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Third copies, February 1978 Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1978

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 TELEX
. VANCOUVER, B.C., 28 FEB. 1978
File:  T-78-150
J.D. MASON   05-24725
MONTREAL, QUE.
">
PLS ARRANGE CASH ADVANCE 100.00 FAVOUR J „ ?lmiE  MGR TRAFFIC ^
SALES BCCSS VANC A/C BUSINESS EXPENSES TO BE ACCOUNTED FOR ALSO
100.00 FAVOUR w SHAVER FRT TRF REPRES BCCS - NORTHLAND SERVICE
VANC A/C BUSINESS EXPENSES TO BE ACCOUNTED FOR     BCC-16
M.W. HOLLAND ■  ,
MGR., BCCSS
BB
cc.  Mr. W.W. Hocking
i/ X'OForrn 102A-R
File:     78.POV.529,
CPRail
internal Corresp
Date      VANCOUVER, 28 February
From     M>W- Holland
'°  Memorandum
Mr. R.R. Reid
Further to your memorandum, File 78.POV.529, dated 27 February
1978, regarding the interruption of service of the "Princess
of Vancouver" as a result of the tall ships sailpast.
Kindly draft the appropriate letter for my signature to the
Port authorities, asking them their position in light of the
circumstances you have detailed.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
§          ■' *~'" "V
-m
xSil
J internal Correspondenc
Date     VANCOUVER, 28 February 1978.
From     M.W. Holland
To     Memorandum
Mr. H.L. Hudson
COMPLAINT - MR. PHILIP MURPHY
15
%0>
File:     T-78-99
in?) Form 102A-R
With reference to the attached, would you please send a copy to
Mr. Bob Schmitt for his handling.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
J TELEX VANCOUVER, B.C., 28 FEBRUARY 1978.
File:  655-C
P.I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE.
RE YQUR MEETING WITH INTERESTED PARTIES FOR JOINT PARTICIPATION
YESTERDAY A M KINDLY ADVISE BY RETURN TELEX OUTCOME OF YOUR DISCUSSIONS
AS SAME ARE IMPERATIVE IN OUR APPRAISAL OF MERCATOR PLANS AND
RELATED COSTS    BCC-15
M.W. HOLLAND
MGR., BCCSS .
MWH'BB .'■
':0
J CPRail
Date   VANCOUVER, 28 February 1978. File:  T-78-1012-A
From   M.W. Holland
7o Memorandum
Mr. T. King
Further to your recent memoranda regarding working hours during
weekends on the "Trailer Princess."
Would you kindly take whatever action is necessary to provide us
with a third-party observation of the movement of individuals on
board this vessel.  As I have explained to you previously, we
cannot proceed with any further action until such time as this is
done.
i»X)Form 102-R
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S,
MWH'BB
/
4
J WHolland
BC Coast Steamship Sen
Pier"B", Vancouver BC    V6C 2P.3
Tel (604) 665-3135 Telex 04-507684
28 February   1978.
7Reid File No.   562
•; Manager
Mr. H.N. Crompton, Manager
Quatsino Sound Division
Seaspan International Ltd.
10 Pemberton Avenue
North Vancouver, B.C.
V7P 2R1
Dear Mr. Crompton:
This is to acknowledge your letter of 25 January 1978, regarding the proposed agreements between CP Limited/Aqua Transportation
Ltd., and CP Limited/Seaspan International Limited, related to
the weekend ro-ro service to the North End of Vancouver Island.
I realize this matter has been under our advisement for an extended
period of time, but as you will appreciate, we have been heavily
involved in changing circumstances here at the BCCS Service.
Further, as you are aware, we have been giving considerable attention
to our North End of Vancouver Island service in attempts to build
the traffic volumes to a level which ensures the operation's success.
The terms of the contract are again being actively reviewed, and
hopefully, I will be contacting you in the not too distant future
for the purpose of drawing them to a conclusion.
In the interim, I suggest that we should tear ourselves away from
our respective chairs and get together for lunch in the near future.
In this regard I will be contacting you in the next little while.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
J CPRail
Date   VANCOUVER,   28 February 1978. File:     T-78-150 .
From   M.W.  Holland
To   Mr.   J.L.   Rochon
Supervisor, Data Centre
Vancouver, B.C.
Please issue cash advance to replenish cash float:
$14,035.23    Wholesale Delivery Service       Burnaby, B.C.
$ 4,612,19    Lindsay Cartage & Storage Ltd.   Prince Rupert, B.C.
Agent BCCS - Northland (Agency #9992).
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
rOForm 102-R
J
I r
internal Correspondence
Date   VANC0UVER> 28 February 1978.
F-rom   M.W. Holland
To
File:  T-78-40
Ms. C. Desautels
Personnel Assistant, Recruitment
Personnel Development
Room 152, Windsor Station
Montreal, Que.
(^)Form 102-R
This is in reference to your memorandum dated 14 February 1978, to which
was attached a resume of Mr. David G. Beauchamp.
I have reviewed Mr. Beauchamp's resume and agree with your Department's
conclusions that this individual is exceptionally qualified in his
field; however, at this time we have no openings at the BCCSS, either
in our ro-ro or tug and barge services, but I will keep this resume'
on our file, to be traced at a later date when we are more definite
with respect to our personnel requirements.
I thank you for bringing this matter to our attention.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
J
\ CPRail
internal Corresponds
Date   VANCOUVER, 28 February 1978.
From   m.W. Holland
To   Memorandum
Mr. R.D. Pelley
File:  78.ALA.521.M.
Received a phone call last night from the following:
Ms. Anita Ma
Suite 305, 1420 East 7th Ave.
Vancouver, B.C.
V5N 1R8
Ms. Ma is interested in the May 31st sailing for three persons,
and phoned to confirm that the cabin rate would be $1720.00, plus
an additional $655.00 for the third party.
Would you kindly arrange to forward to Ms. Ma, together with the
appropriate letter, the attached brochure plus two others, one
for each of her friends.
Your immediate attention to this is requested.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB   "i":V"",
)Forrn 102-R Interna! Correspondence
Date       VANCOUVER, 28 February 1978.
From       A.N. Cairns
To       Master, "Princess of Vancouver"
"Carrier Princess"
"Trailer Princess"
NOTICE FOR BULLETIN BOARD
ED Form 102-R
Former long-time employee, Cliff Bennett, Bosun, "Princess of
Vancouver," passed away yesterday.
Funeral arrangements will be advised in local papers.
,N. CAIRNS   ^4~~	
Marine Superintendent
ANC'BB internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, 28 February 1978. File: L-21J
From   M.W. Holland
To   Mr. D. Murray
Terminal Manager
BCCS - Northland Service
Kitimat, B.C.
Attached you will find a copy of a Letter of Understanding recently
signed by representatives of the Teamsters Loeal Union #213 and
U.S.W.A.Local #6611, in Prince Rupert.
It is believed that this document settles the outstanding dispute
regarding delivery made by our Northland Service personnel to
the Cancel Pulp Mill; however, would you kindly keep a close eye
on the situation and advise me should further problems arise.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
cc.  Mr. P.I. Georges, Montreal.
Mr. P.E. Timpson, Vancouver.
Mr. V. Jones, Vancouver.
Mr. N. Parham, Prince Rupert,
fiO Form 102-R r^Mi&*
Date   VANCOUVER, 28 February 1978.
From   M.W. Holland
To   Memorandum
Mr. H.L. Hudson'
File:  T-78-166
!
I have reviewed our File T-78-166 on Ranking Injuries, and note
the severe increase in Coastal Marine Operations Lost Time Injuries as reported in CP Rail's Employee Casualty Statement.
On reviewing 1977, would you kindly provide me with a breakdown
of each of the injuries which occurred, showing cause and duration
of loss of time, and any other specific comments.
It is noted that in the January report we are shown with three
Lost Time Injuries, which even in light of our low season, should
this be multiplied by three for the remaining months of the year
we would end up with a record which is totally unacceptable.
I realize that the office of the Senior Executive Officer has shown
considerable concern in this area, which is understandable in light
of our record.  Accordingly, would you kindly determine a plan of action
we should be following to improve our performance.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
cc.  Mr. A.N. Cairns
X'OForm 102-R
J CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, February 28th, 1973
From M#w# Holland
0 Mr. W.C. Sylander, Vancouver, B.C.
Files 505
Please refer to your letter of January 23, 1978 file G-l-C
concerning B.C. Workmen's Compensation Board.
Actual costs for 1977 and estimate for 1978 are as follows:-
Gross Payroll
Total earnings to a
maximum of $15,600
for 1977 and$L7,600
for 1978
1977 Actual
$ 5,007,001
4,439,160
1978 Estimate
$5,307,421
4,705,510
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/wj
<S> Form 102-R
J CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, February 28, 1978
From  M.W. Holland
FILE:  AGR.l.CMSG.SEN.
To  MASTER
PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER
CARRIER PRINCESS
TRAILER PRINCESS
PRINCESS PATRICIA
For your information and distribution on your vessel, enclosed
herewith are copies of Seniority and Category lists of Masters
and Deck Officers as at January 1, 1978.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB
cS'Form102-R
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
WHolland February 28,   1978
ineid File:     AGR. l.CMSG.SEN.
'.Xinager
Capt.  J.E.S.   Bragg
Business Agent
Canadian Merchant Service Guild
Western Branch
230 West Broadway
Vancouver, B.C.
V5Y 1P7
Dear Capt. Bragg:
Enclosed herewith are two copies of Service Seniority
List and two copies of Category List for Masters and
Deck Officers, as at January 1, 1978.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB
J CPRaii
wrespi
Date VANCOUVER, February 28th, 1978
From M.W. Holland
To Mr. O.R. Robison, Vancouver
Mr. E. Robinson, Nanaimo
Purser, "Princess of Vancouver"
Miss B.C. Thorn
File; T-78-39
Please apply following rates effective March 1, 1978, until
further advised:
U.S. funds at premium on international and foreign freight
traffic covered by CFA Tariff 16G:
Exchange
Surcharge
Discount
11 3/8 Percent
7   Percent
Nil
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/w-j
xpxh
Form 102-R
J :w Holland
wager
H Reid
■ Manager
Pier"B". Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
CP Bail
February 28th, 1978
File : T-78-40
-■■
Mr. Joseph M. DeMille, I
Box 410,
25 Andrews Memorial Drive,
Rochester, New York,
14623
Dear Mr, DeMille:
Reference your letter concerning employment on our
cruise vessel the "Princess Patricia."
We are strictly a coastal operation and in accordance
with the Shipping Act we can hire only Canadian citizens
or landed immigrants.
Sorry we cannot be of more assistance, but thank you for
your interest in Canadian Pacific.
Yours very truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/wj W Holland
ftflejtf
;,' Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier ■■&". Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Te! (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
February 28th, 1978
File: T-78-40
Ms. Karen E. Murray,
R.R. #3, Port Elgin,
New Brunsivjick,
EOA 2K0
Dear Ms. Murray:
Reference your letter of February 20th, 1978 concerning
employment on our Alaska cruise vessel the "Princess
Patricia".
The "Princess Patricia" is an older vessel and owing to her
conformation she has very limited accommodation for female
crew, only four in fact, which are taken up by the Stewardess,
Hairdresser, Gift Shop Attendant and Entertainer. In any
event, all positions on the vessel are filled and we have a
very long waiting list of applicants.
Sorry we cannot be of more assistance at the present time, but
thank you for your interest in Canadian Pacific.
Yours very truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
HLH/wtj
l
i
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2P.3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
V Holland
I Reid
February 28th, 1978
File: T-78-40
Ms. Renee Bienvenu,
#108 - 3040 Chemin St. Louis,
Sainte-Foy, Quebec.
G1W 1R3
Dear Ms. Bienvenu:
Reference your letter of February 9th, 1978 concerning
employment on our Alaska cruise vessel the "Princess
Patricia."
The "Princess Patricia" is an older vessel and owing to her
conformation she has very limited accommodation for female
crew, only four in fact, which are taken up by the Stewardess,
Hairdresser, Gift Shop Attendant and Entertainer. In any
event, all positions on the vessel are filled and we have a
very long waiting list of applicants.
Sorry we cannot be of more assistance at the present time, but
thank you for your interest in Canadian Pacific.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/wj
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
I Reid
Manager
wHolland -February 28th, 1978
File:    T-78-40
Ms. Donna M. Warren,
R.R. 1,
Eganville, Ontario.
KOJ 1TO
Dear Ms. Warren:
Reference your letter of February 11, 1978 concerning
employment on our Alaska cruise vessel the "Princess
Patricia."
The "Princess Patricia" is an older vessel and owing to her
conformation she has very limited accommodation for female
crew, only four in fact, which are taken up by the Stewardess,
Hairdresser, Gift Shop Attendant and Entertainer. In any
event, all positions on the vessel are filled and we have a
very long waiting list of applicants.
Sorry we cannot be of more assistance at the present time, but
thank you for your interest in Canadian Pacific.
Yours very truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/wj r
W Holland
■ ager
l.Rsid
Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
February 28th, 1978
File: T-78-40
Ms. Gisele Muller,
663 Grierson Ave.,
Fort Barry,
Winnipeg, Manitoba. R3T 2S3
Dear Ms. Muller:
Reference your letter of February 5th, 1978 concerning
employment on our Alaska cruise vessel the "Princess
Patricia."
The "Princess Patricia" is an older vessel and owing to her
conformation she has very limited accommodation for female
crew, only four in fact, which are taken up by the Stewardess,
Hairdresser, Gift Shop Attendant and Entertainer. In any
event, all positions on the vessel are filled and we have a
very long waiting list of applicants.
Sorry we cannot be of more assistance at the present time, but
thank you for your interest in Canadian Pacific.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/wj
J CPRail
internal Corresponds.
mce
Date      VANCOUVER, February 28, 1978 File:  AGR. l.CMSG.N. GEN.
From      M.W. Holland
To      Mr. J.T. Sparrow
Manager
Labour Relations
Montreal
IN THE MATTER OF THE CANADA LABOUR CODE (PART V - INDUSTRIAL
RELATIONS) AND AN APPLICATION FOR CERTIFICATION AS BARGAINING
AGENT MADE PURSUANT TO SECTION 124 THEREOF CONCERNING CANADIAN
MERCHANT SERVICE GUILD, APPLICANT, AND CANADIAN PACIFIC LIMITED,
NORTHLAND DIVISION, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, EMPLOYER	
Reference my letter of February 22, 1978, to the Secretary-Registrar,
Canada Labour Relations Board, copy to you, concerning the above-
referenced application.
We now enclose three sets of the following material:
(a) A list showing the name, classification, home address
and telephone number of all employees
(b) A second list showing the same information as that in
(a) above, without addresses and telephone numbers
The organizational chart is presently being prepared and copy of
same will be forwarded to you as soon as possible.
rS)Forrn 102-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc:  Mr. G. Rogers
Canada Labour Relations Board
12th Floor, 1090 West Pender St.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6E 2N7
Copies of the lists are attached herewith,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB
j
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
AW Holland
i R Reid
■ x Manager
February 28th, 1978
File: T-78-30-23
Mr. VI.G. Sutherland,
Manager, Rail Division,
Seaspan International
10 Pemberton Ave.,
North Vancouver, B.C.
V7P 2R1
Dear Sir;
I have a damage report stating that Haida Freightways trailer
No. 241 was accidentally backed into Johnston Terminals #3665
during loading operations for the 2400 hours sailing to Nanaimo
on February 22, 1978 (Arrival time Nanaimo, 0335 hrs. February
23rd, 1978) of the Seaspan Doris.
Will you please provide any details that you may have.
Sincerely,.
AJM/wj
M.W. Holland.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
J LLN5)Form 102-R
L
CPRaii
internal Ct
CONFIDENTIAL
Date      VANCOUVER, February 28th, 1978 Files:    T-78-14
T-78-16
From      A. Meijer
To      Chief Steward, Princess of Vancouver,
Enclosed is a new working schedule for the use of your Storekeeper.
Penalty meal hour came to light through my checking the overtime
sheets and I feel that it was the responsibility of the Chief
Steward, due to the change in the ship's sailing schedule, to
consult me immediately to change the Storekeeper's hours and not
merely sign the overtime sheets.
I trust you will be more attentive to matters of this nature in the
future.
Catering Superintendent.
/ TELEX VANCOUVER, B.C., 27 FEB. 1978
No.126931
W.R. JONES   MDMD
MONTREAL, QUE.
PERCY HINDMARCH PENSIONED JANITOR NANAIMO TERMINAL EMPLOYEE NO 126931
MOVING TO VANCOUVER EFFECTIVE DATE. PLS NOTE NEW ADDRESS P. HINDMARCH
C/O J HINDMARCH 116 EAST 39TH AVE VANCOUVER B C FOR FORWARDANCE PENSION
CHEQUE IN MARCH AND THEREAFTER       BCC-13
M.W. HOLLAND
MGR., BCCSS V.
cc.     Mr. R. Granger        .
Manager, Benefits
Montreal, Que.
J Internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER,   27  February  1978.
From     R-R-   Reld
To  N.D. Mullins, Esq.
Regional Counsel
Vancouver, B.C.
File:  234
We are attaching copies of contract arranged by your office on our
beahlf, in connection with entertainers on board the "Princess
Patricia" during the 1977 cruise season.
Mr. and Mrs. Haswell are being retained again as entertainers for
the 1978 season, and will appreciate if you will draw up similar
contract, with one change on Page 5, Section 2(b), reflecting an
increase from $925.00 each week to $980.00 each week. May we please
have three copies of contract.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
Pi§, fKWAL & PASS
*;V: XXX-{
-v.
(§§g) Form 102-R
■
A •i- ijer
PCCx.'JStSiC
P>'i B", Van:
Tx (604)665
J&*\ 'X-\    FVCSV ■» ')
ii     :-J fe_3fi>.3-iJ
WHolland 21 February  1978.
■iRekl File No.  AGR.2.SIU.
Mr. D.C. Watt
Conciliation Commissioner
5348 Kensington Crescent
West Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Watt:
As per your request, please find attached the Company's statement
regarding an appropriate wage increase for S.I.U. employees working on the vessels of B.C. Coast Steamship Service.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
PET'BB
be.  Mr. J.T. Sparrow, Manager, Labour Relations, Montreal.
Mr. P.I. Georges, Asst. Gen. Mgr., Coastal Marine Operations, Montreal.
Mr. P.E. Timpson, Asst. Supervisor, Labour Relations, Vancouver.
J -  ;!   ix-  ? ixxjr.BC   V6C ?R3
f.;c'W;6v ■■■ x.135. TulexOJ 50/(.-;>:
■■'Holland 27 Vebruary 1978.
3*w FXe.e Wo. AGR. 3. BRAC. S. GEN.
Ait. J. A. foster
Local Chairman
Brotherhood o{ Hallway, Airline £
Steamship Clerks, etc.,  Lodge #526
811 Beach Vrlve
Nanaimo, B.C.
Dear Mr. Vaster:
This has re{erence to my letter o{ 13 Vebruary In reply to your
letter o{ 4 Vebruary, regarding accommodation {on {emale sta{{
on the "Vrlncess o{ Vancouver."
On too occasions Mr. Andre Meljer, Catering Superintendent,
travelled on board the "Vrlncess o{ Vancouver" recently, both
during the day and during the evening , and on these occasions,
In addition to other duties, looked Into the alleged unbearable
noise {rom propellers.
It Is the opinion o{ both the Catering SupeJilntendent and the
Chle{ Engineer that the noise level since the "Vnlncess o{
Vancouver" entered drydock, Is no greater than at any time during
the normal operation o{ the vessel.
The policy o{ assigning passenger cabins {or the {emale sta{{
on the "Vrlncess o{ Vancouver" Is not In order, and Chle{ Stexoands
and Vursers have been advised that this accommodation Is not to
be assigned to the above-mentioned sta{{.
Yours very truly,
R.R. REIP
Asst.  Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
ce.    Mr. R. Welch
Ms.  A.  Williamson
Mr. G. Grekul
"S '
be.  Mr. A. Meijer - Will you please ensure that Chief Stewards
and Purser understand the foregoing.
I 1
Date   VANCOUVER,   27 February 1978.
From   R.R.  Reid
To Memorandum
Mr. M.W. Holland
File:  78.POV.529
I have just spoken to Gordon Darling, who is a CP Air Passenger
Representative, in connection with this file-
I have effectively been told that the "Princess of Vancouver"
will not be able to perform either her 8:00 a.m. or 12:00 noon
sailing on 25 July or 30 July, because of the passage of tall
ships through the Narrows at the approximate time of the
"Princess of Vancouver's" aforementioned sailings.  In so many
words, I was told that nothing is going to deter the political
overtones on this occasion, and that the CP will just have to
take its lumps in so far as its scheduling is concerned on these
days.
I would suggest that this matter be taken up with National
Harbours Board, because I am certain '.it is not the intention
to interrupt normal commerce in and out of the Harbour, notwithstanding the Sea Festival.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
(Form 102-R
vi ! Reid
- Manager
BC Coast Steamship Serv, ze
pier "B", Vancouver. BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
27 Vebruony 1978.
Vile Mo.   7'8.529.R.
Mr.  David R.  Lamb
Russell Steel Social Club
9311 River Drive
Richmond,  B.C.
V6y 2A9
Dear Mr.  Lamb:
Enclosed please {Ind ln{ormatlon pertaining to the 1978 dance
cruise rates and service on board the "Vrlncess o{ Vancouver"
Kindly note that due to other duties being per{ormed by Union
crew members, and rest periods, dinner cannot be served during
layover In Nanaimo, and must be partaken o{ en route Nanaimo.
The usual practice Is {or regular clientele to be accommodated,
and then your entire group will be brought down by Chle{ Steward.
As Saturday night Is generally a light sailing, there Is little
delay a{ter departure {rom Vancouver prior to commencement o{
meal service.
Should there be any additional ln{ormatlon required, kindly let
us know.
Yours very truly,
R.R.  REI17
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "S". Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
PHa
xW Holland
R Reid
Manager
27 Vebruary 1978.
Vile No.   78.529.U.
Ak.  W.   Umezukl
V.O.  Box 48543
V.S. Bentall Centre
Vancouver, B. C.
1/7X M3
Pe<z/_ Ait.  Umezukl:
Enclosed please {Ind ln{ormatlon pertaining to the 1978 series
o{ dance cruises on board the "Vrlncess o{ Vancouver."
You will notice minimal Increase In meal and bar service.
J{ we can be o{ any service to you, please let us know.
Yours very truly,
R.R.  REIP
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, 27 February 1978. File: AGR.1.CMSG.GEN.
From   R.R. Reid
TO   Mr. A.E. Schmidt
Supt., Dept. of Investigation
Vancouver, B.C.
During the regular inspection of Pier B-C by Investigation Officers,
when "Trailer Princess" is tied up over the weekend it would be
appreciated if an inspection could be made, with advice to this
office if ship is secure, or if personnel are working on board ship
at the time inspector's report made.
We are particularly interested in knowing whether there is any
employee working on board ship after 3:30 p.m. on Saturday or
Sunday.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.,
RRR'BB
)Form 102-R Date
From
To
SSI) Form 102A-R
rai
File:     494316
internal Correspondence
VANCOUVER, February 27th, 1978
M.W. Holland
Mrs. D. Martin,
Pension Benefits, Montreal.
Your Speedi-Memo of February 9th, 1978 concerning Officer's
Insurance Coverage for W.H. Hockman.
As requested, the Health Statement has now been completed by
Mr. Hickman and is returned herewith.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HV/ ^
rMfflfft-W internal Correspondence
Date       VANCOUVER, February 27th, 1978 File:  T-78-1012D
From       M.W. Holland
To       A. McDermott
Manager, Insurance and Fire Protection.
I am enclosing photostat copy of Form 112 covering inspection of
"the Trailer Princess" on January 20th, 1978.
Kindly note Item 4, the 10 lb. dry chemical fire extinguisher,
has been sent out for necessary checking of the gauge readings,
&_■c-c<f___-v£-- again- below allowable limits.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
ST) Form 102A-R Internal Correspondence
Date
From
To
VANCOUVER,  February 27th,   1978
M.W.   Holland
Mr.  W.   Barham,
CP Transport,  Vancouver
File:  164
On February 13 I wrote you concerning accident which took place
on August 23, 1977 involving Doman Marpole tractor No. 210,
driven by Mr. George Bone and CP Transport tractor driven by
your employee.
Will you kindly reply as soon as possible in order that I may
settle the matter with Mr. Bone's Solicitor.
iS&Form 102A-R
Manager,   B.C.C.S.S.
VI W/u^ ! Reid
Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "6", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
WHolland February 27th,   1978
File:     T-78-1032
Ms. J.Wallace,
Pay Research,
Personnel Department,
Government of N.W. Territories,
Yellowknife, N.W.T.
Dear Ms. Wallace:
Concerning your telephone inquiry of February 13, 1978 in which
you requested copies of position guides for our Marine Superintendent
and Superintendent Engineer.
I regret that these are not available at the present time as there
have been several changes in duties and the guides are being rewritten.
As soon as they have been completed and approved, we will be glad to
forward you a copy.
Yours very truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager B.C.C.S.S.
N«/«4 CPRail
Date
From
To
VANCOUVER, February 27th, 1978 File:  494263 (I)
A. Meijer
Mr. T. Irvine,. Chief Steward, Princess of Vancouver.
A form B.C.C.S.S. has been submitted by you covering injury to
A.A. Omeria on February 22, 1978.
Item 5 is incomplete in that it does not state whether Mr. Omeria
cut his finger or whether you have investigated the incident to
determine whether a piercing or cutting hazard exists.
Will you kindly look into this and advise me immediately.
Form 102A-R
Catering Superintendent, -   ' unsrsn 'xn-xxT!p'SBrvi(XB
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
i W-Holland
•■■
iReid
- Manager
February 27th, 1978
File T-78-14
Serve-U-Supply Ltd.,
646 Powell St.,
Vancouver, B.C.
V6A 1H4
Dear Sir:
At present your commissary supply original invoice, plus two
additional copies, for B.C.C.S.S. are forwarded to our Purchasing
Department.
Effective March 1st, will you kindly let me have an additional copy
which should be forwarded to:
Catering Superintendent,
B.C.C.S.S.,
Pier "B", Ft. of Burrard St.,
Vancouver, B.C.
V6C 2R3
Yours very truly,
A. Meijer
Catering Superintendent,
AM/wj CPRail . W/i
Internal Correspondence mSj
Date     VANCOUVER, February 27th, 1978 File:  ALA.521
From     R.R. Reid
To      A.G. Graham, Esq.
Solicitor,
Vancouver, B.C.
RE:  NEW TORONTO TRAVEL SERVICE INC
Please refer to correspondence exchanged under your file 1-420 and
laterally your letter of January 10th, 1978 concerning information
and payment of Alaska transport by New Toronto Travel Service Inc.
We have just received advise from the President of Your Host Travel
Agency, Mr. Perry, to the effect that the organization currently
known as Lake Shore Travel Service registered in the name of Maria
A. Rush effective February 1st will be affiliated with Your Host
Travel Agency, 1971 Queen St. E., Toronto, Ontario M4L 1H9, and will
henceforth be known as Your Host - Lake Shore Travel. Miss Rush
will continue to operate and manage the office.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc: W.J. Cumerford, Manager,
Customer Agency Accounts,
Montreal.
I regret that your letter dated December 19th, file 7999-1207 was
received while I was on annual vacation and inadvertently was not
brought forward on my return. However, nothing has transpired to
date, my letter to Mr. Graham. You are now up-to-date on copy of
this letter. I have received no further advise from our legal
department concerning status of collection. The change in ownership may prompt some new action in this respect, and will keep you
advised.
RRR/wj
(Form 102-R File:     494316
CPRail
internal Correspondence
Date      VANCOUVER, February 27th, 1978
From      M.W. Holland
To       Mrs. D. Martin,
Pension Benefits, Montreal.
Your Speedi-Memo of February 9th, 1978 concerning Officer's
Insurance Coverage for W.H. Hickman.
As requested, the Health Statement has now been completed by
Mr. Hickman and is returned herewith.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
Form 102A-R
G-tviivttfi S.-pt.
Tftftt.! .ai f
Acx.v   ,t
■-"-"— ■—*- internal Correspondence
Date
From
To
VANCOUVER, February 27th, 1978 File:    494263 (I)
A. Meijer
Mr. T. Irvine, Chief Steward, Princess of Vancouver,
A form B.C.C.S.S. has been submitted by you covering injury to
A.A. Omeria on February 22, 1978.
Item 5 is incomplete in that it does not state on what part of
the machine Mr. Omeria cut his finger or whether you have investigated the .incident to determine whether a piercing or cutting hazard
exists.
Will you kindly look into this and advise me immediately.
)Form 102A-R
Catering Superintendent. CPRail
internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER, February 27th, 1978 File: T-78-X012D
From     M.W. Holland
To     A. McDermott
Manager, Insurance and Fire Protection.
I am enclosing photostat copy of Form 112 covering inspection of
"The Trailer Princess" on January 20th, 1978.
Kindly note Item 4» the 10 lb. dry chemical fire extinguisher, has
been sent out for necessary checking of the gauge readings, account
below allowable limits.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S. BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
fail
^wHolland February 27th,   1978
fiRReid
v',f Manager
File:     T-78-10D
Mr. R.L. Nesbitt,
Superintendent of Operations,
Port of Prince Rupert,
National Harbours Board,
P.O. Box 730,
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Dear Mr. Nesbitt:
Due to the possibility of our Alaska Service continuing in 1979
it will be appreciated if you would given us position protection
for the cruise season.
This will not involve the Princess Patricia.
Your early reply would be greatly appreciated.
Yours very truly,
M.W. Holland,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S. AWHolland
i'HReid
x'Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "3", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
CPRali
February 27th, 1978
File:  T-78-10D
Mr. Art Nelson,
Port Director,
City of Wrangell,
P.O. Box 531,
Wrangell, Alaska 99929
Dear Mr. Nelson:
Due to the possibility of our Alaska Service continuing in 1979
it will be appreciated if you would given us position protection
for the cruise season.
This will not involve the Princess Patricia.
Your early reply would be greatly appreciated.
Yours very truly,
M.W. Holland,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S. BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
mmHolland
■■■lMReid
■.- Manager
February 27th, 1978
File:  T-78-10D
Mrs. Joan B. Farewell,
Clerk,
Corp.of the Village of Alert Bay,
Box 28,
Alert Bay, B.C.
Dear Mrs. Farewell:
Due to the possibility of our Alaska Service continuing in 1979
it will be appreciated if you would given us position protection
for the cruise season.
This will not involve the Princess Patricia.
Your early reply would be greatly appreciated.
Yours very truly,
M.W. Holland,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S. BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Te! (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
'WHolland February  27th,   1978
HReid
- Manager
File:     T-78-10D
Mr. E.J. Emery,
Administrative Services Officer,
The City & Borough of Juneau,
I55> S. Seward St.,
Juneau, Alaska 99801
Dear Mr. Emery:
Due to the possibility of our Alaska Service continuing in 1979
it will be appreciated if you would given us position protection
for the cruise season.
This will not involve the Princess Patricia.
Your early reply would be greatly appreciated.
Yours very truly,
M.W. Holland,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S. ma
Reid
I Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Te/ (604) 665-3 735, Te/ex 04-507684
CPRail
Vf Holland February  27th,   1978
File:     T-78-10D
Mr.FrankG. Downey,
Manager,
Passenger Sales & Service,
White Pass & Yukon Route,
Box 2147,
Seattle, Washington 98111
Dear Mr. Downey:
Due to the possibility of our Alaska Service continuing in 1979
it will be appreciated if you would given us position protection
for the cruise season.
This will not involve the Princess Patricia.
Your early reply would be greatly appreciated.
Yours very truly,
M.W. Holland,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S. ■ xixlland
xRvi-l
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2P.3
Tel (604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
February 27th, 1978
File:  T-78-10D
Mr. James Van Altvorst,
Executive Assistant,
City of Ketchikan,
Box 1110,
Ketchikan, Alaska.
97801
Dear Mr. Van Altvorst:
Due to the possibility of our Alaska Service continuing in 1979
it will be appreciated if you would given us position protection
for the cruise season.
This will not involve the Princess Patricia.
Your early reply would be greatly appreciated.
Yours very truly,
M.W. Holland,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc: Mr. Leonard C. Laurance
Vice-President, Operations,
Alaska Pacific Marine, inc.
P.O. Box 110a,
Ketchikan, Alaska 99901
U.S.A. Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, February 24, 1978
From A. Meijer
To Chief Steward, Princess of Vancouver
A temporary change in the daily working schedule of the Storekeeper
effective March 6th will be as follows:-
1130 - 1230 - 1
1230 - 1300 - Lunch
1300 - 1530 - 2 1/2
1545 - 2015 - 4 1/2
Dinner   ,    	
1800 - 1830
r
S3 Form 102A-R
Catering Superintendent.
Asst. Mgr.
jM,_rjne 5upt,^0]^
§ypt.. Engr,
Asst.- Supt- Engr.
Supt
^ermin
Depti. ''Analyst.
—rT-^
J Dafe VANCOUVER, February 24, 1978
From  A. Meijer,
To  Chief Steward, Princess of Vancouver
Effective thid date all orders are to be forwarded to the Catering
Superintendent ensuring that delivery date is indicated.  This also
includes the orders the Storekeeper has been telephoning in direct.
If there are any delays or late deliveries, please contact this
office immediately.
)Form 102A-R
Catering Superintendent,
cc: Storekeeper, Princess of Vancouver
V
« r
Pier'B", Vancouver. BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
MW Holland
>RZid February 24,  1978
: Manage*
File:  1978 - Capper's Wkly Travel Club
Mr. Gordon West,
President,     . , t
Capper's Weekly Travel Club,
616 Jefferson St.,
Topeka, Kansas,
U.S.A. 66607
Dear Gordon:
Many thanks for your letter of February 16th.  It certainly is good
to hear from you again and while we will not have the privilege of
representation from Capper's on board the Patrieia this year, I am
taking the liberty of enclosing two copies of our new brochure,
which should bring back fond memories.
Should there be a replacement for the Patricia, we will certainly
let you know for any future consideration by your company for
travelling to Alaska.
Yours very truly,
R.R. Reid
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
RRR/wj
</■ W Holland
i R Reid
- Manager
DC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
February 24,   1978
File:     ALA.055.AIR
Mr. D. Huisman,
Merchandise Service,
CP Air,
Executive Park,
Richmond, B.C.   v ,
Dear Mr. Huisman:
With reference to CSE-Air agreement between our two companies,
/ I wish to advise that the rate of commission for the 1978 Alaska
/ Cruise season has been increased by 1% to travel agents from 10 -
11% and accordingly, this will be your authority to extend to
travel agents 11% when dealing directly with them in addition to
retaining the 5% for CP Air as previously agreed.
When transactions originate in CP Air offices where no travel agent
is involved, you are to retain 11% commission.
Should there be any question concerning this arrangement, please
do not hesitate to contact me.
Yours very truly,
R.R. Reid
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR/wj Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
W Holland
P. Reid
.■ Manager
February 24, 1978
C.G. Brodie-Brockwell,
Lindsay Power Squadron,
67 Victoria Ave. N.,
Lindsay, Ontario
K9V 4G6
/-      Dear Mr. Brodie-Brockwell:
Thank you kindly for your letter of February 18th.
We have received the Ripple Rock film and do appreciate the
quickness of it's return.
We do regret that Alaska Diary was not available for your showing,
but will make arrangements to forward a copy of it for your June
17th annual dinner.
Again, many thanks for your interest in our Alaska services.
Yours very truly,
R.R. Reid,
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR/wj CPRail
Internal Correspondence
E
Date VANCOUVER,  February 24,  1978
From r.r.  Reid
To  J. Shave
File:  T-78-69
Attached please find circular letter from the Alaska Division of
Tourism dated February 15th, which certainly is most informative.
This is for your information.
R.R. Reid
I" Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR/wj
)Form 102A-R (@) Form 102-R
ternal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, February 24, 1978 File:  T-78-10D
From R.R. Reid
To N.H. Parham, Agent, Northland, Prince Rupert
Thank you kindly for your letter of February 20th, regarding the Prince
Rupert NHB pier handling charge of $3.00 being assessed on cruise ships
using their facilities during the coming season.
Our cruise folders include the $3.00 Prince Rupert charge in it's total
pier charge,  having assumed prior to our acquisition of Northland's
dock in Prince Rupert that we would be using the NHB facility.  In
view of the fact that this amount has been quoted to all our tour group
operators and individuals, it is now too late to make any alteration
and accordingly this charge will be continued throughout the coming
summer.
You will note from the enclosed brochure that the amount of $12.00 is
shown as a total pier handling charge and is not broken down as is the
case in the matter of cruise operator's brochures.
R.R. Reid,
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc: Victor Jones:  Reference Mr. Parham's letter of February 20th to me,
with copy to you.
RRR=wj
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
■ >W Holland
■■ iger
IRReid
:.■' Manager
February 24,   197!
File T-78-67
Ms. Joan Bloomfield,
Berry Point Road,
Gabriola Island,
British Columbia.
Dear Ms. Bloomfield:
Thank you kindly for your letter of February 18th, concerning the
change in schedule presently being performed by the Princess of
Vancouver.
In view of the necessary repairs to Pier A-l, Vancouver, this schedule will probably be in effect for the next several weeks.  Prior
to that time, consideration will be given to any possible change in
schedule or resumption of the former schedule.  While we appreciate
that the schedule presently being performed by the Princess of
Vancouver may be convenient to our passenger traffic, as a majority
of our traffic is governed by the commercial traffic, which we carry
below decks and in turn their scheduling of receipt of the traffic
at either end of our service, we have to give first consideration to
their requirements.  It may possibly be that the slight change in
schedule will not affect too greatly their committments.
We do appreciate the time taken to write to us and announcements will
be made leter in the Spring concerning scheduling of our ferry service
for the coming summer.
Yours very truly,
R.R.   Reid,
Asst.   Manager,   B.C.C.S.S.
RR/wj
J m
m
CPRail
internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, February 24, 1978 File:  78.521.W.
From R.R. Reid
^° Ann Foreman, Secretary to Mr. W.D. Wilks
Dear Ann:
I am attaching photostat of your letter of February 13th in which
reservations have been requested for Mr. Wilks during the coming
summer.  Please find against the dates listed, the respective car
numbers.
Should there be any changes, feel certain there will be no problem
in taking care of them during the coming summer.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
gg) Form 102-R CPRail
internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, February 24th, 1978 File: 176
From T. King
To M.W. Holland
Attached telex concerns a system and equipment for Preventative
Maintenance Planning and spare year inventory for marine type
vessel's and operation.
A letter was received at Northland partially explaining this system
but at present not interested to such a degree mainly due to the
method of our operation.  To make such a system work it is apparent
that due to the changes of personnel aboard our vessels ie. week on
week off set-up.  It could involve a large increase in the work load
of our present engineering staff (management).
I shall review the pamphlet and if I think that we could utilize part
of the system, we can answer accordingly.  Copy of pamphlet will be
forwarded to you to sight.
B
Marine Superintendent.
TK/wj
Form 102-R
V RETAiN THIS COPY FOR FOLLOW-UP
Canadian Pacific
EXEMPLASRE JAUNE ACONSERVER POUR SUIVBEL'AFFAlRn
Canadien Pacifiaue
From:
De:
M.W. Holland
Department
Service
Vancouver, B.C.C.S.S.
-
Send To:
A:
Mr. W.G. Sutherland
Manager, Rail Division
Seaspan International
10 Pemberton Avenue—
N. Vancouver, B.C.
V7P 2R1
Date
24 February 1978
Subject      FU      x-78-30-22
Objet:
Message     Dear sir.
Would you please advise if log book of "Seaspan Doris" shows any notation regarding
fc -, . -,,_ _S.. „     V;:-^ - : ■    :    ; ';   x:-:':"l-   , "'.'    ./'""    ?.   "' —- — I  ■'■.  ,.,  :■ rZi  1x11"
damage occurring to a logging truck consigned to Berk's Intertruck while aboard the
vessel ex Vancouver 16 February 1978 to Nanaimo.                                                                             "-
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Damage/consisted of a cut approximately three feet in length on sidewall and tread of
right rear outside tire accompanied by a large gouge in the sidewall of this same tire.
/Yours truly,
/''.'■  : -  .                                                ■•                                                                                            ■ ' .■'
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.                                                                                                    ~:
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Use lower portion for reply.
Utiliser la section du bas pour reponore
Reply from
Reponse de
To Originate: Hand or typewrite message. Remove yellow copy Avoid verbal instructions use a To Reply: Write reply, snap set - retain white
(follow-up copy) and forward balance of set. Evitez les instructions verbales, utilisez un original and return pink copy. •    ;.
Save envelope typing: Fold form at arrows   5 IC O _T _T/7 //T7 _?'/77 D     * Pour, repondre: Ecrivez votre reponse, detacher, conservez
For use in #9 or #10 window envelope. <"J ~-CidU.I:! I IsBsll I _/ ['original blanc et retournez I'exemplaire rose
Pour Ecrivez a la main ou a la machine. Detachez I'exemplaire jaune. conservez-le pour suivre I'affaire. et envoyez les autres exemplaires.
■ erWoyerX   Evitez de taper des enveloppes: Pliez aux fleches. et utilisez des enveloppes a fenetres no 9 et no 10. CPRail
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Manager
Asst. Mgr.
Marine Supt.     ^jry
Supt.  Engr,
<2-
-T4-__
H
J^i***^'*^   <=_f News Summary
News and views on topics of
current interest prepared by Public Relations
and Advertising Department
Vol. 34 No. 8       Feb. 24, 1978
Aviation 12       R&D Gap 8
Business & Finance 16       Railway 10
Japan's HSST 5       Shipping 13
JAPAN'S HSST
A radically inproved High-Speed Surface Transport (HSST) system is now
well along in development testing in Japan. Intended to reduce sicgnifi-
cantly the travel time of air passengers between city centres and airports, the airplane-like body flies at an altitude of ten niillimetres.
R & D GAP
In spending on Research & Development (R & D) Canada only outranks such
countries as Turkey, Greece, Ireland and Italy. Consequently, Canadians
are paying for their failure to promote a strong, market-oriented R&D
effort that results in wealth-generating and high-technology industries.
TRENDS AND TOPICS
Railway workers agree to a tentative one-year contract with a 6-per-cent
increase retroactive to the beginning of the year. The contract also includes retention of passes, layoff payment plan and pensioners' increase.  2
Three of Canada's seven major airlines could disappear by 1985 because of
the current economics of the airline industry, says a market research manager of CP Air. He also claims airlines must rationalize their services.   2
Construction of a third ship-to-shore crane at the Brunterm container
tentiinal in Saint John, N.B., has been completed, and the new crane,
valued at $2.5-million, is now in operation to serve increased demand.    13
Construction of the world's first Arctic Class 2 commercial bulk carrier, the MV Arctic, is nearing completion at Port Weller, Ont., and is
scheduled for delivery in May. It will be operated by a Montreal group.   14
Residents of Prince Rupert, B.C., are hoping a coal development 800 km
in the interior will revive their city's economy. They are also hoping
grain will shift north to the city from congested southern B.C. ports.    15
Unitank Ltd. completes its new, $8-million year-round bulk liquid terminal and storage facility at Quebec City. It is designed for handling
and storage of petroleum products, chemicals, vegetable oils and fats.    16
Canadian Pacific 2
NEWS IN BRIEF
100,000 RAIL WORKERS GET SIX-PER-CENT INCREASE
MONTREAL - Four months of negotiations culminated in Montreal Feb. 21 in the
signing of a tentative contract for the country's 100,000 unionized rail workers.
The one-year agreement provides a six-per-cent wage increase retroactive to the
beginning of the year. The final outstanding issue in the discussions —
the retention of special passes on passenger trains for employees of CN and CP
Rail — was settled earlier in the day. Written into the pact is an inverse
seniority plan which allows employees with the most seniority to accept layoffs
and receive up to 80 per cent of their regular pay through a combination of
unemployment insurance benefits and payments from their company's job-security
fund. The tentative agreement will also mean improved monthly benefits for
railway pensioners who retired before 1973.  (Montreal Gazette, Feb. 22)
AIRLINE CLOSINGS FORECAST FOR 1985
FREDERICTON - J. Robert McGee, market research manager for CP Air, says three of
Canada's seven major airlines might disappear by 1985 because of the current economics of the airline industry. "We have more airlines than Canada's financial
position can merit," J. Robert McGee said in Fredericton, N.B., on Feb. 20.
"Too many airlines in this country are losing money," he said. Airlines must
also start to rationalize their service, he said, adding that some regions would
get better service than is now possible if the rationalization took place.  (CP -
Ottawa Citizen, Feb. 21)
DCME PETE NEARING AGREEMENT FOR MOST POWERFUL ICEBREAKER
EDMONTON - Dome Petroleum Ltd. of Calgary is close to signing an agreement for
construction of the world's most powerful icebreaker, says Benjt Johanasson,
Dome's director of marine systems. The proposed icebreaker — known as AML, for
Arctic marine locomotive — will be built by an East Coast Canadian shipyard.
(CP - Globe and Mail)
CP AIR APPLIES FOR NORTHWEST ROUTES
VANCOUVER - CP Air has applied to the Canadian Transport Commission for permission
to operate a service connecting Calgary, Prince George, B.C., and Whitehorse, Y.T.,
starting April 30. The airline is seeking a five-times-a-week service under its
application to consolidate all five of its domestic licences into one licence.
Pacific Western Airlines Ltd. of Vancouver and Air Canada of Montreal have said
they will oppose the licence consolidation.  (Globe and Mail, Feb. 21)
BOOKINGS FOR HOTELS RISE BY EIGHT PER CENT
TORONTO - Business was up across the board in Canada's hotel industry last year.
Sales nationally rose by almost eight per cent and room occupancy rates climbed
by 3.3 per cent. Calgary, Edmonton and Halifax establishments showed by far the
biggest gains. Montreal was alone in reporting losses in all departments.
(Financial Times, Feb. 20) NEWS IN BRIEF
MARATHON U.S. REALTIES EXPAND
TORONTO - Marathon U.S. Realties Inc. of Chicago, an affiliate of Marathon Realty
Co. Ltd. of Toronto, has bought an 11-acre office park containing four buildings
on the outskirts of Atlanta, Ga., for $4-million. The Chicago affiliate expects
to complete a 31-storey office tower in San Francisco in the summer of 1979 and
will begin construction this year on twin office towers in Portland, Ore.  (Globe
and Mail, Feb. 17)
TRANSPORTATION POLICY ASKS EFFICIENCY, NOT EXPANSION
WASHINGTON - Transportation Secretary Brock Adams, in issuing a new national transportation policy, said the nation's systems are to be used more efficiently rather
than being expanded.  Future programs, he said, will concentrate on upgrading, rehabilitating and maintaining existing, and needed, railway, airway and highway systems.  (Information Letter, Association of American Railroads, Feb. 15)
MINIMUM WAGE GOES TO $3 Jan. 1
TORONTO - The minimum wage in Ontario will rise from $2.65 to $2.85 an hour on
Aug. 1 and to $3 an hour next Jan. 1, Labor Minister Bette Stephenson announced
Feb. 20.  (Globe and Mail, Feb. 21)
PIPE SIZE URGED FOR YUKON LINE DISAPPOINTS U.S., ANGERS NDP
OTTAWA - The U.S. Government is disappointed and the New Democratic Party opposition
is enraged at the National Energy Board's recommendation that a 56-inch-diameter,
thin-wall pipe be used for the mid-Yukon to mid-Alberta portion of the $10-billion
Alaska Highway gas pipeline. While the recommendation would allow all the pipe
for the Canadian portion of the pipeline to be manufactured in Canada by two large
domestic steel mills, NDP Leader Edward Broadbent said there is still no guarantee
that Canadian mills will get the pipe contracts. U.S. technical experts had expressed a marked preference for a 48-inch, thick-wall pipe that could be operated
at a high pressure and provide better fuel efficiency, lower gas transportation
costs and higher capacity over the lifetime of the project than either the 48-
inch or 54-inch thin-wall and low-pressure options supported by the Canadians.
(Globe and Mail, Feb. 21)
14 SHIPS WAITING TO LOAD GRAIN IN VANCOUVER
VANCOUVER - At last count, 14 ships were waiting in Vancouver to load grain and
16 more were expected within a week, while many Prairie grain elevators cannot
accept any more deliveries, a board meeting of the Palliser Wheat Growers Association was told. Hedley Clorenshaw, Palliser vice-president, said the transportation and grain handling system "reminds me of a huge pipe that is four feet wide
on the Prairies and tapers down to a two-inch pipe when it hits Vancouver. If
the grain handling system was as up to date as farmers who produce for it, we
couldn't grow enough to supply the ever-expanding markets of the war Id."  (Globe
and Mail, Feb. 21) 4
NEWS I N BRIEF
CP RAIL TO KEEP VANCOUVER ISLAND SERVICE
VANCOUVER - CP Rail has announced that it will retain responsibility for Dayliner
service on the E & N Railway after VTA Rail takes charge of the country's passenger
trains on April 1.  (Vancouver Province, Feb. 22)
BCR RULES OUT DEASE EXTENSION
PRINCE GEORGE - British Columbia Railway president Mac Norris said Feb. 21 that
railway management has resigned itself to the fact that the Dease Lake extension
is not economically feasible at this time.  (Vancouver Province, Feb. 22)
CP (BERMUDA) BULK CARRIER DETAINED IN IRAQ
VANCOUVER - The bulk carrier, H. R. MacMillan of CP (Bermuda) Ltd., has been
detained in the Iraqi port of Basrah for the past 17 months, impounded because of
a dispute over her cargo of rice.  (Vancouver Province, Feb. 21)
PARK QUESTIONS VISTORS
CALGARY - This year visitors to lake Louise, Alta., will be asked to express,
through a public-participation program, what they would like to see included in
any expansion of the area.  (Vancouver Sun, Feb. 17)
DOMINION BRIDGE
MONTREAL - Dominion Bridge has received three contracts totalling more than $4.5-
million for construction of three bridges in Quebec and New Brunswick. The company's
Quebec branch will build bridges over the York River in Gaspe and the La Lievre
River in Buckingham, Que., while Dcnainion's Robb Engineering division in Amherst,
N.S., will build a bridge at Cambridge, N.B.  (Globe and Mail, Feb. 21)
TRUCKING RATES
ET1CNTON - Alberta truckers operating in Alberta and into British Columbia will be
taking an eight-per-cent increase in rates effective March 1. The Alberta Trucking
Association said the increase will apply to coimodities falling under general
freight. It said the increase has been approved by the federal Anti-Inflation
Board and is the first increase in the area since Jan. 1, 1976.  (Globe and Mail,
Feb. 21.)
NEW SALES TAX BLOW HITS MONTREAL HOTEL INDUSTRY
MONTREAL - Plagued by lack of customers and alarmingly high costs, the hotel and
restaurant industry has received another blow from Quebec City — a 10-per-cent
sales tax on the service charge they levy on banquet and convention customers.
The industry is upset not just by the tax but by the fact that it is retroactive.
(Montreal Star, Feb. 21)
HOME OIL HAILS B.C. FIND
CALGARY - A Home Oil Co. Ltd. official says an oil discovery near Fort St. John,
B.C., might yield an amount equal to 10 to 15 per cent of British Columbia's current production.  (Vancouver Province, Feb. 15)
* * * 5
JAPAN'S HSST
JAPAN'S HSST: A VIABLE ALTERNATIVE FOR RAPID AIRPORT-CITY CENTRE TRANSPORTATION
(ICAO Bulletin)
(By Akira Hayashi, Deputy General Secretary Overall
Development Committee, Japan Air Lines)
A radically improved High-Speed Surface Transport (HSST) system is now
well along in development testing in Japan.
Intended to reduce significantly the travel time of air passengers from
city centre to distant airport, it will have the body of an aircraft but fly
without wings at an altitude of ten millimetres and cause neither noise nor
atmospheric pollution. Ultimately, it should provide a solution to the
problem of access to our major airports, which more and more are being
forced to locate farther and farther from our cities, For example, consider
the situation we face in Japan.
The door to Tokyo's new International Airport in Narita is finally
about to be opened. Kept shut for the past seven years due to the strong
opposition by local inhabitants, the airport's opening is certain to please
those connected with air travel. But this pleasure will be dampened by the
general concern over the fact that the new airport is located 65 kilometres
east of the city and 80 km, from Haneda Airport, south of Tokyo, making it
the second most distantly situated airport in the world.
Do not, however, rush to the conclusion that 65 km today is inconsequential — that superhighways make it only a one-hour drive. The expressway
that runs from Narita into the centre of Tokyo is the most crowded road in
Japan. Even now it takes up to two hours to reach the airport, and sometimes
three hours from the airport.
We have exhorted people to use public transportation such as railways,
but in reality very few do. Air passengers, especially international
travelers, carry a lot of baggage. It is only natural that they prefer
to use automobiles.
Now let us consider the problem from the airline management side. The
distance of Narita from Tokyo presents a serious problem to airlines and
their crews. It means that in many cases it will be necessary for crews
to remain overnight at airport hotels, thus reducing their home stays in
Tokyo. Pilots scheduled for afternoon flights will have to spend a half
day to ramp out.
When we discuss airport location, anywhere, we come across a contradiction. An airport has to be located near a city, while at the same time it
has to be apart from the city. The former is based on demand for accessibility to the airport, the latter on environmental motives.
The major issue in the current policy for the best airport location
would then be how to narrow the gap as much as possible between the two
to overcome this contradiction in an harmonious way — or, how to shorten
the "time-distance" between the airport and the city? JAPAN'S HSST
So far, motor vehicles have been the principal means of access to and
from airports. In some places, trains and monorails have been used and in
certain areas helicopters or hovercraft. But none of these could be taken
for general means of access. In fact, too little attention has been paid
to the problem of airport access. We have simply been relying on the availability and convenience of the motor vehicle.
However, two years ago something happened to bring the stark reality
of the worsening situation clearly to our minds. The supersonic Concorde
began flights between Paris and Rio de Janeiro. Air France runs a special
bus from Paris for the convenience of passengers. But what happens if the
bus is delayed in traffic? The world's fastest commercial aeroplane has
to await its arrival. Many have suggested that commercial aeroplanes also
should wait at Narita for passengers who have checked in at an air terminal
downtown and boarded a bus for the flight. Airlines cannot normally run
a business this way.
The various factors in air transport have to be based on the scheduled
departure and arrival of the aeroplanes. Delaying departure reduces the
aeroplane; to 3 secondary role, while the bus, that relic of the previous
century, attains the major role. This is too much. We have come to the
limits of our patience with ground support facilities that have failed to
keep up with the progress in aeronautics. It is clear that a drastic
change in thinking is called for — one based-on new technology, if we
are to cope with the situation and revive the raison d'etre of air
transport.
A solution, using this radical breakthrough in concept and technology
demanded by our times, can perhaps be found in the HSST system being
developed by Japan Air Lines at its testing grounds near ilaneda Airport.
To picture the HSST, imagine an aircraft, without wings and landing gear,
"flying" noiselessly only millimeters above a guideway. The levitation is
produced by magnetic attraction. Magnets fixed on the sides of the
fuselage are drawn upward toward anchor rails mounted on the guideway,
producing the lift that raises the vehicle above the rail.
To propel the floating vehicle forward, a linear induction motor is used.
It operates on the same principle as the conventional rotary electric motor,
but one opened up into a flat shape (i.e., a rotary motor with infinite
radius). From a 10-mm height, "flight" is actually carried out.
The HSST operational prototype will have a body shape resembling that
of a DC-8 jet airliner, with similar interior styling for the passenger
compartments. Streamlined end vehicles will carry 112 passengers, standard
middle vehicles 120 each. A minimum train will consist of two end vehicles,
with middle vehicles added as needed. Overall weight will be half that of
conventional train of the same capacity.
Features of the HSST include high speed, low construction and operating
costs, safety and the capability to handle the varying demands of mass
transportation. These features, however, have always been the criteria for
practical mass-transit systems. The present and future demand two others,
pollution-free and energy-efficiency, both of which are satisfied by the JAPAN'S HSST
HSST design. Unlike other existing transit systems, the HSST produces no
aggravating noise or ground vibration, and no atmospheric pollution, thus
it will not disturb those living along the line.
The absence of wheels obviates a principal source of deafening noise;
the linear induction motor does not produce any sound at all. However, there
is some noise, although indeed very slight.
With its high cruising speed, it will cut travel time between Narita
Airport and Tokyo to 15 minutes and between Narita and Haneda Airports to
only 20. This makes it faster in overall delivery time than a helicopter
or even a jet aeroplane.
Electronics box Instrument panel
Bloc electronique Tableau de bord
Caja electronica     Tablero de Instrumentos
Remote control unit Thyristor chopper
Mecanisme de telecommande     Interrupteur a thyristor
Mecanismo de telemando Interrupter de tlristor
Levltation magnet
Electro-aimant de flottaison
vElectroiman de suspension
4.20m	
2.60m-
Drawing shows major
components of the test
vehicle and positioning
of the craft on the guide-
way. Levitation (10 mm)
is accomplished by
electromagnetic attraction below the rail,
motion by a linear induction motor.
Reaction plate
Plaque de reaction
Placa de reaccion 8
R&D GAP
'BUILD OUR R & D -- OR SEE UNEMPLOYMENT RISE'
(Financial Post)
No less an industrial giant than the U.S. is worried that its mighty
capacity for technological innovation is slipping — and that should make
Canadians sit up and take notice.
While the U.S. still spends more on research and development (R & D)
than any other nation, the accelerating rate of research spending by its
major trading partners — notably Japan and West Germany — is striking,
a special Financial Post conference on R & D was told in Ottawa in the
last week of January.
The U.S. has been setting aside less of its Gross National Product
toward research, and is now spending an estimated 2.51 of GNP on R & D,
vs 3% a decade ago. Meanwhile, the Japanese have increased their R&D
spending to 2%  of GNP from 1.31, and the Germans to 2.4% from 1.3%. These
figures still give the U.S. a deceptive edge, but the Americans emphasize
defense and space research, while the Germans and Japanese prefer to place
the bulk of their R&D money on commercially-oriented projects.
If the Americans are worried about their innovative capabilities,
Canadians should be alarmed. Canada spent $2.1-billion on R & D last year
— or only 1% of GNP, a dismally low sum when compared to research spending of most industrialized nations.  (We outrank such countries as Turkey,
Greece, Ireland and Italy — but that's not saying much.) So anemic is
our research thrust that two U.S. firms, General Motors and IBM, surpassed
the entire Canadian effort in 1977, spending a total of $2.2~billion on
R&D.
The message that emerged from The Post's research and development
conference was clear: unless Canada builds up its R&D strength and
creates a favorable environment for entrepreneurs, expect some high-
technology firms to pull out or fold up, and unemployment to go even
higher.
Not only are many other countries investing more in R & D than we are,
they are also experiencing solid spurts in plant and equipment investment,
fueled by favorable tax policies and government financing. As a result,
productivity is getting a boost. "I believe that the capacity of the
Canadian economy to absorb technical skills and to enhance entrepreneurial
initiatives is becoming so poor that something must and will be done about
it," John Shepherd, executive director of the Science Council of Canada,
told the 250 delegates at the conference. Mr. Shepherd holds some optimism
for the future, pointing out that Canada has a lot going for it — material
resources, financial strength and technical skills. "The only missing
ingredients are decisive leadership and effective management." In that
regard, Canada hasn't done itself proud. As the current trade deficit in
fully manufactured goods approaches $ll-billion, for example, the country
has still to produce a coherent industrial policy. 9
R&D GAP
Meantime, we will continue to pay for our failure to promote a strong,
market-oriented research and development effort that produces wealth-generating high-technology industries. One of the penalties: a monthly loss
of 10,000 jobs, Mr. Shepherd estimates.
"If we accept the argument of Dr. E.F. Denison of the Brookings Institute,
and others, that technology is a dominant factor in productivity, if we are
inclined to agree with a recent U.S. presidential report that technological
innovation is the primary determinant of economic growth and competitiveness,
then we must clearly accept the relationship between sound research and
development policies, industrial self-sufficiency, economic well-being, and
the national responsibility to help Canadians find work and earn a living,"
Mr. Shepherd said.
In contrast to the Japanese, Canadian politicians have been slow to
realize that high technology generates great wealth and employment, a
point made by Dr. Thomas Vanderslice, senior vice-president, U.S. General
Electric Co. His firm commissioned a study from Data Resources Inc.,
Lexington, Mass., which gauged the impact of R & D (and the high-technology
enterprises it creates) on the economy. Its key findings:
-i HIGH-TECHNOLOGY industries grew nearly three times as fast as low-
technology ones.
— PRODUCTIVITY in high-technology industries was twice as high as in
the low.
— HIGH-TECHNOLOGY industries were more inflation-resistant.
— EMPLOYMENT in high-technology industries has been growing almost
nine times as fast as those in the low-technology sector.
"The same kind of favorable ratios prevail in terms of international
trade," Mr. Vanderslice said. "The positive contribution of high-
technology products is up to a plus of more than $25-billion a year.
By contrast, the U.S. trade balance in products with low-technical content
is down from breakeven in 1960 to a $16>billion deficit.  Moreover,
from 1950 to 1974, output per manhour rose at a 4% annual pace in sectors
devoting an above-average share of income to research and development. This
is better than twice the productivity achieved by industries with lower-
than-average commitments to new technology."
The DRI study also points out that if U.S. R & D spending increases to
its high in the early 1960s — instead of continuing to decline — consumers
will be spared a 7.2% boost in prices between now and 1990. And, Mr. Vanderslice noted: "By 1990 this difference between a decrease and an increase
in our R&D efforts is more than $90-billion. Or, to put it in individual
terms, the growth rate of per-capita income could be as much as 17% greater
than it would be in the pessimistic scenario." 10
RAILWAY
CP RAIL AIDS ARMED FORCES IN NATO EXERCISE MOVE
(CP Rail News Release)
Fourteen armored personnel carriers (APC's) lumbered aboard four CP Rail
cars in London, Ont., in the early morning of Feb. 13, in preparation for the move
of the 1st Battalion of the Royal Canadian Regiment to Norway as part of the upcoming NATO exercise: Arctic Express.
The shipping by rail of the vehicles set Canadian military history
as the first time that combat-ready armor has successfully travelled by
rail. Before the operation the APC's were always hauled by truck to
their destinations and then deployed. Railway operations were too involved
and time-consuming to allow efficient deployment of the forces in an
emergency.
"We are always looking for the most economical and reliable way of
moving our vehicles," said Lieutenant James V. Rose, Base Traffic Officer
at CFB London, describing the reasons behind the choice of the railway for
the move. "It is necessary for us to have the ability to move quickly
within a limited time," continued Lieutenant Rose, "and in the past this
has meant using trucks for our moves." Winter conditions often hamper the
reliability of road, transport though.
CP Rail Sales Representative in London, Dave Ralph, came up with the
answer to the armed force's need for easily-loaded, reliable transportation
when he booked the four 90-foot pedestal cars for the move. Used primarily
for shipping heavy farm machinery, the cars handled the APC's with ease.
Following a trial loading a week before the actual move, the fourteen
APC's were in place and secured within an hour of the start of the operation.
"We have received nothing but co-operation from the railway at all
levels," concluded Lieutenant Rose, "the move went off quickly, easily and
efficiently." Destination for the vehicles is CFB Trenton vtfiere they will
be loaded onto aircraft for shipment to Bardufloss, Norway.
* * *
CN (CENTRAL STATION SHOP AREA IN MONTREAL TO EXPAND
(Montreal Gazette)
CN will begin building a $2-million addition to the shopping area in its
Central Station complex this summer, Yvon Masse, a CN vice-president, said Feb. 16.
The addition is the first phase in a three-part plan to spend $15-mill-
ion over the next five to eight years on alterations to the station and the 11
RA ILWAY
adjoining Queen Elizabeth Hotel, also owned by CN. Only the first phase has
been approved by the CN, board of directors, another CN official said. It involves construction of a new shopping mall north of the existing concourse in
Central Station.
The mall, with 25,000 square feet of retail space, will run east and
west, connecting with two existing passageways that connect the station with
Place Ville Marie. The project will also provide space for existing stores
on the north side of the concourse to expand to the rear. All the new retail
space will be created from what is now a parking garage for the Queen Elizabeth Hotel.
A CN official said the plans for the Queen Elizabeth include overall
modernization of the hotel and installation of a health club which would
include a jogging track and a swimming pool.
* * *
CN PLANS $58-MILLION PROGRAM
(Ottawa Citizen)
CN plans to spend $58-million this year in Ontario, A. Raymond Williams,
vice-president of the Great Lakes region, said in Oshawa, Ont., Feb. 20.
He said that the funds will be used to expand yards and sidings, purchase new machinery and equipment, and improve training facilities and
working conditions for employees. "Increasingly larger capital programs
are planned for each succeeding year in the next five-year period."
* * *
CANADIAN CARLQADINGS
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
U.S. CARLQADINGS
For Week Ending
Feb. 7, 1978
66,831
4,263,473
7,513
Total for Year to
Feb. 7, 1978
349,910
22,502,060
36,122
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
1,759
9,943
442
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
+ 13,290
+    1,346,992
+ 1,075
Percentage
Change
- 2.6
- 0.2
- 5.6
Percentage
Change
+ 3.9
+ 6.4
+  3.1
(UNAVAILABLE) 1
I
32
AVIATION
AIR SAFETY RULES HIT
(Canadian Press - Montreal Star)
Current safety regulations, as they apply to attendants and passengers,
fall short of what is needed, says a report prepared for the Canadian Air Line
Flight Attendants Association.
The association represents stewardesses, stewards and pursers.
The report says that:
— TRAINING for emergencies, for most Canadian flight attendants,
consists of nothing more than audio-visual presentations with
a written exam.
— NONE of the current training programs for flight attendants pro
vide instruction on how to deal with the panic and hysteria
that accompany an emergency in the air or on the ground.
— ALTHOUGH Canada is a northern country, flight attendants are not
given instructions on Arctic survival.
— FIRST-AID training that attendants get is not adequate for them
to cope with in-flight medical emergencies.
— ALTHOUGH hijackings have become a fact of aviation life, little
or no training in psychology is given on how to handle hijackers
or passengers in their grip.
— AND, contrary to the popular notion that the flight attendant's
life is an easy one, he or she is "often required to be on duty
for upwards of 17 hours, all the while remaining pleasant, alert
and responsive to passenger needs."
The report notes that Wardair, which sends its attendants to the
American Airlines school in Dallas, is an exception to the audio-visual
teaching approach. The overall conclusion, however, is that "current air
navigation orders are sadly outdated and do not reflect the needs of today's
passengers."
* * *
NORDAIR PROFIT RIDING HIGH
(Montreal Star)
Nordair Ltd. had a 1977 net profit of $3.2-million or $1.46 a share
against $1.2-million or 55 cents a year earlier.
Increased earnings were due to cost reductions, lower interest payments, higher load factors and improved utilization of aircraft.
•k    Jc    -k 13
SHIPPING
THIRD CRANE COMPLETED AT SAINT JOHN TEPvMINAL
(Brunterm News Release)
Construction of a third ship-to-shore crane at the Brunterm container
terminal in Saint John, N.B., has been completed and the new crane, valued at $2.5-
million, is now in operation.
"The new crane was constructed in response to the continued traffic
growth at the Brunterm container terminal," said G. E. Benoit, president
of Brunterm. "Saint John is one of Canada's fastest growing ports and
indications are that container traffic will continue to increase by 15
per cent per year," he said.
Similar to the two other cranes in operation at the terminal, the new
crane has an outreach of 115 feet and a backreach of 60 feet with a lifting
capacity of 40 long tons for containers and 45 long tons with cargo beam.
Featuring articulated bogies, the crane can turn the corner between
the 1,350-foot marginal and 1,190-foot slip berths. "Brunterm is the only
Canadian container terminal to feature cranes with articulated bogies "which
increase the terniinal's flexibility," said Mr. Benoit.
Brunterm regularly serves 10 container steamship lines, which link
North America with the Atlantic and Mediterranean ports of Western Europe
and several destinations on the Pacific Rim, including Japan, Hong Kong,
Taiwan, Australia and New Zealand.
The terminal is located almost 300 miles closer to major industrial
markets than any other seaport in Atlantic Canada.
* * *
MAJOR IMPROVEMENTS PLANNED FOR SAINT JOHN
(Toronto Globe and Mail)
Major cargo-handling additions are planned or under study for the Port
of Saint John.
A contract is expected to be let soon for construction of the second
phase of a forest products terminal opened last year. Engineering studies
are expected for another berth and a fourth crane at the $50-million
Rodney container terminal, which opened three years ago. And tentative
plans are underway for wharf construction and land reclamation projects
that would add an additional 23 acres of container, break-bulk, steel,
automobile and heavy-equipment handling capacity at the port.
While some of the projects are still in the formative stage, general
optimism about the port's future suggests that it continues to hold much
of the East Coast's shipping momentum previously lost to Halifax because of
indecision there about providing additional container capacity.
* * * 14
SHIPPING
FIRST ARCTIC CLASS SHIP IS NEARING COMPLETION
(Toronto Globe and Mail)
Construction of the world's first Arctic Class 2 commercial bulk carrier,
the MV Arctic, is nearing completion and is on schedule for delivery in May, according to representatives of the owners and builders.
Duncan Maxwell, president of Port Weller Dry Docks Ltd. of St. Catharines, a division of Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd. of Toronto, said the 28,000-
ton ship is now at the outfitting stage, which includes final placement of
bulkheads, pannelling and piping.
The ship is owned by Canarctic Shipping Co Ltd. of Ottawa, which is
jointly-owned by the federal Government (with 51 per cent) and North
Water Navigation Ltd. of Montreal. North Water, a consortium comprising
Upper Lakes Shipping, Canada Steamship Lines Ltd. of Montreal and Federal
Commerce and Navigation Ltd., also of Montreal, will operate the ship.
* * *
SOVIETS A THREAT:  MARINE HEAD
(Montreal Gazette)
The Soviet Union is systematically undercutting Canadian shipping, says
Admiral Robert W. Timbrell, president of the Dominion Marine Association.
Mr. Timbrell says that the Canadian government is not justified in
continuing to rely on such foreign lines as the Soviets to carry its
goods to world markets. "Expert world observers emphasize that heavily-
subsidized Soviet shipping lines systematically undercut Western competitors, taking an ever-increasing portion of world trade," he said.
"The impact of this development upon the Canadian situation, where we
rely almost entirely on foreign flag shipping for our exports and imports is or should be obvious."
Mr. Timbrell calls the Soviet fleet "a new and menacing factor" and
says that the cargo ships were not "governed in terms of rates by factors
such as profit. Thus we learn that, within less than 20 years, the Russian
merchant fleet has grown from 23rd to 6th largest in world shipping."
The Soviet ships are now the largest single force at the Port of
Montreal, operating services between this city and such points as western
Europe and Africa.
* * * 15
SHIPPING
PORT COUNTS ON B.C. COAL PROJECT
(Montreal Star)
The 18,000 residents of Prince Rupert, B.C., are hoping a coal development
800 kilometres away will revive a city economy that has been stagnant for 60
years.
The coal will come, when world prices permit, from enormous northeastern British Columbia strip mines planned by British Petroleum and
other energy companies. With it may come grain, shifted north to Prince
Rupert from the more expensive and congested ports in southern ^.C.
"Whether it's coal or grain, Prince Rupert's time has come," says Mayor
Peter Lester.
* * *
CN FAVORS MONTREAL:  REPORT
(Canadian Press - Montreal Gazette)
The Halifax Mail-Star newspaper says a confidential report prepared for
the Nova Scotia development department claims CN is intent on making Montreal
rather than Halifax competitive with the Port of New York.
The newspaper says the report, prepared by the Massachusetts consulting
firm of Arthur D. Little, studies the chances of Halifax becoming a gateway or central distribution point for the midwestern and eastern U.S., as
well as for central Canada. The story quotes the consulting report as saying high freight rates on CN's rail lines out of Halifax are among the factors likely to deny Halifax the role of a gateway in the next five years.
Special-interest groups in the U.S. and high labor and production costs
in Halifax are other reasons, it adds. The cost of moving a 20-foot container from Halifax to Chicago on CN lines is prohibitive, the document
says. But moving the same container through Montreal is competitive with
New York-Chicago rates.
In actual figures, the costs is $500 through Halifax and $350 through
New York for the Chicago-bound container, the report says. CN matches the
New York rate through Montreal, even charging a bit less, it adds. The report of the consulting firm cost about $80,000, of which the federal government paid 80 per cent and provincial authorities the remainder.
* * * 16
BUSINESS & FINANCE
UNITANK'S QUEBEC BULK LIQUID TERMINAL COMPLETED ON SCHEDULE
(Unitank News Release)
Unitank Limited of Montreal has announced the completion of its new $8-
million year-round bulk liquid terminal and storage facility in Quebec City.
The completion of the 80,000-cubic-metre installation coincided with
the loading of 8,000 metric tons of styrene monomer aboard the Norwegian
vessel "Lotos", wnich arrived in Quebec City this week on her maiden voyage.
"We now have a total of 27 tanks available for both long- and short-term
storage and are capable of changing from one liquid commodity to another
on short notice," said John Hoblyn, general manager, Unitank Limited.
"Our terminal is the largest operation of its kind in Canada." The facility, constructed by St-Romuald Construction Ltee of Quebec, is designed
for the handling and storage of petroleum products, chemicals, vegetable
oils and fats.
"The recent styrene shipment was stored in a specially prepared tank
and loaded through stainless steel dockline to avoid risk of cxmt__iriination,"
said Mr. Hoblyn. "The shipment is now en route to an European destination
on behalf of Polysar Limited of Sarnia, Ont., which uses our terminal as
one of its key distribution links. This marks the start of a new growth
industry for Quebec," said Mr. Hoblyn. "The operation is a service industry vrtiich will significantly improve the ability of Canadian liquid shippers to compete in foreign markets."
Mr. Hoblyn summarized his company's role as twofold: It is designed
in part to serve the rapidly expanding Canadian petrochemical and oil-seed
crushing industries by relieving it of the operational costs and worries
of running its own deep-water terminals and storage operations. It also
helps bulk liquid shippers even out the peaks and valleys in inventory and
supply programs.
Tank terminals ensure flexibility of inventory for industries needing
a regular, reliable supply of bulk liquids. They also dramatically improve
turn-around times for high-cost, sophisticated parcel tankers.
Mr. Hoblyn explained Quebec City was chosen because it offers an excellent conbination of marine, road and rail transportation, and is the furthest inland deep-water port in Canada which functions freely year-round.
Unitank's terminal is the first deep-water common user operation in eastern
Canada large enough to acccarmodate multi-purpose parcel tankers in the
30,000-ton range.
The terminal, designed to meet the most rigorous environmental standards, is located at Beauport Flats, the National Harbors Board waterfront
industrial site. It is connected to dock-side at berth 50 by four underground pipelines. Unitank Limited is jointly-owned by Canadian Pacific of
Montreal and Unitank Storage Company of England, a wholly-owned subsidiary
of Tate & Lyle Limited. Unitank Storage Company, through its own and its
associated company terminals, has interest in more than 1.3 million cubic
metres (8 million barrels) of capacity in 11 locations in the United Kingdom and North America. BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8". Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
lei (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507084
;■'-' Holland
, Rvid
X'anagar
sps. K&1.    .7*3, U CJ
CP Raai
22 February 1978.
File No.  AGR.I.CMSG.NjGEN.
Secretary-Registrar
Canada Labour Relations Board
12th Floor,   1090 West Pender  St.
Vancouver,  B.C.
V6E 2N7
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Manager
Asst. Mgr
Marine S
Supt. Engr.
^eL__j£~
Asst. Supt. Engr.
Catering Supt.
Terminal Supt.
D-ptl. Analyst.
Office Mgr.
Account.
i^at^j&frfrf
y
s.
_a
*r
IN THE MATTER OF THE CANADA LABOUR CODE (PART V - INDUSTRIAL
RELATIONS) AND AN APPLICATION FOR CERTIFICATION AS BARGAINING
AGENT MADE PURSUANT TO SECTION 124 THEREOF CONCERNING CANADIAN
MERCHANT SERVICE GUILD, APPLICANT, AND CANADIAN PACIFIC LIMITED,
NORTHLAND DIVISION, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, EMPLOYER.
YOUR FILE 555-923 REFERS
Dear Sir:
This will acknowledge receipt of your letter dated 16 February
1978 in connection with the above-referenced application.
The Company's response to this application will be forthcoming
from Mr. J.C. Anderson, Vice-President, Industrial Relations,
CP Rail, Montreal.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
IW'BB
be.  Mr. J.T. Sparrow, Manager, Labour Relations, Montreal, Que.
Mr. P.I. Georges, Asst. Gen. Mgr., Coastal Marine Operations,
Montreal, Que.
Mr, P.E. Timpson, Asst. Supervisor, Labour Relations, Vancouver, B.C.
/ CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date VANCOUVER, 22 February 1978.
From j.d. Finnie
'° Memorandum
Mr. M.W. Holland
File:  651
f
Your letter 21 February, File 651.
I contacted Mr. Swanson 21 February with respect to Pier A-l.  He
stated that they were in the process of submitting an appropriation
to cover repairs and that they had submitted their report recommending repairs be completed as soon as possible.  No further work will
be done until approval is received.  It is estimated by Dominion
Bridge that repairs will take nine weeks after starting date.
1.  Current traffic volumes are quite light.  We have been able to
establish a pattern and are not really experiencing any problems.  The herring movement will commence early March, and the
following schedule will be implemented when traffic conditions
warrant.
NANAIMO TRAFFIC
2.
Ex Van
couver
POV
0400
TP
0800
CP
0930
POV
1230
POV
2000
SD
2400
Ex Nanaimo
SD 0530
POV 0830
CP 1330
POV 1600
TP 1700
POV 2400
It is anticipated that the foregoing schedule will accommodate
traffic offering.
Barge traffic normally handled through A-2 is now being handled
at BCR Slip.  British Army is anticipating a move 28 March 1978.
It is not known at this time how CP Rail will handle this traffic.
Manager, Traffic & Sales - B.C.C.S.S.
Form 102-R  jDF'BB CPRail
internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER,   22 February 1978. File:     T-420
From   m.W.  Holland
To
Mr. D. Murray
Terminal Manager
BCCS - Northland Service
Kitimat, B.C.
During my trip to Kitimat, February 6-7, we discussed a number of
outstanding problems, but did not draw any conclusions which would
finalize the matters.  Accordingly, you are requested to provide me
with memoranda containing your comments and recommendations with
respect to the following:
(a) The use of the "Squamish Warrior" for assistance in placing the
barges on their arrival at Kitimat.  You are requested to review
the costs of this action and to determine an approximate fee that
would be levied by RivTow to provide the same service.
(b) You suggested that info on the contents of the barges would be
most helpful to you in preparing for unloading if they were
listed in accord with their placement on the barge.  On this
item you suggested breaking the barge out into eight areas and
listing the placement of the contents in line with the appropriate diagram.  A procedure to have this effected is requested,
which no doubt will be reviewed in detail with Mr. Aitken,
Terminals Superintendent, during his trip to Kitimat.
(c) Your position with respect to forklifts is appreciated, and immediate action must be taken.  In our conversation you stated
the following:
- No. 2 of 16,000-pound capacity requires a new motor.
- No. 4 was sent to Vancouver in October for repairs and No. 5
sent to Kitimat as replacement.  You would like No. 4 returned ASAP.
- No. 57 went to Vancouver for repairs and was never returned,
and this again, you would like ASAP.
- No. 32 was in very poor condition due to age and wear and tear,
and is of 12,000-pound load capacity and cannot be used to
lift metal, thus for general use is unsuitable.
(S> Form 102-R - 2
- The Ottawa tractor was sent to Vancouver for the replacement
of a cylinder and was sent back merely repaired. The cylinder
is now falling apart again and must be returned for the much-
needed replacement of the cylinder.  This should be done ASAP.
- You stated that No. 16 and two big No. 100's and 101 were in
good shape and presented little or no problem.
We will start rectifying this situation immediately, but in the
interim you are requested to review your equipment requirements
and confirm that should the above action be taken it will provide
you with adequate equipment.
(d) The tow line on board the "Squamish Warrior" should be replaced
and the radio equipment either repaired or replaced. You stated
you have spoken to Mr. Cairns on this subject and that he is
taking appropriate action. ~
(e) You also confirmed that the barges are now being tied up after
midnight and that you are ordering the tug for midnight and the
crew for 1230.  This action is to continue until advised otherwise.
(f) The 2400 series trailers are in extremely poor condition, and
you are experiencing constant problems related to the lighting,
brakes and tires of these units.  This has been noted and. will
be taken into consideration in our review of the equipment
to be retained under our arrangement with Northland. You will
continue with the policy respecting sending tires for retread
until such time as you are advised of changes.  You stated that
condition of equipment on arrival in Kitimat has been so poor
that in many instances units are removed from the barge and sent
directly to the Shop to have repairs effected.  We agreed that a
closer examination of this equipment here in Vancouver before
loading on the barge would limit the number of occurrences
where this has happened, and I agree, after having reviewed the
instances you physically showed me, that something has to be
done.  Again, this matter will have to be discussed with Mr.
Aitken.
(g) With respect to the Truck/Shed Manager, you stated that this
position could remain open at this time, and that we should be
looking for an individual, possibly from CPT, with expertise in
truck equipment who could be made available for three days a
month for an on-the-spot inspection of the equipment in Kitimat,
and an individual who would prepare a report of the deficiencies
to be given to the Superintendent Engineer for use in the preparation of his preventive maintenance programme governing trucks,
trailers and containers. (h) We also discussed certain labour problems that exist in the
operation at your end, and while I will not go into detail of
these at this time, I think we all realize that we must be
looking ahead with a view to curtailing any unfortunate incidences which might occur and which would, in effect, cause
cessation of the service.  We will keep you closely advised
on matters in this area, and you are requested to do the same
with this office.
I would appreciate your written comments on each of the above, confirming that my interpretation is correct, and I would suggest that we
should at our next meeting, place deadlines for the completion of the
projects, where applicable.  It is my intention that we should develop
a very close liaison between our Northern operations and headquarters
here in Vancouver, and this will not only involve the on-site presence
of Vancouver-based personnel, but your own presence here in Vancouver
from time to time.  As I stated to you, we are here to help in any
way that we can, but can only do so if we are aware of the problem.
Please fee free to contact me if you should find matters not progressing in accord with discussions, and I will take whatever action necessary to ensure full co-operation.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
cc.  Mr. V. Jones
Mr. R.R. Reid
Mr. A.N. Cairns
Mr. T. King
Mr. C.A. Aitken X7;;77
Form 102-R
Internal Correspondence
m
Date VANCOUVER,' 22 February 1978. File:  T-78-101-POV
From J.W. McCowatt
To Memorandum
Mr. M.W. Holland
BE;  "PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER" - ANNUAL INSPECTION
With reference to your letter of 21 February, the attached lists
indicate the defects on board the above ship.
Those items which are scored out have been completed, and the items
which are not scored out are in hand.
Total defects listed were 97; those completed number 63, with 33 in
hand; one item is deferred to December 1978, and we have until the
end of February, with extended time for items beyond our manpower
capability.
The largest item to be attended to is the Buoyant Apparatus, and
at the present moment it has been suggested that the ship be updated
and brought in line with similar vessels operating on this coast by
the Senior Surveyor of C.S.I.
It should be observed here that 13 out of a total of 41 Buoyant
Apparatus have been removed from the ship and are considered beyond
repair.  The others are still to be tested.  The Passenger Certificate
has been reduced to 500 passengers.
To cover this item, it is proposed to remove the two liferaft davits
and inflatable liferafts from the "Carrier Princess" and place them
on board this ship, which would bring the capacity up from 500 to
750.   The "Carrier Princess" would then require two ten-man
inflatable liferafts and a Passenger Certificate for 12 passengers.
To update the Certificate to the original for the "Carrier" would
entail transferring the davits by crane and the inflatable liferafts.
In summation, I would like to advise that all Departments have cooperated, and a real good concerted effort has been made in achieving
the work carried out to date, including co-operation shown from the
Inspection Department.
f - 2 -
The vessel complies with all requirements of the classification
society, and I am pleased to advise that there are no outstanding
problems which will impede the vessel's operations.
The cost of testing the inflatable liferafts is estimated at
$4,000.00, and the cost of removing the davits and replacing same
is $3,000.00 using our own shop.  It should be noted that the reduction of the "Carrier Princess" to a cargo ship with 12 passengers
(truck drivers) would increase the special survey period from four
years to a five-year period.
Your decision regarding the foregoing recommendations is requested
to place this vessel comparably with other ships of its class.
The cause of the severity of inspection on this ship in January was
due to domestic housecleaning within C.S.I., and caused largely by
the lack of paper work and information on this ship in previous
years.
Asst. Superintendent Engineer
JWM'BB CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date VANCOUVER,   22 February 1978. File:     T-78-5-A
From M.W.  Holland gf
To Mr. M.R. Hodgson
Dept. of Public Relations & Advertising
Montreal, Que.
Further to Mr. Jones' letter of 16 February, please be advised I
will require business cards of a dual purpose in addition to those
listed in the attachment to his letter.
Accordingly, will you please arrange for a BCCS - Northland Service
card for me to read as follows:
M.W. Holland
Manager, BCCS - Northland Service
500 of these would be appreciated.  I have an ample supply of cards
for my position as Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
I trust all is well with you, and we will get together in the not too
distant future.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
cc.  Mr. P.I. Georges, Montreal.
Mr. V. Jones, Vancouver.
W>  Form 102-R "'Holland
anager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
22 February  1978.
Reid File No.   T-78-49-A
Mr. J. Halliday
1956 East 34th Ave.
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Halliday:
As. you retired from the Company on pension effective 1 January
1978, would appreciate your returning annual BCCSS pass now in
your possession, so that we may request pass in your favour as
"Pensioned Chief Steward."
With kind regards,
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
BB .■ a-xsger
Pier "B", Vancouver. BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex 04-507684
_"-._n ap-rf
wHolland 22 February 1978.
'>ffe« File No. T-78-49-A
Mr. J.A. Foster
811 Beach Drive
Nanaimo, B.C.
V9S 2Y4
Dear Mr. Foster:
As you retired from the Company on pension effective 1 January
1978, would appreciate your returning annual BCCSS pass now in
your possession, so that we may request pass in your favour as
"Pensioned Waiter."
With kind regards,
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
BB CPRail
iMemai Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, February 23, 1978
From M.W. Holland
TO A.N. Cairns,
File:  AGR.1. CMSG.GEN.N.
Ml
Subject:  Certification as a bargaining agent for Canadian
__ Merchant Service Guild covering Northland Division.
Enclosed are notices to be posted on Northland vessels which should
be handled similarly to those for the B.C.C.S. last December.
Will you kindly arrange to have the enclosed notices posted on the
folloxtfing vessels on the date shown:-
Northland Prince
Northland Fury
Squamish Warrior
February 24, 1978
February 28, 1978
Date omitted, but should be posted
at earliest possible convenience.
They are to remain in place for a period of seven clear days and then
taken down and returned to this office.
Also enclosed for your information is copy of a letter received from
Canadian Labour Relations Board covering this matter.
S) Form 102-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
HLH/wj
PLS. INITIAL & PASS CPRail T3
Internal Correspondence HklSi
Date VANCOUVER, February 23, 1978
From A.N. Cairns
Master, Trailer Princess
Trailer Princess will not be required in James Island service,
Tuesday, February 28th, 1978.
Your attention is drawn to OPORD 78-3.
Marine Superintendent.
cc: Blaney Agencies
Chief Engineer, Trailer Princess
Wharf Traffic Supervisor
Superintendent A-3
C. Aitken
J. Finnie
Master Princess of Vancouver
Master Carrier Princess
T. King
J. McCowatt
ANC/wj
(fSb Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
__3
Date VANCOUVER, February 23, 1978 Files:  T-78-1010A
510
From A.N. Cairns
To Master, Princess of Vancouver
Mr. M. Holl, Shipping Master will board your vessel for the purpose
of renewing articles Tuesday, February 28, 1978 11:30 a.m.  Advise
all crew members to be available with the necessary documents.
Note:  To expedite this signing the Purser will phone Mr. Holl at
666-3636 and advise him of the names of persons expected to be
aboard on this date.
f
&_2 Form 102-R
Marine Superintendent.
cc. Purser, Princess of Vancouver
Chief Engineer, Princess of Vancouver
Mr. M. Holl, Ministry of Transport, Ship Safety, Pacific Centre.
ANC/wj
»;xr, „.'i ;•.;•■•-  -,•'>-- Internal Correspondence
Oate VANCOUVER, February 23, 1978
From A.N. Cairns
To 2nd Officer, Princess of Vancouver
H
You will arrange to have the following deck crew your vessel
available for duty on the Princess Patricia as follows:-
R. Kissack
F. Waesche
A. Drew
A. Drexler
March 13, 1978
March 13, 1978
March 20, 1978
March 20, 1978
It will be in order to effect these transfers at the time of crew
change for leave, advising this office of requirement for replacements.
Marine Superintendent.
ANC/wj
QgS) Form 102-R
\| uu uudyi bieWllsnip Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
I W Holland
RReid
- XXianager
CPRail
February 23, 1978
File: 494229
Marilyn Rutherford,
43 Rainbow Dr.,
Woodbridge, Ontario.
L4L 1A8
Dear Ms. Rutherford:
Reference your letter of February 4, 1978 concerning re-employment
on the "Princess of Vancouver".
We will be preparing the crew lists around the first of March, and
are not aware at the present time as to how many of the girls will
be returning from last season.
As I am sure you will appreciate, those with more seniority will be
given preference.
Sorry we cannot give you more information at this time, but wiH
contact you again as soon as possible.
Yours very truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/wj CPRail
internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, February 22, 1978
File: A—100
From
A. Mexjer
To    Mr. Eric Fox, Purchasing Department, Montreal, Quebec,
Regarding our recent telephone conversation. Enclosed is a set ol
photocopies covering all expenses incurred in Northlands' 1977
operation.
Hopefully this information will suffice, but please do not hesitate
to contact if more assistance is required.
»2)Form 102A-R
Catering Superintendent,
AM/w j
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Manager
Asst. Mgr.
^Marine Supt.   [}Q]
Supt.  Engr.
ffjif        i BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
'.'/Holland
nager
.',' Reid
- Manage*
February 22, 197!
File:  494268
Mr. Alastair Evans
28 - 7015 - 135th St,
Surrey, B.C.
Dear Mr. Evans:
Due to policy changes, we regret to advise that our Montreal
office are unable to accept photostat copies of Certificates
of Birth. A copy of your Certificate of Birth was forwarded
to them on January 25, 1978.
We, therefore, request that you let us have your original
Certificate of Birth, once again, for forwardance to Montreal.
Apologizing for any inconvenience.
Yours truly,
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/JB
y Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, February 22, 1978
From M.W. Holland
To Mr. R. Granger
Montreal
File:  494360
In connection with the conditions of entry of Northland Navigation
employees into Canadian Pacific's pension plan, enclosed herewith
is Form 017(b) for Harold L. NARDELLE, #494360, effective January 23/78,
entered Northland Service February 1, 1973.
Manager, B.CC.S.S.
JB
SS Form 102-R
J CANADIAN  PA
CIFIC  LIMITED
British Columbia Coast Steamship Service
POSTED:
DATE:  February 22, 1978
BULLETIN:    #9
The following position is hereby advertised for application in
accordance with Rule 23 of COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT WITH BROTHERHOOD
OF R.R. & S.S. CLERKS.
Applications should be submitted to the undersigned where they
will be received up to and including: March 6, 1978
TITLE OF POSITION:
Ticket Clerk J-2
LOCATION OF POSITION:
Vancouver Wharf Ticket Office
RATE OF PAY:
In accordance with schedule
PERMANENT OR TEMPORARY:
Permanent
HOURS:
12:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
DAYS OFF:
Wednesday and Thursday
DUTIES:
Handles reservations, sells
and issues tickets, writes
up ticket reports, miscellaneous
allied duties as required.
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
cc:  Agent -- Vancouver
Nanaimo
Mr. R. Welch
Sr. General Chairman
B.R.A.S.C.
Mr. A. Gault, Vancouver
Mr. D. Tauson, Nanaimo
t- SETAIN THIS COPY FOR FOLLOW-UP
Canadian Pacific
EXEMPLAIRE JAUNE A CONSERVER POUR SUIVRE ..'AFFAIRE
Canadien Pacifique
From: M>w<>  Holland
De:
Department      B.C.C.S.S.,  Vancouver
Service
send to:      Mr# Ian Blaney
Date                22 February 1978
Blaney'a Travel
Subject            Fixe; T-78-30-12
Objet:
920 Douglas St., Victoria, B.C.
Sidney Freight Ltd, T-2
Message                                                                                                                                                                                                                   .               -
k Would you please advise this office whether or not your Wharfinger at Swartz Bay has any„_j_. _J
knowledge of damage occurring to Sidney FreightLimited trailer T-2 eitherpriorto or duringt
loading aboard the "Carrier Princess", 2200 hours 26 January 1978.
j       ■      ■."•              ■■   V.-V.-...
Copy of report completed at Vancouver is attached for your information.
.'■■'■    x]:::--l;'.xll^l'-l-:      •**%.   xllii-l'--         ■ k-l^x-^j,.: .*'■--. ■ ;\ :%£.-' ■ ''^.l^^-'l               ^^ll^-:"i-:'       ■:.■:.-'"■■ "V'.'■'■"■''-   '•": 'isST
Manager, B.C.C.S«sS.
WM	
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Use lower portion for reply.                                                                                                          Reply from
litiliser la section du bas pour reponare                                                                                      Reponse de
Date
To Originate: Hand or typewrite message. Remove yellow copy Avoid verbal instructions use a                                         To Reply:   Write reply, snap set - retain white
(follow-up copy) and forward balance of set. Evitez les instructions verbales, utilisez un                                    _                   original and return pink copy.
Save envelope typing: Fold form at arrows ,_f OP PTJ /7J1 P'/TI Tl P°Ur r^Pondre: Ecrivez «*re reponse, detachez. conservez
For use in #9 or #10 window envelope. •_? '-'PiP-U.III Is mil11 U                                                               I'onginal blanc et retournez I'exemplaire rose.
Pour Ecrivez a la main ou a la machine. Detachez I'exemplaire jaune. conservez-le pour suivre ('affaire, et envoyez les autres exemplaires.
envoyer:   Evitez de taper des enveloppes: Ptiez aux fleches, et utilisez des enveloppes a fenetres no 9 et no 10.
•y RC Coast Steamship Service
i-.-xr "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3735, Telex04-507684
IW Holland
IReid
: Manager
r x-f~-. i
_S___Z^
February 21, 1978
File:  393809
Mr. J.I. Jenkins
#404 -- 885 Craigflower Road
Victoria, B.C.
V9A 2X6
Dear Mr. Jenkins:
Thank you for your letter of February 10, 1978.
I have forwarded your request to Montreal for the C.P. Rail
News Magazine to be mailed to you as published.
With regard to the over deduction of unemployment insurance
premiums, I am advised by the Accounting Department that you
should claim this in the space provided on your Income Tax
Return.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
"NI CPRail
internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 21 February 1978.
From R.R. Reid
'° Memorandum
Mr. M.W. Holland
File:  655-C
W
Form 102-R
Attached please find work-up figures in connection with "Mercator
One" on the assumption that Car Deck area will be converted to provide 22 additional cabins, as per latest advice from Mr. Georges.
The 1979 estimated revenues and expenses are arrived at as follows:
Revenues are based on 90% occupancy factor.  To allow for a mid-point
between 90% actual, and accommodation actually accommodated by
category, we assume that all passengers will be adult.  This attempts
to protect reduced rates and other types of below-tariff rates for
a rough approximation only.
Some questions yet to be answered include, whether or not employees
will still be favoured with reduced fares with inception of VIA, and
whether or not we will continue to offer reduction to subsidiary
firms' employees.
Basis of Mr. McPherson's calculations are attached. Miscellaneous
revenue is 10% over 1978 estimated income but on the basis of two
Bars being operated.
Crew wages are based on 1977 actual, and until an appreciation of
"Mercator's" factual requirements is known, we have used as a base,
10% of an increase between '77, '78 and '79.
Mr. Meijer has some concerns respecting the type of vessel to be
operated and requirements of crew to perform the necessary crew
functions.  He should have an early opportunity to view the vessel
for his determination of the Catering Department.
Other items of expense are as explained individually hereunder:
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Asst. Mgr.
Marine  Supt.  Cy\f
Supt.  Engr.
Asst. Supt., Engr.
Mktg. Analyst.
ijtjudL,
J - 2 -
Two items of an unknown factor are advertising and marketing,
which obviously will be of a greater expense than shown, having
used only a 10% increase/1978 projected amounts.  Bill Hocking
has also indicated that he is very concerned with regard to the
amount of insurance involved in an operation of this nature.
We have projected earnings on a five-year basis, but by reason of
the expense factor having several unknowns, we have not progressed
it beyond 1979 until insurance, advertising, and marketing can be
resolved.  Obviously, as we conclude the first year we will better
be able to estimate our expenses, and also to refine projected revenues.
While the rate sheet suggested includes four additional cabins which
do not require conversion, we have not included on the rate sheet any
conversion rooms as yet.  Estimates for these rooms are shown
separately.
Undoubtedly figures contained herein will be refined, but recommend
them to you as a base for negotiations and further discussions on
the basis that Mr. Georges has presented the "Mercator."
Understand you are intending to go to Montreal in the near future
and will be taking these figures along with you.
We are working up costs for bringing the ship to Vancouver, and
although I have asked Mr. King for an appreciation of layover of the
"Mercator" on the same basis as the "Patricia," I have not as yet
received same.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB CPRail WjL
internal Correspondence L_k__>l
Date VANCOUVER, 21 February 1978. File:  530
From R.R. Reid
To Memorandum
Mr. M.W. Holland
Reference our conversation last week pertaining to maximum amounts
to be signed for by Departmental Superintendents for requisition
purposes.
The only reference I can find to previous instructions is as
attached, and would suggest that the Superintendents concerned
should continue to have the signatory authority as indicated therein
except for any one item in excess of $2,000.00.  Any item in excess
of this amount should require the Manager's signature, or in his
absence account vacation, business or illness, the Asst. Manager.
Providing you concur, instructions will be drawn up accordingly.
Sp Form 102-R
Asst.   Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
/ BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Teiex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
%&£t   rallli
W Holland
■agar
R Reid
■:.' Manager
■21 Vebruary 1978.
Tile Mo. T-78-69
Mr. Alan Nordllng
General Manager
Klondike Visitors Association
Box 335
Vows on City,  Yukon Territory.
YOB 1G0
Dear Mr. Nordllng:
Many thanks {or the kindness o{ your letter o{ 14 Vebruary enclosing copies o{ business cardi, collected while on the Worlds
o{ Alaska Tours.
It has certainly been a disappointment to learn o{ the cancellation o{ a major portion o{ the Eastern segment; however, In
so {an as the AVA show to date Is concerned,  I {eel sure that IX
has bene{lted us In the operation o{ the "Vrlncess ?atrlcl.a."
T{ there Is any way we can assist you locally, please do not
hesitate to let us know.
Yours very truly,
R.R. REID
Asst. Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB r
(S) Form 102-R
CPRail
internal Correspondence
Date VANC0UVER> 21 February 1978. File:  309491
From R.R. Reid
To Mr. R. Gavin
Storekeeper
Vancouver, B.C.
Effective Monday, 27 February 1978, Mr. G.J. Webster becomes
Assistant Storekeeper under your jurisdiction.
As mentioned, Mr. Webster has commitments for vacation June 5-30
inclusive, and understand that there is no problem in his continuing
with his plans.  He also has one week to take in the fall at your
convenience.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S,
RRR'BB
cc.  Mr. G.J. Webster
Mr. C.A. Aitken
Mr . H.L. Hudson r
CPRail
Internal Corresponds
m
Date VANCOUVER, 21 February 1978.
From r.r. Reid
'° Memorandum
Mr. M.W. Holland
File:  655-C
i
"MERCATOR ONE"
We have completed estimate of Revenue and Expenses for operation in
1979 as far as we can project figures.  Remaining are advertising
and Management refinement, and clarification on Insurance based on
leasing the "Mercator" from her new proposed owners.
Estimate for cost of bringing the vessel out from Florida is just
about finalized.
The costs and revenue are computed on basis of 22 converted cabins
on the Car Deck area, of which 18 will be outside, four inside, all
two beds, shower and toilet, plus use of four other staterooms, for
total number of staterooms 162, and 330 passengers.  Projections are
en route Mr. Georges.  Net before fixed costs and refinement mentioned
above, $1,051.5.
Next exercise is to assume expenses on basis if we lease vessel from
Magi, and in turn lease her to a charterer for winter months; e.g.,
concern presently negotiating with us for use of vessel in summer.
Initial meeting is set for discussion purposes with Department
Superintendents this afternoon at 2:00 o'clock.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S
RRR'BB
® Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 21 February 1978. File:  4Q2
From M.W. Holland
'° Memorandum
Mr. R.R. Reid
m
In accord with our earlier conversation, would you kindly have Mr.
Carpenter complete the required lease forms so that I may present
them to Mr. Margetts at tomorrow's Management meeting, when the
lease of vehicles will be discussed.
At that time I hope to have a full presentation prepared for Mr.
Margetts, which will include a policy governing the operation of the
cars, and the draft of a letter to Mr. Campbell requesting his
approval for the acquisition of these vehicles.
In line with this, could you have prepared for me the expense
claims for use of personal autos for the year 1977 for yourself,
Mr. Cairns, Mr. King, and Messrs. Aitken and Finnie.  I am sure
Gordon Marshall can supply you with this in short order.
Also, if you could review the draft I have given to Beverley of
the letter to Mr. Campbell it would be appreciated, as well as
the attached draft of policy governing the use of automobiles.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
ifS|> Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 21 February 1978. File:  429-N
From M.W. Holland
To Memorandum
Mr. T. King.
A Management meeting is being held with Mr. Margetts, Wednesday, 22
February, at which time outstanding matters with respect to the
takeover of Northland will be discussed.
Would you kindly have available to me a status report on the survey
of equipment, which should include the position regarding the tugs
and barges which were covered by surveys with Mr. Jepson.
If there are any other items which you would like to have discussed
at this meeting, please indicate and I will follow suit.
m
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
J CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 21 February 1978. File:  429-N
From M.W. Holland
To Mr. V. Jones
Vancouver, B.C.
Listed below you will find areas which I would appreciate having
the opportunity to discuss either with you directly, or at a
Management meeting between ourselves and Mr. Margetts.  These are *
as follows:
1. At the current time there is no flow of revenue and expense material
through this office, and I feel somewhat removed in light of this
set of circumstances, inasmuch as I have not set up a desk at
Northland, but which I will do in the near future, no later than
1 March.  I nonetheless would appreciate being copied in on
revenue summary of each sailing and kept apprised of related
expenses.  I realize that we are still in our formative stages,
but ask that in any procedures that are set up they ensure my
awareness of our position.
2. I have discussed with Mr. Walter Wright our position with respect
to claims and additional duties which we will expect him to
assume in his future employment with Canadian Pacific, which will
include certain insurance items as well as General Office administration.  In this light would you kindly prepare a list of responsibilities which Miss Taylor is currently handling, but could
be handed over to Mr. Wright.  I will discuss the matter with the
appropriate personnel at this end, and hopefully, we can have a
smooth-flowing system for administrative paper work in the near
future.
3. As you will appreciate, I do  have considerable concern for the
marketing and sales functions of our overall operations.  I feel
that I am somewhat in the dark with respect to how these projects
have progressed, which in light of my conversations with other
companies' officers in the industry, could lead to embarrassment
of Canadian Pacific, in that it would appear that the right hand
doesn't know what the left hand is doing.  Again, I note we are
in the preliminary stages of setting up our procedures, but I
x^'X^x
Form 102-R - 2 -
would ask that you provide for updates from time to time on the
various projects which you have under way.
In the past couple of months I have tried to prevent duplication
in any of the areas of operations and administration, which, during
the transition period you have so ably handed.  However, I think we
are now getting to a point where I will be in a position, in the
near future, to set up the manpower to handle some of these items
which have fallen into your hands.
Rather than procrastinate further, I would suggest that I should
have a desk at the Northland offices as of 1 March, and that as of
that date subjects in the areas of administration, operations,
and labour and personnel, could be forwarded to that desk for handling.
It is my intention, of course, to delegate much of this work to the
appropriate personnel, and hopefully, not only will you be relieved
of some of these nuisance-type items, but we will achieve a systematical
and efficient procedure for their handling.
I think it would be helpful if you and I set aside an hour twice a
week to sit down and go over outstanding matters pertaining to
both the operations and the marketing and sales areas, so we are
both kept fully informed.
I hope you will find these comments helpful, and would suggest that
perhaps Monday morning meetings would be conducive to the above
proposal.  Please advise your concurrence or otherwise.
1
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
y internal Correspondence
m
Date VANCOUVER, 21 February 1978.
From M.W. Holland
To Mr. J.W. McCowatt
Vancouver, B.C.
File:  T-78-1010-A
i
Mr. Margetts has called a Management meeting between myself and Mr.
Jones for 0900 Wednesday, 22 February.
Would you kindly have prepared for me, a status report on the
situation with the "Princess of Vancouver," together with your
confirmation that all is in order and that there are no outstanding problems which will impede the vessel's operations.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
Form 102-R internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 21 February 1978.
From M.W. Holland
To Memorandum
Mr. R.R. Reid
Further to our discussions this morning, would you kindly provide me
with a written status report on the "Mercator One" for a Management
meeting with Mr. Margetts at 0900 Wednesday, 22 February.
The report should contain any recommendations which you might have
on procedures you think we should follow in this matter.
—7
&<
•<
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
© Form 102-R CPRail
internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER,   21  February  1978.
From     M.W.  Holland
To     Memorandum
Mr.   R.R.   Reid
For a Management meeting with Mr. Margetts at 0900 Wednesday, 22
February, would you kindly provide me with a status report on our
AVA participation, which details the shows which have been cancelled in the East, and the action we are  taking to compensate for
this loss of exposure.
Would also appreciate your comments on your conversation with Bob
Giersdorf.
m
(|2> Form 102-R
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S,
MWH'BB CPRail WJl
internal Correspondence 1_L!_3
Date VANCOUVER, 21 February 1978.
From M.W. Holland
To Memorandum
Mr. A. Meijer
Mr. Margetts has called a Management meeting for 0900, Wednesday,
22 February, at which time I would appreciate having a report
from you with respect to action you have taken for the provisioning
of vessels and general improvements on board the "Princess of
Vancouver."
This report does not have to be lengthy, but should detail problems
you have encountered, and recommendations for remedial action.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date VANCOUVER, 21 February 1978.
From M.W. Holland
To Mr. J.D. Finnie
Vancouver.
File:  651
Would you kindly provide me with a status report on the Pier A-l
situation, stating the projected repair costs as they now stand,
and the commencement date, estimated date of completion of repairs,
and the target date for completion itself.
I would also appreciate your comments with respect to:
1. How we are managing the movement of our current traffic to
the Island.
2. What is the status of the barge traffic, which prior to the
mishap was being handled through the Pier A-l slip.
I suggest you contact Mr. Swanson, advise him I am tied up with
S.I.U. negotiations at this time, but would appreciate anything
he could give me on the subject.
/
*^_ss>*i_y
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
■J   /■ /'7 ^
^>Ctl^ s z^-1-
-c^^sf
Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date VANCOUVER, 21 February 1978.
From M.W. Holland
To Memorandum
Mr. W.W. Hocking
There is a Management meeting to be held with Mr. Margetts at 0900,
Wednesday, 22 February, and I would appreciate if you could provide
me with the following:
1. An extension of your January report on passenger and automobile
carryings up to and including the latest date possible.
2. A performance of the Beaver Cove service from commencement of
contract up to 31 January 1978.
3. Revenues and expenses for January showing final position, as
well as an estimate taken from your sheet of projected revenues
and expeses.
4. Truck and trailer carryings (I believe I have this from Mr.
Aitken.
5. Rail carryings for year to date, showing comparison with
previous year and projection in plans.
Also, any comments you have with respect to average revenues would
be helpful.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
MWH'BB
£S) Form 102-R Internal Correspondence
m
Date VANCOUVER, 21 February 1978. File: AGR.2.SIU.
From M.W. Holland
To Mr. P.E. Timpson
Asst. Supervisor
Labour Relations
Vancouver, B.C.
Mr. Margetts is holding a Management meeting at 0900 Wednesday,
22 February, at which time he will be seeking an update on our
negotiations with the S.I.U.
In light of this, I would appreciate if you could provide me with
a summary status report for his perusal.  Any comments regarding
future action which you recommend would be appreciated.
Ii
y^^rg^oiaiT*
f
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB infernal Correspondence
Date   VAWCOUVER, February 21,  1978
From   A.  Heijer
To Chief Cook - Carrier Princess
Chief Cook - Trailer Princess
rile
i— (0—±lL
83 Form 102-R
In order to put the ordering of food supplies on a proper basis
a new  form has been produced. A set will be forwarded for your,
next food order. Each week thereafter, you will be provided with
a set of ordering forms for current use.
All ordering is to be done weekly only, and . you should arrange to
have one day's supplies on hand at all times in the event of delayed
delivery.
Provisions are to be ordered and supplied using the "Portion Control"
method.
So that the system of ordering may be effective, completed forms are
to be forwarded direct to the Catering Superintendent together with
meal form. To this end your co-operation will be much appreciated.
Catering Superintendent
cc. Master - Carrier Princess
Master - Trailer Princess
HH/wj
J Date    VANCOUVER, February 21, 1978 File: T-78-17
From    A, Meijer
To    Mr, M,W. Holland
Princess of Vancouver
Trips made February 8,15  Days
Trips made February 20   Nights
1) Chief Stewards have been notified to forward all requests
to catering Superintendent instead of original to Purchasing
and thereby altogether eliminating all direct ordering,
2) Outstanding union issues have either been successfully concluded or are in hand*
3) As an interim measure I have instructed Chief Stewards to be
firmer on proper dress code*
4) Excessive storeroom supplies have been returned and in due
course I will implement proper invento*"\ control,
5) Due to a lower volume of passengers travelling during winter
schedule, cooks have been instructed to eliminate steam table
as much as possible, and cook to order, I am exploring the
possibility of supplying bakery requirements on a daily basis
in order to ensure fresh, top quality.
6) Priority subject is "Bar Control" which I am looking into,
7) At present I am trying to improve communications between ships
and office.
Catering Superintendent,
AM/wj
jiiOpForm 102-R £K. xxixts'i sieamsnipservi-x.u
Pier "6", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
Reid
Manager
%drfr
wHolland February 21,  1978
File:     103
Mr, Ian Grassick,
President,
Grassick Transport Ltd,,
220 Esquimau Rd,,
Victoria, B.C.
V9A 3K9
Dear Mr, Grassick:
It is indeed unfortunate you were not in your office on Thursday,
February 16th last when Mr, J.D, Mason, Asst. to Vice-President
Finance and our Mr, C.A, Aitken called in to see you. It would
have been much simpler to explain the nature of business at hand
by conversation than in written form.
We are concerned at this time about the amount of the outstanding
you have incurred at our Wharf Ticket Office and the ageing of the
accounts. At the time of the visit you were owing $42,133.50
covering period December 21, 1977 to February 14, 1978 inclusive.
As you are aware, the Credit Application allows for 7 days, therefore, it is readily seen the account is far out of line.
Approximately a year ago the same situation occurred at which time
you had agreed to bring the account into line by a set date; this
has not been done on a continuing basis.
I regret to advise you that the account must be brought into line
by March 31st, 1978 and failing this, restrictive credit will be
put into effect.
I would appreciate hearing from you that the above will be adhered
to as we do appreciate your past traffic routed through us and look
forward to a continuance of same.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc. J.D. Mason
HLH/Wj BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tef(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
wHolland February 21,  1978
age'
H Reid
'Xanager
File:     578
Canadian Industries Limited,
Box 10,
Montreal, Quebec
H3C 2R3
Attention: Mr. R.E, Keiller
Insurance Manager
Dear Sirs:
We have written you on no fewer than three occasions requesting
Royal Insurance Company Policy No. 8L-6174/5, and we have still
not heard from you in this regard.
Your prompt attention to this matter will be appreciated.
Yours truly,
M.W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
HLH/wj Internal Correspondence
Data   VANCOUVER, February 21, 1978
From   A, Meijer
To   Mr, D, Murray, Nordock, Kitimat,
File: S-020
We received two invoices regarding provisions "Squamish Warrior",
the first one dated January 10th in the amount of $64,45 and the
second one dated January 16th for $33,02.
Each amount was only shown on a tape.
Until such time that another system will be implemented, please
show which items have been purchased. As an example I enclose
an order which was purchased for your office through Norcanco,
Catering Superintendent,
B,C,C,S*S,
CC, R.R, Reid
Purchasing
/wj
Sit) Form 102-R CPRail
internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, February 21,  1978
From    A,N, Cairns
To    Chie f Engineer,
PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER
File: 405
Enclosed is current copy of Lloyd's Survey Certificate covering
machinery D.B.S., T.S., C.S.M. & Repairs for the "Princess of
Vancouver",
Please ensureit is posted in the appropriate frame in the
passenger space and return the existing certificate to me.
§5>Forit1 102A-R
Marine Superintendent
B.C<C ,S,S.
HLH/wj CPRail
internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, February 21, 1978
From    A.N, Cairns
To    Master
PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER
File: 405
Enclosed is current copy of Lloyd's Load-Line Certificate for
the "Princess of Vancouver",
Please ensure it is posted in the appropriate frame in the
passenger space and return the existing certificate to me.
"»Form 102A-R
Marine Superintendent
u ,CC,o ,S,
HLH/wj
rf -^H£^^r^^^i
!x\h--i<
1   tAU
.  EL )Form 102-R
internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER, February 21, 1978 File: T-78-14
From    A, Meijer
Jo     Chief Cook - Carrier Princess
Chief Cook - Trailer Princess
In order to put the ordering of food supplies on a proper basis
a new form has been produced, A set will be forwarded for your
next food order. Each week thereafter, you will be provided with
a set of ordering forms for current use,
AH ordering is to be done weekly only, and you should arrange to
have one day's supplies on hand at all times in the event of delayed
delivery.
Provisions are to be ordered and supplied using the "Portion Cut"
method.
So that the system of ordering may be effective, completed forms
are to be forwarded direct to the Catering Superintendent together
with meal form. To this end your co-operation will be much appreciated.
Catering Superintendent,
c,c. Master - Carrier Princess
Master - Trailer Princess
\l '. W Holland
H Reid
' Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2P3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
€P Bail
February 21,  1978
File:    T-78-101
Canadian Coast Guard Ship Safety,
P.O, Box 10060,
700 W, Georgia St.,
Vancouver, B.C.
V7Y 1E1
Attention: Lionel Midford
Dear Sir:
Re: "Princess of Vancouver''
With reference to our recent conversation of February 16, 1978,
attached is a list of masters and mates on board, on the final
day of drydocking, January 27th, 1978.
Yours truly,
J.W. McCowatt
Assistant Superintendent Engineer.
/wj 7? Raid
' Manage
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Te! (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
tXfeXSf-' A
February 21,   1978
File:     197408
Mr. L.L. Wedman
#906 -- 4758 Grange Street
Burnaby, B.C.
V5H 1R2
Dear Mr. Wedman:
Reference your enquiry concerning "pensionable service",
attached herewith is a letter received from the Manager,
Pensions and Benefits, dated February 8, 1978, which is
self-explanatory.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B",Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
\ai
./Holland February 21,   1978
He/rf Fiie.     424464
Manager
Sun Life of Canada
200D --338 Broadway Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3C 0T3
Dear Sirs
Re:  A. TAYLOR, Loc. 5062, Emp.No. 424464,
S.I.N. 708-081-062	
Reference your memorandum of February 14, concerning the
above mentioned employee.
Mr. Taylor was not absent from work at any time during the
period April 28, 1977, to January 28, 1978.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB iernal Correspondence
m
Date    VANCOUVER, February 21, 1973 File:    T-7S-1G12A
From    T.  King
To    Mi-. M.W. Holland,
"With regard to the working hours during the weekend of February
11th and 12th, 1978 on our vessel the "Trailer- Princess".
On Saturday, February 11th, 1978 the vessel returned from Nanairno
at about loOO hrs, completed her- discharge and proceeded to the
lay-by berth.
Sunday, February 12th, 1978 vessel was manned at approximately
0800 hrs, and shut-down with the last engineer departing at 1605
hrs.  Attached are payroll sheets covering this period.
Superintendent Engineer.
£2) Form 102A-R
lK/WJ
T--""•—«-tfS
^4M
mi internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, February 21,  1978
From   M.W. Holland
To   Messrs. A. Meijer   - B.C.C.S.S.
E. Robinson - B.C.C.S.S.
0. Robison  - B.C.C.S.S.
R. Pellej'"   - B.C.C.S.S.
V. Jones   - Northland
N.E. "liood   - Northland
W.V. Shaver - Northland
. J.R. Dickson - Northland
C.J. Siddall - Northland
D.J. Murray - Northland
W.D. Hickman - Northland
N.H. Parharn - Northland
Attached yoix will find t!A Code Of Business Conduct", which has
been passed to the Board of Directors, and a copy of which is
to be distributed to each employee of the Company who has
executive, managerial or supervisory responsibilities.
The Code also specifies that the Head of each Department will
confirm to Senior Management each year, that each employee in
the above-mentioned categories under his -jurisdiction, has
completed a Form of Acknowledgment in respect to this current
version of the Company's code.
Accordingly, will you kindly return the Form of Acknowledgement
on Page 11, forwarding same to Mr. Hudson of my office for his
use.
Manager, B.C.C.x
txm ',.-•
An/ wj
ID Form 102-R CPRail
internal Correspondence
¥4
Date     VANCOUVER, February 21, 1978 File: T-78-83
From    A. Meijer.
To    Mr. G. Grekul
Plsase be advised that it has been agreed to have Mrs. Grekul
check and repair minor damage to:
60 Torn Blankets
158 Torn Spreads
507 Torn Siieets
The above work will be dons at an hourly rate of $5.00.
Any further repairs to linen examined at the present time will be
discussed at a future date.
)Form 102A-R
Catering Superintendent,
/wj ■ ence
Date  VANCOUVER, February 21, 1978
From  M.w. Holland
To
File:  X-77-14-12
Mr. A. McDermott
Montreal
Your letter of January 25, further regarding damage to rail cars
and mill track at Duncan Bay on December 11, 1977, involving the
"Seaspan Doris."
I am enclosing a photostat copy of a note from our Senior Traffic
Supervisor to the Terminals Superintendent dated December 20, which
is self-explanatory.
Our Office Manager telephoned Mr. Logan recently and he stated that
he had found a note on his desk asking him to call B.C. Coast, which
he did. He does not know to whom he spoke but according to Mr. Logan
somebody said "what do you know about damaged cars at Elk Falls?"
He replied that he knew nothing of the matter -- end of conversation.
The General Claims Agent will have given details of the cars involved
in this mishap.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc:  Mr. W.C. Sylander, Vancouver
HLH/jb
tSP Form 102-R
N TELEX VANCOUVER, B.C., 20 FEBRUARY 1978,
File: AGR.2.SIU.
P.I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE.
KINDLY CONFIRM COMPANY'S POSITION AS STATED BY MR WADDELL TO P
TIMPSON.THIS DATE WITH RESPECT TO S I U NEGOTIATIONS    BCC-1
■■... ■ ' . ' -     ■■'%''
M.W. HOLLAND
MGR., BCCSS ..
MWH'BB
■
•:;'; -.
11 ":tii§
'■
ill
1;   ;.;
i
_ X
.:J TELEX      . VANCOUVER, B.C., 20 FEBRUARY 1978.
File:  655-C
P.I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE.
CONV THIS AFTERNOON. REGRET FILES PERTAINING TO OUTWARD JOURNEY PR
PATRICIA NO LONGER AVAILABLE. PRESUME THEREFORE IN ORDER USE 4 THOUSAND
TONS AS APPROXIMATION PANAMA. CANAL PASSAGE PURPOSE    BCC-100
R.R. REID
ASST. MGR., BCCSS
■".■'"■•'        ■' "' "M ' ' - , •     '•
RRR'BB ;■> ■>■_'•;■
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Internal Correspondence
m
Date  VANCOUVER, 20 February 1978. File:  655-C
m
From  M.W. Holland
T"0  Messrs. R.R. Reid
A.N. Cairns
T.  King
W.W. Hocking
RE:  "MERCATOR ONE"
You are requested to be in my office at 2:00 p.m. Tuesday, 21
February, for a detailed discussion on the possible replacement of
the "Princess Patricia" by the "Mercator One."
During this meeting we will finalize details which have been requested by Montreal for negotiation with the principals.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
vf||) Form 102-R TELEX .VANCOUVER, B.C., 20 FEBRUARY 1978
File: 655-C
P.I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE. _ -
IN ORDER FINALIZE ESTIMATED COST BRING MERCATOR_VANCOUVER PLS ADVISE
PANAMA CANAL VESSEL TONNAGE TO ESTIMATE CANAL COSTS      BCC-98
R.R. REID
ASST. MGR., BCCSS
RRR'BB
-'!ts(^M0-
4 CPRail
Date VANCOUVER, 20 February 1978.
From m,w. Holland
To Mr. E. Robinson
Nanaimo, B.C.
File:  AGR.7.BRAC.SEN. (2)
v
Enclosed are seven copies of the Seniority List for Wharf Freight
Shed and Janitor employees, effective 1 January 1978.
Kindly give a copy to each employee and let me know if anyone
contests his position on the Seniority List prior to 90 days from
date of receipt, in accordance with Article 21.3 of the Collective
Agreement.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
BB
be.  Mr. R. Welch
System General Chairman
Brotherhood of Railway, Airline & Steamship
Clerks, etc.
401 Dominion Building
207 West Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 1H7
Twelve copies of Seniority List are attached.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
V
'■l> Form 102-R
J- CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date  VANCOUVER, February 20, 1978 File:  118404
From  M.W. Holland
To  Mrs. D. Martin
Pension Benefits Records
Montreal
Re:  L.B. JACKSON, P-118404, ex Roll 956,
 Retired on Pension February 1, 1978
As Mr. Jackson was last shown on the payroll on Period 01,
deductions for the Officer's Group Insurance for the month
of February was not made.
Mr. Jackson's personal cheque in the amount of $16.19 is forwarded
herewith to cover.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
© Form 102-R
N/ internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, February 20, 1978 File:  T-78-1012D
From J. McCowatt
To Master, "Trailer Princess"
Chief Engineer, "Trailer Princess"
Attached are the recommendations of the fire prevention inspection.
Please advise on the necessary action required to correct these
deficiencies in the most economic manner so that approval may be
given to carry out same.
Asst. Supt. Engineer
B.C.C.S.S.
JWM/jb
ED Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
.rffl
WHolland -February 20,   1978
RReid File:     130021
■ tifanaaer
Mr. K.D. Hodsall
Adminis trator
Estate Department
Davis & Company
Barristers & Solicitors
14th Floor, Burrard Building
1030 West Georgia Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6E 3C2
Dear Sir:
Re:  Estate of Donald J. McKILLOP,
 deceased January 12, 1978	
We have been advised by our Benefits Department in Montreal
that Capt. McKillop's December, 1977, pension cheque remains
outstanding.
It will, therefore, be appreciated if you would arrange to
have the above cheque returned to this office, as it now forms
part of the estate.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
JB
J .'■"/ Holland
i mid
■Vr agar
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CP RaM
February 20, 1978
File:  484382
Mr. T.J. Shyshka
#211 -- 312 Mount Benson Street
Nanaimo, B.C.
Dear Mr. Shyshka:
Re:  Claim for sick benefits for the period
 January 23 to January 29, 1978, inclusive
Enclosed herewith is a copy of a memorandum received from
Sun Life, which is self-explanatory.
Please obtain a note from your doctor indicating all dates
of actual treatment during the above mentioned period, and
forward same to this office as soon as possible.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB
\J )Form 102-R
internal Correspondence-
Date      VANCOUVER,  20 February 1978 File:  0-002
From      M.W.  Holland
T°      G. Friesen
Nortnland
Vancouver
Further to conversation between yourself and Andre Meijer
concerning loan of one electric typewriter, this pending
the outcome of the final disposition of Northland office
equipment.
The machine is required for the use of an additional steno
hired for the summer season.
Furtiier copy of this letter is attached. Kindly insert in
space provided, tue serial number and make of the machine and
retain the original for your records and return the other copy
to us. Same will be acknowledged.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH'GP
Serial Number Make
/ nager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Picr-B",Vancouver,BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
'Holland 20 February 1978
*bW File: T-78-30-20
Foremost Foods Ltd.
P.O. Box 2600
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 3W8
Attention; Mr. W.L. Dinsmore
Dear Sir:
Re: Your trailer #763 Damage Claim - 12 February 1978
Your notice of intention to claim dated 16 February 1978, has been
received and the matter is under investigation.
When our investigation has been completed, we will inform you
of the results.
If you are writing in regard to this claim, please quote the above
file number.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM'GP
J internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER,  20 February 1978
From     M.W. Holland
To      D.C. Freeman
Freight Claims Agent
Vancouver
File: T-77-30-186
Attached is my complete file covering alleged damage to
CP Transport unit #24019 on or about 24 October 1977, while
in the possession of B.C.C.S.S.
Since we cannot establish the exact location in which damage
occurred, it would appear that B.C.C.S.S. must bear the cost
of repairs*
If you agree with these findings, I would appreciate it if
you would arrange payment in the amount of $37.84 to CP Transport*
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM'GP
SO Form 102-R
J Dafe  VANCOUVER, 20 February 1978 File: T-78-30-4
From      M.W. Holland
To       D.C. Freeman
Freight Claims Agent
Vancouver, B.C.
Attached you will find my complete file covering alleged
damage to CP Transport trailer #44186 while in possession
of B.C.C.S.S. on or about 5 January 1978.
Since the exact location where damage occurred cannot be
established, it would appear that B.C.C.S.S* must bear the
cost of repairs.
If you agree with these findings, I would appreciate it if
you would arrange payment in the amount of $167*52.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM'GP
SjFonil 102-R internal Correspondence
Date   February 16th. 1978 File: T-78-30-5
From  Mr. M. W. Holland
To   Mr. D. C. Freeman
Freight Claims Agent
Vancouver, B. C.
Re. Capital Freightways T-63
Attached is my complete file covering damage sustained to
Capital Freightways unit T-63 on January 9th. 1978 during
loading operations of the Carrier Princess.
Since there appears to be little doubt as to our responsibility in this matter, I would appreciate it if you would
arrange settlement with Capital Freightways in the amount
of $500. (Five Hundred Dollars), the limit of our liability.
When settlement has been finalized with Capital Freightways,
I would appreciate receiving a copy of your voucher as it is
my intention to claim restitution from Johnston Terminals Ltd.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
tSForm 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
f^B1^ Bg-, SB
'Holland February  16th.   1978
xReid File:  T-78-30-5
X:--ager
WITHOUT PREJUDICE
Johnston Terminals Limited
P. 0. Box 5300
Vancouver, B. C.
V6B 4B6
Attention: Mr. Gerry French, M.V.A. Claims Dept.
Dear Mr. French:
Re. Your File: 78-43-B
Further to your reply of February 10th. 1978 regarding damage
to Capital Freightways Ltd. T-63 while being loaded aboard the
vessel Carrier Princess by your driver, Mr. L. Munro on January
9th. 1978, this will confirm that it is still our intention to
claim damage costs from your firm.
Although you have stated that Mr. Munro remains adamant in his
stand on this matter, I should point out that there are at least
three witnesses to the mishap and that none of these witnesses
corroborates Mr. Munro's statements. In fact, in view of comments made by Mr. Munro to several of the crew members during
the latter part of last week concerning possible court action I
have been confronted by another crew member who confirms statements made by other witnesses and they are directly opposite to
Mr. Munro's position.
Since Mr. Munro failed to heed the signals as required, I must
conclude that Johnston Terminals Limited cannot deny liability
in these circumstances. Therefore, when Capital Freightways
Limited claim has been finalized a claim will be submitted to
your firm for payment.
Yours very truly
M. W. Holland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc: Mr. I. Froese _.    *
i
GPRaii
internal Correspondence
Date     February 14th. 1978 File: 164
From     A. J. McPherson
To     Mr. M. W. Holland
Re. Damage Claim,Capital Freightways trailer T-63 and Johnston
Terminals hostler, Mr. Len Munro.
Attached you will find the complete file T-78-30-5 concerning
the above. It would appear that I have handled this claim as
far as I am able and that, any further progress will have to
involve both yourself and management at Johnston Terminals.
As it stands now, Capital Freightways Ltd. have a claim against
us for $795.62 for which we claim liability in the amount of
$500. However, it does not seem fair that Capital Freightways
should be out of pocket the difference since they were not a
contributing factor to the mishap.
From all reports (from crew members who witnessed the incident)
the party primarily responsible for this was the Johnston hostler,
Mr. Len Munro who failed to heed the signals because he felt he
knew where the trailer should be parked.
As a short reply to Mr. Gerry French's letter, I would point out
that our signal code does not contain any signals to indicate that
the hostler should change lanes. Also, since writing the letter
to Johnston Terminals on February 6th. 1978 I was surprised to find
that one of our S.I.U. members felt strongly enough about this occurrence to call in to this office and offer himself as a witness.
to the mishap. The list of witnesses, now numbers three that have
come forward.
Departmental Analyst
)Form 102-R Johnston l erminalsTimited
P.O.Box 5300, Vancouver, B.C. V6B 4B6
Telephone (604) 874-7371
Telex 045-1142
February 10,   1978
WITHOUT PREJUDICE
'"7""-ni7.-v,
C.P.  Rail
B.C.   Coast Steamship Service
Pier   'B'
Vancouver,   B.C.
V6C  2R3
Attention:    M.-W.   Holland,   Manager
Dear Sirs:
RE:     YOUR FILE #T-78-30-5
OUR  FILE  878-43-B
We are in receipt of your letter of February 6,   1978,  regarding the above
noted file,  which refers  to damages sustained  to Capital  Freightways
trailer  ffT-63.
We confronted our driver,   Len Munro,   with your letter and the details contained  therein.     He remains adamant  that  the deckhand did signal him to
port aft,   not  to stop.     As Mr.  Munro has several  years  experience on this
particular job he is well   versed in  the interpretation of signals.     He is
also considered  to be a  very conscientious employee,   and we feel   that there
is no reason to disbelieve him.     Therefore we must respectfully maintain
a complete denial of liability.
ruly,
'r*\ J]/&u/
if—
Gjetry French j
fv-K^fl.   Claims Dept.
/P9
TRUCKING / GENERAL COMMODITIES/ CHARTER/ CONTRACT & GENERAL CARTAGE / HEAVY HAULING / CRANES   BULK COMMODITIES
FORWARDING / TRUCK/ RAIL/ AIR/ INTERNATIONAL.
MARINE TERMINALS / FURNITURE MOVING & STORAGE / OFFICE MOVING / WAREHOUSING / DISTRIBUTION & STORAGE / DEMOLITION V
VANCOUVER TELEPHONE: 254-6010 VICTORIA TELEPHONE: 386-6116
f;
Capital Freightways Ltd.
GENERAL FREIGHT SERVICE
P.O. BOX 1262 655 QUEENS AVENUE
V8W 2T6 VICTORIA, B.C.
February 8 1978
C P Rail
Marine Dept Pier "B""
Vancouver BC
V6C 2R3
Attention:     Clem Aitken
mi—   mi i.-i,  ■ -_■—»■ —i     ■;■  ■.-_..   i»n— m-'■■   i.-'i-i  !■- - >■ ■-     m    i
Dear Sirs:
: Furth£_r to our letter of January 10th,
we have haci^xhej necessary repairs made to our
trailer N<&/T63/and enclose copies of the invoices
from CanacMBK^irailrnobile for $750.62 and Fred
Ashmore Signs for ia.x5.00 for a total claim of
$795.62.
¥e would appreciate a settlement cheque
from you at your earliest convenience.
Yours truly
Thomas  Der
General  lianaprer
TD/ga
encl >Ti3A-rL MOBILE]
I., in i ■ ™
NO. DE FACTURE
INVOICE NO.
CANADIAN TRAIHvfOBILE  LIMITED
2680 S30CAN STREET
VANCOUVER, RC. V8M 4ES
604-253-7131
79480
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CUSTOMf.R CODE
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SALESMAN
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WORK ORDER INSTRUCTIONS
DIRECTIVES FEUILLE DE TRAVAIL
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WRITTEN BY
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APPROVED BY
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I HEREBY AUTHORIZE THE ABOVE REPAIR WORK AND NECESSARY PARTS/JE, SOUSSIGNE, AUTORISE
LES REPARATIONS DECRITES PLUS HAUT ET LES PIECES NECESSAIRES
CUSTOMERS SIGNATURE/ SIGNATURE DU CLIENT
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CONTINUED ON PARTS REQ. NO.
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CANADIAN TRAILM08ILE LTEE DECLINE TOUTE RESPONSABILITE
POUR TOUTE PROPRIETE DU CLIENT LAISSEE A L'EXTERIEUR DE
NOTRE ENCEINTE CLOTURES ETFERMEE ETCE, A LA DEMANDE
DU CLIENT.
UNE LIVRAISON EFFECTUEE DE CETTE MANIERE NOUS DEGAGE
DE TOUTE RESPONSABILITE FUTURE.
CANADIAN TRAILMOBILE LIMITED ACCEPTS NO LIABILITY FOR
CUSTOMER PROPERTY WHICH IS LEFT OUTSIDE OF OUR FENCED
AND LOCKED PREMISES AT THE CUSTOMER'S REQUEST.
DELIVERY IN SUCH MANNER RELIEVES CANADIAN TRAILMOBILE
LIMITED FROM ALL FURTHER LIABILITY.
FACTURE DE SERVICE
SERVICE INVOICE
DUPLICATE
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PRIX DE LISTE
TOTAL DES
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TOTAL
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PARTS
PRIX TOTAL
NET DES
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BLUEIINE D 32 «)
u\._. ^'wa^rijrcra"' I *"Of np vTv,-' v,--^i..     -
Per "8". Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
V.'Holland
RRoid
CPRail
6 February 1978
File: T-78-30-5
WITHOUT PREJUDICE
Johnston Terminals
P.O. Box 5300
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 4B6
Attention:
Dear Sir:
Mr. Gerry French
M.V. Claims Department
Re:
Your file 78-43-B of 24 January 1978
I have attached a memorandum received from the 1st Officer of
the "Carrier Princess" briefly outlining the occurrences prior
to hostler L. Munro striking the Grassick trailer.
In connection vith this I would note the following:
1. It is not necessary for your driver to be advised of
protruding beams etc. on any other trailer already loaded.
It is his responsibility to obey the signals of our
seaman.
2. The seaman, H. Prosick, did not signal driver over to the
port side aft but in fact, signalled him to stop.
Further, in conversation with the 1st Officer, F.A. Hart, he states
that L. Munro admitted in front of witnesses, at the time of the
incident, that he did not realize that the slot had already been
filled by another unit.
Under normal circumstances, with the number of hostling units operating, it would have been Mr. Munro1s turn to load the unit where
the Grassick trailer was parked; however, while Mr. Munro was away
from the vessel picking up the Capital Freightways unit T-63, Grassick
Transport Limited was prevailed upon to load their own unit as there
were no tractors at the dockside able to accommodate the overhanging - 2
load. When Mr. Munro returned he was not aware of this occurrence and simply tried to load the Capital Freightways unit
where the Grassick unit had been parked.
The fact that light conditions were poor may have contributed
to the incident to the extent that Mr. Munro could not see the
trailer behind him and assumed the space was vacant; however,
as noted before, it is not Mr. Munro's position to assume anything. In his capacity, it is essential that he obey the signals
as given. This he did not do.
Since this is the case, it is still our intent to claim for recovery
on our settlement.
Your comments and further investigation would be appreciated.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
AJM'GP i
Date
From
To
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temal Correspondence
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 -*"•   ocHVICE
WJW Form 102-R Johnston Terminals Limited
P.O.Box 5300, Vancouver, B.C. V6B 4B6
Telephone (604) 874-7371
Telex 045-1142
January 24,   1978
WITHOUT PREJUDICE
C. P. Rail
B. C. Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, B. C.
V6C 2R3
Attention: Mr. M. W. Holland, Manager
Dear Sir:
Re:  Accident - January 9, 1978
Our Driver - Len Munro
3rd Party Unit - Capitol Freightways #T-63
Our File #78-43-B
Your File #T-78-30-5     .	
We are in receipt of your letter of January 18, 1978 wherein you
advised the writer of your intent to claim as a result of the
above-captioned loss.
We have interviewed our driver, Len Munro, and ascertained the
following facts:
- the driver was not advised of the long load on the Grassick trailer
and did not observe the protruding beams because of the light conditions.
- the deck man, Harvey Prosick, signalled our driver over to the
port side aft, which the driver was proceeding to do at the time of
loss.
The results of our investigation show that this loss resulted primarily
from the signals given by your deck hand, Mr. Prosick, who neglected to
signal our driver to stop in time to avoid an accident, but was waving
our driver to the port side aft at the time of the collision.  It is
also our feeling that the strategically poor placement of the long load
and your deck hand's failure to warn of the location of the long load is
a further contributing factor to this loss.  Therefore, we have no other
alternative but/to respectfully decline your claim.
French
Claims Department
.-' "v.; £0
TRUCKING / GENERAL COMMODITIES/ CHARTER / CONTRACT & GENERAL CARTAGE / HEAVY HAULING / CRANES / BULK COMMODITIES
FORWARDING / TRUCK/ RAIL/ AIR/ INTERNATIONAL.
MARINE TERMINALS / FURNITURE MOVING & STORAGE / OFFICE MOVING   WAREHOUSING / DISTRIBUTION & STORAGE / DEMOLITION BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B". Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
CPRail
>V Holland
18 January 1978
i Reid
■ X'j-M";
File:  T-78-30-5
Johnston Terminals Ltd.
P.O. Box 5300
2020 Yukon Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 4B6
Attention: Mr. J. French
Dear Sir:
Re:  CAPITAL FREIGHTWAYS T-63, 10 JANUARY 1978
During the loading operation of the 1730 hours sailing of the
"Carrier Princess" on 10 January 1978, the above trailer received
extensive damage when Johnston hostler, Mr. L. Monroe, failed to
heed signals and backed unit into Grassick trailer with overhanging
load.
With copy of this letter, you are advised that when we have made
settlement with Capital Freightways it is our intention to claim
restitution from your firm.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.  (/
AJM'GP r
internal Correspondeno
Date     VANCOUVER, 13 January 1978
From     M.W. Holland
To  Mr. Fred Hart
1st Officer
"Carrier Princess"
e
File: T-78-30-5
I have received your report of 9 January 1978 concerning
damage to Capital Freightways trailer #T-63 but require
clarification on one point*
Would you please advise, as soon as possible, if seaman
H» Prosick signalled the hostler to stop using proper signals
or if, in fact, he signalled hostler to change lanes.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM'GP
Wofe ■ Tc^i It (/  IA/rf*     F. H Sri.   CfH   Fr i <% 3**,   \3 bS .
/G^ick,- 0/h Steel Load](W tee^,    p^ t—     •*
V4rvC0UVER TELEPHONE: 254-6010
VICTORIA TELEPHONE: 386-6116
Capital Freightways ■ Lid.
FREIGHT SERVICE
P.O. BOX 1262
655 QUEENS AVENUE
VICTORIA, B.C.
January 10 1978
C P Rail
Marine Dept Pier
Vancouver BC
V6C 2R-3
Attnr Clem Aitken
ngi
Dear Sirs:
This is our Intent to Claim for damages
to our trailer- number T63 in the amount of $659.30,
The damage was to the rear door of the trailer and
occurred at approximately 5:15 PM on January 9th
1973 during the loading of the trailer aboard the
Carrier Princess at your Vancouver terminal. A
copy of the report made on the arrival of the
vessel at Swartz Bay is enclosed.
Also be advised that there will be a
claim submitted for damage to the goods carried
in the trailer.
Yours truly
Thomas Der
General Manager
TD/ga
encl
■ j -
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oxcept as noted (contents and condition of content* unknown}, marked, consigned and destined as indicated below, which Canadian Pacific Limited, hereinafter
cail*d the "Carrier','agrees to transport to its usual place of delivery at the said destination. It is agreed that every service to be performed hereunder shall be subject
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CAPITAL   FREIGHTWAYS   LTD.,
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1. This Sill of Lading is subject to the provisions of the Rules as applied by the Carriage of Goods by Water Act,
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be applicable- As a condition precedent to the making of any claim or the recovery of any .oss or judgement
against the Carrier, notice of loss of or damage or delay to the vehicle must be made in writing to the Carrier,
and any suit brought as required under the rules of the said applicable Act. In no event shall the Carrier or
the Carrier's officers, servants or agents be or become liable tor any loss of o: damage or delay to or in connection with the said vehicle in anamount exceeding $500 unless a higher value is declared and inserted herein,
and the extra charges based on such higher value are paid.
z. Noth.ng in this Bill of Lading shall operate to limit or deprive the earner of any statutory protection of exemption from or limitation of liability, and the carrier shall be entitled to the benefit of Title 46, U.S.C.A., Sec-
tions 1SJ.^to^186, inclusive, and to the benefit of sti laws of Canada granting the earner exemption from or
£5«r*c^/ gC^
CATION OF LIABILITY
limitation of liability.
3. This Bill of Lading does not constitute a receipt for any equipment or goods of 3ny kind left in or on said
vehicle, and in no event shall the Carrier be liable for any loss, damage or delay in connection therf with.
4. The Carrier shall have the benefit of all applicable taws granting to ship owners exonerations from or limitation
of liability.
5. The terms and conditions hereof shall apply to any liability of the Carrier which may arise prior to the loading on and subsequent to the discharge from the ship.
6. The person!s) using this 3ill of Lading assume(s) all risk of loss or injury to person or property caused by oi
incidental to the dangers of navigation, even though such dangers arise as 3 result of the negligence of the
ship owner's servants or otherwise howsoever.
7. This Bill of Lading is non-negotiable. 	
SHIPPER'S SIGNATURE
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CARRIER'S SIGNATURE
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Signature      ;
Title 7^
Date Time CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER,   17 February  1978.
From     A#  Meijer
PIS. INITIAL & PASS
File;
To
Mr. R.R. Reid
Vancouver,B.C.
RE:  TRIP ON "PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER", 8 AND
AGR.3.BRAC..S..GEJ
Account.
T-STTEBRUAS*—
•<B9- Analyst.
PROVISIONS
In order to control all aspects of the catering end, it is essential
to pass all requests through my office and no ordering is to be
done without approval.
The following is with reference to your letter of 14 February;
Upon arriving at Nanaimo (1500), Mr. Jack Foster and I went over all
the points listed as their grievances.
1. Noise Factor in Female Quarters
As was pointed out before, the passenger accommodation was only
granted on a temporary basis.  Since returning to service, there
seems to be no more excess vibration than before, which has been
acknowledged by our Engineering Department and the Chief Engineer
on board.
As an alternative I have suggested that the girls sail on a
three-day schedule instead of six days.
2. Johnson has relinquished his Waiter's position.  J. Foster agreed
not to take further action.
(tjg) Form 102-R
3.  A total of seven new mattresses will have to be ordered,
item is in hand.
This
4. Stewards' Mess and Cooks' washroom need painting.  Mr. King asked
for a detailed list, which will be forwarded.
5. We will need advice from Engineering Department regarding cost
estimate. - 2
6. As an interim, I have asked Chief Steward to be firmer on
proper dress code.
7. T.V. in Stewardess' recreation room.  Girls concerned want to
keep their privacy and do not want to part with T.V.  I turned
down the request for a T.V. in the Stewards' Mess, as they
already have one in their recreation area.
8. Lighting seems to be sufficient.
9. I recommended painting the Stewards' Mess. Chief Engineer claims
the heat always has been adequate before.  I will write a memo
to Mr. King. The problem seems to be the draught from the skylight.
The idea of cutting a new entrance into the cafeteria should be shelved
temporarily, because of cost and no apparent solution of outgoing
customers crossing the incoming line-up.
I would like to point out that the drapes in the cafeteria were removed a couple of years ago and have not been replaced.
Catering Sjjna&rinbejident
m
V V
J BCCoast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135. Telex 04-507684
.CPRail
.'/Holland
•17 February  1978.
RReid  .
File No.   608
Chevron Canada Ltd.
1050 West Pender St.
Vancouver,  B.C.
Gentlemen:
Shell Canada Ltd.
Western Marketing Region
1075 West Georgia St.
Vancouver, B.C.    Attention:
Mr. Helm
Imperial Oil Ltd.
Distribution Terminal
3232 Underhill
Burnaby, B.C.
Attention: Mr. Cleaver
Gulf Oil Canada Ltd.
1075 West Georgia St.
Vancouver, B.C.
It is noted that your company is frequently called upon to
provide lube oil and other commodities to ships lying at
anchor or in loading berths at Vancouver Wharves.
We would like the opportunity of meeting with you and submitting a bid on these movements. We envision an arrangement
whereby all that would be necessary is one phone call the day
prior to the move, and we will take care of the rest.
I XTOuld be pleased to hear from you regarding this matter, and
enclose my business card for your convenience.
Yours very truly,
J.D. FINNIE
Traffic Manager
JDF'BB
M.W. Holland )
A.N. Cairns  ) For your information.
J. Ferguson  )
Out-of-pocket expense approximately $535.00.
It is my intention to offer $900.00 per move.
Your views please.
be.  Mr.
Mr.
Mr,
Mr. V. Jones CPRail
Internal Correspondence
\E
Date  VANCOUVER, 17 February 1978.
From  m.W. Holland
To
Mr. P.E. Le Feuvre
Asst. Treasurer, Banking
Toronto, Ontario.
A review of our current banking arrangements for both the ro-ro
operations of the BCCSS and our new tug and barge operations for
Northland services, indicates that the following changes are required to our current banking practices:
1. Currently, the Wharf Ticket Office is making deposits to the
Bank of Montreal, 595 Burrard Street, which is approximately
three blocks away from the office.  The deliveries are undertaken by Loomis at an approximate cost of $140.00 a month.
There is a branch of the Bank of Montreal in Granville Square,
which is directly opposite to us and on adjacent property,
and which would be much more convenient for us to be directing
our daily deposits.  We can arrange for the deposits to be
made in the company of an Investigation Department Inspector,
which will, of course, minimize the security risk.  In light
of this, will you kindly make the arrangements as quickly as
possible for our deposits to be made to the Granville Square
Branch.  It is understood that the Granville Square Branch is
being used by various other revenue-generating entities of
Canadian Pacific.
2. Whereas originally we requested that arrangements be made for
the daily deposits of the Northland Service to be made at the
Bank of Montreal, 1730 Commercial Drive, this Branch is a considerable distance from the Northland offices; there is a
C.I.B.C. Branch at 1904 Powell Street, which is less than
half a mile away.  Again, much time is being taken (between
three-quarters and one hour of each day) to make this deposit,
and relocation of the D.T.C. account to the C.I.B.C Powell
Street Branch would greatly improve on current procedures,
and accordingly, you are requested to set up the necessary
arrangements.
gP Form 102-R - 2
By copy of this letter I am asking Mr. P. Georges, Asst. Manager,
Coastal Marine Operations, Montreal, to provide you with his confirmation that the above action should be taken.
Mr. R.R. Reid of this office will provide any additional information
you may request.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
WaTH'BB
cc.  Mr. A.G. de Souza
Toronto, Ont.
be.  Mr. R.R. Reid
Mr. V. Jones '
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date
VANCOUVER,   17  February 1978.                                           File:     AGR.7.BRAC.S
From
M.W.  Holland
To
Mr.   O.R.   Robison,  Vancouver.
Mr.   E.  Robinson,    Nanaimo.
Enclosed are six copies of the Seniority List for Ticket Office
employees,  effective  1 January  1978.
Kindly give a copy to each employee and let me know if anybody
contests  their position on the Seniority List prior  to 90 days
from date of receipt, in accordance with Article 21.3 of the
Collective Agreement.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
BB
be.  Mr. R. Welch
System General Chairman
Brotherhood of Railway, Airlines &
Steamship Clerks, etc.
401 Dominion Building
207 West Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 1H7
Twelve cooies of Seniority List are attached.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
I r-
Qg) Form 102-R
k TELEX VANCOUVER, B.C., 17 FEBRUARY 1978
File: AGR.2.SIU.
P.I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE.
RE SIU NEGOTIATIONS. UPON RETURNING TO VANC DATE MR TIMPSON WAS INFORMED
BY BRIAN SIMS CMC THAT THEIR COMMISSIONER'S REPORT HAD BEEN RECEIVED. -
COMMISSIONER RECOMMENDED 8 PCT IN WAGES IN THE FIRST YEAR OF THE CONTRACT.
8 PCT REPRESENTS 60 CENTS. HE FURTHER RECOMMENDED FOR THE SECOND YEAR 65 CENTS
V . .        . - '■ "  ,
V" ■ -' " " - -: *.". '
INCREASE OCT 1/78 AND FURTHER 15 CENTS PER HOUR 6 MONTHS LATER FOR TOTAL
OF 80 CENTS OR 10 PCT. HE HAS RECOMMENDED REJECTION OF ANY MONIES BEING
•PLACED INTO THE SCHOOL OF SEAMANSHIP. HE RECOMMENDED 5 CENT INCREASE IN
THE FIRST YEAR OF CONTRACT FOR THE UNION HIRING HALL AND FURTHER 5 CENT
INCREASE OCT 1/78. COPY OF THEIR REPORT WILL BE OBTAINED EARLY MONDAY
MORNING. PLS FORWARD COPY THIS TELEX J T SPARROW     BCC-97
M.W. HOLLAND
MGR., BCCSS
cc.  Mr. P..E. Timoson tiU Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
W Holland
■ iger
SI Reid
' 'Xanager
)P Rail
17 February 1978
File: T-78-1032
Mr. W.A. Whibley
2391 Kings Ave.
West Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Mr. Whibley:
Regarding your call into this office on which occasion you
requested information on the "Princess Elaine's" colouring.
Enclosed, herewith, is the copy of the photograph you provided
with the ship's colours duly noted thereon.
We are happy to have been of assistance to you in this matter.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH'GP Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 17 February 1978
From H.L. Hudson
To    Mr. N. Artinoff
Personnel Assistant
Montreal
File: 162
With reference to your letter of 21 December concerning
additional copies of the Personnel and Administrative Manual.
We had advised Mr. Granger as to the three positions to which
this manual was to be allocated but as we have not received
them to date, perhaps this message did not reach you. They
are to be distributed as follows:
1 copy for General Manager, BCCS - Northland in Vancouver
1 copy for Controller BCCS - Northland in Vancouver
1 copy for Agent, BCCS - Northland in Kitimat
With regard to the manuals on hand in this office, I regret
to advise that over the years we have lost two of them. We
would appreciate receiving one additional copy for BCCS in
Vancouver.  All four copies should be forwarded to my office.
Office Manager
B. C, C. S. S .
HLH'GP
)Form 102-R Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 17 February 1978
From        A. Meijer
To Chief Steward
"Princess of Vancouver"
File: T-78-1010A
Please note that on Sunday 19 February, new tile will be
installed in the cafeteria.
If your passenger load is not too heavy, would you please
use the diningroom facilities instead of the cafeteria in
order that there will be no interruption in finishing of
this work.
Catering Superintendent
AM'GP
)Form 102-R
J •PRail News Summary
News and views on topics of
current interest prepared by Public Relations
and Advertising Department
Vol. 54 No. 7
Feb. 17, 1978
Aviation
Business & Finance
Economics
Energy Policy
16 Highway
22 Metric Conversion
20 Pipeline
8 Railway
17
5
18
11
METRIC CONVERSION
Plans for converting transportation modes to the metric system will be implemented during the next few years. Railways plan substantial metric operations by 1983; air cargo will begin in the late 1970s; marine freight will
be completed for 1978; and the trucking industry has 1980 as its deadline. 5
ENERGY POLICY
Canada's energy policy has two aims: to provide incentives to increase domestic supplies; and to hold down energy growth to 3.5 per cent a year. But
by 1985 rising demand and declining reserves will require Canada to import
1.2 million barrels daily causing a $6-billion balance-of-payments deficit. 8
TRENDS AND TOPICS
CN places a ban on loading of boxcars destined for nine U.S. states because
of delays in returning cars to Canada. A series of storms in the states has
bogged down return of cars, creating a critical shortage of newsprint cars. 13
Prairie transportation ministers are trying to enlist the assistance of a
native westerner who is in charge of fostering regional development to achieve their goal of regional development and diversification for the West. 14
An inter-European task force is being planned to battle air terrorism. The
highly-trained, equipped and mobile task force would be empowered to cross
international boundaries of nine European countries at a moment's notice. 16
Although powerful railroad interests have prevented the building of slurry
pipelines in the U.S., the Carter administration may give qualified support
to legislation which could pave the way for a nationwide pipeline network. 18
Seven of Canada's most influential businessmen claim only drastic measures
to keep Canada competitive on world markets can save the country from economic collapse. They blame high wage rates that make products too expensive.20
Canadian Pacific reports a record preliminary net income of $248.0-million
for 1977, up from $190.5-million for last year. Significant increases came
from CPI, CP Air, CP Rail and the Soo Line, with a loss for CP (Bermuda). 22
Canadian Pacific 2
NEWS IN BRIEF
AIRCRAFT 'PUBLIC PLACE'
EDMONTON - Alberta Provincial Court Judge W. F McLean has ruled that the interior
of an aircraft is a public place. The ruling was in reference to a public disturbance charge against a passenger on a Wardair jet which landed at Edmonton International Airport on a flight from Hawaii on New Year's Day, 1977.  (CP - Montreal
Star, Feb. 15)
REPORT CRITICIZES HALL PROPOSAL FOR RAIL RATES
OTTAWA - Retaining statutory rates for the movement of prairie grain by rail will
not help the system become more efficient and the federal Government could become
the major financial participant in the grain-handling system, a report says. The
report is the second from a commission headed by U.S. economist Carl Snavely. It
is studying the costs of moving western grain by rail. The latest report disagrees
with several recommendations of the Hall Commission. It says the Hall recommendations for keeping statutory rates would leave the system "virtually devoid of monetary incentives for efficient use of the transportation resource and, perhaps even
worse, monetary penalties for inefficient uses of that resource." (CP - Globe and
Mail, Feb. 11)
ROYAL YORK RENT FOR YORK STREET IS QUESTIONED
TORONTO - The Toronto City Council asked its staff Feb. 13 to have another look
at whether $1,600 a year plus taxes is a high enough rent for the owner of The
Royal York Hotel to pay for a closed-off part of York Street beside the hotel.
An airline limousine service operates from this part of the street.  (Globe and
Mail, Feb. 15)
ALGQMA NET INCREASES
SAULT STE. MARIE - Net earnings of Algoma Steel Corp. Ltd. increased ,$13.4Trillion in 1977, says a report to shareholders. Net earnings of $37.5-million on revenues of $688.35-million in 1977 compared with $24.1-million on revenues of
$585.43-million in 1976. Ccmoon-share earnings increased to $2.62 a share in
1977 from $1.72 the previous year, says the report.  (Edmonton Journal, Feb. 8)
TRANSPORT VEHICLE HITS 304 KPH
TOKYO - Japan Air Lines reported achieving a speed of 304 kilometres (190 miles)
per hour Feb. 14 in a test of a quiet, pollution-free vehicle it hopes some day
will carry passengers between airports and city centres. The "high-speed surface
transport" has no wheels, but "floats" less than an inch above its track, held
up by magnetic power, JAL said. The vehicle has an electric linear motor, which
JAL said produces no noise or exhaust in normal operation.  (AP - Montreal
Gazette, Feb. 14)
PIPELINE START FELT KEY TO UPTURN
WINNIPEG - An early start on construction of the Alaska Highway gas pipeline system would provide the impetus necessary to revive the Canadian economy, according
to J. D. Allan, president of Steel Co. of Canada Ltd., Toronto. (Globe and Mail,
Feb. 15) NEWS IN BRI EF
INDUSTRIAL PARK LINES UP CUSTOMERS
VANCOUVER - Marathon Realty said it has made its first sale of two parcels of
land in its 277-acre Mayfair Industrial Park in Coquitlam. Ninety acres in the
first two phases of the development are ready for market, at $130,000 to $165,000
an acre. Forty acres have been reserved for CP Rail-related companies.  (Vancouver
Province, Feb. 14)
RUPERT'S GRAIN ROLE DOWN-PLAYED
VANCOUVER - A new grain elevator at Prince Rupert wouldn't end slowdowns in
grain movements through Vancouver, warns R. M. Dawson, senior vice-president
of Cargill Grain Co. Ltd. Other grain terminal elevators in Vancouver feel the
federal government would be betraying them, if it were to spend funds to expand
Prince Rupert's facilities.  (Vancouver Province, Feb. 14)
COAL STRIKE UNDERMINES CANADA-U.S. AUTO PLANTS
DETROIT - Chrysler Corp. may be forced to shut down all production by March 1,
idling 160,000 workers in the U.S. and 13,000 in Canada due to power cut-backs
because of the coal strike in the U.S.  (Toronto Daily Star, Feb. 14)
TOO MANY JOBS RATED AS BILINGUAL, RAIL UNION SAYS
MONTREAL - CN is being over-zealous in expanding its bilingual services to parts
of the country where they may not be needed, says the president of CBRT. Donald
Nicholson says the CN and its largest union are still far apart over which jobs
should be designated as bilingual and whether a special premium should be paid.
(Toronto Daily Star, Feb. 14)
INFLATION RATE SHCWS SLIGHT DROP
0TT7AWA - The Consumer Price Index advanced another 0.4 per cent in January,
although the inflation-rate increase dropped slightly. Statistics Canada reported the price index reached 167.8 last month based on 1971 prices. The rate
of increase between January, 1977, and January of this year was an even nine
per cent. The rate of inflation in December over the preceding year was 9.5
per cent.  (Ottawa Citizen, Feb. 14)
PROVINCES OPPOSE BELL LINK
WINNIPEG - Communications Ministers from the Prairie Provinces will oppose an
application before the federal Canadian Radio-television and Telecorinanications
Ccinmission to interconnect CNCP Telecommunications' lines with the Bell Canada
telephone exchange network, going to the federal Cabinet if necessary.  (Winnipeg
Free Press, Feb. 11)
TRUCKING ASSOCIATION WARNED ABOUT POOR SERVICE
WINNIPEG - Need for co-operation to correct motor transport carriers' problems
and better public relations was the message of the Manitoba Trucking Association 's two-day conference which ended Feb. 11. Railways were a source of NEWS IN BRIEF
discussion and concern during the conference. Trailer units leased and carried
by rail are competing with trucking, Association president Milt Penner said,
while the railway is being "substantially subsidized" by the federal Government.
"It's not fair competition," he said.  "We realize that for grain and passenger service they should be subsidized, but we do not feel they should be subsidized to compete with private industry."  (Winnipeg Free Press, Feb. 13)
VOLRICH FLIES NEW IDEA FOR FALSE CREEK
VANCOUVER - Mayor Volrich of Vancouver on Feb. 9 suggested developing a convention centre on False Creek's North Shore. Plans for a residential development in
the area were shelved last year by Marathon Realty, which owns the site.  (Vancouver Province, Feb. 10)
PIPELINE ADVISORS NAMED
MONTREAL - Q and M Pipe Lines Ltd. has announced the appointment of the SNC group
and Lavalin Inc., both of Montreal, as principal consultants to a proposed pipeline
linking Montreal with eastern points. Q and M Pipe Lines is jointly-owned corporation. Q and M proposes a natural gas pipeline system from Montreal to eastern
Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.  (Montreal Gazette, Feb. 14)
CONRAIL DOUBLES ESTIMATE OF CASH NEED TO $4-BILLION
WASHINGTON - Conrail, which only last month calculated it might need as much as
$2-billion in added federal aid, now thinks it may need twice that amount. Government sources said the Congressionally-created Northeast railroad believes
$1.3-billion is the iru.nimum amount of new federal aid that it will need during
the next five years, and that's under the "most optimistic" assumptions.  (Wall
Street Journal, Feb. 15)
TEXACO, SAUDI INTERESTS CREATE A JOINT VENTURE FOR OIL TRANSPORTATION
NEW YORK - Texaco Inc. and Saudi Arabian interests have formed a joint-venture
shipping company to transport oil. The new company, capitalized at $3.4-million,
is Saudi International Petroleum Carrier Ltd., Texaco said.  (Wall Street Journal,
Feb. 14)
s.
CP CHIEF SEES FLAT YEAR FOR THE CANADIAN ECONOMY
WINDSOR - F. S. Burbidge, president CP Ltd., says the company sees 1978 as a year
in which the movement of freight will be flat. He feels there will be little improvement over the final half of 1977, when the railway began to feel the impact
of the overall economic slowdown.  Mr. Burbidge said there were bright spots in
movement of fertilizer from new plants in operation and improvement in the pulp
and paper industry. Soft spots were in trucking operations and ocean shipping
operations. Telecommunications shows steady growth, he said, and in regard to
hotel operations he praised the program of the federal minister of Trade and
Commerce in promoting tourist trade and travel in Canada.  (Windsor Star, Feb. 10)
* * * METRIC CONVERSIO
TIMETABLE FOR METRIC PINPOINTS CONVERSION DATES
(Canadian Transportation & Distribution Management)
What is SI and why is it making life difficult? That is a question
traffic and transportation executives seem to be asking these days. To answer
briefly, SI is the abbreviation for "Le Systeme International d'Unites" or
"International System of Units."
It is the most modern version of the metric system, and the system
which Canada will implement for transportation within the next few years.
Conversion dates of direct concern to Canadian traffic managers follow.
— AIR CARGO: There currently are no definite plans concerning
conversion for air because of its inter-relationship with U.S.
airlines and with the international aviation community concerning
flight operations and safety. However, this sector can introduce
metric tariffs on air freight at any time it chooses, because
cargo is its only interface affected by metric conversion. The
conversion process will begin in the late 1970s.
— RAIL TRAFFIC: The railways have finished their conversion plan
for substantially metric operation by 1983. This later start is
due to the vast extent of interline rail operations, which make
it impractical to convert before the U.S. railways are in a
position to plan, participate and concur in decisions affecting
such items as rolling stock, materials, design, methods, computer
systems, tariff and business practices, where it has been traditional to work in unison. The railways do hope, however, to
have the capability of accepting shipments in metric units by
1980.
— MARINE FREIGHT: This sector has completed its plan to become
substantially metric during 1980 and has no constraints which
prevent this from happening. Conversion of other charges such
as port fees, pilotage fees and Seaway tolls which are levied
directly on the ship began in 1977 and will be completed during
1978.
— TRUCK TRAFFIC: The trucking industry has submitted a plan indicat
ing August, 1980, as its conversion deadline. Owing to the multitude of provincial regulations governing this industry, it faces
some severe co-ordination difficulties but anticipates that it will
successfully overcome these. This sector's plan also includes
the operation of warehouses and storage for goods in transit.
The road sign conversion program commenced in September, 1977, and
was completed by year's end. The Metric Commission feels that while road
sign conversion will not generally alter the operations of the road transport industry, the move introduces legal and safety aspects. It recommends
the following actions be taken in both private and commercial trucking concerning training of vehicle operators and modification of vehicles:
J 6
METRIC CONVERSION
— (1) Ensure that all operators are aware of the applicable metric
units — for example, kilometres per hour, kilometres, metres and
tonnes, and have an appreciation of the numerical values of each.
— (2) Ensure that all operators know the height and weight of their
vehicles in metric units for clearance and load limits.
— (3) Make all operators aware that during the transition period, and
afterwards if applicable, both metric and imperial signs will be
legal and each must be obeyed as they are encountered.
— (4) Equip each vehicle with some means of measuring speed in kilo
metres per hour.
— (5) The preferred method of modification is to affix a commercially
available overlay of individual numbers to the speedometer to
indicate metric speeds. Such stick-on items should preferably be
affixed to the face of the speedometer or, if necessary, to the
glass covering, but in this latter case it is important to ensure
there is a minimum of parallax error.
— (6) The use of a converter in the speedometer drive is not recom
mended as the subsequent odometer reading will be in mixed units
and the legal implications of this have not been resolved. Further,
a converter will drive the speedometer approximately 60% faster than
normal so the indicator may be off the graduated range and the instrument may suffer internal damage.
To aid truckers who are having difficulties with metric, the Canadian
Trucking Association, in conjunction with the provincial trucking associations, is putting together a metric practice guide. It was scheduled to
appear by the end of January, 1977, and will deal with all matters that"
affect carrier operations. It will contain detailed conversion charts and
will be fully bilingual.
(Here is rough rule of thumb to help figure out distances on highway
signs: to translate kilometres to miles, multiply by six and take away the
final 0. Thus for 50 km, you go 50 times six and you get 300. Knock off
the 0 and it's 30 miles. For miles to kilometres, divide by six.)
The trucking sector plans to meet with the railways to discuss the
implementation of conversion to Celsius of trailer temperature control
units. This is of concern to carriers who engage in piggyback transportation where temperature readings are taken at terminals and railway
inspection points. The discussions will attempt to ensure that a coordinated approach is generated which will minimize problems associated
with the conversion process.
The Metric Commission's Working Group on Tariffs, which is composed
of shipper and carrier representatives, plans to have the conversion of FIETR I C  CONVERS I 0
tariffs on behalf of all modes of transportation completed by January,
1981. By that date the Working Group aims to have co-ordinated full
conversion with a "minimum of dislocation to the user public" in air,
water and road transport tariffs. The Post Office and Customs and
Excise are included in the 1981 deadline, but pipeline tariffs are not.
Although named in the original tariff schedule, the railways will not
in fact meet an implementation date until January, 1983, when linking U.S.
lines will have made the conversion to the metric scale. Recognizing the
confusion that rail's later date could cause, the Metric Commission is
working on ways to minimize these problems ahead of time. The full tariff
conversion program is as. follows:
— SEPTEMBER, 1977, to January, 1978: Establish conversion factors,
rounding techniques and conversion tables by transportation
mode and/or application.
— JANUARY, 1978, to December, 1980: Implement conversion tables, and
as required, commence filing tariffs and amendments in metric units
only with all regulatory authorities on the basis of need by each
transportation mode.
— JANUARY, 1981: Completion — all tariffs converting to metric units
with the following exception. The goal of the Tariff Working Group
is for all modes to have their tariffs published completely metric,
or to have the capability to do so by January, 1981. This may be
accomplished by re-issuing some publications and/or the use of
conversion tables.
The Import-Export Committee of the Metric Commission is preparing a
questionnaire for exporters designed to obtain a clearer picture of the
exporting experience of Canadian industry as it relates to metric conversion. A point of interest to Canadian exporters is the fact that the U.S.
is converting to the metric system within the same time frame as Canada.
CM. Bolger, Chairman of the Metric Commission, recently told the
Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs in Ottawa that in 1976
"Canadian exports to the U.S. totaled $25.8-billion. About 501 of this
involved measurement-sensitive products. Because Canada has the lead
over the U.S. in metric conversion, many Canadian companies. . . are
penetrating measurement-sensitive markets in the U.S. for the first time
in their company histories. "
Obviously, metric conversion is going to have a large impact on the
Canadian traffic and transport disciplines. In light of this fact, many
Canadian companies have designated someone in their organization to be
a metric conversion officer (MCO), to handle all aspects of conversion
as it applies to that company's business. 8
ENERGY POLI CY
CANADA'S ENERGY PLAN TAKES HOLD
(Wall Street Journal)
While haggling over the Carter administration's energy plan drags on,
Canadians view the U.S. debate with a certain smugness.
Canada's two-year-old energy policy is, by most accounts, a rousing
success in spurring both energy conservation and the search for new
reserves. Many Canadian industry and government observers suggest that
the U.S. Congress might do well to look north of the border for an example
of the effective resolution of several energy issues common to both
countries.
Debate on energy policy in Canada came to a head in 1975 following a
bitter federal-provincial struggle over resource-revenue sharing. Now,
although squabbling persists on some points, cooperation among oilmen and
the two levels of government is the best in years. Drilling activity is
at a record level, and the oil and gas industry shines as the one bright
spot in Canada's otherwise depressed economy.
The Canadian plan takes a middle course between the major alternatives
being hotly debated now in the U.S. Natural gas prices in Canada remain
regulated and heavy taxes have been placed on crude oil and gasoline to
induce conservation. In that respect, Canadian policy is somewhat
similar to the Carter administration's proposals and falls far short of
the complete deregulation sought by much of the U.S. oil and gas industry.
But the Canadian plan also provides numerous direct production incentives
as a stimulus to increasing supplies — something that U.S. oil and gas
interests say is lacking in the Carter plan.
Canadian oil and gas executives aren't totally happy with the plan, ^
but most say they can live with it. The mere existence of a plan, says
William Richards, president of Dome Petroleum Ltd., "makes it possible for
us to do some reasonable forecasting, unlike the U.S. oil industry which
still faces considerable uncertainty."
Although Canada was a net exporter of oil until 1976, government studies
showed that declining reserves and increasing demand could require imports
of up to 1.2 million barrels a day in 1985, creating a balance-of-payments
deficit in the oil account of nearly $6-billion (Canadian). Faced with
this gloomy prospect, the government of Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau
adopted a scheme to promote Canadian self-reliance.
The Canadian plan outlined five primary goals: to move Canadian oil
prices towards world levels over two to four years and to increase the price
of natural gas to an energy-equivalent value with oil; to reduce dependence
on imported oil from over one-half to one-third of total demand by 1985;
to maintain self-sufficiency in natural gas, and to at least double exploration in Canada's frontier regions to help ensure long-term supplies. 9
ENERGYPOLICY
To accomplish these objectives, the Canadian government began a
program to phase out oil exports to the U.S. by the early 1980s. Exports
in 1977 were an average of only 270,000 barrels daily, down from a high
of 1.2 million barrels in 1973. Last year imports met the government
goal, accounting for less than a third of Canadian demand of 1.8 million
barrels a day.
Domestic oil and natural gas prices are being allowed to rise in
four stages. The second $l-a-barrel increase took effect Jan. 1, bringing
the price for Canadian oil to an average $11.75 a barrel (compared to a
little over $8 a barrel in the U.S. and world price of about $14). Additional price hikes are set for July 1 and Jan. 1, 1979. Natural gas prices are
rising along with oil prices and now are pegged at $1.85 per thousand
cubic feet (compared to about $1.45 in the U.S. and $1.75 under the Carter
energy plan).
Several proposals under debate in Washington echo measures already in
effect in Canada. Canadians pay a 10-cent-a-gallon surcharge on gasoline,
bringing average gasoline prices to about 86 cents a gallon. Other conservation incentives include a graduated sales tax on cars based on vehicle
weight, a tax on automobile air conditioners, tougher mileage standards,
revision of building codes to encourage efficient energy use, a $1.4-
billion federal home insulation grant program and removal of the excise tax
on insulation materials.
The impact of the conservation plan already is apparent. A government
spokesman estimates Canada's rate-of-growth of energy use met the target
goal of 3.51 last year, down from an average annual growth-rate from 1965
to 1975 of 51, though he concedes part of the decline may reflect Canada's
sluggish economy. Studies indicate per-capita consumption of home heating
fuel has gone down dramatically because of higher prices, and public
response to the home insulation program has been favourable.
~\
Changes in provincial and federal tax and royalty schemes have sparked
an accelerated search for new petroleum reserves and have largely resolved
a dispute which three years ago brought Canadian exploration activity to
a virtual standstill. Under Canadian law, the federal government has
the right to impose direct taxes and to regulate interprovincial and international trade, while the 10 provinces own mineral and petroleum deposits
and can impose royalties on resource production. But after the Arab oil
embargo of 1973 and the rapid escalation of oil prices, the provinces and
Ottawa took sides in a fierce tug-of-war over which level of government was
entitled to the lion's share of the extra revenues accruing from price
increases.
In late 1973 and 1974, the three major producing provinces — Alberta,
British Columbia and Saskatchewan — altered their royalty rates so that
each provincial government would retain the bulk of future price increases.
The federal government, fearing an erosion of its revenue base, eliminated
the 1001 deduction from federal income tax previously allowed on provincial
royalty payments. The result was outrage from the oil industry, which
argued it was subject to double taxation. Many companies cut back sharply 10
ENERGY POLICY
on capital spending, with Imperial Oil Co., Canada's largest oil concern,
chopping $115-million from its original 1975 budget of about $440rmillion.
Over 201 of the available drilling rigs moved out of Canada, and less than
half of the remaining rigs were in use.
Since 1975, both levels of government have made important concessions
to break the impasse. Alberta, which accounts for 80% of Canadian petroleum production, introduced refunds on royalties and tax credits to offset
the negative impact of the federal tax changes. It also offered an extensive drilling-incentive plan that provided, among other things, additional
tax write-offs for exploration and royalty-free periods on new production.
British Columbia and, to a lesser extent, Saskatchewan, also adjusted
royalty rates to encourage resource development.
As a result, exploration activity is booming, especially in western
Canada where a current shortage of drilling rigs is expected to continue
throughout the winter drilling season. Total capital expenditures by oil
companies were over $9-billion last year, up from $5.5-billion in 1975,
according to the Canadian Petroleum Association, an industry trade group.
Recent discoveries include the West Pembina field in Alberta, which could
be the country's biggest oil find in a decade, and large natural gas
deposits in the Elmworth area of Alberta and in northern British Columbia
that could rival Alaska's Prudhoe Bay.
Whether credit for these discoveries should be given to the Canadian
energy plan is open to question; much exploration was under way before
the plan went into effect. Some observers, particularly in Canada's poorer
provinces, say that the chief effect of the higher prices allowed under the
energy plan will be more inflation.
But there's no disputing the fact that supplies of natural gas, at
least, have been rising rapidly in the wake of the energy plan. Indeed,
Alberta recently tightened up its incentive plan for natural gas exportation, and there is considerable pressure now on the Trudeau government
to allow additional exports to the U.S.
Some goals of Canada's energy plan haven't been met, notably efforts
to step up exploration in northern areas, which have been stymied by lack
of agreement on rules governing frontier exploration. But, in the main,
Canada appears to have assembled an energy policy that works, and energy
bill conferees in the U.S. Congress may be heartened to note that the
task isn't impossible.
HQ GAS PIPELINE
Calgary will be the location of the government's central agency to
oversee construction of the Canadian section of the proposed Alaska Highway natural gas pipeline, reported The Calgary Herald. It will be staffed by about 200 employees drawn from government departments, including
northern affairs and environment as well as the National Energy Board.
Other offices of the monitoring agency will be in Ottawa and likely White-
horse, the Yukon capital. 11
R A I LWAY
CP RAIL GRAIN HAULING LAGS
(Saskatoon Star-Phoenix)
CP Rail lagged significantly behind CN during December and January, delaying grain shipments to West Coast ports, Transport Minister Otto Lang said Feb. 6.
However, the CP Rail performance is not normally that bad and was caused
by unusual circumstances, the minister said. The railway lost a number of
transportation days when a bridge in the Rockies went out and its subsequent
bid to catch up was hampered by cold, he said.
The minister said Canadian Wheat Board shipments are generally behind
because of transportation problems caused by cold weather and other factors,
including the CP Rail tie-up and a strike at a swing bridge across the
Fraser River in British Columbia.
He said the Wheat Board started January about 20 million bushels behind its shipment target and was planning to put 57 million bushels through
the system. This is a difficult task considering that the system has never
put through more than 37 million bushels per month, he said.
FIVE COMMODITIES FORM BULK OF CP RAIL TRAFFIC
(Edmonton Journal)
Grain, sulphur, coal, liquid propane gas and fertilizer shipments will continue to provide most of the outbound traffic for CP Rail in 1978.
Dressed meat and livestock shipments will add to this total. Sulphur
shipments increased to 1.6 million short tons through a record handling
of 330 unit train loads of export sulphur. Equipment used was part of a
fleet of 353 hopper cars purchased by CP Rail from National Steel Car Corp.
of Hamilton. The $ll-million order also supplied solid train service for
fertilizer movements from the new Cominco Ltd. ammonia-urea plant at Carse-
land.
Another type of solid train movement established a first with a "power
swap" arrangement. Urea shipments from Cars el and to Ohio are hauled by
CP Rail locomotives to the U.S. border and are then picked up by Soo Line
locomotives.
Coal shipments through Vancouver were up to 9.8 million short tons,
from 8.7 million tons exported during 1976. The potential for thermal
coal shipments to central Canadian markets should increase considerably.
CP Rail and the Union Pacific Railroad have also entered into a "run-
through" arrangement that gives CP Rail increased locomotive power during
winter months for trains running between Calgary and Vancouver. The agreement involves the daily through-freight trains between Calgary and Portland, 12
RAILWAY
Oregon, operating via Lethbridge and Kingsgate, B.C.,on the Canada-U.S.
border.
Until the end of March, Union Pacific locomotives will be used on the
run between Lethbridge and Kingsgate, as well as handling the U.S. portion
of the haul. CP Rail locomotives, freed from the Lethbridge-Kingsgate
operations,will be reassigned to service Calgary-Vancouver runs, where
more locomotive power is required during winter months.
During Union Pacific's heavy September-November traffic period, CP
Rail will return the favor, operating its locomotives between Kingsgate
and Hinkle, Oregon, freeing UP locomotives for other areas.
On the industrial side, two new industrial parks in Edmonton received
CP Rail service. Another 10 such parks in urban industrial areas in the
province are to receive CP Rail service this year. Nine new or relocated
industries received CP Rail service in 1977 and another 20 are slated to
receive it in 1978.
RAIL LAND DISPOSITION COMMITTEES FORMED
(Medicine Hat News)
Transport Minister Otto Lang announced in Regina on Feb. 4 the formation
of committees in each of the Prairie provinces to monitor disposition of land that
will become available with rail-line abandonment.
Each rail roadbed steering committee will include two representatives
of rural municipal organizations, one from municipal groups, a provincial
official, a federally-appointed chairman and a farmers' representative,
Mr. Lang told a news conference.
He said the committee will compile inventories of roadbeds involved
and outline the possible interests in the lands. Mr. Lang said that if
the province had no interest in the land it would be offered to the local
municipality as a first priority and then to adjacent land holders. If
the land holders wanted the land, they would pay to the municipality an
unspecified amount of compensation for the parcel.
DERAILS FEDERAL PLAN
(Winnipeg Tribune)
Alberta will continue to block a federal plan to disperse abandoned rail
land to municipalities and adjacent landowners, according to Dr. Hugh Horner, Alberta transportation minister.
Rejecting an invitation from Otto Lang, federal transport minister, to 13
RAILWAY
take part in a land-allocation scheme orchestrated by Ottawa, Mr. Horner
said Alberta maintains that Crown land belongs to the province, not Ottawa,
and has declared each abandoned line in the province as a public works
area under legislation that allows the provincial government to expropriate
it at any time.
PRAIRIE BLIZZARDS TRAP TRAIN TRAVELLERS
(Canadian Press - Montreal Star)
Passengers on CP Rail's Canadian transcontinental passenger train were bused to points west Feb. 9 after spending 36 hours in Swift Current, Sask., because
the mainline was blocked by a snowbound train.
The line was blocked Feb. 7 when a snowplow train bogged down in huge
drifts near Gull Lake, just west of Swift Current. Two diesel units became stuck trying to rescue the snowplow unit.
The 48 passengers were treated to meals and rooms in city hotels during their stay and were given free tickets for their bus ride.
CN BANS BOXCARS FOR U.S.
(Dow Jones - Montreal Star)
CN has placed an immediate ban on the loading of boxcars destined for nine
states in the U.S. because of delays in returning cars to Canada.
Excluded from the ban are specially-equipped boxcars assigned to the
Association of American Railroads' pools.
The nine states affected are Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York,
Maryland, New Jersey, Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts.
A series of storms has bogged down traffic there to the point that
the number of CN boxcars on U.S. railroads is now more than 5,000 higher
than normal for this time of year.  R. R. Latimer, CN Rail vice president
and senior executive officer, said: "The situation is serious and the only
way to be fair to our customers is to stop sending cars into those areas
where delivery and return is taking abnormally long periods. We will be
monitoring this daily, but we expect car shortages for at least two weeks."
Some 85 per cent of CN's 3,600 newsprint cars are in the U.S., according to newsprint industry officials. This is up from 65 per cent less
than a month ago. CP Rail recently put its figure at nearly 80 per cent.
The CN decision poses dual problems for the newsprint industry, an official
said. "We must divert shipments to trucks, a not very efficient means.
"How ingenious we are in storing newsprint will determine if we can keep
the mills going," he said. m
RAILWAY
SASKATCHEWAN TOWNS RECYCLE ABANDONED RAILWAY STATIONS
(Winnipeg Free Press)
Abandoned farm houses and barns are common sights along Saskatchewan roads
and highways — reminders of the decline of rural communities because of larger
farms, improved highway systems and mechanization.
But another symbol of the past — the empty railway station — is being
recycled. In many cases the station has become home for the former station
agent. Others have been turned into museums, libraries, restaurants and
resource centres.
CN STARTS NORTH SHORE FERRY SERVICE
(Montreal Gazette)
CN's $50-million train ferry service between Matane and Baie Comeau, Que.,
opened recently with no fanfare.
Michel Boucher, CN's manager for the St. Lawrence Region, said the
ferry provides the Baie Comeau region of the North Shore of the St. Lawrence with its first train link with the rest of North America. Initially
it will be used to transport North Shore paper and aluminum from the Canadian Reynolds Metals Ltd. smelter at Baie Comeau. "But as we go we expect
to grow very much," said Mr. Boucher.
PRAIRIE TRANSPORTATION MINISTERS SEEK HORNER'S AID
(Toronto Globe and Mail)
Prairie transportation ministers are pursuing a new tack in their drive
to change freight rates in favor of western Canadian industries.
The ministers from Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba held talks with
federal Industry, Trade and Commerce Minister Jack Horner earlier this
week in Winnipeg and emerged from the meeting with hopes that Mr. Horner
will support their position in the Cabinet. Saskatchewan Transportation
Minister Gordon MacMurchy said that the ministers are not trying to subvert
federal Transport Minister Otto Lang's jurisdiction over transportation matters, but they are trying to use Mr. Horner's influence as a western minister and his jurisdiction over industrial development.
"As a federal cabinet minister in charge of a department heavily involved in fostering national and regional development, and as a minister
from Western Canada, it is important at this time that you join with us
in discussions which will lead to achieving our objectives of accelerated
regional development and diversification on the Prairies," the ministers
said in their brief to Mr. Horner. 15
-R-A I LWAY
At present, it costs Western Canada $25.8-million a year more to ship
processed products to Central Canada than it does to ship raw products in
the rapeseed, meat processing and alfalfa dehydration industries, even
though the raw products take up more bulk. "We ask for your department's
financial assistance in removing the financial disincentives to western
processing and industrial expansion through introduction of assistance
which removes the rate differential on finished versus raw products," the
ministers said.
Mr. Horner told a news conference after the meeting that permanent
solutions are needed and that there are three ways to help western processing: by working on the freight rates, by improving the transportation system and by giving assistance to western processing industries so that they
can ship more processed products and less bulk.
CANADIAN CARLQADINGS
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
For 10 Days Ending
Jan. 31. 1978
103,735
6,738,393
10,025
Change from Similar
Period, 1976
+ 14,102
+ 1,188,249
+       623
Percentage
Change
+ 15.7
+ 21.4
+  6.6
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
Total for Year to
Jan. .VI r 1Q78
283,079
18,238,587
28,609
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
+ 15,049
+ 1,356,935
+     1,517
Percentage
Change
+ 5.6
+ 8.0
+  5.6
U.S. CARLQADINGS
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
For Week Ending
Feb. 4, 1978
362,421
13.8 billion
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
31,876
.3-billion
Percentage
Change
- 8.1
- 2.4
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
Total for Year to
Feb. 4, 1978
1,743,881
64.9 billion
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
180,879
3.1 billion
Percentage
Change
- 9.4
- 4.6
Piggyback
Total for Year to
Jan. 28, 1978
30,820
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
+     1,412
Percentage
Change
+  4.8
* * * 16
AVIATION
BRITISH AIRWAYS - LOW FARES
(Canadian Dow-Jones)
A new package of low fares effective April 1 subject to government approval between the U.S. and U.K. was to be filed by British Airways in the next
few days, Dave Schenider, marketing manager, U.S., said Feb. 9.
British Airways will meet the competition head-on and match any low
fare between all points in the USA and cities in Great Britain, Mr. .
Schneider stated. British Airways also will offer standby and budget
fares between Britain and points in the USA outside New York if the UK
and American governments approve them. Negotiations between the two governments over these fares are currently underway in London.
The revised Apex fares between New York and London-Glasgow-Manchester
will be $320 in the winter, $360 in the shoulder and $429 in the peak summer
season. Roundtrip budget and standby fares between New York and London
will be $256 in the basic season — unchanged — and $299 during the peak
summer season.
INTER-EUROPE TASK FORCE PLANNED TO BATTLE AIR TERRORISM
(Financial Times, London, England - Calgary Herald)
Proposals for the establishment of a highly-trained, equipped and mobile
anti-terrorist police squad, empowered to cross international boundaries at a moment's notice on the basis of standing treaties, may first be put into effect by
the nine-member European Community (EC).
The Council of Europe has already passed a convention for the suppression of terrorism; but it is not yet in force pending ratification by member
countries. Britain is to ratify the convention during its next session of
Parliament in London. Several other European countries are expected shortly
to follow suit.
CUT-BACKS?
Scheduled airlines, to meet growing competition from charter and non-
reservation- type services and survive, will have to pack more passengers
into their aircraft, trim operational costs more, and lower frequency of
service on key routes, particularly the North Atlantic, says Ross Stainton,
deputy-chairman and chief executive officer of British Airways, reported
The Montreal Star. The economic objective in this highly competitive volume business is to get the load factor up, he said at BA's Place Ville
Marie office. Methods of handling passengers have to be simplified and
fare structures modified. "The scheduled lines have to compete head-on
with the charter and non-reservation-type operators or they will stand
to lose part of their market share." 1
17
H I GHWAY
ENERGY CRUNCH IS BEARING DOWN ON TRUCKING
(Canadian Transportation & Distribution Management)
World supplies of oil, on which Canada's trucking industry so heavily
depends, may be inadequate to meet world demands by as early as the mid-
1980s.
Graham Armstrong, research director for the Office of Energy Conservation, Federal Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, told the recent
Ontario Trucking Association meeting that the major implications for the
trucking industry are as follows:
(1) There will be increasing need for the trucking sector to
reduce its growth rate of fuel consumption.
(2) Conversely, there will be additional opportunities for growth
of the trucking industry resulting from energy conservation
initiatives.
DON'T CONFRONT TRUCKERS ON REGULATION, CARTER URGED
(Washington Star)
President Carter's key transportation advisers have urged against a major
legislative confrontation with the powerful trucking industry over the issue of
reducing federal controls over trucking.
The 15-page option paper says the legislative program should include:
— A new pro-competitive policy statement that will serve as
a guide to the ICC.
~ REVERSE the burden of who has to prove what in ICC cases
when truckers want new routes or changes in rates.
— CREATE a zone within which truckers would be allowed to
raise or lower rates without ICC interference.
— TRIM the powers of rate bureaus.
— ALLOW the ICC to exempt from regulation certain kinds of
trucking operations.
— REVISE leasing regulations to guarantee fair treatment of
individual owner-operators when they deal with regulated
trucking companies. 18
PIPELINE
THE PRESIDENT LEANS TOWARD COAL PIPELINES
(Business Week)
Powerful railroad interests, which have steadily prevented interstate pipelines from transporting coal, are reaching the end of the legislative line.
Carter Administration officials said last week that the White House
plans to give qualified support to legislation that could pave the way
for a nationwide pipeline network to carry coal slurry, a mixture of pulverized coal and water.
If the proposed 4,676 mi. of slurry pipelines are actually built, the
long-term impact on rails could be disastrous. "As it's now written, legislation would let the pipelines skim off all the lucrative business and
not really benefit any users except for a few large utility companies,"
says James Walker, associate general counsel of Burlington Northern. However, other railroad executives admit privately that in view of growing
support for pipelines, they may have to compromise.
"A number of things have fallen into place," says Robert McNeil, assistant to the president of the Slurry Transport Assn., the well-heeled lobbying organization for pipelines. "Two years ago people had their minds on
issues like coal leasing, strip mining, and the whole energy question. Now,
after President Carter has said he wants all utilities and many factories
to switch to coal, the time has come for slurry pipelines." To a large extent, Representative Morris K. Udall (D-Ariz.), chairman of the House Interior Committee, agrees: "There is no reason for any more delay in an
already drawn-out process of considering a relatively simple piece of legislation," he says.
Sensing chances for big profits in such direct-marketing situations,
many companies have been trying to put together deals to attract financing.
Typical is Energy Transportation Systems Inc., a joint venture of Bechtel,
Kansas-Nebraska Natural Gas, Lehman Bros., and Houston-based United Energy
Inc. The company has won the right of eminent domain in some states it
must cross to build a pipeline from the Gillette coal mine in Wyoming to
a proposed utility in central Arkansas.
Burlington Northern's Walker characterizes such projects as the antithesis of "a sound national transportation policy," and says the losers
would include not only railroads but also small utilities in remote locations that pipelines would likely serve.
In the past, railroads have easily stifled pro-pipeline legislative
attempts, largely by alliance with powerful environmental groups. Increasing chances for new legislation this year is the environmentalists' preoccupation with nuclear energy, as well as President Carter's call for coal conversion. Moreover, Congress' Office of Technology Assessment says that it
thinks that pipelines are more economical than railroads in some cases, and
the Transportation Dept. concludes in a recent report that railroads may 19
PIPELINE
need federal assistance to handle increased coal loads. Companies that are
pushing pipelines — including giants such as Williams Companies, Brown &
Root, and Bechtel — are asking for legislation, not loans.
Proposed coal slurry pipelines
1 Pipelines planned
tCoal areas
Burlington Northern R.R.
•**■** Chicago & North Western R.R.
"Of course, pipelines would take substantial business away from the
railroads," says Thomas Correia, a Standard & Poor's rail analyst. "But
you have to remember that there are still many problems with slurry pipelines .
"So far," he continues, "no one knows what it really costs to build
them, and water supply, especially in Western states, will be a huge problem. Apart from that, a pipeline would put many utilities at the mercy
of having only a single source for coal supplies." 20
ECONOMICS .
PRODUCTIVITY MAY STUNT GROWTH
^Business Week)
President Carter's numerous economic statements of recent weeks made clear
that he believes sustained real economic growth of 4^ per cent to five per cent a
year is the key to solving the country's stubborn problems of unemployment and inflation.
But a recent report of the Council of Economic Advisers shows that the
President's economists are deeply concerned that persistent low-growth
rates of productivity may prevent the economy from growing at that pace
for an extended period. And the Administration is already coming under
attack for not proposing adequate remedies for such a fundamental problem.
What is at stake is nothing less than the future of economic growth
and, since productivity levels determine how competitive U.S. goods are
abroad, such related matters as the balance of trade and the stability
of the dollar. Indeed, the level of productivity — defined as output
per hour worked — is one of the economy's chief underpinnings.
BUSINESS WARNS OF CRISIS
(Canadian Press - Montreal Star)
Seven of Canada's most influential businessmen say only drastic measures
to keep Canada competitive on world markets can save the country from economic
collapse.
The executives made suggestions ranging from a 30-per-cent devaluation of the dollar to making trade unions voluntary.
Conrad Black, president of Western Dominion Investment Co. Ltd.,
a director of Argus Corp. and The Bank of Commerce, said that unless Canadian products are more competitively priced, "the only thing we can do
is wait for inflation in the rest of the world to catch up with us."
Mr. Black said that unless the Canadian government "devalues the Canadian
dollar by about 30 per cent," the only answer is to roll back wages.
Harry Rosier, president of Abitibi Paper Co. Ltd. and a director of
six other Canadian companies, said wages in Canada's pulp and paper industry "are around 20 per cent higher than they are in the United States."
Canadian unions generally have "gone beyond parity with their American
counterparts," he said.
Mr. Rosier, whose company employs about 20,000 Canadians, said Canadian companies cannot compete internationally because of the high wages
and do not have the power to compete against the power of unions.
A. A. Thornbrough, president of Massey-Ferguson Ltd. and a director 21
ECONOMICS
of Argus Corp. and The Bank of Commerce, said union leaders may "insist
on taking us over the precipice" with unreasonable wage demands and
"they can do just that.  We can't reduce unemployment without growth,"
and Canadian companies cannot grow if they are unable to compete on
foreign markets, he said.
Stephen Roman, president of Denison Mines Ltd., said Canada is being
out-produced and underpriced on world markets. "It's one thing for Canadian unions to demand equal pay with the U.S. but it's gone beyond that,"
he said. Mr. Roman said he knew one U.S. company that operated a branch
plant in Ontario for two or three years, then closed it when Canadian wage
rates became 70 cents an hour higher than U.S. rates.
Thomas Bata, president of Bata Ltd. and a director of IBM Canada Ltd.,
said Canada must be competitive and that if it means adapting to technological change and new machines, unions must not balk at such measures.
5.5 PER CENT GROWTH SEEN FOR CANADA
(Canadian Dow-Jones - Toronto Daily Star)
Canada can achieve average annual real economic growth of 5.5 per cent
over the next four years while bringing down its inflation and unemployment rates,
the Finance Department says.
The department's growth projection assumes that the U.S. doesn't have
an economic recession before 1981 and that Canada's political uncertainties don't worsen.
The projection is contained in a comprehensive analysis of Canada's
prospects in the medium-term, the first such report published by the
Finance Department. It will be submitted for consideration to a three-
day meeting of federal and provincial government leaders which opened
in Ottawa Feb. 13.
The department said that over the 1978-81 period economic growth is
expected to be paced by brisk expansions in exports and business investment.
* * *
SUMMIT TO REBUILD ECONOMY
Prime Minister Trudeau and the 10 provincial premiers have a chance at
this week's Ottawa summit to turn the economy towards recovery, stated an
editorial in The Financial Times. Or they can muff the chance and leave
things in worse shape than before. If they agree on concerted action to
stimulate the economy in this year's budgets, they will send a signal of
hope to Canadians. But if they put aside immediate problems to talk about
"structural changes" and similar cloudy generalities, public skepticism
and pessimism will grow. 22
BUSINESS & FINANCE
CANADIAN PACIFIC LIMITED REPORTS PRELIMINARY EARNINGS
(Canadian Pacific News Release)
Canadian Pacific Limited on Feb. 13 reported preliminary net income of
$248-million-, or $3.43 per Ordinary share, for 1977. This set a record and was
up from $190.5-million, or $2.62 per share in 1976.
Net income for the final quarter of 1977 was $60-million, compared with
$65.4-million in the same period of 1976.
Results for 1977 included extraordinary income of $7.2-million representing the company's share of the net gain by Canadian Pacific Investments
Limited on the sale of CanPac Leasing Limited in April.
Apart from extraordinary income, the most significant increases came
from CP Investments, CP Air, CP Rail and the Soo Line Railroad. These
were partially offset by decreases for Canadian Pacific (Bermuda) Limited
and miscellaneous income.
Income from CP Investments was up substantially and reflected improvement in most operating sectors. The largest increases were in oil and gas,
metal mining, iron and steel and pulp and paper. Hotel operations were adversely affected by continued depressed conditions in the hospitality industry.
In the transportation group, CP Air improved its results markedly,
showing a profit in 1977 compared with a loss in 1976. This was achieved
largely as a result of stringent cost-control programs and fare increases.
Because of continued depression in the bulk-shipping market, CP (Bermuda)
incurred a sizeable loss for the year, compared with a small profit in
1976.
The company's annual report is to be issued at the end of March.
* * *
FREE TRANSIT SERVICE IN BIG CITY IS URGED AS AN EXPERIMENT
(Wall Street Journal)
Transportation Secretary Brock Adams would like to see a major city experiment with free mass-transit service, and Denver is emerging as a leading candidate.
Without mentioning any choice for the role, Mr. Adams said in a speech
to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., that a "fare-free system of
public transit" could lure people from their cars, reducing gasoline usage
and air pollution, and helping to revive the inner city. His aides say
he'd like to see the free service offered at all hours, but the plan would
more likely be tried by a major city only during nonrush-hour periods.
Planners in Mr. Adams' department see Denver as a good prospect. Denver officials have even conferred with Mr. Adams on the possibility of the
federal government  paying the operating costs of a fare-free trial by
the city's Regional Transportation District.
* * * Internal Correspondence
i__-^
Date  VANCOUVER, 16 February 1978.
From  M.W. Holland
To  Mr. R.R. Reid
Vancouver, B.C.
File:  336
_.
(fg) Form 102-R
Further to our discussions this a.m., you are requested to review
the Marine Insurance File 336, and ensure that we have complied
with all requests from Mr. A. McDermott which have been made of
the BCCSS.
Also, as mentioned, I would appreciate if you would familiarize
yourself with the insurance aspect of our operations, and that
in future you will handle this area direct with Mr. McDermott.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
■ CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 16 February 1978.
From M.W. Holland
To Mr. P.E. Timpson
Asst. Supervisor
Labour Relations
Vancouver, B.C.
File:  AGR.2.SIU.
Mr. D. Watt, Commissioner, Labour Relations Department, phoned to
advise that he had spoken with Mr. Poole and has set up a meeting
at the Labour Relations Board offices for 1000 on Tuesday morning,
21 February.
As an off-hand comment, Mr. Poole suggested that if everything
wasn't tidied up within a couple of hours he would be requesting
the Commissioner to write his report.
I would appreciate a briefing of your discussions in Montreal as soon
after your return to the office as is possible.
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
Form 102-R
J
\ BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
tf>.
iw Holland u fehtiuany 197S.
i :--r
mnm rile Mo.  343
• Manager
Seagull Uanlne Ltd.
1052 Common St.
Montneal, P.Q..
Attention: Ufi. Ed leagman
RE: M.S. "IMCAM SUPERIOR"
Gentlemen:
Attached Is a purchase onden 8255 ^ok the above. ship.    Vlease
have this ohden filled, using the latest date, possible on this
equipment.
Since this item was sent to Vancouven. on 22 Ve.ce.mbest 7977, we
would appfie.cl.ate. youn. eanly attention.
Invoice Incan Slvipi Ltd. In ThundeA Bay, which will. be. sent to
mysel{ iofi approval In any case.
Thank you Ion. youn. attention to oun a^avts.
Youns ven.y tnuly,
J.W. McCOft/ATT
Asst. Superintendent Engineer
JWM'BB
J CPRail ' fA
I_!
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 16 February 1978. File:  407
From A.N. Cairns
To Master
"Princess of Vancouver"
On reviewing your Pilot House Log, it is noted the sequential trip
numbers are in error.
You will make a thorough review of this situation and submit a
letter of corrections, so that office copies may be amended accordingly.
This inattention to detail in Officers' duties places an unnecessary
work load on this office and is not acceptable.
, Jaac
Marine  Superintendent
ANC'BB^^
Form 102-R
y Pier"B,\Vancouvcr,BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CPBail
i w Holland -f 6 rebruony 1978.
■Manager tile   NO.     164
Wi. W.A.L. Lethonn
Marine Superintendent
Rea Brothers  [Insurance] Limited
lna.de Indemnity Mouse
12/54 Gneat Eastenn Stneet
London,  EC2A 3AX
England.
RE: LOSS Of ONE CARTON  PUMP SPARES JULY, 1974
CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE'NO.  LB 3028367
Vean. Sin:
This will acknowledge youn letten, Elle WALL/MT/7755491,
(Addressed to CV Sivips, London, which has been ne&enned to
this ofi&lce.
As nequested, ronm ojj Indemnity has been signed and Is
netunned henewlth.
We will look forward to hearing &nom you In the neon fiutune
with nespect to settlement o£ oun. claim.
Youns veny tnuly,
hUJ. HOLLAND
Manager., B.C.C.S.S.
BB
be.    Mr. S. Marchant
Insurance & Claims Processor
C? Ships
P.O.  Box 276
Tna^algar, Square,  London, i'lC2N 5EB
England.
Thank you fan youn letter o£ 7 rebnuary, rile CVT/95/0333.
We appre.clate youn assistance In this molten. J
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S. Pier "B". Vancouver, BC   U6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
■
CPBail
tw Holland u Tebruany 1978.
■■■'■■  Manager Vile   No.     164
Mr.. W.A.L. Lethonn
Marine Superintendent
Rea Brothers  [Insurance] Limited
Trade Indemnity House
12/34 Gneat Eastern Stneet
London,  EC2A  SAX
England.
RE: LOSS Or ONE CARTON PUMP SPARES JUL7, 7974
CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE NO.   LB 3028367
Vean Sir.:
This will acknowledge your letter, Tile WALL/MT/7755491,
o-ddnessed to CV Ships, London, which has been ne^enned to
this oiilce.
As nequested, Torm ofc Indemnity has been signed and Is
neturned herewith.
We will look forward to hearing &nom you In the near. fiutun.e
with nespect to settlement o£ our. claim.
Yours veny tnuly,
M.W.  HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
BB
6c.    Mr. S. Marchant
Insurance 5 Claims- Vnocessor
CV Skips
V.O.  Box 276
Trafalgar Square,  London, l')C2N  5E8
England.
Thank you ion your letter o& 7 rebruony,  rite CVT/95/0333.
We appreciate your assistance In this matter. \ /
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S. V?!<VHolland
■IRReid
' Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CPRail
■16 rebruanjy- 19.18.
Tile No. 405
Lloyd'£ Register ol Shipping
219 - 355 BunJiond Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6C    2G8
Attention:    Mr. T. Taylor.
RE:    "VR1NCESS OF VANCOUVER"
Gentlemen:
This has nelerence to your, letten ol 6 rebnuany 1978 concerning
the Load Line Certlllcate Ion the above ship.
Vlease be advised that the oHldal Certlllcate has been Iramed
on board this vessel.
Also, the pnevlous Certlllcate Is neturned Ion cancellation, as
nequested.
Yours veny tnuly,
J.W. McCOWATT
Asst. Superintendent Engineer
JWM'BB
(/ >p'^^txxxi% 77 s^ffiffiM
7 7-77
\A
:'■;*..:;;■:
ffi
CPfla/7
Internal Correspondence
t<
'4sK_t
Xi
Date February 16th. 1978 Filet T-78-30-5
From  Hr. M. W. Holland
To Hr, D. C. Freeman
freight Claims Agent
Vancouver, B* C.
Pffff <^p,it^l Freightways T-6?
Attached is my complete file covering damage sustained to
Capital Freightways unit T*63 on January 9th. 1978 during
' \ loading operations of the Carrier Princess.  »
Since there appears to be little doubt as to our responsibility in this matter, 1 would appreciate it if you would
arrange settlement with Capital Freightways in the amount
of J5W*  (BiiiM MuihUiuI BUllffrg) , thi_-.limiL.ir  1 II Mill 11 y.
When settlement lias been finalized with Capital Freightways,
I would appreciate receiving a copy of your voucher as it is
my intention to claim restitution from Johnston Terminals Ltd.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S*       {/     .
L^^Form JOg-H
'       '• ' ■        .    ".    :■>■   '
*.««:|7,v ■:■,-■.
■-i'-'77 :-77>;7.7x; BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier • e ", Vancouver. BC   V6C 2R3
Te!(604)665-3135. Te/SxO4-507684
' W Holland
■ ■- Reid   j
'/;:^agry\
February 16th. 1978
File: T-78-30-5
WITHOUT PREJUDICE
Johnston Terminals Limited
P. 0. Box 5300     #
Vancouver, B. C.
V6B 4B6
Attention: Mr. Gerry French, M.V.A. Claims Dept.
Dear Mr. French:
Re. Your File: 78-43-B
Further to your reply of February 10th. 1978 regarding damage
to Capital Freightways Ltd. T-63 while being loaded aboard the
vessel Carrier Princess by your driver, Mr. L» Munro on January
9th. 1978, this will confirm that it is still our intention to
claim damage costs from your firm.
Although you have stated that Mr. Munro remains adamant in his
stand on this matter, I should point out that there are at least
three witnesses to the mishap and that none of these witnesses
corroborates Mr. Munro's statements. In fact, in view of comments made by Mr. Munro to several of the crew members during
the latter part of last week concerning possible court action I
have been confronted by another crew member who confirms statements made by other witnesses and they are directly opposite to
Mr. Munro's position. j'
Since Mr. Munro failed to heed the signals as required, I must
conclude that Johnston Terminals Limited cannot deny liability
in these circumstances. Therefore, when Capital Freightways
Limited claim has been finalized a claim will be submitted to
your firm for payment.
Yours very truly
M. WASlolland
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc: Mr. I. Froese I
passsE
PIM-"
*_'*-_*'
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Li
File:   164
Date    February 14th.  1978
from    A. J. McPherson
TO     Mr. M* W. Holland
Re. Damage Claim.Capital Freightways trailer T-63 and Johnston
Terminals hostler, Mr. Len Munro.
Attached you will find the complete file T-78-30-5 concerning
the above. It would appear that I have handled this claim as
far as I am able and that any further progress will have to
involve both yourself and management at Johnston Terminals.
As it stands now, Capital Freightways Ltd. have a claim against
us for $795.62 for which we claim liability in the amount of
$500. However, it does not seem fair that Capital Freightways
should be out of pocket the difference since they were not It-
contributing factor to the mishap.
From all reports (from crew members who Witnessed the incident)
the party primarily responsible for this was the Johnston hostler,
Mr. Len Munro who failed to heed the signals because he felt he
knew where the trailer should be parked.
As a short reply to Mr. Gerry French's letter, I would point out
that our signal code does not contain any signals to indicate that
the hostler should change lanes. Also, since writing tne letter
to Johnston Terminals on February 6th. 1978 I was surprised to find
that one of our S.I.U. members felt strongly enough about this occurrence to call in to this office and offer himself as a witness
to the mishap. The list of witnesses now numbers three that have
come forward.
(j£|Fonn 102-R
Departmental Analyst Johnston Terminals Limited
P.O.Box 5300, Vancouver, B.C. V6B 4B6
Telephone (604) 874-7371
Telex 045-1142
February 10,   1978
WITHOUT PREJUDICE
C.P.  Rail
B.C.  Coast Steamship Service
Pier   'B'
Vancouver,   B.C.
V6C  2R3
Attention:     M.W.   Holland,   Manager
Dear Sirs:
RE:     YOUR FILE  #T-78-30-5
OUR  FILE  X78-43-B
We are in receipt of your letter of February 6,  1978,  regarding the above
noted file,  which refers to damages sustained to Capital Freightways
trailer #T-63.
We confronted our driver,   Len Munro,  with your letter and the details contained  therein.     He remains adamant that the deckhand did signal him  to
port aft,   not  to stop.    As Mr.  Munro has several  years experience on  this
particular job he is well  versed in the interpretation of signals.    He is
also considered  to be a very conscientious employee,  and we feel  that there
is no reason to disbelieve him.     Therefore we must respectfully maintain
a complete denial of liability.
uly,
J^K  J] 0*^
French
Claims Dept.
/pg
TRUCKING; GENERAL COMMODITIES I CHARTER; CONTRACT * GENERAL CARTAGE i HEAVY HAULING i CRANES / BULK COMMODITIES
FORWARDING I TRUCK ' RAIL I AIR; INTERNATIONAL.
MAR*. TERMINALS i FURNITURE MOVING ft STORAGE I OFFICE MOVING! WAREHOUSING; DISTRIBUTION ft STORAGE! DEMOLITION inifiinir-1
immmm
, AmtiMVm T_iBW40MS.',^MlO1.O
TOR!A TELEPHONE: 386-61*1
♦*
p.o. $ox lies
V8W2T8
Capital Freightways Ltd.
GENERAL F&EIGHT SERVICE
655 QUEENS AVENUE
VICTORIA, B.C.
February; Ci9?$
C P Rail
Marine Dept    Pier "BM
o'ouver    BC
V6C 2R3
Attention: , CI era Aitken
Xii-i»i.MI»WRP-W-«iiiW-*'-»il'il|l>W-l»  Biliii^i-tflWIWinirtllMW^^iiiWWiliW  iii-ywllj't-.-*■■!"■    ,.'•-;
. Bear Sirs:
Further to our letter of January 10th,
&® have ht ^ry repairs  made to our
trailer N. d  enclose copies  of the invoices
from CRnacSiji-^Trailmobile for $750.62 and ^red
Ashraore Signs for $45.00 for a  total claim of
.$795.62.
Wmm'
■:\.-::x-%i:XX   a;;;G7"'wXiixXtS    g    Q e;x7X,: = ,,::7>,,;:x,77.   - XXxX-ixx^
-,  your earliest convenience.
Yours truly
Thomas   .
General  ii I        33-A67
no. de mece
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BLUEUNE  D 32 X -ti.Xii ;v--J;«^_____X»
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier ■8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
TeJ (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
CPRa.il
'V,'Holland
FtReid
6 February 1978
File: T-78-30-5
WITHOUT PREJUD1CE
Johnston Terminals
P.O. Box 5300
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 4B6
Attention:
Dear Sir:
Mr. Gerry French
M.V. Claims Department
Re:  Your file 78-43-B of 24 January 1978
I have attached a memorandum received from the 1st Officer of
the "Carrier Princess" briefly outlining the occurrences prior
to hostler L. Munro striking the Grassick trailer.
In connection with this I would note the following:
1. It is not necessary for your driver to be advised of
protruding beams etc. on any other trailer already loaded.
It is his responsibility to obey the signals of our
seaman.
2. The seaman, H. Prosick, did not signal driver over to the
port side aft but in fact, signalled him to stop.
Further, in conversation with the 1st Officer, F.A. Hart, he states
that L. Munro admitted in front of witnesses, at the time of the
incident, that he did not realize that the slot had already been
filled by another unit.
Under normal circumstances, with the number of hostling units operating, it would have been Mr. Munro's turn to load the unit where
the Grassick trailer was parked; however, while Mr. Munro was away
from the vessel picking up the Capital Freightways unit T-63, Grassick
Transport Limited was prevailed upon to load their own unit as there
were no tractors at the dockside able to accommodate the overhanging
»  »  »  i - 2
load. When Mr. Munro returned he was not aware of this occurrence and simply tried to load the Capital Freightways unit
where the Grassick unit had been parked.
The fact that light conditions were poor may have contributed
to the incident to the* extent that Mr. Munro could not see the
trailer behind him and assumed the space was vacant; however,
as noted before, it is not Mr. Munro's position to assume anything. In his capacity, it is essential that he obey the signals
as given. This he did not do.
Since this is the case, it is still our intent to claim for recovery
on our settlement.
Your comments and further investigation would be appreciated.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
AJM'GP :77,7\777707,777777.;^ "  : X ■ XXXX^XX XXXXXx " ;,   .;.;..; ^■v■^::■^^7■;:V^.^*; .-eS^--: ^fX?X:.;X7V;.7;7^.
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CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date
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_s€-_^-i_>-t^-^<^     ,_^<-«_u_-_«L
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7'j3_>       -t^g-«____e_
£3 Form 102-R -■ xxx-X,L-i^.i/..X.X.vj :X-.'i':iirf!?_iAav____^WsaSiS^C
Johnston Terminals Limited
P.O.Box 5300, Vancouver, B.C. V6B 4B6
Telephone (604) 874-7371
Telex 045-1142
January 24,   1978
WITHOUT PREJUDICE
C. P. Rail
B. C. Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, B. Cfc
V6C 2R3
Attention:  Mr. M. W. Holland, Manager
Dear Sir: ;
Re:  Accident - January 9, 1978       ;
Our Driver - Len Munro
3rd Party Unit -■ Capitol Freightways #T-63
Our File #78-43-B
Your File //T-78-30-5	
We are in receipt of your letter of January 18, 197,8 wherein you
advised the writer of your intent to claim as a result of the
above-captioned- loss.
We have interviewed our driver, Len Munro, and ascertained the
following facts: I
- the driver was not advised of the long load on the Grassick trailer
and did not observe the protruding beams because of the light conditions,
- the deck man, Harvey Prosick, signalled our driver over to the
port side aft, which the driver was proceeding to do at the time of
loss.
The results of our investigation show that this loss resulted primarily
from the signals given by your deck hand, Mr, Prosick, who neglected to
signal our driver to stop in time to avoid an accident, but was waving
our driver to the port side aft at the time of the collision.  It is
also our feeling that the strategically poor placement of the long load
and your deck hand's failure to warn of the location of the long load is
a further contributing factor to this loss.  Therefore, we have no other
alternative but/to respectfully decline your claim.
TRUCKING   GENERAL COMMODITIES I CHAFtTEfi   CONTRACT & GENERAL CARTAGE   HEAVY HAULING   CRANES   BULK CX>MMOOITIIf«
FORWARDING I TRUCK   RAIL   Alfi   SNTERNATiONAL.
MARINE TERMINALS   FUHNfTURE MOVING - STORAGE   OFFICE MOVING I WAREHOUSING   DISTRIBUTION - STORAGE   (W.MOUI ION X'XiXl
fe_-lfe^*ilS^I_i^fes;
ffi^sjmmmmmimmm
W Holland
< Reid
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier' 8", Vancouver. BC   V6C 2HJ
Tel {604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
CP flail
18 January 1978
File: T-78-30-5
Johnston Terminals Ltd.
P.O. Box 5300
2020 Yukon Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 4B6
Attention: Mr. J. French
Dear Sir:
Re:  CAPITAL FREIGHTWAYS T-63, 10 JANUARY 1978
During the loading operation of the 1730 hours sailing of the
"Carrier Princess" on 10 January 1978, the above trailer received
extensive damage when Johnston hostler, Mr. L. Monroe, failed to ,
heed signals and backed unit into Grassick trailer with overhanging
load.
With copy of this letter, you are advised that when we have made
settlement with Capital Freightways it is our intention to claim
restitution from your firm.
Yours very truly^
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM'GP .._.-_*i^viM*«^ j    ,   jj^ '^j^Mi&Miaiim^SiiisattBtiBM
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER* 13 January 1978
From     M.W. Holland
To     Mr. Fred Hart
1st Officer
"Carrier Princess"
File: T-78-30-5
I have received your report of 9 January 1978 concerning
damage to Capital Freightways trailer #T-63 but require
clarification on one point.
Would you please advise, as soon as possible, if seaman
H» Prosick signalled the hostler to stop using proper signals
or if, in fact, he signalled hostler to change lanes.
-Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM'GP
SS Form 102-R
(Vote'. Tailed tw^   F Hart). <** F^<% 3**, ^\^
He s't:-)+e.   seaway cj^wci.  co^'fct Siq'h&ls   »ht
/G^sSict- OL Steel Loaafha^ bee*    p^r* ■- -■■•_,.-.. .«w«v. tsfln^. ^ •Messrs     iB_-te-»a,»w,-... ..v..x>£X-a-&*.aii--X^^
IVER TELEPHONE: 254-6010 v VICTORIA TELEPHONE: 386-6116
Capital Freightways Ltd.
FREIGHT SERVICE
P.O. BOX 1262 <555 QUEENS AVENUE
VICTORIA, B.C.
January 10 197S
C P Rail
Marine Dept Pier "Bw
Vancouver BC
V6C 2R3
Attn: Clem Aitken
Bear Sirs:
. - »
This is our Intent to* Claim for damages
to our trailer- number T63 in the amount of $659.30.
The damage was to the rear door of the trailer and
occurred at approximately 5^15 PM on January 9th
197^ during the loading of the trailer aboard the
Carrier Princess at your Vancouver terminal. A
copy of the report made on the arrival of the
vessel at Swartz Bay is enclosed.
Also be advised that there will be a
elaim submitted for damage to the goods carried
in the trailer.
Yours truly
Thomas Der
General Manager
TD/ga
end __-0-_att
«iv: ^«*___H_B6i
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Signature
Title
r—7*3"
9/s/?^   /7
Date
Time CPRail
Internal Corre
nee
Date  VANCOUVER, 14 February 1978.
From  M.W. Holland
1°  Mr. V. Jones
Vancouver.
Attached is copy of letter sent to Mr. B.D. Margetts by the Mayor
of Kitimat, which is self-explanatory, and I will follow -up on
this matter in due course, as I have already spoken to Mr. Margetts
per my conversation with the Mayor on my last trip to Kitimat.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Manager
Asst. Mgr.
Marine
Supt. Engr.
At*Jx Sapt, Engr.
_T<_mii&al iy^
&*««. Ant**
i|g) Form 102-R
/ CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 14 February 1978.
From M.W. Holland
To Mr. J.L. Rochon
Supervisor, Data Centre
Vane ouver, B.C.
Further to your discussions with Mr. George Dockrill this miorning.
Would you kindly prepare emergent cheques payable to those listed
below.  It is not our intention to follow this procedure more than
necessary, and please be assured we are taking the necessary action
to eliminate this in future.
Northland Navigation (1962) Co. Ltd.
Burton Delivery Service Ltd.
Casco Terminals Ltd.
Consolidated Freightways Inc.
G.H. Cottrell Ltd.
Johnston Terminals Ltd.
McElroy's Carriers Ltd.
Wholesale Delivery Service
Freybe Sausage
Ames Brothers Distrs.
Harlan Fairbanks
International Cabinets & Fixtures
Viking Alexander Metal
Yuen Fong Co.
Wholesale Delivery Service
Your early attention to this matter will
Vancouver
North Burnaby
Vancouver
Portland,   Oregon
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Burnaby
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Richmond
Vancouver
Vancouver
Bunaby
be appreciated.
$25,146.93
181.00
350.75
1,851.97
339.30
1,133.69
32.30
3,595.40
312.54
1,512.45
815.65
2,362.56
204.59
129.05
11,089.79
IS; Form 102-R     Manager,   B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
j BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier-"fl",Vancouver,BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
M W Holland
:'-,-iar>or
aR Reid
tsst Manager
14 V2.bf1uuOLK.1j 1978.
ViZe Mo.  77.ALA.527.-P.
Wt.  CM. Donaldson
Vonoldson £ Vonoldson
Canada Building
Windson, Ontanio.
W9A JB?
Vean Wt. Vonoldson:
This will acknowledge necelpt o& youJt letten o{, 7 Te.bA.uany,
Inqulntng Into the avallab-UUXy o£ a bet ol baggage. wheels
Inom youn 1 July J977 cnulse.
Ai you. one. probably awane, thene one no cnuLse ships using Tien
B-C at this time ol the yean, and accon.di.ngly, thene one veny
lew anticles lelt am the baggage lock-up anea. As this anea is
unden the junlsdiction ol the Supenvison, Whanl Openations, T
checked the holding anea with km, only to lind iX Is completely
bane ol any anticles whatsoever.      I can only assume, thenelone,
that the taxi dntven did not netunn the baggage wheels to the
plen, as they would still have been locked tn this anea had he
done i>o.
Vouns veny tnuly,
R.R. RE1V
Asst. Managen, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
J CPRail
Internal Correspondence LX_>i
Date  VANCOUVER, 14 February .1978. File:  T-78-69-AVA
From  R.R. Reid
To  Mr. J.G. Shave
Advertising Representative
Vancouver, B.C.
Will you kindly look into the attached from the Alaska Visitors
Association.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
RRR'BB
v^'-'i'
3 Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"S", Vancouver,BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
CPHal
VJWHolland
■ •.- ig i
-; R Raid
-:,st Manager
14 Vebnuony 1978.
Vile Mo. 7-78-10.
Wi. flobent Vindingen
Monketing Coondlnoton
State ol Alaska
Vouch E
Juneau, Alaska 99811.
Vean Jilt. Vindingen:
Many thanks Ion youn letten ol 6 Vebnuany and the action taken
in youn absence in connection with obtaining pnessune-sensitive
labels pentaining to intenest in cnuise ship tnavel Inom
Calilonnia. and B.C. to Alaska.
Vouns veny tnuly,
R.R. REID
Asst. Uanagen, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
J CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, 14 February 1978. File:  T-78-10.12-A
From  A.N. Cairns
To Master
"Trailer Princess"
You will arrange to hand to the Storekeeper, BCCSS Cwith requisition
to cover) both lifeboat-^covers for repair or replacement.
W
Marine Su*
AWC'BB
cc.  Mr. R. Gavin - Forward covers to Ancient Mariner for action.
(S> Form 102-R
y 6C Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
MW Holland
Vbagser
R R Reid
-''Ssf Manager
CP Rail
■14 Vebnuony 1978.
Vile Mo.   78.ALA.519.A.
Mi. Joe Vollen
Vinecton
Amenicon Hosts Touns
401-A West Kotella Ave.
Anaheim, Calilonnia 91801.
Vean Joe:
Have Just neceived coloun sepanations as discussed when we
met in Vancouver.       Sonny Ion the delay, but hope we haven't
held you up too much.
I am attempting to clanily space situation with one ol oun
majon openatons, and will have an answen this week in onden
to give you actual stateroom nwnbens on dates ol sailings
nequested.
Slide presentation -is on its way, and othen items wene shipped
last week.    Thene should not be any shipping changes, but il
thene one, please let me know Ion reimbursement.
With best regards, and again, it was a pleasure meeting you.
yours very truly,
R.R.  REIP
Asst.  Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
AIRMAIL SPECIAL VELIVEW
■J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
mmm»k -14 Vebruony 1978.
»ww Vile Mo.  78.S11.S.
{Ar. Gordon T. Southom
1416 Angus Vrive
Vancouver, B.C.
V6H 71/3
Vear Mr. Southom:
Enclosed please lind transpontation to Manaimo March 23 and
return March 18, with separate auto and passage tickets Ion
Mns. Henley March 23 and 27.    The charges lor your transportation total $51.00, and lor Mrs. Henley, $18.00.
Please let me have your requirements lor the rest ol this year,
at your convenience, and have an enjoyable Easter weekend on
the Island.
Yours very truly,
R.R. REIP
Asst. Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 14 February 1978. File:  AGR.3.BRAC.S.GEN.
From R.R. Reid
T° Mr. A. Meijer
Vancouver.
With reference to our 9 February meeting with representatives from
BRAC.
When travelling on the "Princess of Vancouver" on Wednesday, 15
February, will you please look into the following points raised during
our meeting:
1. As discussed subsequently; i.e., noise factor in female quarters. .
2. Clarify Johnson's status and make certain he has been told to
relinquish Waiter's position.
3. Check all Stewards' Department mattresses and make recommendation
for replacement.
4. Determine which Stewards' quarters, Mess and recreation area
require painting.
5. Look into the aerial boxes requested for Stewards' Department
and the feasibility of same.
6. Determine requirement of black socks, white shirts for Stewards'
Department, and request Ray Gavin to stock same, also make
recommendation as to requisition by employees and number of
pairs of socks and shirts to be given any one employee each year.
Matter of trousers will be held in reserve for time being.
7. Check T.V, in Stewardess' room, determine whether or not the
area lends itself to good reception and the possibility of it
being transferred into the crew's Mess, or alternatively,
availability of leasing an additional T.V. for Stewards' Mess.
8. Check lighting in Stewards', Cooks' and recreation area.
9. Check Stewards', crew's Mess for warmth, also if there is
Form 102-R
—i _ a>
V
,4 __ *
- 3 -
still a noticeable draft from skylight.
10.  Feasibility of cutting a new entrance to the cafeteria in the
dining room entrance area.
Please discuss before you leave.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB • Rail
temal Correspondence
Date
From
To
VANCOUVER, 14 February 1978
M.W. Holland
Mr. O.R. Robison, Vancouver
Mr. E. Robinson, Nanaimo
Purser, "Princess of Vancouver"
Miss B.C. Thorn
File: T-78-39
lOForm 102-R
Please apply following rates effective 15 February 1978,
until further advised:
U.S. funds at premium on international and foreign freight
traffic covered by CFA Tariff 16G:
Exchange
Surcharge
Discount
11 1/8 percent
7     percent
Nil "
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
gp
J Form 102-R
Internal Correspondence
Date        VANCOUVER, 14 February 1978 File: 336
From        M.W. Holland
To        A. McDermott
Montreal
With reference to your letter of 2 February, files MO-L-2-1
and MI-G-F-2 concerning insurance coverage for oil pollution
in the U.S.A.
The last day that the "Princess Patricia" will operate in
U.S. waters is 4 October 1978, after that the vessel will be
withdrawn from service permanently.
Will you kindly arrange to have the policy extended to cover
the period 1 October to 4 October 1978.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH'GP
y BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
CPRail
W Holland
■ Manager
•14 February 1978
File: T-78-101POV
Lloyd's Register of Shipping
219 - 355 Burrard Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6C 2G8
Attention:  Mr. N. MacLean
Re:  Annual Survey "Princess of Vancouver"
Dear Sir:
Copies of the undernoted documents are attached for your records.
1. C02 Flooding for Engine Room and Boiler Room, etc.
by Vancouver Fire Prevention Service Co. Ltd.
2. Testing and calibration of protective relay breakers
and switchboard meter etc. by Westinghouse Canada Ltd.
Yours truly,
J.W. MCCOWATT
Asst. Supterintendent Engineer
B.C.C.S.S.
JWM'GP
7 tix, i^oasii)iearnsnip service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
I vy Holland
B Reid
■ Waoage*
14 February 1978
File: T-78-101POV
E
Canadian Coastguard Ship Safety
P.O. Box 10060
700 West Georgia
Vancouver, B.C.
V7Y 1E1
Attention: Mr. L. Midford
Re:  Annual Survey "Princess of Vancouver"
Dear Sir:
Copies of the undernoted documents are attached for your records.
1. C02 Flooding for Engine Room and Boiler Room, etc.
by Vancouver Fire Prevention Service Co. Ltd.
2. Testing and calibration of protective relay breakers
and switchboard meter etc. by Westinghouse Canada Ltd.
3. Thickness determination of deck plates on the M.V.
"Princess of Vancouver" by B.H. Levelton and Associates
Ltd.
Yours truly,
J.W. MCCOWATT
Asst. Superintendent Engineer
B.C.C.S.S.
JWM'GP
si CPRail
Internal Correspondence
B3
Date   VANCOUVER,   15 February  1978. File:     153
From   m.W.   Holland
To Mr. J.T. Sparrow
Manager, Labour Relations
Montreal, Que.
In respect to your letter of 25 November 1977 concerning the Masters'
working hours on our vessels as they relate to Federal Employment
Standards, discussions on the matter have been held with all parties
concerned, and Mr. N. Sigsworth, Manager, Ship Safety, Vancouver,
advises that we are not in contravention of regulations as he interprets them.
Ships' Safety Certificates are issued annually on completion of inspection by Canadian Coast Guard officers, and the hours of work
of personnel, as with all other facets of the ships' functional
capabilities, are deemed to be approved with the issuance of a
Certificate of Safety.
:
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
ANC'BB
cc. Mr. P.I. Georges, Montreal, Que.
Mr. P.E. Timpson, Vancouver, B.C.
SP Form 102-R
I BC Co:.-:;: Steamship Service
Pier "B". Vancouver. BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
^Holland -J5 Vebruary 1978.
»■«*« Vile Mo. T-78-99
Mi. l/.R. Vurlsh
Jones, Gable 6 Company Limited
110 Yange Street
Toronto, Ontario.
M5C 1Tb
Vean Mr. Vurlsh:
This will acknowledge your letter ol 13 Vebruary 1978, accepting our oiler ol $41.85 in settlement ol your claim.
I have today authorized our Accounting Vepartment to process
payment in this amount.    Cheque should reach you in about, two
weeks.
yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAMV
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH'BB
be.    Mr. W.W. Hocking - Please reimburse Mr. Vurlsh accordingly.
J CPRail
Internal Correspondence
B
Date VANCOUVER, 15 February 1978,
From A. Meijer
To Chief Steward
"Princess of Vancouver"
File:  AGR.3.BRAC.S.GEN.
9
Please be advised that a portion of the cafeteria (near the Cashier's
corner) will be allocated to accommodate the overflow of the Stewards'
Mess during meal hours ONLY.
The area is not, and I repeat not, to be used for coffee breaks or
any other purposes other than meals.
Responsibility for cleaning this station must be borne by those
utilizing same.
Catering Superintendent
AM'BB
cc.  Mr. R.R. Reid
IE3 Form 102-R
I
J CPRail
Date    VANCOUVER,   15 Vebruary 1978.
From    R.R.  Reid
Vile:    A6R.3.BRAC.S.GEW.
7o    Memorandum
Mr. H.L. Hudson
Attached Is photostat ol letter Irom BRAC.
Please arrange to keep lists available pertaining to all new
BRAC employees respecting their joining BRAC or otherwise.
-
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
f^tlForm 102A-R
. •-
I BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "6", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
? '//Holland
; R Reid
st Manager
■15 Vebruary 1978.
Vile Mo. T-78-10
Mr.  C.K. Williams
814 West 10th St.
Month Vancouver,  B.C.
V7P 1B4
Vear Clay:
Many thanks lor your letter dated 14 January and the excellent
Suggestions contained therein.
I have just had a meeting with Mr. Holland concerning same, and
while it would be gneat to contemplate employment ol the
"Princess Patricio" in one ol the pnognammes, we have lound that
she has now become too expensive a vessel to operate, and un-
lortunately, she will be put up lor sole upon completion ol this
year's cruise season.
We are looking lor an alternative vessel, but at the moment
everything is in doubt.    However, all the suggestions you have
lorwarded to us will be kept on \lle lor whatever use we might
be able to make ol them in lutune consideration ol another vessel.
With every good wish to you on your pending retirement, and ap-
pneclation Ion your Interest and concern lor the "Princess Patricia"
and the B.C.C.S.S.
yours very truly,
R.R.  REIP
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
J CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date VANCOUVER, 15 February 1978. File:   78.521.W.
From R.R. Reid
To Mr. 0. Robison
Wharf Ticket Agent
Vancouver, B.C.
Will you please reserve car space for Mr. W.D. Wilks, as per attached
list,  covering long weekends during 1978, confirming numbers.
As you are aware, Mr. Wilks holds annual pass for himself and automobile.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
Cf||) Form 102-R
V CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 15 February 1978. File: AGR.l.CMSG.N.
From M.W. Holland
To Mr. P.E. Timpson
Asst. Supervisor
Labour Relations
Vancouver, B.C.
Spoke with D. Lowry this a.m., who advises that he can meet with
us on 20 February, but that he has a commitment in the afternoon,
and therefore has suggested an early start.
Would you kindly confirm these arrangements with Mr. Lowry on
your return.
He also stated they are going through the certification process
for the Northland Deck Officers; the same process as they recently
followed with respect to B.C. Coast Deck and Engineer Officers.
m
(S3 Form 102-R
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
J Internal Correspondence
Date      VANCOUVER, 14 February 1978.
From     M.W. Holland
To      Memorandum
Mr. W. Kazulin
File:  AGR.ll.USA.N.GEN.
t^g) Form 102A-R
In conversation with our Montreal office this morning, it was
confirmed that the COLA clause for the Steel Workers at Kitimat
should be implemented as soon as possible.
Accordingly, would you kindly take whatever action is necessary
to ensure this is handled as expeditiously as possible.
Manager*  B.C.C.S.S,
MWH'BB
x<-:vxwJ'*v
if;tn y -
MM
v CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date VANCOUVER, 15 February 1978.
From m.W. Holland
'° Memorandum
Mr. A.N. Cairns
File:  651
i
Form 102-R
This is in reference to your memorandum of 16 January 1978, regarding the problems with which BCCSS is faced with respect to the
scarcity of berthing for its vessels.
Would you kindly undertake a complete analysis of our berthing
problems and provide me with your detailed recommendations for
the construction of facilities which would adequately resolve our
problems.  Included in your recommendations should be an estimate
of the costs involved, as this document will serve as the basis
for a presentation to Management for a capital expenditure.
I think we all appreciate, with the increasing Alaska traffic,
that we are facing a very difficult situation, which could, if
not resolved, result in considerably increased costs to the
BCCSS.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
r
y H
To
(52) Form 102-R
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 15 February 1978. File:  429
From M.W. Holland
Mr. J.D. Finnie
Vancouver, B.C.
I received a call from Mr. A.C.  Olson of Olson Industries, who is
currently moving goods to the Port McNeill area.  He had received
a notice of our proposed 8% increase in the Northland tariff, and
called inquiring as to the extent of our new service.
His company has a branch warehouse In Port McNeill, and their main
commodity is large-size rope used in the logging industry.  He
stated that since the discontinuance of the RivTow service, which
nobody was sad to see disappear, he has been shipping via Haida
Freightways into the area.
I thanked Mr. Olson for his call and suggested that one of our
representatives would like to meet with him in the not too distant
future, to review his requirements for shipments to the North.
Olson Industries are located at 3185 Grandview Highway, and the phone
number is 435-3331.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
J. CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 15 February 1978.
From M.W. Holland
To Mr. R.A. Ferguson
Regional Manager
Public Relations & Advertising
Vancouver, B.C.
File:  T-78-69
1
This refers to your memorandum to Mr. R.R. Reid, your File 8600,
dated 7 February 1978, to which was attached a publication entitled
"How to Get the Most out of your Cruise to Alaska."
I am fully aware of the restrictions we have on our advertising
budget, but would suggest that at the cost of $1.00 per copy, an
edition such as this handed out at the time of check-in on board
the vessel would be a most fitting way to start the Alaska cruise.
The cover, of course, would have to be appropriately designated
earmarking, if possible, our 75th anniversary of coastal shipping,
and as well, the final year in service with Canadian Pacific of
the "Princess Patricia."
I agree that such a venture would have to be viewed as a straight
goodwill proposition, but at the expense of $1.00 per person, surely
such an expenditure is warranted in light of the circumstances.
Accordingly, I ask that it be given your further consideration and
that we review our budget with the intention of trying to find the
necessary funds.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
cc.  Mr. R.R. Reid - Please follow up in light of the above comments.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
S) Form 102-R
J CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 15 February 1978.
From M.W. Holland
To Mr. H.L. MacAulay
Superintendent
Vancouver, B.C.
Further to our recent conversation, you will find attached copies
of Bulletin No. 256 governing the loading of rail cars on the
"Trailer Princess," as well as a statement from Mr. T.J. Shyshka,
Sliptender at the Nanaimo Terminal.
We have not pursued the effect that these documents might have
on the outcome of an investigation into the mishap, as it was felt
that Pacific Region would be handling the investigation and that
we might be asked for our assistance.
It is not my intention to carry this matter any further than we have
to, and as discussed with you, we are quite willing to take whatever action is best for Canadian Pacific.  At this time I have not
reviewed the documents you have supplied me with, but will do so
in the next few days, and perhaps we could meet briefly to finalize
our action.
(Sb Form 102-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B",Vancouver,BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CPRail
.'AW Holland
15 Vebruary 1978
RRReid
-.•y Manager
Vile Mo.  305
Mr. A.J. Helmcken
Archivist
City ol Victoria
City Hall, Centennial Square
Victoria, B.C.
V8W 1P6
Vear Mr. Helmcken:
This is to acknowledge your letter ol 9 Vebruary 1978, Indicating
that you will be in Vancouver Irom the 11 to the 14.
I will be leaving town Ion a two-week period on the llnd, but
would be pleased to meet with you on the list.    Hopelully we
could do this over lunch, and should this be acceptable to you,
would you kindly let my secretary, Miss B. Buss ell,  know and
we will plan on meeting at 11:00 noon in my ollice on Pier "B".
I would like to bring Mr. Reid along with me, as he has been
associated with the BCCSS lor many years and will be able to
contribute positively to our discussions.
yours very truly,
M.W.  HOLLAMV
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HdH'BB
j BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
P Hail
I •■' Holland
Reid
Manager
15 February 1978
File: 484529
Mr. H. Prosick
22681 River Road
Maple Ridge, B.C.
Dear Mr. Prosick:
Kindly telephone the Office Manager on 665-3146 and arrange
an appointment with me for the purpose of discussing your
status with B.C. Coast Service.
Yours tru ly,
& 91, /a
A.N. CAIRNS
Marine Superintendent
B.C.C.S.S.
HLH'GP
J Date VANCOUVER, 15 February 1978
From m.W. Holland
To Mr. O.R. Robison, Vancouver
Mr. E. Robinson, Nanaimo
Purser, "Princess of Vancouver"
Miss B.C. Thorn
File: T-78-39
Effective immediately United States funds to be accepted
at 107o premium.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
gP
!»2> Form 102-R g) Form 102-R
31
Dafe   VANCOUVER, 15 February 1978 File: 527
From       A.N. Cairns
To       Mas ter
"Princess of Vancouver"
The enclosed Radio Inspection Certificate is forwarded for
posting in your vessel. When posted, will you please advise
this office of receipt.
hr
Marine Superintendent
B.C.C SS.
GP
y CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date  VANCOUVER, 13 February 1978.
From  R.R.Reid
To Memorandum
Mr. M.W. Holland
File:  T-78-129
With reference to your request for an appreciaton of the decreased
carryings by the "Princess of Vancouver" between Vancouver-Nanaimo-
Vancouver during the month of January 1978.
B.C. Ferries have not experienced a similar decrease in their
traffic; in fact, from the attached report you will note they
have experienced a considerable increase in traffic.
Some of the reasons respecting our decrease can be attributed to:
1. The lack of sustaining advertising from the end of September
1977, discontinued to assist our Alaska advertising deficit.
2. While traffic from Vancouver Island is generally down, B.C.
Ferries larger vessels are able to handle everything offering,
and as a result we are not getting any of the overflow traffic.
3. Detrimental comments that have been appearing concerning the
possibility of our discontinuing passenger service have not
helped us.
4. Delayed schedules resulting from non-operation of Pier A-l are
of an historically contributing factor.
It would appear that we need to offer a superior type service to
that being given by B.C. Ferries in order to hold our own with them;
clean ship, good food and a cheerful staff are the only things we
having going for us, and suggest this is an area which Mr. Meijer
will have great impact in achieving.  I cannot offer any other
reasons for decrease in traffic.
Cgg) Form 102-R
Asst.  Manager,   B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier^B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
ny Holland
I rage/
a R Reid
■'-o: Manager
13 Vebruary 1978.
Vile Mo.  T-78-69-AVA
Mr.  Richard W. Montague, Virector
State ol Alaska
Vept.  ol Commerce & Economic Vevelopment
Pouch E
Juneau, Alaska 99811.
Vear Richard:
Kindly neler to your letter ol 16 January concerning balance
due in the amount ol $4,999.70 lor CP Rail's ad in the 1978
"Alaska Experience."
By the time you receive this letter I leel payment will have
been received, in view ol my conversation with Von Vixon.
Apparently, the billing was sent to him quite early last loll.
He returned it with the advice that approval had been given
Ion the payment 1 January, and requested that billing be sent
back to him.    It seems tills was not done, and to date Von has
not received updated billing; however, it is his leeling that
cheque would have been sent no later than 30 January, as a
normal consequence ol their ledger postings.
Please let me know il you have not received payment as yet.
yours very truly,
R.R. REW
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
/ Pier"B". Vancouver. BC   V6C2FI3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
! W Holland
■   ;.j^r
nr.eid
■13 Vebruary 1978.
Vile Mo.  T-78-10
Mn. W.V. Stager
2110 lone Street
Sacramento,  Colli.  95815.
Vean Mn. Stager:
Thank you kindly Ion your lettzn ol  37 January.
The Alaska walrus pin lormerly was the State ol Alaska oHicial
welcome to visitors.    It is to be regretted that this pnactlce
was discontinued with the chanoe in goveJinorshlp.
The lew walrus pins we had in the ollice have all been given
away, but we are given to understand that it may be possible to
purchase walrus pins during the coming season.    We have not decided as yet whether we will do tlxis lor our passengers, as the
pins are required to be purchased in bulk) however, 11 tills is
done we will be very happy to send along a walrus pin to you.
Meanwhile, should a spare walrus pin turn up among any ol our
employees, we will pass it along to yon.
yours very truly,
R.R. RE1V
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
be.    Mr. G.H.  Burchill
Purser,  "Princess Patricia"
11 you happen to have a spare walrus pin,  I would appneciate
neceiving it.
Asst.  Manager,  B.C.C.S.S. TELEX
VANCOUVER, B.C., 13 FEBRUARY 1978
- File: T-78-10-MOVIE
P.I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE.
ATTN LYNDA. RICHARD FORWARDED YOU ALASKA DIARY PRINT FROM VANC PUBLIC
RELATIONS LAST DECEMBER FOR SPECIAL SHOWING. PLS ADVISE IF IT HAS
BEEN RETURNED TO YOU AND IF SO FORWARD AS PUBLIC RELATIONS REQUIRE
SAME    BCC-92
R.R. REID
ASST. MGR., BCCSS ■.
RRR'BB BC Coast Steamship Service
Ptef'B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
i W Holland
' imager
IRReid
■ xx. Manager
13 February 1978.
File No. 78.ALA.521.D.
Mr. James Dunn
5391 Bonanza Dr.
Huntington Beach, California 92649.
Dear Mr. Dunn:
Orville Gormican phoned me advising that you had asked him
to forward information concerning the "Princess Patricia"
Alaska cruise for the coming 1978 season.
I am very pleased to enclose brochure and Daily Bulletin
pertaining to this year's cruise services, from which you can
determine range of costs and sailing dates.
An employee reduction is available on the basis of 25% of the
minimum passage fare,  which in the brochure is under category
(a), on the shoulder period sailings only, May 15th to June
16th inclusive, and September 4th to September 28th.  Depending
on the category of your choice, you would deduct from the total
cost as shown on the brochure, the equivalent 25% reduction
from category (a); for example, if you are travelling on the May
23rd or 31st sailing, the reduction available to you would be
25% of $1240.00, which is the category (a) rate on these sailings
for two people.  The reduced amount available to you would then
be $310.00.  However, if you desired accommodation listed under
(e) category, which is shown as a total of $1720.00, you would in
fact only pay $1410.00; that is, $1720.00 minus employee's
allowance of $310.00 plus port taxes of $12.00 each person.
After looking through the folder, please write me personally
concerning any questions you may have, and/or request for
reservations.  The earlier part of the season permits you longer
daylight hours, and generally speaking, clear sailing days.
While the temperature is slightly lower than mid-season, notwithstanding, you will find that earlier sailings are most enjoyable. *
«
- 2 -
Hoping that we may have the privilege of Mrs. Dunn and yourself
travelling with us this year,
Yours very truly,
R.R. REID
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
be.  Mr. T.O. Gormican
Office Manager
Vice-President, Pacific Region
Vancouver, B.C.
Will let you know if Mr. and Mrs. Dunn decide to travel.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S, Dafe  VANCOUVER, 13 February 1978.
From    r/r. Reid
To    Mr.  E. Robinson
Nanaimo, B.C.
File: T-78-23
This will acknowledge receipt of your letter dated 6 February,
File S-7-78, concerning Nanaimo Terminal holiday list, which is
in order.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
X*r»T?)Form 102A-R
J Date   mNCOUVER, 13 February 1978,
From  R.R. Reid
To Mr. J.G. Shave
Advertising Representative
Vancouver, B.C.
File No.   T-78-69
ffigVForm 102A-R
v<^v
In connection with 1978 Alaska advertising budget, will you kindly
arrange payment of the enclosed delivery of Alaska brochures,
charging same against Item 11-5.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
RRR'BB BC Coast Steamship-Service
Pier"B", Vancouver. BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135. Telex 04-507684
*P Rail
■vHolland -?3 Vebruary 1978.
R«ew file Mo.  AGR.3.BRAC.S.GEM.
Mr. J.A.  Vosten
Local Chairman
Brotherhood ol Railway, Airline £
Steamship Clerks, etc.,  Lodge #516
811 Beach Vrive
Manaimo,  B.C.
Vean Mr. Vaster:
It Is agreed that where crowded conditions in Stewards' Mess
Roon preclude use by alt crew members, it will be in order
to use a portion ol the Caleterio near the Cashier's Conner.
yours very truly,
R.R.  REIT?
Asst. M onager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
cc.    Mr. R. Welch
Mr.  P.  Rouillard
Mn. G. Gnekul
Mr.  A. Meijer - Will you please arrange accordingly with
Chiel Stewards,  "Princess ol Vancouver."
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S. ,
Pier'B", Vancouver. BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CPRail                                                                            f^
W Holland
. 73 Vebruary 1978.
H Reid
K_u_g_r
Vile Mo.  AGR.3.BRAC.S.GEM.
Mr. J.A. Vaster
Local Chairman
Brotherhood ol Railway, Airline S
Steamship Clerks, etc.,  Lodge #516
811 Beach Vrive
Manaimo, B.C.
Vean Mn. Vaster:
The various items discussed at our meeting on 9 Vebruary will
be discussed with Mr. M.W.  Holland at the linst opportunity.
Vor your inlormatlon, Mr. Holland Is not available at the
present time.
As soon as the items discussed can be clarilied, we will write
you lurther.
yours very truly,
R.R. REIT?
Asst. Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRRnBB
cc.    Mr. R. Welch
Mn.  P. Rouilland
Mn. G. Gnekul
/   ' Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
"Holland ' 13 Vebruary 1978.
®» Vile Mo.AGR.3.BRAC.S.GEM.
Mr. J.A. Voster
Local Chairman
Brotherhood ol Railway, Airline S
Steamship Clerks, etc., Lodge #516
811 Beach Vrive
Manalmo, B.C.
Vean Mn. Voster:
This will acknowledge receipt ol your letter dated 4 Vebruary
1978, and discussion   item ol our meeting 9 Vebruary, relative
£° grievance submitted by Ms. A. Williamson regarding accommodation lor the lemale stall on board the "Princess ol Vancouver."
An initial investigation by Mr. A. Meijer,  Catering Superintendent,
on 8 Vebruary, Indicates an absence ol noise in the area occupied
by the lemale stall; however, ice will Investigate this matter
thoroughly during week ol 13 Vebruary and take whatever connective
measures may be necessary should we lind corroborating evidence
lor the grievance.
you will be advised as Soon as possible,
yours very truly,
R.R. REW
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
cc.    Ms.  A.  Williamson
Mr. R. Welch
Mr. G. Gnekul
be.    Mr. A. Meijer - Should you lind vessel noise laetons wlilch
would interlere with lemale cnei'j's nest authenticated,
please authonize Chiei Steward on Second Steward to use
unoccupied passenger cabins, pending determination il it
is possible to remedy noise lactor. BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier^B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
m Holland
fefte/d
• Manager
.13 Vebruary 1978.
Vile Mo.  T-78-10
m
sxl
Mr. Roger M. Clark
Project Leader
Pacllic Morthwest Vonest and Range
Experiment Station
4507 University Way W.E.
Seattle, Washington 98105.
Vean Mn.  Clank:
In connection with the necent meeting held in Seattle concerning Glacier Bay Motional Park and the inlormation you attempted
to secure Irom some ol the cruise operators , I am now pleased
to attach one copy ol the completed passenger survey which was
asked Ion on 16 ol our regular sailings during the past cruise
season.
We hope that you will lind some inlormation which will assist
you.    In respect to the last question concerning Glacier Bay, we
asked:    "Vid you enjoy your visit to Glacier Bay?"    InsuHident
space on the questionnaire prevented our asking specilic questions
Should we conduct a survey on board the "Patnicia" this yean, and
11 one on two pertinent questions con be included which you would
like us to odd to the survey lonm, please let us know within the
next month.
yours very truly,
R.R. REIT?
Asst. Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB Internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER, 13 February 1978. File:  T-78-10
From     R.D. Pelley
To  Mr. R.R. Reid
Vancouver, B.C.
Attached is my travel itinerary for period 15 February to
10 March 1978.
'«%)Form 102A-R
Sales Representative
RDP'BB ITINERARY - MR. R.D. PELLEY
15 FEBRUARY, WEDNESDAY
Vancouver to Los Angeles.
Costa Mesa:
South Coast Plaza Hotel
666 Anton Boulevard
Ph:  (714) 540-2500
16 FEBRUARY, THURSDAY
Costa Mesa:
South Coast Plaza Hotel
17 FEBRUARY, FRIDAY
Anaheim:
The Grand Hotel
Number One Hotel Way
18 FEBRUARY, SATURDAY
Beverly Hills:
Ramada Inn
1150 South Beverly Drive
19 FEBRUARY, SUNDAY
Woodland Hills
Woodland Hills Holiday Inn
21101 Ventura Boulevard
20 FEBRUARY, MONDAY
Los Angeles to San Francisco.
San Francisco:
San Francisco Hilton & Tower
Mason & O'Farrell Streets
21 FEBRUARY, TUESDAY
San Francisco:
San Francisco Hilton & Tower
Ph: (714) 772-7777
Ph: (213) 274-7777
Ph: (213) 883-6110
Ph: (415) 771-1400 - 2 -
22 FEBRUARY, WEDNESDAY
San Francisco:
San Francisco Hilton & Tower
23 FEBRUARY, THURSDAY
San Francisco to Victoria, B.C.
Victoria:
Empress Hotel
Douglas St.
Ph:  112 - 384-8111
24 FEBRUARY, FRIDAY
Victoria:
Empress Hotel
25 FEBRUARY, SATURDAY
Victoria to Vancouver.
26 FEBRUARY, SUNDAY
Vancouver
27 FEBRUARY, MONDAY
Vancouver (Office)
28 FEBRUARY, TUESDAY
Vancouver (Office)
1 MARCH, WEDNESDAY
Vancouver:       C.G.O.T.
Holiday Inn
Hastings St.
2 MARCH, THURSDAY
Calgary:
Palliser Hotel
9th Avenue & 1st St. West
3 MARCH, FRIDAY
Edmonton:
Chateau LaCombe
101 Street at Bellamy Hill
Edmonton to Vancouver
Ph: (604) 266-8621
Ph: (403) 429-4321 - 3 -
4-5 MARCH, SATURDAY & SUNDAY
Vancouver (Home)
6 MARCH, MONDAY
Vancouver to Winnipeg.
Winnipeg:
Marlboro Inn Ph;  (204) 942-6411
331 Smith St.
7 MARCH, TUESDAY
Saskatoon:
Sheraton Cavalier Motor Inn Ph: (306) 652-6770
612 Spadina Crescent East
8 MARCH, WEDNESDAY
Regina:
Landmark Inn Ph: (306) 586-5363
4150 Albert St.
9 MARCH, THURSDAY
Winnipeg to Vancouver.
10 MARCH, FRIDAY
Vancouver (Office) .Holland
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver. BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex 04-507684
I
.13 February 1978
•3Reid File:   X-77-5-4
'X ineger
The Salvage Association
931 Marine Building
355 Burrard Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6C 2G8
Dear Sirs:
Further regarding the "Carrier Princess" which ran aground
enroute Vancouver to Swartz Bay 9 November 1977.
Enclosed herewith is bill for aircraft chartered on that
occasion and it will be appreciated if you will endorse copy
of same and return as soon as possible, as this is urgently
required for insurance purposed.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH'GP Dafe   VANCOUVER, 13 February 1978
From        J.W. McCowatt
To Mr. W.D. Scott
Incan Superior Ltd.
Thunder Bay, Ontario
File: 343
Enclosed herewith, duly approved are the following:
1. Packing Slip
Wagner Engineering Ltd., Order No. 82541 covering
Potentiometer and Dill Valve.
2. Invoices
Sperry Marine, No. M3777 checkout Sperry Lever Pilot
S/N 1039 in the amount of $848.00.
Asst. Supt. Engineer
JWM'GP
g£) Form 102-R Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 13 February 1978
From R.R. Reid
To Mr. A.G. DeSouza
Treasury Department
Montreal
File: 168
Master Charge Use -- B.C.C.S.S.
With reference to your recent conversation with Mr. Holland.
Since inception of Master Charge in May, 1977 following is
resume of the use thereof in B.C.C.S.S. through January 1978:
No. Cards  No. Tickets  $
Vancouver Whf Tkt. Office 371
Nanaimo Whf. Tkt. Office 378
"Princess of Vancouver"     85
834
700
725
132
1557
13,562.87
7,859.20
2,584.25
$24,006.32
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'GP
K) Form 102-R 6C Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8". Vancouver. BC   V6C 2R3
lei (604) 665 -3135. Tele/. 04-507684
OPRa
.' Holland
i Reid
'Al-jger
.13 February 1978
File:  164
Mr. James P. Clarke
Barrister 6c Solicitor
470 Granville St.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6C 1V5
Dear Sir:
Re:  Accident on 23 August 1977 at approx.
11:00 a.m. - Doman Marpole Tractor #210
driven by George Bone __
We have received your letter of 9 February concerning the above
incident.
Statement contained in your first paragraph, that one of our
hostlers was driving Doman Marpole Tractor No. 210 is not factual,
Mr. George Bone was driving the Doman Marpole tractor at the time
it was backed into by a C.P. Transport tractor driven by their
employee "Henry."
It will, therefore, be advisable if action on this matter were
held until I can establish responsibility (B.C. Coast Service or
C.P. Transport).
I have spoken to C.P. Transport's Claims Manager today and am
taking this matter up with him further, in writing.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc. W. Barbara - C.P. Transport - Vancouver
Further to conversation.  Copies of everything relevant is
enclosed.  The ladder was used by Mr. Bone for climbing in and
out of his vehicle, privately owned but a necessary piece of
equipment.
Please let me have your comments as soon as possible.
HLH'GP
 Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
J Internal Correspondence
Date        VANCOUVER, 13 February 1978 File: T-77-30-202
From        m.W. Holland
To        D.C. Freeman
Vancouver, B.C.
Attached is my complete file covering damage to Sidney
Freight Limited trailer 45-370 on 10 November 1977 prior
to loading.
Our responsibility in this instance is limited to reimbursement of the costs to repair the unit.
If you concur, I would appreciate it if you would arrange
settlement in the amount of $101.60 to Sidney Freight Limited.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM'GP
£hd9Form 102-R Internal Correspondence
Date        VANCOUVER, 13 February 1978
From        M.W. Holland
To   W.W. Hocking
File: T-77-30-202
Attached you will find correspondence and supporting invoice
#26442 for labour costs incurred by Sidney Freight Limited
in transporting their trailer 45-370 to Victoria on 10 November
1977.
Since we appear to be partially responsible for this occurrence
and in the interest of maintaining customer relations, I would
appreciate it if you would arrange payment in the amount of
$128.00 to Sidney Freight Limited.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM'GP
jOForm 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, 10 February 1978. File:  429-N
From  m.W. Holland
To  Mr. V. Jones
Vane ouver, B.C.
Attached is copy of letter from Mr. R.E. Mills, General Manager,
Burrard Cartage Co. Ltd., which is a follow-up to a conversation
we had, during which he expressed his interest in providing log-
trucking services for our Northland operations.
You will note that he has requested a meeting, which I will
arrange, and which will allow us to assess Mr. Mills' intentions.
In the interim I thought you might like to have one of your staff
members prepare a dosier on Burrard Cartage Co. Ltd., which I
would appreciate reviewing with you before a meeting is set up.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
MWH'BB
© Form 102-R telex Vancouver, b.c, 10 February 1978
Filer T-78-150
J.D. MASON 05-24725
MONTREAL, QUE.      • '  .
PLS ARRANGE CASH ADVANCE 150.00 FAVOUR R R REID ASST MGR BCCSS
VANC PAYABLE NOT LATER THAN TUES 14 FEB A/C BUSINESS TRIP SEATTLE
BCC-90 .
M.W. HOLLAND
MGR., BCCSS ' .   ■ .     ' -
BB
y TELEX
VANCOUVER, B.C., 10 FEBRUARY 1978
File:  651
B.D. MARGETTS -
MONTREAL, QUE.
SPOKE H L THOMPSON 1530 FEB 10. NO APPROVAL TO PROCEED WITH REPAIRS
TO PIER A-l.  MATTER IN ABEYANCE WAITING FOR CP RAIL MARKETING AND
BCCS REPORTS. ESTIMATED TIME TO EFFECT REPAIRS 9 WEEKS.   BCC-89
v
M.W. HOLLAND
MGR., BCCSS ^ -
JDF'BB
_ " tlP
V TELEX " VANCOUVER, B.C., 10 FEBRUARY 1978.
File:  655-C
P.I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE. - •
FURTHER TO MR REID'S TELEX BCC-85 WOULD APPRECIATE ADVICE AS TO YOUR
PLANS FOR DISCUSSION WITH INTERESTED PRINCIPALS RE MERCATOR AND
STRONGLY SUGGEST REPRESENTATION FROM THIS OFFICE TO ASSIST YOU IN
PRESENTATION OF REVENUES AND COSTS,AND TO GAIN AWARENESS OF PRINCIPALS'
PLANS FOR MERCATOR. MR. REID CAN BE MADE AVAILABLE FOR THIS PURPOSE.
BCC-87
M.W. HOLLAND     '     , .
MGR., BCCSS
MWH'BB
7 TELEX •    VANCOUVER, B.C., 10 FEBRUARY 1978,
File:  AGR.2.SIU.N.
P.I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE.
RE SIU PROCEEDINGS WITH CONCILIATION COMMISSIONER DOUG WATT. MEETING WAS
HELD ALL DAY YESTERDAY FEB 9 AND CONTINUES' TODAY 1000. MR ALF POOLE AND
MR MCLEAN REPRESENTED THE UNION AND MORE PROGRESS'WAS EXPERIENCED YESTERDAY
THAN AT ANY OTHER PREVIOUS MEETINGS. TWO VERY CONTENTIOUS ISSUES WITH THE1*
UNION ARE THE HIRING HALL PAYMENT AND A PAYMENT FOR THE SCHOOL OF SEAMANSHIP".
THE UNION IS ALSO UNDER THE IMPRESSION THEY ARE ALLOWED A 2 PERCENT PRODUCTIVITY
FEATURE ON TOP OF THE 6 PERCENT IN WAGES. MR. TIMPSON WILL BE IN MONTREAL
BEGINNING NEXT WEEK FOR ARBITRATION CASES AND WILL BRING YOU UP TO DATE
RESULTS OF'TODAY'S MEETINH AND STATUS OF THE CMC PROCEEDINGS.
PLS FORWARD COPY J T SPARROW
BCC-86
M.W. HOLLAND
MGR., BCCSS
cc.  Mr. P.E. Timpson, Vancouver.
PET'BB
7 TELEX
P.I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE.
VANCOUVER, B.C., 10 FEBRUARY 1978
File:  655-C
MERCATOR 1979 PROPOSED OPERATION 18 CRUISES MAY 15-OCT 6, 7% DAY DURATION BASED'
90 PERCENT SEASONAL OCCUPANCY WITH RATES APPROXIMATING 1978 PRINSENDAM PLUS 10
PERCENT STOP COLUMN ONE REVENUE REPRESENTS NO CONVERSION BUT INCLUDES'4 EXTRA '
CABINS I.E., SUITE, HOSPITAL ROOM AND 2 ENGINEERS ROOMS STOP MISC INCLUDES
HANDLING AUTOS STOP EXPENSES 110 PERCENT 1978 REFINED TO REFLECT LOWER FUEL COST
ELIMINATE LAYUP EXPENSE   MAINTENANCE TO COVER BASIC VESSEL CLEANUP AND ANY
PAINTING STOP COLUMN TOO REPRESENTS CONVERSION CAR SPACE WITH 27 CABINS MISC
ADJUSTS FOOD. COSTS AND ELIMINATES AUTOS STOP STEVEDORING AND INSURANCE ELIMINATES
CAR HANDLING '
1979
REVENUE
MISC
TOTAL
COL.
ONE
4,154,
.5    '
239,
.8
4,394.3
COL. TWO
5,005.4
151.8
5,157.2
EXPENSES
OPERATING
CREW WAGES
FUEL AND TAX
VESSEL-MISC..
STEVEDORING
EMPLOYEE BENEFITS
INSURANCE AND CASUALTY
OTHER - AAA TR COMM
ADVERTISING
TAXES, PAYROLL
MARKETING
MANAGEMENT
TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSE 3,729. 6
NET BEFORE MAINTENANCE  664.7
LESS MAINTENANCE        .50.0
NET BEFORE FIXED COSTS  614.7
/9/v/
i;293.9
369.1   ; r
727.7 'I  ;
127.5
;.' ,, 123.8
60.5
563.1 ■ , . '. ' ';;."
288.2
159.1
31.0
145.0
3,888.9
1,268.3
50.0
1,218.3
HAVE BEEN UNABLE OBTAIN OBI INDICATION WHAT CURRENCY SITUATION WILL BE LIKE IN
1979 SO AT THIS TIME HAVE NOT INCLUDED ANY BENEFITS FROM U S DOLLARS.    BCC-85
1,293.9
369.1
654.9
135.8
123.8
61.5
467.3
288.2
159.l'
31.0
145.0
R.R. REID
ASST. MGR.
n/
BCCSS CPRail
Internal Correspondence
[El
Date VANCOUVER, 10 February 1978.
From M.W. Holland
To Mr. G.A. Swanson
Asst. General Manager
Operation & Maintenance
Vancouver, B.C.
File:  651
P
This is further to the meeting held in my office on Monday, 6
February 1978, between members of the Pacific Region and the BCCS
Service, for the purpose of discussing the operating conditions
which have resulted from the non-function of Pier A-l.
In the face of an estimated cost of $500,000.00 to effect repairs
to the slip, it is my understanding that the necessity of Pier A-l
has been questioned from the standpoint of BCCSS's ability to move
traffic under the restriction of Pier A-3 usage only.
We have reviewed the overall employment of the slips in light of
the traffic demands, both rail and truck and trailer, and the
following comments are offered:
RAIL TRAFFIC
The following vessels and barges use A-l slip under arrangement with
CP Rail:
Barge 913
Barge 902
Barge 906
Barge 912
Barge 912
Seaspan Doris
Seaspan for Utah Mines
Seaspan for Port Alice
Seaspan for Bestwood
Seaspan for Port Mellon
Seaspan for Woodfibre
Seaspan for Crofton
24-28
trips
per
year
(Estd.)
24-28
ii
ii
ii
80
ii
ii
it
36
ii
ii
ii
36
ii
ii
"
156
n
ii
ii
Also, the British Army moves tanks and other heavy equipment over Pier
A-l three times each year.  This is the exchange to Suffield, Alta.,
and it is estimated this contract alone is worth approximately
$200,000.00 per year to CP Rail.
Other points to be considered are:
Form 102-R - 2 -
When BC Rail is on strike, Vancouver Wharves are served by barge
via the A-l slip which, of course, is also the alternative
should the Second Narrows Bridge dispute with CNR not be decided
in our favour.  Further, when the A-3 slip is out of action, the
E. & N. Railway traffic is served via Pier A-l.  The value of this
was evidenced in November 1976 when Pier A-3 was out of service
for one month due to an accident, and rail traffic was handled
through A-l.
While we cannot comment on the value of line haul on shipments
from CP/CN competitive points, there must be an advantage to CP
Rail due to the fact that A-l slip provides water access to the
various water-locked points on the West Coast.  Should the final
delivery point be transferred to BCR slip, there would be the
possibility that CP could lose some of this traffic to the CN.  If
the BCCSS operated from Pier A-3 alone, it would become extremely
difficult to serve Vancouver Island, as we could not guarantee daily
service, because adherence to schedule is necessary and the handling
of both the rail, and truck and trailer traffic, would be subject to
delays caused by various circumstances.  This will make it difficult
to maintain the high level of service required by some customers;
i.e., MacMillan Bloedel.
Other factors related to the rail element of our operation would be
the question of what would happen should A-3 itself be shut down
for general maintenance, or by reason of an accident.
Another point is, that without the A-l slip the BCCS and CP Rail
would be unable to solicit new traffic such as would result from
the proposed wood chip terminal at Howe Sound, which could be served
by CP Rail-BCCS via A-l, and mineral deposits ex Campbell River,
should these moves materialize.  Also, outside the present BCCS
vessels, the only other vessels capable of loading at Pier A-3 are
the "Seaspan Doris," the "Seaspan Greg" and the Seaspan Barge 912.
You will note this excludes the "Haida Transporter," which is
called in from time to time to alleviate traffic pressure caused
by high volumes.
There are other problems which would have to be reviewed but with
which CP Rail Marketing and Sales would be more conversant than
ourselves, but which, it is suggested, should be looked at closely,
and these include the use of the BN slip and the Seaspan slip.
With respect to the former, CP Rail would pay $.18 per cwt. for each
car handled on CP Rail lines and turned over to the BN for further
handling.  Problems related to such a move are that the BN have
placed limitations on their facility and certain barges are not - 3 -
allowed to operate into same. Also, other facts to be considered
are the slip is a tidal operation and the BN Rail crews are noted
for their unreliable performance.
With respect to the Seaspan slip (BCR), this slip has poor water
access and requires assist tugs to berth barges.
BCR crews presently load Seattle traffic for Foss and Seaspan, which
leaves little available time for other movements.  Also, both
Seaspan and the BCR would have to approve other loadings if it was
decided that water-locked rail points formerly moved from Pier A-l
would be served from this location.  Such action, in all probability,
would mean that CP Rail would lose the line haul.
TRUCK AND TRAILER TRAFFIC
The BCCSS moved 87,175 units in 1977 on a 24-hour operation, utilizing
both Piers A-l and A-3, but with emphasis on the latter. Attached is a
schedule of the operations as they stood before A-l was taken out of
commission.  It does not take into consideration use of the Pier A-l
slip under arrangements between CP Rail and other marine parties for
the movement of rail cars to destinations. Also attached is the schedule
we are following without the use of Pier A-l, and which is acceptable
and workable, but restrictive.  It is suggested that this schedule
can be considered "tight" and any delays in arrival of vessels,
to all intents and purposes, place the overall schedule out of whack
and cause considerable operational problems and customer inconvenience.
However, the BCCSS is handling the current level of traffic under
these circumstances with only Pier A-3 in operation, but traffic levels
are seasonally light.  BCCSS could face the loss of the herring movement in March with the restricted slip accommodation.  However, the
effect of a disruption in service without the use of Pier A-3 could
prove disastrous.  The BCCSS would be placed in a position of being
unable to move traffic, rail or truck and trailer, to Vancouver Island,
either through Swartz Bay or Nanaimo, and shippers would be forced to
use B.C. Ferry Corporation vessels via Tsawwassen/Swartz Bay, or Horseshoe Bay/Departure Bay, with probable permanent loss of some traffic.
In summary, it is our opinion that the A-l slip is essential for the
BCCS to provide efficient service in the waterborne carriage of
rail and commercial truck and trailer traffic. Also, the Pier A-l
operation in conjunction with Pier A-3 is necessary for CP Rail to
continue enjoying long-haul traffic to the Island.
All the above comments are presented for your review and consideration,
and as you will appreciate, they are opinions of the BCCSS and are not
stated as fact.
__J - 4
We would be pleased to expand on any of the above points and provide
any other assistance that may be required.
f3-
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
be.  Messrs.
R.R. Reid
A.N. Cairns
J.D. Finnie
C.A. Aitken
B.D. Margetts, Montreal.
P.I. Georges, Montreal.
V. Jones,     Vancouver.
J CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date  VANCOUVER, February 10, 1978
From  M.W. Holland
To  Mr. R. Granger
Montreal
File:  152203
2SP Form 102-R
Re:  Floyd W. Atkinson, #P-152203, S.I.N. 701-340-838
Further my letter of January 23, concerning the above mentioned
employee who will retire on pension effective March. 1, 1978,
on medical grounds.
Enclosed herewith is Certificate of Marriage and Mrs. Atkinson's
Certificate of Birth. Mrs. Atkinson's date of birth was shown as
September 18, 1923, on Form P.F.2, when in fact it should have
been shown as September 18, 1922.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
VALUE  Z12-11-00
JB
vi CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, February 10, 1978
From J.W. McCowatt
'° Mr. R.A. Ferguson
Vane ouver
Further to your letters of January 4 and 10, 1978, file 5100,
concerning copies of various plans as requested from us by
Mr. Doug Hubert of Lakeshore Photo Ltd. Sylvan Lake, Alberta.
The following copies are now attached:
- General Arrangement
- Outboard Profile
- Inboard Profile
- Plate Line Body Plan (print reproduction)
We have received a certified cheque in the amount of $14.42
and Canadian postal money order in the amount of $13.75 for
a total of $28.17, to cover.
The above reproductions appear to agree with Mr. Hubert's
requirements and are the only plans which we have to meet his
needs.
Trust the above are satisfactory to him.
Asst. Supt. Engineer
B. C. C.S.S•
JWM/jb
cc:  Mr. W.W. Hocking, Vancouver
iHS Form 102-R
m
j Pier"B", Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
'If
:< _£
;y Holland February 10,   1978
:i«8M File:     109
'.■,- a x-
State of Alaska
Department of Revenue
Pouch SA
Juneau, Alaska  99811
U. S. A.
Dear Sirs:
Returned herewith, duly completed, is Business License
Application for 1978 and Business License Return for
1977.
Cheque covering license fee in the amount of $25.00 is
presently being processed and will be forwarded separately.
Yours truly,
Manager,   B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
J CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date VANCOUVER, February 10, 1978
From J.W. McCowatt
File:  S.O.
To MASTER
CHIEF ENGINEER
PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER
CARRIER PRINCESS
TRAILER PRINCESS
PRINCESS PATRICIA
MACHINE SHOP FOREMAN, VANCOUVER
It has come to my attention that machine shop personnel are being
given work on board ship by general members of the ship's crew.
This procedure upsets our planned maintenance process and may result
in non-important items of work being carried out to the detriment of
the more important work.  This practice has to cease.
All work to be carried out by the machine shop will require proper
authorization through normal channels.  Any important work where time
is crucial should be dealt with by telephone communication.
S) Form 102-R
Asst.   Supt.   Engineer
B.C.C.S.S.
JWM/jb
I CPRail WT^L
Internal Correspondence LL__>1
Date VANCOUVER, February 10, 1978 File:  T-78-1012A
From j.w. McCowatt
'°    Chief Engineer
TRAILER PRINCESS
In order to obtain a second opinion on the zinc content of
Ralube 950, kindly arrange for a sample to be taken from the
storage tank and forwarded to "Finning" for zinc content analysis
of this oil only.
S) Form 102-R
Asst.   Supt.   Engineer
B.C.C.S.o.
JWM/jb
N BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
-iWHolland February  10,   1978
'7Re/* File:     T-78-40
X'-; ■;iOl.v
Mr. Glen Fullerton
3230 Verdun Avenue
San Mateo, California  94403
U. S. A.
Dear Mr. Fullerton:
Thank you for your letter of January 20, concerning employment
aboard the "Princess Patricia."
Our cruise season commences May 15, and you will not be available
until June 15, 1978. We have already on hand several applications
from people who will be available to us at the beginning of the
season and who will work until the season's end, October 6.  It
will, therefore, be appreciated that we cannot make a job offer
to you at this time.
There is always, however, the possibility of a resignation and also
we may require relief Porters, so if you will be kind enough to
advise us your telephone number, we will contact you should such
a vacancy arise; provided, of course, you are available at short
notice.
Yours truly,
Assistant Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
f
J Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 10 February 1978 File: 608
From A.N. Cairns
To   Master
"Princess of Vancouver"
In order that there be no misunderstanding as to what
trailer/rail traffic is to be carried on respective sailings,
it is incumbent upon the officer in charge of loading and the
duty traffic supervisor to clearly understand what units
actually comprise the consist and to ensure the customers'
needs are met as scheduled.
The loading officer, therefore, will advise the master to sail
only after confirming with the traffic supervisor that all units
In the consist are aboard.
It cannot be too strongly stressed that all employees must
assume responsibility for the effective management of customer
traffic.
Marine Superintendent
cc. Master - "Carrier Princess"     "Trailer Princess"
1st Officer - ■    » "
2nd Officer - M    " "Princess of Vancouver"
3rd Officer - »•    '*    M      (4)
Wharf Traffic Supervisor, Vancouver
E. Robinson, Nanaimo  (4)
0. Robison, Vancouver
C.A. Aitken, Vancouver
J.D. Finnie, Vancouver
ANC'GP
fiS) Form 102-R
J Date VANCOUVER, 10 February 1978
From R.R. Reid
To J. Shave
Vancouver, B.C.
File: T-78-69
S3 Form 102-R
Re:  1978 Advertising Budget — Alaska
Please arrange debit in amount of $1,284.00 Cdn against
Alaska advertising budget item 11-9 AVA to cover AVA booth
display. Payment was required by manufacturer in 1977 and
we suspended the item for 1978.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
RRR'GP
vi Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 10 February 1978
From J.W. McCowatt
To Chief Engineer
"Trailer Princess"
File: T-78-1012A
■» Form 102-R
Attached is a lubricating oil analysis on #1 Gen. 7 February 1978,
indicating a high sodium content with the notation "if the
salt water entry can be stopped, then this oil will be suitable
for further service."
Find out the cause of the above and advise on your findings at
an early date.
Asst. Superintendent Engineer, B.C.C.S.S.
p.s. Other sample reports also attached.
JWM'GP
7 Form 102-R
Infernal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 10 February 1978 File: T-78-1007A
From J.W. McCowatt
To Chief Engineer
"Carrier Princess"
Attached is a lubricating oil analysis on P.O.M.E, 6 February
1978, indicating a high copper content with this notation
"the only area for concern at this time is the higher copper
reading, indicating some bearing metal loss which is likely
to warrant early concern."
Have another analysis made from this engine to check as soon
as possible.
Find out the cause of the above and advise on your findings
at an early date.
Asst. Superintendent Engineer
JWM'GP
J CPRail
H
PLS. IMT1AL & PASS
Manager
Asst.
Dep
Account.
Mktg. Analyst,
■It- News Summary
\
News and views on topics of
current interest prepared by Public Relations yd _   34     Mo.   6 Feb.   10,   1978
and Advertising Department
Air Canada Projections      5      Coal Report 10
Aviation 16      Labor 18
Business & Finance        19      Railway 13
AIR CANADA PROJECTIONS
Air Canada president Claude Taylor is interviewed on a wide range of subjects pertaining to aviation developments during the next few decades. He
believes air fares must continue to match increases in the cost-of-living
and airlines might reduce frequency of scheduled flights for businessmen.  5
COAL REPORT
Coal production is continuing to grow, but the emphasis is shifting from
foreign demand for metallurgical coal to domestic demand for thermal coal;
A major new customer is Ontario Hydro, but soaring prices for oil and gas
may force electric utilities in other provinces to switch to thermal coal. 10
TRENDS AND TOPICS
Record tonnages and increased spending on rail-line upgrading highlighted
CP Rail activities in the Pacific Region in 1977. Total ton-miles reached
a record 40 billion, with major rail improvements totalling $84.3-million. 13
An escalating air fare war is developing in the U.S. American Airlines is
pushing discounts of about 40 per cent on all its domestic flights, while
United and Braniff Airlines announce similar discounts on domestic routes. 16
U.S. workers averaged 5.8-per-cent increase in major labor contracts last
year, while Canadian workers attained 7.7 per cent. In 1976, U.S. workers
had 6.4-per-cent average gains, while Canadian workers had 10.2 per cent. 18
In developing a new, 20-year transportation policy, Metro Toronto is aiming at ending an over-dependence on the automobile. Planners believe highspeed street car routes will be best to meet Metro's future transit needs. 19
Canadian Pacific Investments reports preliminary consolidated net income
for 1977 of $214-million, a record for the company, compared with $140.2-
million in 1976. The company's annual report will be issued in mid-March. 20
For 1977, Cominco Ltd. reports a sharp increase in earnings and substantial rise in sales and other revenues. Net earnings amounted to $62.2-mill-
ion, up from $47.7-million in 1976. Total revenues were up $33.5-million. 20
Canadian Pacific /
2
NEWS IN BRIEF
42 FACE CP RAIL LAYOFFS IN WINNIPEG
The future of 42 workers employed in CP Rail's Higgins Ave. freight sheds in
Winnipeg is in question after a notice of intention by the railway to phase out
the jobs by April 15. R. J. Shepp, CP Rail's General Manager of Operations, said
the operation will continue under a new contract arrangement between the railway
and two local cartage firms. (Winnipeg Free Press)
NEW GRAIN TERMINAL ON COAST IS OPPOSED
The president of the Winnipeg-based Pioneer Grain Company said Feb. 3 he
strongly disagrees with suggestions Ottawa should spend money now on a new grain
terminal at Prince Rupert, B.C. (Winnipeg Tribune)
ROBERTS BANK PLAN HITS BRICK WALL OF OPPOSITION
Federal and provincial departments, various municipalitiesf   environmental
groups and local residents have landed like a ton of bricks on a plan to expand
Roberts Bank. Gary Runka, chairman of the provincial Agricultural Land Commission, says the proposed expansion would increase train traffic to Roberts Bank
from the present 900 trains annually to 3,500 in 1995 and the impact to farming
areas along the rail route would be "nothing but negative." A final review of
the project will include public hearings. (Vancouver Sun)
OIL HUNT ALLOWED IN PROPOSED PARK IN EAST KOOTENAYS
An oil and natural gas exploration permit has been granted to Shell Canada
for a wilderness area of the Kootenays in the Akamina-Kishenena Valley which was
dedicated in 1956 as a land reserve. (Vancouver Sun)
RUPERT TERMINAL URGED
A mammoth grain terminal should be built in Prince Rupert, B.C., to handle
Asian-bound northern Prairie wheat, said Alberta Transport Minister Hugh Horner.
The terminal would take the wheat now funnelled through the St. Lawrence Seaway
and Mr. Horner said the reduction in freight rates could save the Prairie farmers
an estimated $25-million annually. (Vancouver Province)
CP RAIL STATION IN VANCOUVER GETS REPRIEVE
VIA Rail President Frank Roberts said in a press conference in Vancouver on
Feb. 7 that VIA Rail will continue to use both CN's and CP Rail's Vancouver stations for transcontinental passenger train service while it ponders which station
it will ultimately use. (Vancouver Province)
HORNER, PRAIRIE MINISTERS DISPUTE FREIGHT RATES ISSUE
Transport Ministers from the three Prairie governments and federal Industry,
Trade and Commerce Minister Jack Horner met in Winnipeg on Feb. 7 and agreed to
disagree on seeking ways to remove economic disincentives to processing and industrial expansion in the West. (Winnipeg Free Press)
HORNER PROMISES HELP FOR WEST
Federal Industry, Trade and Commerce Minister Jack Horner on Feb. 7 promised
to help the three Prairie provinces find new ways to solve the problems of their
rapeseed-processing and beef-packing industries. (Winnipeg Tribune) NEWS IN BRIEF
CN FREIGHT RECORD SET
CN's Mountain Region set a single-day record Jan. 14 for volume of freight
tonnage handled. In the 24 hours, CN trains in Alberta and British Columbia recorded 155 million gross ton-miles, four million more than before.  (Winnipeg
Free Press)
AIR CANADA BUYS JETS
Boeing Co. said Feb. 2 that Air Canada has purchased five advanced 727 jet aircraft valued at more than $70-million. The order calls for deliveries late next
year. (Montreal Gazette)
TORIES WILL BACK BILL TO WIPE OUT CN DEBT
Progressive Conservatives say the party will give conditional approval in principal to legislation designed to put CN on a new financial footing and wipe out
$808-million in debt. (CP - Montreal Star)
$100-MILLION A YEAR PROFIT IN CARDS FOR CN: BANDEEN
CN could be earning more than $100-million a year within next two years if Parliament passes a recapitalization bill, according to CN president Robert Bandeen.
Mr. Bandeen says the bill would effectively wipe out $808-million worth of CN debt
to the government. The recapitalization bill — Bill C-17 — would cut CN's debt
to 42 per cent, reducing the amount of interest it must annually pay from about
$130-million to about $65rmillion. In addition CN will stop losing $50-million
a year on passenger service when Crown corporation VIA Rail Canada takes over its
passenger business during the next year or so. The combined effects of these developments will add $115-million to CN's potential profit by 1980. (Montreal
Gazette)
OVERPASS EYED AT CP RAIL CROSSING
Alberta Transportation officials say they are considering an overpass for the
Highway 11 level rail-crossing in Red Deer, Alta., which claimed an Innisfail
youth's life last month. Five deaths and more than 15 injuries have been recorded
at the crossing in 21 years. Road and rail officials won't speculate on the cause
of the fatalities. But there is a pattern to the mishaps. Rail accident investigators have reported the signals were operating properly in all instances. Some
reports have been corroborated by eyewitnesses who saw the wig-wag lights flashing.
Engineering specifications say motorists should have a 22-second warning before
the fastest train reaches the highway. Few travel at top speed, officials say.
Heading south, the train is coming out of a curve, on which it reduces speed
when it reaches the highway crossing. (Red Deer Advocate)
ICEBREAKER JOB NEARS
Dome Petroleum after two short seasons of drilling in the Beaufort Sea could
put out the contract for its proposed 150,000 h.p. Arctic icebreaker in a matter
of weeks. And there are only two bidders . . . Saint John Dry Dock in New Brunswick and Davie Shipbuilding at Quebec City. (Montreal Star) 4
NEWS IN BRIEF
ALGOMA SHARE PROFIT UP 90 CENTS
Algoma Steel Corp. Ltd., of Sault Ste. Marie, reports profit for the year ended
Dec. 31, 1977, of $37,530,000 or $2.62 a share, compared with $24,080,000 or $1.72
a share a year earlier. (Toronto Globe and Mail)
WHEAT SALES CLIMB 11 PER CENT
Wheat sales in August and September by the four major exporting countries were
up 11 per cent from the same two-month period in 1976, Statistics Canada said Feb. 7.
Canada, Australia and Argentina all recorded improved sales while the United States
suffered a decline in exports. Preliminary figures indicate Canada exported 116.7
million bushels of wheat in August and September, 1977, the highest figure since
1966 when 116.7 million bushels were also sold. (Montreal Gazette)
CORPORATE PROFITS UP 15.1 PER CENT IN YEAR
A preliminary survey of profits of publicly-owned Canadian corporations indicates that after-tax operating profits looked considerably better in 1977 than they
did in either 1976 or 1975. Combined profits of the 95 companies surveyed were almost $3-billion, 15.1 per cent over 1976. The increase followed a 2.8-per-cent
gain in 1976, a 5.2-per-cent decline in 1975 and a 20-per-cent increase in 1974.
(Toronto Globe and Mail)
NEB OKAYS WESTCOAST EXPANSION
The National Energy Board has approved a $150-million pipeline expansion project proposed by Westcoast Transmission Co., Vancouver, for the Fort St. John area
of northeast British Columbia. (Dow Jones - Montreal Gazette)
PIPELINE BILL PROPOSED
The government introduced legislation Feb. 3 permitting construction of a $10-
billion pipeline to carry Alaskan and northern Canadian gas to domestic and U.S.
markets starting in January, 1983. The legislation would create a single agency
responsible to the National Energy Board to supervise all aspects of planning and
construction. The private backers of the projects, rather than the government, are
responsible for all costs incurred by the agency. (Montreal Gazette)
RAIL UNION RESUMES TALKS
Talks have resumed for the country's 100,000 unionized rail workers to get a
new contract. And there were signs that negotiations, which broke off last week,
were making progress. Federal mediator William Kelly, assistant deputy labor minister, has been closeted with the parties in a downtown hotel in Montreal since
Feb. 6. On Feb. 8 he said all issues have been covered at least once since the
talks reconvened. Mr. Kelly is expected to stay with the negotiations until they
reach some sort of conclusion. The unions want a one-year contract agreement with
improvements in fringe benefits to make up for the fact that federal anti-inflation
controls limit their wage increase this year to six per cent. The six-per-cent increase in the one-year offer would raise the average salary in the industry by
about $930 to almost $16,000. CP Rail and CN offered a two-year contract in early
January and then came up with a one-year package. Company negotiators say both
offers included "generous" improvements to job-security provisions. The unions
are pressing for further guarantees to help stem layoffs in the industry and more
generous pension benefits.
* * *
1 ^— 5
AI RCA NAPA PROJECTIONS
TAYLOR HOPES AIRLINE WILL GO PUBLIC
(Montreal Star)
Air Canada president Claude Taylor looks forward to the day when his
airline can offer employees a new kind of bonus — a special deal on the
purchase of company shares.
If Air Canada can make a profit for some five consecutive years, the
company might adopt such a plan. Adr Canada expects to report a record
profit for 1977 following three years of losses. Mr. Taylor has in mind
a share purchase plan something like the one Bell Canada has been offering
its employees for many years.
Of course such a move would require federal -government approval. Mr.
Taylor ran afoul of Anti-Inflation Board rules early this year when he
offered employees an extra pass as a reward for their good work in 1977.
The AIB ruled the plan outside its guideline.
The idea of employee shares was one of several covered by Mr. Taylor
during a discussion with The Montreal Star on the future of aviation in
general and Air Canada in particular. Other key points, predictions,
impressions and observations that came up in the taped conversation
include:
— ENERGY - An energy shortage in the mid-1980s could lead to strict
government regulation of flight frequencies.
— ROUND-IHE-WORLD ROUTES - The days when Air Canada looked forward to
becoming a round-the-world airline are over. High fuel costs and
more strict government rules about landing rights make such goals
unrealistic.
— AIR FARES - They will continue to match increases in the cost-of-
living. Mr. Taylor's guess is they will account for the same
proportion of a passenger's salary in the year 2,000 as they do
today.
— MERGERS - Canada will likely have two or three large airlines, many
smaller airlines, with few medium-sized or regional carriers.
— NEW PLANES - Air Canada will be replacing its DC-8s in the next five
years. Most of the new planes will be Boeing 727s, plus a few more
wide-bodied aircraft. In the 1980s, the airline will likely
acquire one new type of plane not yet off the drawing boards in the
U.S.
— SST - Use of the supersonic transport by Air Canada and most other
airlines will not start until well into the 1990s or later. 6
A I R CANADA PROJECT IONS
— TOURISM - There could be a growing market for charter travel that
is paid for by companies as part of a benefit plan for employees.
— AIR CRUISES - Champagne flights to the South Pole and other remote
areas may become popular, but will never be a major market. The
costs will be too high.
-- TRADE BALANCES - Air Canada will continue to take Canadians to foreign countries despite the tendency for it to upset the balance-
of-payments. Using Canadian carriers helps keep part of the
holiday money in Canada.
— MEDIOCRE SERVICES - Canadians will have to change their attitudes
towards service if they hope to attract more Americans and Europeans to this country.
~ LAKER-STYLE FARES - Standby fares will continue to be viable for
travel between Europe and the U.S. because these areas have large
populations. However, most persons will still want to travel with
a reservation.
— PROFITS - Government-owned companies the size of Air Canada should
produce profits. Otherwise, they will become too great a drain on
the economy.
The following is an edited version of The Montreal Star's interview
with Mr. Taylor.
(Q) Why did you make a bid to buy Nordair?
(A) It was for sale, and it offered two things we don't have. One,
which is a burning desire on my part . . . (is that) of all the national
goals we were able to achieve, none of them involved the North ... a
growing area of interest. Secondly, Nordair had the charter operation, a
tour wholesale company that was sitting there ready-made. Sure, we could
have started one on our own . . . and it would have been just one more in
the market. And the Canadian market is not that big and cannot support
that many.
(Q) What is Air Canada's attitude toward profits?
(A) The general pattern if you are going to put a company on the public
market (sell shares to employees or the public), you tend to want three to
five years' profit record behind you. When we were talking (to Transport
Minister Otto Lang) about whether the new Air Canada bill would provide
for shares to go public at some point, he made the statement, which I
agree with, that once the company had a three-to-five year profit record,
then one could look at having some shares go public . . .  One of the first
things I'd love to do when we've got this (profit) record — I make this
recommendation — would be to make a certain portion of our shares available
to employees and a certain portion to Canadians generally. This means we 7
A I R CANADA PROJECTIONS
would have to reconstruct the board of directors, and that sort of thing,
but that's possible. The more people you can get to participate in an
organization this size, in an ownership sense, the better off it will be.
We've got to show we can manage the enterprise properly.
(Q) What effect will the energy crisis have on the airline's operations
in the 1980s and beyond?
(A)  Somewhere in the mid to late 1980s, there is going to be an energy
crisis in terms of supply. Depending upon how that shortage hurts aviation,
it could dictate a couple of things. We don't see any great changes coming
in technology that are going to permit airplanes to fly on, say, hydrogen.
If we get a five-per-cent improvement in energy consumption, it's probably
about the maximum. There's going to be a real reckoning with respect to
short-haul travel by air. Whether with these (energy) cost pressures are
going to be some formal allocation of fuel in order to ensure there is
enough energy for necessary travel, nobody really knows.
(Q) Will airlines end up with only two types of flights — scheduled
flights for businessmen and charters for everyone else?
(A) It could happen. One of the ways we have coped is to make the
airplane more productive. We put more seats in the big planes to get more
productive capacity per gallon of fuel. One way to do this, to get more
productive capacity, is to operate charter services, which means you fly
planes only when they are full. I wouldn't say there will be no scheduled
services. There will obviously be some, but I think the frequency of
services that we are used to today will be a thing of the past. We may very
well be legislated out of that kind of thing as a measure of conservation.
(Q) Does Air Canada still want to become a round-the-world airline?
(A) I have no vision of Air Canada becoming a round-the-world airline.
Those days are gone. We have to accept the fact unlike the days when Pan
Am went around the world and was every country's national airline, every
country began to get its own airline and Pan Am lost its traffic rights.
(Q) Are there any prospects for new international routes?
(A) If one wants to look far enough, one would have to admit that
two of the continents We're not represented in are South America and
Africa, and as these areas emerge economically, I would have to believe
that Air Canada's red tail would eventually fly there.
(Q) What are the long-term prospects for fares?
(A) You can calculate some large figures. If you want to project,
airline fares are probably going to have to increase with the rate of inflation. If someone wants to project an average of six per cent per year, you
are going to get some astronomical numbers. My guess is that if people
spend say 10 per cent on transportation now, that number is not going to
change an awful lot. 8
AIR CANADA PROJECTIONS
(Q) Will there be more mergers of Canadian airlines?
(A) My guess is that we will probably have two or three good-sized
airlines as well as what I refer to as third-level airlines — the smaller
airlines. The second, regional lines like Quebecair, will tend to get
folded into the larger ones, and there will be the little ones on the
bottom. I would like to see Air Canada and CP Air maintaining their positions
(internationally).
(Q) What new equipment will Air Canada buy in the future?
(A) We will be doing a replacement job over the next five years, and
our DC-8s will basically be out of the fleet. Those seat miles have to be
replaced. In some cases they will be replaced by bigger airplanes (wide-
bodied planes like the 747 and L-1011), and in some cases by airplanes the
same size as the Boeing 727, a good domestic airplane. Somewhere in the
mid-1980s, we're going to need a new airplane of the 200-seat variety, and
this is one the industry has not settled on. It is the only new plane on
the horizon.
(Q) Are there any new travel trends that could have a big impact on
airlines?
(A) Incentive travel is a potential market. In the Soviet Union,
the bonus system (for employees) is travel and vacation. If you meet your
quota, you end up on the Black Sea for a holiday. It's a growing market,
but it will not be a major force in the industry.
(Q) How about air cruises — special trips around the world, or
over the South Pole, for example? Is there a market for such trips?
(A) We've found that some people are running out of destinations.
People who have gone to Barbados for years are looking for new destinations.
You have to keep developing new markets. As for air cruises and turning
planes into casinos, you would have to be careful about that. It's going
to become a fairly expensive way to carry people.
(Q) Do Air Canada's advertisements on travel to foreign places hurt
Canada's trade balance?
(A) I can get pretty emotional over that. Sure, we can stop advertising Florida, but that's not going to stop all the people who are freezing
to death here from going to Florida, and Eastern and Delta will double their
advertising budgets in Canada and that's going to make the balance-of-
payments worse. At least by carrying some of them (the passengers going
abroad) on Air Canada we are keeping some of the money circulating in the
Canadian economy.
(Q) What can be done to promote more travel in Canada?
(A) If we're talking about really making an impact on the balance- 9
AIR CANADA PROJECTIONS
of-payments, it's going to be in bringing foreigners to Canada. It's not
going to be in moving Canadians back and forth across Canada. There are
not enough of us. Jack Horner was right when he said the service in hotels
and restaurants is not as good as you get below the border. That's something
that is not going to change overnight. It's going to take some incentives.
(Q) How should a major Crown corporation such as Air Canada approach
its business?
(A) If this country is ever going to get off the ground economically,
the various enterprises are going to have to provide a financial return on
the money invested. You can't operate and not make a profit. It will be
too heavy a drain on the economy. People in this country are not motivated.
I want people in this country to be able to hold their heads up and not
be looked upon as public servants. If we're ever going to get a service
attitude in this country that's going to attract foreign tourists, people
are going to be motivated,
AIR CANADA SPREADS WINGS
(Canadian Press - Montreal Star)
Air Canada may soon be getting into the package tour and hotel-booking business.
Claude Taylor, Air Canada president, said that greater independence
offered the Crown corporation by new federal legislation will allow Air
Canada to diversify into areas of transportation other than just carrying
passengers.
Speaking on the CTV program Question Period Feb. 5 Mr. Taylor said
the government's transport legislation will help Air Canada in a number
of ways. The bill gives Air Canada a board of directors which will operate with the airline's management alone. Currently, /Air Canada and
Canadian National are under a single board. "When the new bill is proclaimed we will be totally distinct from the CN."
He noted that some American airline companies make much of their profit from areas such as hotel and package deals and the new bill, which
went through the Commons last week, will allow Air Canada to do the same.
"... In today's environment there are so many things that an airline can
do."
Mr. Taylor said he does not intend to diversify for the sake of it.
But he said, "if I can diversify into areas that will strengthen the airline and not upset the balance of the marketplace with respect to some
of the other industries in Canada on which we must rely then I believe
that this is the area where we will be able to move. ..."
There have been concern expressed by some Opposition members that
Air Canada's diversification could threaten small industries already in
such fields as trucking and hotels.
J 10
COAL REPORT
COAL'S COMEBACK IN CANADA
(Financial Post).
Canada's desire for energy self-sufficiency puts the spotlight
once again on coal.
Coal production, which has soared to more than 31 million tons a year
from as low as 10 million tons in 1969, continues to grow. Annual levels
of 60 million - 70 million tons by 1990 are forecast. The reasons for
coal's comeback are shifting, however, from foreign demand for metallurgical coal to domestic demand for thermal coal.
Exports of the higher-priced metallurgical (or coking) coal to steel
mills, particularly in Japan, have been a big incentive for new mines in
Western Canada. The price of metallurgical coal soared to about $55 a ton
for recent shipments from $12 a ton in 1970.
Most of Canada's coal imports, of course, go to feed Ontario's thermal
power plants and its world-scale steel mills at Hamilton and Sault Ste. .
Marie — the latter, which own their own metallurgical coal mines in the
U.S., are beginning to buy more of their coal from Western Canada.
Nonetheless, the malais,e in the worldwide steel industry has taken
the urgency out of new projects for metallurgical coal — at least for
now.
At the same time, soaring prices for oil and gas are worrying electric
utilities which need to use thermal plants to generate electricity. In
Saskatchewan, Alberta, Ontario, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, the power
companies are finding coal a less expensive fuel for thermal plants.
For example, Western Canadian companies plan capital outlays of $350-
million to provide new coal supplies to Ontario Hydro. And some of the
projects temporarily delayed in British Columbia have price tags starting
at $200-million. In Ontario itself, a $700-million mine-mouth coal-burning
complex is being talked about in government and business circles. The site
is 500 miles north of Toronto where Ontario has sizeable lignite (low-heat
value) deposits that could feed an electric-power plant.
Perhaps the biggest worry for the coal industry is the necessity for
long-distance transportation of the resource from mine to point of use.
On a ton-mile basis, the coal industry is one of the largest users of
Canada's railways. For example, the export of 13 million tons or more
of Western Canadian metallurgical coal depends on transporting this
commodity 700 miles from the mountain areas of Alberta and British
Columbia to tidewater at or near Vancouver.
Starting this year, there will be regular large shipments of thermal
coal from the same Western regions for 1,400 miles to a new Thunder Bay
terminal. From there, ships will carry the coal to thermal-generating
plants of Ontario Hydro. 11
COAL REPORT
"Because of these geographical facts, the industry is completely
dependent upon the railways for movement of very large tonnages of
coal," says Garnet T. Page, Minister of the Coal Association of Canada.
"No other mode of transportation is available or practicable.  'The railways enjoy a classic natural monopoly situation enabling them to dictate
freight rates and, by inference, to determine which potential coal development projects may proceed. This means that a shipper has little or no
strength in negotiating with the carriers."
As a high-risk industry, the coal companies dislike a situation where
the railways dictate the costs, but assume little, if any, commercial risk.
Coal executives fear that the railways may try to indulge in cross-subsidization with coal and other bulk-commodity shippers bearing excessive rates
in order to support the railways' efforts in other areas.
Ontario Hydro this year expects to begin moving sizeable amounts of
steam coal from Western Canadian sources through a new domestic supply
system. In brief, the "Western coal supply program" involves five key
elements: supply from the mines; rail transportation to Thunder Bay;
terminal storage at Thunder Bay; Great Lakes vessel shipment to Hydro's
Nanticoke generating station; and blending of the bituminous coal with
U.S. coal prior to use at Nanticoke. The project involves the supply and
transport into Ontario of almost four million tons a year at the outset.
Of this, 2.7 million tons per year of bituminous coal will come from
British Columbia and Alberta and about one million tons of lignite coal
from Saskatchewan.
Hydro now has commitments from three Western Canadian mines:
— LUSCAR STERCO LTD. will supply two million tons a year of high-
volatile bituminous coal from a mine under construction at
Coal Valley in the Coalspur area of Alberta.
— BYRON CREEK COLLIERIES LTD. will supply about 700,000 tons of
medium-volatile bituminous coal from its mine near Corbin, B.C.
The company already is shipping about 200,000 tons a year to
Hydro during the summer months.
— MANITOBA & SASKATCHEWAN COAL CO. will supply one million tons of
lignite coal a year for use in Hydro's Thunder Bay extension
generating station. This new 300-megawatt unit under construction
is designed for lignite fuel, and should begin operation in early
1980. The company now has an open-pit mine at Bienfait, Sask.
Initial shipments will start in late 1979.
The coal from all three mines will go to Thunder Bay by unit trains
over distances of 730-1,450 miles. Under the transportation arrangements
with CP Rail and CN Rail, "all of the locomotives and rolling stock will
be in accordance with the specifications of each railway with the financing
for the equipment to be arranged by Ontario Hydro." Total value of all
equipment is expected to exceed $50-million. Each railway system has 12
COAL REPORT
initiated a considerable amount of capital work to upgrade trackage,
lengthen sidings, and make other improvements necessary to handle
this additional traffic.
The terminal at Thunder Bay being constructed by Thunder Bay Terminals
Ltd. will have an initial annual throughput capacity of three million tons,
''"with provision to expand on short notice to six million tons a year1."
Although prospects for the near term don't look too promising for
Canada's number one coal-producing province, there are many proposals
for new mines in British Columbia. The only bright spot is Kaiser
Resources Ltd., British Columbia's largest producer. Even though Japanese
steel mills, its largest customer, are producing at only 70% capacity and
piling up inventory, Kaiser has secured about four million long tons of
extra business.
The province's other major metallurgical producer, Fording Coal Ltd.,
sold 2.1 million tons to the end of November, average price $57.08, vs
1.8 million tons in 1976 — (average price $54.62). The company, which
operates an open-pit mine 20 miles north of Sparwood, is also jointly
owned: 40% by Cominco Ltd. and 60% by Canadian Pacific Investments.
Trailing behind in third place is Byron Creek Collieries, whose
Corbin mine produces 500,000 tons of thermal coal a year.
Meanwhile, the search for new markets continues. Fording president
J.H. Morrish sees the future for coking coal in the Pacific Rim. At last
fall's Canadian Coal Conference, he predicted: "I think we will be doing
very well if we increase our coking coal exports by seven million tons a
year by 1982, to a total of 18 or 19 million tons a year.  Of this increase,
four million tons will be to Japan, another 1.5 million tons to other
Pacific Rim nations, and perhaps 0.5 million tons to South America and
Europe. The remaining one million tons will move to Eastern Canadian mills."
IRON ORE DEVELOPMENT CALLED OFF
(Kenora Daily Miner)
The $200-million Bending Lake mining development will not be proceeded
with at this time, according to an announcement by L. J. Lamb, president, Steep
Rock Iron Mines Limited.
Mr. Lamb said in view of the current iron-ore surplus, it is not
possible at this time to proceed with the development of the project.
The company, he said, will continue to monitor the iron-ore supply
and demand situation in the Great Lakes region. Steep Rock has been
examining the feasibility of developing an iron-oxide deposit at Bending Lake, 40 air miles northwest of Atikokan. Bending Lake is located
40 air miles north of Atikokan, roughly mid-way between Atikokan and
Ignace. 13
RAILWAY
RECORD TONNAGES, HIGHER SPENDING HIGHLIGHT PACIFIC REGION IN 1977
(CP Rail News Release)
Record tonnages and increased spending on rail-line upgrading
highlighted CP Rail activities in the Pacific region in 1977.
The region, which includes over 5,000 miles of track from Swift
Current, Sask., to Port Alberni on Vancouver Island, is traditionally
the railway's busiest, last year accounting for over a third of total
ton-miles handled in Canada by CP Rail. Major improvement and upgrading
programs on the heavily-used mainline and other trackage totalled $84.3-
million, up from $77-million in 1976. The work is in addition to the
$5.6-million start-up on the first two of four double-tracking and grade-
revision projects. Total ton-miles exceed 40 billion — the highest
ever reached on the region. The previous record was 38.9 billion, set in
1973.
Unit train movements of sulphur from Alberta through the Port of
Vancouver increased to a record 1.6 million tons last year from 1.3
million tons in 1976.
A lack of major labor disruptions in the coal industry contributed
largely to increased coal tonnages from mines in southeastern B.C. CP
Rail moved 9.8 million tons of coal in 1977, compared with 8.7 million
tons in 1976. The growing use of individually-designed solid train
operations saw CP Rail initiate special trains for the movement of
woodchips, fertilizer and mandarin oranges.
In April, a 100-car solid train carried almost 5,000 tons of spruce
woodchips from the south-central interior of B.C. to Pacific Coast
Terminals at Port Moody for export to Japan. And in August, three 82-car
trains each moved 8,200 tons of granular urea fertilizer from Cominco's
new ammonia/urea plant at Carseland, Alta., to Port Moody for export to
South America.
Almost nine million mandarin oranges from Japan left Vancouver's Pier
B-C in late November aboard a CP Rail solid train bound for eastern Canada.
The movement was the largest single shipment of its kind ever handled by
the railway.
Total volumes for movements of containers, piggyback trailers, automobiles and pool car traffic increased during 1977. The year also saw the
most intense traffic in the railway's history when up to 33 trains a day
moved over part of the Fraser Canyon section during a 51-day period in
August and September as a result of detouring CN Rail trains.
Of the $84.3-million spent on the region:
— $47.1-MILLION was spent for day-to-day maintenance.
— $9.6-MILLION for the installation of 106 miles of new rail. 14
RAI LWAY
— $6.2-MILLION for the installation of almost 600,000 ties.
-- $1.5-MILLION for the laying of 228 miles of new ballast.
Other expenditures went towards construction and extension of various
sidings, purchase of new maintenance equipment and machinery, construction
of a new station and office facility at Revelstoke, B.C., and replacement
of 14 bridges, including the first phase of a $3-million project to replace
the railway's famous Mountain Creek bridge.
DATA CENTRE FOR CN
(Winnipeg Tribune)
Construction is underway on a new CN computer centre in south Winnipeg.
Peter Leitch Construction Ltd. is scheduled to have work completed
by early spring on the one-storey, 62-by-127-foot CN data processing centre. CN spokesman Jack Skull said the $l-million*-plus data centre will
house about 17 employees and IBM computer equipment with ample space for
future expansion.
The new facility will process payrolls, assist in inventory control,
and assist in freight train operations planning.
MODEL CITY SOUGHT AS CN CLEARS LAND
(Montreal Gazette)
Early this summer, bulldozers will put the final touches to one of the
biggest land-clearing plans ever in Montreal.
The razing of a few remaining sheds just south of St. James St.
near the Dow planetarium will open 32 acres of prime downtown property —
enough for a compact model city. CN officials are confident the site —
more than 10 blocks long, stretching from Windsor St. to Guy St. — will
be the fertile ground for yet another development of major proportions,
not unlike Place Ville Marie in its impact, but smaller and more spread
out.
The enthusiasm isn't shared by city planners, however, who worry that
the sprawling tract will become an embarrassing wasteland for want of a
developer with the capital to pursue such an ambitious project.
CN has been slowly phasing out its downtown express facility and
the shift will be complete by July, when a new $7.5-million terminal in
Lachine will be opened. John MacKenzie, manager of planning and development in CN's real estate division, says his department has already begun putting out feelers to interest capital investors. CANADIAN CARLOADINGS
15
RAI LWAY
(UNAVAILABLE)
PIGGYBACK LOADINGS
Containers - Carloads
Trailers  - Carloads
Containers - Tons
Trailers  - Tons
Containers - Carloads
Trailers  - Carloads
Containers - Tons
Trailers  - Tons
U.S. CARLOADINGS
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
Piggyback
For Month Ending
December, 1977
11,740
19,009
485,430
452,296
Total for Year to
December. 1977
141,135
237,535
5,541,076
5,666,392
For Week Ending
Jan. 28, 1978
343,358
12.9 billion
Total for Year to
Jan. 28. 1978
1,381,525
51.1 billion
Total for Year to
Jan. 21, 1978
31,241
Change from Similar
Period, 1976
+
+
+
+
1,144
991
78,924
15,086
Change from Similar
Period, 1976
+
+
+
+
14,132
13,823
939,956
246,800
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
48,520
1.1 billion
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
148,938
2.7 billion
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
+     4,168
Percentage
Change
+
+
+
+
10.8
5.5
19.4
3.5
Percentage
Change
+
+
+
+
11.1
6.2
20.4
4.6
Percentage
Change
-  12.4
8.0
Percentage
Change
9.7
5.1
Percentage
Change
+     11.7
* * *
CN FINANCING
CN is understood to be arranging a private placement financing in New
York of at least $100-million (U.S.) reported The Globe and Mail. CN is
offering 20-year debentures through investment dealers Salomon Brothers,
McLeod Young Weir Inc. and Greenshields Inc. The securities carry a 9.25-
per-cent interest rate. Sinking fund provisions reduce their average life
to 13 years. The attractive rate has aroused an enthusiastic response from
financial institutions. 16
AVIATION
AMERICAN CUTS FARES
(Montreal Gazette)
American Airlines jumped into an escalating air fare war Feb. 2 by
announcing discounts of about 40 per cent on all its 1,000 daily flights
within the United States.
Subject to government approval, American Airlines said it will offer
"super saver" fares to all 52 cities it serves effective March 23 through
May 31.
On Jan. 31, United Airlines announced plans for similar discounts on
all flights of more than 900 miles one-way, and on Feb. 1 Braniff Airlines
gained government approval for its "home free" fares which offer 50-percent reductions on certain routes.
AMERICAN AIRLINE WANTS CUTS IN FARES TO BATTLE SKYTRAIN
(Reuters - Winnipeg Free Press)
Trans World Airlines proposed Feb. 2 a new series of North Atlantic fares
for the 1978 tourist season that would extend Skytrain-type fares to four U.S.
cities besides New York at discounts of up to 62 per cent.
The airline also proposed so-called advance purchase excursion (Apex)
fares about nine per cent below those offered a year ago. TWA pricing
vice-president John Heilner said the new fares are to make "a constructive response to our customers' desire for low-cost transportation to
Europe and ... to eliminate the current uncertainty regarding trans-
Atlantic fares."
Major North Atlantic airlines have been negotiating unsuccessfully
for months on 1978 fares. At meetings last year in Florida and in Geneva
last month, they were unable to agree on how to stimulate new traffic
while protecting revenues from Britain's Freddie Laker, who last year
began offering a no-reservations Skytrain fare of $236 round-trip between
New York and London.
NEW-ERA LANDING SYSTEM WILL GET DORVAL TEST
(Montreal Star)
An intense rivalry between U.S. and British versions of a new microwave
landing system for airplanes comes to a head at Dorval airport in late March, in
"fly-off" tests involving at least four planes and dozens of scientists, pilots
and technicians.
Teams from the two countries will be vying for the seal of approval 17
AVIATION
of a committee of the Montreal-based International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), which is to select one of the two systems as the international standard.
The microwave method is considered much more accurate than present
instrument landing systems, which use ordinary radio waves. Airports
equipped with a microwave system would eventually be able to handle
more traffic than now.
SCRAMBLE FOR AIR COURIER MARKET BEGINS
(Financial Times)
An airline industry scramble for a share of Canada's private, long-haul,
inter-city courier traffic broke into a gallop last week.
At stake is more than $50-million worth of inter-provincial parcel,
envelope and computer tape transmission movements. Three different
types of carrier are after the business. Whoever wins, few, if any,
cost benefits are seen filtering through to basic users. But the drive
for prime rights to the mushrooming courier traffic has government wondering whether new air carriage regulations are needed now, rather than later.
The three main contenders for the air courier traffic in Canada are:
— THE transcontinental and principal regional carriers;
— CLASS 3 and Class 4 airlines which, according to their
present licences, can either fly or not fly according
to a schedule, as they please;
— AIR courier services set up by large users — for example,
Canada's five largest banks.
TWO U.S. AIRLINES ELIMINATE LIFE RAFTS
(AP - Toronto Globe and Mail)
Two major airlines have cut costs by removing life rafts from passenger
jets flying routes over stretches of water. And the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration says at least four other major carriers have been told they may do the same.
Braniff International and National Airlines confirmed Feb. 6 that life
rafts have been removed from their aircraft flying the two affected routes
— the Atlantic coastal corridor linking Miami and the U.S. Northeast and
Gulf routes between South Florida and the western United States. Transoceanic routes are not affected. The airlines had asked for the exemptions
on the grounds that they could save fuel without the weight. V
18
LABOR
CONCILIATION MEETINGS RESUME IN DOCK DISPUTE
(Montreal Gazette)
Contract talks between longshoremen and management of ports in Montreal,
Trois-Rivieres and Quebec City continued last week with the help of conciliation
commissioner Rolland Tremblay.
The longshoremen in Quebec City and Trois-Rivieres have already signed
tentative agreements with the Maritime Employers Association (MEA) which
represents management on eastern Canadian waterfronts in all labor matters.
But the signed agreements depend on a contract being signed in Montreal,
and so far this has not been done.
The longshoremen in Montreal have balked over job security issues.
The dockers want a return to the elaborate job security program they
had in the early 1970s, when the men were paid even when there was no work
for them. Management wants to reserve the right to layoff men when they
are not needed and guarantee at most a minimum yearly salary.
U.S. PAY BOOSTS WON IN MAJOR LABOR PACTS FELL IN '77
(Wall Street Journal)
U.S. workers won somewhat less-generous wage gains in last year's
major collective bargaining settlements than they did the year before, the
Labor Department reported.
The department said annual wage increases in major pacts settled last
year averaged 5.8% over the life of the contract, trailing the 6.4% average for 1976 contracts. Major contracts are those covering 1,000 or more
workers. First-year increases averaged 7.9% in 1977 settlements, compared
with 8.4% in 1976 pacts.
* * *
WAGE INCREASES REDUCED TO AVERAGE 7.7 PER CENT .LAST YEAR
(Canadian Press - Montreal Gazette)
Collective agreements provided a 7.7-per-cent average annual increase in
base rates in 1977, down from 10.2 per cent in 1976.
Moreover, the federal labor department reported Feb. 7 the 123 major
settlements negotiated during the fourth quarter of 1977 produced average
annual increases in base rates of seven per cent in compound terms, compared with an average of 7.4 per cent in the third quarter of 1977. Of
the 567 major collective agreements negotiated in 1977, 391 were one-year
agreements, 138 were two-year agreements and 38 were three-year agreements.
The one-year agreements provided average annual increases of 8.1 per cent
in base rates, the two-year agreements provided increases of 7.9 per cent
in the first year and 6.1 per cent in the second, the three-year agreements
provided increases of 7.2 per cent in the first year, 4.8 per cent in the
second year and 3.8 per cent in the third year 19
BUSINESS & FINANCE
PANCANADIAN LOSES PROPANE EXPORT BID
(Toronto Globe and Mail)
The National Energy Board has turned down a propane export application by
PanCanadian Gas Products Ltd., a subsidiary of PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd. of Calgary, because the exports proposed would have exceeded percentages allowed under
a propane export allocation program established by the NEB in 1973.
PanCanadian, in an application made last July, had wanted to export
up to 7.3 million barrels of propane during a five-year period starting
Jan. 1, 1978. The NEB program currently requires Canadian companies to
allocate 48 per cent of their propane production for Canadian use (compared with the 18 per cent proposed by PanCanadian). In its decision,
the NEB recognized that if the PanCanadian application had been approved,
other propane export applications would soon follow.
FAST TRAM TO TORONTO AIRPORT PROPOSED FOR METRO
(Toronto Globe and Mail)
A high-speed street car line to Toronto International Airport from the new
Kipling terminal of the Bloor-Danforth subway line will be considered as part of
Metro's new transportation policy for the next 20 years.
The transportation policy, which will be incorporated with Metro's
new policy of relieving development pressure on the central city and increasing population in the boroughs, also proposes that Metro, with one
exception, build no more subways or subway extensions.
The transportation policy is designed to end what is described as an
over-dependence in the Metro boroughs on the automobile. Planners believe
that high-speed street car routes, like those proposed for Finch Avenue
and Eglinton Avenue, are most able to satisfy the future transportation
needs in Metro. The policy would give high priority to expansion of
Metro bus and trolley coach routes and supports preferential treatment
for transit on the road system.
CARGILL OPENS NEW ELEVATOR IN BRANDON
(Brandon Sun)
Cargill Grain Company's second biggest grain elevator in Manitoba was opened in Brandon's industrial park Feb. 1.
The $1.3-million high through-put elevator has a storage capacity of 20
BUSINESS & FINANCE
3,500 tonnes (125,000 bushels). According to plant manager Andy Glover,
the elevator will service farmers within a radius of 20 to 30 miles.
CANADIAN PACIFIC INVESTMENTS LIMITED REPORTS PRELIMINARY NET INCOME
(News Release: Canadian Pacific Investments Limited)
Canadian Pacific Investments Limited Feb. 3 reported preliminary consolidated net income for 1977 of $214-million, or $3.57 per common share. This was a
record for the company. It compared with income for 1976 of $140.2-million, or
$2.36 per share.
Net income for the final quarter of 1977 amounted to $56-million, compared with $40.8-million in the same period of 1976. Results in 1977 included extraordinary income of $8.5-million, which represented net gain
on the sale of CanPac Leasing Limited in April, 1977.
Apart from extraordinary income, the improvement in earnings was attributable to increases in almost all operating sectors. The most significant of these were in oil and gas, which continued to benefit from higher
prices and volumes; in metal mining, due largely to better lead prices and
larger volumes; in iron and steel, reflecting both increased steel product
shipments and equity in higher earnings of Dominion Bridge; arid in pulp
and paper, because of increased shipments and the fact that income in 1976
was adversely affected by the last two months of the mill workers' strike.
Income from metal mining and pulp and paper benefited also from the
exchange rate of the U.S. compared with the Canadian dollar. Investment
income was up due to gains on sales of investments. CP Hotels incurred
a loss, reflecting depressed conditions in the hospitality industry.
The company's annual report is to be issued in mid-March.
CCM-NCO EARNINGS CLIMB SHARPLY
(Montreal Gazette)
A sharp increase in earnings and a substantial rise in sales and other revenues were reported Feb. 7 by Cominco Ltd. for the latest year.
Net earnings amounted to $62.2-million or $3.43 a share, up from $47.7-
million or $2.66 a share in 1976. Sales and other revenues totalled $765.3-
million, up from $731.8-million.
F. E. Burnet, chairman and chief executive officer, said production of
lead increased to meet strong demand at prices significantly higher than
in 1976. Prices for gold, silver, tin and electrical power were also above
1976 levels, he said. The decline in value of the Canadian dollar relative
to the United States dollar had a beneficial impact on the company's earnings from export sales, he added. Internal Correspondence
IV-N1
Date  VANCOUVER, 9 February 1978. File:  434-A
From  M.W. Holland
To  Mr. B.D. Margetts
General Manager
Coastal Marine Operations
Montreal, Que.
??
In a conversation yesterday with Mr. AI1stair Pollock, President,
Council of Marine Carriers, I was requested to allow my name to
stand as a Workshop Chairman at the Second Annual National Conference on the Marine Industry in Canada, to be held in Ottawa
in late May or early June.
I said I would be quite willing to co-operate in any capacity that
would contribute to the success of the Conference.
At the same time, Mr. Pollock asked me whether you might let your
name stand as a panelist on one of the major panel presentations
to the Conference delegates.  I said I could not answer for you,
but that I would refer the request to you and advise him of your
position.
Would you please give consideration to the above, and I will act
accordingly.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
CSS Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 9 February 1978.
From M.W. Holland
To Mr. C.A. Aitken
Vancouver.
This refers to your memo dated 6 February 1978, File L-?1Q6, regarding the problems you encountered with respect to lift truck #103 on
Friday, 3 February.
I fully concur in your recommendation, and would suggest that in
future you do not need to obtain my approval for such action as you
have outlined, as efficiency in the terminal operation is imperative,
and all caution should be taken to ensure that adequate equipment
is available.
Accordingly, in future you should bring these matters directly to
Mr. King's attention, or Mr. McCowatt, having them treated as
priority projects.  In any case, I appreciate being kept advised.
m
,
Cg) Form 102-R
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
J CPRail
Internal Correspondence
is
Date VANCOUVER, 9 February 1978.
From M.W. Holland
To Mr. V. Jones
Vancouver, B.C.
File:  164-N
I have reviewed Mr. Freeman's memorandum to you dated 2 February 1978,
regarding the handling of the BCCS - Northland claims, and his Department's position in this matter.
I am somewhat disappointed that we cannot hand over this responsibility
to the Claims Department, but from his memo it is quite evident that
this would only lead to confusion in the overall procedures of
handling our claims.
Accordingly, I accept option No. 2 and concur in your conclusion
that we should retain Mr. Wright under the terms discussed.  If we
are to retain him, what is the possibility of making him the Mini
Office Manager of the Northland administrative offices? Your views
on this thought would be appreciated.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
QJ?J) Form 102-R
V CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date VANCOUVER, 9 February 1978. File:  AGR.2.SIU.
From M.W. Holland
To Mr. P.E. Timpson
Asst. Supervisor
Labour Relations
Vancouver, B.C.
Conversation with Mr. A. Pollock, President, C.M.C. yesterday, he
advised that the Towboat Industries negotiations with the S.I.U.
have been terminated and the Commissioner is drafting his report.
He stated they had considerable problems with both the Hiring Hall
clause and the one respecting a contribution to the School of
Marine Seamanship.  He advised that on the Hiring Hall item they
have agreed to a monthly payment of $2,000.00, and on the School
of Seamanship $.05 in the first year and $.15 in the second.  He
was very adamant in his remarks that it was his hope Canadian
Pacific would not go beyond any of these limitations.
I advised him it certainly was not our intention to do so, but I
could not commit myself to our final position.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B".Vancouver,BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3/35, Telex04-507684
:W Holland
3 Reid
February 9, 1978
File:  T-77-31-23
Insurance Corporation of
British Columbia
P.O. Box 809
Applecross Road
Nanaimo, B.C.
V9R 5N2
Dear Sirs:
Re:  Your File 3144517 / 23
Olivene KNIBBS	
Reference your letter of January 20, concerning the above
which we acknowledged on January 31, 1978.
After due consideration we are agreeable to accepting the
responsibility in this instance and no doubt you will be
forwarding an invoice for cost of repairs in due course.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
III
mHolland
I f. Reid
-■ Manager
February 9, 1978
File:  152203
Mr. F.W. Atkinson
7288 Inlet Drive
North Burnaby, B.C.
V5A 1C4
Dear Floyd:
We have been advised by the Pensions Department in Montreal
that you may be eligible for a Disability Benefit under the
Canada/Quebec Pension Plan.
You should, therefore, arrange to obtain an application form
from the Government Pension Plan District Office.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB CPRail
Internal Correspondence
m
Date   VANCOUVER, February 9, 1978
From   M.W. Holland
To
Administrator
Financial Security Program
Pensions & Benefits Department
Montreal
File:  152203
Re:  Floyd W. ATKINSON. P-1522Q3, S.I.N. 701-340-838
The above mentioned employee, who will retire effective March 1, 1978,
on medical grounds, is a member of the Financial Security Program
for Officers, Supervisors and Specialists, and may be eligible for
waiver of premiums.
Please advise in this regard and if Mr. Atkinson is eligible, will
appreciate receiving the necessary forms for completion at your
earliest convenience.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB
(S) Form 102-R CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, February 9, 1978 File:  165196
From M.W. Holland
ToMr. R. Granger
Montreal
Re:  J.A. FOSTER, #165196. S.I.N. 701-378-028
As requested in your form letter of January 31, enclosed herewith
are the following original documents:
Certificate of Marriage
Mrs. Foster's Certificate of Birth
and Certificate of Change of Name
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
VALUE Z12-10-98
JB
K) Form 102-R
m BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
mHolland
VKtgSl
\ | Reid
*_3 Manager
CP Rail
February 9, 1978
File: 479331
Mr. J.M. Robert
Adminis trator
Canadian Seafarers Welfare Plan
634 St. Jacques
Montreal, Quebec
H3C 1E7
Dear Mr. Robert:
Reference your
McMuldrock.
letter of February 1, concerning Peter L.
Mr. McMuldrock worked on the "Carrier Princess" and the
"Princess of Vancouver" in 1976 but did not work at any
time in 1977.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, February 9, 1978 File:  405
From A.N. Cairns
To Master
PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER
Enclosed is current copy of Lloyd's Load-Line Certificate for
the "Princess of Vancouver."
Please ensure it is posted in the appropriate frame in the
passenger space and return the existing Certificate to me.
Marine Superintendent
B.C.C.S.S.
VALUE Z12-10-97
HLH/jb
13
©j Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel (604)665-3135. Telex 04-507684
Any Holland February 9, 1978
rlRRaid File;     561
'.sv \t,tnagas
Mr.  W.H.  Brown, Jr.
Officer in Charge
Anchorage Quarantine Station
Department of Health, Education
and Welfare
Public Health Service
Center for Disease Control
P.O. Box 6083
Anchorage, Alaska 99502
U. S. A.
Dear Mr. Brown:
We have received your letter of January 31, and are pleased
to enclose herewith a copy of the "Princess Patricia's" schedule
for 1978.
Your reminder concerning Public Health regulations requiring the
Masters of passenger vessels to report cases of diarrheal illness
24 hours in advance of arrival is appreciated and will be passed
on to the vessel's Master.
There are no changes in our Alaska agents.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc: Master, "Princess Patricia"
Chief Engineer, "Princess Patricia"
Copy of Dept. of Health letter is attached.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
y-WHoltand
4M____f
' Manager
February 9, 1978
File:  578
Canadian Industries Limited
Box 10
Montreal, Quebec
H3C 2R3
ATTENTION:
Mr. R.E. Keiller
Insurance Manager
Dear Sirs:
While we have written you on two occasions requesting Royal
Insurance Company Limited Policy No. 8L-6174/5, we have not
heard from you to date.
The fact that the policy has expired is of some concern to
us and it will be appreciated, therefore, if you would forward
the renewed policy as soon as possible.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B".Vancouver,BC    V6C2R3
Tel (604)665-3135. Telex 04-507684
\
wHolland February 8,   1978
ff«e« File:    413784
• Manager
Mr. D. G. Park
1013 Beverley Drive
Nanaimo, B.C.
Dear Mr. Park:
Due to policy changes, we regret to advise that our Montreal
office are unable to accept photostat copies of Certificates
of Birth. A copy of your Certificate of Birth was forwarded
to them on November 14, 1977.
We, therefore, request that you let us have your original
Certificate of Birth, once again, for forwardance to Montreal,
Apologizing for any inconvenience.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb , <
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C_^«J
re/f6W)665-3J35, Telex04-507684
CPRbU
|W Holland
g fle/d
Manager
.8 February 1978.
File No. 429-N
Mr. L. Marks
National Harbours Board
Port of Vancouver
Suite 520, Granville Square
200 Granville St.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6C 2P9
Dear Larry: -
„_ _. further to car cassation this ^^^^T
2J_,__ you could _-H- \£l*££3L  which Canadian
^^^"tl S BCCS - HarthXana operation.
_ u-o ipi-rer and should you not
PTease find attached^J of this let . ^ ^^ ^ ^
locate the original kindly a
a signed copy forwarded to Mr. bP
/
If I may be of any assistance,
kindly advise.
Yours very truly,
M.W. HOLLAND
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
MWH'BB
<r
Manager
A«st. Mgr.
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
—r
Marine
Supt. Engr.
S"P*- ]%[
Asst. Supt. Engr.
Catering Supt.
Terminal Supt.
Oeptl. Analyst.
Office Mgr.
Account.
^Aktg. Arvajyjt>~
T-U
I
&
Ja__i	
Z Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, 8 February 1978. File:  T-78-69
From   R.R- Reid
j0   Memorandum
Mr. M.W. Holland
Mr. Burchill made presentations at Brea, California, and San
Luis Obispo, California, Saturday and Sunday, 4 and 5 February,
and when last advised, he had been approached by Shriners, El
Bekal of Long Beach, California, this coming weekend, also Balboa
Marina, Balboa Park, California.
His movements beyond were unknown when last speaking to him.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
RRR'BB
ffitlForm 102A-R
'■"<.■■:[<■■<*■&
x':-.r- Date     VANCOUVER,   8 February File:     T-78-69
From     R.R.  Reid
To  Mr. J.G. Shave
Advertising Representative
Vancouver, B.C.
Confirming our telephone conversation yesterday, will you
please arrange for five colour separations, as indicated on
sample left with you, for use by Mr. Joe Becker, President,
Atlas Travel Service, who has space with us on all sailings
this year.
Mr. Becker has asked us to co-operate with him in the cost
of his brochure to the amount of $1500.00, but I have declined
at the moment on the basis that we do not have the necessary
funds available.  However, I am hopeful there will be some
area in the Budget from which we may be able to offer assistance at a later date.
■xa j^ifA
H ^hD
IB-^^V
!
:
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
KpForm 102-R
J Pier B", Vancouver. BC   V6C 2R3
le.l(604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
QPBall
wHolland g Vebruary 1978.
'Reid Vile Mo.  T-78-69
Mr. A.E. Gale
Vancouver Island Coach Lines Ltd.
110 Vouglas St.
Victoria, B.C.
VW 2B3
Dear Mr. Gale:
Thank you kindly lor your letten written under date ol 28
Vecember 1977, received lollowlzg my return Irom annual
vacation, concerning the Travel Shows in Victoria, Vebruary
23 and 24.
Mr. Richard Velley, Sales Representative Irom this oll-ice,
will represent us, and will arrange lor voucher to be issued
in your lavour at the earliest possible time.
It would be appreciated il you could luniilsh us with details
as to the individual's Involvement in both activities, on il
the SO minutes allowed each individual includes the verbal
pnesentation and the showing ol a lilm.
yours very truly,
R.R.  REW
Asst. Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
rrr'Bb
be.    Mr. 3.G. Shave  - It will be appreciated il you will kindly
arrange lor voucher to be Issued in lavour ol Vancouver
Island Coach Linens to the value ol $300.00, account participating in Travel Show in Victoria on Vebruary  23 and  24.
On Vebruary 24 it Is anticipated 700 will be in attendance.
This item should be charged against Item 11-5 unden the
heading "Seminars."
Asst. Managen, B.C.C.S.S. • iV Holland
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
€P Ball
,8 Vebnuony 1978,
iRReid. Vile T-78-10.
IS Manager
Mn. S Mns. J.P. Messervey
6046 Cherry Street
Holilox, M.S.
B3rf 2K3 	
Dear Mr. S Mrs. Messervey:
Thank you kindly lor the courtesy ol youn letter ol 291 January
concerning our TEV "Vrlncess Vatnlcia."
We will shortly be starting the ship up lor her 1978 cnulse
season, and as the various members ol the crew return to the
vessel we will arrange to have a copy ol your letter available
lor them.
Again, thank you lor writing us.
yours very truly,
R.R. REIV
Asst.  Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB ■X.maqe
BC Coast Steamship Sen/ice
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
sv/Holland 8 Vebruary 1978.
*»«_« Vile:    78.GEM.055.
' ist Manager
Mn.   Lome Campbell
6029 -  172nd Place S.W.
Lynniwood, Washington 98036.
Dear Mr. Campbell:
Thank you lor your letter ol 31 January, and T am pleased
that you necelved the items lorwarded to Bill Bridges.
We are pleased to enclose current BCCSS pamphlet, together
with our 1978 Alaska cruise brochure.
yours very truly,
R.R.  REW
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04 -507684
iv,Holland - 8 Vebnuony 1978.
xtReid Vile Mo.   76.GEM.529.G.
Mn. Donald J. Henlrey, C.A.
Trustee
Henlrey, Mason, Korbtn S McMahon
1500 United Kingdom Building
409 Granville Street
Vancouver, B. C.
V6C 1T2
IN THE MATTER OV THE BANKRUPTCY OV
GRAMSOM YACHT CHARTERS LTV.,  a
limited liability company carrying
on business at the Month Voot Bute
Street, in the City ol Vancouver,
Province ol British Columbia
Veor Sir:
This will acknowledge receipt ol your notice concerning
captioned bankruptcy.
Please note that Item 20 having relerence to the amount a I
$4,500.00, should be deleted as payment has been received
Irom Mr. Granberg.
yours very truly,
R.R. REJV
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
* W Holland
7 x.ger
iRReid
7s' Manager
.8 Vebruary 1978.
Vile Mo.  78. ALA. 521. C.
Mr. J.A. Vrennan
Vice-President and General Manager
West Kootenay Power and Light Company,  Limited
1385 Cedar Avenue
Trail,  B.C.
V1R 4L4
Vear Mr. Vrennan:
Thank you kindly lor your letten ol 30 January concerning our
"Princess Patricia" Alaska cruises.
JI we can be ol any service to you In booking a "Princess
Patricia" Alaska cruise, will be pleased to hear Irom you as
to which sailing you would preler.
Thank you lor your interest in the "Princess Patricia."
Yours very truly,
R.R. REID
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B",Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Telex04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
€P Ball
1 "/Holland
SpJxfleM
".'jsx Manager
■8 Vebruary 1978.
Vile Mo.  T-78-69.
Mr.  J.J. Robinson
Manager,  B. C. and Yukon
Canadian Government 01lice ol Tourism
P.O.  Box 49178
Suite 2743, Bentall Centre Tower 111
595 Burrard Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V7X 1K8
Vear Mr. Robinson:
With relerence to your Bulletins 1 and 2 concerning the Canada
Mid-West Seminars at Vancouver,  Calgary and Edmonton, Winnipeg,
Saskatoon and Regina, this will conlinm that we will be a
partner with CGOT in those cities and will be represented by
Mr.  Richard Pelley, Sales Repnesentatlve lor CP Rail Alaska
Cruises  [BCCSS).   \
As payment lor our attendance at these CGOT presentations is
arranged through our Vepartment ol Public Relations, we have
requested them to obtain a voucher made payable to Receiver
General ol Canada lor handling with you in the amount ol $300.00,
on the basis ol $50.00 per city.    As soon as this is in hand
we will be pleased to lorward same to you.
Thank you lor your consideration ol our participation.
Yours very truly,
R.R. RE1V
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB 1
Date   VANCOUVER, 8 February 1978. File:  AGR.l.CMSG.GEN.
From   A.N. Cairns
To   Master
"Princess of Vancouver"
During the period of temporary schedule change your vessel
account repairs to A-l slip, the Third Officers' working hours
will be as follows:
Form 102-R
A.M.
Watch
0215
- 0430
-    1\
0615
- 0930
-   ih
1015
-  1300
-    2-3/4
8k
P.M.  Watch
1345 -  1630
1815 - 2030
2215 - 0030
- 3-3/4
- 2%
- %
8%
Marine.'' Su
ANC'B
cc.
Molson
F.A. Eastman
E. Schimpf
7 Date    VANCOUVER, 8 February 1978.
From    R.R. Reid
To    Mr. J.G. Shave
Advertising Representative
Vancouver, B.C.
File;  T-78-69:
Account Canadian CGOT participation by this office at Vancouver,
Calgary, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Saksatoon and Regina, will you
please arrange voucher at your earliest convenience made payable
to the Receiver General of Canada, forwarding here for handling
with Local Manager for B.C. and Yukon, CGOT six shows- at $50.00 -
$300.00.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
Bg| Form 102-R
J Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER,   8 February 1978. File;     T-78-69.
From   R.R.  Reid
To Mr. J.G. Shave
Advertising Representative
Vancouver, B.C.
Enclosed please find:
Furniture rental bill account World Travel Fair Booth, Vancouver,
B.C., in amount of $124.00, accountable to Item 11^6 of Budget.
Cost of forwarding brochures CP Air, $21.60 and Canadian National
$23,35, both accountable to Item 11-5 of the Budget.
Co-op P. Lawson Travel arranged by Richard Pelley in the value
of $77.00 under Item 11-2 of the Budget.
Will you please place these in line for payment.
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
S) Form 102-R .
TELEX    / - VANCOUVER,'B.C., 8 FEBRUARY 1978.
File:  655-C
P.I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE.
CONV YESTERDAY MERCATOR HAVE LOCATED LOWER DECK PLAN TOM KING'S PAPERS
V " -___r
STOP COULD NOT SELL 8 .SGL RMS AS REQUIRE FOR CREW AS PRESENTLY INDICATED
ON PLAN STOP BELIEVE 3 DBL RMS ARE AS SUGGESTED ORIGINALLY BY YOU AS RMS
129-131-133 ALREADY INCLUDED IN OUR REVENUE ESTIMATE STOP RMS AFT OF THIS
AREA ASSIGNED TO ENGINEROOM PERS NEXT OFFICERS MESS UNSUITABLE TO HAVING
PUBLIC IN AREA ALSO PLAN INDICATES FUEL TANKS ACROSS ALLEYWAY STOP WILL INCLUDE
HOSPITAL ROOM 2 PERSONS 2 LOWERS B AND T STOP HOCKING INCLUDED OWNER'S
SUITE BUT PLS CONFIRM IF INTENTION IS TO NOW SPLIT UP.SUITE STOP AS SHOWN
ON BROCHURE SUITE IS CONNECTING BUT NO CORRIDOR ROOM FROM BEDROOM STOP
AGAIN REFERRING BROCHURE AS DO NOT HAVE SHIP'S PLAN FOR UPPER DECK IS IT
-POSSIBLE 2 DBLS BOAT DECK COULD BE SGL.RMS 4 AND 6 ALREADY IN OUR ESTIMATE
AS OTHERWISE SUGGEST RMS YOU MENTIONED REQUIRED FOR DECK OFFICERS STOP
LOOKING AT CONVERSION AREA CANNOT VISUALIZE 30 RMS SO PERHAPS CLARIFICATION
NEEDED AS TO EXACTLY WHAT OCCUPANCY' AND FACILITIES ARE PLANNED THIS AREA
HOWEVER WILL ESTIMATE 14 INSIDE RMS S AND T 2 BEDS 4 SGL S AND T 4 DBL
2.BEDS T 4 SGL x. T 4 DBL T STOP ALSO SUGGEST OWNERS'. EVALUATE THEIR CREW
AREA REQUIREMENTS STOP WE ARE STILL CONTEMPLATING 7-1/2 DAY CRUISE AS
UNABLE SCHEDULE ACCEPTABLE 7-DAY CRUISE TO .INCLUDE POSITIVE AREAS OF
•INSIDE PASSAGE COMMENSURATE WITH VESSEL'S SPEED CAPABILITIES.'   BCC-69
R.R. REID        ■■ i  ■
ASST. MGR., BCCSS
RRR'BB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier^B",Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Telex04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
I \:x\
AI W Holland
,=?RHeW
xssr Manager
8 Vebruary 1978.
Vile Mo.   78.ALA.521.H.
Mr. £ Mrs.  H. Hanson
1905 Maylair Vrive
Victoria, B.C.
V8P 1R1
Vean Mn. S Mrs. Hanson:
We were very pleased to learn through Mrs.. Oram ol your plans
to join Mr. and Mrs. Oram on the July 2nd sailing ol the
"Princess Patricia" to Skagway, Alaska, and return.
As Mrs. Oram has pnobably Indicated to you, the rate lor you
will total $1059.00, and closer to the dote ol ticket issuance
we will be in touch with you as a reminder lor cruise payment.
We are enclosing copy ol the Vaily Cruise Bulletin, which will
give you some insight into the "Princess Patricia" and also the
route we lollow along the Inside Passage.    We are certainly
looking lomcard to having you on board ship, and know you will
have an enjoyable cruise with us.    Should you have any questions
concerning the cruise, please leel Iree to phone me collect at
665-2502.
Vor those people who have not mode the cruise belore, a suggestion
with regard to clothing is to pack comlontable, inlonmal attire,
a pair ol good comlontable walking shoes, a warm topcoat or jacket,
and head gear ol some description, because notwithstanding the
summer temperatures, you could leel cool out on deck when the ship
stands oil Ihe glaciers, or should the weather be overcast, the
natural bneezes created by the ship's movement under these circumstances can be cool.    Conversely, when you are in the shelter ol
the stern, the warmth ol the sun is sullicient to give you a bit
ol a tan.
Thene one two occasions on which ladies may wish to wear long
dresses, and those are the Captain's Cocktail Party, evening ol
the llnst day out alter departure Vancouver, and Captain's Vinner
night.    Insolar as gentlemen are concerned, we suggest a sports
jacket or business suit lor dinner on any occasion, and at break-
lost and lunch, inlormal attire is perlectly acceptable.
As a guide to tipping, we suggest lor youn considenatlon three
individuals,  your Room Steward, Vining Room Waiter and Bellboy.
Insolar as the lirst two are concerned,  $1.50 per person per day f
-  2
Is adequate, and lor Bellboy services, rouglily $.50 a call.
Hopelully you will not require the services ol our Stewardess,
but should you, it would be nice to remember her, and possibly
$5.00 or $10.00 at the end ol the trip would be most appropriate.
Yours very truly,
R.R. REIP
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
6c.    Mrs. H. Oram
1526 Cedar Hill Cnoss Rd.
Victonla,  B.C.
V8P 2P1
Vean Mrs.  Oram:
Thank you kindly lor your letter ol 30 January j'ust necelved.
Copy ol our Vaily Cruise Bulletin is enclosed lor your use,
and as mentioned to Mr. and Mrs. Hanson, should you have any
questions that may arise Irom the lour ol you getting together
to discuss your cruise, please do not hesitate to phone me
collect.
Yours very truly,
Asst.  Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
j Date   VANCOUVER, 8 February 1978. File:  T-78-10
From   R.R- Reid
jo   Memorandum
Mr. M.W. Holland
Reference your corner comments on memorandum to Mr. Pelley dated
9 January.
1. Second printing of Alaska brochure has slightly delayed distribution of brochures; however, this is an on-going process
for the next few months and am not disappointed in the progress
being made. Envelopes have been addressed for Agency mail-out
and are awaiting further brochure supply. We are able to
handle mailing on the basis of between 450 and 500 daily,
depending upon volume of mail handling and C.S.C.
2. Report of Sales - With Alec McPherson now in residence in
this office, this will be handled weekly as arranged, and
you will be kept informed of progress.
3. Some variance will be effected in Richard's plans end of
February and beginning of March, which I will discuss with
him on his return.
4. I had previously arranged for all positive letters on File
T-77-10 to be actioned.
Form 102-R
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
I
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B",Vancouver. BC   V6C2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
x W Holland
H Reid
■' Manager
February 8, 1978
File:  T-78-99
Mr. V.R. Durish
Executive Vice-President
Jones, Gable & Company Limited
110 Yonge Street
Toronto, Ontario
M5C 1T6
Dear Mr. Durish:
I have received your letter of January 25, concerning additional
expenses involved due to the fact that on November 5, 1977, our
vessel the "Princess of Vancouver" was unable to put into its
regular berth, due to damage caused by an overturned tank car on
the Nanaimo dock.
It will be appreciated that these were circumstances beyond our
control and while any inconvenience is naturally regretted, we
cannot see our way clear to reimburse you the full amount of your
claim ($65.10).
We are, however, prepared to pay for the Budget Rent-a-Car bill,
as it is documentary proof of expense.
Will you kindly let us know if you are prepared to accept an amount
of $41.85 in settlement?
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb Internal Correspondence-
Date    VANCOUVER, February 8,  1978 File:    604
From    M.W.  Holland
To    Mrs. M. Remillard
Administrative Services
C-25 Concourse
Windsor Station
Montreal
Further to conversation with this office date, it will be
appreciated if you will kindly arrange for the following
changes in the Canadian Pacific Telephone Directory, Vancouver.
These are in addition to those changes submitted in November,
1977, for the new printing.
Page 2 - BRITISH COLUMBIA COAST STEAMSHIP SERVICES
Kindly add at bottom of list:
255-3535 . . . Northland Services (all departments)
local 3137  — name of Catering Superintendent should be
changed from Atkinson, F.W. to Meijer, A.
local 3138
local 3149 -•
■- please insert Departmental Analyst
McPherson, A.J.
Agent -- change name from McPherson, A.J.
to Robison, O.R.
Similar changes should also be made in the Index.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
'J Holland
:Reid
•.7-,/;;.f
February 8, 1978
File: 323659
Sun Life of Canada
Health Insurance Claims Office
200D -- 338 Broadway Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3C 0T3
Dear Sirs:
Re:  Group No. 7030, Sub. No. 001, Loc. 5062,
M. KOSARCZUK, Emp.No. 323659, S.I.N. 713-076-404
Reference your memorandum of January 18, enclosed herewith
is a current medical report from Mr. Kosarczuk's doctor,
for your further consideration.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB Date      VANCOUVER, February 7,  1978
From-     H.L.  Hudson
To      Ms.  N.  Cartwright
Montreal
File: 433
Further to my letter of February 6, your file 193-2, concerning
medical examinations for officers and supervisors.
Attached herewith is list of names of those concerned.
Office Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
JB
Form 102-R Date   VANCOUVER, 7 February 1978.
From   A.N. Cairns
To   Master
"Carrier Princess"
File: T-78-1007-A
jQForm 102-R
To facilitate an Engineroom generator exchange, you will arrange
to berth stern south (starboard side to) at Pier B-l, Saturday,
11 February 1978, and be on berth for an 0900 start with the
dock crane.
On completion, "Carrier Princess" will, unless otherwise advised;
remain in this berth until 0800 Monday, 13 February.
dent
cc.  Chief Engineer, "Carrier Princess"
Traffic Supervisor
Mr. D. Smith, Casco, Pier "B"
Mr. T. King
Mr. J.W. McCowatt
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Manager
Asst. Mgr.
Marine Supt. V4/
Sx.
Asst-. Sunt-.
."Aktg. Analyst.
m^
*a ,
	
J Date    VANCOUVER, 7 February 1978.
From    J.W. McCowatt
File:  T-78-1010-A
To    Mr. D.W. Harris
Chief Officer
"Princess of Vancouver"
Reference your conversation with the undersigned, 31 January 1978,
concerning Scott Air Packs, your letter was not received in this
office to my knowledge.
Please be advised that two complete outfits of the latest design
have been ordered as per attached copy of requisition, one for
the deck and one adjacent to Engine Room.
Kindly advise when these have been received on board the above
ship.
All other breathing apparatuses are to be removed from the ship
and destroyed.  Contact Ken Bourgeau concerning this matter when
the ship is ready.
Asst. Superintendent Engineer
JWM'BB
cc.  Mr. K. Bourgeau
BCCSS Machine Shop
Vancouver.
SS Form 102-R
J
J CPRail
>Q?rBS?j
fence
Date    VANCOUVER,  7 February  1978.
From   R.R.  Reid
To   Mr. J.D. Bromley
Vice-President
Vancouver, B.C.
File:  T-78-99
Kindly refer to your letter of 18 January 1978, File 77.036.5,
addressed to the Hon. S. Bawlf, with copy to me, and also your
mailgram of 31 January concerning complaint received from Mrs.
CC. McConnan.
After returning from annual vacation, Mr. Reid contacted Mrs. -
McConnan by phone, and is taking the necessary steps concerning
housekeeping and catering on board the "Princess of Vancouver,"
which appeared to be the basis of Mrs. McConnan's complaint.
Mrs. McConnan seemed satisfied with our telephone conversation.
"SP-Form 102-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
be. Mr. A. Meijer
Mr.& Mrs. McConnan travelled on 24 December .1977 sailing of
the "Princess of Vancouver," departing Nanaimo 0800, and returned on the noon sailing 26 December to Nanaimo.  Mrs, McConnan' s main complaint centred around the housekeeping of the
lounge just outside of the dining room area, where she said that
the walls, chairs and carpet appeared grimy, dusty and lacked
proper housecleaning.  She also mentioned that the food in the
restaurant was greasy, cold, and served indifferently.  She was
so concerned, that although very hungry, she would not eat her
breakfast.  Her husband did and felt ill afterwards.  When
asked whether or not she brought this to the attention of one
of our Officers, she said there just wasn't anyone in view during
the whole trip.  We have had several letters in the past voicing
similar complaints, and the foregoing is for your information
in your future dealings with Catering personnel on board the
"Princess of Vancouver."
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S, BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier"B", Vancouver,BC   VGC2R3
Telex 04-507684
Tel (604) 665-2507 or 665-2508
M W Holland
X .-i.igoi
IRReid
' rn Manager
7 Vebruary 19J 8.
Vile Mo. T^78-J0^V
Mr.  Len Lauronce, President
Alaska Pacillc Marine,Tnc.
P.O.  Box 6018
Ketchikan, klaska  99901.
Vean Len:
Thanks kindly lor your letter ol 26 January.    We are very
pleased to learn that you will be with us again in 1978
acting on our behal{).
We accept the increase in lee ol $275.00 pen voyage.
Although our Alaska endeavours still nemain uncertain,  I
may   possibly be contacting you in the near luture concerning
same.
With best personal regards, and thank you lor your complimentary
comments concerning our Alaska cruise brochure.
Yours very truly,
R.R. REID
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER,   7 February  1978.
From   R.R.   Reid
To  Mr.   0.  Robison
Vancouver,  B.C.
File:  168
The Royal Bank of Canada has forwarded to us Merchant Deposit Card
for use in connection with Chargex associated with the "Princess
Patricia." This card, together with copy of their letter, is enclosed for your use, and would request that you kindly be guided
accordingly during the coming cruise season of the "Princess
Patricia."
Asst. Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
RRR'BB
)Form 102-R ;' Manager
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B". Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
■fWHolland 7 Vebruary 1978.
'■nRem Vile Mo.  T-78-10
78.ALA.521.V.
Mr. Hugh Bird
Vagabond Travel
103 - 2nd Ave. West
Box 610
Qualicum, B.C.
VOR 2T0
Vean Hugh:
It was a pleasure talking to you 2 Vebruary.
Enclosed are copies ol brochure shells and photo ready adveJi-
tlsing material lor co-op ads.
When you have linalized your plans, please advise me ol the
details.
A case ol shells will be shipped to you soon.
Looking lorward to a successlul 1978 season.
Yours very truly,
R.V.  PELLEY
Salens Representative
RDP'BB
J TELEX
VANCOUVER, B.C., 7 FEBRUARY 1978.
File:  609
P-I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE.
WEEKLY ANALYSIS T AND T TRAFFIC PERIOD JAN 22-31/78 WAS 2030 UNITS
1977 WAS 1911 UNITS FOR INC 119 OR 6.5 PER CENT.YEAR TO DATE 1978
IS 6103 UNITS 1977 WAS 6524 UNITS FOR DEC 421 OR 6.5 PER CENT
BCC-68
M.W. HOLLAND
MGR., BCCSS
CAA'BB
M BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8". Vancouver, BC   V5C 2R3
Toi(604)665-3135. Telex04-5076S4
'.'J Holland
■■■' Reid
vmaget
CP
7 Vebruary 1978.
Vile Mo.  601
Mr. T.V.  Bastable
Virector ol Vistnibution
Labatt Breweries ol British
Columbia Limited
976 Richards Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 3C1
Mr. Ron Vabbro
Logistics Coordinator
Labatt Breweries ol Bnitlsh
Columbia Limited
976 Rlcltards Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 3C1
Gentlemen:
This has relerence to our meeting 1 Vebruary 1978 to discuss movement ol your trollic between Vancouver and Manaimo, and Vancouver
and Swartz Bay.
As discussed, ellectlve 1 Vebruary 1978 arrangements have been
made to allow a 10% discount on all trollic moved by youn company
between Vancouver-Swartz Bay and Vancouver-Manaimo.
Our Trollic Supervisor, John Verguson, can be contacted at 665-3156,
and will be most pleased to assist with respect to movement ol your
tralllc.    He will call Bob Ulxner,  521-1242, daily around 2:00 p.m.
lor your tralllc requirements.
Victor and I appreciated the opportunity to meet with you and discuss your requirements.    Should any problem areas arise,  I would
appreciate being advised.
Yours very truly,
J.V.  FIWMIE
Tralllc Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
be.    Mr.O. Roblson, Vancouver.
Mr. J.  Verguson,  Vancouver.
Mr. M.W.  Holland,  Vancouver.
Mr.  V. Jones,  Vancouver. BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
CPRail
iW Holland
7 Vebruary 1978.
<RReid
5.' Manager
Vile Mo.  343
Incan Ships Ltd.
Suite 622,  3 Place Ville Marie
Montreal, Que.
H3B 2E3
Attention:    Mr. V.V. Hazan
Gentlemen:
This has relerence to your letter ol 18 January 1978, concerning compressor rental In Superior Irom United General
Constructors Inc.
Their original oiler requires this equipment to be insured
under their policy and not under ours; due to lire and
vandalism it was considered that we would not accept liability.
The second requirement lor their insurance coverage was to pay
lor the services ol a maintenance man per day.
This was discussed between the above company and mysell, and
we were able to have them accept Greg Leln, who Is in our employ,
as the service man [this saved Incan considerably more than the
insurance cost), and also to prevent liability to us we would
pay an additional amount to cover their insurance pnemium.
Thunder Bay rental agreement is a dlHerent matter and is not
applicable to this situation.
All bills have been approved lor payment 1977.
Yours very truly,
9-
J.W. McCOWATT
Asst. Superintendent Engineer
JWM'BB
cc.    Mr. W.V. Scott
Genenol Manager
Incavi Superior Ltd.
Ste.   102, Medical,Ants Bldg.   ,, *
105 S.  May St., ThunderBatj, Ont.
P7E 1B1 CPRail
Date    VANCOUVER, 7 February 1978,
From    J.D. Finnie
To    Mr. V. Jones
Mr. M.W. Holland
Regarding meeting 6 February 1978 with CP Rail personnel with,
respect to possible shutting down of A-l ramp due to heavy repair costs.
I submit the following for your perusal. Mr. Swanson has requested a memo from the BCCS outlining our position with respect
to effect of their proposal.
A-l SLIP
Following vessels and barges use A-l slip:
Barge 913
Barge 902
Barge 906
Barge 912
Barge 912
Seaspan Doris
Seaspan for Utah Mines
"   " Port Alice
"   " Bestwood
"   " Port Mellon
"   " Woodfibre
"   " Crofton
24-28
trips
per
year
24-28
ii
ii
ii
80
ii
ii
ii
36
»i
ii
ii
36
ii
»i
■i
156
it
ii
V
Other requirements of A-l slip:
British Army Movement
Occurs three times a year.  Exchange of British Army tanks and equipment to Suffield, Alta.  This contract alone is worth approximately
$200,000.00 per year to CP Rail.
When BC Rail on strike, Vancouver Wharves is served by barge via A-l
slip.  A-l slip is also the water access to North Vancouver should
the CNR win the 2nd Narrows Bridge squabble.
When A-3 slip out of action, the E. & N. Railway is served via A-l
slip.  (A-3 was out of service for one month in 1976, due to an
accident, and rail traffic was satisfactorily handled through A-l.)
)Form 102-R - 2 -
A-l Slip provides CP Rail with water access to the various water-
locked points on the West Coast.  Through this I am sure CP Rail
is able to secure the line haul  on shipments from competitive
points.  Change the final delivery point to the BCR slip and
CNR would no doubt pick up additional business at CP Rail's
expense.
GENERAL COMMENT:
The BCCS is presently maintaining a satisfactory level of service
for our truck and trailer customers using A-3 slip.  On a permanent
basis it becomes more difficult vrlth.  only one slip when rail traffic
for the E. & N. must go through A-3.  The BCCS could not guarantee
daily service because prompt adherence to schedule is vital, and
handling of rail is subject to delays for various reasons; for
example, if the rail were not ready promptly for the 1000 "Carrier
Princess," the vessel would have to be withdrawn for the day and
the rail traffic handled the following day.  CP Rail would most certainly be in a difficult position with MacMillan and Bloedel, especially with the level of service demanded by them.  The use of
one slip for the frequency of sailings employed by the BCCS could
at best be described as haphazard. While we can get by when one
slip is out, there are so many variables in wind, tides, heavy
traffic loads, breakdowns, etc., that I personally feel the BCCS
and CP Rail could not maintain either a frequency of service of a
dependable service that the customers could rely on, thereby forcing
them to seek alternate service.  The following points are also
areas of concern:
1. What do we do if A-3 slip is the only one kept operating and
it is shut down for maintenance or damage?
2. Through A-l slip CP Rail and the BCCS can solicit new traffic;
i.e., proposed wood chip terminal Howe Sound is expected to
be served via CP Rail - BCCS via A-l slip; mineral deposits ex
Campbell River, etc.
3. Outside of the present BCCS vessels, the only other vessels
capable of loading rail at Pier A-3 are the:
"Seaspan Doris"
"Seaspan Greg"
Seaspan Barge 912
The balance of the rail/barges operating on the West Coast
cannot operate at Pier A-3. - 3 -
4.  Alternate slips are the BN and Seaspan Slip (BCR).
A. BN Slip.  CP Rail will pay 18/cwt for each car handled
on CP Rail lines and turned over to the BN.  The BN have
placed limitations on their facility; i.e., Barge 906 is
not allowed to operate there.  Also, it is a tidal
operation and the BN rail crews have a poor performance
record.
B. Seaspan Slip (also known as the BCR Slip).  This slip has
poor water access and requires an assist boat to berth
barge.  Also, tidal operation.  BCR crews presently loading Seattle traffic for Foss and Seaspan. Seaspan loads
a tandem every 36 hours and Foss loads two tandems every
60 hours.  Both Seaspan and BCR would have to concur if
it was decided that water-locked rail points would be
served from this location.  CP Rail in all probability
would lose the line haul on certain cars with the change
in final delivery point.
5'.  PRIVATE & CONFIDENTIAL
BCCSS is currently reviewing the possibility of providing
direct water service to Campbell River, using the "Seaspan
Doris." This most likely would result in a flat barge serving
Crofton and it would work at the BN if A-l slip is not in
service.  Instead of receiving 18/cwt per car, CP would pay
BN 18/cwt. per car off CP Rail lines.
CONCLUSION:
With one slip at its disposal, our customers would not be able to
rely on frequent, dependable service, and would have to seek
alternate service, thereby making it uneconomical for the BCCS
to continue operating as at present.  The truck and trailer and
rail operation currently produces revenues of $12,000,000 per
annum, and this will certainly decrease with only one slip to
provide service.
?
.D.
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Date      VANCOUVER, February 7, 1978
From      M.W. Holland
To  Ms. Halina Potvin
c/o Director of Internal Audit
Room E-28
Windsor Station
Montreal
File:  506
As requested in your letter of January 17, returned herewith
is list with pensioners signatures and amount of pension.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB
E*>Form 102-R Internal Correspondence
Date      VANCOUVER, February 7, 1978
From      M.W. Holland
To      Supervisor
Data Centre
Vancouver
File:  429-N
ATTENTION:  Mr. Jim Merrifield
With regard to the acquisition of Northland Navigation and the
absorption of certain employees into C.P. Rail, B.C.C.S.S., please
assign Payroll 958 and 959 to Table 240 as follows:
PAYROLL 958
Book 10
11
12
13
PAYROLL 959
Book 10
11
12
Please advise this office when the above has been completed
so that Forms PDB1 may be submitted.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB
Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B", Vancouver, BC    V6C2R3
Tel (604)665-3135, Telex 04-507684
•W Holland
i R Reid
' rXanager
February 7, 1978
File:  T-78-40
Mr. Glen Fullerton
3230 Verdun Avenue
San Mateo, California  94403
U. S. A.
Dear Mr. Fullerton:
Thank you for your letter of January 20, concerning employment
aboard the "Princess Patricia."
Our cruise season commences May 15, and you will not be available
until June 15, 1978. We have already on hand several applications
from people who will be available to us at the beginning of the
season and who will work until the season's end, October 6.  It
will, therefore, be appreciated that we cannot make a job offer
to you at this time.
The only possible opportunity there would be is if there is
a resignation from an employee and then you would have to be
immediately on hand in Vancouver.
Yours truly,
Assistant Manager
HLH/jb
\ i
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
■ VY Holiand
Ti Reid
- Manager
6 Vebruary 1978.
Tile Mo.  T-7Z-1007-A
T-78-101-CP
Canadian Coast Guard Ship Safety
P.O.  Box 10060
700 W.  Georgia St.
Vancouver,  B.C.
V7V 1E1
Attention; Mn. Allan T-unmedge
Gentlemen'.
RE;    "CARRIER PRINCESS"
With reference to your inspection reouirements on board the above
vessel, please lind attached a photo copy ol the insulation resistance survey on generatons and motors, etc., by A. TLushton, Marine
Electrician.
Trust you will {ind this report to your satisfaction.
Yours very truly,
J.W. McCOWATT
Asst. Superintendent Engineer
JWM'BB
PLS. INITIAL & PASS
Marine  Supt.   (J^
Supt. Engr.
Asst. Supt.  Engr.
Caterinx;  Supt.
Terminal  Supt.
|   Deptl. Analyst.
Office Mgr.
Account.
Uktg. Analyst.
/ >i
mm
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Telex04-507684
Holland 6 Vebruary 1978.
SU Vile Wo.  T-7o--I0_0-A
T-7S-I07-CP
Canadian Coast Guard Ship Safety
P.O.  Box 10060
700 W.  Geongia St.
Vancouver, B.C.
my iei
Attention:    Mr. Hell MacLean
Gentlemen:
RE: "CARRIER PRIMCESS"
With reference to your inspection requirements on board the above
vessel, please lind attached a photo copy ol the Insulation resistance survey on generators and motors, etc.
Trust you will lind this report to youn satis lactlon.
Yours very truly,
J.W. McCOWATT
Asst. Superintendent Engineer
JWM'SB !W Holland
BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135,Telex 04-507684
6 Vebnuony 1978.
■■*tfew Vile Mo. T-78-1010-A
■xttanager T~78~101'^OV
Lloyd's Register ol Shipping
119 -  355 Burrard St.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6C 1G8
Attention:    Mn. Hell MacLean
Gentlemen:
RE:     "PRINCESS OF VANCOUVER:
With relerence to your inspection requirements on board the above
vessel, please lind attached a photo copy ol the Insulation   resistance survey on generators and motors, etc., by A. Puston, Marine
Electrician.
Trust you will lind this report to your satis lactlon.
Yours very truly,
J.W. McCOWATT
Asst. Superintendent Engineer
JWM'BB BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
I W Holland
.6 Vebruary 1978.
8 Reid
'X x\ig?r
Vile Ho. T-78-1010-A
T-78-101-POV
Canadian Coastguard Ship Solely
P.O.  Box 10060
700 West Georgia St.
Vancouver, B.C.
V7Y 1E1
Attention:    Mr.  Lionel Midlord
Gentlemen:
RE: nPRlHCESS OV VAHCOUVEP,"
With relerence to your inspection requirements on board the above
vessel, please lind attached a photo copy ol the insulation resistance Survey on generators and motors, etc., by A. Puzton,
Marine Electrician.
Tnust you will lind this report to your satis lactlon.
Yours veny truly,
J.W. McCOWATT
Asst. Superintendent Engineer
JWM'BB
Nj Infernal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, 6 February 1978. File:  T-78-1007-A
From    A.N. Cairns
To    Master
"Carrier Princess"
To facilitate scheduling for Tuesday, 7 February, "Carrier
Princess" will arrange to depart Swartz Bay at 0530, and will
operate at maximum RPM's for this passage only.
lOForm 102-R
cc.  Chief Engineer, "Carrier Princess"
Mr. C.E. Blaney, Blaney Agencies, Victoria.
Mr. T. King
Mr. J.W. McCowatt
Mr. J.D. Finnie
Traffic Supervisor Date   VANCOUVER, 6 February 1978.
From   A.  Meijer
Tq   Chief Steward
"Princess of Vancouver"
File: T-78-16
. AGR.3.BRAC.S.GEN.
Due to the temporary change in the operating schedule of the "Princess
of Vancouver," the daily working schedules of your Department will
be temporarily adjusted as follows, effective "# February 1978:
Waiters   Dr.   Hrs.
1045 - 1200
1200 - 1230
1230 - 1530
1545 - 1930
Dinner
1800 - 1830
N.S.A.
\h
Lunch
3
3-3/4
__
Hrs.
0830 - 1100
1100 - 1130
1230 - 1400
1600 - 2000
Dinner
1800 - 1830
2000 - 2100
Lunch
ik
_A	
8
1 Hr.
O.T.
Cashier
Hrs.
0830 - 1130
3
1130 - 1200
Lunch
1230 - 1430
2
1600 - 1900
3
Dinner
,'-'-*■
1800 - 1830
8
Bartender
Hrs.
1200 - 1530
3H
1600 - 1900
3
2000 - 2130
\k
8
2130 - 2300
Ik  O.T.
Bar Waiter
1230 - 1530
3
1600 - 1930
3
2000 - 2200
2
8
2200 - 2245
3/4 hr. O.T.
j_S Form 102-R
j )Form 102-R
I
Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, 6 February 1978..
From   C.A. Aitken
To Memorandum
Mr. M.W". Holland
On Friday last, 3 February, we had an incident on the dock, where
equipment was involved, or rather, the lack of it.  Lift Truck #104
was down with a right front flat tire for a period of 40. minutes
during the mid-afternoon.  Lift Truck #103, which unit has a greater
lifting capacity, is fitted with a special carriage to accommodate the
ro-ro fitting, and was useless to substitute for #104.
I would recommend we have someone down to look at #103 to advise regarding use of 6-foot long forks for handling containers.  If this
can be done, we could have two machines loading containers, allowing
one to be spare in event of a breakdown.
The problem would be the ro-ro fitting which, if possible, should
be interchangeable with the long forks, or failing this, attached to
the hydraulic fifth wheel, similar to Kitimat machine.
Please advise your concurrence in obtaining information as outlined
in Paragraph 2.
Terminals Superintendent
CAA'BB TELEX
VANCOUVER, B.C., 6 FEBRUARY 1978.
File:  T-78-150
J.D. MASON    05-24725
MONTREAL, QUE..
'PLS ARRANGE CASH ADVANCE 100.00 FAVOUR J D FINNIE TRAFFIC MANAGER BCCSS
VANC A/C TRAVELLING EXPENSES PAYABLE SAP TO BE ACCOUNTED FOR ALSO
CASH ADVANCE 200.00 FAVOUR C A AITKEN TERMINALS SUPT BCCSS VANC A/C .
/
TRAVELLING EXPENSES PAYABLE VANC NOT LATER THAN MON 13 FEB TO BE
ACCOUNTED FOR     BCC-65
M.W. HOLLAND
MANAGER, BCCSS -
BB s
- .   v
cc.  Mr. W.W. Hocking ' . \-
-"". i  ;■ ■
I
V BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135. Telex 04-507684
W Holland
RReid
: X'.vager
p_y_r
6 Vebnuony 1978,
Mr.  C.G. Vuncon
Vistnlct Service Engineer
General Motors ol Canada Ltd.
2347 Cherokee Vrive H.W.
Calgary, Alta.
TIL 0X6
Vear Sir:
Please lind attached, list ol spare E.M.P. engine pants lor your
perusal.
Yours very truly,
"l A-
y
T. KING     \ \
Superintendent Engineer
TK'BB
>J Date     VANCOUVER,   6 February 1978.
From     T.  King
To     Mr. H.I. Williams
Purchasing Agent
Vancouver, B.C.
Reference your letter 31 January 1978, concerning surplus engine
parts for E.M.D. Model 12-645E4 diesel engines.
Please note that our engines are the 645-E7 series, but we will
che.ck the adaptability of these parts for our use through a General
Motors representative and advise of their suitability as soon as
possible.
Superintendent\fingineer
TK'BB
Q Form 102-R f
%
l_J
'
r
*_*»
CPS CMO MTL
CPR PCCSS VCR
VANCOUVER 6 FER/78
F D MARGETTS
MONTREAL QUE
P I GEORGES
MONTREAL QUE
CONFIRMING CCNV WITH MR GEORGES DATE. MEETING HELD MGR BCCS OFFICE
FORENOON DATE WITH GLEN SWANS ON ASST GEN MGR PAC REG GERRY BATES
MGR FRT SALES E C HUGH MACAULAY SUPT VANC DIV HARRY THOMPSON REG
ENGINEER AND 2 OTHER MEMBERS ENGINEERING DEPT WITH R REID A CAIRNS
C AITKEN AND J FINNIE REPRESENTING ECCSS. SWANSOM ADVISED AS REPAIRS
CONTINUED WITH PIER A-l HAS BECOME EVIDENT WEAR AND TEAR OF FERRY SLIP
WILL MOW COST IN TOTAL BETWEEN 4 50 AND 500 THOUSAND DLRS IN ORDER MAKE
IT SERVICEABLE. QUESTION POSED MEETING WAS WHETHER CR NOT WE AND CP
RAIL NEED PIER A-l. AT THIS MEETING IT WAS NOT POSSIBLE FOR GERRY
PATES TO DETERMINE WHAT RAIL TRAFFIC WOULD PE LOST IF DIRECTED TO
AN ALTERNATIVE PIER E.G. B C RAIL NORTH VANC AND SIMILARLY TRAFFIC
DIRECTED BY OURSELVES STCP IF REQUIRE UTILIZE ONLY PIER A-3
ENVISION SCHEDULING DEMANDED BY CUR SHIPPERS WOULD
BE MOST DIFFICULT TO MAINTAIN TOGETHER WITH FACTCR TO MAINTAIN
PRESENT SAILINGS WOULD UTILIZE PIER A-3 CN 24-HOUR BASIS WITH NO
ROCM FOR EXPANSION AND PROBLEMATIC HANDLING OF SEASONABLE PEAK PERIOD
SAILINGS. CONSENSUS OF MEETING WAS PIER A-l IS NECESSARY HCWEVER FOR
FURTHER CONSIDERATION OF EXPENDITURE OF ADDITIONAL DOLLARS BOTH BATES
AND OURSELVES REQUESTED BY SWANS ON SUPPLY PIER A-l TRAFFIC VOLUME AND
DOLLAR VALUE TC CURSELVES AND CP RAIL- THIS INFCRMATICN WILL BE
COMPILED FOR MR HOLLAND'S PERUSAL BY HIS RETURN WED.MORNING AND
DISCUSSION WITH YCU PRIOR SUBMISSION CP RAIL. IN CCNV WITH MR HOLLAND
HAVE ACQUAINTED HIM WITH FOREGOING. ORIGINAL MARGETTS COPY GEORGES
PCC-67
P. P. REID
ASST  MGR   BCCSS
LYNDA   -   PLEASE   MAKE   CCPY   OF   ABOVE   FOR   MR   GEORGES.       THANKS
BB
i
CPS   CMO   MTL
CPR   PCCSS   VCR
/,   r
^— Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, February 6, 1978
From   M.W. Holland
To    Mr. R. Granger
Montreal
Form 102-R
In connection with the conditions of entry of Northland Navigation
employees into Canadian Pacific's pension plan, the following
applications, Forms 017(b), are enclosed herewith:
NAME
EFFECTIVE
DATE OF BIRTH
ENTERED NORTHLAND
SERVICE
C.J. Brassinne
S. Hendrix
L.K. Taylor
L.E. Sayers
J.R. Dickson
N.E. Wood
A. Meijer
Jan. 1/78
Feb. 1/78
Dec. 11/49
Aug. 20/47
May 18/42
June 26/48
May 22/47
April 22/26
July 18/36
Aug. 30/71
Sept. 12/73
June 30/60
March 24/75
June 1/69
Jan./59
Sept. 27/60
MANAGEMENT RETIREMENT INCOME PLAN
N.H. Parham
Jan. 1/78
Sept. 26/31
Sept. 11/72
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
1 SCpForm 102-R
Date    VANCOUVER, February 6, 1978 File: 494326
From    M.W. Holland
To    Mrs. Pat Matthews
Kitimat
If you wish to contribute to the Canadian Pacific Pension Plan,
please sign the enclosed two Forms 017(b), have same witnessed
and return to this office as soon as possible.
You are also entitled to participate in the C.P. Rail extended
health benefits.  If you wish to take advantage of this service,
please complete, sign and return to this office the enclosed
C.U. & C. Health Services Society application (instructions for
completion are enclosed together with C.U. & C. pamphlet).
We are also enclosing Form TDl for your completion and signature,
and Group Insurance application (please complete item #15 of this
application and sign where indicated).
Will appreciate the above forms being returned to this office at
your earliest convenience.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB
J «SForm 102-R
CPRail
ice
Date    VANCOUVER, February 6, 1978 File:  133126
From    M.W. Holland
To    Mr. D.J. Murray
Kitimat
As you were under 40 years of age when you joined Northland
Navigation, you will be eligible for the regular Canadian
Pacific Pension Plan and not the Management Retirement Income
Plan.for which you signed up.
This latter form has, therefore, been destroyed and it will be
appreciated if you will now sign the enclosed two copies of
Form 017(b), have same witnessed and return to this office as
soon as possible.
You are also entitled to participate in the C.P. Rail extended
health benefits.  If you wish to take advantage of this service,
please complete, sign and return to this office the enclosed
C.U. & C. Health Services Society application (instructions for
completion are enclosed together with C.U. & C. pamphlet).
We are also enclosing Form TD1 for your completion and signature,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
N Internal Correspondence
Date     VANCOUVER,   February 6,   1978
From     H.L.  Hudson
File:  433
To      Ms. N. Cartwright
Senior Operations Analyst
Coastal Marine Operations
Montreal
Reference your letter of January 31, file 193-2, concerning
medical examinations for officers and supervisors.
I have no record of this ever being done at B.C.C.S.S., but
am implementing same forthwith and list will be forwarded to
you shortly.
Office Manager
B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
a'OForm 102-R Internal Correspondence
Date    VANCOUVER, February 6, 1978 File:  130021
From    M.W. Holland
To    Mr. N.D. Mullins
Law Department
Vancouver
Re:  Donald J. McKILLOP, 17-130021,
 deceased January 12, 1978	
Further my letter of January 20, to Mr. K.D. Hodsall, copy to
you, concerning the above mentioned, we now enclose the following
documents:
— Completed Form P.R.3
--  Copy of Certificate of Death
— Copy of Last Will and  Testament
Manager,  B.C.C.S.S.
JB
Form 102-R Date   VANCOUVER, February 6, 1978
From   M.W. Holland
• To   Mrs. D. Martin
Pension Benefits Records
Montreal
File:  494316
Further my letter of January 19, concerning the acquisition of
Northland Navigation and the absorption of certain employees into
C.P. Rail, B.C.C.S.S.
Enclosed herewith is Enrollment Form OSS-1 for William D. HICKMAN,
#494316, S.I.N. 420-882-672.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
*£> Form 102-R <                          0
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Dalle
VANCOUVER,  6 February 1978                               F
From
M.W. Holland
To
E.   Robinson
Nanaimo
I
File:  T-78-30-9
Form 102-R
Attached you will find copy of damage report completed at
Vancouver regarding CP Transport unit #24014.
Would you please advise if you have any knowledge of damage
occurring to this trailer either prior to loading or during
loading on the "Princess of Vancouver", 2400 hours 17 January
1978.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc. 3rd Officer
"Princess of Vancouver"
Copy attached for your information.
Can you advise if you have any knowledge of damage occurring
while aboard the "Princess of Vancouver".
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM'GP
M Internal Correspondence
Date        VANCOUVER, 6 February 1978
From        M.W. Holland
To        E. Robinson
Nanaimo
File: T-78-30-12
Attached you will find copy of damage report completed at
Vancouver 30 January 1978.
Will you please advise if you have any knowledge of damage
occurring to this trailer either prior to loading or during
loading on the "Carrier Princess", 2200 hours, January 26 1978.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc. 1st Officer
"Carrier Princess"
Copy attached for your information.
Can you advise if you have any knowledge of damage occurring
while aboard the vessel.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
AJM'GP
ijOForm 102-R
vl Infernal Correspondence
Form 102-R
Date VANCOUVER, 6 February 1978 File: T-78-30-6
From        M.W. Holland
To E. Robinson
Nanaimo
Attached you will find copy of damage report made at
Vancouver regarding Johnston Terminals trailer #3566
ex "Seaspan Doris", 0830 12 January 1978.
Will you please advise if you have any knowledge of
damage occurring to this unit either prior to loading
or during loading on the "Seaspan Doris".
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM'GP
.
vl W Holland
BC. Coast Steamship Service
Pier'B", Vancouver, BC   V6C2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
CPRail
'6 February 1978
19 Reid
■™9er File:  T-78-30-6
Mr. W.G. Sutherland
Manager, Rail Division
Seaspan International
10 Pemberton Avenue
N. Vancouver, B.C.
V7P 2R1
Dear Mr. Sutherland:
Would you please advise if log book of "Seaspan Doris" has any
notation regarding damage to Johnston Terminals trailer #3566
while aboard the vessel on 0500 sailing ex Nanaimo to Vancouver,
12 January 1978.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM'GP
J BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
CP Bali
w Holland -6 February  1978
B Raid
■Vang* File: T-77-30-205
Mr. W.G. Sutherland
Manager, Rail Division
Seaspan International
10 Pemberton Avenue
N. Vancouver, B.C.
V7P 2R1
Dear Mr. Sutherland:
Would you please advise if log book of "Seaspan Doris" shows
any notation regarding damage occurring to CP Transport trailer
#54010 during the sailing ex Nanaimo 0525 to Vancouver, B.C.
on 22 November 1977.
I regret the delay in requesting the information but a situation
has arisen which requires an answer to this question.
Sincerely,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
AJM'GP CPRail
Internal Correspondence
|) Form 102-R
Date VANCOUVER, 6 February 1978 File: T-77-30-151
From M.W. Holland
To D.C. Freeman
Freight Claims Agent
Vancouver, B.C.
Attached you will find ray complete file covering alleged
damage to Transport Pool trailer #29-3513 (under rental
agreement to C.P. Transport) on or about 2 September 1977.
Since the original report completed prior to delivery
indicates that damage was "definitely a few weeks old", it
is my recommendation that this claim for damages not be
entertained.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
AJM'GP
J CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 6 February 1978
From M.W. Holland
To D.C. Freeman
Freight Claims Agent
Vancouver
File: T-77-30-205
-„
Attached you will find my complete file covering alleged
damage to Caravan trailer 24115 (under rental agreement
to Sidney Freight Ltd.) on or about 27 October 1977.
Since the source of the damage has not been pinpointed and
the damage was reported prior to delivery it would appear we
have the responsibility.
I would appreciate it if you would arrange settlement; therefore, in the amount of $218.48 with Sidney Freight Ltd. if
you concur.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
AJM'GP
(X/xt) Form 102-R CP Rail
Internal Correspondence
Date VANCOUVER, 6 February 1978
From M.W. Holland
To E. Robinson
Nanaimo
File: T-78-30-4
n
Attached you will find copies of damage inspection report
to CPT trailer #44186 indicating damage to left side of
unit.
Will you please advise by return mail if you have any
knowledge of damage occurring to this unit prior to loading
on the 2400 sailing of 5 January 1978 of the "Princess of
Vancouver"•
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
cc. 3rd Officer
"Princess of Vancouver"
Copy also attached for your information. Can you supply
any information regarding damage to this unit while aboard
the "Princess of Vancouver".
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
AJM'GP
§) Form 102-R BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver. BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135, Teiex 04-507684
xWHolland
Rett
yanager
6 February 1978
File: T-78-30-5
WITHOUT PREJUDICE
Johnston Terminals
P.O. Box 5300
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 4B6
Attention:
Dear Sir:
Mr. Gerry French
M.V. Claims Department
Re: Your file 78-43-B of 24 January 1978
I have attached a memorandum received from the 1st Officer of
the "Carrier Princess" briefly outlining the occurrences prior
to hostler L. Munro striking the Grassick trailer.
In connection with this I would note the following:
1. It is not necessary for your driver to be advised or
protruding beams etc. on any other trailer already loaded.
It is his responsibility to obey the signals of our
seaman.
2. The seaman, H. Prosick, did not signal driver over to the
port side aft but in fact, signalled him to stop.
Further, in conversation with the 1st Officer, F.A. Hart, he states
that L. Munro admitted in front of witnesses, at the time of the
incident, that he did not realize that the slot had already been
filled by another unit.
Under normal circumstances, with the number of hostling units operating, it would have been Mr. Munro1s turn to load the unit where
the Grassick trailer was parked; however, while Mr. Munro was away
from the vessel picking up the Capital Freightways unit T-63, Grassick
Transport Limited was prevailed upon to load their own unit as there
were no tractors at the dockside able to accommodate the overhanging - 2 -
load. When Mr. Munro returned he was not aware of this occurrence and simply tried to load the Capital Freightways unit
where the Grassick unit had been parked.
The fact that light conditions were poor may have contributed
to the incident to the extent that Mr. Munro could not see the
trailer behind him and assumed the space was vacant; however,
as noted before, it is not Mr. Munro's position to assume anything. In his capacity, it is essential that he obey the signals
as given. This he did not do.
Since this is the case, it is still our intent to claim for recovery
on our settlement.
Your comments and further investigation would be appreciated.
Yours very truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
AJM'GP
N mce
Date     VANCOUVER, 3 February 1978,
From     M.W. Holland
To     Memorandum
Messrs. R.R. Reid
A.N. Cairns
J.D. Finnie
File:  651
Received a call from Asst. General Manager, Pacific Region, Mr.
k-A. Swanson, who has requested a meeting at 1030 on Monday, 6
February, in my office, to discuss the Pier A-l situation and
to determine the handling of traffic over the next period of
time.
You are requested to be in attendance at this meeting, and to
provide me with a full report of the problems discussed and the
conclusions reached.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S,
MWH'BB
gB Form 102-R TELEX VANCOUVER, B.C., 3 FEBRUARY 1978.
File:AGR.ll.USA.N.
P.I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE.
REFERENCE OUR RECENT INQUIRIES CONCERNING THE APPLICABILITY OF THE COLA
CLAUSE IN THE UNITED STEELWORKERS AGREEMENT FOR THE NORTHLAND EMPLOYEES
KITIMAT.  THE TERM OF THE AGREEMENT IS NOV/76 TO NOV/78.  FOLLOWING IS
THE WORDING OF A LETTER RECEIVED BY NORTHLAND ON OCT.19/ 76 QUOTE
DEAR MR FRIESEN j . .
WITH REFERENCE TO YOUR LETTER OF OCTOBER 7, 1976 CONCERNING THE NORTHLAND
GROUP OF COMPANIES, THE FOLLOWING OBSERVATIONS WOULD SEEM TO BE GERMANE
TO YOUR SITUATION.
THE NORTHLAND GROUP OF COMPANIES ARE COVERED B¥ THE GUIDELINES DUE TO
YOUR MEMBERSHIP IN THE B C MARITIME EMPLOYERS ASSOCIATION FOR THE PURPOSES
OF BARGAINING WITH THE ILWU. THE CURRENT AGREEMENT WITH THE ILWU, HOWEVER,
IS NOT SUBJECT TO THE ANTI-INFLATION REGULATIONS AND WILL NOT BECOME SUBJECT
UNTIL THE 1ST OF JANUARY 1977. THIS BEING THE CASE, NORTHLAND WILL NOT BE
SUBJECT TO MANDATORY REPORTING REQUIREMENTS UNTIL THAT DATE.
I BELIEVE THIS EFFECTIVELY RESOLVES YOUR PROBLEMS WITH REDUNDANCY AND
TERMINATION PAY. ... \ ., .
YOURS SINCERELY "  . ' _'
I f "*
J S ROUSHORNE
ACTING DIRECTOR     .
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION AND UTILITIES DIVISION
COMPENSATION BRANCH '..■■'-.■
UNQUOTE
PLS FORWARD COPY OF THIS TELEX TO MR J T SPARROW ATTN I WADDELL WHO WILL
BE DISCUSSING THE MATTER WITH MR TIMPSON BEGINNING OF THE WEEK.   BCC-63
M.W. HOLLAND
MGR., BCCSS
cc.  Mr. P.E. Timpson, Vancouver.
Mr. V. Jones, Vancouver.
PET'BB
J TELEX VANCOUVER,  B.C.,   3 FEBRUARY  1978.
File:     651
P.I. GEORGES
MONTREAL, QUE.
RE PROBLEMS WITH PIER A-l. MEETING TO BE HELD BETWEEN REPRESENTATIVES
OF THE B C COAST STEAMSHIP SERVICE AND THE ASST GEN MGR PAC REGION.
MESSRS REID CAIRNS AND FINNIE WILL ATTEND IN MY ABSENCE AND WILL
PROVIDE STATUS REPORTS ON CONCLUSION. AT CURRENT TIME WE ARE LOOKING
AT EXPENDITURES IN PROXIMITY OF 190 THOUSAND DLRS TO EFFECT REPAIRS
BCC-64
M.W. HOLLAND
MGR., BCCSS
MWH'BB
/
J TELEX
VANCOUVER, B.C., 3 FEBRUARY 1978,
File:  132
430
B.D. MARGETTS
MONTREAL, QUE.
THE FOLLOWING IS SUMMARY OF INTERVIEW MR BAWLF GAVE TO PRESS YESTERDAY
QUOTE
THE CORPORATION 'WILL NOT. DO ANYTHING PRECIPITOUS' ABOUT FARES.
THERE IS 'CONSIDERABLE ATTRACTION' IN THE NOTION OF INTRODUCING FAST HARBOR-TO-
HARBOR FERRIES THAT WOULD BE FOR PASSENGERS ONLY. THESE MIGHT BE HYDROFOILS '■■
OR SOME OTHER TYPE OF FAST-MOVING VESSEL.
TERMINAL LOCATIONS MAY HAVE TO BE REASSESSED. HORSESHOE BAY, IN PARTICULAR,
IS AT CAPACITY AND CANNOT BE EXPANDED. THE IONA-GABRIOLA ISLAND ROUTE IS THUS
BACK UNDER CONSIDERATION.
THE NUMBER OF PASSENGERS- IS EXPECTED TO TOP 10 MILLION THIS YEAR FOR THE
FIRST TIME AND IS CONSERVATIVELY ESTIMATED TO GROW TO 15 MILLION BY 1985.
A CONCERTED EFFORT TO UPGRADE THE QUALITY OF FOOD ON THE FERRIES WILL BE
MADE. THE NUMBER OF MENU ITEMS WILL BE REDUCED AND THE EMPHASIS WILL BE PUT
ON QUALITY, RATHER THAN MULTIPLE CHOICES.
A SAME-DAY SERVICE BETWEEN PORT HARDY AND PRINCE RUPERT WILL BE INAUGURATED IN
MAY 1979 WHEN THE NORTHERN VANCOUVER ISLAND HIGHWAY LINK TO PORT HARDY IS
COMPLETED. '
THE SERVICE WILL CALL AT OCEAN FALLS, WHICH IS PROPOSED AS A HUB FOR FEEDER
SERVICES TO OTHER COMMUNITIES,.SOME OF THEM NOW ISOLATED.
A SIMILAR FEEDER SERVICE FOR THE NORTH COAST MAY BE INSTITUTED BASED IN
PRINCE RUPERT AND SERVING SUCH COMMUNITIES AS PORT SIMPSON AND KINCOLITH.
UNOUOTE
IN SUMMARY INTRODUCTION OF HARBOR-TO-HARBOR, PASSENGERS-ONLY FERRIES LINKING
VANCOUVER-NANAIMO AND VICTORIA-VANCOUVER; ADDITIONS TO THE FERRY FLEET, WHICH
NOW OPERATES AT FULL CAPACITY IN SUMMER MONTHS AS WELL AS ON MANY WINTER
WEEKENDS; NEW TERMINAL FACILITIES; NIGHT OPERATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL
TRAFFIC AND POSSIBLE WEEKEND BANNING OF COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC, ARE OPTIONS BEING
CONSIDERED. •'.'•"•'
BCC-62
M.W. HOLLAND
MANAGER, BCCSS
'MWH'BB -
^  ^ "_*_-*«* I
ce
Date   VANCOUVER, 3 February 1978,
From   C.A. Aitken
7o Memorandum
Mr. M.W. Holland
RE:  PARKING SPACES AT THE NORTHLAND FACILITY
In connection with last three paragraphs of your letter of 30
January last, the following have been ascertained and recommendations herewith:
Capt. Lou Fleming advises there are no commitments to floating or
yard personnel provided for in their labour contracts. As far as
Spaces 1 to 10 and 11 to 20 are concerned, I suggest a suitable
sign be placed on each post of the respective sections as follows:
SECTIONS 1-10
Reserved
Spaces
between signs
 s>
SECTIONS 11-20
Visitor
Parking
between signs
>
Visitor
Parking
between signs
<; >
OR
Visitor
Parking
between signs
>
have the white lines repainted and spaces signed "Reserved" or
"Customer Parking."
Please authorize my arranging for an outside contractor to do
necessary paint work.
Form 102-R - 2 -
Regarding the directive to personnel, how about circular to
BCCSS and Northland offices explaining the set-up?
C.A. AITKEN
Terminals Superintendent
CAA'BB
/ CbForm 102-R
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
File:   T 78  -  35
m
Date
From
To
Vancouver, B.C., February 3, 1978
W.W. Hocking
Mr. H.S. Harriman,
Manager, Revenue Accounting,
Montreal, P.Q.
Your File: PD-B/5-1
Allocation of the above revenues to "Trucks & Trailers" for the
month of January 1978.
There were 10 unaccompanied autos on the Vancouver-Nanaimo run
and they should be credited to "Drive-On Autos" for the 'Princess
of Vancouver' and 'Other Vessels' in the amounts of $150 and $100
respectively.
Revenue credited to "Trucks and Trailers" is as follows:
Vancouver-Nanaimo Car Ferry (of Vancouver)
OTHER VESSELS
497.
Carrier Princess
Seaspan Doris
Haida Transporter
7%
34%
107o
517o
1007»
The Swartz Bay route carried 40 unacommpanied autos for a credit
of $1,230 to "Drive-On Autos."
Seaspan Doris also perfromed on the Vancouver-KelseyBay-Elk Falls-
Beaver Cove service January 7/8, 14/15, 21/22, 28/29. Included
were 39 unaccompanied autos for a total credit of $4,368 to
"Drive-On Autos."
Accountant, B.C.C.S.S.
J CPRail
Internal Correspondence    piu: t 78 - 35
Date      Vancouver, B.C., February 3, 1978
From      W.W. Hocking
To      Mr. H.S. Harriman,
Manager, Revenue Accounting,
Montreal, P.Q.
Your File: AF 700201
Employment of vessels and car ferry for the month of January 1978
are as follows:
Princess of Vancouver    January 3-22, 27-31
Carrier Princess January 4-7, 9-14, 16-20, 23-28, 30, 31
Seaspan Doris January 2, 3, 23-26
Trailer Princess January 21
Box Car carryings on the Vancouver-Nanaimo route were as follows:
LOADS    EMPTIES (inc PCS)    TOTAL
Princess of Vancouver     293 251 544
Carrier Princess 443 381 824
Seaspan Doris 79 13 92
Trailer Princess 12 7 19
f»Form 102-R
827 652 1479
Box car carryings on the Vancouver-Elk Falls (Duncan Bay) portion
of the Beaver Cove Service were 33 loads, 28 empties for a total
of 61.
Accountant, B.C.C.S.S.
B
j BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "B", Vancouver, BC   V6C 2R3
Tel (604) 665-3135, Telex 04-507684
x'Holland
8 Reid
■x-rager
February 3, 1978
File:  506
Mr. J. Martin
1138 East 21st Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.
V5V 1S8
Dear Mr. Martin:
In connection with the pension you are presently receiving
from Canadian Pacific, will you kindly call in to this office
at your earliest convenience.
Perhaps you would like to telephone Mr. Hudson first on
665-3146.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb BC Coast Steamship Service
Pier "8", Vancouver, BC    V6C 2R3
Tel(604) 665-3135. Telex 04-507684
mHolland February 3,   1978
'>ReW File:     165196
Manager
Mr. J.A. Foster
811 Beach Drive
Nanaimo, B.C.
Dear Mr. Foster:
Re:  Your Retirement on Pension effective January 1/78
The Pensions Department in Montreal have now advised that photostat
copies of documents will no longer be considered.
We, therefore, request that you forward to this office at your
earliest convenience the following original documents:
Certificate of Marriage
Mrs. Foster's Certificate of Birth and
Certificate of Change of Name
The above documents will be promptly returned to you "registered
mail" after registration in Montreal.
With regard to U.S. Railroad Retirement Board benefits, if you have
not been contacted by a Board Representative within a reasonable time,
you should get in touch with the Field Office at the following address:
Federal Building, Room 942
915 Second Avenue
Seattle, Washington 98174
U. S. A.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
JB Date     VANCOUVER, February 3, 1978 File:  X-76-14-15
From    M.W. Holland
To     Mr. A. McDermott
Montreal
Further regarding damage to A-3 ramp on October 30, 1976, when
contacted by our vessel the "Carrier Princess."
I have received further charges from Dominion Bridge Company
and copy of this invoice is attached.
I will forward the copy of voucher in payment when received
from the Data Centre.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb
89 Form 102-R
J CPRail
Date    VANCOUVER, February 3, 1978
From    M.W. Holland
To    Mr. G. Darrah
Department of Research
Montreal
Further to conversation, this will confirm that Mr. D.A. Hall
was transferred to Payroll 956 effective February 1, 1978.
Will you kindly forward Form PDB1 as soon as possible, at the
same time advising annual vacation still outstanding.
Form 102-R
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb .
■__ ____jL
J BC Coast Stedrnstup Service
Pier "B", Vancouver. BC   V6C 2R3
Tel(604)665-3135. Telex04-507684
CPRail
:wHolland February 3,   1978
RR&id File:    X-77-5-4
'■•' r'j.yer
The Salvage Association
931 Marine Building
355 Burrard Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6C 2G8
Dear Sirs:
Further regarding the "Carrier Princess" which ran aground
enroute Vancouver to Swartz Bay November 9, 1977.
Enclosed herewith are bills for towing services rendered
on this occasion and it will be appreciated if you will
endorse copies of both the Seaspan and Rivtow invoices
and return same as soon as possible, as these are urgently
required for insurance purposes.
Yours truly,
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
HLH/jb CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Dale VANCOUVER, 3 February 1978
From M.W. Holland
To P.A. Nepveu
Montreal
File: 161
£§!) Form 102-R
With reference to your letter of 11 January 1978, file
10-00-00 in which you enclosed the Company's cheque in
the amount of $300.00 in favour of The Missions to Seamen,
As requested, official receipt in duplicate is enclosed
herewith.
Manager, B.C.C.S.S.
GP
J News Summary
PLS. WlTIAL-iTNtlf^ ~*7
>
News and views on topics of
current interest prepared by Public Relations
and Advertising Department
Vol.   34
Mgrine Supt,
T
As.fc Supt  Eagc,
TT
eh.  3, 1978 i
Amtrak Decline?
Aviation
Coal Transport Report
Labor
5
15
8
18
Pipeline
Railway
Shipping
Tourism &
Catering' Supt.
Terminal  Supt.-
f/,4). iujtt*.
Qepij.. Analysr.
rice Mgr..
&a_ok_ftt>.
[_ II     JU
*■      lfe_S
24
11
21-
-20-
:mm- -»»-i^i.
z
AMTRAK DECLINE?
s_»
The U.S. could soon be the only industrialized nation in the world without
railroad passenger services connecting its major cities. Faced with rising
costs and static subsidies from the federal Government, Amtrak's only solution is to reduce periodically its rail passenger services between cities.
COAL TRANSPORT REPORT
An eight-volume report, commissioned by the U.S. Government, concludes that
assuming a necessary upgrading of existing lines, railroads should be able
to handle the tonnages of coal forecast for both the northern Great Plains
and central Appalachia at rates competitive with those of slurry pipelines.
TRENDS AND TOPICS
A railway union spokesman says federal labor minister John Munro has been
asked to intervene in current bargaining with railways, following a breakdown in negotiations in Montreal on what unions say are inadequate terms.
19
CP Rail files an application to build Sl miles of new mainline track between
Lake Louise, Alta., and Stephen, B.C., as part of its continuing program to
meet the future transport needs of western Canada's resource-based economy. 11
Air Canada and CP Air file for fare increases averaging four per cent, effective April 1 in Canada and April 15 on Canada-U.S. routes. Both airlines
cite rising fuel and labor costs as tbe principal reason for the increases. 15
U.S. railroad unions and management are locked in a battle over work rules.
Management contends unless unions agree to sweeping changes in costly, decades-old clauses governing crew size and pay, some carriers won't survive.  18
Government and industry tourist officials are trying to convince Canadians
to travel more in Canada by packages of new, low-cost domestic tours. Among
the companies participating are CP Air and Air Canada, as well as VIA Rail. 20
A 'near-crisis* situation in a backlog of export shipments of grain at the
Port of Vancouver has created a renewed demand to expand the facilities of
the Port of Prince Rupert to ensure Canada can meet its export commitments. 21
Canadian Pacific NEWS IN BRI
REGINA RAIL RELOCATION TALKS BRING OPTIMISM
In two months a formal application to implement the bulk of Regina's
proposed $50-million to $100-million rail relocation program could be presented
to federal officials. Aid. Clive Rodham, contacted in Ottawa Jan. 19 after a
tri-level meeting on Itegina's project, said the joint city-provincial application could be made "perhaps sooner" than April or May. (Regina Leader-Post)
AIR CONTROLLERS GET 6%
The Canadian Air Traffic Controllers Association has signed a one-year
collective agreement with the federal government ending Dec. 31, 1978, transport
minister Otto Lang said. The agreement, which calls for a 6-per-cent increase
in total compensation, has been ratified by the 2,200 controllers employed
across Canada, Mr. Lang said. (Montreal Gazette)
RAIL FERRY TO END SERVICE
Crowley Maritime Corp. will lay up its 520-foot rail-car carrier 'Alaska'
indefinitely because of poor traffic returns and rising costs. The vessel,
which can carry 47 rail cars, had been used since 1964 on weekly sailings from
the Fraser River to the Alaska port of Whittier, a terminus of the Alaska Railroad. (Montreal Gazette)
SOME WIRES CROSSED
Hearings into an application by CNCP Telecommunications for the right to
interconnect with the facilities and equipment of Bell Canada will begin in
Ottawa Feb. 28. At issue is the right of CNCP Telecommunications to tie-
in its network with the Bell system and officials have said it amounts to a
challenge of Bell's monopoly on some types of computer communications links.
Interconnections now are prohibited by Bell. CNCP Telecommunications argues
that permitting the interconnections would stimulate competition and lower
costs while Bell says it would drain money from a profitable sector that would
have to be recovered from private telephone rates. (Toronto Sun)
77 PRODUCTION OF NEWSPRINT 9 MILLION TONS
Canadian newsprint production in 1977 reached nine million tons, an increase
of 3.4 per cent over 1976, the Canadian Pulp and Paper Association reported. The
industry's shipments to the United States, its dominant market, amounted to 6.3
million tons, up 1.4 per cent, although total U.S. consumption for the year was
a record 10.2 million tons, 6.4 per cent ahead of 1976. (Globe and Mail)
NORDAIR TAKEOVER STUDIES
A federal official is investigating the proposed takeover of Nordair by Air
Canada to see if the deal meets Federal combines and transport laws, says Herb
Gray, the former consumer and corporate affairs minister. (Montreal Star)
NEWSPRINT PRICE UP
Great Lakes Paper Co. of Thunder Bay, Ont., is increasing its U.S. price for
30-lb. newsprint $15 a ton (U.S.) to $320 a ton effective .April 1. The move
follows similar increases by other major producers. Most of Great Lakes Paper's
newsprint is sold in the U.S.  (Montreal Gazette) 3
NEWS IN BRIEF
TEAMSTERS HAS PACT WITH TRUCKERS IN B.C.
The Teamsters Union has reached a tentative agreement with British Columbia's
trucking industry. It calls for a 6-per-cent general wage increase this year and
a 10-per-cent increase in benefits and wages in 1979.  (Globe and Mail)
AIR CANADA BUDGET APPROVED
The federal Government has approved Air Canada's 1978 capital budget, which
includes $68.5-million for purchasing new aircraft, parts and equipment. The
big question mark concerns the selection of a new 200-seater passenger jet. At
present, Air Canada has opted to wait and see what the major aircraft manufactures
introduce during the next few years before making any commitments. (Globe and Mail)
DOMINION BRIDGE NET GAINS SHARPLY IN YEAR
A sharp increase in earnings and a substantial rise in revenues were reported
Jan. 31 by Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd. of Montreal for the latest year. Net earnings
amounted to $37.5-million or $3.53 a share, up from $29.4-million or $2.77 a share
in 1976, restated because of an accounting change. Revenues totalled $596-million,
up from $522-million. (Montreal Gazette)
CATASTROPHIC GAS STORAGE DISASTER PREDICTED
The U.S. General Accounting Office has concluded that a serious storm, earthquake or terrorist attack could cause a major rupture in facilities used to store
liquefied energy gas throughout the U.S. and thus result in the deaths of tens
of thousands of Americans. (Montreal Star)
2 AIRLINES SEEK CARGO RATE RISE
Air Canada and CP Air have filed for domestic air cargo rate increases
ranging between 7.5 and 10 per cent, to become effective Feb. 15. The present
$15 minimum charge would rise to $16 under the new schedule, while general cargo
rates would go up by 7.5 per cent. Specific commodity rates and the general
import rates would rise by 8 per cent, while container rates would rise by 10
per cent. The rate for priority air freight would rise by 8 per cent. (Globe
and Mail)
NEW COMMITTEE WILL HASTEN PIPELINE BILLS
The federal Government plans to establish a special parliamentary committee
to speed up review and passage of enabling legislation for the Canadian portions
of the $10-billion Alaska Highway gas pipeline. The legislation itself, which
will also establish a single pipeline monitoring agency for the mammoth northern
project, is scheduled to be introduced in Parliament Feb. 3. (Montreal Star)
UNITED AIRLINES HAS PLANS TO EXTEND ITS SUPER SAVER FARES
United Airlines stepped up the discount ticket war, saying it plans to
extend its Super Saver fares to all of its routes of more than 900 miles in
length. If the Civil Aeronautics Board approves, United will be offering
discounts of up to 40%  from regular round-trip coach fares on more than
1,500 routes in the continental U.S. and Canada. It currently offers such
	 NEWS IN BRIEF
discounts on just 26 routes. (Wall Street Journal)
TWA PLANS SURGERY ON FLEET, CHANGES IN ACCOUNTING TO CUT ITS DOMESTIC LOSSES
Trans World Airlines is trying major surgery on its fleet in an effort to
cut the heavy losses on its domestic routes.  The airline also is planning
a major accounting change, switching about $25-million in expenses from the
domestic operation to international routes. The net result, says C.E. Meyer,
president, is that the domestic operation, which had a $42-million loss last
year, may break even this year and move into the black in 1979. (Wall Street
Journal)
AIR CANADA ROLE RESTRICTED
Air Canada won't be allowed to branch into areas outside air travel and
connected tourism, the Commons decided Jan. 31. (Winnipeg Free Press)
GRAIN METRIC SWITCH COMPLETE
The grains industry Feb. 1 completed its conversion to metric units. Quantities of grain delivered to country elevators now will be expressed in metric
tonnes rather than in bushels, and export grain prices to farmers will be given
in dollars per metric ton. (Winnipeg Free Press)
ECONOMIC GROWTH HOPES DIM
Hope is dimming for a strong pickup in economic growth during the rest of
1978 according to the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce. The Bank's Newsletter
says there is doubt that acceleration in growth expected in the second half
of the year will in fact occur. (Toronto Star)
SHIPPING JAM IN VANCOUVER CONTINUES
As of Jan. 31, there were still 15 grain ships at anchor, waiting to load
grain in the port of Vancouver, with another eight ships actually loading. The
backlog of needed types of grain to the port is due to bad weather slowing up
Western Canadian grain-collection machinery. (Vancouver Province)
JAPAN COMPLAINTS OVERBLOWN, CLAIM BANFF HOTEL MEN
Complaints that Japanese tourists were hustled by the Banff Springs Hotel
during Christmas week were blown out of proportion, hotel officials said Jan. 30.
Officials said when the overbooking became evident the tourists were given the
option of spending a day in Calgary or taking their chances in Banff. There
was no discrimination involved. (Vancouver Sun)
KAISER EXTENDS OIL AND GAS INTERESTS
Kaiser Resources Ltd. and Petro-Canada announced Jan. 30 an agreement under
which Kaiser could earn up to a 10-percent working interest in about 1.1 million
acres of oil and gas rights surrounding Sable Island, off the East Coast of Nova
Scotia. (Vancouver Sun) 5
AMTRAK DECLINE?
IS AMTRAK NEARING THE END OF THE LINE?
(Washington Post)
The United States soon may become the only industrialized nation in
the world without railroad passenger services connecting its major cities.
By this time this year, for example, you may not be able to travel on
the National Limited from Union Station to Kansas City. The Floridian between
Chicago and Miami may be canceled. Southern Railway may halt the only train
service from Washington to Atlanta and New Orleans. Long train trips from
Chicago to the Pacific Northwest may be remembered only in history books.
Such drastic cutbacks appear inevitable unless the Carter administration
and Congress are prepared to change their policies on spending for Amtrak,
the subsidized national rail passenger corporation, as spelled out in recent
actions. Stated briefly, the administration's policy to date has been to
hold the line on Amtrak's subsidies at current levels of about $500-million
a year. Since costs continue to rise, however, the only way for Amtrak to
balance its annual budgets under such a policy is to reduce services each
year in an amount equal to inflation in expenses.
Orren Beaty, president of the National Association of Rail Passengers,
told Secretary of Transportation Brock Adams recently that such a ceiling
on aid means rail passenger service will be well on its way to
extinction. With forced cutbacks in service every year, Beaty added,
"nothing will be left but a few corridor services," such as between New York
and Washington.
No American is more perplexed about the current situation than former
rail industry executive and current Amtrak president Paul Reistrup. He said
in a recent interview with the Washington Post, "We can't keep chopping service,
especially since we really have got the thing (Amtrak) going."
Reistrup also urged Congress to make the kind of decision America's
government does not often embrace: Either make a commitment to intercity
passenger service by assuming there will be continuing subsidies and benefits to the public, or do away with Amtrak altogether.
Since Amtrak was founded by Congress in 1971, the pressure from Capitol
Hill always has been for more and more service. But intercity passenger
service is a money-losing business on virtually any route in the world
today, because if fares were priced at a level to match costs, there would
be no riders. Thus, more service always costs more money. If the United
States wants intercity trains, said Reistrup, "then its funding level should
permit such a system to be developed and operated properly." If not, "maybe
we should eliminate it entirely," he added.
To the average traveler or taxpayer seeking clues for an understanding
of the future for rail passenger service, the conflicting reports, pronouncements and government decisions in the past four months would appear 6
AMTRAK DECLINE?
to be a monumental case of schizophrenia. One day, the news media reported
that notices soon would be posted around the country detailing cutbacks in
trains and service scheduled in the next month or so. A month later, the
public was treated to Amtrak's five-year plan, a blue-sky scenario of new
passenger cars, engines and expanded services that had nothing to do with
reality but which presumably pleased rail passengers. Then, in true perils-
of-Pauline style, Amtrak threatened cutbacks without more federal aid, got
little response and actually started the cutbacks, got some money and reinstated some service, initiated other cutbacks because the extra money wasn't
enough and, finally, suspended the latest cutbacks when Congress coughed
up a bit more dough. For a week, the Floridian was being dropped from
Amtrak's schedules in January; now, that cancellation has been withdrawn.
All the while, some intercity rail service has deteriorated - - notably
aboard the East Coast Metroliners. But the federal government is pouring
millions of dollars into improvements along the Boston-Washington routes, and
new contracts with operating railroads and recently-completed track work
have permitted better service. In September, nearly 69 percent of Amtrak
trains were on time compared with about 60 percent in August (but Metroliners
were on time only 26 percent of all trips, down from 30 percent). So there
is a mixture of good and bad reports about the current level of Amtrak
service, which does not permit an easy assessment.
In terms of the total U.S. government budget for the current fiscal
year 1978, which projects spending of $458.25-billion and a deficit of
$61.25-billion, Amtrak's subsidy is not a major factor. Originally, the
passenger corporation asked for $534.1-million to underwrite losses from
rail service this fiscal year. The administration, supposedly one that
favored rail passenger transportation, asked for $500-million. Congress
came up with $488.5-million for the year that began Oct. 1. And Amtrak,
faced with a deficit of more than $50-million, began taking steps to cut
service.
At first, Senate and House appropriations conferees approved an additional $8-million. But when Amtrak directors responded by voting to cancel
the only Chicago-Florida service and to speed up the process by which other
trains would be dropped in a few months, Congress added another $10-million.
The conference committee also bought some time by ordering Amtrak to stop
making plans to cancel any existing services until a new Department of
Transportation reexamination of Amtrak routes is prepared by March.
But the problem of financing Amtrak - - or if America even wants an
Amtrak - - remains. Although public opinion polls show Americans in support
of passenger trains, few people ever ride what remains of a vast system that
connected most communities by rail several decades ago.
In the fiscal year ended last Sept. 30, Amtrak carried 19.2 million
riders compared with 18.15 million the previous year and under 17 million
for its first full:year of operations. Measured against earlier years,
however, the recent increase in ridership shows that rail travel is not
popular. Back in 1944, railroads reported 90.23 million passenger miles
traveled. With the availability of money and gasoline after World War II, 7
AMTRAK DECLINE?
Americans' love affair with the automobile was confirmed and rail travel was
down to 39.9 million passenger miles by 1947 and to 14 million by 1964.
The total hit a low of 4.3 million in 1972 before starting a slow climb to
about 6 million today, more than 4 million of which is attributable to
Amtralc.
All the ivhile, Americans are buying cars in record numbers. General
Motors Corp. chairman Thomas A. Murphy said his firm and the auto industry
faces sales records in 1978, including 11.75 million new cars. People buy cars
"not because they want to be ostentatious, or anything like that, they buy
them because they need that type of vehicle to handle their transportation
needs," Murphy said. "I deeply resent as an American (the idea) that
we are going to interfere with people's freedom, we don't want them to have
the capability to carry the family in one automobile," the GM chief executive
added.
For Amtrak, looking at its less than 1-percent share of current intercity
travel vs. 87 percent for the auto, 11 percent for air and 1.5 percent for
bus, the current controversy over its financing adds up to a critical crossroads. Either Amtrak will be permitted to develop a gradual increase in
market share or it will see its potential growth destroyed by cutbacks in
service (even a reduction to three times weekly from daily service in certain
trains means fewer riders overall, Reistrup pointed out).
To be sure, Amtrak has a goal of major improvements and development of
new highspeed trains outside the Northeast Corridor - - such as Chicago-
Detroit and Los Angeles-San Diego. Increased frequency would be added
between Los Angeles and San Francisco and Chicago and Pittsburgh. New trains
would be added in such markets as Cincinnati-Dayton-Columbus. A total of
353 new passenger cars would be purchased. Amtrak projects that its ridership
under agressive marketing could be boosted 29 percent in the next five years
to 26 million by 1982. Revenues would grow from $287-.million to $482-million.
The cost of this plan, an operating subsidy over the five years of $3.5-
billion, or $695-million a year, plus grants to buy equipment of $1.05-
billion or $210-million a year.
If just 1 percent of auto travelers shifted to trains, says Amtrak,
revenues would jump from $371-million to $527-million in 1980. This change
would save 600,000 barrels of oil annually. But instead of planning this
future growth, DOT officials, members of Congress and Amtrak officers in
1978 appear destined to be studying potential cutbacks to reduce subsidies,
mainly by restructuring Amtrak's system of routes. In the process, service
to some communities will be eliminated. 8
C 3 A L TRANS. PORT REPORT
COAL: CHEAPER BY RAIL — IF ...
(Railway Age)
A federally-commissioned study has determined that, along selected routes,
the costs of hauling coal by unit trains are competitive with those of coal-slurry
pipelines — if the railroads upgrade their track.
The eight-volume report, "Comparative Coal Transportation Costs: An
Economic and Engineering Analysis of Truck, Belt, Barge and Coal Slurry
and Pneumatic Pipelines," was carried out for the Bureau of Mines and the
Federal Energy Administration by the Center for Advanced Computation of the
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Professor Michael Rieber, a principal investigator on the project,
said that if the railroads do make the necessary track improvements "they
can in fact beat the competition" for carrying coal. "If they don't,"
Rieber added, "then I don't believe for one minute that they're going
to make it."
Some of the study's more significant findings are contained in the
introductory volume, in a table that compares the unit costs (in dollars
per ton) of moving coal by slurry pipeline and unit train from Gillette,
Wyo., and from Colstrip, Mont., to various cities in the Midwest, South,
and Southwest. In that table, unit costs are listed for moving slurry
through a pipeline that would return no water to the point of origin and
through a pipeline that would return the water. For unit trains, three
situations are considered ~ fuel capacity, 80 per cent of capacity, and
120 per cent of capacity.
A look at the data shows that the cost of running unit coal trains compares favorably with that of transporting coal by slurry pipeline. For
example, in the run from Gillette to Sioux City, Iowa, even the highest-
cost rail situation (801 capacity; $4.27/ton) is less than the low figure
for pipeline (no water return; $5.14/ton). In most cases, the 1001 (full
capacity) rail figure falls somewhere between the low and high pipeline
costs.
However, the authors of the study emphasize that "the comparative costs
in (the table) must be viewed with great care. They are clearly biased
against, the unit train. The slurry costs are understated; t?o unit train
costs overstated."
For unit trains, the entire cost of road and track upgrading has been
assessed against the coal-carrying operation. Clearly, some of this should
be allocated to other rail traffic which shares the benefits. Similarly,
no credit is taken for route flexibility, the possibility of back haul,
or any advantages accruing to existing trackage in a time of national
emergency " 9
COAL TRANSPORT REPORT
However, it must be emphasized that if the railroads do not upgrade where
necessary, the loads and speeds cannot be sustained, and the rail cost estimates should not be used.
Regarding unit train costs, the study says that "mileages were derived
from a system route map utilizing the shortest rail distance between origin
and destination pairs. The costs are based on a movement of 25 million tons
per year, with train speed of 30 mph loaded and 60 mph unloaded. A 10-percent bottleneck penalty was assessed throughout. Increasing tonnages decrease costs and costs are directly related to bottleneck assumptions for
all tonnages and speeds. ..."
In calculating costs of slurry pipelines, the report states, "It is
assumed that the pipeline delivers 25 million tons per year at a flow rate
of 3.5 mph. The estimated mileages are the linear distances between the
origin-destination pairs. River crossings are not separately costed but,
rather, are assumed to be part of the linearity. An exception is made for
points along the Great Lakes if linearity leads to a crossing. Here, the
distance used was the shortest practicable land route.
"The cost estimates are all based on full pipeline capacity utilization.
If the utilization drops by about 13% (3-mph operation), a penalty of approximately 15°i in cost is incurred. Water for dilution must be added if
utilization drops more than 131.
"If a 5-mph, 38-inch pipeline (36 million tons per year) is assumed,
reducing the flow rate to yield 25 million tons per year (3.5 mph) suggests
a one-third increase in cost for a 30.61 drop in capacity."
In general, the report continues, "Based on our analysis, and assuming
the necessary upgrading, the railroads should be able to handle the tonnages
forecast out of both the northern Great Plains and central Appalachia. ..."
But the report makes several recommendations it sees as necessary for
rails to carry the projected increase in coal. "It is probable...that more
lines must be developed in the northern Great Plains area. By 1990, double
tracking from Colstrip, Montana, to eastern North Dakota and from Gillette
to eastern Nebraska may be required. Additionally, more spurs into the coal
fields will become necessary. Finally, a more direct link between the
Colstrip and Gillette areas would prove helpful by establishing shorter
rail distances and relieving the more western connecting loop."
The study finds "no apparent rail network problems in the East. The
major concern...is the amount of deferred and delayed maintenance on critical
lines. The speed with which this can be remedied may be seen in the upgrading efforts in the Northeast Corridor. It may also be observed in the
data reported for Conrail during its first nine months.
"In the West, increased rail capacity must be associated with higher
train speeds and the safety hazards these entail. 10
COAL TRANSPORT REP OR T
"We have suggested the necessity for rerouting around cities and towns
as well as protected level crossings and overpasses. In the East rerouting
is probably not possible. Given the existing mainline corridors, it appears
more reasonable to lay more parallel track. It should also be possible to
provide for coal storage and distribution facilities outside major consumption centers.
"For rail shipments from Appalachia westward, the rail deterioration
situation may not be as bad as it is often pictured. It should be noted
that the Chessie system was willing to incorporate segments of bankrupt
lines in Ohio, western Pennsylvania, Indiana, and Illinois. The condition
of these lines is not apt to be as bad as those that were left for Conrail."
The report underscores that it is concerned with cost, not with the
prices charged to rail or slurry customers, and has strong words for rails
about prices:
"The rail problem is one of finance and, sometimes, of diversion of rail
revenues to non-transport use. In large part this seems to be due to the
attitude that as costs rise prices must rise (except where freight competition is too strong). Costs rise due to inflation, but per-unit costs
are also rising because of freight diversion. The very increase in prices
serves to decrease demand by diverting potential and existing traffic.
'The result is less revenue to cover the existing, relatively fixed cost
of service. The railroads appear to behave as if demand were a function
of money GNP (i.e., with the inflation factor) rather than a function
of price and relative price for the service.
* * *
ECONOMIST SAYS CROW RATE SHOULD INCREASE
(Regina Leader-Post)
National unity depends on viable east-west trade and the statutory
Crows Nest Pass freight rate is a majcxr economic incentive encouraging such
trade, Grant Devine, an agricultural economist from the University of
Saskatchewan, said January 24.
Therefore, the Crow rate should be retained and even increased with the
taxpayers absorbing the difference, Mr. Devine told breeders attending the
Saskatchewan Livestock Convention.
Mr. Devine said inflation has caused operating costs to rise far beyond
what they were when the rate was set and an increase is needed to let the
companies upgrade line and buy new equipment.
However, because the benefits of the Crow rate ripple through the
economy, benefitting all, the increase should be paid from the public purse
rather than by farmers, he said. 11
RAI LWAY
CP RAIL APPLIES TO CTC TO BUILD NEW RAIL ROUTE
(CP Rail News Release)
CP Rail has filed an application with the Canadian Transport
Commission to build 5.5 miles of new mainline track between Lake Louise,
Alta., and Stephen, B.C.
The $12-million project is part of a continuing program by CP
Rail to increase railway capacity and meet the future transportation
needs of western Canada's agricultural and resource industries.
Documents filed with the railway's application include a plan,
profile and legal description of the proposed route. Also included
is a detailed environmental study carried out in accordance with
federal Department of the Environment guidelines. It concludes that
the route is environmentally acceptable.
The new track will have a reduced grade for use by heavy westward
trains, while the existing line will remain in use for eastward trains,
Going west from the vicinity of Lake Louise station, the proposed
alignment is to the north of the present line, crossing the Trans
Canada Highway and Bow River west of the Jasper Highway intersection.
It then follows a route adjacent to existing transportation corridors,
rejoining the mainline at Stephen near the provincial boundary.
Formal filing of the application follows public notice given by
CP Rail on Dec. 21, 1977.
Construction work has already started on two similar track projects in British Columbia approved earlier by the Commission - **
4.5 miles of new trackage near Revelstoke and 11 miles near Salmon
Aim.
The two B.C. projects and Lake Louise make up the first phase of
the line-improvement program between Calgary and Vancouver. The
second phase would involve construction of about 19 miles of new
trackage in the Beaver River Valley east of Rogers Pass which may
include a new eight-mile tunnel below the existing Connaught Tunnel.
RAIL REVENUES UP
(Edmonton Journal)
Revenues of Canada's six largest railway companies totalled
$290,202,399 in October, up 8.7 per cent from a year earlier, Statistics 12
RAILWAY
Canada reported.
Railway expenses were up 8.8 per cent to $268,873,837, and net
income was up 7.5 per cent at $21,328,562. The railways carried
12,526,881 ton-miles of freight in October, up 1.9 per cent, while
passenger-miles came to 112,307,000, down 3.6 per cent for the month.
TRAIN-BUS PRICE WAR DEVELOPING
(Ottawa Journal)
Voyageur Colonial is planning to slash its Ottawa-Toronto return
bus fare by as much as $5 to be competitive with the train.
An unexpected price war has developed that will make a trip to
Toronto, by train or bus, one of the best travel bargains available.
Late last year, CN introduced a special three-day excursion train
fare of $20.65 for the trip.
Voyageur Colonial president George McDonnell said the bus company
reluctantly feels it must follow suit and is planning to offer the
reduced round-trip fare.
SIDING BATTLE TO CONTINUE DESPITE RULING
(The Windsor Star)
Despite another legal setback, citizens of South Walkerville and
Remington Park say they will continue to fight CP Rail over use of the Powell
Siding in Windsor, Ont.
The citizens lost their latest court fight to prevent the railway from
re-applying to use the siding. The city will decide whether to appeal after
examining the judgment. A spokesman for the citizens says they will continue
the fight.
Mr. Justice Angus Cattanach has dismissed an application to the Federal
Court of Canada to prevent a new panel of the Canadian Transport Commission
(CTC) from hearing the railway's new application to use the siding. The
decision clears the way for CTC hearings to resume into the application. No
date has been set for continuation of the hearing.
Lawyers for the city and citizen groups fighting the railway successfully
argued before the CTC's railway transport committee Jan. 16 that CP Rail's
new application should not be heard until the Federal Court decision was handed
down. Mr. Justice Cattanach ruled that the new panel acted within its jurisdiction in hearing the latest application and was not guilty of bias, as
charged by the opponents. 13
RAI LWAY
HOW NOT TO OPERATE A SUCCESSFUL RAILWAY
(CP-Montreal Star)
The McKenzie royal commission has ended hearings and is expected to
submit its report based on a 10-month inquiry into the Crown-owned British
Columbia Railway to the provincial government some time in May.
As well as paying the cost of the commission, estimated to be $l-million,
B.C. taxpayers will pay the estimated $500,000 cost of the railway's own
presentation during the inquiry.
The commission heard that:
— PUBLIC investment in the railway totals almost $l-billion, including
$650-million in borrowings from sources such as the Canada Pension
Plan and various provincial government funds;
— WITH its accumulated losses over the past 20 years totalling $257-
million, and its present operations adding to the loss, the railway
will never be in a position to repay the debt;
— UNDER the accounting method used by the former Social Credit govern
ment of W.A.C. Bennett, the BCR's true 16-year loss of $66.1-million
was artificially reduced to $3.7-million;
— THE railway's Fort Nelson extension, billed as the gateway to northern
mineral riches, with a total capital investment of $70-million,
has failed to spawn an industrial boom;
— THE uncompleted Dease Lake extension, on which the construction
budget soared from $69-million to $160-million, serves an area endowed with low-grade thermal coal and timber stands of a stunted,
low-yield variety;
— THE railway, on which some communities are totally dependent, exists
primarily to service the forest industry, which is the mainstay of
the provincial economy;
— THE forest industry, because of its insistence that the BCR maintain
uneconomic routes, and its enjoyment of the railway's low freight
rates, benefits from a public subsidy.
In his final argument to the commission, BCR lawyer George Cumming urged
that the Fort Nelson extension be upgraded at a cost of $35-million. The
extension, regarded as Fort Nelson's economic lifeline, has cost $150-million
since its opening in 1971 and has experienced 270 derailments and 75 outages
in the last two years. 14
RAILWAY
CALGARY-EL^IONTON DAYLINER SERVICE WOULD 'LIKELY BE' FIRST TO BE SCRAPPED
(Calgary Herald)
The Calgary to Edmonton Dayliner is likely to be the first rail
service to be derailed when VIA Rail assumes management responsibility for
rail passenger service in Canada on April 1.
Harold Murray, VIA western president, held the same view Jan. 25 as
other VIA Rail executives that there is no need for the Dayliner because
of the alternative surface and air services available on the route.
CANADIAN CARLQADINGS
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
Carloads
Volume (Tons)
Piggyback
U.S. CARLOADINGS
For Week Ending
Jan. 21, 1978
69,107
4,510,072
6,600
Total for Year to
Jan. 21, 1978
179,289
11,493,615
18,583
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
+     2,442
+   330,938
321
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
+ 892
+ 162,107
+      893
Percentage
Change
+
+
3.7
7.9
4.6
Percentage
Change
+
+
+
0.5
1.4
5.0
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
Carloads
Volume (Ton-Miles)
Piggyback
For Week Ending
Jan. 21, 1978
353,162
13.1 billion
Total for Year to
Jan. 21, 1978
1,038,199
38.2 billion
Total for Year to
Jan. 14. 1978
29,031
Change from Similar
Period ,1977
7,808
+     0.2 billion
Change from Similar
Period, 1977
100,386
1.6 billion
Change from Similar
Period,  1977
+ 1,798
Percentage
Change
2.2
+       1.6
Percentage
Change
8.8
4.1
Percentage
Change
+  6.6
* * * 15
AVIATION
AIR CANADA, CP AIR SEEK 4°a FARE INCREASES
(Globe and Mail)
Air Canada and CP Air are seeking fare increases averaging 4 per cent,
effective April 1 in Canada and April 15 on Canada-U.S. routes.
In addition, passengers flying from Canada to the United States would
pay an extra 2-per-cent currency surcharge because of the drop in value of
the Canadian dollar in relation to the U.S. dollar.
The two airlines will also: ease the restrictions on charter-class
Canada fares; introduce new inclusive-tour packages, in which the air fare
and hotel accommodation are combined; and eliminate blackout periods in
family plan and senior citizen fares.
Both airlines cite rising costs as the reason for the proposed increases.
John McGill, Air Canada vice-president of marketing, said the charter-
class fares, introduced last year, now will be available on shorter journeys
and will apply on all services 400 miles and over rather than on flights of
more than 700 miles as in the past.  The minimum-stay requirements will be
reduced to seven days from 10 days. The advance-booking period will remain
at 45 days.
Mr. McGill said more than a half-million charter-class seats were offered
by the airline last year and because of the program's success the number of
seat allocations will be doubled this year. He said that during the peak
season June to September, charter-class capacity will be increased to four
times the 1977 level. Last year, the airline had to stop selling when the
available seats quickly sold out until the fall.
G.E. Manning, CP Air vice-president of marketing, said that the charter-
class fares will apply for the first time to the airline's Alberta, B.C. and
Yukon routes. The airlines will also introduce a special individual inclusive-
tour fare, which will be valid all year, and will represent a discount from
the regular economy rate of 15 per cent in the summer and 20 per cent in the
winter. New group inclusive-tour fares on routes of 400 miles or more
requiring a minumum of 10 passengers will have discounts of 20 per cent in
summer and 30 per cent the rest of the year.
Week-end excursion rates, which offer a 25-per-cent discount from the
regular economy fare, will be retained on routes of up to 700 miles.
Mr. Manning of CP Air said the current cost-increases, particularly
for aviation fuel, are beyond the control of the airline and can only be
recovered by increasing passenger fares. 16
AVIATION
AIR ROUTES OVER NORTH ATLANTIC REVITALIZED BY LOW SKYTRAIN FARES
(Montreal Gazette)
After six years of doing everything in their power to frustrate Freddie
Laker's attempts to introduce his Skytrain service between London and New York,
the major airlines flying the same route are finding that they are actually
benefitting from the inauguration last September of the low-fare service.
It now looks as though Laker, far from robbing the six other major
airlines of business, has helped stimulate a strong upsurge in North Atlantic air travel from which his rivals are benefitting. Lower air fares have
been one of the principal reasons for a large increase in interest in the
United States as a place for Europeans to visit. Some travel agents there
are forecasting that four times as many Britons will vacation in the U.S.
this year as in 1977.
Last December, Freddie Laker claimed that his privately-owned airline
would carry about 400,000 passengers across the Atlantic in 1977, and
500,000 passengers in 1978. He claims that bookings for his advance booking
charters for this summer are running at twice the 1977 level.
Mr. Laker is now applying to extend his Skytrain service to Los Angeles.
AIRLINES FACE FUEL CRISIS UNLESS ALTERNATIVES FOUND
(Canadian Transportation & Distribution Management)
While the coming energy shortages hold serious implications for all transport modes, aviation could suffer the worst blow unless more reserves are discovered or alternative sources of energy are developed.
That is the grim picture painted by C. H. Glenn, vice-president fleet
planning, Air Canada. He recently told the Canadian Association of Physical Distribution Management that the airlines, unlike other modes, cannot easily switch to other available fuel sources. "People say there is
plenty of oil in Canada, but because the airlines can use only a small percentage of what is refined from a barrel of crude, most of the available
fuel is useless to us."
He added that conservation and fuel substitution have become priorities
in light of predictions that demand for oil will exceed supply sometime after 1985. Also, the federal government has requested its departments, agencies and Crown corporations to reduce their energy consumption by 10 per
cent during the 1976-77 fiscal year and freeze it at or below that level
for the next 10 years. 17
AVIATION
AIR CANADA REVERTS TO GOOD OLD NAVY BLUE
(Montreal Gazette)
Fashion says "Wait long enough and a style will come back." Nothing
proves that old saw better than Air Canada's new flight attendant's uniform
which was worn in the air for the first time Feb. 1.
Attendants are back to square one in navy blue jackets and skirts. They
were de rigeur 40 years ago when, in October, 1938, Trans Canada Airlines
introduced their first true stewardess uniform.
WORLD FARE PLANNED
(Montreal Gazette)
A round-the-world excursion fare was announced Jan. 30 by Pan American
World Airways.
The fare will allow travel from the U.S. to many cities overseas for
up to 80 days. The new special fare will be available on a standby basis
at economy-class level of $999 and first-class level of $1,599, a saving
of nearly 45 per cent off the regular fares. It will also be available on
a reserved-seat basis, with unlimited stopovers, at $1,199 economy and
$1,899 first class, more than 35 per cent off the regular fare. The fare
will be effective March 10, subject to U.S. Government approval.
* * *
2 AIRLINES INTRODUCE LOW FARES FROM U.K.
(Globe and Mail)
British Mrways and Air Canada will introduce low charter-class return
fares from Britain to Canada in April. The two airlines are already operating
charter-class fares from Canada to Britain.
A British Airways spokesman said introduction of the fares after April 1
will cut about $48 from the current low-cost advance purchase excursion fare
now in effect from Britain to Canada. He said the fares will help stimulate
travel from Britain to Canada and will apply from London, Manchester and
Glasgow. 18
LABOR
THE RAILROADS' SHOWDOWN WITH LABOR
(Business Week)
U.S. rail unions have plunged into a pitched battle at the bargaining table over work rules.
Railroad management contends that unless the unions agree to make
sweeping changes in costly, decades-old provisions governing crew size
and pay, some carriers may not survive. The unions, desperately trying
to protect job security in a declining industry, are balking at this
hard-line approach.
The result could be a major strike later this year. To avoid emergency injunctive action by the government, the unions are talking about
staging a selective walkout against sane railroads. But even a short
strike against a few major roads could cause irreparable economic harm.
The seeds of the current problem were sown in the immediate postwar
years, when the railroads replaced steam locomotives with diesels,
drastically changing the character of railroad jobs. After the railroads
first proposed, in 1959, to eliminate the fireman's job in diesel
locomotives, it took 13 years of bitter wrangling at bargaining tables,
before Presidential boards, in the courts, and in Congress before the
issue was finally settled. The railroads' latest attempt to reduce labor
costs, which amount to 511 of the operating dollar, is in some ways even
more broad-based. The carriers are proposing changes in three work-rule
categories for freight trains. These include:
— REDUCING the size of train crews. For many decades, freight-train
crews have consisted of an engineer, a conductor, and two brakemen.
Management wants to eliminate at least one, and in some cases both,
of the brakemen. The unions oppose an across-the-board reduction,
for safety and other reasons.
— ELIMINATING a steam-era wage formula under which a train crew's
daily pay is based on eight hours of work, or 100 mi. of travel,
whichever comes first. There was good reason for this system
many years ago, when trains were slower. But today's diesels usually
exceed 100 mi. a day. The railroads want to substitute a straight
hourly pay-scale.
— REDUCING the number of crew changes required per trip. Crews now
must be changed each time a train enters a different union "seniority
district" and — particularly onerous to the carriers — each time
it enters or leaves a freight yard.
Management is demanding that these issues be negotiated on a national
basis so "crew consist" — or crew size — is uniform for all carriers. The
unions, however, want to continue the tradition of bargaining railroad-by-
railroad on issues involving crew size and makeup.
The crew-consist issue affects only the 188,000-member UTU, because it 19
LABOR
represents the brakemen whose jobs would be eliminated. The other big
operating union, the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers (BLE), is
involved with the UTU in the 100-mi. pay and crew-change disputes. The
national negotiations on economic issues also cover five off-train unions,
such as the Brotherhood of Railway & Airline Clerks, and six shopcraft
unions led by the International Association of Machinists (LAM).
RAILWAY LABOR TALKS BREAK DOWN
(Dow Jones)
The Associated Railway Unions — ARU — said in Montreal on Feb. 2
that they have asked Federal Labor Minister John Munro to intervene in current
bargaining with CN, CP Rail and 11 smaller carriers.
A union spokesman said talks broke down following submission by the
railways Feb. 1 of "inadequate" proposed terms. The spokesman said the
request was sent to Mr. Munro Feb. 2 and that railway negotiators have been
notified of the request. A meeting between unions and railways is now
adjourning without further scheduled sessions.
The Canadian Press also reported that contract talks for Canada's
100,000 unionized railway workers ground to a halt Feb. 2 at a downtown
hotel in Montreal. Union negotiators entered a bargaining session and
read a brief statement critical of the railways' comprehensive contract
proposal.
The following statement was issued Feb. 2 by Canadian National
and CP Rail regarding negotiations with the Associated Railway Unions:
"The railways regret the decision of the Associated Railway Unions
to break off negotiations. In keeping with the anti-inflation guidelines
of the government of Canada, the railways made a film and fair offer for
a one-year contract — a six-per-cent wage increase retroactive to Jan. 1,
plus an increase in fringe benefits.
"Under this offer, the average annual earnings of railway workers in
Canada would be increased in 1978 by $938 to $16,563."
CANADIAN LABOR COSTS UP 66°a
Labor costs for Canadian manufacturers rose 661 between 1971 and 1976,
reported The Financial Times. But according to a new Statistics Canada
study, inflation was responsible for only two-thirds of the increase. The
rest was either conceded by management or forced upon it by unions or government in the form of overtime payments, extra paid leave and larger welfare
payments. 	 20
TOURISM & TRAVEL
HOTEL SLUMP 'WORST EVER' - THEY'RE ALL LOSING
(Montreal Gazette)
Provincial tourism ministers met with Jack Horner, federal minister of
industry, trade and commerce, in Ottawa Jan. 30 to try to pump new life into
a tourism industry which has sagged from coast to coast — but especially in
Montreal.
The Montreal situation is so grim that some local hoteliers are saying
that it is unlikely a single major hotel will make money in the city this
year. The first three weeks of January are conceded by most managers to
be "the worst ever." According to the confidential hotel occupancy
figures obtained by The Gazette, not one of the city's hostelries came
even close to the "break-even" point. For most new hotels, between 70 per
cent and 75 per cent of the rooms must be filled to make money. An older
hotel can make money with as little as 55-per-cent occupancy. But the hotel
with the highest occupancy in downtown Montreal was the Bonaventure with
66.3 per cent of its rooms filled.
CHEAP TOURS PROMOTE TRAVELLING IN CANADA
(Montreal Star)
Government and industry tourism officials have moved to promote more
travel by Canadians at home through a package of new low-cost tours.
The program, which involves the country's two major airlines, Air
Canada and CP Air, as well as railways, hotel chains and travel agents,
was announced Jan. 31 following a one-day federal-provincial tourism ministers' meeting. The ministers agreed that the program, which includes 54
tours, will not wipe out Canada's estimated $1.7-billion 1977 travel
deficit but will attract more Canadians to vacation within the country.
The Globe and Mail also reported that some examples of the new packages
are:
— AIR CANADA is offering a package tour of the Atlantic Provinces
including hotel and car for a week, based on two people to a room,
for $251 in the summer high season.
— VIA RAIL is offering an eight-day tour of Western Canada including
transportation and hotels that can cost less than $160.
— CP AIR is offering an 11-day hotel and car-rental package to
visit Ottawa, Montebello, Montreal and Quebec, returning to Ottawa,
for $262 a person, two to a room, plus air fare.
* * * 21
SHIPPING
NEED SEEN FOR PRINCE RUPERT GRAIN TERMINAL
(Winnipeg Free Press)
Major tie-ups in West Coast grain shipments won't end until Canada
stops relying on the port of Vancouver and the Fraser Valley rail lines to
export grain, according to sources in the grain and transportation industries.
This year's backlog in export shipments of 22 million bushels is considered the worst in 25 years by some industry officials, who said it could
have been avoided if another grain terminal had been built at Prince Rupert
or a second rail line put through the Rocky Mountains.
The need for expanded use of the port of Prince Rupert is recognized
by the grain industry, and sources said Canadian Wheat Board officials have
privately suggesting the port needs a new 20 million bushel grain terminal.
But, until there is a change in attitudes about Prince Rupert there will
be no change in the West Coast situation, according to Jim Wright, newly-
elected president of the Palliser Wheat Growers Association.
However, Brian Summerville, executive assistant to the Alberta Wheat
Pool's general manager, said, "Building a new facility at Prince Rupert
requires a large capital investment, and companies have to look at it
carefully before going ahead.
"If there really is a significant increase in (St. Lawrence) Seaway
tolls, it will be to the advantage of the Canadian Wheat Board to draw
grain to the West Coast from even as far east as Winnipeg. This will
mean a significant increase in grain movement out of the West Coast, and
means there will have to be more rail and terminal capacity," he said.
Mr. Summerville downplayed the role a new terminal at Prince Rupert
could have played in preventing this year's backlog in grain shipments,
and said the terminals at Vancouver have performed well this year. "I can't
see any percentage in pointing the finger at anyone... but it's pretty
evident that transportation is still our largest concern. We've still got
problems with co-ordinating sales, ships, terminals, the country and railways," he said.
Noting that there have been few labor problems at the West Coast, he
said the export delays are being caused by ships arriving in bunches,
problems the cold weather creates for the railways on the Prairies and in
the mountains, and bottlenecks in rail transportation within the port area
at Vancouver. While agreeing that the backlog has resulted from the same
problems that plague West Coast grain shipments every year, Mr. Wright said
he has to go along with statements that there is a near-crisis situation
at the West Coast.
He said the Wheat Board is not going to meet its projected exports for
the West Coast of 32 million bushels a month, and that "our sales will be
limited again this year because we can't get stuff out of the West Coast." 22
SHIPPING
Doug Campbell, the association's research director, said if the
West Coast works at 80 per cent of capacity it will be able to meet the
scheduled 32 million bushels in monthly grain exports. But, in order to
catch-up on the 22-million bushel backlog, it will have to work at peak
efficiency, pushing through 40 million bushels monthly.
Canadian Wheat Board sources admit the backlog won't be cleared up
until May or June, but were hoping few ships arrive in the first half
of February so they can catch-up on most of the backlog. Describing this
winter's West Coast shipping program as "too ambitious," Glenn Stephens
of Canadian Stevedoring in Vancouver, said, "I'm sure that 90 per cent of
the ships will be on demurrage before they leave."
The Winnipeg Free Press Weekly also reported Mr. Campbell said that
since grain terminals at Vancouver can only push through 40 million bushels
a month if they work at peak efficiency and only one million bushels a
week is slated for Prince Rupert, Canada will continue to have trouble
meeting export commitments during the remainder of the crop year. To
meet this "ambitious" shipping program, the Wheat Board told the railways
at the beginning of the season it needed 1,500 cars of grain a week, but
didn't start asking for this number of cars until early winter, when the
weather makes rail movement difficult, a spokesman for CP Rail said.
Gordon Howie, a member of Prince Rupert's grain co-ordinating committee,
said the grain industry has always known that it needs additional handling
capacity at Prince Rupert, but is only now gearing up to spend money on new
facilities. He said Prince Rupert has been treated as a "surge" port when
conditions at Vancouver become intolerable.
This was illustrated by Canadian Grain Commission statistics, which show
that during the six weeks between Oct. 19 and Nov. 30, 1977, Prince Rupert
only exported 1,363,000 bushels of wheat. Wheat exports since Nov. 30 varied
between 586,000 bushels and 1,161,000 bushels, while at Vancouver