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Third copies, April 1978 Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1978

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 )Form 102-R
CPRall
?asp©H0euee
Date     VANCOUVERF 25 April 1978. Filet  552
From     J-W. McCowatt
To     Master
"Trailer Princess"
"Inspection Certificate ," Form S.I.C. 16, is attached.  It
should be posted in a conspicuous place on the "Trailer
Princess" for the information of all on board, and • it should
be kept so posted while it remains in force and the ship is in
use (Section 397, Canada Shipping Act).
Kindly acknowledge receipt and return existing Certificate to
this office.
m
,
Asst. Superintendent Engineer
BB
T&6M*   f^jL CPRall
internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER, 25 April 1978. File: 555
From     J.W. McCowatt Lr
To     Master
"Carrier Princess"
"Inspection Certificate," Form S.I.C. 16, is attached.  It
should be posted in a conspicuous place on the "Carrier Princess"
for the information of all on board, and it should be kept so
posted while it remains in force and the ship is in use (Section
397, Canada Shipping Act).
Kindly acknowledge receipt and return existing Certificate to
this office.
)Form 102-R
Asst. Superintendent Engineer
BB CPRall WZ4
Internal Correspondence m3
Date    VANCOUVER, April 251 1978 File: T-7&-235
From    A#N» Cairns
To    Master, "CARRIER PRINCESS"
CONFIDENTIAL
It will be appreciated if you would look into the duties of
both the cook and messman your vessel in that both are claiming
an additional hour overtime daily in excess of prescribed
hours as per attached*
Your comments regarding the actual necessity for these additional hours is requested. In addition I am advised that
on occasions these two employees are not on duty during
their respective hours of work*
Marine Superintendent
ANC:gg
fg) Form 102-R
j. r
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
''■'!Holland
I Reid
Variager
Pile:    T-78-1034
April 25, 1978
Miss J. Mills
112 West St. Paul Street
Kamloops, B.C.
V2C 1G1
Dear Miss Mills:
Your letter of March 29 addressed to our Public Relations Department
has been passed on to me for handling*
I regret the delay in replying which can be accounted for in part by
the diligent search that we carried out of our records*
We are sorry to advise that we have no knowledge of Mrs. Florence
Dall ever working with B*C* Coast Service.
Yours truly,
M*W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg r
W Holland
1 Reid
BC Coast Steamship Service
Rier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Te! (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
CPRall
File: T-7&-40
Date: April 25, 197S
Mr. Peter Howcroft
39 Harriet Street
Penetanguishene, Ontario
LOK IPO
Dear Mr. Howcroft:
Thank you for your letter in which you express interest in working
on this Company^ vessels*
I regret to advise that this yearfs crew requirements have been
fully met, and there is little or no chance of us being able to
accommodate you.
Due to the fact that our cruise vessel will be retired at the end
of the current season, possibly out of sentiment, all of our employees who worked with us previously have exercised their rights
as "Union" employees to return to work for the "Princess Patricia"*s
final year. There is no doubt, also, the prevalent unemployment
situation has some bearing on this matter.
In addition, we will still have a pool of people who made personal
applications some months ago who must receive consideration for
positions that may arise through illness or leave of absence.
We much appreciate your interest in Canadian Pacific, however, and
hope you are successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg r
W Holland
I Raid
■ Manager
P/er "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
CPBaii
File: T-7&-40
Date: April 25, 1973
Mr* Loren Milbury
150 Victoria Street East
Box 1351
Alliston, Ontario
LOM 1A0
Dear Mr. Milbury:
Thank you for your letter in which you express interest in working
on this Company1s vessels*
I regret to advise that this yearfs crew requirements have been
fully met, and there is little or no chance of us being able to
accommodate you.
Due to the fact that our cruise vessel will be retired at the end
of the current season, possibly out of sentiment, all of our employees who worked with us previously have exercised their rights
as "Union" employees to return to work, for the "Princess Patricia"f s
final year. There is no doubt, also, the prevalent .unemployment
situation has some bearing on this matter.
In addition, we will still have a pool of people who made personal
applications some months ago who must receive consideration for
positions that cay arise through illness or leave of absence.
We much appreciate your interest in Canadian Pacific, however, and
hope you are successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg r
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    VCC 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
W Holland
'-imager
IR Reid
/ Manager
File:    T-7#~40
Date: April 25, 1978
Mr. Nelson Ruest
Box 3045
Hinton, Alberta
TOE ICO
Dear Mr. Ruest:
Thank you for your letter in which you express interest in working
on this Company's vessels*
I regret to advise that this year's crew requirements have been
fully met, and there is little or no chance of us being able to
accommodate you.
Due to the fact that our cruise vessel will be retired at the end
of the current season, possibly out of sentiment, all of our employees who worked with us previously have exercised their rights
as "Union" employees to return to work for the "Princess Patricia"fs
final year. There is no doubt, also, the prevalent unemployment
situation has some bearing on this matter.
In addition, we will still have a pool of people who made personal
applications some months ago who must receive consideration for
positions that may arise through illness or leave of absence.
We much appreciate your interest in Canadian Pacific, however, and
hope you are successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg > uuaoi uicai i
'W Holland
:i Reid
' Manager
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
File: T-7&-40
Date: April 25, 1978
Mr. Larry J. Scoles
809 Bartlett Hall
University of Alaska
Fairbanks, Alaska 99701
U.S.A*
Dear Mr* Scoles:
Thank you for your letter in which you express interest in working
on this Company's vessels*
I regret to advise that this year's crew requirements have been
fully met, and there is little or no chance of us being able to
accommodate you*
Due to the fact that our cruise vessel will be retired at the end
of the current season, possibly out of sentiment, all of our employees who worked with us previously have exercised their rights
as "Union" employees to return to work for the "Princess Patricia"fs
final year* There is no doubt, also, the prevalent unemployment
situation has some bearing on this matter.
In addition, we will still have a pool of people who made personal
applications some months ago who must receive consideration for
positions that may arise through illness or leave -of absence.
We much appreciate your interest in Canadian Pacific, however, and
hope you are successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg r
/Holland
i Reid
Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
CPRail
File: T-78-40
Date: April 25, 1978
Ms* Karen Rochelle Davy
5842 Etiwanda Avenue
Tarzana, California 91356
U.S.A.
Dear Ms* Davy:
Thank you for your letter in which you express interest in working
on this Company's vessels*
I regret to advise that this year's crew requirements have been
fully met, and there is little or no chance of us being able to
accommodate you*
Due to the fact that our cruise vessel will be retired at the end
of the current season, possibly out of sentiment, all of our employees who worked with us previously have exercised their rights
as "Union" employees to return to work for the "Princess Patricia"'s
final year. There is no doubt, also, the prevalent unemployment
situation has some bearing on this matter.
In addition, we will still have a pool of people who made personal
applications some months ago who must receive consideration for
positions that may arise through illness or leave of absence.
We much appreciate your interest in Canadian Pacific, however, and
hope you are successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg r
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CP'Rai
WW Holland
>RReid
File: T-78-40
Date: April 25, 1978
Ms* Kathleen Bolton
One Autumn Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02215
U*S*A.
Dear Ms. Bolton:
Thank you for your letter in which you express interest in working
on this Company's vessels*
I regret to advise that this year's crew requirements have been
fully met, and there is little or no chance of us being able to
accommodate you*
Due to the fact that our cruise vessel will be retired at the end
of the current season, possibly out of sentiment, all of our employees who worked with us previously have exercised their rights
as "Union" employees to return to work for the "Princess Patricia"'s
final year* There is no doubt, also, the prevalent unemployment
situation has some bearing on this matter*
In addition, we will still have a pool of people who made personal
applications some months ago who must receive consideration for
positions that may arise through illness or leave of absence*
We much appreciate your interest in Canadian Pacific, however, and
hope you are successful in obtaining employment elsewhere*
Yours truly,
M.W* Holland
Manager, B*C*C.S*S*
HLH:|g r
W Holland
RReid
• Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
File: T-78-40
Date: April 25, 1978
Mr* Colin Curragh
811 Fenwick Place
Port Moody, B*C.
V3H 1C1
Dear Mr. Curragh:
Thank you for your letter in which you express interest in working
on this Company's vessels*
I regret to advise that this year's crew requirements have been
fully met, and there is little or no chance of us being able to
accommodate you.
Due to the fact that our cruise vessel will be retired at the end
of the current season, possibly out of sentiment, all of our employees who worked with us previously have exercised their rights
as "Union" employees to return to work for the "Princess Patricia"'s
final year. There is no doubt, also, the prevalent unemployment
situation has some bearing on this matter.
In addition, we will still have a pool of people who made personal
applications some months ago who must receive consideration for
positions that may arise through illness or leave -of absence.
We much appreciate your interest in Canadian Pacific, however, and
hope you are successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
1W Holland
■:-ager
iRReid
v Manager
File:    T-78-40
Date: April 25, 1978
Mr. Stewart Barnes
1641 West 60th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.
V6P 2A?
Dear Mr. Barnes:
Thank you for your letter in which you express interest in working
on this Company's vessels*
I regret to advise that this year's crew requirements have been
fully met, and there is little or no chance of us being able to
accommodate you.
Due to the fact that our cruise vessel will be retired at the end
of the current season, possibly out of sentiment, all of our employees who worked with us previously have exercised their rights
as "Union" employees to return to work for the "Princess Patricia"'s
final year. There is no doubt, also, the prevalent unemployment
situation has some bearing on this matter.
In addition, we will still have a pool of people who made personal
applications some months ago who must receive consideration for
positions that may arise through illness or leave -of absence.
We much appreciate your interest in Canadian Pacific, however, and
hope you are successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg r
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135. Telex 04-507684
n
W Holland
i ager
R Reid
' Manager
File:    T-78-40
Date: April 25, 1978
Ms. Penny Cwynar
679 Stadacona Street East
Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan
S6H OKI
Dear Ms. Cwynar:
Thank you for your letter in which you express interest in working
on this Company's vessels*
on this Company's vessels
I regret to advise that this year's crew requirements have been
fully met, and there is little or no chance of us being able to
accommodate you.
Due to the fact that our cruise vessel will be retired at the end
of the current season, possibly out of sentiment, all of our employees who worked with us previously have exercised their rights
as "Union" employees to return to work for the "Princess Patricia"'s
final year. There is no doubt, also, the prevalent unemployment
situation has some bearing on this matter.
In addition, we will still have a pool of people who made personal
applications some months ago who must receive consideration for
positions that may arise through illness or leave of absence.
We much appreciate your interest in Canadian Pacific, however, and
hope you are successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg CPRall
Internal Correspondent
Date   VANCOUVER, April 25th,  1978 . File:    78*ALA.055*STAT
From  A.J. McPherson
To Mr* R.R* Reid
Re: Conversation of April 20th* 1978—One sitting in dining room.
The following is the cost associated with each alternative discussed:
Alternative 1: Do not alter present situation employing 17 stewards
plus three Deck Porters with two sittings* The three deck porters
are included because Alternative 2 includes these three plus additional six who are designated to be Junior waiters (or similar
classification)* They will perform duties of deck porters as well
as service in dining room.
Cost for 17 Stewards, 2 Hours o/T Allowed Per Day:
Daily Rate.** * $31*01
Add 2 Hours o/T per Day****  17*48
Weekly Leave, A/V and
Stat* Holiday Provision
.705 x daily rate   21.86
Benefit Programs and
Payroll Taxes Provision
.205 x daily rate........*   6.36 j4».4£.
Cost per Day per Steward   $76.71 94m    i , - .
Seasonal Cost: 145 days  $11,122.95 xu^^
Cost for 17 Stewards: 17 x $11,122.95  $189,090.00
208, 962.
***/2
El
w
($?J) Form 102-R Page 2
File: 78.-ALA.055.STAT
April 25th, 1978
Add Cost for g Deck Porters (Utility Person)
Daily Rate.*...* *  $24*97
2*5 Hours o/T per Day******  17*60
Weekly Leave, A/V and
Stat* Holiday Provision ,
•705 x daily rate.********  17*60
Benefit Programs and
Payroll Taxes Provision ,
.205 x daily rate    5>12  12>33_
Cost per Day per Porter    $^57^ £ _
Seasonal Cost: 145 days*.*. **• $9,467*00*loW3*
Cost for 3 People: 3 x $9,467   $/28,i401*00 3)5^Qy_
Total Cost Alternative $217,491*00 #240,502,'
Alternative 2: One sitting with 17 Stewards now employed plus
nine bodies employed under classification of Jr. Steward who will
perform duties of waiter and deck porter* Overtime allowance now
one-half hour per day for both categories.
Cost of 17 Stewards:
Daily Rate, *  $31*01
Add ^ Hour o/T per Day*****   4*27
Weekly Leave, A/V and
Stat* Holiday Provision
• 705 x $31.01*.   21.86
Benefit Programs and
payroll Taxes Provision
.205 x $31*01 ^      6*36       1 K1.&
Cost per Day per Steward $63*60      6$jfl
Seasonal Cost:    145 Days.*     $9,222*00   >OO0U
Cost for 17 Stewards:    $9,222.00 x 17*     $156,774.00
no 021.
'1
.../3 Page 3
File: 78.ALA.055.STAT
April 25th, 1978
Post for 9 Jr, Stewards:
no,oz|.
Daily Rate .  $29.37
Add -§Hour o/T per Day....   4.14
Weekly Leave, A/V and
Stat. Holiday Provision
.705 x $29.37   20.71
Benefit Programs and
Payroll Taxes Provision
.205 x $29.37        6.02    M.ll
Cost per Day per Jr. Stwd. $60.24    Iq^ZA aana.
Seasonal Cost:    145 days     ?8,734.80    **T»T.
Cost for 9 Jr. Stwds.:    9 x $8,734.80 $ 78, 613.20   £5262.
Total Cost Alternative 2: $235,387.20 *255,2$3'
Alternative 3:    Employ   26 Stewards who will also do duties currently
assigned to deck porters:    One-half hour o/T will apply.
10,001
From Alternative 2, the Seasonal Cost for a Steward is $9,222.00*..
.•♦ For 26 Stewards it will be:    $2397??2y6&.    260t 026-
Summary of Costs: SHOUup  Bg
Alternative 1:    $217,491        *2 40,502.
Alternative 2:    $235,387
*255,283.
Alternative 3: $239,772  *260, 026 •
A.J. McPherson
Departmental Analyst
AJM:gg
\; BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
W Holland
.'.'jer
" Reid
Manager
CPHai
April 25, 1978
File: 126820
Mrs. R.G. Creech
232 Irving Road
Victoria, B.C.
V8S 3Z9
Dear Mrs. Creech:
Your letter concerning pensioner J.J. Hawkins has been passed to
me by our Pensions Department in Montreal for further handling.
Before we can implement the provisions of the Pension Plan, it
will be necessary for you to complete the enclosed Form PF-36
and return it to this office together with a certificate from
Mr. Hawkin's personal physician attesting to his incompetence
and giving the medical reasons therefor*
We will then process the matter further.
Please note that Mr. Hawkin's April 1978 pension cheque and
further cheques cannot be released until this matter has been
resolved.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
HLH:gg CPRall
internal Correspondence
B
Date    VANCOUVER, April 24, 1978 Filet 604
From    M.W* Holland
To   Mrs* J. Dale
Telephone Supervisor
Granville Square
Vancouver
Will you kindly arrange for an additional telephone line to be
installed in this Department.
This is for use of the Chief Timekeeper, W# Kazulin*
In addition, please arrange to show the following in the next
printing of the locaii Canadian Pacific Telephone Directory,
under B.C.C.S.S* Accounting
' MARSHALL, G.M.   665-3139
Manager, B.C.C.S.S*
HLH:gg
cc: Mr. G.M. Marshall
PLS. JNITiAL & PASS
Asst. SypV Engr.
Cafermg Suph
Terminal Supt;
jBS *******   \jfhP ^hiM
^   Form 102-R CPRall Wyi
Internal Correspondence fk^
Date    VANCOUVER, April 24,  1978 File<    162
From    h.L. Hudson
To    Lorraine Taylor
Company's Code of Business Conduct
Herewith tear-out portion completed by Mr. J. Agar,' Terminal
Manager.
Office Manager
Jd.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg
■C'3   Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date        VANCOUVER, 21 April 1978 File: 410
From        J.D* Finnie
To        m.W. Holland
I am receiving complaints from our truck and trailer customers
regarding the high incidence of nicks and scratches to their
trailers.
A review of our Hostling Drivers and observation by our
Terminal Supervisors indicated that the main cause is lack of
adherence by the ships' crews to loading signals. When the
driver is backing down the trailer, the Seaman directing the
trailer is not always giving the six foot warning signal and
the signal to stop is being given too late. If the trailers
being parked nose to tail are parked too close, when the hydraulic fifth wheel picks up the unit the top rear of the trailer
will contact the trailer behind inflicting damage.
It would be appreciated if instructions with respect to signals,
copy attached, be again issued to ships1 crews.
Manager Traffic 6c Sales
cc. A. Cairns
J. Ferguson
a JDF'GP
PLS. INSTIAL & PASS
tnsn&scT
Art. Mgr. |
Marino <-nt     f I
— - --JcAcsrr
UL
\   Asst. Sup:-. Engr.
-TtL
%
V
f
T*
A*t*j*u    /nhA ~    <&f~
S)F°™ 102-R CPRall Wj&
Internal Correspondence jL^l
Date     VANCOUVER, April 21, 1978 File:  78 REF
V
From     M.W. Holland ■
To    Mr. Omer Robison
Agent
Vancouver Wharf Ticket
Would you please complete "Statement of Selling Agefat" portion
of attached PT59fs in favour Green, Kleiman and Mitchell parties.
Would you also date stamp this portion as well.
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
AJM:gg
".?3   Form  102-R
J Pier' Wyancouve?, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
nv Holland
in&ger
R Reid
■ Manager
April 21, 1978
File:  T-78-10D
Ms. Ella Souter
Tourist Information
Alert Bay, B.C.
Dear Ms. Souter:
We are pleased to enclose current brochure outlining the 18
regularly scheduled sailings.
In past years we have had the pleasure of the Indian Ceremonial
Dances being performed while the "Princess Patricia11 is in port.
We will be pleased to know if this will be done again this year
on our behalf, and the rate for the performance.
Yours very truly,
R.R. REID
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR:gg
J CPRall rwyi
Internal Correspondence WL3
Date     VANCOUVER,  April  21,   1978 File:     T-78-10
From     R.R.   Reid
To    Mr. I. Margetts
Montreal
I am attaching an appraisal of placing the "Princess Patricia"
during 1979 in B.C. waters and as discussed with you, this is
a very rough outline in view of the time limit available to
prepare this presentation.  Schedule is not necessarily the
one to be followed but feel the appraisal of Victoria is necessary to attract south-of-the-border volume.
Estimates are based on 1978 anticipated expenses pro rated to
the shorter cruise.  Against advertising I have liberally taken
50 percent of that projected for the Alaska marketing on the
assumption that much of our advertising will be joint Alaska
and B.C. waters, but obviously a great deal of attention in
Pacific Coast states will be necessary to attract additional
volume.  I have done similarly with management figures as here
again joint effort will be done by our Alaska staff but additional
staff will have to be hired both in the office and on the road.
Maintenance figures have been supplied by Tom King as time permits
him to evaluate maintenance requirements.  I do not have a feel
for fixed costs at this time.
I have listed three possible travel considerations under the
heading "Revenue."  I believe under Item A or B we would have
no difficulty in selling the cruise but they are unprofitable.
I feel, however, that C is too high-priced and with fixed costs
could also prove unprofitable.
After having a look at.:, utilizing the ship beyond this year
and having spoken with Tom King concerning maintenance for the
next two or three years, I recommend you do not consider utilizing
the "Princess Patricia" beyond the 1978 Alaska cruise season
because I feel that we would price ourselves out of the market
in an attempt to make a moderate profit.
i?)   Form  102-R
Assistant Manager,   B.C.C.S.S,
RRR:gg "/Holland
: Reid
Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
April 21, 1978
File:  360085
Mr. William Davedoff
595 East 46th Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Davedoff:
In connection with U.S. benefits, I have ascertained that you
have 88 months credit with the U.S.R.R.B., but this is not
enough to qualify you for a disability pension (which requires
120 months), but does entitle you to U.S.R.R.B, sick benefits.
However, you may be elgigible for benefits under the U.S. Social
Security program, and your are requested to report to the U.S.
Consulate, 1199 West Hastings Street, on May 2, between 9 and 2
and put your case to their representative.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg
cc:  Dr. H.W. Hankinson hitit "& ', Vancouver, du    vol, zr\<s
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
W Holland
nager
ir Reid
it Manager
April 21, 1978
File:  360085
Seafarers1 International Union
837 Homer Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Gentlemen:
W. Davedoff, seaman, "Princess of Vancouver", has this date been
temporarily suspended from duty for reasons of concern for his
own personal safety.
Mr. Davedoff has a medical/emotional problem that impairs his
ability to react to situations in the carrying out of his duties
that could expose him to possible injury.  Every effort is being
made to determine what compensation may be available to Davedoff
should he not be able to overcome this problem.
Yours very truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR:gg
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
f*K
■1W Holland
r-jger
R Reid
April 21,   1978
:.-' Manager
File T-78-69
Mrs. Eileen Uren
8513 Aldous Terrace *
Sidney, B.C.  V8L 1K9
Dear Mrs. Uren:
We are very pleased to learn from Robbie Dunn, CJVI/900, General
Sales Manager, that you are the grand prize winner of a "Princess
Patricia" Alaskan cruise - congratulations! We are enclosing our
current Alaska Cruise brochure in the event that you do not have
a copy in your home from which you can determine on the ship's
floor plan the location of Cabin 218, which we are pleased to
assign on the August 11th sailing for use of your family.
While Cabin 218 has only two twin beds, there is room in the cabin
to place a cot for your son.  Because this is the largest cabin
on board ship, we feel this will not be inconvenient to you, and
during the day the cot can be collapsed and stored in the corner
of the room.  Please let me know if this is acceptable or whether
you would like a cabin in which there are three separate berths.
After you have had an opportunity to discuss this with Mr. Uren
and your son, we will be pleased to hear from you.
We are certainly looking forward to having you aboard the "Princess
Patricia" and again, congratulations.
Yours truly,
R.R. Reid
Assistant Manager
RRR:gg
cc:  Mr. Robbie Dunn - In appreciation for the extended coverage
given the "Princess Patricia" and the success of the Captain
Cook Treasure Chest promotion. CPRall W^d
Internal Correspondence m^%
Date        VANCOUVER,  21 April  1978 File:  T-77-30-200
From        J.D. Finnie
To   0. Robison
Vancouver
Re: Doman Transport outstanding freight charges' in the amount
of $119.56, their pro# 179875 amount $37.85 and pro
#180243 amount $81.71. ;
These charges are connected with a trailer claim to Domans1
trailer DT-19 on 9 November 1977. This trailer was shipped
ex Vancouver on 9 November at 2000. It collapsed enroute and
was returned to Vancouver 0230 10 November where it was removed
from the vessel. Tractor 310 was placed underneath the trailer
and it was again shipped at 1200 on 10 November 1977. The
trailer was delivered to site and returned empty account damaged
on 14 November.
Total charges assessed were $213.28 less 25% ■ $159.96, plus
hostling charges $11.20 - $171.16.
Charges should have been $68.80 less 25% - $51.60
Difference of $119.56
Please arrange for a reduced ticket report to reflect the outstanding charges of $119.56.
3S Form 102-R
Manager Traffic & Sales
cc. A.J. McPherson
JDFfGP CPRall
Internal Correspondents
Date    VANCOUVER, April 21, 1978        File:  494317
Ffom    M.W. Holland
To    Mrs. D. Martin
Pension Benefits Records
Montreal
Further to my letter of yesterday concerning promoted "Northland"
employees. ,
Enclosed is enrollment form in the Officers, Supervision and
Specialists Financial Program which Mrs. J.K* Brassine has
declined.
H
<# F°
rm 102-R
MANAGER, B.C.C.S.S.
HLHrgg BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
W Holland
R Reid
File:    T-78-30-51
" Manager
April 20th, 1973
Shell Canada Limited
2751 Underhill Avenue
Burnaby, B.C. V5A 3C2
Attentions Mr. Harry Wood
Warehouse Foreman
Dear Sirs:
Re: Shell Canada Trailer 39341
Account. " £1.
I have investigated your claim for damages to the above trailer on
or about February 28th, 1978. As a result, I have been unable to
find any record of damage occurring during the loading/unloading
operation or while parked aboard the vessel. Further, it appears
that when Victoria Van & Storage picked up the unit, they did not
make any mention to our staff regarding missing glad hands. In
fact, your phone call of March 8th, 1978 to A.J. McPherson, Vancouver, B.C. regarding the alleged damage is the first record I
am able to obtain.
Under the Water Carriage of Goods Act, RSBC 1970, it is incumbent
on the shipper to indicate any damage at the time of delivery. In
any case, this notice of damage or other incident cannot be made
after three days has elapsed following the delivery.
I regret that I cannot process this claim further unless you are
able to supply evidence of compliance with the above statute.
Yours veiy truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg CPRall WTjd
Internal Correspondence |j^l
Date   VANCOUVER, April 24th, 1978        Files T-78-30-71
From   M.W. Holland
To   Mr. D.C. Fjreeman
Regional Manager
Freight Claims, Pacific
CP Rail
Vancouver, B.C.
Attached you will find my complete file covering minor damage to
Chess Enterprises 1976 GMC Van during the loading operation for
the 1730 hours sailing of the M.V. ♦'Trailer Princess" April 7th,
1978.
Damage occurred when van was edged under front of trailer unit.
When hostler alighted from van, the unit bumped fifth-wheel pin
on trailer. The van was parked underneath the trailer unit for
space-saving reasons and this appears to be the cause of the
damage.
I would appreciate it if you would make the necessary arrangements to reimburse Chess Enterprises in the anount of $40.00 as
per attached invoice.
\m   Form 102-R
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
iW Holland
.' itiaget
'i R Reid
o*sT Manager
April 20th, 1978
Files T-78-30-70
Johnston Terminals Ltd.
P.O. Box 5300
Vancouver, B.C.
Attention: M.V.A. Claims Dept.
Dear Sirs:
At approximately 1000 hours of April 8th, 1978, Johnston Terminals
driver Mr. George Graw inadvertently backed a flat deck trailer into
a stationary commissary dolly causing extensive damage to the dolly.
Upon impact the left front of the dolly was badly smashed, and it
appears from the buckling that occurred in the middle of the unit
that the frame may also be bent.
To defray costs of repair or possible replacement, our machine shop
is attempting to rebuild the unit. When repairs have been completed,
a statement of loss will be forwarded to you. for acceptance.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJMsgg CPRall WTd
Internal Correspondence ftjf
Dale       VANCOUVER, April 20,   197#
From      A. Meijer A
To      Chief Electrician I   / O       J
"PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER"
Dear Sir,
Through the Chief Steward, we received a requisition to supply
you with a Posturepedic mattress.
Mattresses on board the "PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER" are not of
standard size and must be made to measure.
In order for the Company to bear the extra expense involved,
we request you supply us with medical evidence.
Catering Superintendent
B.C.C.S.S.
AJMsgg
:5)   Form  102-R W Holland
:-ager
R Reid
• ' Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
April 20, 1978
File No.: T-78-40
Mr. A. Fullerton
3230 Verdun Avenue
San Mateo, California 94403
U.S.A.
Dear Mr. Fullerton:
Concerning employment opportunities on the "Princess Patricia"
this coming season.
The cre\i list for the Stewards Department has now been completed and as this was done strictly on a seniority basis, it
is very much regretted we are unable to accommodate you; at
least not on the first few sailings,
Will you kindly confirm your availability by telephoning June
Beebe or the Office Manager at 665-3146 as you are on the
"short" list of employees to be called back to fill relief
vacancies.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLHsgg  W Holland
'  r.:-r
R Reid
' Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CPBaii
Aprf.1 20, 1978
File No.: T-78-40
Mr. David K. MacLennan
Rural Route #2
Maria Bridge
Cape Breton, Nova Scotia
Dear Mr. MacLennan:
Concerning employment opportunities on the "Princess Patricia"
this coming season.
The crew list for the Stewards Department has now been completed and as this was done strictly on a seniority basis, it
is very much regretted we are unable to accommodate you, at
least not on the first few sailings.
Will you kindly confirm your availability by telephoning June
Beebe or the Office Manager at 665-3146 as you are on the
"short" list of employees to be called back to fill relief
vacancies.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLHsgg BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
;p
'Holland
*
Reid
Manager
April 20,  197^
File No.:    T-7&-40
Mr. Andrew R. Wilson
2188 Berkly Avenue
North Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Wilson:
Concerning employment opportunities on the "Princess Patricia"
this coming season.
The crew list for the Stewards Department has now been completed and as this was done strictly on a seniority basis, it
is very much regretted we are unable to accommodate you, at
least not on the first few sailings.
Will you kindly confirm your availability by telephoning June
Beebe or the Office Manager at 665-3146 as you are on the
"short" list of employees to be called back to fill relief
vacancies.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLHsgg
j BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CP Bali
W Holland
*
8 Reid
■' Manager
Aprf.1 20,  1978
File No.:    T-78-40
Mr. Ronald A. Glaboff
4977 Kadota Drive
Delta, B.C.
Dear Mr. Glaboff:
Concerning employment opportunities on the "Princess Patricia"
this coming season.
The creiv" list for the Stewards Department has now been completed and as this was done strictly on a seniority basis, it
is very much regretted we are unable to accommodate you, at
least not on the first few sailings.
Will you kindly confirm your availability by telephoning June
Beebe or the Office Manager at 665-3146 as you are on the
"short" list of employees to be called back to fill relief
vacancies.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLHsgg
y tfu uoasisteamsmp service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
!W Holland
:'-ager
R Raid
/ Manager
April 20, 1978
File No.: T-7&-/*0
Mr. Robert V. Wickett
6875 Wiltshire Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Wickett:
Concerning employment opportunities on the "Princess Patricia"
this coming season.
The crew list for the Stewards Department has now been completed and as this was done strictly on a seniority basis, it
is very much regretted we are unable to accommodate you, at
least not on the first few sailings.
Will you kindly confirm your availability by telephoning June
Beebe or the Office Manager at 665-3146 as you are on the
"short" list of employees to be called back to fill relief
vacancies.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLHsgg
y BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
/Holland
Reid
Manager
April 20,  197S
File No.:    T-78-40
Mr. Ewald A. Biersack
1601 - I616 Pendrell Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Biersack:
Concerning employment opportunities on the "Princess Patricia"
this coming season.
The crew list for the Stewards Department has now been completed and as this was done strictly on a seniority basis, it
is very much regretted we are unable to accommodate you, at
least not on the first few sailings.
Will you kindly confirm your availability by telephoning June
Beebe or the Office Manager at 665-3146 as you are on the
"short" list of employees to be called back to fill relief
vacancies*
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLHsgg
J nv Holland
tmger
R Reid
' ISC Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
April 20, 1978
File No.: T-78-40
Mr. Scott D. Jorgensea
5387 Willow Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Jorgensen:
Concerning employment opportunities on the "Princess Patricia"
this coming season.
The crew list for the Stewards Department has now been completed and as this vras done strictly on a seniority basis, it
is very much regretted we are unable to accommodate you, at
least not on the first few sailings.
Will you kindly confirm your availability by telephoning June
Beebe or the Office Manager at 665-3146 as you are on the
"short" list of employees to be called back to fill relief
vacancies.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLHsgg r
BC Coast Steamshio Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Teiex04-507634
CP Bail
W Holland
*
RReid
.' Manager
April 20,  1978
File No.:    T-78-40
Mr. Michael R. Robidoux
740 Guilford Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6G 2N4
Dear Mr. Robidoux:
Concerning employment opportunities on the "Princess Patricia"
this corning season.
The crew list for the Stewards Department has now been completed and as this was done strictly on a seniority basis, it
is very much regretted we are unable to accommodate you, at
least not on the first few sailings.
Will you kindly confirm your availability by telephoning June
Beebe or the Office Manager at 665-3146 as you are on the
"short" list of employees to be called back to fill relief
vacancies.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLHsgg IW Holland
■-^ager
R Reid
St Manager
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CPFIaii
April 20, 1978
File No.:  T-78-40
Mr. Paul M. Cuffley
12377 - 80th Avenue
Surrey, B.C.
Dear Mr. Cuffley:
Concerning employment opportunities on the "Princess Patricia"
this coming season.
The crew list for the Stewards Department has now been completed and as this was done strictly on a seniority basis, it
is very much regretted we are unable to accommodate you, at
least not on the first few sailings.
Will you kindly confirm your availability by telephoning June
Beebe or the Office Manager at 665-3146 as you are on the
"short" list of employees to be called back to fill relief
vacancies.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLHsgg MW Holland
Vanager
RRReid
Asst Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CP Bali
April 19, 1978
File: T-78-40
Mr. Robin Simpson
P.O. Box 5142, Station "A"
Toronto, Ontario
Dear Mr. Simpson:
With reference to your application for employment on our cruise
vessel "Princess Patricia."
The crew list has now been compiled, and we veiy much regret that
we will be unable to offer you a position.
We have a large number of employees "laid off" from last season,
all of whom have expressed their desire to work again this year
due, in part, to sentiment (as this is the "Princess Patricia"fs
last season in Alaska service) and, also, to the general scarcity
of jobs.
Unfortunately, we will not be able to accommodate all of them,
and as they are all "union" employees, seniority must prevail.
Therefore, if vacancies do occur during the season, we will have
to offer them to these remaining "laid off" personnel.
Thank you for your interest in Canadian Pacific, however, and we
hope you are successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours troily,
M.W. Holland
Manager
HLH:gg
B.C.C.o.o. Be uoasi steamsntp service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
MW Holland
Manager
' RRReid
st Manager   .
April 19, 1978
File: T-78-40
Mr. Glen Fullerton
3230 Verdun Avenue
San Mateo, California 94403
U.S.A.
Dear Mr., Fullerton:
With reference to your application for employment on our cruise
vessel "Princess Patricia."
The crew list has now been compiled, and we very much regret that
we will be unable to offer you a position.
Vie have a large number of employees "laid off" from last season,
all of whom have expressed their desire to work again this year
due, in part, to sentiment (as this is the "Princess Patricians
last season in Alaska service) and, also, to the general scarcity
of jobs.
Unfortunately, we will not be able to accommodate all of them,
and as they are all "union" employees, seniority must prevail.
Therefore, if vacancies do occur during the season, we will have
to offer them to these remaining "laid off" personnel.
Thank you for your interest in Canadian Pacific, however, and we
hope you are successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg
J J W Holland
■,'ager
IRReid
- •' Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
April 19, 1978
File: T-78-40
Mr. Geoffrey Thompson
306 - 1816 Haro Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Thompson:
With reference to your application for employment on our cruise
vessel "Princess Patricia."
The crew list has now been compiled, and we very much regret that
we will be unable to offer you a position.
Vie have a large number of employees "laid off" from last season,
all of whom have expressed their desire to work again this year
due, in part, to sentiment (as this is the "Princess Patricia"1s
last season in Alaska service) and, also, to the general scarcity
of jobs.
Unfortunately, we will not be able to accommodate all of them,
and as they are all "union" employees, seniority must prevail.
Therefore, if vacancies do occur during the season, we will have
to offer them to these remaining "laid off" personnel.
Thank you for your interest in Canadian Pacific, however, and we
hope you are successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager
HLHsgg
B.C.C.S.S. \MWHolland
' :'.'-ager
RRReid
si Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665*3135, Telex 04-507684
CPBaii
April 19, 1978
Files T-78-40
Mr. Frederick A. Smith
807 - 1246 Haro Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Smiths
Further to your letter regarding your wife Apolonia.
With reference to your application for employment on our cruise
vessel "Princess Patricia."
The crew list has now been compiled, and we very much regret that
we will be unable to offer you a position.
We have a large number of employees "laid off" from last season,
all of whom have expressed their desire to work again this year
due, in part, to sentiment (as this is the "Princess Patricia"fs
last season in Alaska service) and, also, to the general scarcity
of jobs.
Unfortunately, we wiH not be able to accommodate all of them,
and as they are all "union" employees, seniority must prevail.
Therefore, if vacancies do occur during the season, we will have
to offer them to these remaining "laid off" personnel.
Thank you for your interest in Canadian Pacific, however, and we
hope you are successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLHsgg BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
WW Holland
• Onager
R R Reid
'■■:::: Manager
April 19, 1978
File: T-78-40
Mr. Christopher Thomas
1 - 223 Nelson Street
Kingston, Ontario
Dear Mr. Thomas:
With reference to your application for employment on our cruise
vessel "Princess Patricia."
The crew list has now been compiled, and we very much regret that
we will be unable to offer you a position.
We have a large number of employees "laid off" from last season,
all of whom have expressed their desire to work again this year
due, in part, to sentiment (as this is the "Princess Patricia"fs
last season in Alaska service) and, also, to the general scarcity
of jobs.
Unfortunately, we will not be able to accommodate all of them,
and as they are all "union" employees, seniority must prevail.
Therefore, if vacancies do occur during the season, we will have
to offer them to these remaining "laid off" personnel.
Thank you for your interest in Canadian Pacific, however, and we
hope you are successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg
:.:;") r
MW Holland
Manager
RRReid
' >s< Manager
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CPRall
April 19, 1978
File: T-78-40
Mr. Sandy Martin
Capilano Travel Ltd.
1759 Capilano Road
North Vancouver, B.C.
V7P 3B5
Dear Mr. Martins
Further to your letter regarding your son Jamie.
With reference to your application for employment on our cruise
vessel "Princess Patricia."
The crew list has now been compiled, and we very much regret that
we wall be unable to offer you a position.
We have a large number of employees "laid off" from last season,
all of whom have expressed their desire to work again this year
due, in part, to sentiment (as this is the "Princess Patricia"*s
last season in Alaska service) and, also, to the general scarcity
of jobs.
Unfortunately, we will not be able to accommodate all of them,
and as they are all "union" employees, seniority must prevail.
Therefore, if vacancies do occur during the season, we will have
to offer them to these remaining "laid off" personnel.
Thank you for your interest in Canadian Pacific, however, and we
hope you are successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours trolly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S*S.
HLHsgg
y 1W Holland
■ ■■- iger
RRReid
■'•ssr Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
April 19, 1978
File T-78-40
Mr. Stuart McNab
I695 Haverhill Place
North Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. McNab:
With reference to your application for employment on our cruise
vessel "Princess Patricia."
The crew list has now been compiled, and we very much regret that
we will be unable to offer you a position.
We have a large number of employees "laid off" from last season,
all of whom have expressed their desire to work again this year
due, in part, to sentiment (as this is the "Princess Patricia"fs
last season in Alaska service) and, also, to the general scarcity
of jobs.
Unfortunately, we will not be able to accommodate all of them,
and as they are all "union" employees, seniority must prevail.
Therefore, if vacancies do occur during the season, we will have
to offer them to these reniaining "laid off" personnel.
Thank you for your interest in Canadian Pacific, however, and we
hope you are successful in obtaining employment elsewhere.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg du uoasf znearnsnip o^i vice
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
W Holland
'Reid
' Manager
April 20,   1978
File:     AGR.3.BRAC.S.SEN.
Mr.   R.  Welch
General Chairman
Brotherhood of Railway, Airline
6c Steamship Clerks, etc.
401 Dominion Bank Building
207 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Welch:
With reference to seniority rosters for the various employees
of the B.C. Coast Steamship Service represented by your organization.
Please find enclosed two copies of the following seniority lists:
Galley Staff
Uncertificated Ratings in the
Catering Department
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB CPRall
internal Corre.
ence
Date      VANCOUVER, April 20, 1978
From      M.W.. Holland
File:  AGR.3.BRAC.S.SEN.
TO       CHIEF STEWARD
MASTER
MASTER
PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER
PRINCESS PATRICIA
CARRIER PRINCESS
TRAILER PRINCESS
Enclosed herewith are copies of the following Seniority Lists,
effective April 1, 1978:
Galley Staff
Uncertificated Ratings in the
Catering Department
Kindly display for a period of 90 days from date of receipt
and advise me if anybody contests their position on the Seniority
List.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc: Mr. J.A. Foster, 811 Beach Drive, Nanaimo,  B.C.
JB
?*2)Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
CPRall
WHolland
''ziger
RReid
;sf Manager
April 20, 1978
File:  127341
Sun Life of Canada
200D --338 Broadway Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3C 0T3
Dear Sirs:
Re:  T.P. LEONG, Emp.No. 127341, Audit No. 955,
Loc. 5062, S.I.N. 701-378-366 __-_
Reference your memorandum of April 17, concerning the above
mentioned employee.
Enclosed herewith is doctor's report for your consideration.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB CPRall WTA
Internal Correspondence mJ%
Date    VANCOUVER, April 20, 1978 File:  452931
From    m.W. ft pi land
To    Mrs. D. Martin
Financial Security Program
Administrator *
Pension Benefits Records
Montreal
As you are aware, on January 1, 1978, B.C. Coast Steamship Service
took over the operation of Northland Navigation.
It was only recently, after a review of wages, that the final decision
has been made and employees were placed in the appropriate grades
retroactive to January 1, 1978.  One of the employees involved,
Wilhelm M. KAZULIN, #452931, promoted to a supervisory grade (S-2)
has now completed the Enrollment Form for the Officers, Supervisors
and Specialists Financial Security Program, and same is enclosed
herewith.  It will be appreciated if, under the circumstances, that
the necessity of submitting the green form be omitted.
Three additional employees who were also promoted to the supervisory
plan effective January 1, 1978, are Mrs. C.J. BRASSINE, #494317,
Mrs. S. HENDRIX, #494315 and Mrs. P. MATTHEWS, #494326.  Enrollment
forms for these officers will be submitted as soon as possible.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
)Form 102-R CPRall WTA
Internal Correspondence LL ft
Date  VANCOUVER, 20 April 1978 File: 470195 (I) •
From  m.W. Holland
To
@> Form 102-R
I. Koppel
2nd Engineer
"Carrier Princess"
Re: N.W. RUSH. 470195, injury 12 April 1978, 1630
Please ensure this office is advised if Mr. Rush loses time
or attends a doctor account this injury.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
GP CPRall Wjk
internal Correspondence JL^l
Date  VANCOUVER, 20 April 1978.
From  R*R. Reid
jo  Memorandum
Mr. M.W. Holland
Mr. Margetts has asked for an appreciation at this point in time,
of the "Princess Patricia" 1978 Alaska cruise Profit and Loss
Statement.
Using the same five base sailings from which we determined per
capita 1978 cruise fare (May 15-31, June 16, July 18, August 11),
it appears we are slightly over plan ($4,050,330 vs. Plan $3,983,675) by
$66,655.  Other revenue-producing items are constant except Exchange
appears slightly below Plan ($93,000 vs. Plan $94,396) or - $1,396
for an overall improvement in the revenue of $65,259.
Discussions with Mr. King indicate test fuel will be used in the
"Patricia," permitting a seasonal decrease in fuel cost of approximately $50,000. Mr. King indicates no further savings in maintenance at this time; however, from foregoing, an approximate improvement in net of ($65,259 4-50,000) $115,259 is evident, for total of
$353,430. Based on Noreen Cartwright's marketing plan net of $238,171.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
RRR'BB
Form 102-R
r
/ TELEX
J.D. MASON   05-24725
MONTREAL, QUE.
VANCOUVER, B.C., 20 APRIL 1978
File: T-78-150
PLS ARRANGE CASH ADVANCE 100.00 FAVOUR J D FINNIE TRAFFIC MANAGER
BCCSS VANCOUVER A/C BUSINESS EXPENSES TO BE ACCOUNTED FOR   BCC-3
M.W. HOLLAND
MGR., BCCSS
BB
cc.  Mr. W.W. Hocking
'""" * -•"^^-••" •• -"'
~" -ft,-
) i ■ 11
1   ""/ ". '-'t'-x '■'l'''±$ffiHW&
' $kjeB
j \
• '■•• ;-\V'S
i
/ r
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
i\V Holland
:g::r
R Reid
'  Manager
CPBall
19 April 1978.
File No. T-78-40
Mr. Keith M. King
11505 - 97th Avenue
Surrey, B.C.
Dear Mr* King:
Mr. Cairns has advised me that you were in to talk with him
with respect to possible employment with the BCCS - Northland
Service.
While at this time we are unable to offer you a position, I
do acknowledge your background and the depth of your experience.
Please be assured that we will place your personal resume on
file, and should an appropriate position become available we
will contact you further.
Yours very trulys
M.W.HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
MWH'BB
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Account.
me&bp \-iktfcdgtA 4,--~"":  *>•
                   \
TELEX
- VANCOUVER, B.C., 19 APRIL 1978
s.
File:  T-78-101-PP
A. McDERMOTT 05-268621
I
MONTREAL, QUE.
.-'-.'•■;• :"-.-!-"'■ •. /...'." .:..■•'•■■'-■.'• ■■'     ' y-."'••'-■■ .-•.;•    '' '.-'■-'.: '                 ".;•- "'.
PR PATRICIA TO BURRARD DRYDOCK 17 APRIL ENTERED DOCK 0720 ON THE
BLOCKS 0740 DRY 0840
PR PATRICIA OUT OF DRYDOCK 18 APRIL COMMENCED FLOOD 1550 AFLOAT 1650
CLEAR OF DOCK 1740 SECURED PIER B BERTH 4 AT 1800
BCC-100
A.N. CAIRNS
MARINE SUPT. BCCSS     :,
ANC'BB +
CPS   G.MO  MTL
CPP.  PCCSS, VCR    . " '   \ /
VANCOUVER   19  APRIL/7 8 ,.
P   I   GEORGES^-  -.,-.. .'•   "•;.      .    '■ r.;'.',.'
MONTREAL- QUE        ."-■;; •: '/-: . "      !      '"■■■ —
IT  VAS  DETERMINED  AWHILE  AGO -THAT  COASTAL'BOND  COVERING
NORTHLAND'S    OPERATIONS   HAS'MJOT   BEEN  ISSUED 'AND  PRESENTLY   IS
BEING  PREPARED .BY :.MARSH. AND .MCLENNAN   CN   BASIS   CF   CLASS -A
WAREHOUSE   BOND?H_OW£VER   SUPT/CANADA   CUSTOMS" CUTSIDE: CPERATI CMS
BELIEVES   THIS   MAY   NOT   BE  NECESSARY  AS   POSSIBLY  NORTHLAND  IS
COVERED  UNDER   ITEM- 81 63-CP.  IN   THE   AMOUNT   OF   SO   THOUS   DLRS   STOP •
CLASS .A  CUSTOMS   WAREHOUSE   IS   SET  UP  AT  2285   COMMISSI ONERVST.fV
VANCOUVER  ALSO  ALUMINUM   CO   OF   CANADA.KITIMAT .NORTHWEST   CORNER      .    -
OF   KITIMAT  HARBOUR  AND   CANADA   CUSTOMS   FEEL   WILL   BE'  C   K   AFTER
- ■ ...       --•'..' '■'•;-''''-'• :    ' '■ • ■ V '"
' . ■;•,   V     .' ••'■>',:. \ V;'-.  ".* »   ._,*',•'•■'■;.. i..'- -#■■.*'..'■
THEIR   INSPECTION   NEAR   FUTURE   STOP'WILL  YOU   PLEASE- QUERY . SOMECNE .
IN   TRANS POP TAT I CN "'WHO   MIGHT  HAVE  ACCESS   TO   FEDERAL   GOVT -
ASCERTAINING   IF   NORTHLAND;WOULD   BE   COVERED   UNDER  AFOREMENTIONED
ITEM   1863-CP   IN 'ORDER   ELIMINATE \NECE35ITY   ADDITIONAL   BOND,
PRESENTLY 'BEING   PREPARED.      BCC~99 . .'.,
R  R   REID ■ ^ . .    ;'        ' .' . ".'.'. ..   ■   . '''*['
ASST  MGR   ECCSS. v -' ? V / ]'
CORRECTION   SECOND   LAST   LINE   SHOULD' READ   QUOTE   ITEM   5163-CP   UNQUOTE
R  R   RE1D>- *      ' . " x   "
ASST   MGR   BCCSS ■ -■ _. : -;   )
♦ - ?%• "
CPS   CMC   MTL
CPR   BCCSS   VCR If  W HOLLAND
Manager
; R REID
'\ssL Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC
V6C 2R3
Tel (&04) 665-3135
Telex 04-507684
.19 April 1978.
File No. 429-N
Capt. L. Fleming, President
Northland Navigation Co. Ltd.
2285 Commissioner St.
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Capt. Fleming:
Attached is an invoice from Seaspan International Ltd. for
costs incurred for towing Northland equipment on the dates
January 10-11-12, 1978.
As you will appreciate, this was necessitated by the fact
that the "Fury" was not available to us, as was expected
within the terms of our contract, on these dates, and
therefore, it is considered these sums are the account of
Northland Navigation Ltd.
Should you have further queries, kindly advise.
Your early attention to this matter will be appreciated.
Respectfully,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB CPRall WTd
Internal Correspondence mS%
Date    VANCOUVER, April 19, 197# File T-77-i4-ll
From   ||.W. Holland
To   Mr. A. McDermott
Montreal
Regarding damage to Nanaimo wharf on November 11t 1977 f when the
ffPrincess of Vancover" listed and destroyed 29 facing planks.
Another invoice has now come to light from Western Canada Steel
in the amount of $39#.60f copy of which is enclosed*
This will be charged to the incident by our Accounting Department in April.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg
cc: W.W. Hocking
||) Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
H
Date    VANCOUVER, April 19, 1973 File 78.REF
From    m.W. Holland
To   Mr. H.S. Harriman
Manager, Revenue Accounting
Montreal, P.#Q;
Attached PT59 covering BCS17#01730 refunded with C.I.B.C. Money
Order M2032688 issued April 7th, 1978*
Please note that this money order was reported on previous report
#304 to Assistant Treasurer, Banking ox April 7tii, 1978 and should
have been included with refund batch forwarded to you on that date.
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJMrgg
Enclosures
(JS) Form 102-R r
CPRall Wjk
Internal Correspondence ft^
Date   VANCOUVER, April 19, 1978
From   R.D. Pelley
To   Mr. J.G. Shave
Public Relations and Advertising Representative
Granville Square
This is regarding recent ads placed by P. Lawson Travel in the
Powell River News. I had the pleasure of meeting with Ms. Juliette
Strauss of P. Lawson Travel to discuss our cooperative advertising
venture. At that time we did not reach an agreement as to what ad
Ms. Strauss would use. I advised her to make some changes to suit
her own needs as necessary, but to keep the basic format of our
photo-ready ads. In my absence and with my approval, Ms. Strauss
placed the ad that you have seen. I was surprised to see that it
was much different than the excellent material which He made available. I must also say I was not too disappointed. The ads that
she has placed have resulted in approximately 11-12 confirmed
bookings, which gives the B.C.C.S.S. a very good value for our
cooperative dollars.
I have advised Ms. Stra&ss that before other ads are placed to
please contact me and I will view and approve all ads before
placement.
Sales Representative
RDP:gg
.•"O Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, April 19, 1978 File ALA.055.STAT
From   A.J. McPherson
To   Mr. R.R. Reid
Assuming 100$ Occupancy rate of 320 per sailing (licenced Capacity),
total revenue from fares available from 18 sailings is $5,057,260.
The Mean Revenue Per Passenger for total occupancy calculates to
$878.
Our Estimated Actual Mean Revenue for 197# of $823.74 per passenger
is 92.8$ of above. Estimated Revenue for 1978, assuming 83.28$
occupancy is $4,050,330. which is 80.08$ of maximum revenue possible«
n
A.J. McPherson
Departmental Analyst
AJM:gg
($p   Form  102-R W Holland
■ager
R Reid
»' Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
*
April 19, 1973
File T-78-10
Mr. D. Blaine Mikesell, President
Carefree Travel, Inc.
520 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 722
Chicago, IL 6o6ll
U.S.A.
Dear Mr. Mikesell:
Thank you very much for your letter regarding the possibilities of
cooperative advertising featuring the "Princess Patricia." I agree
with you that time is of the essence and that if ads are to be
placed, it should be done within the next two or three weeks.
Enclosed are photo-ready copies of our newspaper advertising. When
you have decided which of the three ads you would like to use,
please advise the cost involving eacn newspaper. We will consider
covering 50 percent of the advertising cost. Please advise if this
meets with your approval.
Looking forward to hearing from you soon.
Yours truly,
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
BHP:gg
Enclosures CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date    mNCOUVER, April 19, 1978 File: T-78-10
From    R.D. Pelley
To   Mr. R.R. Reid
To advise you that travel plans to Elkford, B.C. have been
cancelled until a later date. I will still consider doing
a presentation in this area if and when I am able to obtain the use of their recreational hall.
I will keep you advised.
B
Sales Representative
B.C.C.D.o.
CS) Form 102-R CPRall
internal Correspondence
Date        VANCOUVER, 19 April 1978 File: T-78-30-70
From        J.M. Ferguson
To M.W. Holland
Reference your letter of 13 April 1978 regarding the damaged
supply dolly.
The dolly is extensively damaged. The Machine Shop Foreman
feels the dolly can be repaired, but that he will have to almost
completely rebuild it. He will keep a record of all expenses
incurred.
B
Terminal Manager,  B.C.C.S.S<
JMFfGP
Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER, April 19, 1978
From     A.»N.„ Cai.fns
To    Memo to the File.
Interviewed Davedoff this date in the pres^ja4k*9o:f&<i&l$sfc Hudson, Of fit
Manager, and discussed with Davedoff the reasoning~arid circumsta'tic?
relating to the decision to suspend him from service for his own
safety.  It is the agreed opinion of myself, Mr. Hudson, and the
ship's officer, under whose supervision Davedoff worked, that he is
not sufficiently alert mentally to safely carry out the duties of
his job in the areas of work where rail and trailer traffic are such
that a person of other than normal alertness represents a liability
in respect to personal safety.
In considering the possibility of employing Davedoff elsewhere in
the fleet, the same problem exists, ie. handling of ship's lifesaving
equipment, etc.
In view of the above, steps will be taken to determine Davedoffs
eligibility for benefits under one or more of the following:
- U.S. Railroad Retirement Plan
- Canada Pension Plan
- Worker's Compensation Plan (by reason of an accident sustained in
the employ of another company some, years ago)
- SIU Welfare Plan
The above was discussed with SIU representative Doug MacLaren this
date.  Davedoff has been advised to consult with his personal doctor,
who is presently treating him to determine if some further rehabilitation program could improve his present reflexes.
Thursday 20 April
DR. ROMEO SKWAROK, PSYCHIATRIST
#325 2184 West Broadway Telephone 731-1870
Called to advise Davedoff has been referred to him for treatment
and requests being advised of any action taken with respect to
Davedoff's employment or compensation, etc.
-^-f"
t)   Form 102-R
72 * Page 2
File 360085
April 21, 1978
Davedoff.' s physician agrees that his mental/physical problem will
require several months of specialist treatment.
Marine Superintendent
B.C.C.S.S* M W HOLLAND
Manager
■1 R REID
Asst. Manager
BC Coast Steamship Servii
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC
V5C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135
7"e/ex 04-507604
18 Ap/uZ 1978.
Tllz Mo.  T-78-69
Alt. Thomcu M. VykeA
Vam ?n.oducXlon& ltd.
818 Douglas St.
VICTORIA,  B.C.
V8W 266
Dunn. Tom:
With. n.zi2Annc.2. to youh. conv&uatlon with Alt. UoULand lcu>t Thau-
day and fajJuthoJi to ouh. loXteA o^ 17 Uanch, concerning tht
"PilnccAA Fatnlcla" Captain Cook'* T&etm&Jte. Chat, thl& wiilZ
confilAm that ouA. /icqulA<zme.nt will amount to 5,000 units, and
h.zqua>t that you a/iAange. production oft tlvU quantity.
VouU voAy truly,
R.R.  REIP
At>4t.  ManageA,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR';88
^. my*      af Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, 18 April 1978. File:  78.529.C.
From   R.R. Reid
To    Purser       ) „  . „
m.-   r  <■.-   j \  Princess of Vancouver
Chief Steward )
There will be a group of 30 Grade 8 students, with Mr. Adye in
charge, from Comox Junior High School, travelling on the "Princess
of Vancouver" from Nanaimo 0830 Friday, 21 April, returning same
day at 2000.
Any meal service will be at individual's expense.
En route Vancouver the group is interested in visiting the Bridge,
in view of their navigation studies.  On copy of this letter to
the Master we are asking him to extend the courtesy of the Bridge
to the group at his convenience, and would ask that you arrange to
assist group to the Bridge.
S3 Form 102-R
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
cc.  Master, "Princess of Vancouver" - Kindly note comments to
Purser and Chief Steward.  It will be appreciated if
you will extend courtesies of the Bridge to this group.
Chief Engineer, "Princess of Vancouver"
Mr. E. Robinson, Nanaimo - Per conversation.
Mr. 0. Robison, Vancouver.
1 CPS   CMO  MTL i
CPR  BCCSS  VCR
VANCOUVER   18  APRIL/78
P   I   GEORGES \
MONTREAL   QUE
ESTIMATED  DELIVERY   COSTS   MERCATOR   ONE  SHELLBURNE  N   S   TO  VANCOUVER
MILEAGE  HALIFAX-PANAMA  2338   ALLOW   SHELLBURNE   DIFFERENTIAL   100   MILES
TOTAL   TO  PANAMA   2238   PLUS   PANAMA   TO  VANCOUVER  4032   -   6270   MILES
ACCORDING   1965   ISSUE  DEPT   OF  U  S   NAVAL   OCEANOGRAPHIC   OFFICE ACTUAL
DIRECT  NORMAL   TRANSIT   TIME  HALIFAX   TO  VANCOUVER  AT   16   KNOTS   AVERAGE
16   DAYS   10   HOURS   ALLOW   FOR   CANAL  AND   ONE  FUEL   STOP   2   DAYS   SUB   TOTAL
18   DAYS   10   HOURS.      ALLOW   FOR   TRAVEL*   PREPARATION  AND  SAILING   3   DAYS
SAY   22   DAYS   DELIVERY   TIME  FROM   DEPARTURE  SHELLBURNE.      FUEL
CONSUMPTION   .512   BBL/PER  MILE AT   16  KNOTS     -   6270   X   .512  X   16   DLRS
BBL   *
LUBE   OIL
50   GALS  X   18-1/2  X   1.86/   GAL.
AVERAGE  DAILY   CREW  WAGES
27  AT   <2500   DLRS   X  22)
PANAMA  CANAL
SAN   PEDRO  FUEL  STOP
SUBSISTENCE  ENROUTE ,
27  X      10.00  X     22
MISCELLANEOUS
27   GROUP  FARES  Y  CLASS   VANC   HALIFAX X  230.00-
LESS   ESCORT  FARE   (GROUP   CONSIDERATION)
BUS   HALIFAX-SHELLBURNE   (APP.)     .
ASSUME  PICKUP   PIER   B   TO'AIRPORT  VANCOUVER
MISC   TOTAL
51*364
1*721
53*085
55*000
3*000
1*300
6210
230
5*980
100
100
EXAMPLE  SCHEDULE
LV  VANCOUVER
0800
AR   TORONTO
1510
LV   TORONTO
1655
AR  HALIFAX
192 5
LV  HALIFAX
1945
TOTAL
BCC-96
R R   REID
ASST MGR  BCCSS
CPS   CMO  MTL
CP  AIR   FLT  60
AIR CANADA FLT 192
CHARTER BUS 2-1/2HR TRIP
5*940
6*180
124*505
CPR  BCCSS   VCR CPRall \f^4
Internal Correspondence [£%|
Date   VANCOUVER, April 18, 1978 File: T-7&-10
From   R.D. Pelley
To   Mr. R.R. Reid
To advise you that travel plans to outbound B.C. have been
cancelled until a later date. I will still consider doing
a presentation in this area if and when I am able to obtain the use of their recreational hall.
I will keep you advised.
Sales Representative
B.C.C.S.S.
RDPrgg
(*jjg)   Form 10P-R ■   .
CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Dais    VANCOUVER, April 18, 1978 File: T-78-1012A
From    A.N. Cairns
To    Master, "TRAILER PRINCESS"
The shipping master will board your vessel at 0800 Wednesday,
19 April for the purpose of renewing articles.
A.N. Cairns
Marine Superintendent
ANC:gg
cc: Chief Engineer, "TRAILER PRINCESS"
'•'■'?) Form 102-R f W Holland
' inager
^.RReid
sf Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B".Vancouver. BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
April 18, 1978
File: 0-102
Humphries Water Freight Ltd.
1591 - 19th Avenue
Campbell River, B.C.
Dear Sirs:
With reference to the attached invoice pertaining to services
provided by your vessels on behalf of our "Northland Fury" on
8 April 1978, please provide a breakdown of costs, as applied,
ie. daily rate, hourly rate, minimum call-out, etc.
Yours truly,
A.N. Cairns
Marine Superintendent
ANC:gg CPRall
Internal Correspondence
B
Date   VANCOUVER, April 18, 1978
From   A.J. McPherson
To   Mr..R.R. Reid
File: ALA.055.STAT
Calculations of a MEAN REVENUE PER PASSENGER for the "Princess
Patricia" 1978 Season indicate a mean of $823.74 per passenger.
Assuming that we will meet the Plan estimate of 83.28$ Occupancy
or 4917 passengers the revenue from fares alone will be:
$823.74 x 4917 - $4,050,330
A quick check of the revenue to be derived from the U.S. Funds
exchange indicates that it will total approximately $93,000
which compares favorably with Plan $94,396.
A.J. McPherson
Departmental Analyst
AJM:gg
Ǥ   Form 102-R
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "S". Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135. Telex 04-507684
^g
■ W Holland
■-ager
• R Reid
■ Manager
April 18, 1978
File No. AGR.2.SIU.GEN.
Kendall, Trudel & Co.
666 Sherbrook West, Suite 1400
Montreal, Quebec H3A 1E7
Dear Sirs:
The following is the information requested in your letter of
April 14, 1978:
Contributions Made to the Canadian
Seafarer's Welfare from April 1, 1977 to March 31. 1978
Pay Period
1977 8 & 9
10 & 11
12 & 13
14 & 15
16, 17 & 18
19 & 20
21 & 22
23 & 24
25 & 26
1978
1 & 2
3 & 4
5, 6 & 7
Dates
Covered
Amount Contributed
4/1  -
A/29 -
- 28/77
•5/26
$ 1,014.00
1,176.75
5/27 -
•6/23
1,176.75
6/24 -
-7/21
1,107.00
7/22 -
- 9/01
2,030.25
9/2  -
- 29
1,252.50
9/30 -
■ 10/27
1,112.25
10/28 -
- 11/24
968.25
11/22 -
- 12/22
906.75
12/23 -
l/20 -
- 1/19
.2/16
855.00
817.50
2/17 -
■ 3/30
1,317.75
Total
$13,734.75
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg W Holland
■jger
9 Reid
■■' Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver. BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
April 18, 1978
File: 168
Imperial Oil Ltd.
2 Place Ville Marie
Montreal, Quebec
Attention: Supervisor, Retail
Dear Sirs:
Kindly forward eight Esso credit cards for use of this Department
as follows:
C.P. Rail
B.C.C.S.S.
Vehicle Number 1 through 8
Will appreciate receiving these as soon as possible. Completed form
is attached.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg '//Holland
liReid
-' Manag&r
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B". Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
}$§
April 18, 1978
File: T-78-10
Northill Sanitation .
Box 62
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Gentlemen:
As in the past, I would appreciate your arranging pick-up at the
Prince Rupert dock, from our vessel, the "Princess Patricia", of
approximately 12 large containers of garbage each trip during the
forthcoming cruise season.
Enclosed with this letter is a copy of our 1978 Alaska cruise
brochure showing dates on which the vessel will call, at Prince
Rupert during the regular cruise season. We will arrange placement of the containers on the dock and any problems or questions
concerning the disposal should be discussed with the Chief Steward
and financial matters with the Purser.
Will you please confirm this arrangement and advise your charges
for collection each trip.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH:gg
bcc: Purser, "PRINCESS PATRICIA"
Chief Steward, "PRINCESS PATRICIA'.!
N. Parham - Prince Rupert
Gordon Walker - Prince Rupert CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, April 18,  1978
From  A. Meijer
To   Bartender, "PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER"
File: T-7«-15
Enclosed a new weekly stocksheet for use in your bar backroom.
Please record when additional supplies are either added or removed
from bar use. This will provide you with a daily stock account.
This stock sneet must be completed, each Saturday after closing,
and the balance of stock on hand to be transferred on to a new
sheets.
The following poinds must be ODserved:
1. Before final stocktaking, Bal-O-Matic System must be filled.
2. Cooler is to be stocked with beer.
3. You are to ensure that the tape on your cash register shows
the proper date and each customer is to be furnished with a
sales slip.
4. Every first Monday of the following month, stocktaking will
take place.
5. As usual, your barbook to be completed, and returned to the
office within the first week.
6. Bar orders are to be ready not later than Friday, in order to
comply with delivery for spirits on Wednesday and beer on
Thursdays.
./2
J|) Form 102-R Page 2
File T-78-15
April 18, 1978
In consideration of the above, an extra half hour overtime will
be allowed each Saturday.
Catering Superintendent;
AJM:gg
cc: Chief Steward CPRall W£
Internal Correspondence wlH(
Date    VANCOUVER, April 18, 1978
From    J.W. McCowatt
To   H.K. Markan, Second Engineer, "PitlNCESS Or' VANCOUVEtt"
With reference to your overtime claim 25th March, your employee
No. 479345.
Tne claim for 2 hours "changed leaky flange joint gasket on bilge
line" is not concurred with.
This overtime is therefore disallowed.
J.E. McCowatt
Asst. Supt. Eng.
«»EM:gg
cc: Chief Engineer "PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER"
W. Kazulin, Accounting
fi™S   Form  102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
IV W Holland
' r.ager
RReid
is Manager
April 17, 1978
File No. T-78-40
Mr. M.W. Cart
#107, 10633-111 Street
Edmonton, Alberta
T5H 3G1
Dear Mr. Cart:
Your letter to Mr. Holland of March 25 and his reply of April 12 have
been passed on to me for handling.
The crew list for the Catering Department has now been compiled and
while cognizant of the splendid services; you have provided us with in
the past, we regret to advise that we are unable to accommodate you
this year on the "PRINCESS PATRICIA", for as you are aware, all
Stewards Department positions are covered by an agreement with the
union, which means that seniority must prevail.
As this is the "PRINCESS PATRICIA'S" final year in service, last
year's crew are most anxious to serve, and as it stands, we are not
able to accommodate all of them} so there will be quite a few people
disappointed besides yourself.
I will, of course, keep your letter on hand in the event that, if you
are available, we may be able to offer you something later on in the
season, depending upon the number of relief positions required.
Yours truly,
A. Meijer
Superintendent, Catering
HLH:gg r
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
! W Holland
■cage!
' R Reid
' Manager
April 18, 1978
File: T-78-10
Ms. Juliette Strauss
P. Lawson Travel (Main)
409 Granville Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Ms. Strauss:
To acknowledge receipt of your invoice dated 30 March 1978 for cooperative
advertising in the Kernsdale Courier and Power River News, I will pass
this invoice to the appropriate department for payment.
I am pleased to see that you are receiving positive results from your
newspaper advertising. Although you are not getting the response on the
sailings you have booked space. Nevertheless, I feel they will be successful for you, as booking trends appear to be eight to six weeks prior
to sailing.
When you are considering more advertising featuring the "PRINCESS PATRICIA",
would you please advise me so I may keep some control on my budget.
Wishing you much success with your 1978 cruise program.
Best regards,
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
RDP:gg BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B". Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex 04-507684
CPiRaii
iV Holland
i Reid
■ Manager
April 18, 1978
File:    T-78-10
Ms. Carol Grieveson
34 Greystone Crescent
Georgetown, Ontario
L7G 1G9
Dear Ms. Grieveson:
This is to acknowledge receipt of your letter of early April regarding
your program to help a handicapped child. I am very pleased you selected
"PRINCESS PATRICIA" Cruises for information. I am happy to enclose a
selection of brochures and other pictorial information and sincerely hope
that this will be of benefit to Todd.
Good luck with your program. Please convey my regards to Todd's parents.
If you would like additional information, please feel free to contact
me.
Yours truly,
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
RDP:gg
Enclosures BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
:W Holland
' >g-r
R Reid
• Manager
1
April 18, 1978
File:  AGR.l.CMSG.GEN.
Capt. J.E.S. Bragg
Business Representative
Canadian Merchant Service Guild
Western Branch
230 West Broadway
Vancouver, B.C.
V5Y 1P7
Dear Capt. Bragg:
Enclosed herewith is current "Leave List" for Deck and Engine
Officers (B.C.C.S.S./Northland).
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C C.S.S.
JB CANADIAN       PACIFIC       LIMITED
B.C.C.S.S./NORTHLAND NAVIGATION
NAME
LEAVE DAYS AS OF
APRIL 13, 1978
H.S. Scott
F.J. Child
H. Blomerius
W. Harris
W.J. McCreary
P.A. Pedersen
M. Minnette
H.W. Hall
G.L. Ash
R.M. Laing
W.E. Bland
B.R. Vanduzee
D. Hiebert
N.J. Krulitski
A.S. Fraser
A. McKenzie
B.A. Nerada
R.M. Askew
22
3
5
12
23
8
2
18
21
34
53
20
46
36
51
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S. CPRall W^d
Internal Correspondence
Data       VANCOUVER, April 18, 1978 File:  576
From       M.W. Holland
To       Mr. N.W. Patteson
Manager
Payroll Accounting
Montreal
Enclosed herewith are completed Forms CER-1 for the following:
Michel THOMAS, #494184, Roll 955
Peter William ROSS, #484400, Roll 955
Manager, B.C.C.S S
JB  .
)Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
rl W Holland
' y.ager
H R Reid
' 1st Manager
April 18, 1978
File: 484382
Sun Life of Canada
200D -- 338 Broadway Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3C 0T3
Dear Sirs:
Re:  T.J. SHYSHKA, Loc. 5062, Audit No. 956,
S.I.N. 714-101-433, Emp.No. 484382
Reference your memorandum of April 6, concerning the above
mentioned employee.
Enclosed herewith are copies of all correspondence, and as
Mr. Shyshka has not yet answered our letter of March 10, I
suggest we close our file on this claim.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
W Holland
eager
7 R Reid
-■ Manager
CP Rail
■April 18, 1978
File  126622
Mr. M.O. Chow
730 Pembroke Street
Victoria, B.C.
Dear Mr. Chow:
Re:  Clifford A. BENNETT, deceased February 27, 1978
The Pensions Department in Montreal have advised that they will
require satisfactory proof of age for Mrs. Bennett before a
survivor allowance can be payable.
Will you, therefore, please obtain from Mrs. Bennett a copy
of a document which indicates her birth date (Certificate of
Birth, Baptism Certificate), and forward same to this office.
The Pensions Department have also advised that Mr. Bennett's
January, 1978, pension cheque remains outstanding and are
requesting that this cheque be returned. Please advise if
cheque was deposited to an account or if same is still in the
hands of Mrs. Bennett.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex 04-507684■
W Holland
HReid
■ Manager
18 April  1978
Mr. D.  Jones
Marine Co-ordinator
Crown Zellerbach Canada Ltd.
P.O. Box 2079
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 3T1
Dear Dennis:
Reference your note requesting waybills covering movements of
rosin to Duncan Bay.
Copies of waybills are attached.
As requested, the following is a list of GATX rail car movements,
and pros covering, all billed to C.S.C., Vancouver:
Rail
Our
Car
Waybill
Statement^
Date
Pro#
Charge
5769
135229
10425E/27
07/21/76
000107
$378.10
5770
135247
10425E/27
07/21/76
000108
378.58
5771
This billed
to CZ only.
5773
135270
10425E/27
07/21/76
000103
375.87
78618
135284
10425E/27
07/21/76
000104
376.03
5770
135302
10425E/32
08/31/76
000127
380.57
5771
135308
10425E/37
10/07/76
000145
378.82
64975
135319
10425E/41
11/07/76
000163
377.94
78618
135332
10425E/01
01/07/77
000192
371.97
78051
135354
10425E/15
04/21/77
000239
384.39
5773
135364
10425E/15
04/21/77
000240
381.60
78618
135381
10425E/20
05/31/77
000271
375.63
64975
135395
10425E/25
07/07/77
000280
363.93
. . 2 - 2 -
GATX 5769 was billed to you on our pro #100002 10 January 1976
and GATX 5770 on pro #113228 on 28 February 1976. These cars
were also billed to CP. Rail in July at the request of the
C.P. Rail, Customer Service Centre. It was not realized by our
ticket office that this was to cover the movements in January
and February respectively, which had also been billed to you.
Mr. Robison is arranging to allow a credit $342.00 for GATX 5769
and $342.43 for GATX 5770. This will appear on your next statement.
Yours truly,
J.D. FINNIE
Manager Traffic & Sales
cc.  0. Robison - Vancouver
The above refers to recent conversation and your letter of
21 March 1978. Please arrange accordingly.
Manager Traffic & Sales
u .0 .0 »o .£> .
JDF'GP t
 , .	
',"!' "■ "      ~"    . ; ..-..ij ;;• .;■.-,' '■_■;_■ .';'~:"y~^: "
TELEX
VANCOUVER, B.C., 17 APRIL 1978
File:  78.ALA.521.V..
P.I. GEORGES '.:-■'        -   T
MONTREAL, QUE.
CONV FRI WILL GUARANTEE MRS VINCELLETTE B CATEGORY ROOM SGL. OCCUPANCY
BASIS AUG 27 SAILING.      BCC-92
R.R.; REID   im-!t
ASST: MGR., BCCSS
RRR'BB
PLS.  [NITIAL & PASS
Account.
4fJka
^tAv
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■Jsjm
$MrM
*m
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E@
Date   VANCOUVER, 17 April 1978. File;  162
From   M.W. Holland
j0   Mr. B.D. Margetts
General Manager
Coastal Marine Operations
Vancouver, B.C.
CODE OF BUSINESS CONDUCT FORMS
S&3 Form 102-R
Your letter of 4 April, File P-300.
Enclosed are completed forms as requested, together with-a list
of names for reporting to Montreal.
Still to come are forms for P. Matthews, S.. Hendrix and C.
Brassine.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH'BB
t 'M3J
V HOLLAND
BC Coast Steamship Service
:ager
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC
1 REID
V6C 2R3
;.  Manager
Tel (604) 665-3135
Telex- 04-507634
17 April 1978.
File No. AGR.3.BRAC.S.GEN.
Mr. R. Welch
System General Chairman
Brotherhood of Railway, Airline &
Steamship Clerks
401 Dominion Building
207 W. Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C .
V6B 1H7
RE:  PAUL PO-LOK TONG
Dear Mr. Welch:
It has been brought to my attention that the above-named employee
was granted leave of absence for the purpose of visiting his
sick mother in China.  The lady subsequently passed away, and
Mr. Tong is presently involved in settling her affairs and recovering from the shock.  As this leave was of an emergent compassionate nature, it was granted without hesitation.
Unfortunately, due to absence account illness of the Catering
Superintendent, the conditions of the General Agreement, Article
26.2, were not complied with after three months had elapsed, and
it is for the purpose of correcting this omission that I am
writing you.  Would appreciate receiving, retroactively, your
permission for Mr. Tong to prolong his leave for the period from
January 27th until May 15th, 1978.
The oversight is regretted.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH'BB
cc.  Mr. J.A. Foster
Local Chairman, BRAC
811 Beach Ave., Nanaimo, B.C. CPRall
Internal Correspondence
m
Date    VANCOUVER,  17 April 1978. File;     T-78-150.
From    M. W.  Holland
To Mr. J.L. Rochon
Supervisor, Data Centre
Vancouver, B.C.
Please issue cash advance to replenish, cash float:
$25,000.00  Wholesale Delivery Service, Burnaby, B.C.
Above amount required to cover services rendered for cartage
account our Northland operation.  This is a partial payment on
our outstanding indebtedness to this firm.
Agent, BCCS - Northland (Agency #9992).
i-QForm 102-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
WWH'BB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135. Telex 04-507684
M W Holland
Cnager
R R Reid
SI Manager
CP^aii
17 April 1978.
Tile Mo. T-78-69
Wi. John Vrope
"Showctlon" Cholnman
Shaw festival Theatric Foundation, Canada
Box 774
Niagara-On-Thc- Lake, Ontario.
LOS  UO
Vear Mr.  Vrope-
Thank you kindly fion your recent letter concerning the fiun
almoin. sponsored by Shaw festival In Its filrst Travel Auction.
We sincerely regret that the 1978 cAul&e season by the
"Princess Vatrlcla" will be the last yeah, ofa operation o& oufi
vessel, and as such, will not be In a position to extend
complimentafvy cruise ion. the succeeding yeah..
We wish you every success In your venture, and regret that we
will not be a participant.
Yours very truly,
R.R.  REW
Asst. Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'SB CPRall
Dat0   VANCOUVER, 17 April 1978. File:  T-504
From   M.W. Holland
To   Mr. P.E. Le Feuvre
Asst. Treasurer, Banking
Toronto, Ont.
Further to Mr. Reid's letter of 27 March, File T-504, with which
were enclosed specimen signature cards with signing fights for
DOT's issued in connection with BCCSS, etc.
On instruction of Controller, please delete the name of Carole
Siddall and find enclosed card signed by Mr. Victor Jones,
which has my approval.
S3 Form 102-R
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
h -4
CPS   CMO   MTL i   ' ;
cpr BCCSS' vcn -••. .■:-.*
WM€.my±R   17". APR/78
H  CAPTVR1C-HT  .
MONTREAL   QUE
PLS   ADVISE   PHIL   FCR   HIS   GENTLEMAN   ON. SEPT   4   CAN. MOV-   OFFER   CAB-IN
32S   IN   LIEU   216   FCR   CHOICE     BCC-P3 ' ., S
P   P   REID
ASST  MGR   PCCSS ,- .       i
A.
cps  eric MTL - ■
CPR   DCCSS   VCR
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21 ^:M§i
. TELEX
VANCOUVER, B.C., 17 APRIL 1978
File:  103
J.D. MASON -  05-24725
MONTREAL, QUE.
IDEAL FUEL PAID FEB 21 AND 28 ACCOUNTS NANAIMO AND S/BAY APR 15 STOP
ALL MARCH AND APRIL TO DATE STILL OUTSTANDING STOP ENDEAVOURING PAY
2 MORE PERIODS BY END THIS WEEK. WILL CONFIRM WED 19.' ADVISE IF IN
ORDER CARRY ON.    BCC-94 '
M.W. HOLLAND
MGR., BCCSS , -
cc.  Mr. C.A. Aitken
Mr. 0. Robison
CAA'BB CPS   CMC- MTL ■" .       '
CPP.   BCCSS   VCR    N '  . . . • .
VANCOUVER   17   APRIL/78 - :..;!=        :,
P   I   GEORGES
MONTREAL   QUE .      , '   ' ' .
MTD  MRS   VINCELLETTE READ  AS   FOLLOWS   QUOTE
COM   V   FRI   VILL   GUARANTEE   I1RS' VINCELLETTE   E   CATEGORY   ROOM' SGL
i 'if
OCCUPANCY   PASIS   AUG   27 . SAILING ...UNQUOTE
rcc-94 ' *'■'■,   '.''■'
R  R   REID    . '- % •'    -
ASST  MGR  BCCSS
* ': '■■■. » '
CPS   CMC   MTL .
■    .   . ■: r-
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CPR   BCCSS.   VCR
\ BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8". Vancouver. BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
W Holland
- agar
R Reid
: Manager
April 17, 1978
Mr. Milo Hicks ,
1029 West 23rd Street
North Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Hicks:
Thank you for your letter of early April. I am pleased to hear that
you have taken an interest in our Alaska cruise vessel Princess
Patricia. Enclosed you will find a picture postcard of the Patricia
and also a package of our promotional matches.
As you mentioned, the Princess Patricia will soon be withdrawn from
Alaska cruising. It is unfortunate to see such a gracious lady being
withdrawn from service. However, we must keep abreast of the changing
times. The main reason for her withdrawal is economic. In 1979 the
United States and Canadian Departments of the Environment will be imposing restrictions on all ships sailing in coastal waters. The
restrictions being one of sewage holding tanks and also control of
stack emissions. For the newer ships these problems can be easily
overcome. With a ship the age of the Princess Patricia, the cost
for meeting these new requirements would be very high. I expect the
Patricia will be sold at the end of her 197& cruising season.
Best of luck with your hobby and collection. I will also enclose a
1978 Princess Patricia brochure. With your keen interest in the
Princess Patricia, maybe you should consider taking a cruise through
Alaska to bid her a fond farewell.
Yours truly,
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
RDP:gg
Enclosures W Holland
■    ra-jSI
R Reid
c Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135. Telex 04-507684
VJ
April 17, 1978
Mr. William D. Berke and Jean Berke
Pisa Brothers, Inc.
International Building, Rockefeller Center
630 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Dear Sir and Madam:
Thank you very much for your notification of your association with Pisa
Brothers Travel Bureau. I will make the necessary adjustments to our
mailing list to insure that you receive our material as quickly as possible.
I wish you much success with your new association with Pisa Brothers.
Best regards,
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
RDP:gg //Holland
iger
R Reid
' Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135. Telex 04 -507684
April 17, 1978
Mr. Ed Von Nordeck
Let's Travel Tours
3780 Elizabeth Street
P.O. Box 2768
Riverside, CA 92516
U.S.A.
Dear Mr. Nordeck:
Thank you very much for your request for additional Princess Patricia
brochures. Under separate cover you will receive a supply which should
take care of your immediate needs.
I was pleasantly surprised to see a very excellent ad placed in your
newsletter. With support like this from yourself, we will no doubt
receive much needed support and hopefully from bookings which will
assist us both.
If I may be of assistance in future, please contact me at (604)
665-3194 collect.
Looking forward to hearing from you soon.
Best regards,
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
RDP:gg ■/Holland
I Reid
■ Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
April 17, 1978
Mr. Allan Bell
Allan Bell Charters
310 Armour Road
North Kansas City, MO
U.S.A.
Dear Mr. Bell:
64116
Thank you very much for your inquiry of Canadian Pacific's Princess
Patricia Alaska Cruise. Under separate cover you will receive 25 of
our current brochures and a counter display. As requested, you will
be placed on our permanent mailing list for all future publications
and display material.
Regarding your request for group rates, we do not offer a reduction
from our brochure price; however, for every 15 adult round trip passengers booked, you will receive one adult round trip fare free. I
also regret that I am unable to provide any giveaway items for fund
raising programs or group presentations.
Princess Patricia is presently experiencing very successful preseason booking period, especially in relation to the September 28th
sailing. It happens to be the last sailing of the Princess Patricia
and therefore is sold out at this time. I will keep you request for
group space on this sailing on file and hopefully will be able to
reevaluate the situation at a later date.
If you are interested in any other sailing during the season, I will
be most happy to survey the availability of space for you.
Looking forward to hearing from you soon.
Best regards,
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
RDP:gg BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B". Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
fail
W Holland
7 Reid
■' Manager
April 17, 1978
Mr. Hendrik Wijnen
Gateway Tours Ltd.
P.O. Box 4326
Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A
Dear Hank:
3T3
It was a pleasure hearing from you again. I would like to thank you
for your cooperation and friendship during the recent Canadian Government Office of Tourism presentations through Western Canada and the
Prairie Provinces. Travelling the show circuit with friends seems to
make these presentations more bearable. I was recently back to Winnipeg
and several of our contacts asked me to pass their regards to you.
£he/-i~£-
I am pleased to hear that you are utilizing our Princess Patricia shoffsr
If I may be of more assistance, please feel free to contact me. With
regard to your request for south-bound space on our September l6th or
24th sailings from Skagway, I will register your request. The cost of
this accommodation will be forwarded to you if we are able to accommodate
you. I will make every effort to place you on the sailing you requested.
Looking forward to seeing you again and best of luck with your 1978
tour program.
Best personal regards,
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
RDP:gg BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
I V/Holland
RReid
..' Manager
April 17, 1978
Mr. Robert E. Armstrong
Athabaska Insurance & Travel Agency
Box 960
Athabaska, Alberta TOG 0B0
Dear Mr. Armstrong:
Thank you very much for your letter requesting travel agency discount
rates for yourself and wife for one of our sailings in September. As
mentioned at the Canadian Government Office of Tourism presentation
in Edmonton, the space availability of our September sailings is limited to mid-range and upper categories, and I might say they are
selling well.
I will register your request for those sailings and hope we are able
to accommodate you. As you know, all travel agency reduced rates
cruises are based on space availability on or close to date of sailing.
If we are able to accommodate you, you will be advised when space is
available. The travel agency discount is presently 50 percent off
minimum fare, which also includes a spouse.
Once again, it was a pleasure to meet you at the C.G.O.T. presentation and hope to see you again in the future.
Best regards,
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
RDP:gg W Holland
■  i-jer
RReid
; Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver. BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
April 17, 1978
Mr. Ray Patel
Anik Travel Ltd.
Northgate Mall
Albert at .Ninth Avenue North
Regina, Sakatchewan S4R 3C4
Dear Mr. Patel:
I have received a letter from your Marie Staples regarding a refund
for our cooperative advertising venture. I have also received your
invoice for same and have forwarded it to the appropriate department for payment.
As per our discussion of March 8, 1978, we will be refunding to you
50 percent of total invoice, which will now alter the figure of
$197.57 to $164.64. I trust this will meet with your approval.
It is indeed a pleasure doing business with Anik Travel. We
looking forward to serving you again.
Best regards,
are
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
RDP:gg
P.S. Please pass along my regards to Marie Staples. BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver. BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
CP Rail
l '/V Holland
c-ager
R Reid
■ Manager
April 17, 1978
Ms. Linda Fast
P. Lawson Travel
Rupertsland Square, Skywalk Level
444 St. Mary Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3G 3J2
Dear Lindas
Thank you very much for your letter and request for travel agency
reduced rate for our Princess Patricia Alaska cruise. As mentioned
at the recent Canadian Government Office of Tourism presentation in
Winnipeg, your name will be registered for a tour during the season.
I can not guarantee what sailing, if any, you will be on. As you
know, space is assigned on or near date of sailing. If availability
is good, you will be advised as soon as possible for your convenience
of travelling from Winnipeg to Vancouver.
At present, travel agency discount would be 50 percent off regular
minimum fare for yourself and your friends, if he or she is a travel
agent. If not, regular fares will apply.
In closing, we will do our best to handle your request,
luck for a good 1978 season.
Best regards,
Best of
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
RDP:gg BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-50768*
CP Rail
W Holland
I Reid
■' Manager
April 17, 1978
Mr. Norman V. Honnet, CTC
Southwest Travel Service
1200 Summit Avenue, Suite 512
Fort Worth, Texas 76102
U.S.A.
Dear Mr. Honnet:
Thank you very much for your letter of March 9» I certainly will
agree with you that the consumer travel show in Fort Worth was very
successful. It happened to be one of the best attended shows on our
circuit through the United States. I sincerely hope a great deal of
business will be generated by this Alaska show both for yourself and
other agencies in the area.
Enclosed you will find 12 copies of our 1978 Princess Patricia brochures. If in future you require more, please contact me. I do not
have copies of 1978 C.P. Rail schedules; however, I will pass along
a request to the appropriate department and I am sure you will receive copies of the same shortly.
Good luck with 197S season,
you soon.
Best regards,
I am looking forward to hearing from
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
RDP:gg BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
>P Rail
WHolland
.' Reid
■ Manager
April 17, 1978
File T-78-69
Mr. Glenn A. Clark
Phillips Travel Ltd.
921 - 103rd Avenue
Dawson Creek, B.C.
V1G 2G4
Dear Mr. Clark:
Thank you very much for the opportunity of assisting you with your
Trade Fair being held in Dawson Creek.
Under separate cover you will receive a supply of Canadian Pacific
Alaska Cruise brochures featuring the Princess Patricia and a counter
display poster.
The Princess Patricia is a Canadian Vessel which operates from
May 15 to and including September 28 on 7s day round trip cruises
through the famed Inside Passage to Alaska. Because of her size
(603O tons), the Patricia is able to navigate the more intricate
waterways of the Inside Passage. These are areas such as Wrangell
Narrows, which is a 24 mile long channel that "zig zags" through the
Passage. Another highlight is Tracy Arm, a narrow, steep-walled
fjord that winds its way through the mountains of Southeastern
Alaska.
Let's not forget areas such as Ketchican, Wrangell, scenic Glacier
Bay, Old Skagway, Juneau, Prince Rupert, and Alert Bay. At each
of our ports of call, passengers have an opportunity to enjoy
optimal shore excursions which will allow them a look at the ports
and surrounding area up close.
.../2
... Page 2
Mr. Glenn A. Clark
April 17, 1978
We feel the Patricia offers the best and most complete cruise
itinerary of any ship plying the Inside Passage. With our 75 years
of operations on the Coast, we have the experience and expertise to
make a passenger cruise a memorable one.
Best of luck with your Trade Fair. I am sure, with a high spirited
organization as the Kiwanis Club, it will be an overwhelming success,
Best regards,
Richard D. Pelley
Sales Representative
RDP:gg BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
K Holland
H Reid
' Manager
•April 17, 1978
File:  118444
Mr. F.G. Billcock
524 Fernridge Place
Victoria, B.C.
V8Z 2Y5
Dear Mr. Billcock:
Reference your telephone call to this office concerning
the demise of Mr. Percy D. Billcock on March 30, 1978.
Please complete the enclosed Form P.R.3 and return to this
office together with a copy of the Certificate of Death and
Last Will and Testament.
We would also appreciate receiving Mr. Billcock's Long Service
Pass, if it can be located, in order that a new pass may be
issued in Mrs. Billcock's name.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB Internal Correspondence
Date      VANCOUVER, 17 April 1978
From     j.d. Finnie
To      0. Robison
Vancouver
With reference to the attached correspondence, please issue
a statement to the Supervisor, Customer Service Centre, Vancouver,
Tariff authority CFA 500 15320 Wll-C, water portion 58.3 x
102500 = $597.58. Car moved 14 January 1978 to Duncan Bay via
BCCSS barge service.
m
Manager Traffic & Sales
JDF'GP
»Form 102-R @Fprni 102A-R
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, 14 April 1978. Fiie:  126
From   R.R. Reiid
To   Mr. E. Marr
Supervisor
Customer Service Centre
Vancouver, B.C.
Attached is photostat of letter received from Vancouver Wharf
Ticket Office.
I would like an opportunity to discuss this with you at your
convenience.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Marine Supt. (,\^
Supt. Engr.
Asst. Supt. Engr.   ij-.jhi iui
Account.
*L»-v*-
dF
) '-if
wM
\twMW TELEX VANCOUVER, B.C., 14 APRIL 1978
File:  T-78-150
J.D. MASON   05-24725
MONTREAL*, QUE.
PLS ARRANGE EMERGENT CASH ADVANCE 600.00 FAVOUR R D PELLEY SALES
REPRES BCCSS VANC A/C TRIP TO LOS ANGELES AND ELKFORD B C TO ARRIVE
NOT LATER THAN MORNING 18 APRIL    ' BCC-89
M.W. HOLLAND
MGR., BCCSS
RDP'BB
cc.  Mr. W.W. Hocking
4 TELEX VANCOUVER, B.C., 14 APRIL 1978
File:  655-C
P.I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE.
AM AWAITING STATUS REPORT ON MERCATOR RE EPA/GOVT OF N S NEGOTIATIONS.
PLS ADVISE SOONEST.    BCC-88
M.W. HOLLAND .  '•'    , _ : .
MGR., BCCSS
MWH'BB
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B". Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
PftafJ
SW Holland
RRReld
15SJ Manager
14 April 1978.
Y-ULe Mo.   78.521.?.
Mr. Walter VhJUUULps
1955 Watson St.
Victoria, B.C.
V8R 3H7
Dear Walter:
I have had some dl^lculty In obtaining accommodation lor you
on the May 23rd sailing, but am presently holding Room 161,
which Is actually an "F" category room, two beds and an upper,
shower and toilet,  lor which tlie rate will be $1240.00 less
251 employee discount, $310.00, totalling $930.00 plus Vler
handling charges ol $24.00 = $954.00.
Tor Mrs.  I/.  Meadley we are holding lower In Cabin 160, also an
"F" category room,  but on guarantee category "C" rate ol $780.00
plus $12.00, total $792.00.
Should there be any deluxe cabins open at sailing time I
arrange lor Ha/iry Burchlll to transfer you.
will
Tull payment should be made by May 1st li accommodation accepted
alter talking with Mrs. Meadley.    The cabins presently assigned
are quiet and comfortable.
Enclosed with this letter are brochures and meal sitting request
lorms.    There are two sittings, the llrst - breakfast 0800, lunch
1230, and dinner 1800, with second sitting at 0845,  1330 and 1900.
Alter discussing your preference with Mrs. Meadley, please return
lorms lor pre-assignment, with your remittance.
With best regards,
R. R. Reid
Asst. Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'88
cc.    Mrs.  I/. Meadley
3015 Vean
Victoria, B.C. BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver. BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-50768*
CPRall
M W Holland
'.wager
IRReid
"»f Manager
14 April 1978.
Tile Mo.   78.521.P.
Mrs. Roberta Foole
CP Air Operations Centre
1 McConachle Way
Richmond,  B.C.
Vear Mrs. Poole:
With relerence to our telephone conversation, kindly line enclosed some literature respecting our "Princess Patricia"
Alaska cruise.
Will be In touch with you on 1 June regarding ticketing; however,
lor your Inlormatlon, I am presently holding Cabin 215, leaving
Vancouver 8:30 p.m.  24 June, returning to Vancouver on 2 July at
9:00 a.m.
Yours very truly,
R.R.  REIV
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'88 be uoast sieamsmp z>u< <.....„■
Pier'B". Vancouver. BC    V6C ?R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) G65-2507 or 665-2508
! VV Holland
IR Reid
.f Mznag^r
€P Ball
14 April 1978.
Tile Mo.  77.521.T.
Mr. M.W. Byrnes
Soles Manager,  Centtuxl U.S.
CP Air
233 M. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60601.
Vear Mr.  Byrnes-
I am writing to you In connection with the dlUlculty we have
experienced In receiving lull payment Irom Mr.  Harold Beehli,
who, as you know, travelled with us to Alaska 26 July 1977,
but his cheque was M.S.T.    Through the ellorts ol your olllce
we have been successlul In recovering all but $4,387.20.
There seems to be some concern as to Mr. Beerli's actual residence, and am wondering 11 you can conllnm he still resides at
Mo.  6 West White Oak, Arlington Heights, Illinois 60005.    We
have reached the point where we leel that legal action Is long
overdue, and wish to advise hln ol tlvis.
Again, we do appreciate the ellorts which your, olllce has made
on our behall In recovering the amount ol money that we have
received to date, but we cannot be presuming on your time
Indellnltely.
Yours very truly,
R.R. REW
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'88
be.    Mr. W.J.  Comerlord, Manager,  Customer S Agency Accounts, Montreal.
We have written Mr. Beerli In the past, under double registered
letter, advising that 11 settlement was not lorthcomlng the matter
would be turned over to our legal Department lor whatever action
necessary.    Tollowlng the last letter we did receive $3,000.00, but
there now seems to be some doubt as to Mr. Beerli's whereabouts,
and as mentioned In my letter to you under date ol 23 March, CP Air
has been trying to reach him again by a recorded telephone number.
Ill can determine his whereabouts I will again advise him that we
Intend taking legal action 11 the outstanding amount Is not paid by
return. t
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S. BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B". Vancouver.BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2503
\m
m W Holland
14 .April 1978.
RRReid
*S-Sf Manager
Tile Mo. 78. 521. B
Mrs. Phyllis R.
Box 138
Trultvale, B. C.
VOG 110
Boyce
Vear Mm. Boyce:
Johnny Petruccl showed me your letter and asked 11 I would drop
you a line concerning the 28 September sailing, as he Is going
on leave.
Regretlully, tire sailing at tlie present time Is sold out, but
11 there Is anything we can do through cancellation to accommodate you on the 28 September, we certainly will.
Johnny sends you his best regards.
VouM very truly,
R.R. REIP
Asst.  Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB CPRall
Internal Correspondence
m
Data    VANCOUVER, 14 April 1978.
From   R.R. Reid
To    Ms. N. Cartwright
Montreal, Que.
File:  T-78-69
Thanks very much for forwarding Helen H. Nicholson's letter to
me.  I would sure like to do something for her, and will give
this some serious thought.
While we are considering placing on board ship a Captain Cook
package which will include a scroll, I am uncertain at the
moment whether we will have any spare copies of the quantity
required by Mrs. Nicholson.  I have made a photostat of her
letter and put it on file if you wish to write Mrs. Nicholson
yourself; otherwise, on your suggestion we will write to her and
advise that we will send something to her. Meanwhile, will have
to decide exactly what it will be.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
) Form 102-R
v/ *
(M*& i,.;w„^,,,-
Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER''14 April 1978.
From    R.R.   R&cd*
.Jo    Alt.  (/. Jcme<s
~i: l/ancouve/u
fct£e:    T-504
ggSEonri 102A-R
Relerence your letter, ol 3 April. '
Will you please complete the enclosed card lor placement with
Treasurer.
AsAl*  Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRr'bb "j
/ CPRall WZ4
Internal Correspondence H
Date  VANCOUVER, April 14, 197^ File:  342
From m.W. Holland
To Mr. 13on Murray
Northland, Kitimat
As discussed with Pat Matthews on the telephone today,
will you kindly insure that this procedure is followed
in the case of all personal injuries to employees or
any other persons injured on the Company's premises.
Similar forms to be submitted to cover damage to
vessels and wharf facilities and additional item to
be completed; in this case, would be approximate cost
of repairs.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg
cc:  Mr. A.N. Cairns. As per Mr. Holland's memorandum
of March 23rd, I have set up proper handling of
Northland's Forms 1409 fov this office.
;:;5) Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
m
Date   VANCOUVER, April 14, 1973        Files:  148295
130205 *
From   M#w# Holland
To   Mr. R. Granger
Manager, Pensions and Benefits
Montreal
Please refer to correspondence on your files No. 37931
and 58507BL concerning pension contributions in favour
of employees Gordon W. Marshall, No. 148295, Social
Insurance No. 602-458-036 and V/illiam VJ. Hocking,
No. 130205, Social Insurance No. 602-453-010.
Thank you for forwarding a copy of Mr. Hocking's letter
to Mr. Patterson dated January*4.  It sheds light on
this matter in that in his letter Mr. Hocking is not
referring to pension plan deductions but over-deductions
of Officers and Supervisors Group Life Insurance, Code
971.
iVe do not understand why your office connected this
with the pension plan.
The necessary refunds have already been made.
Trust this will finalize the matter.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
HLH:gg
(::'§) Form 102-R CPRall WF^
Internal Correspondence Wk!H
Date   April 14, 1973
From  A. Mei'jer
To  M.W. Holland
Upon request from Mr. J.D. Finnie I have purchased some
gifts for CP. Family Curling Bonspiel commencing 14
April 1973.
The items are: '
4 Filter-Type Coffee Pots
4 Sets of Steak Knives
Enclosed a receipt of $130.07 on my personal Master Charge,
A refund at your earliest convenience would be appreciated,
GjQ)   Form 102-R
Catering Superintendent,
AJM:gg
/ CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, April 14, 197^ File:  P-500
From   a. Meijer
To   J.G. Reid
Cook - OCEAN PRINCE
Upon receipt of the Kitimat invoice regarding ships
stores purchased April 7, we noticed the fallowing
personal Items:
1 Ctn.  DuMaurier K.S. $6.65
1 Large Toothpaste |>1.59
Total     $8.24
We request a refund and assume that the practice of
making purchases of this nature will cease immediately,
Catering Superintendent
AJM: ge
cc:  W.W. Hocking - Vancouver
J. Agar - Northland
H Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, April 14, 1973       File:  Tickets General.
From  M.W. Holland
To  Mr. H.S. Harriman
Manager, Revenue Accounting
CP Rail
Windsor Station
Montreal, P.Q.
Attached you will find four B.C.C.S.S. Ticket Invoices
covering tickets shipped to various agencies on this
date.
Copy for your records and information.
m
M.W.  Holland
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S,
•Afllfl: gg
&%}   Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Da,s  VANCOUVER, April 14, 1973       File:  1377^9
From  H.L. Hudson
To  M.J. ^ixon, Cashier
"PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER"
Your question regarding pension deduction from your
recent cheque.
In computing your pension entitlement it was ascertained
that certain deductions were omitted in past years and
to bring your tension credits up to date, it was necessary
to make a forward deduction as per cory of Form PF4l
attached.
m
Office Manager,
HLH:gg
(.;'??) Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
PBaii
^Holland ^ APril   1978
RffleW File:  T-78-99
• Manager
Mr. Art Adye
R.R. #2
Fern Road
Courtenay, B.C.
Dear Mr. Adye:
I received your request for consideration of a refund due to
alleged "overcharging" by our Nanaimo ticket office attendant.
Although it is true that our Nanaimo Office does not presently
display rate signs as has been implemented in the Vancouver
Wharf Ticket Office, it is generally accepted within the transportation industry that rates are only advertised in brochures
or are available upon request at any office of the company. Due
to the multitude of rates available and their frequency of change,
it is not always practical to have signs displaying them.
Regardless that our staff attempt to assist all patrons with their
ticket needs, it is incumbent on the individual to determine and
request the rate that is applicable to his situation.
I regret, therefore, that no further consideration can be given
to your request although we do hope you will continue to utilize our
services when and where possible.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM'GP CPRall
Internal Correspondence
B
Date VANCOUVER, 14 April 1978 File: T-78-39
From M.W. Holland
To O.R. Robison, Vancouver
E. Robinson, Nanaimo
Purser, "Princess of Vancouver" ,
Miss B.C. Thorn
Sylvia Hendricks, Northland
Please apply following rates effective 15 April 1978 until
further advised:
U.S. funds at premium on international and foreign freight
traffic covered by CFA Tariff 16G:
Exchange
Surcharge
Discount
15•- 3/8 percent
9      percent
Nil
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
GP
Form 102-R V
New
ews Summary
'      News and views on topics'of
current interest prepared by Public Relations
and Advertising Department
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
WORST GRAIN-CAR SHORTAGE IN YEARS IN U.S.
Railroads, shippers and the government in the U.S. are wrestling with
the worst freight-car shortage in more than a decade. A major cause of
the pinch is the intensified desire of farmers and elevator owners to
sell the grain they stored last year when prices were low.
Page 8
SEABOARD ROAD SHOULD BE SPLIT, ICC UNIT SAYS
The Interstate Commerce Commission's enforcement unit said that two parts
of the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad should be split off, contending that
the rail system has indulged in anticompetitive practices. The two lines
recommended are from the Ohio River to Chicago and Jacksonville to Tampa.
Page 10
DOWNEY RAPS NEW SEAWAY TOLL
A recent agreement between the federal government and the U.S. to increase St. Lawrence Seaway tolls has been criticized by Manitoba Agricultural Minister Jim Downey, who charges that the provinces were not
consulted and grain production cannot afford the increased costs.
Page 13
TRENDS AND TOPICS
CP Hotels and the Hotel Corporation of the Bahamas have signed a long-
term agreement under which CP Hotels will manage the government-owned
Lucayan Bay Hotel in Freeport, Grand Bahamas.
Page 14
The largest equity issue ever undertaken in Canadian markets is underway as underwriters for Bell Canada of Montreal have begun offering
$175-mi11 ion of convertible preferred shares of the company.
Page 17
A group of eight major Japanese steelmakers has agreed to buy 940,000
metric tons of coking coal this year from Mclntyre-Porcupine Mines
Ltd., of Toronto, at a price of $58.50 U.S. a ton.
Page 19
"Railway Rehabilitation and Passenger Services" was the subject of
a speech by J.W. Mason, Superintendent, Moose Jaw Division, CP Rail,
to the Moose Jaw Rotary Club on March 20. A copy is appended.
Canadian Pacific V
2
NEWS IN BRIEF
RAIL TRANSPORT BRIEFS
NEW YORK - SLURRY DEVELOPMENT — According to the Billings (Mont.)
Gazette, a Texas scientist named Leonard Keller has developed and patented a method for moving coal through pipelines without water. Basically, a portion of the mined coal is used to produce methyl. Then, the
dry pulverized coal is mixed with the methyl, creating what Mr. Keller
calls Methacoal -- a fuel that could be piped, stored in tanks and used
to fire steam generating plants. Meanwhile, the Slurry Transport Association reports that the Florida Gas Co. has a preliminary feasibility
study underway on a 1,500 mile slurry line to deliver Kentucky coal to
Florida and Georgia utilities. Another line is reportedly under study
to supply Kentucky coal to middle Atlantic utility companies via a
1,000-mile pipeline. (Traffic World, March 27)
NIGHTHAWK FLIGHTS ALLOWED
VANCOUVER - Air Canada's Vancouver-Toronto 'nighthawk' flights will begin June 15, the airline says. It has received Canadian Transport Commission approval for the flights despite continued opposition in Vancouver from local transport officials who say the flights contravene an unofficial ban on flights between midnight and 6 a.m. The first flight
will take off at 4:25 a.m. EST. Up to 289 passengers will be carried on
each flight at a return fare of $202, compared with advance booking
charter fares of $232. The airline promises to use the quiet Lockheed
L-lOlls and reduce power after takeoff to reduce noise. (Montreal Gazette, April 7)
BELL WANTS AID IF CNCP LINKUP WINS APPROVAL
OTTAWA - Bell Canada will have to increase its rates or get subsidies
from the Government if CNCP Telecommunications is allowed to link its
system into the phone company's, Jean de Grandpre, Bell chairman, says
in a brief to the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission. Mr. de Grandpre said the link would allow CNCP to siphon off
lucrative Bell business that helps keep down the cost of the basic telephone service. (Toronto Globe and Mail, April 6)
SIGNIFICANT GAS FIND IN ARCTIC
CALGARY - Panarctic Oil Ltd. of Calgary and its partners are believed to
have made a significant natural gas discovery in a so-far untried offshore area of the Arctic islands. An announcement from the company,
owned 45 per cent by Petro-Canada, a federal Crown corporation, said
that gas and condensates have been encountered in its Roche Point 0-43
well being drilled about four miles off the northwest coast of the Sabine Peninsula of Melville Island. (Toronto Globe and Mail, April 6) RAIL SUBSIDIES FOR RAPESEED NEAR: HORNER
WINNIPEG - The federal and three priarie provincial governments are expected to subsidize the rail movement of processed rapeseed products by
$30-million over the next five years. Jack Horner, minister of industry, trade and commerce, said April 4 in Winnipeg that the federal
government had already committed $3-million to the program for 1978-79.
Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta have agreed to add another $3-million
per year if the program is extended to five years, he said. (Winnipeg
Tribune, April 5)
PACIFIC WESTERN GETS GO-AHEAD ON TRANSAIR BID
OTTAWA - Alberta-owned Pacific Western Airlines has received permission
from the Canadian Transport Commission to buy controlling interest in
financially troubled Transair Ltd. Both PWA and the Winnipeg-based
Transair serve Resolute and Yellowknife and the sale gives monopoly control of large aircraft serving these points from Western Canada, the
commission said.  (Toronto Globe and Mail, April 8)
HOTELS SHOW HEALTHY RISE IN THEIR SALES
TORONTO - Substantial improvements in sales have been recorded by hotels
in most of Canada's major cities although occupancy rates have increased
only marginally from a year earlier. Figures compiled by Laventhol and
Horwath Management Consultants show that business in Ottawa and Quebec
City improved far more than in other cities, thanks largely to meetings
and conferences sponsored by governments. Occupancy rates in Quebec
City climbed to 72 per cent in February from 62 per cent a year earlier,
while dollar revenue from sales of rooms, food and beverages was up 27
per cent. (Toronto Globe and Mail, April 11)
COLD LAKE PROJECT MAY SPARK COAL MINE
EDMONTON - Imperial Oil could develop a large coal mine for fuel to make
steam required in extracting heavy oil at Cold Lake, Energy Minister Don
Getty said. Mr. Getty said this potential use for coal in the heavy oil
field would involve heating the reservoir where the oil is found so that
it will flow. The mine could be located near Whitecourt, 160 kilometres
northwest of Edmonton, Mr. Getty said in a interview. The coal would
then be shipped either by rail or through a slurry pipeline to Cold Lake
360 kilometres away, Mr. Getty said. Mixing of coal with water to send
it through the line and then drying it at the other end before use is
feasible. Imperial has applied for Energy Resources Conservation Board
approval to build a $4-billion plant at Cold Lake, 240 kilometres northeast of Edmonton. The facility would have a capacity of 160,000 barrels
a day. In the interview, Mr. Getty discussed several aspects of the development of the coal industry in the province. "We're on the threshold
of a tremendous new expansion."  (Calgary Albertan, April 7) 4
PAN AM ORDERS 12 TRISTARS
NEW YORK - Pan American World Airways announced it had decided to buy a
$500-million fleet of 12 Lockheed L-1011 jumbo jet airliners, a move expected to spur further the recovery of the Lockheed Aircraft Corp. from
economic perils. For the L-1011 program, it was the biggest stimulus
since the abrupt 1971 setbacks that came dangerously close to plunging
Lockheed into bankruptcy. The Pan Am decision, coupled with the order
Eastern Airlines is close to sealing for $500-million worth of European
A300 Air-buses, was viewed in the industry as the effective start of a
massive upsurge in plane-buying by airlines around the world. Experts
have estimated that the total of purchases would come to between $60-
billion and $75-billion between now and 1990. (Calgary Herald, April 8)
NOVA SCOTIA GETS NEW MINE
SYDNEY, N.S. - The federal government April 11 approved in principle a
new coal mine at Donkin, N.S., which will produce up to two million tons
of coal a year. The new mine is part of a five-year $265-million coal
development project in Cape Breton. Major rehabilitation of a mine in
Glace Bay and improvements to coal transport, storage and shipping
facilities are also planned. The Cape Breton Development Corp. said
there is 800-million tons of coal in Cape Breton, half of which can be
extracted. (Montreal Gazette, April 12)
NET OPERATING INCOME OF U.S. RAILROADS HITS 45-YEAR LOW
WASHINGTON - Net railway operating income for the nation's railroads
dropped to $347-million in 1977, the lowest since the Depression years
of the 1930s, the Association of American Railroads announced. The industry association reported that net railway operating income dropped
from $442-million in 1976 to the lowest point since 1932. The AAR also
pointed out that the industry's rate of return on net investment for the
year was 1.28 per cent, compared with 1.53 per cent in 1976. (Traffic
World, March 29)
CHESSIE LOSS HITS $67-MILLI0N
WASHINGTON - Chessie System Inc., a holding company whose railroads are
principal carriers of coal in the Northeast and Midwest, April 3 posted
a steep loss of $67-million for the first quarter of 1978. Chairman
Hays T. Watkins blamed the 109-day coal strike and severe winter weather
for the quarterly loss, which was far greater than a $7.4-million loss
in the 1977 period. Without these two developments, Chessie would have
been profitable, Mr. Watkins said. The first quarter of 1977 also was
affected adversely by severe weather. (Washington Post, April 4)
COAL SEARCH AGREEMENT
TORONTO - Denison Mines Ltd. and Gulf Oil Canada Ltd. have signed an
agreement to explore a major coal deposit 100 kilometres south of Dawson
Creek, B.C. The study will cost about $15-million and create 150 jobs.
Denison will hold 60 per cent of the venture, Gulf 40 per cent. (Montreal Gazette, April 12)
* * * RAILWAY
BRITISH ARMY LANDS IN VANCOUVER
VANCOUVER - The largest movement of combat-ready military vehicles handled by CP Rail in the six years British armed forces personnel have
been training in Canada is on its way to Suffield, Alberta.
Over 84 tracked and wheeled army vehicles, including tanks and self-
propelled guns, were unloaded at Vancouver's Pier B-C last week from the
Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessel 'Sir Galahad'.
Since 1972, as expected, every  time a movement of 55-ton Chieftain main
battle tanks (MBT's), armoured recovery vehicles (ARV's), Abbott self-
propelled guns and other military material is made, interest is generated along the CP Rail route between Vancouver and the British Army
Training Unit-Suffield, 30 miles northwest of Medicine Hat.
The British Army trains at the 1000-square-mile Suffield base under a
1970 agreement between the Canadian and Alberta governments and the
British Ministry of Defense. A year-round staff of 15 full-time British
officers instructs 805-man battle-group contingents who rotate every six
weeks from April to October.
The U.K. forces exchange their equipment about twice-yearly through the
Port of Vancouver — importing new vehicles and returning vehicles
destined for major overhaul at army bases in Britain and Europe.
The 115 pieces of military equipment in the present exchange bring to a
total of approximately 800, the number moved by CP Rail since February,
1972.
The movement is co-ordinated by Westward Shipping Ltd., the British Ministry of Defense's shipping agents in Vancouver, and by CP Rail's Overseas Trade marketing and sales group.
The $330,000 Mark 6 Chieftain tanks, scout cars, ambulances, trucks,
etc., are marshalled by CP Rail's downtown Vancouver yard near the pier
and loaded aboard 51 and 65-foot flatcars and bi-level automobile cars
for the 791-mile trip east.
The Landing Ship Logistic's (LSL) 'Sir Galahad' arrived in Vancouver
March 29, from Marchwood Military Port, England. She is one of six
identical LSLs — all named after knights of the round-table — assigned
to supply British Army bases in various parts of the world.
(CP Rail News Release, April 3)
* * *
MOBILE TRAIN ANALYZER INTRODUCED BY CP RAIL
MONTREAL - CP Rail has become the first Canadian railway to use a mobile
train analyzer/simulator for teaching train-handling techniques to
enginemen. The Mobile Train Dynamics Analyzer is the newest development in the
railway's continuing study of the forces involved in the movement of
trains over track. The analyzer is housed in a specially modified
Olsen-Kerbmaster truck.
"We have been using a simulator located in Montreal for approximately 15
months but because it is stationary, it was extremely difficult to
obtain maximum utilization," said Dow Alexander, manager, track/train
dynamics.
The mobile unit, which travels by road, has greater flexibility and is
capable of visiting all areas on the CP Rail system. The training area
of the mobile unit is capable of seating seven people, including a supervisor and holds in addition to the locomotive control panel, a telex
machine, another keyboard about the size of an office calculator to tie
into the computer, a mini-computer about half the size of a coffee machine, and a cathode-ray tube monitor.
During the mobile's six-month testing period, it has travelled from
Vancouver, B.C., to Saint John, N.B., and included sessions at CP Rail
facilities in Vermont and Maine.
"The mobile analyzer/simulator is one of the most advanced and sophisticated pieces of equipment in use to teach better train handling methods to our enginemen," said Mr. Alexander.
It is the newest of a number of specialized computer-based tools developed in response to problems associated with modern railroading. In the
early 1970s, the increasing weight of new freight car loads, and the
more sophisticated locomotives built to haul them, had outdated some of
the older techniques of analyzing train-handling problems. "With
today's heavier, longer and faster trains, more is required from engine-
men than "seat-of-the-pants" experience," said Mr. Alexander.
Developed by Freight Master of Fort Worth, the TDA not only identifies a
wide variety of train-handling problems, it also puts them on television. The operator describes a "train" on a keyboard, and then "operates"
it over a moving graph track layout on a cathode-ray screen. Once programmed, the system can duplicate anything from a single unit and a caboose to a 200-car unit train with remote-control slave engines.
In addition, the computer has been programmed to cover the complete CP
Rail main line as well as many secondary subdivisions.
The control panel is identical to that of a standard diesel-electric
locomotive, but instead of commanding a 3,000-horsepower engine, the
various handles and buttons direct a mini-computer.
Any acceleration of braking movement will produce a movement of the
graph line representing the forces within the train. Any handling mistake is detected causing the line to buckle and dance like a snake at
the precise "car" in the consist of the imaginary train, indicating anything from slack running-in to breaking a car knuckle.
— The ability of the Track Dynamics Analyzer to reproduce actual conditions -- including everything from wet rail to different types of
brake shoes on cars — allows an engineman to recognize the errors that
might cause a derailment, without even going near a real train. The
engineman can also review his performance with instant video replays and
stop-action.
In its role as a training device, the mobile TDA has been well received
in the various areas it has visited. "We are now able to get to engine-
men in out-of-the-way locations which was up until now difficult," said
Mr. Alexander. "The unit is also opening up a new frontier in track/
train analysis. When an accident occurs, all the skills of railway
operating personnel are pooled to find out why. By duplicating the
situation, the analyzer can assist finding out what might have gone
wrong."
"The scope of the TDA is almost endless," said Mr. Alexander, "we are
discovering more ways to put it to use, which will possibly mean CP Rail
adding another mobile TDA to meet the demand."
(CP Rail News Release, April 6)
* * *
NEW RADIO COMMUNICATIONS FOR ISLAND RAILWAY LINES
NAMAIMO, B.C. - Once a year a helicopter will carry a CP Rail radio
technician to the isolated peak of Mount Cokely, near Port Alberni on
Vancouver Island. The technician will immediately begin inspection of
what, at first glance, might appear to be some new design of space capsule.
But the smooth-finished, insulated fibreglass cone has a very  'down-to-
earth' application. It is a specially-constructed, weatherproof shelter
housing new radio repeater equipment designed to improve railway communications on Vancouver Island.
Referred to as a Comshel, the 28-foot shelter protects two battery-powered radio repeaters, antennae and other communications eauipment, which
are relay stations for transmitting messages between train dispatchers
and trains, as well as track maintenance forces and mobile supervisors.
The Comshel can also provide protection for maintenance personnel in an
emergency.
At 5,302 feet above sea level, the newly-installed mountain-top radio
repeater station can only be reached by helicopter. Its location was
chosen to allow for maximum range between repeater and radio equipment
on all trains operating between Nanaimo and Courtenay and Parksville and
Port Alberni. By early next year, the railway will have added more
repeaters, expanding the system to cover the entire E&N railway line
south to Victoria. 8
This particular installation is the first Comshel on the CP Rail system,
replacing pole lines which have been used traditionally in Vancouver Island operations.
Other CP Rail mountain-top radio installations located in British Columbia are housed in conventional shelters or in microwave radio station
sites. Underground buried cables serve to interconnect radio stations
located at some of the 20 trackside points remote from their operations.
CP Rail operates 66 radio repeater stations in B.C. Together, these facilities integrate the several hundred mobile and portable radios used
by operations personnel and engineering forces into a comprehensive communications system of which Cokely is the latest addition.
"The Comshel is a valuable protection device in areas such as this where
direct physical access is impossible and where weather conditions can be
quite harsh," said Bill Lee, of CP Rail's radio communications department in Vancouver.
The radio repeaters, installed at mountain-top locations, have a low
power requirement and operate on VHF (very high frequency). Each measures 5i inches high, 19 inches wide and 7i inches long.
With its own battery power source, the mountain-top installation does
not require costly hydro power, cables or generators. The equipment can
be left unattended for years, but annual inspections will be made to ensure the 29 one-volt batteries which power the radio repeaters are in
good operating order. The Comshel was designed and built by Sinclair
Radio Laboratories of North Burnaby, B.C.
* * *
(CP Rail News Release, April 7)
WORST GRAIN-CAR SHORTAGE IN YEARS IN U.S.
NEW YORK - Railroads, shippers and the government are wrestling with the
worst freight-car shortage in more than a decade.
A major cause of the pinch is the intensified desire of farmers and
elevator owners to sell the grain they stored last year when prices were
low. A strengthening export market has helped push up grain prices
nearly 40 per cent in recent months and railroads can't find enough
hopper cars to meet the demand.
Elevator operators, who usually can get the cars within a month, say
they must book long "unit trains" 150 days in advance. Norman Habel, a
central Iowa operator who buys grain from farmers and sells to large
merchandisers, usually can fill 100 rail cars a month; but currently,
his monthly car allocation has been cut to 25. "We expect the (grain-
car) shortage to continue through the harvest season," says Henry Metz,
freight-car utilization manager for the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific
Railroad. Grain-car demand has surged while railroads are also busy hauling fertilizer from chemical plants to farmlands for spring planting and while
shippers of a wide range of other commodities are trying to make up for
time lost during the recent tough winter. During last winter, either
their own production was affected by the cold and snow-storms or their
goods couldn't be hauled because rail operations were hampered.
Additionally, many locomotives and freight cars still are in bad shape
from cold weather wear and tear. Engines and cars have been especially
clogged in the yards and shops of Consolidated Rail Corp., the big, government-funded Northeast road, which notes that besides the effects of
two severe winters, its service has been handicapped by bad track and
equipment acquired from bankrupt railroads two years ago. And, many
coal cars and locomotives used to serve Eastern mines moved westward
during the recent long coal strike and haven't yet been returned.
Eastern mines expect some coal-car shortages "very shortly,"- which will
last until all the cars are sent back, says Joel Burns, director of the
Interstate Commerce Commission's Bureau of Operations.
The Norfolk & Western Railway (N&W) did cut back sharply in car-repair
work during the strike, reducing the availability of usable cars, a
spokesman acknowledges. But he adds that the road has nearly caught up
with repair work.
At recent count, railroads each day were running about 13,000 boxcars
short of customer needs and about 27,000 covered hopper cars, according
to the Association of American Railroads, the industry's trade group.
These shortages are the worst since the 1960s, the ICC says; at the peak
of a 1973 pinch, brought on by grain shipments bound for the Soviet
Union, the shortage of covered hopper cars ran at about 16,000 cars a
day.
In an attempt to alleviate the current problem, the ICC has issued a
string of orders directing or permitting railroads and shippers to take
actions to improve rail-car flow. For instance, the number of "jumbo"
grain cars that can be used in unit trains serving elevators and the
number of consecutive unit-train trips for one customer were limited to
make more cars available for small Midwestern shippers.
The ICC also allowed substitution of small cars for larger ones and open
hoppers for covered hoppers, and limited to 24 hours the time that cars
can sit loaded at a shipper's plant or in a rail yard. The agency further directed the quick return of empty grain cars to the hard-pressed
Burlington Northern and the North Western, and of fertilizer cars to the
Seaboard Coast line. "We'll consider any type of order" to ease the
pinch, the ICC's Mr. Burns says.
The railroad association has taken some steps of its own. The fines
levied on member roads for violating the group's car-service orders were
raised to $200 for each violation from $100 on April 1; each car that
isn't returned to the road that owns it, when the association has ordered the return, constitutes a violation. The double penalty was aimed
mainly at Conrail, the biggest offender. 10
William Van Slyke, director of the railroad association's car-service
division, says the April 3 opening of Great Lakes ports will boost rail-
car flexibility, better weather will help get empty cars back to loading
areas and locomotives into service and the reopening of previously
frozen, inland-river navigation will start barges moving again, relieving some demand on railroads.
So far, though, rising customer rail-car demands are keeping the car
shortage severe. Railroads have been able to load only about 23,000 to
24,000 grain cars a week, about the same as last summer when farmers
were less eager to move grain.
(Wall Street Journal, April 10)
* * *
SEABOARD ROAD SHOULD BE SPLIT, ICC UNIT SAYS
WASHINGTON - The Interstate Commerce Commission's enforcement unit said
that two parts of the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad should be split off,
contending that the rail system has indulged in anticompetitive practices,
Under the ICC staff unit's recommendation, the railroad would have to
divest itself of one of two lines from the Ohio River to Chicago and
also one of two links between Jacksonville and Tampa, Fla.
The ICC's Bureau of Investigation and Enforcement said that Seaboard has
violated merger conditions imposed on it by the ICC when the agency approved consolidations that formed the Southeast Rail Network. The Seaboard system has eliminated access by competing roads to its rail lines
and has misrouted freight traffic from paths along those competing
lines, in both instances violating ICC directives, the enforcement
bureau said. Using a monopoly provision, Seaboard has allowed service
to shippers to deteriorate, the bureau said.
The enforcement unit also said the railroad has failed to operate the
Louisville-Nashville Railroad as an independent line, and has instead
integrated the L&N's operations into its own with the result of a lessening of competition with other roads. The ICC in 1970 approved Seaboard control over the L&N.
The ICC staff unit's recommendations were made as part of a commission
investigation of Seaboard. In that investigation, competitors, including Southern Railway and Florida East Coast Railway, contend that Seaboard has restricted rail competition in the Southeast to their detriment.
Roads that make up the Seaboard system are formally under the wing of
Seaboard Coast Line Industries Inc., a holding company. They have been
given the trade name of "the Family Lines," and include half a dozen
roads -- among them the dominating Seaboard Coast Line and the L&N. The
Seaboard itself was formed by merger of Seaboard Air Line Railroad and
Atlantic Coastline Railroad, approved by the ICC in 1963. 11
Merger conditions allegedly violated by Seaboard include ones applied to
the Seaboard Air-Atlantic merger and Seaboard's subsequent acquisition
of control of L&N.
The enforcement bureau took special note that although the ICC told Seaboard to keep access open to competing roads, the Jacksonville Gateway
has been closed to other railroads by allowing deterioration of service
there, switching major yards elsewhere, and in other ways. Seaboard
also has favored the "family lines" over competing carriers in allocating traffic and has restrained the right of industries located on Family
Lines' track to route traffic over competing lines, the bureau said.
Because of Seaboard's alleged "monopoly of certain segments of traffic,
there is no longer a competitive incentive to provide an acceptable
level of service," the enforcement bureau said. It said shippers have
experienced deteriorating Seaboard equipment, worsening track and roadbed, longer shipment times a decline in freight-car availability, higher
rates and poor service in other forms.
Partly because L&N hasn't been maintained as an independent railroad,
the bureau said, the Family Lines have a "significant unfair competitive
advantage" at both ends of the Flon"da-to-Illinois operating area. The
bureau said that either the Evansville, Ind.-Chicago, or the Louisville-
Chicago line should be split off the Seaboard system and that one of its
two Jacksonville-Tampa lines also should be divested.
(Wall Street Journal, April 10)
* * *
FIRST STEP TAKEN ON EAST YARD
WINNIPEG - The first step to clear the way for the massive East Yards
development project was taken in Winnipeg April 6, when an executive
policy committee voted to begin the process of changing the area's land
use designation.
However, the fate of the multi-mi 11 ion-dollar project still rests with
market conditions, say spokesmen for Canadian National Railways and
Great-West Life Assurance Co.
The policy committee voted to ask council to prepare an amendment to the
Great Winnipeg Development Plan to allow the 80-acre railway yards site
to be converted into commercial and residential development.
Before the plan amendment is approved, however, the city or some other
level of government must acquire 35 acres of riverbank parkland which
will be created by the proposed development.
Chief Commissioner D. I. MacDonald told the committee the plan amendment
will allow CNR and Great-West to proceed with plans for the site, which
lies east of Main Street.
(Winnipeg Tribune, April 7)
* * * 12
CANADIAN CARLOADINGS
For 10 Days Ending
March 31, 1978
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
99,238
5,912,700
10,984
10,410
938,865
738
9.5
-  13.7
6.3
Total for Year to
March 31, 1978
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
877,466
55,296,570
93,015
1,938
+   333,816
+     1,373
0.2
+   0.6
+   1.5
U.S. CARLOADINGS
•
For Week Ending
April 1, 1978
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
461,611
17.2 billion
7,788
+    0.8 billion
1.7
+  4.4
Total for Year to
April 1, 1978
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
4,987,096
190.1 billion
589,270
5.5 billion
-  10.6
2.8
Total for Year to
March 25, 1978
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
Piggyback
403,855
33,346
* * *
9.0
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
N.W.T. GET TELEPHONES
OTTAWA - The federal government has signed contracts to pay Bell Canada
and CN Telecommunications about $1.8-million to introduce telephone
service to five communities in the Northwest Territories.
The contracts are the first stage of a five-year, $9-million federal
program to subsidize the improvement of communications links in the
North. Eleven more communities will get telephones by 1980.
(Montreal Gazette, April 7)
* * * 13
SHIPPING
DOWNEY RAPS NEW SEAWAY TOLL
WINNIPEG - A recent agreement between the federal government and the
U.S. to increase St. Lawrence Seaway tolls has been criticized by Manitoba Agriculture Minister Jim Downey.
He charged the provinces were not consulted beforehand and grain producers cannot afford the increase in costs that will result.
Mr. Downey told the Canadian Grains Council annual meeting at the Winnipeg Inn April 4, that toll increases over a three-year period will increase producers' direct costs from just over $l-million to $2-million
annually.
Estimates made by the Manitoba Transportation and Economic Council, indicate grain producers will be paying 22 to 33 cents more to ship each
ton of grain while carrier charges for lake vessels could reach four or
five cents per bushel instead of the one cent a bushel charge originally
envisaged, said Mr. Downey.
At the same time Ottawa's share of grain handling costs will drop by 42
per cent, which is "evidence of the government's indication to shift the
cost burden onto the farmers' shoulders."
He added that he also would like to see the federal government allow
rapeseed meal and oil to move at similar freight rates as raw rapeseed.
* * *
(Winnipeg Tribune, April 5)
UNIFIED PORT SYSTEM PLAN OF CANADIAN GOVERNMENT
NEW YORK - Pierre A. H. Franche, chairman of the National Harbours Board
of Canada, addressing the American Association of Port Authorities at a
luncheon in the Washington hotel in Washington, D.C, March 16, delineated the Canadian government's plans, soon to be implemented by enactment of legislation by the Canadian Parliament, for establishment of a
single, unified Canadian ports system.
The new policy embodied in the pending legislation (the "Canada Ports
Act"), Mr. Franche said, will provide the users of Canada's ports with
more accessible, efficient and equitable treatment in the movement of
goods and persons. The unified ports system is designed, he said, to
foster and promote Canada's national, regional and local trade.
Particulars of the new ports policy and of the new administrative structure for Canadian ports were set forth in an illustrated brochure,
printed in English and French, copies of which were given to all who
attended the luncheon. Titled "A New Ports Policy for Canada" and
published by Transport Canada (the Canadian Ministry of Transport), the
brochure included a foreword by Minister of Transport Otto Lang. 14
"Canada's new ports policy," he wrote, "... at last will unite what has
been a fragmented ports and harbours system into a strong and coordinated body. ... "While the new policy will enable the ports system to meet
the challenges of the future by allowing us to better coordinate port
development, I think the most satisfying aspect of the policy is emphasis
on built-in autonomy for ports."
Reading matter in the brochure includes the following: "...In spite of
refinements made in port administration over the years, Canada's ports
are still governed by more than half a dozen statutes. The result is a
fragmented system which has made it more difficult to meet the challenges of today. ..."
* * *
(Traffic World, March 27)
TOURISM    &    TRAVEL
CP HOTELS TO MANAGE FOURTH RESORT IN BAHAMAS
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMAS - Canadian Pacific Hotels Limited (CP Hotels) of
Toronto, Canada, and the Hotel Corporation of the Bahamas have signed a
long-term agreement under which CP Hotels will manage the government-
owned Lucayan Bay Hotel in Freeport, Grand Bahamas. The agreement,
which takes effect immediately, was announced April 3 by both parties.
The management services to be provided by CP Hotels include the company's marketing and sales network, world-wide reservation system,
purchasing division and technical services.
Located on a peninsula which extends out into Bell Channel Bay, the
Lucayan Bay's 168 guest rooms are situated in two three-story wings
which connect to a central pavilion containing the lobby, reception
area, restaurant and lounge facilities, and boutiques.
The Lucayan Bay marks CP Hotels' fourth venture in the Bahamas. In
November, last year, the company signed an agreement with the Hotel
corporation of the Bahamas to manage the 220-room Balmoral Beach Hotel
on Cable Beach, Nassau, New Providence and the 145-room Lucayan Harbour
Inn and Marina in Freeport, Grand Bahamas.
The agreement also authorized CP Hotels to supervise the remodelling and
re-equipping of the Lucayan Beach Hotel in Freeport, Grand Bahamas. CP
Hotels will be responsible for the management of the hotel when the
property has been renovated and re-opened, later this year.
(CP Hotels News Release, April 3)
* * * 15
HIGHWAY
HIGHWAY DAMAGE BY BIG TRUCKS WORRIES VARIOUS AGENCIES, AND CRACKDOWNS LOOM
NEW YORK - Various federal and state agencies are blaming the truckers
for the fast deterioration of the nation's highways and asserting that
they are falling far short of paying for the damage they inflict.
Signs of the impending crackdown are mounting:
-- THE federal government has threatened to cut off highway-construction
money from 14 states accused of inadequately enforcing truck-weight
laws. Another 12 states have been warned that their enforcement is
marginal.
-- A number of states recently have conducted studies to assess the road
damage done by heavy trucks. Most have determined that trucks should
indeed be paying higher fees to defray repair expenses.
-- THE Department of Transportation is making plans to restrict big
trucks to a limited number of interstate highways -- to be known as
"freight corridors" -- to reduce the number of highway miles needing
repair in the future.
-- SINCE December, the FHA has clamped down on 30 truck routes of 450 to
500 miles each that the agency doubts can be driven in one day without
violating speed limits or FHA restrictions on the number of hours a day
that a driver can be on the road. The FHA says that in addition to
helping enforce the 55-mile-an-hour speed limit, the agency hopes that
its action will reduce the number of trucks on the road and thus road
damage.
Moreover, the increased scrutiny of road damage by trucks is hurting the
industry's efforts to get all states to adopt the federally approved
truck-weight limit of 80,000 pounds.
Federal and state officials also are concerned that too many trucks are
operating above legal weight limits.
Some states are stiffening penalties for overweight vehicles.
Some states are considering raising heavy-vehicle taxes.
Higher taxes and fees could hurt the trucking industry in its successful
battle with the railroads. Trucks continue to carry even-bigger chunks
of the nation's freight each year. Last year, trucks accounted for more
than 40 per cent of the nation's total freight ton-miles, and the industry's share is expected to grow.
"But we'll probably get stung a bit by the road-damage issue," concedes
the marketing vice president of a Midwest truck freight hauler. "The
question is how much it will cost us and how much we'll have to increase
rates.
(Wall Street Journal, April 6)
* * * 16
ECONOMICS
ECONOMY COULD SPLIT CANADA TOO
MONTREAL - Which should come first? Which is the chicken and which the
egg?
The Trudeau administration often seems to be hypnotized by the national
unity issue. But economics may be an equally fertile terrain for it,
not only with regard to the forthcoming elections but from the viewpoint
of keeping the country together.
Opinion polls indicate that Canadians generally are more concerned about
the depressed state of the economy than about the possible separation of
Quebec. Francophone Quebecers themselves rate unemployment and inflation much higher among their personal worries than constitutional change.
The harsh fact is that the Canadian economy is going through a phase of
painful readjustment to both domestic and international conditions. As
long as the Canadian government and public are not prepared to take the
kind of drastic action that has refloated the Japanese economy twice
since World War II, and that is a remote possibility indeed, our economic performance will be unsatisfactory for several years to come.
In a document produced in February and entitled Canada's Economy -- Medium Term Projections And Targets, the federal department of finance estimates that it would require a 7.4-per-cent annual investment growth
rate, a 5.5-per-cent over-all economic growth rate and a 2.2-per-cent
ceiling on increases in real labor incomes to restore reasonable economic conditions within four years. Whatever the federal government is
able to do, we have to look forward to five to six per cent unemployment
and a similar rate of inflation as we enter the 1980s.
The economic concept of the Canadian fathers of Confederation was of a
low cost economy with access to lucrative outside markets, particularly
the United Kingdom and the United States. The pattern has been reversed.
Prime Minister Trudeau has recognized this situation in recent speeches,
including the one to the Economic Club of New York. He also seems to
have understood that the private sector offers the best hope of recovery
from the present doldrums.
Instead of trying to spend itself out of the recession by public works
projects, the federal government is holding the line on spending and
seeking to stimulate the private sector by tax concessions and other
incentives, and by increasing consumer spending. The state is to have a
supplementary, facilitating role, not a primary one.
Canadians are traditionally reluctant to invest their savings in ventures where an element of risk is involved, and outside capital has now
become more wary as well. It has been estimated that Canada needs a
hundred billion dollars in foreign investments in the next 20 years for
resource development projects. 17
If Canadians are to maintain and develop their standard of living as
they obviously desire, federal government policies must be directed toward attracting the necessary domestic and foreign funds to the productive sectors of the economy.
* * *
(Montreal  Gazette, April  7)
PIPELINE
DOUBTS GROW ABOUT PLANNED ALASKA HIGHWAY GAS PIPELINE
CALGARY - Will the Alaska Highway natural gas pipeline actually be
built?
Doubts are being expressed by a steadily growing group of respected and
influential businessmen on both sides of the international boundary over
whether the line will ever be built. They worry that the cost to the
consumer of the gas will be high -- much higher than the cost of domestic gas in the lower 48 states. This would make the Alaska gas uncompetitive, and financing for the pipeline hard to come by, unless the
U.S. Government takes the lid off all gas prices.
The key to a successful underwriting of the pipeline and to ensuring
that exploration for North Slope gas moves beyond the Prudhoe Bay field
appears to be the price soon to be set in the United States for domestic
gas.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, April 7)
* * *
BUSINESS & FINANCE
SMALL INVESTORS MAY MAKE HUGE BELL OFFERING A SUCCESS
MONTREAL - The largest equity issue ever undertaken in Canadian markets
is underway as underwriters for Bell Canada of Montreal have begun offering $175-mi 11 ion of convertible preferred shares of the company.
Strong demand from individual retail investors for the shares appears
likely to make the offering a very  successful money-raising operation,
despite a conspicuous lack of interest from professional investment
managers. It is understood that institutional buyers have placed orders
for only between $40-million and $50-million of the shares. The securities, priced at their par value of $25, will pay a dividend of $1.96.
This produces a dividend yield of 7.84 per cent. However, tax credits
available in connection with income from dividends of Canadian companies
make this yield equivalent to much higher returns earned in the form of
interest on debt securities. In a typical range of tax brackets for
individual investors it can be equivalent to bond yields of between 11.5
and 14 per cent. 18
With this issue Bell will have raised $375-million so far this year.
The company borrowed $200-million (U.S.) in January through an issue of
30-year bonds in the New York market. The yield on the bonds was nine
per cent.
Bell is looking to raise a total of about $450-million in the capital
markets this year, although this could change, depending on the result
of the company's latest application for rate increases.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, April 13)
* * *
HUSKY OIL PREDICTS STRONG EARNINGS
VANCOUVER - Calgary-based Husky Oil Ltd. will continue its profit growth
in 1978, but not at the rapid rate of 1977, James E. Nielson, president,
said after the annual meeting.
The company earlier reported 1977 profit of $42.8-million or $4.06 a
share, a rise of 43 per cent from a year earlier.   Positive factors
that could influence this year's results are a projected increase in
retain sales from the company's 1,180 service stations in six provinces
and territories and 16 western U.S. states.
He is gratified by the positive approach toward the petroleum industry
taken by the federal Government in its recent budget. "We were pleased
with the improved depletion (allowance). They talked about tertiary recovery incentives, but I don't know what they are."
Tertiary recovery -- methods to get oil out of the ground that go beyond
natural flow and pumping water down the well -- is of particular interest to Husky with its heavy oil production around Lloydminster, Sask.,
and its landholding of 1.3-million acres in the area.
Another factor increasing this year's profit could be the Canadian
petroleum price increase set for July 1. But "the greatest leverage we
could have is price improvement in the U.S. market" and that is not
assured. He said active conversations are being held with provincial
and federal governments on Husky's proposal of a joint venture $520-
million heavy crude upgrading plant near Lloydminster.
He told the annual meeting that Husky has proposed formation of a task
force from the parties. This would hammer out differences and narrow
down the objectives and methods that would be pursued in trying to tap
more of Husky's estimated 16-billion barrels of heavy oil in the area.
Husky is still interested in coal projects and could close a coal deal
this year. "That would come before the upgrading plant (in time)."
Husky is putting in a catalytic cracking unit at Prince George that will
allow it to convert production from essentially fuel oil to gasoline and
diesel fuel. The change will increase capacity to 10,000 barrels a day,
and is to be on stream in October this year. The refinery uses B.C.
crude oil and will find its markets locally.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, April 13)
* * * 19
PANCANADIAN PETROLEUM REPORTS INCREASED EARNINGS
CALGARY - PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd. had estimated first-quarter net
earnings of $38.0-million up from $29.2-million or 94 cents a share in
the year-earlier period.
The results were reported by John M. Taylor, president, at the annual
meeting in Calgary. Mr. Taylor said "a continued increase in oil and
gas production is anticipated through 1978."
(Montreal Gazette, April 7)
* * *
JAPANESE CUT PRICE AND QUANTITY IN DEAL WITH MCINTYRE
VANCOUVER - A group of eight major Japanese steelmakers has agreed to
buy 940,000 metric tons of coking coal this year from Mclntyre-Porcupine
Mines Ltd., of Toronto, at a price of $58.50 U.S. a ton.
Nippon Steel Corp. said April 6 in Tokyo that the agreement was reached
shortly after a three-year contract with Mclntyre-Porcupine expired
March 31. Under the previous contract, the Japanese firms had imported
1.5 million tons of coking coal a year.
The $58.50 U.S. per ton price compares with $72.39 Cdn. a ton for the
previous contract. At April 6 rate of exchange, the $58.50 U.S. price
amounts to $65.56 Cdn. or $6.83 less than the price under the old contract.
The 940,000 metric tons figure the Japanese have agreed to take is also
somewhat misleading, according to Wayne Crocker, a mining analyst with
Pemberton Securities Ltd., of Vancouver.
"The contract calls for first deliveries to begin May 1, to go through
to April 30, 1979. So there will be no deliveries made in April," said
Mr. Crocker in an interview April 6.
"The actual tonnage shipped by Mclntyre during the next year could be
down 47 per cent from the volume delivered in 1977. The contract calls
for 940,000 metric tons less 15 per cent at the option of the Japanese
buyer, so that eliminates 141,000 metric tons anyway," he said.
"The original contract called for 1.5-million long-tons per year over a
three-year period.
"One must also keep in mind that the Japanese took 1.2-million tons in
1977, 12 per cent less than contracted for. They were able to do this
because their contract allowed them to take plus or minus five per cent
of the agreed upon tonnage. The Japanese didn't send ships to take the
coal contracted for and this further reduced the total volume they had
contracted to take," said Mr. Crocker.
	 20
Meanwhile, Kaiser Resources Ltd., of Vancouver, declined to comment on
its current negotiations with the Japanese. Under its 15-year contract,
ending in 1985, the price of coal on April 1 this year and April 1,
1980, is to be reviewed.
Until a new agreement is reached, Kaiser has said it will continue to
bill its Japanese customers at $57.23 U.S. a long-ton.
* * *
(Vancouver Province, April 7)
JAPANESE JOIN TAR SANDS GROUP
TORONTO - Canada's national oil company says it has reached a preliminary agreement with a Japanese company to embark on a $300-million project to study tapping oil buried deep in Alberta's Athabasca tar sands.
Petro-Canada, which is operating for a group including Imperial Oil Ltd.
and Canada-Cities Service Ltd., said Japan Oil Sands Co. Primrose Ltd.,
would get a 25 per cent stake in oil sands leases in return for spending
at least $74.8-mil1 ion on a three-phase 15 year pilot project.
The Calgary-based national oil company, which revealed last year that it
was negotiating with the Japanese, will start work on the first 10-well,
five-year phase of its project near Fort McMurray, Alta. as soon as it
signs a final written agreement with the Japanese, a spokesman said.
A second five-year phase, which could start about 1983, would be about
twice the size of the first, Petro-Canada said. The third phase, expected to begin in about 10 years, would take the group into a study of
full-scale production.
In return for spending at least $74.8-million over the next 15 years,
Petro-Canada's Japanese partners will earn a 25 per cent interest in 1.2
million acres of Alberta oil sands leases owned by Petro-Canada, Imperial Oil and Canada-Cities Service. They also will get rights to a deep
recovery in situ process owned by the three companies,
(Toronto Daily Star, April 5)
* * *
INTERPROVINCIAL PIPE IS CONSIDERING DIVERSIFICATION
TORONTO - Although Interprovincial Pipe Line Ltd. expects to be in the
oil transport business for many years to come, some of its cash flow
will be put into diversification, David Weldon, chairman, has told
shareholders at the annual meeting.
"We have not done anything as yet," he said. "This is something that
should be approached cautiously." While investments in non-pipeline
projects are a possibility, he indicated there may still be a need to
participate in a system to get Alaska oil to market.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, April 13)
* * * 'RAILWAY REHABILITATION AND PASSENGER
SERVICES"
by
J.W. Manson
Superintendent, Moose Jaw Division, CP Rail
to
The Moose Jaw Rotary Club
March 20, 1978.
It is always a pleasure to join with you for our weekly
meeting of Rotary Club. It is doubly so today, since I am
being given this opportunity to share with you some
thoughts about a subject that is very important to me —
railroading.
It was suggested that I say something about the branch
line rehabilitation program being carried out this year
with the aid of funds from the Federal Treasury. It was also
suggested that I speak about the passenger services.
The latter is fairly straightforward, so I propose to deal
briefly with it first. The rehabilitation program is, I think,
capable of being misunderstood, so I will deal with it at
somewhat greater length in a few minutes.
A — Passenger Services
I am sure that all of you are aware that Canada's railways
have been losing money on their passenger services for
years. You may not be as aware of the fact that this is
common for railroads around the world nor of the dimensions of the losses incurred.
It is not long since most land transportation of people
occurred on railways. Some of you no doubt travelled by
train when this was still true. It is only since the Second
World War that people shifted in a large way to travel by
air and on the highways. Yet that shift is so complete that
nearly 90 per cent of inter-city travel today is by private
car, and less than two per cent is by train.
At a quick glance, that might suggest that there is a
tremendous potential for trains here. To double the number of rail passengers, trains would have to attract only
one out of every 50 people who now make inter-city trips
by car.
So, why don't the railways go after this business? As far
as CP Rail is concerned, the answer is simple. We
couldn't afford it.
Consider the dimensions of losses incurred in carrying
passengers. The costs of carrying passengers on Cana
dian railways in 1976 were more than $300 million, while
the revenues from those passengers amounted to less
than $90 million. These figures don't include the commuter services — just inter-city passengers.
In other words, fares from inter-city passengers in that
year covered just 28 per cent of the costs of the service
they received.
It is possible that attracting more passengers might have
reduced the loss as expressed on a per-passenger basis,
but it would also likely have increased the loss as
expressed in gross dollars. Merely boosting the number
of passengers would likely boost total losses. Something
much more significant was needed.
The result was the Government's decision to create VIA
Rail Canada to take over all inter-city rail passenger
operations from CN and CP Rail. Another result was a
study conducted by the Canadian Transport Commission
to devise a rationalised system designed to give transcontinental passenger service at a reduced total cost.
The CTC's final plan was evolved after public hearings
and much debate. It moved in the direction of reducing
duplication of services between CN and CP Rail, but not
necessarily all the way. For example, the plan will still
feature two routes across Western Canada — one along
CP Rail's mainline, which goes through Moose Jaw, and
one along the CN mainline through Saskatoon and
Edmonton.
It will be VIA's job to implement that plan and, if it seems
appropriate, to subsequently seek modifications to it. VIA
will be responsible for all the services to passengers. It
plans to obtain equipment from the railroad companies
and contract with us to supply train crews (enginemen
and conductors) and to permit their trains to run on our
tracks.
If there are to be sweeping changes in rail passenger
service to places like Moose Jaw, they will not be
immediately apparent. New equipment will probably not
be seen here for a couple of years at least. There will still be one train a day in each direction. The timetable may be
changed, but we still do not have final decisions on that.
One of VIA's goals is to reduce the deficits incurred in
carrying passengers by rail. We certainly wish them well
in that endeavor. It would be nice to think that deficits
might even be eliminated entirely, but not even the most
enthusiastic boosters of VIA are that optimistic. Consider
a densely populated country like Japan — which moves
so many millions of people by train every day that departures are often only minutes apart — yet even there the
railways lose money on their passenger services.
Theoretically, of course, VIA could increase fares. The
trouble with that is that it would probably drive
passengers away, and that would be in conflict with one of
the goals the VIA people feel will help reduce deficits.
That goal is to increase load factors — in other words, to
fill a larger percentage of seats and berths on each train.
Some people actually favor reducing fares to attract
travellers from competing road and air modes. They tend
to defend that approach with the argument that these
other modes have a greater portion of their basic costs
covered by funds from public treasuries and that
increased subsidies for rail passengers are therefore
justified. It is a complicated issue and it is difficult to
arrive at answers that will seem right to everyone.
So, to sum up — change will come to rail passenger
services, but it will be introduced gradually. In fact, it may
scarcely be felt in Moose Jaw — at least in the short term
— and it is far too early to tell with certainty what the long
term may bring.
In turning to the rehabilitation program, I want to deal with
it in four steps — first of all to clarify some possible areas
of misconception and later to try to give it a perspective.
The program so far authorized by the Federal Government is just the first step toward what is ultimately
needed. It will restore better conditions on branch lines,
but that is all. It does nothing to resolve the basic
problem. Nevertheless it can provide part of a foundation
for the dependable grain-gathering system Western
Canada must continue to have.
greatest. Secondly, many of the lines wh,er,e work is to be
done will only be partially restored by this initial program.
CP Rail has a total of close to 9,000 miles of track in the
three provinces between Ontario and British Columbia.
Some of this trackage is destined for abandonment.
Nearly half of the remainder is mainline or secondary
mainline trackage where the traffic volumes and importance are such that maintenance of the track has always
been sustained to high standards.
Very little traffic other than grain still moves by rail over
the remaining branch-line mileage, and the volumes of
traffic in a number of cases would not pay the costs of
properly maintaining the lines even if the rates for shipping grain were compensatory.
For too many years, the maintenance these lines have
needed has been deferred, and many have deteriorated to
a point where trains must reduce speeds to 10 or 15
miles per hour.
The object of the rehabilitation is to restore conditions
that will permit us to operate trains carrying cars weighing up to 220,000 pounds at speeds up to 30 miles per
hour. In other words, the lines will be restored to conditions that would have prevailed if funds had been available all along to keep them maintained.
Following this restoration, a rehabilitated line should be
able to handle the hundred-ton hopper cars as long as
they aren't too heavily loaded, and trains should be able
to move on them at speeds which will permit a reasonable
degree of efficiency. Higher speeds would be nice, but 30
miles per hour for branch-line trains is acceptable.
However, not all of the mileage that is to get work this year
will be fully rehabilitated. Some sections of track will be
fully restored to the specified standards. Others will have
current conditions improved to varying degrees. CP Rail
has opted for improvements on as many miles as possible
with the available money, manpower and equipment. This
is considered preferable to totally restoring a comparatively limited number of miles.
B - A Start
The 1977-78 program for rehabilitating branch lines in
the Prairie Provinces is not complete in itself. It must be
regarded as the beginning of an undertaking that would
take several years to carry out.
There are a couple of reasons for this. First, the program
does not embrace all the lines needing rehabilitation — it
doesn't necessarily even include those where need is
In other words, some of the lines on which we will be
working this year will need more rehabilitation work if
there are subsequent programs.
There are, of course, other lines where rehabilitation
won't even get a start this year. Included in this category
are those lines whose future remains doubtful even
following the report by the Hall Commission. That report
suggested further study on just about 900 miles of CP
Rail lines to determine which should be retained and
which should be abandoned. That sturdy is being given now by the Prairie Rail Action
Committee which is expected to complete its work within
the next 10 months or so. Presumably it will recommend
that some parts of that 900 miles will go the way of the
858 miles of CP Rail line the Hall Commission recommended for abandonment.
That part which the PRAC recommends for retention will
need rehabilitation in future programs, and the need in
some cases may be even more urgent than on some of
the lines which will get work done this year. Lines selected for inclusion in the initial program were chosen
from among those for which abandonment has been
prohibited until the year 2000.
This initial rehabilitation program allocates $42 million
for equipment and work on CP Rail lines. The cost of
rehabilitating all of the lines that will need it — including
some whose futures are not yet decided — will likely be
considerably more than five times that amount.
C — Restoration Only
The 1978 rehabilitation program will restore reasonable
operating conditions to parts of a number of lines where
conditions have declined over many years. However, that
is all that it will do.
It will not, for example, restore such conditions on all the
branch lines that need it. And it does nothing about the
continuing need for maintenance in future.
Aging in the components of railway track is something
like aging in people. It is inevitable. And it begins from the
moment a component is restored or replaced.
Every new tie, every spike or rail anchor, every yard of
ballast begins to deteriorate the day after it is installed.
Deterioration may be slow at first, but it tends to accelerate — especially when maintenance is deferred.
Let me explain this by speaking about just one component for a moment. Wooden ties are treated with creosote
to help resist the effects of weather, but that only slows
down the effects — it doesn't prevent them. When a tie
begins to decay, it gradually stops performing its function
of supporting the rails and holding them in place.
When one tie becomes defective, these functions become transferred to adjoining ties. They must then
provide double the support and anchoring performance,
and that means a significantly increased rate of
deterioration. In other words, the remaining ties undergo
a much more rapid aging process. And the acceleration of
that aging process increases as still more ties become
defective.
Normal maintenance should provide for replacement of
ties soon after they become defective. If every tenth tie is
defective, it has little effect on operations. If every third tie
is defective, the interests of safety demand that trains
operate at slow speeds. Eventually, when several ties in a
row become defective, it becomes too dangerous to
operate at all. Then we must either replace some ties or
close the line.
Thus, while rehabilitation of lines is important in the short
run, the maintenance of those lines in their restored
condition is important in the longer term. So far, there
have been no decisions about how to look after that long-
term need. The conditions which caused the railways to
defer maintenance on those branch lines in the first place
still exist. In some ways, they may be more acute. Yet
logic dictates that a rehabilitation program should be
followed by an adequate maintenance program if the
maximum benefits from rehabilitation are to be achieved.
I would like to digress a little for just a moment here, and
try to explain a complicating factor in accounting procedures that tends to confuse some of these issues a
little. That factor is the distinction that must be made
between expenses and capital investments.
If a single rail is replaced in a line, that would be
considered a maintenance expense. If every rail is replaced over a particular section, that is similar to buying
new plant or equipment and is considered to be a capital
expenditure.
One reason that such a distinction is important is that the
two kinds of expenditure are treated differently in the
calculations for branch-line subsidies. Expenses are fully
reclaimable for the year in which they are incurred.
Capital spending must be amortized and claimed over a
period of years. Theoretically, the railways should still get
all the costs back through subsidies over a period of
years, but in practice the government agency disallows
some of what CP Rail considers to be part of the real
costs. This has tended to discourage us from doing work
on the branch lines that would be classed as capital
spending.
The amount of work required for the rehabilitation programs would put it into the capital-spending category.
However, by paying the costs in full for the year in which
they are incurred, the Government is treating this spending the way it would treat expenses. It is possible that the
continued maintenance of rehabilitated lines might also
qualify for similar treatment. We don't know that yet.
If it is so, it will mean that the lines could be maintained in
their restored condition, but that will also increase the
amount of the branch-line subsidies paid each year by
the Federal Government. D — The Basic Problem
E — A Base for Building
To keep the rehabilitation program in perspective, one
should remember that it treats a symptom. It does not
treat the basic problem.
To describe the basic problem, I would like to quote from
a statement given to the Hall Commission when it was
beginning its public hearings in the Fall of 1975. Canadian Pacific President FS. Burbidge said:
"The basic problem which I think must be recognized if
the Commission's work is to achieve lasting success is
that there are insufficient revenues to allow a satisfactory
level of service to the Prairie farmer, let alone provide the
additional investment necessary to improve it. Rail revenues are too low.
". . .The revenues from grain transportation do not justify
the investment necessary to maintain and improve the
system, with the consequence that the rail plant used to
serve the grain industry is deteriorating."
That was a true statement two-and-a-half years ago. It is
equally true today. Nothing has been done to reduce the
railways' grain-revenue shortfall, which grows larger
each year as the ravages of inflation widen the gap
between costs and revenues.
The revenue shortfall has been primarily responsible in
the past for deferring of needed maintenance on the lines
which carry little else but grain. Lack of maintenance
resulted — over time — in the deteriorated condition of
many of these lines. The rehabilitation program now
being funded by the Federal Government will partially
restore some of those lines to conditions that prevailed
before the deterioration began. But the situation that
caused that deterioration to occur remains with us, and
the process of deferred maintenance and deterioration
will likely resume again unless that basic revenue problem is tackled.
There are a couple of things that have happened since
1975 which give hope that something may be done. The
Snavely Commission studied the railways' costs of transporting grain and reported to the Government on the
difference between those costs and the revenues the
railways received. Then the Hall Commission recommended that the railways' losses be covered by grants
from the Federal Treasury.
Whether it adopts this recommendation or some other
course of action is up to the Federal Government. The
point I make now is simply that the problem has not yet
been resolved and, until it is resolved, the rehabilitation
program is like taking aspirin for a headache caused by a
brain tumor. The symptom can be relieved for awhile, but
the basic cause will bring it back again if nothing else is
done.
I realize that, by reciting all the things that the rehabilitation program is not, I am in danger of sounding very
negative about the program. If I have created that impression, let me hasten to correct it.
The rehabilitation program is a very positive and very
necessary one. If rehabilitation were not carried out,
deterioration in branch lines would be bound to reach a
point, sooner or later, which would prevent further operations on them. By acting now, that threat to the transportation of Prairie grain is forestalled.
It does more than that. In many cases, restoration of
better conditions will enable faster and more efficient
operations than are possible under current conditions.
This may be of some benefit to the railways. It is certainly
of benefit to grain shippers and, insofar as they share the
costs, to taxpayers.
In fact, rehabilitation is a necessary first step to building
the grain handling and transportation system that the
Prairie Grain Belt will need during the next few decades.
The determination by the Hall Commission of some segments of the rail network that is to form a part of that
system — and now the work of the Prairie Rail Action
Committee in helping decide some other parts of it — are
among some of the other needed steps.
It remains for decisions to be made about extending the
rehabilitation program to the lines and parts of lines that
will not be restored this year. It remains for decisions to
be made about some parts of the network that are to be
retained, and for decisions to commit money to restoring
conditions on those lines. Above all, it remains for decisions to be made about how to finance transportation of
grain in future — decisions about increasing railway
revenues for grain, about who is to pay and how much is
. to be paid.
These are important decisions and there are many
ramifications. They are not to be taken lightly. They
deserve careful thought and warrant serious consideration. But, once they are made, there will be a need for
rehabilitated lines on which to develop tomorrow's grain-
transportation system.
In other words, this year's rehabilitation program is an
important first step towards building the grain transportation system Western Canada wants and needs. If equally
sound programs are subsequently developed to tackle
the more basic problems, they will then have the solid
foundation of a capable branch line network on which to
build. There is still a lot to be done before we get to that
point, but a good start is being made.
Thank you. .
TELEX VANCOUVER, B.C., 13 APRIL 1978
File:  78.ALA.521.M.
P.I. GEORGES
•MONTREAL, .QUE.
LETTER SENT MR J MCPHERSON APRIL 7 AND HAVE ALREADY RECEIVED HIS
DEPOSIT. REGRET LETTER WENT DIRECT TO MCPHERSON WITHOUT COPY TO
YOU. PHOTOSTAT.IN MAIL.    BCC-87
R.R. REID
ASST. MGR., BCCSS '
RRR'BB "    "
Mail Copy Mr. P.I. Georges - Photostat mentioned above is attached.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
r~* BC Coast Steamship Service
Pipr'B" Vancouver. BC   V6C2HJ
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-250/or 665-2 r/J8
CP Rail
■W Holland
....
I ff field
■ -rannger
13 April 1978.
Tile Mo.   78.521.M.
Mr. W.V. Gordon
do CP Air
Grant McConacitle Way
Vancouver AMT, B.C.
Vear Bill:
It was nice to speak to you again on the telephone yesterday.
VMuffi'  ^TU a good-sized cabin with tw *?>?*%*">
charges Vancouver and Prince Rupert, totaling ?***.*»
T am enclosing meratuAe lor Mr. and m. MeWLand will give
loTacMthe beginning 4 May to arrange UckeUng.
VouM very truly,
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
Catering Supt.
Terminal Supt,
Depfi. Analyst.
Office h\gr.
Account.
vtofen^y
£*•■ wfn.   &
/
if BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "S", Vancouver. BC    V6C2R.':
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
■• //Holland
< i • 3<)'-r
iflfteW
• Manager
13 April 1978.
Tile Mo.  234
Mr. S   Mm. L.M. Hoswell
16201 Beach Road
P.O.  Box 8
White Rock, B.C.
Dear Terry & Betty-
Enclosed please llnd one copy ol contract signed by Mr. Holland,
lor your use throughout the coming season.
Sorxy lor the delay In making arrangements lor your jackets, but
Illness In the Purchasing "Department prevented our putting through
the necessary authority.    This has now been done and there should
be no problem.
YouTA very truly,
R.R. RE1V
Asst.  Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
G AC Cojisf Steamship Service
Pier'B".Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel (604) 665 -3135, Telex 04-507684
cp man
'■.'Holland
■13 April 1978.
Tile Mo.  T-78-99-A
Hk. Vavld M.  YuroU
do Triangle Club
Juneau, Alaska 99801.
Vear Mr. YuroU:
Many thanks lor your letter ol 6 April.
It was Interesting to learn that the herring had arrived eafily
In the Juneau area.    A lot ol l^jshermen In this part ol the
world are still looking lor them.
Yes, the "Princess Patricia" Is being readied lor her lixsl
cruise, leaving Vancouver 15 May, and hopelully, we will bring
a lot ol happy passengers Into the Juneau area this year.
We appreciate your thoughtlulness In writing to us and the
time you have taken as well.    We will be happy 11 you will come
down and visit us on board the "Patricia" when she Is In port. ■
Yours very truly,
R.R. HEW
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'88
be.    Purser,  "Princess Patricia"
I am attaching copy ol letter received Irom l-\r. VuroH.
Should he at any time come down to the sliip wlule she Is
In Juneau, It would be appreciated 11 you would kindly
do the necessary.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S. BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B'.Vancouver. BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 nr 665-2503
"W Holland
■ ager
: B Reid
■/ Manager
13 'April 1978.
Tile Mo.  T-78-69
Ms.  Lorelli Embry, Editor
Sunset Travel Review
3055 Wilshlre Boulevard, Suite 660
Los Angeles, Calilornla 90010.
Dear Lorelli--
On Tuesday I had the privilege ol attending the annual Sunset
Magazine luncheon at the Tour Seasons Hotel, and It was good
to see Paul Messer with his usual charm and appeal.
We are most appreciative ol the larewell column In the Travel
Review section ol Sunset's multi-purpose organization, and
thank you lor your Interest In the "Patricia" and the Alaska
scheduling which we lollow, and hopelully, which we may be
able to continue In '79 with a replacement lor the "Patricia."
This, ol course, Is all In the planning stages, and It might
just not work out; however, everyone here Is keeping his
lingers crossed.
Yours very truly,
R.R.  REW
Asst.  Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B". Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04 507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
.' WHolland
a ft Raid
c Manager
73 April 1978.
Tile Mo. T- 78-10
Mr. Morman Kneisel,  President
Kneisel Travel Inc.
345 M.E.  8th Avenue
Portland, Oregon 97232.
Dear Morm:
This will acknowledge receipt oI your letter ol  29 March with
thanks.    It will be most helplul to us In our planning lor the
lutare ol our Alaska Involvement.
At the present time 1 am unable to write to you In an alllrmatlve
manner, but sulllce It to say that we have dellnltely not discounted the possibility ol a continuation with a replacement lor
the "Patricia."     Hopefully news will be available shortly as
to what we are going to be able to do.
I greatly appreciate the time taken In writing to us as you have
done.
With best regards to yoursell and all those whose labours at
Kneisel Travel contribute to the suceesslul lirm that you head.
YouM very truly,
R.R.  REIV
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
be.    Mr.  PA.  Georges, Montreal, Que.
You will be Interested In reading the attached photostat ol
letter Irom Mr.  Morman Kneisel, President, Kneisel Travel Inc.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
\J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135. Telex 04-507684
<W Holland
R Reid
■ Manager ■
CP Bali
13 April 1978.
Tile Mo.   78. 529.S.
Ms. Janet Jones
Vepl.   133, Simpson Sears
6560 Vow Ave.
Burnaby,  B.C.
Dear Ms. Jones•-
This will conlirm receipt ol your telephone call cancelling
dance cruise originally requested by you lor July 29 on board
the "Princess ol Vancouver."
We regret to learn ol the cancellation, but 11 we can be ol
service to you at any time during the summer, please let us
know.
Youm very truly,
R.R.  REIP
Asst.  Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR',B8 TELEX VANCOUVER, B.C., 13 APRIL 1978
H. TUCKER    064-5850
G.M.D. PARTS
LONDON, ONT.
OUR P.O. 8-50012-10089-8 FOR TURBO CHARGERS FOR PR OF VANCOUVER. RETURN TWO .
TURBO CHARGERS NOS. SER 73-K1-1060 MOD 8412598 SER 73-K1-1163 MOD 8412598 AND
OUR P.0.-10090-8 FOR TURBO CHARGERS FOR CARRIER PRINCESS. RETURN TWO TURBO
CHARGERS NOS. SER 72-K1-1008 MOD 8411800 SER 72-K1-1080 MOD 8411800. BORDER
BROKERS TO MAKE NECESSARY PAPERS TODAY.     BCC-85
J.W. MCCOWATT
ASST. SUPT. ENGINEER BCCSS
JWM'BB  :' CPRall
Internal Correspondence
m
Date   VANCOUVER,  April 13,   197$
From   M.W.  Holland
to   The Master
M.V. Trailer Princess
Vancouver, B.C.
File:  T-73-30-71
1
During the loading operation for the 1730 hrs. sailing,
April 7th, 197$, a delivery van owned by Chess Enterprises
was placed aboard the vessel by L. Munro, Johnston
Terminals hostler snd received' damage to the front end
when parked under overhang of a trailer.
Would you please investigate this occurrence and have
loading officer supply a report on this. Specifically
I would like answers to the following questions:
(i)   Did hostler follow: instructions of deckhand
regarding placement?
(ii)  Why was van parked under overhang of trailer?
(iii)  Why did the Officer not file a damage report?
Your prompt attention to this will be appreciated.
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg
')   Form 10P-R
M CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER,  April  13,   197$
From   M.W.  Holland
Jo   Mr. D.C.  Freeman
Regional Manager
Freight Claims,  Pacific
Vancouver,   B.C.
File:  T-78-30-20
Attached you will find my complete file covering alleged
damage to Foremost Foods unit #763 on or about February
12th, 197$.
As you can tell from the correspondence, Mr. Dinsmore,
Production Manager, Foremost Foods Ltd. has agreed to
a 5O/5O settlement of this claim.
Therefore, if you agree with basis for this settlement,
it would be appreciated if you would arrange releases
and voucher in amount of $3&9.48.
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg
■t)   Form 10P-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "Q". Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
'Y/Holland
I R Reid
-■ Manager
CPRall
April 13, 1978
File: T-78-40
Reverend Titus Ludes
Quincy College
Quincy, Illiiiois 623OI
U.S.A.
Dear Reverend Ludes:
I have received your letter of March 31» 1978 concerning your willingness to conduct religious services on our Alaska cruise ship, for
which many thanks.
Unfortunately, we will not be able to comply with your request as we
are only allowed to issue free transportation to tour group leaders or
our own officers travelling on Company business. Reduced rates are
available only to this Company's employees. The Canada Shipping Act
and Canadian Pacific's own regulations prevent us from doing otherwise.
It is also regretted that we cannot make you an offer of employment
on our vessels. We are strictly a coastal operation with a Canadian-
registered vessel and are allowed only to employ Canadian citizens or
landed immigrants.
While we do not have a regular "man of the cloth" employed on a cruise
vessel, we have been most fortunate to date in that almost every voyage
there is a minister or clergyman passenger aboard who is available to
conduct a non-denominational service on a voluntary basis.
I suggest you try one of the larger steamship companies in the Alaska
cruise business, such as Princess Cruises who operate out of Los Angeles,
California, where you may have some success.
I am sorry I cannot be of more assistance in this regard.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
gg CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER,   April  13,   1978
From    A.N.  Cairns
To    Master
"TRAILER  PRINCESS"
File:  T-78-1012-A
Your vessel will be required in service Saturday,
April 15 as follows*
A. Upon completion discharge ex Swartz Bay load
rail for Nanaimo sailing 0500.
B. Upon discharge Nanaimo load construction equipment.and proceed direct New Westminster for
discharge at Construction Agregates Co. slip.
Returning Vancouver for layover as per schedule.
ent.,
ANCrgg
cc:  Chief Engineer, "TRAILER PRINCESS"
Terminal Manager, A3
Mr. E. Robinson, Nanaimo
Sliptender A3
Mr. J.W. McCowatt
Mr. T. King
Form 10P-R BC Cuast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
€P Ball
i-.V Holland
»
: Reid
Vanagsi
April 13,   197$
File:     T-7$-30-6
Mr. W.G. Sutherland
Manager, Rail Division
Seaspan International
Ten Pemberton Avenue
North Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Sutherland:
I have received a claim for damages account Haida Freight-
ways trailer 216 EX Nanaimo, 0520 hours, April 8th, 197$
on Seaspan Doris.  Damage consisted of the bumper bar and
frame at left rear of unit being severed.
Would you please supply any Information you may have that
will assist me in processing this claim*
Yours truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
AJM:gg CPRall VTA
Internal Correspondence Uk3
Date     VANCOUVER,   April  13,   197$
From     A.C.  Cairns
To    Master, "TRAILER PRINCESS"
"CARRIER PRINCESS"
When berthing at either Pier B or C South, you will
spot the ship as far into the corner as possible to
ensure that maximum pier space remains for other
ships or barges.
Marine Superintendent,
B.C.C.S.S.
ACC:gg „
cc: ^r. Ferguson
C.A. Aitken
D. Smith - Casco "Pier B"
.'-.*) Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
m
Date      VANCOUVER,     April  13,   197$
From      M.W. 'Holland
To      Mr. John.M. Ferguson
Terminal Manager, B.C.C.S.S
Vancouver, B.C.
File:  T-7$-30-70
J
3 Fo
rm 102-R
In connection with attached reports would you please
determine extent of damage to our dolly. ,In particular,
I would like to know if you think it can be repaired
or if it should be replaced.
L
M.W. HOLLAND
MANAGER, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER,  April 13,   197$
From     A.J. McPherson
Jo     Ii-ir. B.D. Margetts
General Manager
Coastal Marine Operations
Montreal,   P.Q.
File:  78.ALA.055.STAT
I
Re:  Conversation of last week concerning'calculation
Average Per Passenger Revenue.
Avg. Revenue as at March 9th, 197$ was $$55.19.
Avg. Revenue calculated as at April 11th, 197$ is
$$^•1.26.  Samole population varies from a high
33.45$ of plan total for May 15, 197$ and September
2$th, 197$"sailings to a low of 13.55$ of plan
total for peak season rates. Peak season rates
will require more refinement as standard error \
factor is significant due to small sample population available.
A.J. MCPHERSON,
DEPARTMENTAL ANALYST
AJM: gg
•'•'?) Form 10P-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Dats     VANCOUVER,   April  13,   197$ File:     606
From     M>?,/#  Holland
To    Mr. H.S. Harriman
Manager, Revenue Accounting
CP. Rail
Windsor Station
Montreal, P.O.
f
The following Vancouver/Nanaimo route tickets with
pertinent correspondence attached are being sent
to you for cancellation:
BCS 5^3 - #10112 - One day excursion, return portion,
value $1.00;
BCS 10 - #145553 - Recreation vehicle plus two adult
passengers, value $25.00;
BCS 5x10 - #36168$ - Auto olus two adults, value
$18.00;
All tickets have been voided at this office by
marking word "VOID" on value portion.
M.W. HOLLAND,
MANAGER, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM:gg
13
•3   Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date
From
To
VANCOUVER,   12 April 197$
M.W.  Holland
Mr. P.E. Le Feuvre
Assistant Treasurer, Banking
Montreal
File:  T-7$-l40
Enclosed herewith is advance cheque No. VI2949
issued over emergent voucher No. All60$ Vancouver
Data Centre, account not now required.
Cheque is made out in favour of Mr. J. Letfin.
MANAGER,
ij.C.C.o.o.
cc: W.W, Hocking
L. Rochon, Supervisor - Data Centre
gg) Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
i
Date VANCOUVER, 13 April 1978 File: T-78-39
From M.W. Holland
To O.R. Robison, Vancouver
E. Robinson, Nanaimo
Purser, "Princess of Vancouver"
Miss B.C. Thorn
Sylvia Hendricks, Northland
r
Effective immediately United States funds to be accepted
at 137. premium.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
gP
)Form 102-R 6C Coasf Steamship Service
Pier "B".Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CPRall
I W Holland
iger
RReid
■ Manager
April 13, 1978
File:  127341
Sun Life of Canada
200D -- 338 Broadway Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3C 0T3
Dear Sirs:
Re:  T.P. LEONG, Emp.No. 127341, Audit No. 955,
Location 5062, S.I.N. 701-378-366	
Reference your memorandum of April 4, 1978, concerning the
above mentioned employee.
Enclosed herewith is doctor's further report for your
consideration.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB _.,„.„*.____*—_ . ■   ..,»*..,>.     ,.,-.,— ;..,;...-_,-^ . ■„ .   .-■■-■-.V ,--„:,-,r-■,.--T■»".--»-'q;^;
CPRall
Internal Correspondence
m
Date    VANCOUVER,  April 13,   197$
From    A.N'.   Cairns
To    Master, "TRAILER PRINCESS"
"CARRIER PRINCESS"
W
File:     T-7$-1012-A
T-78-1007-A
When berthing at either Pier B  or C  South,   you will
spot  the  ship  as far into the  corner  as possible to
ensure that maximum pier space remains for other
ships or barges.
ft
t  L/\
Marine St^;eri(hfee7nden^;
B.C.C.S.S.I     /
ANC'GG \
cc: J. Ferg\son
C.A. AitKren
D.  Smith - Casco "Pier B"
[tift)   Form 102-R
 -   ■ CPRall
Data   VANCOUVER,   12 April  1978.
From   EU&.  Reid
j0   Master
"Princess of Vancouver"
File:  78.529.R.
There will be 25 students between the ages of 11 and 12, together
with seven adults, with Mrs. Vikstrom in charge, sailing on your
vessel from Nanaimo 0830 Friday, 14 April to Vancouyer, and returning from Vancouver same day at 2000 en route Nanaimo.
It will be appreciated if you will kindly extend the courtesy of
the Bridge to this group of students from the Rock City School,
and on copy of this letter to Purser and Chief Steward, I am requesting that they arrange a time convenient to yourself for this
purposes.
Your co-operation is appreciated.
)Form 102-R
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
RRR'BB
cc.  Purser
)
Chief Steward)
"Princess of Vancouver"
Will you please arrange for Second Steward on duty departing
Nanaimo Friday morning, 14 April, to arrange as above noted"
to Master.  No other arrangements are requested for this
group..
Chief Engineer} /" 0 V-
Mr. E. Robinson, Nanaimo.
Mr. ®. Robison, Vancouver.
Mr. C.A. Aitken
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
Account.       j' ^-f-   ^^
/ ernal Correspondence
Data   VANCOUVER, 12 April 1978. File:  78.529.W.
From    R-R- R^id
To
Purser
Chief Steward
"Princess of Vancouver"
There will be 60 adult members of the Wellington Junior High School
Band sailing on your vessel 2000,' 21 April, en route Nanaimo.
No special arrangements are requested en route Nanaimo, except
that there will be two baggage dollies of band equipment to be
handled between Vancouver and Nanaimo.  Nanaimo Wharf Ticket
Office will issue tickets, and any meals taken en route Nanaimo
will be at the individual's expense.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
cc.  Master       ) ,lT. .      c „ n
„, . _ „  .   v  Princess of Vancouver
Chief Engineer)
For your information.
Mr. C.A. Aitken - Will you please arrange to have two baggage
dollies available near loading area not later than 1700
hours 21 April, with a suitable top covering should weather
be inclement.  The group intends loading the baggage dollies
with their instruments, then going back uptown for dinner.
Please ensure that baggage dollies are carried on same
sailing as passengers.
Mr. tk  Robison, Vancouver - Please note comments to Mr.
Aitken and ensure dollies do get on the vessel.
Mr. E. Robinson, Nanaimo - Reference telephone conversation date.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
(Form 102-R
¥ W Holland
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)655-3135, Telex04-507684
12 April 1978.
-Reid File No.   176
Manager-
Mr. P.R. Logan, P. Eng.
President
P.R. Logan Engineering Ltd,
119 Brookside Drive
Port Moody, B.C.
V3H 3H5
Dear Mr. Logan:
This.is to acknowledge your letter of 3 April, outlining your
capabilities with respect to providing the BCCS - Northland
Service with your services as a Consulting Engineer.
Please be advised we will retain your letter on our files, and
should an occasion arise where it is considered your services
would be beneficial, we will be most pleased to contact you.
Thank you for the time you have taken to write to us, and
hopefully we will meet in the near future.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver. BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
m Holland
I Reid
Manager
•12 April 1978.
File No. T-78-40
Mr. M.W. Cart
#107, 10633-111
Edmonton, Alta.
T5H 3G1
St.
Dear Mike:
I thank you for your letter dated 25 March and your kind
comments with respect to your experiences in serving aboard
the "Princess Patricia."
As you will appreciate, we all regret that this is to be the
last season in Alaska cruising for the "Princess Patricia,"
but in light of rising operational costs we have no other
choice.  The response from the general public to the fact
that this is the vessel's last season has been -most rewarding,
and she is heavily booked for the coming season.
With respect to your serving on board the "Patricia" this
summer, I have forwarded your letter to Mr. Andre Meijer, our
recently-appointed Catering Superintendent, who will give your
request full consideration.  Mr. Meijer will advise you of
the situation at his earliest convenience.
I thank you for the time you have taken to write us, and hopefully we will see you here on the West Coast soon.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
be.  Mr.  A.  Meijer CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, 12 April 1978.
From  M,w* Holland
j0 Mr. B.D. Margetts
General Manager
Coastal Marine Operations
Vancouver, B.C.
File:  T-504
We have been encountering lengthy delays in effecting banking instructions for the BCCS - Northland Service, due to the restrictions
placed on this office to request the Treasurer directly for new or
revised Treasury instructions.
As you are aware, I worked in this area before joining Coastal
Marine Operations and am fully conversant with the procedures for
implementing new instructions, as well as the importance of adhering to Company policy on such matters.
Accordingly, I request that authority be given to myself as Manager
of the B.C. Coast Steamship Service to initiate instructions in
the future which are required to meet our operations.  I have
spoken with the Treasury Department on this point, and it was
they who suggested that it would be quite acceptable to them for
such requests to be made from this office.  We will, of course,
keep the Northland office fully apprised of any such actions.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
(Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver. BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
Rai
W Holland
.
B Reid
■ Manager
April  12,   1978
File:     168
Credit Card Department
Chevron Canada Limited
1050 West Pender Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Sirs:
Further regarding credit cards in the series 902-983-025
issued this office, will you kindly arrange to forward one
more card marked "B.C.C.S.S. Number 8."
Yours truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH:gg
V "//Holland
: R Raid
it Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B". Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
mm
P^aii
April 12, 1978
File:  168
Imperial Oil Limited
475 West Georgia Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Attention:  Credit Card Department
Dear Sirs:
Further regarding credit cards in the series 291-692-915
issued this office, will you kindly arrange to forward one
more card marked "B.C.C.S.S. Number 8."
Yours truly,
r':r^<
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH:gg
-7 CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, April 12, 1978
From    A.N. Cairns
To    Master
"TRAILER PRINCESS"
Your vessel will be required in service Saturday, April 15
as follows. t
A. Upon completion discharge ex Swartz Bay load rail for
Nanaimo sailing 0500.
B. Upon discharge Nanimo, load construction equipment and
proceed direct New Westminster for discharge at Construction Agregates Co. slip.
Returning Vancouver for layout as per schedule.
S> Form 102-R
Marine  Superintendent,
B.C.C.S.S.
ANC:gg
cc:  Chief Engineer, "TRAILER PRINCESS'
Terminal Manager, A3
Mr. E. Robinson, Nanimo
Sliptender A3
Mr. J.W. McCowatt
Mr. T. King
r
J CPRall
Internal Correspondence
.Date    VANCOUVER, April 12, 1978
From    A.N. Cairns
To   Master
"CARRIER PRINCESS"
"TRAILER PRINCESS"
!.
When berthing at either Pier B or C South, you will place the
ship as far into the corner as possible so maximum space at
the pier is available for other vessels or barges.
Marine Superintendent,
B.C.C.S.S.
ANCrgg
cc:  D. Ferguson
C. Aitken
t) Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date      VANCOUVER, April 12, 1978 File:  360085
From      HJL# Hudson
70      Able Seaman William Davedoff, c/o "PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER"
You are requested to telephone the Office Manager on 665-3146
and arrange an appointment for an interview with Marine Superintendent Mr. A.N. Cairns.
Your prompt response is required.
Office Manager,
B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg
cc: Mr. William Davedoff
595 East 46th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.
Form 102-R CPRall -TPi
Internal Correspondence §^51
Date    VANCOUVER, 12 April 1978 File-  T-78-140
From   h.L. Hudson
To   Mr. P.E. Le Feuvre
Assistant Treasurer, Banking
Montreal
Enclosed herewith is advance cheque No. V12949 issued over
emergent voucher No. A11608 Vancouver Data Centre,,account
not now required.
Cheque is made out in favour of Mr. J. Letfin.
SO Form 102-R
Office Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
HLH:gg
cc:  W.W. Hawkin
L. Rochon, Supervisor - Data Centre
y CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER,   12 April  1978 File:     S-020
From   A.  Meijer
To   Mr. D. Murray
Noroder Kitimat
With reference to my memo of February 21, please forward a
detailed list of provisions purchased for the OCEAN PRINCE
April 6/7.
JjOForm 102-R
Catering Superintendent,
B.C.C.S.S.
AM:gg
m
j BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B". Vancouver. BC    V6C 2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665 2508
I '//Holland
l •:>-)■■'
B Reid
■ ■ '.linage
11 April 191%.
Vile Ho. T-78-10-V
Mr.  James A.   Van AltvoMt
City Manager
City ol Ketchikan
P.O.  Box 7300
Ketchikan, Alaska.
Vear Mr.  Van AltvoMt:
Thank you kindly lor your letter ol conllrmatlon dated 37
March respecting berthing lor the 1978 cruise season ol tlie
"Princess Patricia," wlilch we lind to be correct.
We do not anticipate any changes In the schedule as attached
to your letter.
YouM very truly,
R.R. REW
Asst.  Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
cc.    Mr.  Leonard C.  Laurance
Vice President, Operations
Alaska Pacillc Marine,  Inc.
P.O.  Box 1108
Ketchikan, Alaska 99901.
Tor your Inlormatlon.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Manager
Asst. Mgr.
Marine  Supt.
Supt.  Engr.
"E
Asst. Supt.  Engr,
Catering  Supt.
Account.
^£v    rply\     cV
^fz^hr
-MP- rtktk
23
\S Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, 11 April 1978. File:  T-78-1012-A
From  A.N. Cairns
To  Master
"Trailer Princess"
Your vessel will be required' in Nanaimo service Wednesday, 12
April.
r
"Carrier Princess" will lay over at "B" South for engine and deck
maintenance, resuming service 1730, 12 April.
J
-^er-  A.N. CAIRNS
Marine Superintendent
ANC'BB
cc.  Master, "Carrier Princess"
Chief Engineer, "Carrier Princess"
Chief Engineer, "Trailer Princess"
Terminal Manager, A-3 (2)
Mr. E. Robinson, Nanaimo.
Sliptender, A-3
Mr. J.W. McCowatt
«2)Form 102-R Interna! Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, 11 April 1978. File:  655-C
From    R«R* Reid
j0    Mr. P.I. Georges
Asst. General Manager
Coastal Marine Operations
Montreal, Que.
With reference to "Mercator One" estimate of revenue and expenses,
and in particular the item under the heading of "Management."
The areas covered under this heading are wages for the Alaska Desk,
including Miss Thom, Mrs. Kusch, Mrs. Worden, together with summer
staff; Office Overload as applicable to Alaska handling, usually
mailouts; Mr. Pelley's wages, my own wages, personal expenses Mr.
Pelley and myself, and a percentage of Noreen Cartwright's expenses
where they can be determined.  There are no wages for Noreen included in this amount.
The only other items that can be identified are the telephone
charges for the Alaska telephone, 665-2507 and 2508.
I would suggest, as my total wages are shown in this area, that
this is incorrect and that only a proportion should be shown.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
)Form 102-R CPRall np^j
Internal Correspondence wkji
Date    VANCOUVER, 11 April 1978. File:  T-78-10
From    R.R. Reid
To Mr. P.I. Georges
Asst. General Manager
Coastal Marine Operations
Montreal, Que.
For your information I am attaching photostat of excerpt from
20 March TravelAge East, which you may not have seen and which
will be of interest to you.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
cc.  Mr. B.D. Margetts
Mr. M.W. Holland
Mr. R.D. Pelley
)Form 102-R /Holland
■   i:y-r
riReid
■ Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier B". Vancouver. BC    V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
11 April 1978.
Tile No.   78.ALA.521.G.
Mr. J. L.  Gibson
Gibson BrotheM
1831 Marine Bldg.
355 Burrard St.
Vancouver, B.C.
Vear Mr.  Gibson'-
We have received a request Irom Vr. and Mm.  King, with whom
you are travelling on the June 24 sailing ol the "Princess
Patricia," lor second meal sitting arrangements, Indicating
they desire to be seated with Mm. Gibson and yoursell at a
table lor lour.
As we would like to accommodate the lour ol you at the
Captain's table, would you please advise 11 this Is lilting,
and also 11 the second sitting Is agreeable to Mm. Gibson
and youMell.
Yours very truly,
R.R.  REW
Asst.  Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB CPBall
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, 11 April 1978.
From  R.R. Reid
To Mr. N.J. Nut tall
Supervisor, Administration & Accounting
Public Relations and Advertising
Montreal, Que.
File:  T-78-69
With reference to your letter of 3 April, I am enclpsing copy
of Canada Envelope's bill for $151.59.
With reference to the ticket refund, I am at a loss to explain
how or why this has been directed to your Department, and would
request that you check with the sender, indicating that such
items are not chargeable to advertising.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
RRR'BB
cc. Ms. N. Cartwright
Montreal, Que.
>_f) Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver. BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)065-3135. Telex 04-507684
CPBali
,.HoUand 11 April 1978.
'^id Tile No. T-78-69
Mr. Honsuell Morkl
Exxpo World Travel Discoveries
Melbourne House
1503 - 3rd Avenue
Seattle, Waslilngton 98101.
Dear Mr. Markl-
This will acknowledge receipt ol your Invoice No.   1019 dated
31 March 1978.
We are placing this In tine lor payment Immediately; however,
kindly note that voucher will come Irom our Montreal olllce
and will take a lew weeks lor delivery ol same.
Wi. Reid expects to be In Seattle the beginning ol next week,
and will have a series ol slides lor you at that time.
With best regards,
■R.R.  RE1V
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
be.    Mr. J.G. Shave,  Vancouver.
Attached please llnd above-mentioned Invoice, which we will
be pleased 11 you will place In line lor payment against
Al/A participation.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S. BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex 04-507684
CP Rail
W Holland ■ 11  April  1978.
RRsid Tile No.  476
Manager
Mr. Roy E. James
Dictaphone Corporation Ltd.
1765 West 4th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.
1/6J JM2
Dear Mr. James-
On 27 March 1978 you wrote Mr. B.D. Margetts, General Manager,
Coastal Marine Operations, requesting a meeting to discuss a
new dictaphone concept.
JI you will please contact me at your convenience, we can
arrange a meeting regarding same.
Youm very truly,
R.R. REID
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB TELEX VANCOUVER, B.C., 11 APRIL 1978
File:  0-102 '
P.I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE.
TUG NORTHLAND FURY SUSTAINED ENGINE FAILURE SATURDAY 8 APRIL
CAMPBELL RIVER AREA ENROUTE KITIMAT WITH 2 BARGES IN TOW.
TUG ISLAND COMMANDER CHARTERED AND COMPLETED TOW TO KITIMAT. FURY RETURNED
VANCOUVER MONDAY TOT-TED BY SOUTHBOUND OCEAN PRINCE. REPAIRS PRESENTLY
BEING EFFECTED AND EXPECT NORTHLAND FURY TO PROCEED ON SCHEDULE
TUESDAY 11 APRIL 1800.     BCC-81 .
M.W. HOLLAND
MGR. , BCCSS .       . - - - -'
ANC'BB    - TELEX
VANCOUVER, B.C., 11 APRIL 1978
File:  0-104
D.J. MURRAY  047-84537
KITIMAT, B.C.
NORD(W VAN
BARGE 101 TOWED KITIMAT WITH UNACCEPTABLE LIST WHICH RESULTED
IN POOR TOWING TIMES ENROUTE. MORE CARE IS TO BE EXERCISED IN
STOWING BARGE TO PRECLUDE REPETITION.  ORIGINAL MURRAY COPY NORNAV; VAN
BCC-80
A.N. CAIRNS
MARINE SUPT.
ANC'BB  ' BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B". Vancouver. BC    V6C 2R3
Tet(604)665-3135. Telex04-507634
■   .        c
'■■:■■ Holland
:,-■
V-insger
April 11, 197$
File:  T-7$-30-3$
Johnston Terminals Limited
M.V.A. Claims Department
P.O. Box 5300
Vancouver, B.C. V6B 4b6
Dear Sirs:
During the loading operation for the March 21st, 0400 hours
sailing of the M.V. Princess of Vancouver, a CP. Transport
tractor unit sustained damage to its front-end when Johnston
Terminals hostler, Mr. Larrv Addison, backed a trailer
(JTL 3629) into it.
The report of the ship's officer states that he told the
hostler to hold his position on the ramp but this was ignored (although ackowledged).  Failure to follow explicit
instructions resulted in the subsequent collision with the
other unit on the ramp.
When settlement has been made with CP. Transport, a statement of loss will be forwarded to you for acceptance.
Yours very truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S, .^.~.*;^-u**m±-^.^ ,tM^*-~<>*rt***z-**^*^'^^M^
CPRall WTjd
Internal Correspondence m^
Date    VANCOUVER, B.C. ■■April. 11, 197$
From    J.W. McCowatt
; To    P.B. Sorenson, Second Engineer, Princess of Vancouver
With reference to your overtime claim 2$th March to
: 4th April 197$ inclusive, your employee No. 429776.
The claim for 7 .hours overtime is not concurred with.
This overtime is. therefore disallowed,.
r'H
Eg 3 Form 102-R
J.W. MCCOWATT
ASST. SUPT... ENG..:
.JWMrgg
cc:  Chief Engineer, Princess of Vancouver
W; Kazulin, Accounting
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CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER,   B.C. April 11,   197$
From    J.W. McCowatt
To    N.K. Markan,  Second Engineer,  Princess of Vancouver
With reference to your overtime  claim 25 March to
3rd April 197$ inclusive,  your employee No.   479345.
The  claim for 1$ hours overtime  is not concurred with.
This overtime  is therefore disallowed.
m
J.W. MCCOWATT
ASST. SUPT. ENG.
JWM:gg-
cc:  Chief Engineer, Princess of Vancouver
W. Kazulin, Accounting
k^pPorm 102-R CPRall
m
Date    VANCOUVER, B.C. April 11, 197$
From    J.W. McCowatt
To    J. Crawford, Junior Engineer, Princess of Vancouver
With reference to your overtime claim 29th March to
4th April 197$ inclusive, your employee No. 470263-
The claim for 7 hours overtime is not concurred with,
This overtime is therefore disallowed.
J.W. MCCOWATT
ASST. SUPT. ENG.
JWM:gg  ." ■
cc:  Chief Engineer, Princess of Vancouver
W« Kazulin, Accounting
OForm 102-R
J Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER,   B.C. April 11,   197$
Fmm    J.W.  McCowatt
^°    A.. Omeria,   Junior Engineer,  Princess  of Vancouver
With reference to your overtime claim 2$th March to
3rd April 197$ inclusive, your employee No. 494179»
The  claim for 14 hours  overtime  is not concurred with.
ft
This overtime is therefore disallowed.
m
J.W. MCCOWATT
ASST. SUPT. ENG.
JWM: gg " : .
cc':  Chief Engineer, Princess of Vancouver
W. Kazulin, Accounting
gpForm 102-R Internal Correspondence
m
Date     VANCOUVER, B.C. April 11, 197$
From     J. W. McCowatt
To    A. Rushton, Electrician, Princess of Vancouver
With reference to your overtime claim 30 March to
4 April 197$ inclusive, your employee No. 494122.
The claim for 5 hours overtime is not concurred with,
This overtime is therefore disallowed.
&£)Fonn 102-R
J.W. MCCOWATT
ASST. SUPT. ENG.
JWM:gg
cc:  Chief Engineer, Princess of Vancouver
W. Kazulin, Accounting
/ Infernal Correspondence
Date
From
VANCOUVER, 10 April 1978.
M.W. Holland
i
jQ   W.F. Murray, Esq.
Solicitor
Vancouver, B.C.
Attached please find a Charter Party recently entered into between
Empire Tug Boats Ltd. and McKenzie Barge & Marine Ways Ltd. on the
first part, and Canadian Pacific Limited, CP Rail -rNorthland Service
on the second part.
Would you kindly review the contents of this charter party and ensure that the interests of Canadian Pacific are adequately protected
before we forward the document to the Secretary for registration.
This Charter is part of the overall presentation for equipment requirements which we will be making to Senior Management for the extension of our service into the Kitimat-Prince Rupert area.  In this
regard you will find attached a form we have been asked to execute
covering the charter of the tug "Island Commander" owned by
Island-Sea Marine Ltd. of West Vancouver.  Would you please review
the terms and conditions of hire as outlined on the afterside of
the document and provide us with your comments with respect to
Canadian Pacific's coverage under these terms.  It is realized this
is not the standard Charter Hire document and in this light you
are requested to ensure that our interests are protected.
Your early attention to this is requested, as Mr. Margetts will be
returning to Montreal the latter part of April, at which time he
will be discussing our equipment requirements for future plans,
with Senior Officers.
(Form 102-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
yti
Account. ^TL    „ i__
J CPRall
Internal Correspondence
DatQ     VANCOUVER, 10 April 1978.
From    A.H. Cairns
_  Master
"Northland Fury"
t3
File: 0-100
Management views with concern the circumstances surrounding the
recent fouling of the tow line your vessel.
While it is not my intent to belabour the point as 'to wherein
lies the responsibility for the accident, I do wish to make it
clear that all employees have a responsibility to protect
Company properties and equipment at all times.
In addition, the principles of safe working practices are involved in this situation, as are costs and operational commitments.
It is incumbent upon yourself and those under your jurisdiction,
to give serious consideration to the concerns of Management.
As one step to preclude a repetition of the "walking back" of
the tow line on the winch when the hydraulics are running, the
hand brake on the winch is to be set at all times when the winch
is not being worked - except when under way with tow - so as to
protect the^^Safety dump" feature.
ent
J. Agar, Terminal Manager, BCCS
Mr. J. Lowe, Shop Foreman
Master, "Ocean Prince" II
Chief Engineer, "Northland Fury"
Master, "Ocean Prince" II
Mr. T. King
Northland.
ii
) Form 102-R News Summary
t, News and views on topics of
current interest prepared by Public Relations
and Advertising Department
Sup
Vol. 34 No. 14
Business & Finance
Highway
Labor
16
14
13
■   in
Te?.
Railway
Shipping
Tel ecommun4ea-tiohs
12
U.S. RAILWAY INCOME FOR 1977 AT RECORD LOW
Net income for U.S. railroads dropped to $347-million in 1977, the lowest since the Depression years of the '30s. The industry's rate-of-re-
turn on net investment for the year was 1.28 per cent, compared with
1.53 per cent in 1976.
Page 8
REPORT CITES U.S. RAIL PROBLEMS
A U.S. report says the most troubling problems confronting its railroads are: (1) failure to change with the times, (2) a surplus of
facilities, and (3) maintaining light density lines at too high a
level of activity for the revenues they produce.
Page 7
ARE TRANSCONTINENTAL SYSTEMS THE SALVATION FOR U.S. RAILROADS?
If efforts of regionalized railroad companies to combine to form
nationwide coast-to-coast systems are carried out, will that signal an end of regional railroading in the U.S.? Almost certainly,
say observers, and it will be the salvation of U.S. railroads.
Page 5
TRENDS AND TOPICS
The disaster in West Coast grain handling that has idled ships in
Vancouver for months has fostered a new rumor — that the Wheat
Board may use the port's bulk-handling facilities to store grain.
Page 9
U.S. rail unions and the industry are so far apart on wage demands
for a new contract that a strike is considered possible this summer,
ending nearly a decade of peace between rail unions and companies.
Page 13
"Mechanical Man - 1978" was the subject of a speech by CR. Pike,
Chief Mechanical Officer, CP Rail, to the Toronto Railway Club on
March 27. A copy is appended.
APPENDED: The annual report of Canadian Pacific Ltd., which inadvertently was not included in last week's News Summary.
Canadian Pacific
)h NEWS IN BRIEF
LINK WITH CNCP WILL PUSH UP RATES FOR PHONES: BELL
OTTAWA - Bell Canada will have to increase its rates or get subsidies
from the government if CNCP Telecommunications is allowed to link its
system into the phone company's, says Jean de Grandpre, chairman of
Bell's board. (CP - Montreal Gazette, April 6)
CNCP RESTRUCTURES TELEGRAM SERVICE
TORONTO - CNCP Telecommunications has restructured its telegram service
across Canada. Regional service centres are provided at key locations
for gathering and delivering messages from areas without telegram offices
or where offices are closed during certain periods. The service centres
are in Halifax, for coverage in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince
Edward Island; Quebec City, for service in French at locations across
Canada where CNCP employees do not speak French; Montreal, for coverage
in Quebec province; Toronto, for most of Ontario; Winnipeg, for northwestern Ontario, Manitoba and Saskatchewan; Edmonton, for Alberta, the
Yukon and Northwest Territories; Vancouver, for British Columbia. (CP -
Montreal Star, April 6)
PIPELINE BILL IS PASSED IN COMMONS
OTTAWA - The government's legislation permitting building of the northern gas pipeline was given final approval in the Commons April 4 and was
rushed to the Senate for consideration there. (CP - Montreal Gazette,
April 5)
CP HOTELS TO MANAGE BAHAMIAN RESORT
TORONTO - CP Hotels and Hotel Corp. of the Bahamas have signed a long-
term agreement under which CP Hotels will manage the government-owned
168-room Lucayan Bay Hotel in Freeport, Grand Bahama. (Toronto Globe
and Mail, April 4)
CHARTER AIRLINES REDUCE SUMMER FARES TO EUROPE
OTTAWA - Summer air fares to Europe are being slashed again by Canadian
charter companies. Cuts of between $10 and $50 a person will come into
effect for passengers travelling to Britain and other European countries
from June to mid-October this year. There is now little difference
between fares charged by the major Canadian operators. (Ottawa Journal,
April 1)
TRUCK RATE BOOSTS RANGING TO 7£ PER CENT ARE CLEARED BY ICC
WASHINGTON - The Interstate Commerce Commission said it will allow truck
freight-rate increases ranging up to 1\  per cent. The industry's 10
regional rate-setting groups had proposed boosts of five per cent to 11
per cent.  The higher freight rates would mainly cover rising wages,
the truckers said. But the ICC trimmed the rate increases to a range of
five per cent to 7\  per cent. (Wall Street Journal, April 3) U.S. RAILS TO FILE RATE INCREASE
WASHINGTON - Railroads will file a package of freight rate increases in
early May, designed to be effective in July. The main features call for
a four-per-cent across-the-board general freight rate increase on traffic moving to, from and within the East and the West; a two-per-cent
general increase on freight moving to, from and within the South; and
increases ranging from four to seven per cent on coal and coke. (Information Letter: Association of American Railroads, March 29)
CHARTER FLIGHTS TRAFFIC RISE OF 8.9 PER CENT
MONTREAL - With charter flights leading the way, total air traffic on
the North Atlantic between North American and European cities showed an
8.9-per-cent increase in 1977 to 15 million passengers, compared with
13.8 million in the previous year, according to the International Air
Transport Association. Canadian scheduled and charter passenger traffic
accounted for 2.5 million of the total, up 5.1 per cent over 1976.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, April 4)
REISTRUP TO LEAVE IN AMTRAK DISPUTE
WASHINGTON - Amtrak President Paul Reistrup will not be reappointed as
chief executive of the troubled rail passenger corporation after failing
to reach agreement with his board of directors on a new one-year term.
(Washington Post, March 30)
RAILS CLAIMED SAFER THAN TRUCKS IN TRANSPORTING HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
NEW YORK - The Association of American Railroads has mounted a campaign
to persuade the public that rails are safer than trucks for transporting
hazardous materials. Last year there were more than 14,000 incidents of
trucks releasing dangerous substances on the road, compared with 1,500
involving railroads, and in 1976 and 1977 dangerous cargos in trucks
caused 46 deaths, in contrast to only two on railways. The railroad
association likes to point out that 91 per cent of the accidents involving hazardous material occur on highways and that they account for
75 per cent of the resultant injuries and 80 per cent of the deaths.
(New York Times, March 26)
ALL EYES ON THUNDER BAY IN GRAIN SHIPMENT PROBLEM
WINNIPEG - Large question marks will continue to hang over Canada's
grain-exporting programs for the next while as attention swings from
East and West Coast shipments to the uncertainties at Thunder Bay.
While grain-handling contracts appear settled, the Seafarers' International Union last week began making noises about a Great Lakes' strike
in early June. Also, stocks at Thunder Bay are well below previous
years' levels. (Winnipeg Tribune, April 1)
HARD TIMES HIT MONTREAL HOTELS
MONTREAL - Statistics show that Montreal's hotels had a worse year in 1977 than their counterparts in nine other Canadian cities. The December occupancy rate was 37 per cent. (Toronto Daily Star, April 3)
NORDAIR SALE RUNS INTO STRONG OPPOSITION
MONTREAL - Air Canada faces stormy weather as it seeks approval from the
Canadian Transport Commission to purchase Nordair. Air Canada's intended purchase has run into strong criticism from both Quebec and Ontario,
the Consumers Association of Canada, the Progressive Conservative party,
its main rival CP Air, and Liberal MP Herb Gray, former minister of
consumer affairs. Most of them will come before the transport commission in the next week or later to argue against Air Canada. (Montreal
Star, April 5)
DESIGN FAULTS BEHIND RAIL TANKER EXPLOSIONS
WASHINGTON - For almost a decade now, the national transportation safety
board, an independent federal advisory body with no regulatory authority, has been pointing to fundamental design defects in the jumbo
tankers that time and again have turned routine derailments and minor
switchyard collisions into holocausts. Since 1969, the federal railroad
administration has been wrangling continually but unsuccessfully with
the railroads -- and with the oil, chemical and shipping companies that
actually own most of the nation's tank cars -- over operating regulations and hardware improvements intended to reduce the jumbo cars' sus-
pectibility to puncture, fire and castastrophic explosion. (Montreal
Star, April 5)
TRAVELLING BILLBOARDS
WASHINGTON - Trucks becoming billboards? Some motor freight carriers
apparently have found a new source of revenue. General Advertising,
Columbus, 0., says the messages of three national advertisers began appearing last month on certain tractor-trailer combinations traveling
through 10 U.S. cities. Under a new media concept called "Truck Stoppers," GA reports that "ads" by the U.S. Air Force Reserve, Mushroom
Shoes and the Veterans Administration will be seen on panels mounted on
all sides of the trailers. (Traffic World, March 27)
NEW BOOK ABOUT RAILROADS IN NEW ENGLAND
WASHINGTON - "New England Railroads — Past, Present and Future" is the
title of a 100-page, hardbound book written by Robert Paul Fuller and
published by New England Transportation Research of Portland, Me. The
publisher's address is P.O. Box 3032, Portland, Me. 04104. (Traffic
World, March 27)
REP. HOWARD UNVEILS $65-BILLI0N PLAN FOR HIGHWAY, MASS TRANSIT PROGRAMS
WASHINGTON - Representative James J. Howard (D-N.J.), chairman of the
surface transportation subcommittee of the Public Works and Transportation Committee, has unveiled a four-year, $65-billion highway and mass
transit funding program. The bill authorizes $100-million for fiscal
years 1979-1982 for enforcement of the 55-mile-per-hour speed limit on
the interstate system. (Traffic World, March 27)
* * * RAILWAY
ARE TRANSCONTINENTAL SYSTEMS THE SALVATION FOR U.S. RAILROADS?
ATLANTA, GA. - America's historic pattern of regionalized railroads is
approaching the end, if present plans materialize, and with the death of
such systems may well come the reincarnation of railroads in the U.S.
If efforts of several separate regionalized railroad companies to combine to form nationwide coast-to-coast systems are eventually carried
out, will that signal the virtual end of regional railroading in the
U.S.? Almost certainly, according to rail observers both within and
outside the industry. Some of these same observers view the likelihood
as the only means of salvation for the industry short of complete nationalization. They forecast the end result to be reduction of America's railroad industry from the present 55 companies to only a handful
of that number -- perhaps as few as half a dozen major lines.
The Interstate Commerce Commission presently has before it a request
that, if approved, would link the U.S. virtually from the Atlantic to
Pacific by a single line. The St. Louis and San Francisco Railway and
the Burlington Northern are seeking approval of a plan to form a single
rail line that would directly connect Gulf Coast ports to the northern
Pacific Coast.
Indications are that the ICC soon will be asked to rule on a proposal by
Seaboard Coastline and Southern Pacific to combine into a single link
that would connect the East Coast (Washington to Miami) with the West
Coast (Seattle-San Francisco-Los Angeles).
Where would such single line transcontinental service leave other regional rail carriers? The only logical answer appears to be: scrambling
to form additional East Coast-to-West Coast units to avoid the awful
specter of business failure that already haunts the industry.
Observers now view a series of mergers to come, particularly involving
such industry leaders as Union Pacific, Southern Railway, Norfolk and
Western, Missouri Pacific, the Chessie System and the Santa Fe. Among
these and the previously mentioned four, a gobbling up of most other
regionalized lines would come.
If the predicted mergers do materialize, all of the U.S. would be covered by a few transcontinental systems -- with one notable exception,
the Northeast. The populous area where Conrail now is struggling, with
Federal funding, to take up the slack left by the failure of private
systems would have the only major regional rail carrier in operation.
Any other exceptions would be small "feeder" type lines that would come
to be described as local rather than regional.
Many observers predict that by the turn of the century even Conrail will
have become part of one or more of the few coast-to-coast giants. As initial mergers evolve there can be expected a number of benefits.
Faster, more efficient, lower-cost cargo movement should result, attracting traffic from rail lines not included in early merger activity
that must still go through the more costly, time-consuming process of
transferring from one line to another at gateways. Shippers will take
advantage of improvements and make the switch from truck to rail. Some
observers forecast the eventual return of railroads to the dominant role
in land cargo transportation as more and more solid container trains
move from one coast to the other and points between.
Merged companies should show improved profitability over those not yet
merged. This profitability will attract investors, with the result that
merged lines will have more capital for upgrading existing equipment as
well as the purchase of new, more efficient equipment.
Growth of containerization will continue and at a more rapid pace than
previously. Shippers in greater numbers will look to intermodal for
domestic and overseas movement of products. The benefits of containerized shipping can be expected to be realized by many who presently, for
numerous reasons, view it as not for them.
One industry insider predicts the development of several huge staging
terminals operated on a co-operative basis by the merged rail companies.
For example, a solid train of containers leaves Los Angeles via the
Southern Pacific/Seaboard combo with a number of cars loaded for Gulf
Coast ports. At some point those cars must be switched off to the Frisco/Burlington line. This will be done at a commonly operated staging
terminal where the two lines intersect, according to the observer's
expectations. Quickly those Gulf-bound container cars, or the containers, will become part of a Frisco/Burlington southbound solid train
for the final leg of the cross-country journey.
A mass merging move appears virtually certain in the years to come. The
St. Louis and San Francisco merger with Burlington Northern will overcome
considerable opposition to become reality, most rail observers believe.
That should make the now-being-discussed Southern Pacific-Seaboard
marriage easier. When and if approved, the two resulting lines would
control more than one-fourth of the industry's annual revenue income.
Faced with this and the growth potential it will represent, can other
industry companies stand back and ignore the benefits therefrom?
The so-called Sun Belt states extending from Atlantic to Pacific roughly
comprising the nation's southern third stand to benefit most from present merger expectations. Will the northern two-thirds not contest
this?
Concerned and knowledgeable industry observers say growth of America's
railroads now can only go the transcontinental direction to survive as
a private industry.
(Container News, March, 1978)
* * * REPORT CITES RAIL PROBLEMS
ATLANTA, GA. - The most troubling problems confronting the U.S. railroad
industry are (1) failure to change with the times, (2) a surplus of
facilities and (3) maintaining light density lines at too high a level
of activity for the revenues they produce, according to an advance look
at a Department of Transportation rail policy capital-needs study given
by DOT Secretary Brock Adams.
The study, required by the Railroad Revitalization and Regulatory Reform
Act (4R's Act), reviews the railroad industry's long-range problems and
prospects from three standpoints:
The railroads' capital needs through 1985 and what role the federal government should have in helping industry to meet these needs. The condition of the industry, together with possibilities for improvements. The
effect federal policies toward other modes of transportation may have on
railroads. Mr. Adams said the main message of the study report is the
necessity for change, including: In the way railroads are regulated, so
that all modes are treated the same. In government investment policy
toward competing modes. In the physical structure and configuration of
the rail network.  In the ways railroads operate. Mr. Adams disagrees
sharply with those who claim the railroad transportation era is coming
to an end, and he said the study supports his opinion. "There are
problems," he admits, "but they are problems that can be cured. I think
it is clear that the railroads have proved that they are essential to a
sound transportation system."
* * *
(Container News, March, 1978)
WEAK LINKS MAY DRAG STRONG LINES DOWN — ADAMS
ATLANTA, GA. - "The condition of some marginal carriers is such that,
unless corrected, the entire industry will ultimately suffer," is the
warning given the railroad industry by U.S. Secretary of Transportation
Brock Adams.
While many of the nation's railroads are quite profitable, Mr. Adams
cautioned that "the strong lines will be in danger of being dragged down
by the weak links in the rail chain." Citing the Midwest as the area of
greatest concern at the present, Mr. Adams called for a revision of the
midwestern railroad network that will produce a slimmed-down, more
efficient system.
For the near future of the midwestern lines, Mr. Adams said: "We foresee three possibilities. We can allow bankrupt lines to be shut down.
We can propose a federal takeover. Or, we can use the federal resources
available to assist in a private sector solution by encouraging voluntary actions by the rail managements, state governments, shippers and
labor to consolidate operations and redistribute or eliminate duplicate
or uneconomic track." 8
DOT favors the third possible resolution, Mr. Adams said.
"Inappropriate" is the term used by Mr. Adams to recommendations of a
"Conrailtype" resolution in the Midwest. "There are several reasons why
the formula for rescuing the freight railroads in the Northeast would be
inapproprate in the Midwest," he said. "The economies of the two regions
are different," he said, and the railroad structures also are different,
he noted.
Remedial action to strengthen Midwest railroads should be taken, Mr.
Adams said, because: The underlying markets in the Midwest are strong.
Shippers want better service than they are getting from marginal carriers. As much as 20 per cent of the midwestern track can be excised or
reduced in level without seriously effecting service.
(Container News, March, 1978)
* * *
U.S. RAILWAY INCOME FOR 1977 AT RECORD LOW
WASHINGTON - Net railway operating income for the nation's railroads
dropped to $347-million in 1977, lowest since the Depression years of
the 1930s.
The industry reported that net railway operating income dropped from
$442-million in 1976 to the lowest point since 1932. The AAR also
pointed out that the industry's rate-of-return on net investment for the
year was 1.28 per cent, compared with 1.53 per cent in 1976.
Ordinary income for the railroads increased from $278-million in 1976 to
$284-million last year, the AAR reported, as gains from non-railroad
operations offset the declines in income from rail operations. In terms
of the industry's ordinary income, the Western District showed an increase from $457-million in 1976 to $486-million last year and the South
rose from $218-million to $240-million in 1977. The Eastern District's
deficit increased to $442-million from $397-million in 1976.
Operating revenues for 1977 came to $20.1-billion, up from $18.6-billion
a year earlier, while operating expenses climbed from nearly $15-billion
in 1976 to almost $16.4-bil1 ion last year.
Commenting on the fourth-quarter results, William H. Dempsey, president
of the AAR, said, "these \/ery  inadequate levels of industry earnings are
expected to decline even further during the first quarter as the result
of the coal strike and extreme winter weather.
"In the longer term, future improvements in industry earnings will be
dependent on the return to full coal production, a strong national economy and prompt action by the Interstate Commerce Commission on the industry's request for a modest general rate increase which will be filed
with the Commission in early May," Mr. Dempsey added.
(News Release: Association of American Railroads, March 29)
* * * OTTAWA EYES BULK TERMINALS FOR GRAIN STORAGE
VANCOUVER - The disaster in West Coast grain handling that has idled
ships in the Port of Vancouver for months has fostered a new rumor --
that the Canadian Wheat Board is thinking of using bulk-handling facilities for grain in the port.
Reports from Ottawa March 28 said Transport Minister Otto Lang has hinted the Board may put wheat into bulk terminals, as well as grain elevators, once it gets to the port where grain is estimated to remain bottle-
necked until summer.
The move would be a reversal of a policy which has been followed for
several years, in which the federal Wheat Board does not use any of the
three bulk terminals in Greater Vancouver: Vancouver Wharves, Pacific
Coast Terminals and Neptune Terminals. Those terminals are used mainly
for commodities such as coal, sulphur and potash, and for some "semi-
grain products" as bran and rapeseed, said an official of one of the
terminals.
The federal government has been under considerable pressure from farmers
and opposition MPs since it became apparent that farmers would suffer
this year, perhaps as much as they suffered back in the crop year 1973-
74. Delays that year meant farmers had to pay $17-million in demurrage,
picking up the tab for delays and ship costs.
But officials of the Canadian Wheat Board in Vancouver and Winnipeg said
they knew nothing of any plans to use bulk handling for grain in the
port. "We're not familiar with any statements made by Mr. Lang," said
Brian Stacey of the Winnipeg office.
(Vancouver Sun, March 28)
* * *
DEMURRAGE COSTS RISING, MAY HIT $10- TO $17-MILLI0N
WINNIPEG - The Canadian Wheat Board expects to meet its goals for West
Coast grain exports in March, but will not be able to reduce the large
deficit accumulated in the previous three months.
The threat of enormous demurrage charges against Canadian grain and Canadian farmers continues to mount, say grain officials who are concerned
that the Thunder Bay program has also been jeopardized. Thunder Bay
lake shipping is expected to start within the next few weeks, although
supplies are not expected to reach anticipated levels.
Some grain industry officials expect total demurrage costs to exceed the
1973-74 level of $17-million, the worst year ever for demurrage costs.
They also express concern regarding Canada's overall grain exporting ability for 1978-79, as rail officials say they have no further capacity
to throw into grain movement. 10
Because the West Coast program must be extended to mid-summer to reduce
the estimated 30-million bushel deficit, the Thunder Bay and Eastern
Canada rail movements are expected also to be affected.
(Winnipeg Tribune, March 30)
* * *
GIANT PARK FOR RAIL LANDS IS OPPOSED
TORONTO - A giant downtown park proposed by city planners would hamper
redevelopment of the railway lands south of Union Station, Matthew Kil-
patrick, a member of the Metro Board of Trade, says.
Mr. Kilpatrick told a special meeting of the city planning board March
30 that it would be better to have a series of small parks scattered
throughout the 180 acres of railway lands bounded by the Gardiner Expressway and Bathurst, Front and Yonge Sts. A single large park might
alter the face of the development and restrict potential commercial uses
for the land when the railroad tracks are relocated into a unified line,
he said.
City planners have suggested that the redeveloped lands include a park
adjoining the CN Tower from King St. to the waterfront between John and
Simcoe Sts.
The city's eventual goal is to co-ordinate the transportation uses, free
the land for redevelopment, extend existing streets south into the rail
lands and unite Toronto's downtown with its waterfront.
A brief two weeks ago from CN and CP Rail criticized the planners'
suggestions for not taking into account enough of the railways' needs in
altering the face of the downtown transportation centre. The brief said
it would be difficult to build and landscape over the tracks south of
Union Station or to sink the tracks below ground.
* * *
(Toronto Daily Star, March 30)
CN CONSIDERS STRINGENT DANGEROUS COMMODITIES RULES
TORONTO - CN is considering more stringent rules for carrying dangerous
commodities following railway accidents in the United States, CN president Robert Bandeen said April 1.
Speaking on the CFRB radio program 'Let's Discuss It', Mr. Bandeen said
special precautions such as separate trains would allow for "a degree of
surveillance you wouldn't have on a normal train." Mr. Bandeen had been
asked what the railway is doing to prevent incidents like those in which
U.S. freight trains derailed and people were killed by explosions or
poisonous gas escaping from tanker cars.
Mr. Bandeen said CN main lines are checked at least once and sometimes
two or three times a year with special equipment to detect cracks in 11
rails. Locomotives and freight cars are inspected regularly at major
terminals, he said. "You're still going to have failures," Mr. Bandeen
said. "I don't care how well-run the operation is, there's no point in
fooling ourselves. You're going to have failures."
(Canadian Press, April 3)
* * *
RESHUFFLE PROPOSED TO HELP IMPROVE BCR
VICTORIA - British Columbia Railway has begun to win its long battle for
financial stability, and its drain on provincial revenues could be
eliminated if a major reorganization is approved, company directors
say.
Their comments were appended to the railway's annual report for 1977,
which showed a net loss of $58-million, almost $5-million more than in
the previous year. The railway also reported a year-end deficit of
$256-million, $58-million more than in 1976.
While operating revenues for 1977 were $101-mi 11 ion, a $33-million
increase over 1976, the railway still had an operating loss of $8-
inillion. The operating loss in 1976 was $21-mi 11 ion.
The directors said they are optimistic that reorganization, proposed in
a submission to a Royal Commission into the company's affairs, would
eliminate railway main line operations as a financial drain on the province. One aspect of the reorganization would be a conversion of existing debt to share capital.
"While an operating loss of more than $8-million cannot give rise to any
sense of jubilation," the directors said, "the vast improvement by
comparison with operating losses in excess of $20-million incurred in
each of the 1975 and 1976 fiscal years is a source of real satisfaction
to all concerned."
The Royal Commission, under Justice Lloyd McKenzie, will present its report to the Government some time in May. The commission was told during
its 10-month inquiry, which ended in January, that public investment in
the railway totals almost $l-billion, including $650-million in borrowing from sources such as the Canada Pension Plan and various provincial government funds.
(CP - Toronto Globe and Mail, April 4)
* * *
TRAIN CEREMONY MARKS 90 YEARS OF ISLAND RUN
VICTORIA - A crowd of about 1,000, mainly railway buffs and politicians,
witnessed ceremonies March 29 marking the 90th anniversary of the arrival
of the first passenger train of the E&N Railway in Victoria.
Politicians talked about keeping the Vancouver Island run between Victoria
and Courtenay, while CP Rail wants to abandon the passenger service.
(Vancouver Sun, March 30)
* * * 12
CANADIAN CARLOADINGS
For Week Ending
March 21, 1978
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
65,815
4,013,224
7,515
7,907
673,356
95
- 10.7
- 14.4
1.2
Total for Year to
March 21, 1978
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
778,228
49,383,870
82,031
+     8,472
+  1,272,681
+     2,111
+  1.1
+   2.6
+  2.6
U.S. CARLOADINGS
For Week Ending
March 25, 1978
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
410,946
15.5 billion
70,211
1.3 billion
-  14.6
7.5
Total for Year to
March 25, 1978
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
4,525,198
172.9 billion
581,769
6.2 billion
-  11.4
3.4
Total for Year to
March 18, 1978
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
Piggyback
367,536
+    30,348
+  9.0
*
* *
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
TELECONFERENCING VIEWED WITH CAUTION
OTTAWA - Canadian government officials are viewing "cautiously" the
latest technological revolution in communication, teleconferencing, a
U.S. researcher in the field said March 30.
"The message I get from talking to middle-management officials in government is that they wish things would go a little faster," said Maureen
McNulty, research associate at the Institute for the Future, in California. She is in Ottawa doing a survey of teleconferencing facilities in
the public and private sectors. She said teleconferencing can save
expenses and time lost from travel. Audio equipment costs $18 to $35 a
month to rent and can link as many as 10 locations in one conference.
Video equipment is much more expensive, and is still very much in the
experimental stage.
(Ottawa Journal, March 31)
* * * 13
LABOR
CANADIAN LABOR WANTS TO FLEX MORE POLITICAL MUSCLE
OTTAWA - Wounded by massive layoffs and fearful of federal threats to
labor rights, the 12th annual Canadian Labor Congress convention in Quebec City this week will be in a fighting mood.
One major policy document, like an echo of an old Pierre Trudeau pronouncement, concludes the current economic system doesn't work.
Admitting that a comprehensive industrial strategy would represent a
real intrusion into private economic decision-making powers, the CLC
nevertheless calls for complete corporate disclosure on everything from
productivity and budgets to a firm's outlook. A key policy document
points the finger directly at multi-national firms, accusing them of
destroying supply-and-demand laws through marketing techniques and price
manipulation. Another policy document carefully delineates how more
than $1.5-billion in corporate tax incentives has produced few new jobs
and fattened the well-to-do.
"The answer to the large corporations is not to break them up, but to
make them accountable for their private decisions to a wider public than
just the shareholders and other investors," the CLC explains.
Recognizing its threatened position in an increasingly conservative
marketplace, the CLC is moving away from its former role as an amorphous
and often bickering pressure group toward that of a political force.
The convention's central document says the CLC must redouble organizing
efforts and channel its power base "into electoral support for the New
Democratic Party."
(Montreal Gazette, April 3)
* * *
U.S. MEDIATORS ENTER TALKS BETWEEN RAILROADS, UNIONS
WASHINGTON - For almost four months many railroads have been without a
major source of cargo -- coal -- because of the miners' strike. This
summer the problem may be reversed: Railroaders could strike, leaving
the coal industry without a primary shipping source.
The rail unions are talking tough about contract negotiations which federal mediators entered March 29. A strike could end nearly a decade of
relative labor peace between rail unions and companies.
The dispute is over a variety of issues ranging from wages to train crew
sizes.
"The railroads are taking a hard line," says Fred J. Kroll, president of
the Brotherhood of Railway and Airline Clerks, one of more than a dozen
unions involved in negotiations with the industry. 14
Industry officials would not comment on the negotiations. But Mr. Kroll
said wages are a key to the industry dispute with the seven unions.
The companies are offering three per cent in the first year, two per
cent in the second and three per cent in the third. The unions want 10
per cent, nine per cent and eight per cent, he said.
Meanwhile, talks without mediators are continuing among the industry and
four other unions, including the 175,000-member United Transportation
Union, which represents brakemen, conductors and trainmen. Renewed
industry efforts to cut crew sizes have made that issue, rather than
wages, the key for the UTU.
(Washington Star, March 29)
* * *
MILWAUKEE ROAD GETS LABOR ACCORD ON TRAIN-CREW SIZE
CHICAGO - The Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad said it
reached an agreement with the United Transportation Union covering the
size of train crews.
Under the agreement, the Milwaukee Road will be permitted to operate
road freight and yard trains with one brakeman instead of two. In return, the agreement provides that all road freight conductors, brakemen
and yard switchmen represented by the union will share in the increased
productivity.
Under the arrangement, no employes will lose their jobs and reduction in
train-crew size will be accomplished through attrition. Ultimately, the
company will be able to operate most of its freight trains and yard-
switching assignments with a third fewer train-crew employes. Normal
attrition rates are five per cent to six per cent a year, the company
said.
(The Wall Street Journal, March 24)
* * *
HIGHWAY
CP TRANSPORT MOVES TO NEW TERMINAL
KAML00PS - CP Transport has moved its Kami oops terminal operation to a
new two-acre, $250,000 facility in the city's southwest industrial area.
The new office and warehouse replace the old facility at Mission Flats.
"The new location puts us closer to the hub of Kamloops' growing industrial area where we feel we can be more accessible to our customers,"
said Fred Montie, manager of market development for CP Transport. The
one-storey, steel-concrete structure measures 136 feet by 40 feet, and
features seven loading bays. The company's Kamloops operation provides
daily freight service to and from Calgary and Vancouver, and includes
six pick-up and delivery vehicles and a full-time staff of 10. Address
for the new terminal is 775 Lavall Crescent. The telephone number remains unchanged (372-3382).
(CP'Transport News Release, April 3)
* * * 15
SHIPPING
U.S. STEEL PROTECTION PLAN THREATENS LAKE SHIPPINC-
WASHINGTON - This year's shipping season on the Great Lakes, which
starts this week with the annual opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway,
could turn into an economic calamity.
Behind this dire prediction -- voiced by the Great Lakes maritime industry, labor and the U.S. and Canadian agencies that jointly administer
the Seaway -- is the U.S. treasury department's new program to discourage cheap foreign steel imports.
The maritime interests claim the department's program will divert foreign steel shipments from the Great Lakes to other coasts, thus causing
a loss of Seaway toll collections and maritime jobs. It also could
cause a severe shortage of trans-oceanic vessels that are needed to
carry Midwestern grain overseas.
This is because the treasury department's so-called "trigger price" system, based solely on Japanese steel production and transportation costs,
has made the Great Lakes the most expensive U.S. destination for foreign
steel. The treasury department established different transportation
costs for steel arriving on the East Coast, West Coast, Gulf Coast and
Great Lakes. Because those charges are based on the cost of transporting steel from Japan -- regardless of where the shipment originates --
the lakes have become the costliest port of entry.
Last year, about 85 per cent of the vessels entering the Great Lakes
carried cargoes of foreign steel, mostly of European origin, amounting
to about five million tons. But this year European steel producers will
find it cheaper to ship to ports on the East Coast or the Gulf Coast.
Great Lakes maritime interests are estimating that as many as 80 per
cent of the steel-laden vessels that formerly serviced the Great Lakes
will now be diverted to the other coasts.
(Montreal Gazette, April 4)
* * *
DEAR OTTO: PRINCE RUPERT HAS HEARD IT ALL BEFORE
VANCOUVER - A review of campaign promises by federal politicians during
the past 20 years shows that if all the promises had been kept, Vancouver and Prince Rupert, B.C., probably would have the best-developed
harbors in the world.
The review was triggered by federal Transport Minister Otto Lang's announcement last month that Prince Rupert has been selected as the site
of a new northern superport, and that millions of dollars of mostly private investment will make it a major port for Canadian grain shipments..
Local officials greeted the announcement with enthusiasm, but also noted
that both federal and provincial governments have promised port development in Prince Rupert since before the First World War.
(CP - Montreal Gazette, April 4)
* * * 16
BUSINESS & FINANCE
BUSINESS SYSTEMS 1978 — AN OVERVIEW
NEW YORK - More significant office product introductions have been made
in the last two years than in any comparable period in industrial history.
And with good reason. According to Alan Purchase, a senior industrial
economist at SRI International, a major contract research and management
consulting firm, the office accounts for 40 to 50 per cent of the total
expenses involved in operating a business organization.
As the costs of white collar labor and office space continue to accelerate at the same time that large corporations continue to extend their
reach throughout the globe, executives are increasingly hard pressed to
find the means to consolidate operations in ways that will yield greater
productivity rates and higher dollar savings.,
The explosive growth of the word processing industry since its inception
in the mid-1960s is a telling reflection of these management concerns.
With its ability to capture information for successive automatic revision and output, word processing has done more to free clerical personnel
from repetitive tasks, and thereby streamline information processing,
than any technology since the introduction of the computer.
The direction the industry is taking now (the introduction of options
such as shared logic systems that allow several operators to perform
their individual work simultaneously from one central processor, and
communications features that permit transmission of processed information to remote locations for instance) indicates a general trend in the
entire office environment. That is, the integration of many kinds of
office equipment into a centralized network of communicating business
systems that allows the collection, storage, and dissemination of information with greater speed and cost effectiveness than has been possible in the office of the past.
Equipment advances in almost every area — reprographics, micrographics,
data processing, photocomposition, communications -- reflect this emphasis on systems integration.
Minicomputers and small business computers are gaining widespread acceptance in modern offices because they are able to provide executives
with important information on a timely basis and at highly accessible
prices. Intelligent terminals that operate in an interactive mode (that
is, they are able to send and receive information to and from a central
data base at the exact moment a transaction is made) offer organizations
the flexibility of truly decentralizing their operations. This flexibility is further enhanced by the fact that many such systems are simple
enough to be operated by personnel without extensive data processing
training. 17
Video conferencing, also called tele-conferencing, is an exciting option
that will become more and more feasible within the next few years.
Using closed circuit television that interconnects, via satellite transmission, the major offices of a company, executives will be able to conduct conferences among themselves without ever having to leave their
offices. They will talk with each other's video images while their
conversation is recorded for future reference. Furthermore, high-speed
facsimile systems, tied into the satellite network will allow important
documents to be transmitted in hard copy form to all conferees before,
during, or after the video meeting takes place.
Micropublishing offers another alternative to the rising costs of mail
service. For several years, users have been aware of the valuable service micrographics provided in the compact storage of large volumes of
records for both active and inactive filing. In the future, more organizations will take advantage of micrographics technology for such applications as micropublishing — whereby thousands of pages of lists, catalogs, and other materials can be recorded on a few microfiche and mailed to customers. By eliminating the high costs of paper, as well as the
mailing costs of bulky documents, micropublishing presents an economical
option to many publishing needs.
Lighting in particular is undergoing some major changes, with the design
of new types of fixtures (many of which are movable) that provide ambient
lighting and reduce the number of kilowatts required to illuminate the
workplace.
Lightweight, movable partitions, modular desks and files, and traveling
curtains now make it possible to change the shape of the office at reasonable cost to accommodate new people and equipment as the need for
them arises.
(Dun's Review, March)
* * *
BETTING ON ATLANTIC OIL
NEW YORK - After four years of controversy, law suits and legislative
haggling, the great gamble for oil and natural gas on the East Coast's
outer continental shelf was finally underway last week. By the end of
the summer, six exploratory rigs will be probing the Baltimore Canyon's
ancient sediments in a game of enormous stakes.
For an energy-hungry nation, the potential payoff is significant. The
odds are against finding major quantities of oil and gas. But there is
a 25-per-cent chance, according to the U.S. Geological Survey, that the
drillers will strike up to 1.4 billion barrels of oil and 9.4 trillion
cubic feet of gas -- and maybe more.
(Newsweek, April 3)
* * * 18
JAPANESE AIRPORT RIOTERS MAY HAVE MESSAGE FOR US
CHICAGO - The civic art that is public protest entered a new dimension
last week as no fewer than 6,000 Japanese rioters clashed with no fewer
than 14,000 Japanese police over something of no more consequence than a
new Tokyo airport.
There is a corporate metality which defines "free enterprise" as meaning: "We can do whatever we want." In Japan, it is holy writ. Industrial expansion is the state religion. The fanaticism that brought the
world Pearl Harbor and the Kamikaze is now devoted to the manufacture of
color television sets -- 10 million a year.
Orwell's Big Brother rules Japan, not from the seat of government but
from the corporate board room. Employees of the corporation are assembled each morning to sing the company song and salute the company flag.
They wear corporation-approved clothing and live in corporation housing.
They vacation at corporation resorts. They are educated to better serve
the corporation. Their future role in the corporation (meaning, their
future lives) is decided by rigorous examinations given almost at kindergarten age.
As a consequence of this mass loyalty and national obedience, Japan is
able to out-produce the United States in merchant vessels and nearly
match it in steel and automobile production -- with only half the United
States' population and only five per cent of its land area.
But a hideous price is being paid with the inexorable destruction of all
that was once beautiful in Japan. The air over Tokyo has become such a
foul murk that sacred Mount Fuji is now visible only on postcards. Perhaps, with all their shouts, and rocks and firebombs, the protesters may
actually be trying to tell us something.
(Chicago Tribune - Montreal Gazette, April 1)
* * *
GREAT LAKES PAPER SEES LITTLE OPTIMISM FOR 1978
TORONTO - Prospects for 1978 offer little optimism that the profit achieved in 1977 can be maintained, Great Lakes Paper Co. Ltd. of Thunder
Bay said in its annual report.
The expectation of reasonable strength in newsprint and building product
markets will be countered by continuing weakness in the kraft pulp market. Continuation of the current U.S.-Canadian dollar exchange rate
would provide considerable advantage but costs can be expected to keep
rising, although at lower rates than in the past.
In 1977 the company earned $14.3-million or $3.97 a share, up sharply
from $4.9-million or $1.35 a share in 1976.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, March 30)
* * * 19
SAUDI ARABIA CONTRACT WON BY SUBSIDIARY
MONTREAL - Dominion Bridge Ltd. has announced the company's U.S. subsidiary has won a $6-million contract from the National Diary and Ice
Cream Co. of Alkhobar, Saudi Arabia.
Cherry Burrell of Cedar Rapids, Pa., a unit of Dominion Bridge subsidiary Amca International Corp., will design, furnish, manufacture and install all equipment for an operating dairy to produce milk products, ice
cream, cultured products and fruit juices.
(CP - Toronto Daily Star, April 4)
* * *
NORANDA MINES RAISES STAKE IN TARA THROUGH PURCHASE OF TWO FIRMS
TORONTO - Noranda Mines Ltd. has increased its interest in Tara Exploration and Development Co. Ltd. of Toronto to 41 per cent through its
acquisition of two holding companies that own 8.5 per cent each, according to an insider trading report filed with the Ontario Securities Commission.
Noranda reported that it bought all the shares of Castel Holdings Ltd.
and Solar Holdings Ltd. on Feb. 14. Castel and Solar each owned 551,000
Tara shares. It also reported that its direct holding at Feb. 14 was
1,567,150 shares, a 24-per-cent interest.
The company indicated in its annual report that the acquisition of the
additional interest was in connection with the conversion of $18.3-mill-
ion of loans it made earlier to certain Tara shareholders.
Tara, through a 75-per-cent owned subsidiary, controls the Navan mine in
Ireland, a big producer of zinc and lead. In 1974 Vancouver-based
Cominco Ltd. and a British ally, Charter Consolidated Ltd., tried to win
control of the company in a hard-fought takeover battle. Noranda intervened in the struggle, in alliance with Tara's management.
When the dust cleared, Cominco emerged with a 17-per-cent interest,
Charter with about 11 per cent and Noranda with 20 per cent.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, April 4)
* * *
MACMILLAN BLOEDEL HOPEFUL FOR IMPROVEMENT
VANCOUVER - MacMillan Bloedel Ltd. is "cautiously optimistic" about
prospects for 1978. The company says in its annual report that it
expects lumber markets to weaken, but demand for linerboard and pulp to
strengthen.
The company says reduction of services and staff resulting from a new
budget process introduced at the head office last year is expected to
save about $5-million in 1978. The cost-effective process is being
extended to all operations. 20
Macmillan Bloedel says that in 1977 losses in the transportation division were $10.9-million before tax recoveries, down from a loss of
$22.8-mi11 ion in 1976. The improvement was due to reducing the size of
the fleet to the level required to handle about 50 per cent of the
company's own ocean-shipping requirements.
Transportation losses are expected to continue until freight markets improve, but they should decline gradually with further changes in fleet
size and composition, the company says.
Despite a writedown of its investment in La Cellulose d'Aquitaine, a
French pulp producer in which it has a 40-per-cent equity interest, the
company says it is continuing to participate in discussions that "might
lead to a restructuring of the capital and management" of the French
concern.
MacMillan Bloedel's 1977 net income of $38.4-million or $1.65 a share
included a $22.3-million debit for a possible writedown of interest in
La Cellulose d'Aquitaine, which it said had been hurt by weak pulp
prices in western Europe and other factors.
* * *
(Montreal Gazette, April 5)
DOMINION BRIDGE TAX FIGHT LOOMS
MONTREAL - Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd. of Montreal and the federal Government's tax authorities are preparing to do battle again over tax reassessments involving the company's Bahamian subsidiary, Span International
Ltd., according to Dominion Bridge's annual report.
Dominion Bridge lost the original fight when the Federal Court of Appeal
last November upheld a lower court ruling and the contention of tax officials that the company was trying to avoid tax by purchasing foreign
steel at an inflated price in the years 1967 through 1969 from a then
wholly-owned Bahamian subsidiary.
In a letter dated Jan. 10, 1978, the tax authorities advised Dominion
Bridge that they intend to proceed with reassessments for taxation for
the three subsequent years, 1970 through 1972. The tax department did
not indicate the amount of the reassessment.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, April 5)
* * *
HEAD OFFICES 'NO EXCEPTION'
MONTREAL - There will be no further discussion with Quebec businessmen
on possible exemption for head offices from provisions of Bill 101, says
Raymond Gosselin, president of the Regie de langue frangaise. Mr.
Gosselin said April 4 that although the provincial language legislation
provides for "special agreements" regarding methods used to implement
the language laws, firms with head offices in Quebec are nevertheless
legally bound to fulfill Francization obligations. (Montreal Star,
April 5) "MECHANICAL MAN - 1978"
An Address by
CR. Pike
Chief Mechanical Officer
CP Rail
to
Toronto Railway Club
March 27, 1978
About two weeks before I sat down to give serious
consideration to what I might say tonight, your secretary
asked me for a subject title so that he could get his
meeting notices prepared. At that time, I really did not
know what subject I could choose that would be of
interest to you. Firstly, for many of you who know my
background, you know that I can't speak with authority on
the fine technical detail that goes into the design or
maintenance of a modern diesel locomotive or even a
100-ton freight car. In fact, as I seem to have made a
career in Canadian Pacific of running out of places in
which to work, I am not sure that I can even now advise
anyone how to maintain track, which is the area where the
greatest proportion of my years of service have been
spent. I did however have a feeling that I could, from a
background that is different than most Chief Mechanical
Officers, offer a view of the Mechanical Department of CP
Rail — that is, our role, our objectives, what we are doing
now, what we might be going to do — and in the process, it
could hopefully provide a kind of word picture of
Mechanical Man — 1978. Hence, the title of my address.
Firstly, all of us in the transportation industry are engaged
in a process I'm going to call — "Business Dynamics".
These dynamics involve the fluctuations and variations
that develop in on-going day-to-day business operations
that are most often difficult to foresee or to forecast. An
important aspect of our industry's success is our ability
to manage these dynamics in a profitable way. We are all
concerned with efficient asset management in the
context of business dynamics. The posture of the
Mechanical Department as it relates to the business of
railroad freight transportation, in the present day's
climate of business, is that we are primarily concerned
with maximizing the utilization of resources.
CP Rail operates about 17,000 miles of main track, We
have about 1,200 locomotives and some 70,000 revenue
freight cars along with some 5,000 service cars which we
use to transport just over 1V* billion gross revenue dollars
worth of freight on an annual basis. There are about
11,000 mechanical function positions within CP Rail
which are devoted to designing, selecting, constructing,
and maintaining this equipment as well as developing
train handling procedures for its use. Taken all together,
these are the assets we try to manage efficiently.
The Mechanical Department has a proud history. Through
technological progress, innovation, ingenuity, and resourcefulness, this foundation of rolling stock equipment and
people have developed and grown to encourage traffic
expansion in its many facets. Very often we have been
able to counter labor intensive conditions with technological change but with escalating prices and higher
borrowing costs this alternative has a narrowing scope
and is becoming less attractive. A principal aim at this
juncture of our growth is to provide improved management systems and capabilities to maximize our resource
utilization. That is, to seek the basis for doing what we do,
in order to find ways to do it better.
How will this aim be recognized? Firstly, let's digress to
another question — that is, what is the objective of the
Mechanical Department? While this may sound naive, the
answer sets the context for mechanical department
operations and our relationship to the business of
railroad transportation. Simply stated, the objective of CP
Rail's Mechanical Department is to provide cost-effective
rolling stock equipment to generate increased net freight
; revenues. All functions within the Department must be
subordinate to and must support this objective.
The first of these functions is in the area of equipment
design and selection. The basic issues of equipment
design relate to sales, transportation efficiency, and
safety. While we have not built our own equipment for
several years, our equipment design effort must be
comprehensive to translate factors of business requirements, technology, operating demands and other costs
into revenue producing hardware. The impetus for equipment selection and purchases is, of course, the levels
and types of transportation services provided by the
Company. At the time of equipment selection we "cast in
concrete" the potential for managing the acquired asset.
The most effective type of locomotive chosen for mainline
unit train service may be severely limited for use in other
parts of the system due to its configuration or the track
characteristic which is required to operate it in safety.
Likewise, in specifying car design, particularly those cars
equipped with special loading configuration or protection
devices, the car style will determine whether it has
narrow use or whether broader utilization is possible.
Thus, design specifications determine future flexibility or
restraint in the management of the acquired asset. While traffic development, volume, and mix constrain
equipment design in relation to gross revenue production,
net income is heavily dependent upon the transportation
efficiency and performance reliability of the equipment.
The incidence of non-scheduled repairs to cars and
locomotives on CP Rail is far out of proportion to what we
require to perform really cost-effective transportation. As
an example, I pause only to note that, on CP Rail we are in
the habit of undertaking about 350,000 light repairs to
freight cars per year. If we consider that our effective
freight car fleet is composed of 70,000 cars, then we can
draw the conclusion that each car is light repaired, on
average, 5 times a year. When you think of the car-day
loss which is attendant in inspecting a car, switching it to
a repair track, repairing it, switching it back to a train yard
and finally inspecting it in a train for departure, you can
see such a habit seriously detracts from the utilization of
the car — and thus, its ability to generate net freight
revenues.
Another aspect of equipment design and selection
affecting transportation efficiency relates to the development of new types of equipment and components to
achieve the inherent advantages of railroad transportation. We need to use equipment performance history, cost
data, results of testing, and other elements to plan for
better equipment design. As a basic example, net to tare
improvement looks toward the transportation efficiency
we require and believe is possible. As a further example,
the railway's inherent advantage in fuel economy with
respect to other forms of transportation: a recent U.S.
report indicates their railroads transport 37% of the
nation's goods while consuming only 9% of its energy.
That advantage should be exploited through innovative
design improvements.
Finally, equipment design and selection is also directed
by safety considerations. Much of the energy expenditure
in moving trains is diverted to inefficient processes
resulting in fatigue, wear and excessive forces. The
industry track/train dynamics program as well as our own
is designed to study the energy transfers involved in
these processes. Basic designs of components and
equipment must be made more efficient to give predictable performance and to minimize failures in service.
Thus, equipment design and selection is a critical first
step in our attempt to manage our resources. As more
efficiency is developed in this area we see greater
opportunity for growth, in addition to having better control
of our revenue dollars.
I seem to have spent quite a bit of time emphasizing the
importance of equipment design and selection to the
exclusion of two other functions which are of course
equally important. These are the maintenance of the
equipment in the field, and the manner in which the
equipment is  used.  I don't intend to go into these
functional areas in particular detail except to say that the
field experience is the measure of design.efficiency.
Firstly, there is the introduction of a new design which
requires study and evaluation, and inherently, what I will
call "Field Engineering". Field Engineering encompasses
all those initial adjustments which are always necessary
to successfully translate the theoretical drawing-board
design to practical and effective service in the field. But
then, also, there is the longer-term experience which
requires recording, measurement, analysis and evaluation to engender future design improvements and to
develop the maintenance policies and philosophies
which will provide optimum service. Very often apparent
deficiencies are caused by an unforeseen method of use,
and the development of corrective measures require the
same kind of recording, analysis, and evaluation to
determine new techniques of use.
Some of the philosophies which are currently under
development within CP Rail's mechanical function today
are worthy of relating. We have three main shops located
in Montreal, Winnipeg, and Calgary, in which staff varies
from 1200 to 2500 at each location, and which are
devoted to major overhauls of locomotives and freight
cars and to the manufacture or rehabilitation and/or
improvement of the components that go to make up such
overhaul. Each of these shops is a pretty significant
business undertaking in its own right.
Throughout our field organization there are four main
locomotive shops devoted to the running maintenance
and servicing of our locomotive fleet which are located in
Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, and Calgary.
There are also some seven main facilities for the running
repair of freight cars located at Montreal, Toronto,
Windsor, Sudbury, Winnipeg, Calgary, and Coquitlam, and
one under construction at Thunder Bay which will come
into operation this spring. Obviously, the extent of
mainshop overhaul and its frequency fundamentally
affects the extent of running maintenance which must be
performed at the line points.
If we do a more thorough rebuild and repeat it in a very
short time-interval, on a locomotive for instance, then it
should require correspondingly less running maintenance when in line service operation. The watershed
between how thorough the rebuild should be, and how
frequent it should be, compared to the work load and
demands which are placed on the running shops to gain
maximum utilization of the equipment is an area of great
concern. Only the closest scrutiny of service record,
reliability and unit cost of the various types of repairs can
possibly give order to the extent of work performed in
each location. In the context of business dynamics, we
must further strive to match capability in response to
varying market requirements. In developing this watershed of main shop/running shop
"maintenance we must have some system which accounts
for labor productivity, material usage, cost and quality of
work performed in each shop. Over the past two years CP
Rail has introduced extensive labor productivity measurement and control systems for many of our mechanical functions. These systems essentially give first-line
supervision a time reference to their work to enable them
to gauge the labor efficiency of work output, to relate
staffing to work load, and to bring under close examination the support systems on which individual tradesmen
are dependent for the efficient prosecution of their effort.
There is a definite and continuing relationship between
labor productivity, material usage, cost and quality. For
instance, labor productivity can easily be improved by
substituting new material component replacement on a
broad basis. If a repair job consists only of replacement of
defective components with new material, obviously the
labor portion of the input is going to decrease and the
productivity is going to increase. There is therefore a
need for good cost control and recording to make sure
that established targets for labor productivity are real and
that material usage — replacement or repair — is proper
for the task and service being performed.
The fourth leg of the table which supports balanced
equipment maintenance management is quality.
Obviously, if quality is allowed to deteriorate, pretty
impressive gains can be established in improved labor
productivity, improved material usage, and reduced costs.
There is, however, a quality which is measured by
reliability in service. If required reliability is not achieved,
the gains obtained in these other areas are really not
effective measures of efficiency.
Along the road then, in looking at the blending of all these
management indicators into one effective management
system, is a requirement to study current maintenance
philosophies and consider the adoption of new ones. We
have recently conducted a review of our maintenance
philosophy for locomotives which included a look at the
practices followed in other parts of the transportation
industry. We looked at practices in vogue in the trucking
industry, in urban transportation systems such as subways and metros, and at the aircraft industry. As you
know, our system of locomotive maintenance is heavily
oriented to datal inspections which have grown out of the
needs demonstrated by operating failures and a kind of
amalgam of apparent maintenance requirements and
manufacturers' recommendations. The datal system says
we shall inspect and/or replace critical elements of a
locomotive on any one of a multiple of fixed time periods.
The time periods vary according to the nature of service.
In maintenance engineering terminology it is called
establishing "hard-time" maintenance tasks. We also
undertake repair work based on what we call "on-
condition" checks. The best example of an on-condition
check is where a wheel gauge is used to measure wheel
profile and where the gauge "go's" so a maintenance
task of reprofile or replacement is indicated. A third order
of maintenance task is determined by a performance
history system which would indicate to us how reliable a
particular part of a locomotive is required to be and the
establishment of a failure time by which a critical
component must be changed or whether such part can
be allowed to fail before replacement is required. The
maintenance engineer calls this "reliability monitoring".
Ninety percent of CP Rail's maintenance tasks for
locomotives are determined by hard-time designation.
The aircraft industry, on the other hand, has developed
systems whereby they have moved the requirement for
undertaking maintenance from hard-time through to the
higher grades of on-condition and reliability monitoring.
To our amazement we found the Boeing 747 manual for
maintenance includes no hard-time tasks but is entirely
based on on-condition checks and reliability-monitored
replacements. Think about that, the next time you fly. This
would indicate that the fundamental principles of locomotive maintenance on railroads could be subject to some
pretty extensive review and an alteration of maintenance
philosophy. Any change, however, is going to place
extreme necessity on our ability to record maintenance
and service events, their correction, their manner of
correction, and in-depth analysis to review cause and
effect, thereby providing the confidence to embark on a
new system of improved maintenance efficiency.
Let us turn, then, from the consideration of maintenance
philosophies into the more concrete examination of a few
examples of what we are accomplishing today.
Something I never had the opportunity to do as a general
operating officer with CP Rail was to visit a locomotive
plant engaged in the manufacture of the current generation of road diesel locomotives. I have recently had this
opportunity and want to tell you how impressed I was with
the sophistication of diesel-electric locomotives from the
first units which appeared on our lines in the early
1950's. The techniques in use, the evolution of change
which has been wrought by the manufacturing industry in
response to new service requirements as well as to the
technological improvement of the species, has been
nothing short of phenomenal. The modern diesel locomotive, being produced for our use to-day, contains very little
of that which was contained in those early locomotives
which were being manufactured 25 years ago, and the
end is not in sight. The challenge of energy conservation
and the rapid diminution of supplies of petroleum fuel
resources on which this equipment is dependent has
given rise to a whole new thrust of determining more fuel-
efficiency responsive systems as well as an exploration
of alternate fuels. The reason is clear, if current forecasts
which indicate the probable complete dissipation of
petroleum resources within the next 25 years are to be
believed, and if we are purchasing diesel locomotives
today, burning petroleum fuels and with a life expectancy \
of 25 years, then obviously we must begin to think of
means by which we can extend the 25-year projected life
of fuel resources or find an alternate fuel by which to
power our locomotives. Another important development
study being undertaken is oriented to our current most
frequent locomotive reliability problem — the D.C. Traction Motor — where we intend t: pursue development of
an A.C. drive.
Secondly, as many of you know, I was away from the
railway for a period of some 4 years while the robot train
concept of operation was developed in Western Canada.
Shortly after returning to the railway, as Chief Mechanical Officer, I had the opportunity to track motor our main
line between Calgary and Vancouver. The first exposure I
had to the robot train coal movement was when we met a
train in the vicinity of Chase, British Columbia and it was
one of the most thrilling experiences I have had as a
railroader over some 30 years of service. As you know,
our robot train operation consists of train sets of 106
bathtub gondola cars each carrying 103 tons of coal,
powered by SD-40-2 3000-hp locomotive units arranged
in a varying configuration with three headend units, up to
four mid-train remotely-controlled units located about
midpoint, and assisted by four pusher units placed 25
cars in from the tail-end where heavy gradients in the
loaded direction are encountered. The first thing I was
impressed with on meeting the train at Chase was it was
big and it was quiet. The silhouette of a 100-ton bathtub
gondola viewed from trackside is really quite a sight and
to look at the cars from overhead, particularly when
empty, you get the impression one car alone would make
a pretty good backyard swimming pool. Secondly, the
train was quiet. It is a permanently coupled train with
rotary couplers which enables the use of stiff draft gear
with a minimum slack so there is little of the usual motion
working through the train and, in addition, each car has
truck-mounted braking assemblies of the Wabcopac-
type which means a lack of the usual long brake rigging
vibrating noises which are heard with conventional
equipment. Thirdly, standing trackside performing train
inspection and encountering four locomotives in mid-
train throttling up under power, which is not expected in
conventional trains, really gives an overwhelming sense
of power and movement. Fourthly, the thought that nine
sets of such trains devoted to a single commodity
movement each handling about 10,000 tons in the loaded
direction means that some 40 to 50,000 tons of coal are
on the move at all times. The concept of a railroad being a
pipeline for the transportation of goods finds no more
obvious expression anywhere. These trains are moving
over 750 miles between mine site and shiploading point
with a round trip load-to-unload-to-retum to mine time
configuration under 90 hours, which is a tribute to the
ingenuity of their design, the level of expertise required
for their operation, and the reliability of their maintenance
to enable such an achievement.
The third area where an impressive accomplishment is
being achieved is in that of train brake systems. &om
intimate exposure to systems which are current and are
being developed on Canadian railroads I can unequivocally state that Canadian railroads are more
qualified and more expert in the maintenance and
operation of train braking systems than any railroad in
North America. This hasn't occurred because we are
smarter than everybody else. It has occurred because we
have successfully met the environmental requirements of
train operation which are more demanding in Canada
than they are anywhere else on the continent. The
response to these environmental conditions has been to
develop equipment use and techniques which are in the
forefront of experience of most other railroads. Historically, train braking systems have been qualified by
charging a train brake line to a desired level of pressure,
sealing off the brake pipe and then measuring its leakage
over a given time-period. This is an effective system of
checking train lines for leakage and has been with us
since the days of steam operation. Due to the effects of
severe cold weather we all know how the ability of the
brake pipe to retain air deteriorates. As a result a new
locomotive feature for maintaining brake pipe pressure
while in operation was introduced to locomotives in the
late 1950's. This was the pressure-maintaining feature of
the modern diesel locomotive. There was an anomaly
therefore introduced whereby the standing leakage test
with the train brake pipe sealed off was not a true
measure of actual operating conditions which were in
effect once the train was moving and utilizing the
locomotive pressure-maintaining feature. We have been
faced, therefore, with deteriorating train performance in
terms of fewer numbers of cars which could be handled
in extremely cold weather due to a method of train brake
qualification which is based on a standing condition.
Extensive testing has been undertaken to find an
improved method of train brake qualification which would
more closely approximate actual operating conditions.
The method developed has been to use the engine brake
pipe flow meter which measures air flow to the brake pipe
and which can be calibrated to indicate whether a rate of
flow is excessive. About a year ago we were successful in
having the Railway Transport Committee accept for
extensive field testing a number of supplementary air
brake rules which qualify train braking systems by air
flow. We now have reports on some 29,000 trains
qualified by this method and operated on CP Rail without
untoward incident, which has given us great confidence
to recommend this improved method of train brake
qualification. There is no secret in where we are heading
with this procedure. We are attempting to fully utilize
equipment capability to improve train-braking-system
testing and qualification procedures which will enable us
to operate longer trains in cold weather assured of
complete safety of train operation. Upon approval of the
airflow method of qualification for trains with locomotives
equipped with pressure-maintaining, we intend to pro- ceed to the utilization of mid-train air supplies to further
improve our train operation and service to our customers
jDy as«uring them of more reliable rail transportation.
Before leaving this system I should note that the air flow
method of train-brake qualifications has three essential
elements. They are, that the air flow as measured by the
brake pipe flow meter in the locomotive on qualification,
must be below the qualifying mark applied to the face of
the BPFM and a pressure in the brake pipe at the caboose
must reach minimum prescribed levels for that train so
that the gradient throughout the train does not exceed 15
lb. pressure differential between locomotive feed valve
setting and the caboose, but in addition on the No. 1 test
the train must be inspected by qualified personnel
throughout its length and any audible air leaks repaired.
In this rather rambling dissertation concerning CP Rail's
Mechanical Department, its maintenance philosophies,
its objectives, and some of its outstanding accomplishments, I have tried to set the stage for saying what kind of
being is Mechanical Man — 1978. Firstly, he is a man who
carries a proud heritage of being technically qualified in
the repair of the equipment which is his main responsibility. However, today he is required to be much more
than that. If the result of his labor is to achieve cost-
effective rolling stock equipment to generate freight
revenues, he must know far more than the simple "how"
to repair equipment. He must know what the proper task
is which he is required to deal with at a particular time,
the proper time for dealing with it, and the proper extent of
that task. The tremendous challenge is for technically
qualified Mr. Mechanical Man — 1978, to be responsive
to all those factors which bear on his work which finally
come down to the realization of his principal objective.
How are we going to equip Mechanical Man — 1978 to
perform this task? Well, that depends on how successful
we are in designing the management information systems
which will provide him with the background of evidence
necessary to indicate that the task is the proper one and
the time for performing it is right. The development of
such systems are long and frustrating things to achieve.
They require the organization to examine in the minutest
detail all the things that they do, by the thousands or by
the tens of thousands, to look at all the various factors
that affect them, and to gather all those things somehow
into a compatible whole which gives this kind of direction.
Difficult? — Yes. Impossible? — an emphatic No. More
difficult things than this have already been accomplished
and will doubtless be encountered in the future.
There is a man in Montreal, named Jean Marc Chaput,
who was written up recently in The Canadian Magazine
which is distributed with weekend newspapers across
Canada. This man works as a kind of management
consultant to build motivation and interest on behalf of
commercial employee management groups. One of his
all-time favorite expressions is — people who know
"how" will always have a job — but they will always be
working for those who know "why". Mechanical Man —
1978 is on the way to finding out "why". Mr. Chaput goes
on to say that about 2% of Canadians are "in the parade".
These are people who are successfully doing the things
they want to do. Success is not measured in money —
though money can be a sign of success. No, success is in
surpassing yourself, achieving a little more today than
you did yesterday. People who do, are in the parade. The
lucky ones. Then there are the 8% of society who sit on
the sidelines watching the parade go by although they
would love to be in the parade, they'd love to be part of the
action, but they do not have the education, or they're
married, or they have six kids, or they are fifty, or too fat, or
too short — so, they watch the parade pass them by. Then
we come to the largest group of them all — and also the
saddest group of them all — the 90% of society who have
not even heard about the parade. They are standing on
the wrong corner when the parade goes by.
Everyone has the right to march in a parade but let's not
kid ourselves, not everyone will. But, if we could just get
another 10% marching, doing things, we could change
the way we do business, we could change our Company
— quite emphatically. It's never too early or too late to
begin. Mechanical Man — 1978, knows there is a parade.
He is preparing himself to join it and unless the rest of
you watch out, he is going to lead it. BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
•rV Holland
; Reid
Manager
CPRall
April 7th,   1978
Mr. Thomas Derr
General Manager
Capital Freightways Ltd
655 Queens Avenue
Victoria, B. C.
Dear Mr. Derr:
PLS. INiTi^L & PASS
Supt. Engr,
Asst. Supt. Er.gr.
/LedLASgiL
Account.
••JMfeA^ay
PH.S:—t
^ yyffi    <df
J3L
4W $4k<l\i
78-30-56
On Monday, April 3rd, 1978 at approximately 2300 hours, Mr. Fred
Buckle, Capital Freightways hostler, Vancouver, attempted to
hook up to Johnston Terminals Ltd. unit 2360 to load it aboard
the Seaspan Doris ex Vancouver to Nanaimo, 2400 hours. Unfortunately, the 5th wheel on his tractor was not properly engaged
and when he pulled away the JTL trailer dropped to the ground
and received extensive damage. Damage consisted of demolished
landing legs, bent frame and bent supports. A crane and fork-
lift were supplied by Johnston Terminals in order to lift the
unit and shift the load. Damage to cargo is undetermined at
the time of this writing.
When Johnston Terminals submits their claim for this damage we
will be submitting a claim to you for re-imbursement of our pav
out. r J
Should you have any questions regarding this, do not hesitate
to call A. J. McPherson at 665 - 3137.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
AJM/jab
P.S.
I understand that the tractor unit in question had been
experiencing similar problems but without major mishap
for several days prior to this, so perhaps you will want
to thoroughly check the unit out. BC Coast Steamship Service
P,sr"B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135. Telex 04-507684
m Holland
igar
HReid
Manager
April 7th, 1978
FILE: T-78-30-58
Mr. R. Grant
Insurance Officer
Doman-Marpole Transport Limited
3rd Floor
435 Trunk Road
Duncan, B. C.
V9L 2P8
Dear Mr. Grant:
While attempting to hook up to Doman's trailer DT 21 during
the unloading operation of the Princess of Vancouver, 2230
hours, April 4th, 1978 at Nanaimo, Doman driver Mr. Ken
Slawson pushed the unit back into CP Transport tanker 82035
causing extensive damage to the tanker. Damage consisted
of a tear in the lower front portion of tank as well as
demolished air lines.
When CP Transport submits their claim to us we will be
looking to you for reimbursement on the settlement.
If you should have any questions regarding this claim, do
not hesitate to contact A. J. McPherson at 665 - 3137.
Yours very truly,
M. W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
AJM/jab CPRall
Internal Correspondence
B
Date
From
To
VANCOUVER, 7 April 1978 FILE: 606
M. W. Holland
H. S. Harriman
Manager, Revenue Accounting
CP Rail
Windsor Station
Montreal, Quebec
I have today sent the following tickets as samples for printer's
use:
BCS5X4
BCS5X10
BCS11
415001 - 415005 inclusive;
468001 - 468005 inclusive;
08601 - 08605 inclusive.
Each ticket was stamped "Not Good For Passage" and "Printer's
Use Only" prior to attachment to requisitions.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
/jab
V Form 102-R
1 CPRall
m
Date   VANCOUVER, 7 April 1978 FILE: T-78-32-01
From   M. W. Holland
To   A. N. Cairns
Marine Superintendent
B.C.C.S.S.
Vancouver, B. C.
I have attached both a letter from Mr. Fred Eastman, 3rd Officer
and the Senior Traffic Supervisor, Mr. B. Tate concerning an
accident that occurred aboard the Princess of Vancouver during
the loading operation for the 1230 hours sailing April 3rd, 1978.
In particular, I have circled in red a comment made by Mr. Tate
suggesting that the seaman responsible for the damage may not
be capable of performing his duties satisfactorily.
Would you please investigate this claim through 3rd Officer,
Mr. Fred Eastman, as we may be leaving ourselves open for
repeated damage claims should this information be known to
the hostlers loading this vessel.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
/jab
Attach.
SS Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date 3   Cu^Ji ^ f-S )
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iraForm 102-R
^>CuncL^w  -Jr. ^    y6 CPRall WjA
Internal Correspondence mSk
Date    VANCOUVER, 7 April 1978 FILE: T-78-30-5
From    A. J. McPherson
To    J. D. Finnie
Manager, Traffic ,,
B.C.C.S.S.
Vancouver, B. C.
RE: Damage to Capital Freightways T-63,
January 9th, 1978, Mr. Len Munro.
In Mr. A. E. Mason's statement of events of March 19th, 1978
he states that Mr. Munro, JTL hostler and a Mr. Klep, Grassick
Transport Ltd. exchanged words after the incident occurred.
It would be greatly appreciated if you would be able to obtain
Mr. Klep's version of this incident through any contacts you
may have at GTL.
Department Analyst
/jab
[
a® Form 102-R c Reid
'.' 11 i ;sr
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
OP Half
"'»°!i™d April 7, 1978 Our File: 403661
Seafarers International Union
837 Homer Street
Vancouver, B. C.
Gentlemen:
I am enclosing a photostatic copy of the First Officer's
report concerning Able Seaman Gordon Reid, which is self-
explanatory.
Mr, Reid's record has been closed and it will be appreciated
if he were not dispatched for work on this company's vessels
in the future.
Yours truly,
A. Cairns,
Marine Superintendent
AC/jab
Encl.
J c
Date
CP Ships
Internal Correspondence
From ^\ N^.\\rWV*> -      7° •   ?• °'V '
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:.'£)   Form 102-S
J CPRall Wji
Internal Correspondence |^j|
Date   VANCOUVER, 7 April 1978 FILE:  240
L~108
From   H. L. Hudson
To    Memorandum
M. W. Holland
Your memorandum of March 28th concerning leased vehicles
in B.C.C.S.S. Northland fleet. I have compiled a list as
requested and copy of same is attached. I have not yet
received information on vehicles driven by Messrs. N. Wood,
W. Shaver and N. Parham.but have requested Mr. W. Wright
to supply me with this information and I will add same to
the list when received.
Shell and Chevron credit cards have been supplied and I
have written Imperial Oil for Esso credit cards which have
not yet come to hand. Am tracing.
(Form 102-R
Office Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
/jab
Attach.
J CPRall
Internal Correspondence
L<
Date   VANCOUVER, 7 April 1978
From   K. L. Hudson
To   W. F. Wright - Northland
FILE: 240
L.-108
Kindly provide me with full details of leased automobiles
presently being used by Messrs N. Wood, W. Shaver and N. Parham.
This should show make, model, year, licence number and serial
number.
If similar details are available for the trucks at Kitimat I
would appreciate receiving same.
Office Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
7 jab
S3 Form 102-R W Holland
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B ".Vancouver,BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
'6 April 1978.
Burnaby Claims Centre
I.C.B.C.
4399 Wayburn Way
Burnaby, B.C.
Attention:  Elaine Hargot
RE:  CLAIM NO. 1087179
Gentlemen:
^SA,    -Wlcp.       Of
Following is claim for damage to heating system in main warehouse of BCCS - Northland Service, 2285 Commissioner Street,
Vancouver, B.C., by Wholesale Delivery Service truck:
20 ft.
2
1
40 ft.
IV1 Black Iron Pipe
90° Black Iron Elbows
1%" Union
1%" Insulation @ $.84 Lin Ft.
$26.00
4.74
4.80
33.60
$69.14
Labour:
8 hrs. @ $12.12/hr.
96.96
$166.10
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
TK'BB CPRall VT/1
Internal Correspondence [A3
Date   VANCOUVER, 6 April 1978
From   Harry Hudson
To    June Beebe
RE:  Notes on the Seminar held on April 6th in
Granville Square concerning Forms PDBl
If any major problems phone Roger Lemay or Allan McFee at
Local 337, Montreal.
The next pay period PDBls will form a master file. In other
words, no form - no cheque.
It will be noted that information is taken off the base after
% years.  (That is, after termination record closure.) Therefore, for the 2 years after any information on these individuals
is still available on the base if required.
Proof of Age - The original certificates are required as a
case was quoted when there was one year's difference in age on
the evidence submitted at the time of employment. The employee
brought this to the company's attention at age 64.  He had
shown himself one year younger to be able to enter the pension
plan. At 64 years of age all his pension payments were refunded
and he was not eligible for his pension. If he had said nothing
and stayed until he was 66 he would have automatically have got
his pension.
./2
IForm 102-R - 2 -
Discussed Chinese names with Roger Leraay and he advised that
we should attempt in all cases to obtain the correct name of
all Chinese employees and change our staff records accordingly
in order to avoid trouble later.
He quoted examples where problems arose through expiry dates
not being kept up. When an expiry date is certain it must
either be removed at the end of the temporary period or extended as necessary, otherwise the employee would be dropped
from the database at the end of the expiry period.
It was recommended that the manual be read thoroughly through
Section 3«W which contain all the meat.
■3 +* 9
The manual is updated every six months. Have you been receiving
updates? Next time you receive some please take the label off
the envelope and forward it to Roger Lemay with a note saying
where it came from as the label shows the bcVck number and they
are trying to get their records together. This number should
be quoted when you advise Montreal of the cancelling of any
manuals.
Social Insurance Numbers - While it is not really lawful to
employ people without a social insurance number there is a
method that can be used to get an employee on the payroll.
That is with the use of a temporary number which you may make
up and insert as follows: 'Take the man's employee number which
consists of 6 digits, precede it with the letters CAN - 123 - 456
(as an example of an employee whose number happens to be 123 - 456^
When the new number is received you must advise Payroll Accounting,
Montreal to make the change as it cannot be made by you directly
onto the form PDBl.
Problems with Social Insurance Number Rejections - Reasons are
that the number could already have been recorded on the data base;
in other words, he could have been working elsewhere and the
record is already set up for him. In this event you must contact
Montreal, advising employee number and date of birth and they
will tell you where he worked elsewhere in the company.
./3 - 3 -
Another reason for rejection is that the social insurance number
supplied is not good.
Old Employee Numbers - Every effort should be made to ascertain
if new employees have worked elsewhere in the company. Their old
number should be obtained and used again. If you are unable to
ascertain same then let Montreal have the employee's name, where
worked and date of birth and they will come up with his old number.
There were some departments that used temporary numbers such as
B & B Department, etc. and these should not be used. A new number
should be given in this instance.
On form PDBl on line 1, item 17 this should be completed to show
preference for English and French as very shortly cheques will be
issued in both languages,at the request of the employee.
If second name is missing and you later find it out,form PDBl
must be corrected by showing the second name in the place provided,
plus repeating the surname and the first name in the white section,
numbers 18 to 50.
Shortly you will be advised that PDBls may now be used to show
hyphens, as in a double-barrelled name and apostrophes in, say,
the name "ONeill," "O'Neill," apostrophe or hyphen to count as
one space. However, do not do this until told.
Date of Birth - The computer will match with date of entry and
if inadvertently shown as eligible for pension will automatically
reject if over 40.
Brian Lewis should be the man to contact regarding proof of age
and apparently he is a fusspot. In showing marital status, etc.
please note that for the purpose of forms PDBl common-law does
not count even though it is recognized in the pension and benefit
plan.
History Sequence Number - Use this on corrections only.
With regard to date effective this can be used and form PDBl
submitted up to 14 days in advance of the date, but not more
than 14 days.
74 - 4 -
U.S. Social Security Number similar to Social Insurance Number
previously referred to in this list. If you do not have one
when employee commences duty and now that we must submit forms
PDBl in order for the employee to get on the payroll, you may
apply a temporary social security number using 999 as the first
three numbers and the balance of the number will consist of the
new employee number allotted. Similarly, the S.I.N, temporary
numbers, when proper number is received a change must be made
by the Manager, Payroll Accounting, Montreal on your advice.
Pension plan details for officers in the over 45 plan (Cairns,
King, Agar and Parham) use Code M and show Code P as contributor.
Further to discussion regarding showing of dual rates as discussed,
people regularly in dual positions such as those in Nanaimo will
remain. They are. not needed elsewhere with the one exception;
that is, if •he±d£or similar relief extends over more than one pay
period form PDBl should be submitted,- and change the rate and
reverting back to the normal rate at the end of the temporary
period.
When PDBls are submitted for relief purposes and the rate is
changed, please insert an "x" in item 24 and show an expiry date.
On expiry remove the "x" by placing an "o" in its place.
Encumbency rate, as for G. Webster, the letter "y" should be
inserted in 24 on line 2 as in the event of a mass:Spe update the
employee could possibly receive a rate increase. When officers
receiving group insurance entitlement in job title under the
title description you should show "on two thirds pay." This is
to ensure that all deductions are made on this basis.
Step Rate Increases  - A good idea is to show an expiry date on
line 3, 44 to 49, making sure that the position is shown as
Permanent or as Temporary, This will produce a reminder form
PDBl which will be forthcoming from Montreal. In the event you
require to change the date entered service you are to contact
Roger Lemay.
In work location we^d-you/not use the term "other," but the
exact location. In other words, for example, "Vancouver - Burnaby."
75 - 5 -
This will enable Pension Records to take a more accurate guess
as to where the individual is working.
In the case of a temporary expiry date in a permanent job wowld—c/^
jse^i not showvTemporary in the Code, but merely put in an expiry
date. Otherwise, when the temporary job is terminated the PDBl
will be closed out when in fact you still have a permanent
position which you may need to keep and fill at a Later date.
!The new position relates to the position only and not the employee,
^Her"is some of the interesting information in which we appear to
have gone astray and that is with the designation of the full-time
and part-time employee.
The explanation of part-time is for somebody who does not work
a full shift, i.e. only a few hours a day. A full-time employee
can be working two, three, four or five days a week, or as
required, but certainly on a daily basis. Therefore, those young
ladies at Northland who are working two or three days a week only
are eligible for all the usual benefits and we should offer them
the pension plan, group insurance, etc.
Line 40, form PDBl is to be used for weekly or monthly rated
people only, and not daily or hourly. (It should be left blank
when it involves our daily rated people in Nanaimo.)
In making out forms PDBl Montreal would appreciate that we
properly discern between I and 1, also between a V and a U as
these badly written figures are causing them a lot of problems.
On line 5, blanks 54 to 57 and 58 to 61 will be used for Canada
Savings Bonds.
The fore-going is the result of my attendance at the morning
session and I hope they will be of some help to you jf although
you must know more than I do about these matters?-" However, I
did welcome the opportunity to refresh my memory on the compilation
of forms PDBl. Bill Kazulin and Manny will be attending the afternoon session which deals mostly with line 5, and they will no doubt
pass onto you what they have learned as I have done.
ce Manage
/jab
Office Manager CPRall
Internal Correspondence
File: 559
Date     VANCOUVER, 5 April 1978.
From     A-N- Cairns
To     Master
"Princess of Vancouver"
"Carrier Princess"
"Trailer Princess"
Enclosed you will find Transport Canada directive ire the
application of Retro-Reflective Tape to various lifesavmg
appliances.
It will be in order for you to arrange compliance with this
regulation soonest.
NOTE:
"Princess of Vancouver" will apply the tape to lifeboats on
completion of painting.
A.N. CAIRNS yy
Marine Superintendent
ANC'BB
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Manager
40S
Asst. Mgr.
-J®m£&>\&ep
v^eA-vwwi— ^V,..  «*5fc
5*2 Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
■ W Holland
R Reid
■ Manager
CPRall
•April 5th,   1978
File:    T-78-40
m
Ms Caroline Zimbrick
733 East 7th
Moscow, Idaho
83843, U.S.A.
Dear Ms Zimbrick:
We were pleased to receive your letter of March 26th, 1978
concerning employment with B.C. Coast Service of C.P. Rail.
As much as we appreciate your interest, I would state at the
outset that we are unable to employ anyone who is not a Canadian
citizen or landed immigrant of this country, and unless you can
meet this requirement there is no point in pursuing this matter
further. If, however, you are eligible for employment in Canada
we would be glad to reconsider your application, so kindly advise
in this regard.
Thank you for your interest in Canadian Pacific and we wish you
every success in your chosen field.
Yours very truly,
M. W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
1 1
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver. BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604) 665-3135. Telex 0^-50768'i
CPRall
1W Holland
April 5th,   1978
IRReid
Mansrgef
Ms Loren Milbury
150 Victoria St. E.
Box 1351
Alliston, Ontario
LOM 1AO
Dear Ms Milbury:
Reference your letter undated concerning employment on our
Alaska cruise vessel the "Princess Patricia".
The "Princess Patricia" is an older vessel and owing to her
conformation she has very limited accommodation for female
crew, only four in fact, which are taken up by the Stewardess,
Hairdresser, Gift Shop Attendant and Entertainer. In any event,
all positions on the vessel are filled and we have a very long
waiting list of applicants.
Sorry we cannot be of more assistance at the present time, but
thank you for your interest in Canadian Pacific.
Yours very truly,
H. L. Hudson
Office Manager
/ CPRall WA
Internal Correspondence rn^M
Date     VANCOUVER, 5 April 1978 FILE: 162
From     m. W. Holland
To      P. I. Georges
MONTREAL
afflSFOMl) 102-R
Will you kindly obtain 12 copies of the booklet "A Code of
Business Conduct," and forward same to this office as soon
as possible.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
/jab CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER, 5 April 1978 FILE:  152203
From     m. W. Holland
To     Mrs. D. Martin
Pension Benefits Records - MONTREAL
RE: Floyd W. Atkinson
Social Insurance No. 701 - 340 - 838
Employee No. 152203	
As per your speedi memo, Crown Life Insurance forms have been
completed and are returned herewith.
Certain information such as a group policy number^ etc. is
missing and it will be appreciated if you will have this
inserted.
Also, on the employer's statement the amount of company
pension has not been shown as we have not yet received advice
in this regard. Perhaps you will be able to ascertain this
information from those concerned in your department.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
/jab
Encl.
uOForm 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
B
Date VANCOUVER, 5 April 1978
Fromn.  w. Holland
To Mrs. D. Martin
Pension Benefits Records - MONTREAL
FILE: 494365
RE:  Edwin J. Agar
Employee # 494365
Entered service March 20. 1978
Enclosed is the completed Enrollment Form in the Officers,
Supervisors and Specialists Financial Security Program for
the above mentioned employee.
This officer has been placed in grade S-^with the title of
Terminal Manager.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
/jab
Encl.
JO Form 102-R
/ CPRall
B
Date VANCOUVER, 5 April 1978
From  m. W. Holland
FILE: 494365
To  R. Granger
Pension Benefits
MONTREAL
Herewith enclosed is the Management Retirement Income Plan
application completed by Mr. Edwin J. Agar who commenced
work with this company on March 20, 1978.
He has been placed in the grade S-5 with the title of
Terminal Manager, payroll # 959.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
/jab
End.
JOForm 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
B
Date   VANCOUVER, 5 April 1978
From    H. L. Hudson
To    m. W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
FILE:  162
RE:  Code of Business Conduct Forms
Regarding Mr, Margetts' memo of April 4th attached. I have
had no previous instruction to forward a list of names and
completed forms. All Northland officers were contacted in
this regard and I have on file signed tear-out pages of the
booklet.
I will be submitting annual reports to Montreal, per their
request and I strongly recommend that these remain in ray
possession, inasmuch as I am responsible for the documenting
of all officers, B.C. Coast or Northland.
Office Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
/jab
Attach.
(Form 102-R
7 ,1
Date   VANCOUVER, April 4, 1978
From  B. D. Margetts
To   M. W. Holland
ile:   P-300
sssa^wfei
^^ISgi
VVAN
CODE OF BUSINESS CONDUCT FORMS=?=^—
The Minutes of the Management Meeting of February 22nd
indicate that a list of names and completed forms were
to be sent to Lorraine Taylor.  As these have not yet
been received will you please advise status of same.
G^^
v^Ai
General Manager
Coastal Marine Operations
'-OForm 102A-R
' ■
! CPRall
Internal Correspondence
M
Date       VANCOUVER, 5 April 1978 File: 360085 (I)
From        M.W. Holland
To        D.L. Annesley
2nd Officer
"PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER"
f
Re:  Injury sustained by William DAVEDOFF,
31 March 1978	
Please ensure this office is advised if Mr. Davedoff attends
a doctor or loses time account this injury.
fiOForm 102-R
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
GP
i "-.'7 Holland
R-Reid
Wanaee.-
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver. BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
I
4 April 1978.
File:  434
Dr. Wood
Economics Dept.
Queen's University
Kingston, Ontario.
Dear Dr. Wood:
This has reference to telephone conversations last month, requesting application forms for Labour Relations Course to be held at
Queen's University, May 7-12, 1978.
At the time of our second phone conversation the application forms
had not been received, but you advised you would reserve space
for two people to attend the course.  The forms arrived the same
day, and Mr. M.W. Holland, Manager, B.C.C.S.S., completed one and
forwarded it that date.
It now transpires the second party will be unable to attend
account other commitments; therefore, would ask you to release
the second space you are holding for CP Rail, B.C. Coast Steamship Service.
Yours very truly,
(Miss) B.H. Bussell
Secretary to Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
J Date  VANCOUVER, 4 April 1978.
From  M.W. Holland
To Mr. H. Whitmore
System Supervisor of Passes
Box 5, Windsor Station
Montreal, Que.
File:  T-78-49
240
y
Reference telephone conversation date. i
Attached is Form 1176 requesting annual passes for BCCS Vehicles
Nos. 1 to 7, All Ports Except Alaska.
As advised in conversation, we are showing two 1977 Dodge Aspens
as Vehicles No. 1 and No. 2 account current gasoline credit cards
having been issued with those numbers.  Passes BH 809 and BH 810
were issued last year for these two automobiles as Vehicles No.
3 and No. 4, and we will return same for cancellation as soon as
new passes have been received.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
BB
JForm 102-R
J CPRall
Internal Correspondence
B
Date  VANCOUVER, 4 April 1978
From  A. Meijer
To   M. W. Holland
B.C.C.S.S. - NORTHLAND
MEALS SERVED ON VESSELS
REPORT: 1
MARCH 1978
CARRIER PRINCESS - Servings
1,171
- Amount
3,212.59
Average
2.74
TRAILER PRINCESS - Servings
644
- Amount
1,867.42
Average
2.90
OCEAN PRINCE    - Servings
i560
- Amount
1,547.04
Average
2.76
NORTHLAND FURY  - Servings
262
- Amount
904.26
Average
3.45
TOTAL SERVINGS
2,637
Average
2.86
TOTAL AMOUNT
7,531.31
Catering Superintendent
/jab
c.c.    W. W. Hocking
(ff?) Form 102-R
V CPRall WTA
Internal Correspondence J^n|
Date  VANCOUVER, 4 April 1978 FILE: 402
L-108
From  m. W. Holland
To   v. Jones
Kindly provide me with full details of leased automobiles
presently being used by Messrs N. Wood, W. Shaver and N. Parham.
This should show make, model, year, licence number and serial
number.
If similar details are available for the trucks at Kitimat I
would appreciate receiving same.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
/jab
SO Form 102-R Internal Correspondence
m
Date   VANCOUVER, 4 April 1978 FILE: 434A
From   A. J. McPherson
To   M. W. Holland
RE:  Your Memorandum of March 21st, 1978
For an Associate Member of the Council of Marine Carriers, the
By-Laws of Incorporation, S. 2(a) state the following:
"an Associate Member shall be entitled to participate
in and receive all the services and benefits provided
by the Corporation except those related to or concerning the labour negotiations of the Corporation."
The Council of Marine Carriers (CMC) appears to have two principal
objectives. They are:
A. To provide vessel owners with union contracts that are
standard for the marine industry and in the best interests
of the owners;
B. To supply a co-ordinating position between the marine
industry and government that allows input from the industry
before regulations are changed.
The latter objective encompasses "all the services and benefits
provided by the Corporation" that would accrue to an Associate
Member.
To further this objective, the CMC has developed direct avenues
of communication with government agencies and officials who are
responsible for regulation changes within the marine industry.
Through their close association with Ottawa, CMC has been able
to place representatives on several committees that also provide
input for regulation changes. As examples, they are presently
represented on the Marine Safety Advisory Council and recently
had representation on the West Coast Oil Ports Inquiry.
.
72
)Form 102-R 7?
- 2 -
Presently, the CMC is advised of all proposed changes to
regulations within the marine industry.  Consequently, they
are able to assess the cost effects on the industry of any
proposed changes and indicate alternatives that are applicable
to the vessel owners they represent before they become law.
In this regard, the CMC represents owners of vessels such as
tugboats and freighters and does not monitor those regulation'
changes applying solely to passenger vessels (e.g.' Fire
Regulations)•
As an Associate Member we would be kept abreast of any
proposed regulation changes and general trends within the
industry. Although we would be excluded from those services
related to labour negotiations, we would receive labour
bulletins of a technical nature and would have direct access
to union agreements within the marine industry.
The by-laws of the CMC allow one vote for each $100,000 of
seagoing payroll and provided the assessment against the
Associate Member Is the same as that levied against the Full
Member, the votes would have equal weight. For voting purposes
we would not be eligible to participate in matters related to
the election of officers and directors nor in those related
to labour negotiations. In our particular case, it would
appear that our vote would have about one-third the weight of
a Full Members' vote and would be mainly restricted to votes
on policy matters.
Using 1977 as an example, the annual cost of receiving these
"benefits and services'* would be as follows:
CASE I: B.C.C.S.S. involved only:
A. Gross Seagoing Payroll:
Assessment (.3% to .35%)
$3,994,021.
$11,982. to $13,979.
B. Excluding Princess Patricia:
Gross Seagoing Payroll: $2,877,370.
Assessment (.3% to .35%)    $8,632. to $10,071.
73 •    *
3 -
CASE II: B.C.C.S.S. Northland included.
B.C.C.S.S. Northland would contribute a further
$.615 million (approximation) to Gross Seagoing
Payroll and assessments for Case A and Case B above
would be as followss
A. Assessment
B. Assessment
$13;827c to $16,132.
$10^477» to $12,224.
An additional $250, would have to be added to the above as the
actual cost of membership.
Sinces as it was pointed out earlier, the CMC does not monitor
regulations for passenger vessels, should we opt for an
associate membership in this corporation, some consideration
for our passenger vessels would have to be negotiated to allow
for this obvious gap (e.g. lower assessment excluding payrolls
of these vessels).
Departmental Analyst
AJM:jab
..,..._,.. »■■,.-.g CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, 3 April 1978.
From   R'R- Reid
j0    Memorandum
Mr. M.W. Holland
File:  T-78-10-D
n
We discussed sometime ago whetK^_Gordon Walked should continue
handling the "Patricia" in Prince Rupert, or whether Norm Parham
should or could assume this responsibility.
Have been speaking to Victor, who is of the opinion, with which
I agree, that Gordon Walker should continue to handle the ship,
as he (Victor) is anxious to get Norm Parham involved in a
greater marketing aspect.
Would appreciate your views, noting Victor is in Prince Rupert
tomorrow, Tuesday, 4 April.
:. Manag
RRR'BB
- JJ&>i~~— "H-<y»   '**f
IjClForm 102-R S?)Form 102-R
ternal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, 3 April 1978. File:  T-78-235
From    A.N. Cairns
To    Capt. J.H. Sandberg
Master, "Princess of Vancouver"
I am in receipt of an overtime sheet in favour W. Gibb, Third
Officer your vessel, claiming one hour overtime, 1415-1645, 21.
March 1978, account vessel late sailing. r
It is noted from the ship's Pilot House Log extract that the
vessel sailed at 1608 on the date for which overtime is claimed.
This overtime sheet is signed by both D. Chamberlain, Second
Officer, and yourself as certified correct and approved.  It is
therefore incumbent upon you to forward a written explanation
supported by Mr. Chamberlain's comments as to why this office
should consider this submission.
It is also noted that on 23 March Mr. Gibb states his reason
for another hour of overtime is "Full load direct traffic," when
your log abstract indicates only 36 autos carried on the rail
deck on the sailing indicated, this being far from a "full load"
on this deck.
Your letter to be forwarded soonest.
Marine Superintendent
ANC'BB
cc.  Mr. D. Chamberlain,  Second Officer, "Princess of Vancouver"
Mr. W. Gibb,        Third Officer,      "   "     "
Mr. W.T«7. Hocking, Accountant.
i BC Coast Steamshio Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
;W Holland
■ iger
i R Reid
,s? Manager
•3 April 1978.
File No. 1-103
Mr. D. Hargreaves
Treasurer
Northland Navigation Co.
2285 Commissioner
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Hargreaves:
Mr. A. McDermott, Manager, Insurance and Fire Protection, has
asked us to ascertain whether the Northland actually paid
supplementary calls in addition to the advance call, and by
how much, in connection with insurance on Northland vessels.
Mr. W.D. Watson, Manager, Insurance and Claims, CP Ships,
London, has advised Mr. McDermott the rate includes a supplementary call, and for this reason we require the aforementioned information.  Any assistance you can give us in this
connection will be appreciated.
We will also appreciate knowing the reporting procedure to
Marsh & McLennan for excess protection and indemnity insurance
under the Marine Multi-Liability Policy.  We assume that when
reporting these charters to Marsh & McLennan for hull coverage,
they automatically report them to the underwriters for excess
protection and indemnity coverage, but would appreciate confirmation of this, or the contrary.
Yours very truly,
R.R. REID
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER,   3 April 1978.
From   R.R.   Reid
To   Mr. A. McDermott, Manager
Insurance & Fire Protection
Mont real, Que.
File:  I-10O
Please refer to your letter of 16 March, File S-BN-3.
Attached you will find original and one copy of application form
as forwarded.
With reference to the question raised whether Northland actually
paid supplementary calls in addition to the advance call, and if
so by how much, this information will be forwarded as soon as received from Northland.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
.
S3 Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Scrvicr.
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135. Telex 04-507684
CP
W Holland
tger
R Reid
■3 April 1978.
File No. 78.529.G.
Mr. Ron Cranfield
13752 - 104 Avenue
Surrey, B.C.
V3T 1W5
Dear Mr. Cranfield:
In connection with wives of Canadian Merchant Service Guild
Officers, who travelled from Nanaimo on 7 March, I now enclose
receipt in amount $93.00 covering their passage, and will be
pleased to receive settlement at your convenience.
Yours very truly.
R.R.
Asst.
REID
Manager,
D«Ut   lubtUi
RRR'BB W Holland
H Reid
■ Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver. BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
CPRall
3 April 1978.
File:  78.529.U.
Mr. W.W. Bridges
Traffic Manager
Vancouver Island Coach Lines Ltd.
710 Douglas St.
Victoria, B.C.
Dear Bill:
In connection with United Grain Growers party, who travelled from
Nanaimo 4:00 p.m. sailing 9 March to Vancouver, I now enclose
receipt in the amount of $144.00 covering 48 passengers at $3.00
each, and will be pleased to receive settlement at your
convenience.
Yours very truly,
R.R. REID
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB :
Internal Correspondence
CPRall W£
Date    VANCOUVER, 3 April 1978 File:  1641
PRIVATE & CONFIDENTIAL
From   M. W. Holland
To    E. Robinson
Manager
Nanaimo Terminal; ■
Nanaimo, B. C.
During the past several weeks we have received numerous
claims for fairly extensive damage to CPT trailers originating at Nanaimo, B. C.
Damage in most instances was confined to large splits and
punctures on the sides of the trailers. Due to the nature
of this damage it would appear that it would have been
obvious to anyone present during the loading operation.
Accordingly, it would be appreciated if you would instruct
members of your staff to note any obvious damage on the 9tM.3nSchecl
G^e&^S   of T niiiwg. This procedure should be followed for all units
/) _/ and not just CP Transport's units.
V
However, perhaps it would be possible for your staff to give
particular attention to CP Transport units for at least the
next two weeks. Surveillance of some of these units could be
made in the CPT lot adjacent to our pier at Nanaimo with notes
regarding damage being sent to this office.
If you would like to discuss this request please call Alec
McPherson for any further details or instructions.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
/jb
Form 102-R Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, April 3, 1978 FILE: T-78-30-31
From    m. W. Holland
To D.C. Freeman
Freight Claims Agent
Vancouver, B. C.
Attached is my complete file covering damage sustained
to Sidney Freight trailer T-29 on or about January 19th,
1978.
From the correspondence attached it appears that damage
occurred during the loading operation at Vancouver but
no one aboard the vessel can supply information on it.
Accordingly, I am requesting that you arrange payment of
this claim in the amount of $38.78 if you agree.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
/jb
Attach.
3a3F«*n 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, April 3,   1978 FILE:    T-77-31-23
From    M. W. Holland
To    W.W. Hocking
Accountant, B.C.C.S.S.
T
I
RE: Damage to 1976 Oldsmobile Cutlass, on December 9th, 1977
Attached are copies of correspondence with I.C.B.C. along
with Final Release signed by both I.C.B.C. and the owner
of the vehicle, Mrs. Olivene Knibbs.
Would you please arrange payment in the amount of $169.29
as directed in the letter of March 23rd, 1978 from I.C.B.C,
i.e. $69.29 to the Insurance Corporation of B. C. and $100.00
to Mrs. Olivene Knibbs, Box 46, Stephens Road, Gabriola Island,
B.C.
B
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
/jb
Attach.
?«?) Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, April 3, 1978 File:  78 Ref.
From   M. W. Holland
To   0. Robinson
Agent
Vancouver Wharf Ticket •
RE: Attached PT59, J. Malcolm Brodie
Please refer to Accounting Instructions Manual re
completion Lost Ticket Bond in such circumstances
and arrange to have Mr. Brodie complete same before
returning to this office for processing.
B
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
Attach,
/jb
»Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, April 3, 1978 File:  606
From    m. W. Holland
To    H. S. Harriman
Manager, Revenue Accounting ,
CP Rail
Windsor Station
Montreal, Quebec
RE:  B.C.C.S.S. Ticket Invoice, Famous Artists Ltd.
March 29th, 1978	
On March 29th a copy of the above ticket invoice was
forwarded to your office reading as follows:
BCS 10   467001 through 468000 inclusive
This should have read:
BCS 5X10 467001 through 468000 inclusive
Would you please amend your records to reflect this
change.
M
V
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
/jb
fjS2)Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, April 3,   1978 File # T-78-30-38
From    M. W. Holland
To    Master
"Princess of Vancouver"
I have a report from our shore personnel regarding an
accident that occurred on A-3 ramp during the loading
operation for the 0400 hours sailing March 21st, 1978.
Damage was sustained to both a CPT tractor unit and a
Johnston Terminals trailer (3629) when Johnston Terminals'
hostler backed into the CPT tractor.
Would you please have the officer on duty forward a
report to this office indicating knowledge he has of
this incident. In particular, Johnston Terminals'
hostler seems to be claiming that the mate should have
signalled him to stop and I would like to know the
loading officer's reply to this.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
/jb
m
)Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
B
Date    VANCOUVER, April 3, 1978 Our File: T-78-30-42
Your File: 86-504-5
From    M. W. Holland
To    Mr. F.W. Barham
Divisional Manager
Accident Claims & Safety
CP Transport
44 West Pender St.
Vancouver, B. C.
RE: Alleged Damage to Unit 44143, March 10th, 1978
I have talked with Mr. Ferguson, Manager, Vancouver Terminal
who completed the original accident report.
He states that his report is correct. The "rust" mentioned
in his report was what the darkened area appeared to be as
there was no shiny metal visible.
Further, it was your own driver who picked up the unit who
first noticed the hacksaw marks where the section had been
cut out. Mr. Ferguson simply confirmed this finding.
It would appear, since there were no incidents that occurred
aboard the vessel on this date, that the trailer was loaded
in this condition at Nanaimo. The damage alleged was done
prior to this with the area being cut out to remove a
potentially dangerous condition.
I suggest that you re-investigate this at Nanaimo as we cannot accept liability for damage as indicated.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
/jb
@F°™ 1°2-R CPRall W2k
Internal Correspondence wL?&
Date    VANCOUVER, 3 April 1978 File: 564
From    m. W. Holland
To    Master
Chief Engineer r
Purser
Chief Steward
"Princess Patricia"
Arrangements have again been made to have Canadian cigarettes
stocked in the News Stand of your vessel, in bond.
Regulations will not permit any crew member having in his
possession at any one time, more than 200 cigarettes, whether
Canadian or American, and then they are only to be for their
own personal use. The total cigarettes of Canadian or American bonded stock allowed crew members for their own use during
any month is not to exceed 750 cigarettes per person.
For your information, the Canadian cigarettes out of the bonded
stock will be sold to crew members at current duty-free prices.
It is extremely important that this privilege is not abused;
otherwise, the arrangement will be cancelled.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
VLSI  /jb
)Form 102-R Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, 3 April 1978 FILE:  564
From    m. W. Holland
To    Master
"Princess Patricia"
Upon resumption this year of international service by your
vessel, attention is again directed to the B.C.C.S.S. Operating Rules and Regulations, Item No. 4-4-1, which outlines the
regulations with regard to crew members bringing merchandise
into Canada from a foreign port, or taking merchandise ashore
in a U.S. port.
You are reminded of your personal responsibility under both
the Canadian and U.S. Customs regulations, and to the fact
that you are held personally liable to fine in the event that
these regulations are disregarded by any member of the ship's
crew. Please, therefore, arrange that each and every member
of your ship's crew is informed of the regulations, and that
circulars explaining the requirements and penalties involved
for infractions, are at all times posted on bulletin boards
in the crew accommodation.
Particular attention should be directed to ensuring that any
new crew members are made aware of these regulations and
liabilities.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
tf^ir /jb
(Form 102-R File:    T-78-30-46
CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, April 3, 1978
From   m. W. Holland
To    Mr. T. King
RE: Attached Damage Report, March 24, 1978
Would you please arrange to have the indicated damage
to the underside of the stairs viewed and a report filed
indicating extent of damage and cost of repairs.
^'-iSForm 102-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
Attach.
/jb ■**
THIS FORM DOSS MOT CONSTITUTE A CLAIM
Mm
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Company L p/A   Ay^P'/A,/Ar> c*.
No. of Tractor	
Name of Driver   ^J~}//?a/   IP/?-?? ^?d>/???<•£
Company by '   j0.j?*&
whom employed , ^^ A   	
Front
Day
_.
Year
Rear
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Left Side
Trailer
Right Side
tr} y<  ^—"
Loaded   l>       To   //s?A/#/se#
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• Name of Vessel      Sailing/X
Off Loaded
Location of Trailerwhen da^-ed noted:    ^/^ 'Pi?////?*?-      •     '•  : .'   ■:'..  : ■
Remarks: /^////n   Ts*J/& /#JfrjSA&% 7/   ^________  _________    ____________^V^2?
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r<.^   ^a/a^sA  / £■■   7?a2j&s£/*^ CPRall
Internal Correspondence
Dale   VANCOUVER, April 3, 1978 FILE: 336
From   M. W, Holland
To   A. McDermott, Manager
Insurance & Fire Protection
Montreal, Quebec
Your letter of March 28th, File: MC6J.-R-45-12, regarding
miscellaneous insurance for B.C. Coast Steamship Service.
It is noted in the second paragraph of your letter that
you make the statement, "insurance on currency in care
of purser on any vessel of your service, is no longer
required." In fact, my letter of March 23rd and yours
of March 9th specifies vessels operating between Sydney
and Vancouver or Swartz Bay and Vancouver. This type of
insurance coverage is still required for the "Princess
of Vancouver" operating between Vancouver and Nanaimo, and
the "Princess of Patricia" operating to Alaska.
B
(S) Form 102-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
^_# CPRall
Internal
B
Date    VANCOUVER, April 3, 1978 FILE: 336
From   M# w<_ Holxand
*° A. McDermott, Manager
Insurance & Fire Protection
Montreal, Quebec (
Your letter of March 28th, File: MC6J.-B-7-2, further
regarding calculation of adjustment premium under the
Cars and Contents Insurance for 1977.
It has been ascertained that the "Seaspan Doris" was indeed
out of service on January 15, 1977 due to engine problems.
The "Seaspan Greg", a vessel whose characteristics are
similar to those of the "Doris" and also owned by Seaspan
International, was utilized on that date in lieu.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
fan/?*?
12) Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
i
Date  VANCOUVER, 3 April 1978 File: 560
From  m.W. Holland
TO  J.L. Rochon
Supervisor
Data Centre •
Vancouver
With reference to your letter of 23 March, File 2-05-09,
concerning B.C.C.S.S. vehicle which is no longer In service.
I am enclosing forms 266R completed as far as possible.
All the information is, unfortunately, not available in
this office but presume this will serve its purpose.
Apparently this vehicle came in to our hands in 1969 from
C.P. Transport Claims Department.
Copy of Sales Order is also enclosed.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLri /jb
Encl.
5 '2) Form 102-R r>J_5
LOCATION OR
MILEAGE
Cmadian (Pacific
AUTHORITY   FOR   RETIREMENT
AT
No.
Vancouver, B.C.
-SUBDIVISION NEAR
Pier B.C.
Vancouver, B.C.
.DIVISION.
Pacific
DESCRIPTION:
1 Van Panel Truck sold to Pacific Logging Co., Victoria, B.C.
on March 25, 1970
FORM 266R
-REGION
Chevrolet
S^IALNO.:5-"7-660-074 M0T07
-C.P.R. NO..
952
ACTUAL
COST:   ESTIMATED $_
ESTIMATED
-SALVAGE:    $-
350.00
ACQUIRED IN YEAR:
1969
UNDER APPROPRIATION NO.:
RELATED TO CURRENT YEAR'S APPRO. NO.:	
DATE . SIGNATURE
PROPERTY SECTION.
PRIMARY ACCOUNT.
.UNALLOCATED COST $.
DATE-
SUPERVISOR
.REGION DATA CENTRE
RETIREMENT AUTHORIZED FROM: P.S.
P.A..
DATE-
GENERAL AUDITOR CPRall
Internal Correspondence
_
Date  VANCOUVER, April 3, 1978 File:  T-78-43 - N
From  M#w# Holland
T°  H.I. Williams - Purchasing Agent
Vancouver
Your letters of March 13th and 30th on File: 982-092-20013-8
& 2 concerning Canadian Liquid Air annual rental of oxygen
and acetylene cylinders.
These cylinders are in use at Kitimat Machine Shop and are
required.
Prepaid demurrage agreement has been duly signed and both
copies are attached for processing. Presume a copy will be
returned to us for our files.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
HLH  /jb
i"12) Form 102-R Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, April 3, 1978 File # T78-16
From    A. Meijer
To    A. Cairns
Enclosed is a photocopy of weekly Overtime Sheets submitted
by the cook and waiter on the "Carrier Princess."
According to the working schedule, also enclosed, each position
has consistently one hour overtime per day more than the schedule
calls for.
The cook claims working hours from 0430 - 1300 (8% hours straight
time) in order to prepare breakfast and lunch for a crew of
approximately 14.
The working schedule calls for one hour's break between 0900 -
1100.
No doubt any qualified cook could work within the stated hours.
The same applies to the waiter who claims an extra hour between
1300 - 1400 each day.
Will you please advise the deck officer in charge to look into
this situation and advise.
M
Catering Superintendent
/*/0 /jb
Encl.
§?2)Form 102-R CPRall
Internal Correspondence
m
¥
Date  April 3, 1978
From £,  Cairns - Marine Superintendent
To  H.I. Williams - Purchasing Agent,
Vancouver
File # 560
It is requested that you prepare a Sales Order for the disposal
of a motor lifeboat (description attached) ex "Princess
Patricia" at an agreed sales price of five thousand dollars
($5,000).
The boat is intended for use on the "MV Gold Corn" of Liberian
registry and represented by Dodwell Shipping of Canada, in
Vancouver.  (Mr. Binky Ling)
Marine (supe^r'ntendent
^Tve-'J5
Attach.
L/V
c.c. W.W. Hocking
,
SB Form 102-R ITEM (A)   1 only M.O.T. approved standard ship's motor lifeboat,
24.0V x 8.4L x 3.5'
Hull - White moujded fiberglas with built-in flotation
and small canopy.
Capacity - 36 persons
Engine - 10 HP YANMAR 2-stroke Diesel
RPM - 1600 Engine 890 Shaft
Propeller - HASBRA 20" diameter 12" pitch
Speed - 6-8 Knots fully loaded
Fuel Capacity -2x5 gallon tanks
■
Clutch - Forward/Reverse
Built Pelagic Pacific Industries,.Sidney, B.C., June 1364.
Condition - Good
I--3.4-<-ft•■?_£_ News Summary
News and views on topics of
current interest prepared by Public Relations
and Advertising Department
Aviation
Business
Highway
Finance
Canadian Pacific's annual report describes new ventures in a wide range
of natural resource, manufacturing, transportation, real estate, hotel
and other activities which will enhance the company's future earnings'
potential. (A copy is appended.)
Page 16
CPI SEES BRIGHT FUTURE FOR COMPANY
In its annual report, Canadian Pacific Investments says while it may be
hard-pressed to match its 1977 earnings in 1978, the completion of major
expansion programs and diversification makes it more optimistic than
ever for the future. (A copy is appended.)
Page 17
WHY TRUCKS ARE GAINING OVER RAILS
While trucks are far less fuel-efficient than railroads and the U.S.
Government is stressing the need for fuel conservation, the trucking
industry is steadily increasing its share of the nation's freight over
railroads. An article in The Wall Street Journal explains why.
Page 13
TRENDS AND TOPICS
CN proposes major cuts in capital spending for almost all of its rail
operations during 1978 as part of a drive to improve profits. Most
other CN operations will get sizeable budget increases.
Page 5
The Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce says the Hall Commission recommendations must be assessed individually since some do promote efficiency
and competion, while others appear political in.nature.
Page 5
Citing unexpected delays in rail contract negotiations, VIA Rail has
postponed its proposed April 1 takeover of from 3,000 to 4,000 CP Rail
and CN employees until later this Spring.
Page 7
Laker Airways announces that after the first six months of operation,
its Skytrain service made a net profit of $1.5-million, and will expand
to two flights a day each way starting April 1.
Canadian Pacific
Page 11 E W S IN BRIEF
HIGHER GRAIN-HANDLING FEE URGED
WINNIPEG - Four Winnipeg-based companies have submitted briefs to the
Canadian Grain Commission hearings requesting substantial increases in
grain-handling tariffs. The hearings opened March 29 in Saskatoon.
Citing rapidly-rising expenses, which in the last six years have doubled
the cost-per-bushel of handling grains, Manitoba Pool Elevators said
that in the case of country storage "the present maximum of one-thirt-
ieth-of-a-cent a day is so low that it is not economically sound for any
organization to build additional storage capacity at rural locations."
(Winnipeg Free Press, March 29)
BANFF PARK RAIL, HIGHWAY TWINNING NEARER
CALGARY - Permission to ahead with a $12-million CP Rail project through
Lake Louise should come from the Canadian Transport Commission soon, according to federal Minister of Transport Otto Lang. Mr. Lang said on
March 28 that permission to go ahead with the project could come in as
little as two or three weeks. Mr. Lang said there is a clear need to
improve rail capacity in the area and it is fairly important that the
government move quickly. (Calgary Albertan, March 29)
WORLD AIR GROUP TO CHOOSE BETWEEN U.S., BRITISH DESIGNS
LONDON - International aviation officials will meet next week in Montreal to decide between rival British and U.S. designs for the aircraft
landing system of the 1980s that will generate at least $1-billion in
orders over the next 10 years. The two proposed guidance systems, based
on advanced microwave technology, would replace the existing instrument
landing system that has been in use around the world since 1949. (Wall
Street Journal, March 30)
WHEAT TALKS LEAVE CANADA PESSIMISTIC
WINNIPEG - Sixty-seven countries, including Canada, have walked away
from the negotiating table in Geneva, Switzerland, leaving the concept
of the establishment of an estimated $4-billion international wheat reserve in doubt. Canadian officials attending the six-week negotiating
session said March 27 they are pessimistic about a new agreement being
reached this year. (Winnipeg Tribune, March 28)
KAISER GETS GO-AHEAD ON OIL DEAL IN NOVA SCOTIA
VANCOUVER - The Foreign Investment Review Agency has approved an application by Kaiser Resources of Vancouver to set up a new business to explore, develop and produce oil and gas off Nova Scotia's East Coast near
Sable Island. (Vancouver Province, March 28) RAIL LINES DOOMED IN B.C. NORTH?
VANCOUVER - According to B.C. Transport Minister Jack Davis, all that is
needed is a collective act of courage on the part of the provincial
government to tear up the Fort Nelson rail line. This will mean certain
abandonment of the unfinished 420-mile from Fort St. James to Dease
Lake, in the far northwest of the province. Mr. Davis feels that instead
of subsidizing freight by rail on the coast, the government should throw
its support behind marine transportation, which could serve as efficiently at a much lower cost. (Vancouver Province, March 28)
GRAIN INDUSTRY NEEDS $500-MILLI0N FOR EXPANSION
WINNIPEG - Canada's grain industry needs $500-million for capital expenditures in the next few years, says a senior official of the Canadian
Grain Commission. Del Pound, chief commissioner of the Grain Commission,
has suggested in recent speeches that about $100-million is needed in
dust-control programs for elevators and terminals. Another $100-mi11 ion
is needed for improvement of West Coast grain-exporting facilities.
(Winnipeg Tribune, March 25)
GRAIN REGULATIONS MAY PROVE COSTLY FOR ELEVATOR COMPANIES
WINNIPEG - Elevator companies faced with tough decision on how to proceed with costly upgrading of facilities will be saddled with extra
costs to meet new federal Government directives for improving health,
safety and environmental standards in primary and terminal elevators.
(Winnipeg Tribune, March 25)
SASKATCHEWAN COMPLETES POTASH TAKEOVER
REGINA - Without anyone actually announcing it, Saskatchewan's NDP government has finished its program of buying out private potash interests
in the province and now is ready to consolidate and develop what it has
acquired. (Winnipeg Free Press, March 27)
B.C. FOREST PRODUCTS TO MODERNIZE
VANCOUVER - B.C. Forest Products said March 22 it will spend more than
$41-mi 11 ion this year on upgrading its operations with the bulk of the
money going toward modernization projects already underway. The report
predicted lumber, newsprint, coated paper and aspen waferboard sales
will remain at satisfactory levels while plywood sales in Canada will
remain difficult with some overseas improvement. (Vancouver Province,
March 23)
PIPELINE FIRM ALLOWED TO WITHDRAW PORT BID
OLYMPIA, WASH. - Trans Mountain Pipe Line Co. Ltd. of Vancouver has been
granted permission to withdraw its application for certification of a
Cherry Point, Wash., site for an oil trans-shipment port. Action on the
request by the U.S. Energy Facility Evaluation Council brought to an end
a controversy over establishment of an oil port on Washington's inland
v/ 4
waters south of Vancouver. Trans Mountain, backed by Atlantic Richfield
Co. of Los Angeles, had proposed shipping Alaskan crude to Arco's Cherry
Point refinery by tanker and then trans-shipping it to Midwest refineries via a Canadian pipeline. (AP - Toronto Globe and Mail, March 29)
FREE PEANUTS IN HOTEL LOUNGE COULD BE UNSANITARY
EDMONTON - The peanuts are gone out of the Garrison Lounge at the Chateau
Lacombe. Apparently a health inspector deemed the practice of placing a
free bowl of peanuts on each table unsanitary and ordered it stopped.
(Edmonton Journal, March 21)
VOYAGEUR TO LAUNCH PIN-STRIPE SPECIAL TO QUEBEC
MONTREAL - Voyageur Inc. is going after the business of the pin-stripe
set. Starting April 10, the Montreal-based bus company will offer travellers four departures daily in each direction between Montreal and
Quebec on week-days only in a bus designed especially to meet the needs
of businessmen and civil servants. Plush seats with airline-type fold-
down tables, four-channel radio, hot meals, hostesses, reservations and
even telephone service will be the order of the day for those taking the
Grand Express. A one-way ticket will cost $21 including a hot meal for
the 260-kilometre trip compared to a food!ess $10.40 on the ordinary
bus. Voyageur will accept American Express, Visa and Mastercharge cards
on the higher-priced trip. Normand Denault, vice-president of marketing,
said that Voyageur reckoned it could compete with rail and plane for
these frequent travellers. A Voyageur survey 18 months ago found that
36 per cent of its passengers were businessmen and civil servants using
just the ordinary buses. (Montreal Gazette, March 29)
AS A CROWN CORP., WOULD THE POST OFFICE BE LETTER PERFECT?
OTTAWA - After several years of studying the pros and cons, the federal
government still has no definite policy on the post office becoming a
Crown corporation, says a post office official.  "We'll probably study
the subject to death," said the official, adding that "we may have to do
it to find out if it works." Officials are also unsure what the public
would gain or lose from a Crown corporation. Some predict postal rates
could rise sharply, or service could be reduced, if the post office attempted to break even on operating costs. (Ottawa Journal, March 28)
DISCUSSION ON VANCOUVER NORTH SHORE RAIL RATES
VANCOUVER - Officials of the CN and CP Rail met with the CTC in Vancouver this week for discussions on the complex issue of rail rates on the
North Shore. The closed hearings were the latest in what officials hope
will result in an organized rate system on commodities moving to and
from waterfront terminals. There has been a difference of opinion
between the railways on how to equitably divide revenue from North Shore
operations, and the railways appealed to the CTC last fall for a decision. An interim decision was made and it appears that the railways
wanted this week's hearings to help determine a permanent one. (Vancouver Sun, March 29)
* * * RAILWAY
CNR CUTS CAPITAL RAIL COSTS $290-MILLI0N
OTTAWA - CN has proposed major cuts in capital spending in almost all of
its rail operations during 1978 as part of a drive to improve profit.
According to the 1978 capital budget recently approved by the federal
Cabinet and scheduled to be tabled in Parliament next month, rail expenditures will be $290-million, compared with the $304-mi11 ion budgeted
for 1977.
Meanwhile, most other CN operations will get sizeable capital budget
increases in 1978.
The CN operating budget also approved by the Cabinet anticipates an
increase in net income in 1978 to $219-million for the rail operations
(excluding passenger services), compared with net income of $192-mi11 ion
in 1977. However, passenger operations are expected to generate a
$55.2-million net loss, compared with a loss of $53.3-million in 1977.
CN Hotels is expected to produce a $1.5-mil1 ion profit in 1978, compared
with a $400,000 loss in 1977. CN Express is expected to face a $19.4-
million loss in 1978, slightly better than the $32.9-million loss in
1977. The corporate headquarters will face a $46.6-million loss, compared with $24.5-million.
CN Telecommunications is expected to generate $29.5-million in profit,
compared with $25-million; and the trucking operation is expected to
earn $4-million, compared with $2.8-million.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, March 23)
* * *
C OF C SELECTIVE ON HALL REPORT
WINNIPEG - The Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce says that the Hall Commission recommendations must be assessed individually because some of them
do promote efficiency and competition in Western Canada's grain handling
and transportation systems, while others appear political rather than
economic in nature.
The Hall Report cannot be given blanket approval because of its good
points, a spokesman for the chamber said. The chamber praised "the most
positive recommendations regarding the railways that they should be
fairly compensated for carrying grain and that the branch line subsidies
owed them should be determined and paid."
But the recommendation that statutory rates be retained with the shortfall in grain transportation revenue being offset by a direct subsidy to
the railways "borders on motherhood and is not supported by an economic
assessment of the effects. "There is no question that the rates detract from development of processing on the Prairies and result in a situation of less efficient use of
resources . . . retention of the rates per se is not at issue but rather
the manner of distribution of the benefits so that comparative advantage
is not adversely affected," says the chamber.
Also noted were apparent inconsistencies and actual conflicts between
related recommendations. "While the Hall Commission discussed the need
for greater efficiency and competition, many of its recommendations with
respect to railways emphasized regulation and showed no regard for
additional costs . . ."a chamber position paper says. Examples:
-- NORTHERN rail lines be built, such as Fort St. John to Great Slave
Lake, a line to Valleyview and an Arctic railway to Inuvik, were recommended without any substantiating cost-benefit analysis; no economic
basis provided for suggesting empty elevator sidings be retained for use
of rail producer cars.
-- RIGHT-OF-WAY be acquired for a rail link between Ashcroft-Clinton, in
the B.C. Rockies, without reasonable assurances of practical economic
nor operational possibilities. (Engineers say the grade would be too
steep).
-- ELIMINATION of stop-off charges as recommended could lift a cost reducing factor by removing a rationing device.
-- ADVISED establishment of a Prairie Rail Authority would add yet another layer of government regulation.
-- PROPOSAL to extend the grain co-ordinators' function to rail yards
would remove a management function from the railways.
-- FORCING rail cars to always move the shortest distance by inter-use
of cars and lines between railways could limit management flexibility
and up costs; rail studies indicate that shortest distances don't always
mean least cost.
-- IT is feared the proposal to interchange cars by a government allocation agency would raise costs and harm rail planning.
Regarding the primary elevator system, the chamber objected to intervention by government regulation in the process of selecting sites which
"is contrary to the premise that government should not dictate when or
where private facilities can be built when independent selection of the
location of such facilities is essential to maintenanace of a competitive
marketing environment."
Regarding ports recommendations by the Hall Commission, the chamber says
they do not appear to understand the need for priorities on available
money for upgrading the total system; do not seem to recognize that
"... projects designed to improve the flow of grain to and through the
the port of Thunder Bay, must have priority on an economic basis over
those at the port of Churchill." The chamber also objected to the
degree of government intervention proposed in the movement of grain
through Vancouver.
(Winnipeg Free Press, March 22)
* * * VIA RAIL DELAYS WORKER TAKEOVER AFTER STALL IN NEW CONTRACT TALKS
MONTREAL - VIA Rail Canada has postponed its April 1 takeover of 3,000
to 4,000 employees from CN and CP Rail until later this spring.
Despite the delay, VIA formally takes over the management function of
Canada's railway passenger services on April 1.
Emery LeBlanc, spokesman for VIA, said March 27 that recent contract
negotiations between the two railways and their unions ran on longer
than expected. VIA had to wait in the wings for these rail talks to be
completed before getting on with its own talks with four CN and CP Rail
unions. This was the chief cause of the delay in the takeover by VIA,
Mr. LeBlanc said.
Passengers will notice little or no difference in train services until
June 1, when VIA puts the first phase of its new transcontinental services into operation. The first phase will eliminate the CP Rail transcontinental passenger service to and from Windsor Station, leaving only
one VIA departure and arrival a day from CN Central Station. Toronto
will also be cut back to one transcontinental service in each direction
per day instead of two.
When phase two goes into effect on Sept. 15, the Toronto and Montreal
trains will join up in northern Ontario and take the CP Rail route to
Winnipeg, then split into two trains that will cross the rest of the
country.
While VIA management is busy negotiating with the railway unions over
the changes of employer, it is also developing more than one million new
fares to cover all the likely combinations of fares between 1,200 CN and
CP Rail stations across the country. The fare schedule, which will
replace the red-white-and-blue rates of CN and the CP Rail equivalent,
will be ready for June 1, Mr. LeBlanc reported. There will be a public
announcement before that time.
(Montreal Star, March 28)
* * *
CP RAIL TO INCREASE TRAILER FLATCAR FLEET
MONTREAL - CP Rail is increasing its capacity for carrying highway
trailers with an order for 90 single hitch piggyback flatcars from
Marine Industrie Limitee in Sorel, Quebec.
Total value of the order is approximately $2.9-million. The 54-foot, 4-
inch flatcars were ordered in response to continued growth in piggyback
traffic throughout Canada.
The flatcars will be used in general service throughout the country.
Delivery is scheduled during May and June, 1978.
(CP Rail News Release, March 27)
* * * NEW HOPE FOR RIDERS OR FRESH TOOL OF GOVERNMENT?
MONTREAL - In the last few months VIA Rail has undergone a number of
changes which may signal eventual disaster for the passenger train in
Canada.
To begin with, VIA Rail was to be established as a subsidiary of Canadian National. Stranger still, for a corporation out to save the passenger train, was the appointment of the president of CN, Robert Bandeen,
as chairman of VIA Rail's board of directors. It was this same Robert
Bandeen who was quoted some years ago as saying that passenger trains
"didn't make any economic sense" and on that basis advocated doing away
with them.
It soon became apparent that VIA Rail, as a subsidiary of CN, headed by
the president of CN, might not give fair treatment of CP Rail or other
future participating railways. Under pressure, it was decided to make
VIA Rail an independent Crown corporation to effect at least the appearance of independence from CN, even though CN president Mr. Bandeen remains as chairman.
Reliable sources indicate VIA Rail is planning service changes which
have not yet been made public. These include raising current CN fares
to the higher CP Rail fares within the next two years, dropping service
between Montreal and Gaspe, Montreal and Saint John, and eventually Vancouver to Jasper, Edmonton and Winnipeg.
Worse, it became clear at a recent conference on rail passenger service
organized by Transport Minister Otto Lang, that it will be the Ministry
of Transport which will stipulate service levels on various routes and
will contract to VIA the running of those services. It now appears that
VIA may be reduced merely to operating the equipment for the government
in the most efficient manner possible. Thus it will be the government
rather than VIA which will determine the passenger rail services Canadians may expect in the future.
VIA has not yet started running trains, yet its record is already poor.
Rather than assuming its mandate to provide good train service for the
Canadian public, it seems to have contented itself with being a tool of
the Ministry of Transport which has on numerous occasions opposed improvements to rail passenger service.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, March 25)
* * *
REGIONAL RAIL PLAN COULD MEAN START OF PROFITS FOR ALBERTA LINE
EDMONTON - The provincially-owned Alberta Resources Railway, which has
been losing money steadily since it opened in 1968, could become a profitable operation within the context of a comprehensive regional rail
transportation program, according to Alberta Transportation Minister
Hugh Horner. The recently-concluded commission of inquiry under the chairmanship of
Emmett Hall looked at the possibility of streamlining western Canada's
antiquated and over-extended rail network to make better use of remaining track and rolling stock.
But to become an integral component of a proposed Northwest Rail Authority's system, the ARR -- currently run by CN essentially as a lateral
to its main line -- would have to link up with other regional railways
in Alberta and British Columbia.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, March 29)
* * *
CP RAIL APPLIES TO DISCONTINUE LAURENTIAN SERVICE
MONTREAL - Despite the protests of environmentalists, the provincial
government and the tourist industry, CP Rail has applied for, permission
to drop what remains of its passenger service to the Laurentians.
At a public hearing of the Canadian Transport Commission March 28, the
railway argued that last year it had lost $165,000 on its weekend passenger service between Montreal and Mont Laurier, with the projected loss
for this year being $108,000. CP Rail has already received permission
to discontinue its weekday service.
However, briefs from the Quebec government and the Association touris-
tique des Laurentides held that the service is essential to the tourist
industry in the Laurentians and should be upgraded, not discontinued.
The association pointed to its own success with le P'tit Train du Nord.
Armed with a grant from the provincial government, it had leased trains
from the railway for eight weekend trips to cross-country skiing trails
between Montreal and Labelle.
(Montreal Star, March 29)
* * *
GRAIN FACILITY STUDIED
OTTAWA - The possible use of a bulk-handling facility for grain at Vancouver, in addition to the regular terminals, is being examined by the
Wheat Board to speed up the movement off the prairies.
Because of severe snow conditions this winter, grain shipments from
prairie points have been very slow, resulting in farmers facing low
grain prices and also low quotas, as most elevators are plugged to
capacity. Many farmers have had to resort to storing grain outside on
the ground.
Opposition critics have complained that because grain shipments are slow
off the prairies this year, it has led to the Wheat Board being 32 million bushels behind in export clearance. They have called on the minister and Wheat Board to take steps to correct the situation.
(Ottawa Journal, March 28)
* * * 10
CANADIAN CARLOADINGS
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
For Week Ending
March 14, 1978
71,577
4,291,425
7,851
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
1,005
210,648
+       83
1.4
4.7
+   1.1
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
Total for Year to
March 14_ 1978
712,413
45,371,488
74,516
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
+    16,379
+  1,946,879
+     2,206
+  2.4
+  4.5
+  3.1
PIGGYBACK LOADINGS
Containers - Carloads
Trailers  - Carloads
For Month Ending
February, 1978
10,937
19,236
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Chanae
+      305
+      107
+  2.9
+  0.6
Containers - Tons
Trailers  - Tons
451,920
484,955
+    29,082
+    29,043
+   6.9
+   6.4
Containers - Carloads
Trailers  - Carloads
Total for Year to
February, 1978
21,382
37,400
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
+      266
+     1,663
+   1.3
+  4.7
Containers - Tons
Trailers  - Tons
888,732
923,327
+    51,062
+    59,327
+  6.2
+  6.9
U.S. CARLOADINGS
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
For Week Ending
March 18, 1978
421,047
15.9 billion
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
51,971
0.5 billion
-  11.0
3.1
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
Total for Year to
March 18, 1978
4,114,259
157.4 billion
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
511,551
5.0 billion
-  11.1
3.0
Piggyback
Total for Year to
March 11, 1978
329,756
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
Percentage
Change
+   .26^,950
+  8.9
* * 11
AVIATION
SKYTRAIN MAKES $1.5-MILLION IN FIRST SIX MONTHS
LONDON - Freddie Laker's no-frills Skytrain celebrated six months of
service March 26 with an announcement it has made a net profit of nearly
$1.5-million and will expand to two flights a day each way starting
April 1.
A Laker spokesman said since the inaugural flight Sept. 26 between London and New York, Skytrain's no-reservation DC-10 service had carried
97,763 passengers across the Atlantic Ocean, filling an average of 78.26
per cent of the seats each trip. The net profit was $1,498,000, the
spokesman said.
Skytrain's success has forced all the other airlines on the route to
introduce competitive standby and budget fares not only to New York but
to a dozen other U.S. cities as well.
Mr. Laker has applied to run a second Skytrain between London and Los
Angeles but faces competition from rival British Caledonian, which has
underbid with a proposed one-way standby fare of $140. The British government, which has heard arguments from both airlines, is expected to
make its decision next month.
(UPI - Montreal Gazette, March 27)
* * *
U.S. CUTS ATLANTIC AIR FARES
MONTREAL - It is now possible to fly round-trip to London from Boston
for as little as $280 Canadian. Such standby fares were previously
confined to New York's Kennedy airport.
British Airways says that its standby return fares to London from Boston
range from $280 Canadian in the low season to $329 in the high season.
From Detroit, they range from $336 to $382.
Because many of the U.S. gateway cities (cities from which planes fly
direct to London on a scheduled basis) are close to the Canadian border,
there may be some keen competition this summer for Canadian airlines.
The new fares south of the border appear certain to put new pressure on
Air Canada and British Airways to make their scheduled fares more competitive, perhaps by cutting the advance purchase payment time for
"charter class" fares from 45 days to 30 or 21 days.
The whole airline fare structure between the U.S. and Europe, particularly the U.S.-London route, is in an unsettled state as a result of U.S.
government promotion of a new "deregulation" policy. Deregulation means
cutting down on the rules and limitations on fares and the length of
visits abroad. It means getting back to the basics of private enterprise
in aviation. 12
While Canadian airlines and executives appear terrified of deregulation,
it appears that they will have to come to grips with the problems created by the trend, especially on the North Atlantic.
(Montreal Star, March 25)
* * *
STANDBY AIR TICKET SALES AT HEATHROW ARE BANNED
LONDON - The British Airport Authority has banned the sale of low-priced
standby air tickets at Heathrow airport, beginning April 1.
The ban, which will last through the summer, means that airlines will
have to sell such tickets outside the airport. Laker Airways, which
flies from Gatwick airport, won't be affected.
The British authority said it took the action to avoid having thousands
of passengers, many of them sleeping at the airport, creating "unacceptable congestion" in Heathrow's long-distance terminal. A spokesman for
New York-New Jersey Port Authority said there aren't any plans for a
similar ban at Kennedy airport.
(Wall Street Journal, March 27)
* * *
AIR CANADA DROPS CHARTER PLANS FOR ITS DOMESTIC FLIGHTS THIS YEAR
MONTREAL - Air Canada will not operate a low-cost domestic charter program this year because it says its recently announced low-fare Nighthawk
flights will be an adequate substitute. CP Air will operate 22 advanced
booking charter flights this year.
Air Canada said it is dropping its proposed ABC flights because it has
not been able to complete arrangements with domestic tour and charter
organizers to operate the program, which would have required bookings 45
days in advance.
The Nighthawk flights to selected Canadian cities will offer discounts
of up to 50 per cent on economy-class fares. The flights will leave
late at night and will require no advance booking.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, March 28)
* * *
HALF-PRICE AIR FARE TO WEST COAST GIVEN APPROVAL
MONTREAL - Montrealers will be able to fly to Vancouver or Halifax for
less than half the regular fare this summer through a newly-approved system of low-cost domestic air charters.
The flights are part of a new charter system which became a reality
March 28 as Suntours Ltd. of Toronto announced that it had received all
the necessary government approvals to operate the scheme. The Advanced
Booking Charters (ABCs) will be operated by all the major airlines except Air Canada. The flights will be purely charter operations, and tickets-must be bought 45 days in advance.
(Montreal Gazette, March 29)
* * * 13
TOURISM & TRAVEL
NEW CITY TOURIST FIRM AIDS VISITORS TO WEST
EDMONTON - Multipak is not a new kind of shoulder bag to carry camping
equipment. Nor is it a new method for packaging meat or dairy products.
But it will help Edmontonians and tourists to the city spend their time
seeing the interesting sights and experiencing the exciting variety that
Edmonton and Alberta has to offer.
Bob Foster, president and general manager of Multipak, said Edmonton has
needed a tourist service that will help visitors enjoy their stay out
west. "If you go to Hawaii there are tours and special services to help
you keep busy but no one has done anything to help visitors find their
way around Edmonton," he said in a recent interview.
Mr. Foster and his staff of tour co-ordinators say they have thoroughly
researched Edmonton and Alberta to find out what interesting sights are
available for tourist visiting. The group has come up with a package of
11 tours that will help visitors learn, explore and enjoy their stay in
the West, he says.
(Edmonton Journal, March 20)
* * *
HIGHWAY
TRUCKS HAUL MORE AND MORE OF NATION'S GOODS
NEW YORK - Who moves America's economy? Three decades ago there was
virtually no contest -- the railroads. Even 15 years ago, there was
little doubt about it -- the railroads hauled a vastly larger portion of
the nation's freight than any other transportation mode. But no longer.
The truckers keep gaining. They continue to gain even though trucks
burn four times more fuel than trains to move a ton of freight -- and
national leaders keep urging that industry find ways to conserve energy.
Last year, between them, the railroads and the truckers hauled a record
amount of freight -- nearly 1.4 trillion ton-miles, roughly double the
figures prevailing annually in early post-World War II years.
The truckers' share edged above the 40-per-cent mark for the first time
in 1977. Fifteen years earlier it stood at 35 per cent, and 30 years
earlier it came to only 13 per cent. When will the lines cross? Many
analysts are convinced that the truckers' share will exceed 50 per cent
within about a dozen years. Anticipating an acceleration of trends apparent since 1975, some analysts foresee a crossover well before the end
of the next decade. 14
Why, at a time of increased concern over energy, does trucking continue
to gain on railroading in the battle to move the nation's goods? Why do
some analysts predict an acceleration of inroads by the truckers?
One major factor in the truckers' rise involves the matter of expense.
The railroads must maintain their track and roadbed, and they employ
some 87,000 persons for this purpose. In contrast, upkeep of highways -- for instance, filling potholes -- is generally performed at
taxpayer expense by 115,000 roadworkers employed by the states. Railroads last year spent $3.5-billion of their own funds to maintain their
tracks.
Union relationships also tend to place the railroads at a cost disadvantage. Railroad regulations involving work procedures, for instance,
remain far more restrictive than those prevailing in the trucking business. This is because, analysts say, the truckers' Teamster-union contracts are less rigid than rail-union pacts.
Rail unions still command for their members a day's pay for each 100
miles traveled on a freight train. A crew member who travels, say, 200
miles would therefore collect about two days' pay for a journey that may
consume less than eight hours of working time. In trucking, in contrast,
a full workday for an intercity driver is usually set at 10 hours. A
driver can easily travel 475 miles in that amount of time.
The railroads would like to trim the number of people in a typical
freight-train crew to as low as two. Currently, however, long-standing
agreements with rail unions generally dictate that there be at least
four persons in the crew of each freight train.
The truckers often use only one driver, even on very long trips. A few
years ago the usual truck complement was set at two under Teamster-union
contracts. But recently Teamster negotiators have consented to long
single-driver runs.
Not surprisingly, the railroads have been raising their freight-hauling
charges faster than the truckers. Since 1970 the railroad charges have
climbed, on the average, some 60 per cent, or about 10 percentage more
than truck rates.
It is also no coincidence that last year the number of ton-miles of
freight hauled by the railroads -- at 821 billion — was some 37 billion
less than the comparable total only four years earlier. Over the same
four years, the number of ton-miles accounted for by trucks rose 44
billion. For all their problems, the railroads still possess an inherent strength. They still haul huge quantities of goods over long,
uncongested rights-of-way. A typical freight train with three locomotives can pull one million ton-miles in a day, or about a hundred times
more than a typical truck can manage.
However, some analysts feel that this inherent strength may have contributed to a complacency that railroad managers are finding hard to 15
shake even after such debacles as the collapse of the Penn Central.
The criticism is that the railroads have failed to fight aggressively
enough for mixed lots of freight and, instead, concentrate overly on
hauling such bulk items as coal, grain and iron ore.
Truck-trailers containing mixed batches of goods can, of course, be
loaded on rail flatcars in an arrangement dubbed piggybacking. But most
railroads have been slow to go after such business, it's claimed, even
though the trucking industry has flourished through mixed-cargo shipments,
* * *
(Wall Street Journal, March 22)
SHIPPING
EXTENSION OF SEAWAY SEASON TO BE EXAMINED
OTTAWA - The St. Lawrence Seaway Authority is expected to award a contract soon for a cost-benefit study on an extended Seaway season of up
to 11 months, according to a senior adviser to president Paul Normandeau.
The study will look only at benefits to Canada, since the United States
is already doing its own investigations, and will probably involve an
annual extension of the present nine-month season by one month a year
until the 11-month season is reached, said A. M. Luce.
(Toronto Globe and Mail, March 23)
* * *
DOMINION MARINE GROUP TO PRESS FOR LOWER TOLLS
MONTREAL - The Dominion Marine Association plans to continue the fight
against higher tolls on the St. Lawrence Seaway, says president Admiral
Robert W. Timbrell.
The challenge came in the wake of an announcement that Canada and the
U.S. had reached formal agreement on a plan to substantially raise tolls
on the Seaway. "We have to accept the fact now that 50 per cent of the
proposed rate hike will come into effect upon the opening of the Seaway
April 3," Mr. Timbrell said. "But another 25 per cent of the hike is
due to come into effect a year from now and the remainder in 1980. We
will continue to press the Minister of Transport (Otto Lang) to delay
these increases -- or even better -- abolish them entirely."
(Montreal Gazette, March 28)
* A- *
MORE GRAIN SHIPS EXPECTED ON LAKES
CHICAGO - Higher than usual movement of ocean-going grain ships is expected in the Great Lakes in the first weeks after the St. Lawrence Seaway opens this year, shipping sources said in Chicago. 16
Sources in the grain industry noted that exports from North Atlantic
ports have been delayed by rail car shortages. They said they expect
shippers will bring ships into the lakes rather than let them sit idle
at the coast.
(Reuters - Western Producer, March 16)
* * *
BUSINESS & FINANCE
NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN 1977 IMPROVE CANADIAN PACIFIC EARNINGS' POTENTIAL
MONTREAL - Canadian Pacific's record earnings in 1977 were accompanied
by important developments designed to enhance future earnings' potential.
The company's 1977 annual report, released March 30, describes new ventures in a wide range of natural resource, manufacturing, transportation,
real estate, hotel and other activities.
PanCanadian Petroleum Limited, a major contributor to earnings in 1977,
conducted an extensive exploration program and acquired land for exploration and development in the high potential oil and gas areas of Alberta
and northeastern British Columbia. Extensive gas finds and two oil discoveries were made in southern Alberta.
Cominco Ltd. opened a new ammonia-urea complex east of Calgary that significantly increased its chemical fertilizer production capacity and
Fording Coal Limited completed a program to increase the capacity of the
treatment plant at its coal mine in southeastern B.C. Pacific Logging
Company Limited planted more than 1,000,000 trees and fertilized large
acreages of forest lands.
Dominion Bridge Company, Limited acquired Amtel Inc., a United States-
based diversified engineering, construction and manufacturing enterprise.
Marathon Realty Company Limited expanded with new shopping centres in
Ottawa and Toronto, office building projects in San Francisco, Toronto
and Burnaby, B.C., and new industrial buildings.
CP Hotels opened its new hotel at Montreal's Mirabel International Airport and took over management of hotels in the Bahamas, Mexico and
Israel.
Chateau Insurance Company acquired the Canadian business of Great American Insurance Company.
CP Rail started construction on a double-tracking program for sections
of the main line through the Rockies to help meet western Canada's
future transportation needs. CP Air ordered two new DC-10-30 wide-
bodied aircraft and two Boeing 737s.
Canadian Pacific Consulting Services Limited undertook new assignments 17
throughout the world and signed a major contract to design a 1,500-km
iron-ore railway in Algeria.
Canadian Pacific had record earnings in 1977 of $247.0-million, equal to
$3.41 per Ordinary share, despite general economic conditions that left
a great deal to be desired. Slow economic growth and accelerating price
inflation restricted real disposable income, and hence consumer spending,
and discouraged business capital investment.
The major strength of the economy was in merchandise exports, particularly to the United States. The decline in the value of the Canadian
dollar gave added impetus to the export sector but also raised the
prices of imports into Canada.
A number of specific situations were favorable enough to enable most of
Canadian Pacific's operations to do better than they had in 1976, even
if earnings in some cases still didn't provide an acceptable return on
investment.
"All signs suggest that 1978 will be another difficult year for the
Canadian and world economies," the report says. "Government actions to
stimulate economic activity are either being taken or are being proposed
in a number of countries, including Canada. These will be welcome as
long as they do not set in motion a new wave of inflation.
"Having been badly battered in recent years, business confidence would
be further shaken by any threat of a resurgence of high inflation rates.
The fairly recent re-discovery by governments of how important such confidence is for sound economic growth may help to influence policiesvin
the direction of restraint."
Under the economic conditions most likely to prevail in 1978, few sectors of the company will find its easy to increase earnings. New labor
contracts have to be negotiated for pulp and paper, iron and steel and
several hotels, in most cases after the phase-out of inflation controls
begins. High world inventories could adversely affect prices of coal,
zinc, pulp and certain agriproducts. The outlook is promising for oil
and gas and real estate and generally favorable for the company's transportation enterprises, with the exception of bulk shipping.
(Canadian Pacific News Release, March 30)
* * i
CPI SEES BRIGHT FUTURE DESPITE CURRENT ECONOMIC DIFFICULTIES
MONTREAL - Canadian Pacific Investments Limited may be hard pressed to
match its 1977 earnings this year but the completion of major expansion
programs and the diversification of the company's interests makes it
more optimistic than ever about its future. 18
"Most projections for 1978 indicate another year of low growth for the
economies of the world's major nations," CPI says in its 1977 annual
report. "The justified concern of governments with the problem of
inflation leaves most of them with little scope for stimulative measures. Still, in a number of countries there have been moves towards
moderately expansionist policies.
"In Canada, these moves come at the same time as anti-inflation controls
are being phased out. The effects of this combination are not wholly
predictable, but it seems reasonable to expect that correction of the
distortions produced by controls will necessitate some difficult adjustments and cause some problems. However, these have to be faced at some
time, and the longer the delay, the more difficult the problems are
likely to become."
These economic conditions will affect many of the company's operations
this year. The existing high levels of world inventories of pulp, zinc,
coking coal and certain agriproducts are likely to continue to weigh on
their respective markets. Many of CPI's subsidiaries face labor contract negotiations, mostly in the period after the phase-out of anti-
inflation controls has begun.
Positive factors include the strength of the oil and gas sector, and
expected improvement in the rate of capacity utilization in the steel
industry, the favorable outlook for real estate and good prospects for
increased shipments of forest products despite the world pulp situation.
"The company's horizons extend, of course, well beyond any one- or two-
year period," the report says. "Making as good a profit as possible
under the prevailing conditions of each year is a prime objective, but
so is the building of a solid base for future earnings' growth. In view
of what has been accomplished over the relatively short period since the
company was established in 1962, there is greater reason than ever
before for optimism about its future. Diversification of its interests
already provides some shield against pronounced downward swings in any
single market or geographical area. Over time, this process can undoubtedly be profitably pursued further.
"Several of the company's subsidiaries have recently completed major
expansion programs and are in a good position to benefit from improved
demand. The prospects for the years ahead are no less encouraging than
the results of the past year were gratifying."
CPI earnings in 1977 were $213.2-million, an increase of $73.0-million
or 52 per cent over 1976. Net income per common share was $3.55 compared
with $2.36 in 1976. Earnings included extraordinary income of $8.5-
million representing the net gain on the sale of CanPac Leasing Limited.
There were a number of reasons for the higher earnings. These included
contributions made by Steep Rock Iron Mines Limited, Chateau Insurance
Company and Baker Commodities, Inc., all acquired during 1976; the lower
exchange rate of the Canadian dollar, and freedom from the labor disputes
that interrupted production at The Great Lakes Paper Company, Limited 19
and Fording Coal Limited in 1976. Market changes that had particularly
beneficial effects were the authorization to export surplus heavy crude
oil, increases in prices for oil and gas, and an improvement in the
demand for, and price of, lead.
The report points to the slow rate of economic growth in most countries
as the major brake on any additional expansion of earnings in 1977. The
United States was an exception as its economy performed somewhat better
in 1977. But even there, as everywhere else, investment in plant and
machinery lagged.
"One result of the world-wide dearth of capital spending was widespread
depression in the steel industry, and related contraction of demand for
coking coal," the report says. "The general sluggishness of world
economies also adversely affected metal mining -- except for lead, gold
and silver — and the pulp and paper industry. When viewed against this
background, the 1977 earnings*achievements of the company's subsidiaries
in those sectors can be more fully appreciated."
(News Release: Canadian Pacific Investments Limited, March 27)
* * *
GRAIN COMPANIES SEEKING TARIFF JUMP OF 25 PER CENT
WINNIPEG - Grain farmers may face increased handling costs of between 20
and 25 per cent next crop year if the Canadian Grain Commission heeds
the advice of grain companies at tariff hearings this week in Saskatoon.
Proposed tariffs would increase costs to farmers an average of five to
six cents per bushel, and would give the industry at least $20- to $30-
million in badly needed extra revenues.
Some company officials interviewed last week suggested that maximum
handling tariffs at terminal points should be increased by as much as 50
per cent. The lower increases for rural elevator tariffs would bring
the average increase down to about 20 per cent, they say.
The Grain Commission will hear about 15 briefs at its three-day hearing
in Saskatoon. It must establish the new maximum tariff levels prior to
the 1978-79 crop year, which begins Aug. 1. ,
(Winnipeg Tribune, March 23)
* * *
INDUSTRIAL DEMOCRACY COMING?
WINNIPEG - Experiments with industrial democracy have gained some momentum in recent years in Canada, but they have yet to become a number one
priority for either labor or management.
This differs from the situation in Europe, where a long history of collaboration between the two parties has produced varying degrees of worker input into corporate decision-making. Because industrial relations 20
in this country have been tied to the adversarial system of collective
bargaining, few observers are holding their breath in the expectation
that a powerful employee voice in management will soon emerge.
For example, the European acceptance of employee representation on
boards of directors cannot be easily transplanted to this side of the
Atlantic, if at all, spokesmen say. However, changes at the other end
of the corporate structure, the shop floor, are more likely to appear.
These changes which would give individuals or groups of employees more
control over their own work and the methods they use to perform it, have
appeared in a few Canadian companies in a limited way. The programs,
which are variously known as shop floor democracy, job satisfaction, and
quality-of-work-life, have been experimental and there is no way of
knowing whether they will take hold.
(Winnipeg Free Press, March 23)
* * *
CP INVESTMENTS RAISES HOLDINGS IN ALGOMA STEEL AND DOMINION BRIDGE
MONTREAL - Canadian Pacific Investments Ltd. indicated in insider trading reports that it has increased controlling holdings in Algoma Steel
Corp. and Dominion Bridge Co.
CPI said it acquired 121,870 Algoma shares on the open market during
February, bringing its total holding to 6,201,810 shares, or 53.1 per
cent.
In addition, CPI said it acquired 136,800 Dominion Bridge shares during
January and February, bringing its direct holdings in the Montreal-based
structural steel producer to 779,900 shares or 7.26 per cent.
CPI, through Algoma, holds a further 4,596,824 shares, or 43.23 per
cent of Dominion Bridge, putting its total direct and indirect holdings at 50.49 per cent.
A CPI spokesman said the acquisitions were made "for investment purposes", adding that he knows of no plans for a full take-up of public
shares in either company.
* * *
(Canadian Dow Jones, March 30)
'URGENT' ROYAL COMMISSION REACHES THIRD ANNIVERSARY
TORONTO - The Royal Commission on Corporate Concentration will celebrate
its third anniversary on April 22 and may have its report ready for the
following week.
The report is in the hands of the Queen's Printer, and, according to a
spokesman for the Royal Commission, printing will be completed by the
week of April 24.
(Financial Post, April 1)
. * * *

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