGillivary and Byron Creek.
The new line, built for Byron Creek Collieries, will handle eastbound
movements of coal from the Byron Creek mine to the new coal port at
Thunder Bay, Ont. Unit train movements are expected to begin by late
July.
(CP Rail News Release, July 12)
* * *
TRANSPORT DELAYS LOSE $150-MILLI0N IN SALES: BOARD
WINNIPEG - Grain transport delays have already cost farmers more than
$150-mi11 ion in lost sales and are damaging Canada's reputation as a
reliable supplier, the advisory committee of the Canadian Wheat Board
says.
The producer-elected committee said last week that further losses will
be sustained unless the railways improve their performances. The committee said that based on vessels already waiting at export ports, which
involve a backup of more than one million tonnes of grain, the sales
already lost will cost farmers far more than $150-mi11 ion in lost
revenues this year.
Wheat board commissioner Esmond Jarvis has estimated demurrage costs may
reach or surpass a record $17-million, but other sources have placed the
estimate as high as $30-million. The advisory committee said the
railways should be directed to take immediate action to build up their
grain car fleets and speed up grain shipments.
(Montreal Gazette, July 18)
* * *
CP RAIL LINE TO BE ABANDONED
RED DEER, Alta. - The Canadian Transport Commission has approved abandonment of 27.1 miles of rail line southwest of Carstairs, a commission
spokesman said.
The CP Rail line runs from Cremona to Collicutt, about 60 miles southwest of Reed Deer. The commission spokesman said the abandonment ruling
is to take effect immediately. Abandonment of the line will force closure of grain elevators at Nier,
Madden, Dogpound and Cremona. The railway was built in 1931 and grain
deliveries to elevators have averaged 725,000 bushels in the past 10
years. Farmers who have been delivering on the line will be forced to
haul grain to facilities at Crossfield, Carstairs and Didsbury.
The government of Alberta has, meanwhile, declared the rail roadbed a
provincial area.
(Red Deer Advocate, July 12)
* * *
MORE GRAIN PREDICTED
SASKATOON - There will be a 25-per-cent increase in the
which the grain-handling and transportation system will
the year 2000, a Canadian Grain Commission member says.
amount of grain
have to move by
George Leith, a panel member at the.annual meeting of the Saskatchewan
Branch of the National Farmers' Union, said July 15 that there could be
only 350 to 500 elevators receiving grain. Farmers will be hauling
grain 25 to 30 kilometres to elevators and will likely share trucking
costs as commercial trucking becomes more common, he said.
He predicted most of the branch lines now being reviewed by the Prairie
Rail Action Committee for possible abandonment will be kept and the
basic network will remain intact.
(CP - Winnipeg Tribune, July 18)
* * *
MIDWESTERN RAILROAD MERGER EFFORT IS DENIED
WASHINGTON - The chairman of the Interstate Commerce Commission says the
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroads is working with the Department of Transportation to develop a possible merger -- a report both
the railroad and a DOT official deny.
ICC Chairman A. Daniel O'Neal testified.before a Senate Commerce transportation subcommittee July 11 that the Milwaukee Road, which went in bankruptcy last winter, "is now working with DOT, which could result in the
merger (or sale) of all or part of the Milwaukee with other railroads."
He added that the commission encourages such a process and has cooperated with the department "as fully as we are able."
(Washington Star, July 12)
CANADA PACKERS WIN ON RAPESEED
* * *
OTTAWA - The Canada Packers rapeseed refinery in Winnipeg is entitled to
the same low railway rates for its products moving to eastern Canada as
its competitors in western Canada, the Canadian Transport Commission
ruled July 14.
(Winnipeg Free Press, July 15)
*! * * f
8
NEW TUNNEL EYED AT ROGERS PASS
VANCOUVER - CP Rail is thinking of digging a tunnel under a tunnel at
Rogers Pass as part of a multi-mi 11 ion-dollar program to double-track
and reduce the grade on its mainline between Calgary and Vancouver.
The new tunnel would be drilled below the existing Connaught Tunnel
which was completed in 1916. Originally, the Connaught Tunnel was
double-tracked, but in 1958 the second set of rails was removed and the
remaining pair centred, in order to provide clearance for new railroad
cars such as trilevel auto carriers.
CP Rail could lower the floor of the Connaught tunnel by 1.5 metres,
which would allow it to again double-track the tunnel while retaining
present headroom clearance. But the job would be costly and interfere
greatly with traffic operations. Lowering the floor would also undercut the concrete lining of the eight-kilometre-long tunnel and new underpinning would be necessary.
CP Rail needs a second pair of rails at Rogers Pass in order to complete
a 31.4-kilometre section of its double-tracking program in the Beaver
River Valley leading to the eastern portal of the Connaught Tunnel. The
railway wants to lay additional rails alongside the Beaver River to ease
the present 2.2-per-cent grade for westbound trains. Existing rails
would be left in place for use by eastbound trains running downhill past
Stoney Creek and the waystop of Rogers to the confluence of the Beaver
and Columbia Rivers.
Mike Wakely, special projects engineer for CP Rail, said the new tunnel
could be drilled below the level of the Connaught Tunnel, thereby knocking height off the uphill climb for trains in the valley of the Beaver
River.
CP Rail's first thought was to lay track on the south side of the valley
and drill an 11.2-kilometre tunnel underneath Avalanche Glacier which
feeds the Beaver River. At one point there would be more than 1,500-
metres of rock and ice above the tunnel roof. CP Rail eventually decided against this alignment, however, because it feared it might encounter severe flooding problems in fissured rock below the glacier.
The railway is now looking at a 13.3-kilometre tunnel approach by rails
laid on the north side of the Beaver Valley. The new tunnel would be
driven 83 metres below the level of the Connaught Tunnel and at a slanting angle to it.
Mr. Wakely said the total Beaver Valley project would likely cost $100-
million and work could not start before 1980 at the earliest. "These
are big bucks and we will have to do a lot of heart-searching," he said.
CP Rail is hoping to make a decision next year on whether or not to
build the new tunnel. It would then have to apply to the Canadian
Transport Commission for permission to proceed. 9
Mr. Wakely said the railway does not know as yet whether it would be
best to build the tunnel using conventional blasting techniques or by
using a boring machine. "Chicago has four 9.7-metre boring machines for
cutting sewers. This work is expected to be completed by 1982 and the
timing might just be right for us," he said.
New trackage built on the north side of the Beaver River will take a
more meandering route than existing trackage position higher up the side
of the valley. The ruling grade will be one per cent.
At present it takes 113,000 h.p. diesel electric locomotives to push a
106-car unit coal train up the existing grade in the Beaver Valley at 19
kilometres an hour. If the grade is eased to one per cent, the number
of locomotives can be reduced and speed increased.
Mr. Wakely thinks that grade easements in hand or planned will give CP
Rail the capacity to move another 20 million tons of westbound cargo a
year. The improvement will come from an ability to run heavier trains
and to slot more trains into the operating schedule.
Elsewhere on the mainline, work is already well advanced on two grade
easement projects west of Revelstoke and completion is expected by
October of next year. A public hearing has been held into a third
project near Lake Louise, Alta., and if CTC approval is given quickly,
work there could start this year.
CP Rail is hoping to reduce the grade for all westbound traffic between
Calgary and Vancouver to one per cent.
The Beaver Valley, calling as it does for 31.4 kilometres of surface and
underground trackage, is the. biggest and most costly undertaking in the
entire program. For this reason it is being left till last.
* * *
(Vancouver Province, July 17)
NEWFIE BULLET MAY BE REVIVED
ST. JOHN'S, Nfld. - The 'Newfie Bullet' may once again blow and puff her
way from St. John's to Port-aux-Basques if provincial Tourism Minister
Jim Morgan has his way.
The possibility of reviving the abandoned passenger-train service as a
tourist attraction was the subject of a recent meeting between local
officials and CN.
The CN officials told Mr. Morgan the onus is on his department to show
that travel by train could be sold to tourists. Mr. Morgan said he
thinks the Bullet would be a success and there is real possibility it
may once again operate, possibly in time for the 1979 tourist season.
The idea is to equip the Bullet with a number of passenger coaches and
dining cars, with emphasis on Newfoundland foods, crafts and entertainment. Tours would be taken from St. John's to points of historic or
other interest.
(Montreal Gazette, July 15)
* * * 10
CP RAIL GIVES PART APPROVAL TO EDMONTON BRIDGE WATERFALL
EDMONTON - Engineering plans for Edmonton's High Level Bridge waterfall
project have been approved by CP Rail but discussions are continuing on
liability insurance.
Howard Little, assistant to J. D. Bromley, a CP Rail vice-president in
Vancouver, said the plans of Peter Lewis and his Edmonton group are acceptable to CP Rail's bridge department.
But Mr. Little said CP Rail has not given its final approval to the
waterfall project because it still wants the Edmonton group to provide
insurance for the full replacement value of the bridge which is about
$25-million.
The Edmonton group plans to use six donated pumps and pipes to create an
artificial waterfall plunging from both the east and west sides of the
bridge.
(Lethbridge Herald, July 8)
* * *
MONEY RAISED FOR WATERFALL
EDMONTON - Though problems keep popping up from every direction, the
proposed high-level bridge waterfall project seems ready to go.
Peter Lewis, one of the workhorses behind the project, said July 14
brokers have raised the premiums required for the $25-million insurance
to satisfy CP Rail as to the full replacement value of the bridge.
The premium for another $5-million in general liability insurance also
was raised.
(Edmonton Journal, July 15)
* * *
RAIL CARS NEEDED FOR WOOD CHIPS
THUNDER BAY - CN has delivered on its promises to lumber companies in
Hearst, 450 kilometres east of Thunder Bay, to maintain the number of
boxcars available to move their wood chips to kraft mills in Red Rock,
according to Keith Penner (L-Thunder Bay).
The promise was made during a meeting of CN and lumber company officials
held in Toronto recently.
CN is awaiting the delivery of hopper cars now on order so that it can
free boxcars presently hauling grain for the movement of lumber, the MP
said.
(Thunder Bay Chronicle-Journal, July 7)
* * * 11
CROWSNEST: A GROWING COST
EDMONTON - The statutory (Crowsnest) rate, at which the railways are
required to haul western grains, has in the past been a great boon to
grain growers.
Today, on paper, it represents a bigger bonanza than ever. With every
passing month, the actual cost of hauling grain exceeds the statutory
rate by a still wider margin. Farmers and their organizations are understandably reluctant to entertain even the faintest suggestion that
this financially favorable situation be tampered with in any way.
However, the cost to the railway companies is now so high that they are
being forced, gradually, to opt out of the grain-hauling business. This
trend has been obvious for some years. In fact, the only obvious aspect
of the whole controversial freight rate issue is that the railways
cannot and will not subsidize grai