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[Returns relative to the letting of the railway work between Emory's Bar and Port Moody, B.C.] Canada. Parliament 1882

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45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No. 48.)
A. 1882
RETURNS
RELATIVE TO THE LETTING
OF  THE
RAILWAY   WORK
BETWEEN
EMORY'S  BAR   AND   PORT   MOODY. B.C.
fPninfcd ftg ®t[^it 4 lWran«*t
OTTAWA:
PRINTED BY MACLEAN, ROGER & Co., WELLINGTON-.STREET,
1882.  45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
1882
(48)
RETURN
To an Address of the House op Commons, dated 20th February, 1882;—
For copies of Advertisements, Specifications, Conditions, Tenders, Correspondence, Orders in Council, and all other papers relative to the Letting
of the Railway work between Emory's Bar and Port Moody, B.C.
By command,
J. A. MOUSSEAU,
Department of the Secretary of State, Secretary of State.
27th February, 1882.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
EMORY S BAR TO PORT MOODY.
Notice to Contractors.    Tender for Work in British Columbia.
Sealed Tenders will be received by the undersigned up to noon on Wednesday,
the 1st day of February next, in a lump sum, for the construction of that portion of
the road between Port Moody and the West-end cf Contract 60, near Emory's Bar, a
distance of about 85 miles.
Specifications, conditions of contract and forms of tender may be obtained on application at the Canadian Pacific Railway Office, in New Westminster, and at the
Chief Engineer's Office at Ottawa, after the 1st January next, at which time phins and
profiles will be open for inspection at the latter office.
This timely notice is given with a view to giving Contractors an opportunity of
visiting and examining the ground during the fine season and before the winter sets
in.
Mr. Marcus Smith, who! is in charge of the office at New Westminster, is instructed to give Contractors all the information in his power.
No tender will be entertained unless on one of the printed forms, addressed to F.
Braun, Esq., Sec. Dept. of Railways and Canals, and marked " Tender for C. P. R."
F. BRAUN, Secretary.
Dept. of Railways and Canals,
Ottawa, Oct. 24th, 1881.
Canadian Pacific Railway, Office of the Engineer-in-Chief,   -
Ottawa, 15th Oct., 1881. .
Sir,—I have the honor to report that the revised location ot the line for the
Canadian Pacific Railway, between Emory's Bar and Port Moody in British Columbia,
is completed, and the preparation of the plans, profiles and specifications far advanced, so much so that I believe I may confidently say they will be finished about
the 1st January next.
Tenders for the work can therefore be invited at any time thereafter that the
Government may desire.   In this connection I may be permitted to remark that as
the completion and putting under traffic of the section now under contract between
Emory's Bar and Eamloops would not be of the same benefit towards the develop-
48—1 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
ment of the resources of the country, as if the whole line from tide-water to Kamloops
was in a condition to be operated; and, further, the construction of the section from
Kamloops easterly through the Rocky Mountains cannot be conducted to the same
advantage without rail communication with the sea coast, it therefore appears to
me important to have the section between Emory's and Port Moody completed no
later than that portion between Emory's and Kamloops.
In order to accomplish this object, I would suggest that authority be given to
invite tenders at an early date, thus giving contractors an opportunity of visiting the
ground during the fine weather and before winter sets in.
As the plans, profiles and specifications will show very clearly the work required
to be done, I recommend that the contract be let under the " lump sum " system, the
contractors being required to carry out all the works shown and specified in the above-
named documents for the said "lump sum," but that a schedule of prices be given
the tender to be mtcle use of in making additions or deductions from the lump sum,
in case of changes in the work, either reducing or increasing it.
I have further to state that I am strongly of opinion, it would be in the interest
of the economical prosecution of the work to let it as a whole, in one contract, and
for the following reasons recommend that this course bo adopted:—
First, Because the rails and fastenings will have to be transported over the line
from Port Moody.
Second, Because such a course will very largely reduce the competition for labor.
Third, Because the work is of such a character as will necessitate the employment of a large amount of plant and rolling stock.
I have the honor to be, Sir, your obedient servant,
COLLINGWOOD SCHREIBER, Engineer-in-Chief.
F. Braun, Esq,, Secretary, Department of Railways and Canals.
(Memorandum.)
Ottawa, 18th October, 1881.
The undersigned has the honor to represent that the Chief Engineer of the-
Oanadian Pacific Railway has reported that the revised location of the line to be
followed by that railway between Emory's Bar and Port Moody, in British Columbia
a distance of about eighty-five miles, has now been effected, and that the plans, profiled
and specifications will, he expects, be prepared about the 1st of Januarv next    He
further reports that the completion and putting under traffic of the section now under
contract between Emory's Bar and Kamloops would not be of the same benefit
towards the development of the resources of the country as if the whole force   tidewater to Kamloops, were in a condition to be operated, and also that tho construction
of the section from Kamloops, easterly, through the Rocky Mountains, cannot be
conducted to the same advantage without rail connection with the sea coast    He
therefore, considers it important to have the section between Emory's Bar and Port
Moody completed no later than that portion between Emory's Ba?and  Kamloonf
and advises the calling of tenders therefor at an early date, border tAfford 2
tors an opportunity of visiting the ground during fi/e weather, andbefor7wintefseS
That, in the opinion of he Chief Engineer, it would tend towards the economical
prosecution of the work that it should be let as a whole, in one contract*7u"h a
course being, he considers, advisable on the grounds • 1st That XI. ™-f \ * *
ings will have to be transported over the Af£2^PortMoS? 2nd T^th/^11"
tion of this course will very largely reduce the competS& lat'r 3rd BecaS
Z^^1^StZrr aSt° neCe88itate ^ -ployment.ral^tCort
That the Chief Engineer further advises that the> •wm.L- i^ w H   ,, ->
sum" system, the contrite, being reuuir/£££%£& wKo™ b^2 45 Victoria.
Sessioi
i:U   l'
its (No.48.1)
A. 1-882
plans, profiles and specifications for a fixed sum, provision being, however, made in a
schedule of prices to be given with the tender, for additions to or deductions from
such sums, in the event of changes being made.
The undersigned, concurring in the views  of the Chief Engineer, as above set
forth, recommends that authority be givenj for the calling for tenders for the con
struction of this
Sum" system.
section.    The work to be let in one contract, and upon the " Lump
Respectfully submitted,
CHARLES TUPPER, Min. Railways & Canals.
Copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honorable the Privy Council, approved by Mis
Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the 19th October, 1881.
On a memorandum dated 18th October, 1881, from the Minister of Railways and
Canals, representing that the Chief Engineer of the Canadian Pacific Railway has
reported that the revised location of the line to be followed by that railway between
Emory's Bar and Port Moody, in British Columbia, a distance of about eighty-five
(85) miles has now been effected, that the plans, profiles and specifications will, he
expects, be prepared about the 1st of January next. That he further reports that
the completion and putting under traffic of the section now under contract between
Emory's Bar and Kamloops would not be of the same benefit towards the development of the resources of the country as if the whole line from tide-water to Kamloops
were in a condition to be operated, and also that the construction of the section from
Kamloops, easterly, through the Rocky Mountains, cannot be conducted to the same
advantage without rail connection with the sea coast.
That he, therefore, considers it important to have the section between Emory's
Bar and Port Moody completed no later than that portion between Emory's Bar and
Kamloops, and advises the calling of tenders therefor at an early date, in order to
afford contractors an opportunity of visiting the ground during the fine weather and
before winter sets in.
That, in the opinion of the Chief Engineer, il would tend towards the economical
prosecution of the work that it should be let as a whole, in one contract, such a course
being, he considers, advisable on the grounds : 1st. That the rails and fastenings
will have to be transported over the line from Port Moody; 2nd. That the adoption
of this course will very largely reduce the competition for labor; 3rd. Because the
woi'k is of such character as 'to necessitate the employment of a large amount of pjant
and rolling stock.
That the Chief Engineer further advises that the work be let upon the " lump
sum " system, the contractor being required to carry out all the works shown by the
plans, profiles and specifications for a fixed sum, provision being, however, made in a
schedule of prices to be given with the tender, for additions to, or deductions from
such sum, in the event of changes being made.
The Minister, concurring in the views of the Chief Engineer as above set forth,
recommends that authority be given for the calling for tenders for the construction of
the section between Emory's Bar and Port Moody, and that the work be let in one
contraet and upon the " lump sum " system.
above   recommendation   for  Your Excellency's
submit   the
Certified.    J. O. COTE, Clerk F. C.
The   Committee
approval.
( Telegram.)
Victoria, B.C., 12th Nov., 1881.
Hon. Sir Charles Tupper.
Mr. Smith reports line, Port Moody to Emory, now definitely loeated and ready
for inspection by intending contractors, and that profile can be seen at his office,
New Westminster. Do you intend notice to this effect should be published as contemplated ?
JOS. TRUTCH. 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
Ottawa, 14th November, 1881.
Hon. Joseph Trhtoh, Victoria, B.C.
Notices for tenders for lines between Port Moody and Emory now being
published.
F. BRAUN, Secretary. .
Ottawa, 19th December, 1881.
Sir,—I am instructed to request that you will be pleased to prepare, for the use
of this Department, a form of contract for the construction of that portion of the
Canadian Pacific Railway between Port Moody and the west end of Contract No. 60,
near Emory's Bar, B.C., the contractors executing the whole of the works mentioned
intthe specifications for a bulk sum, and not at schedule rates.
I am, Sir, your obedient servant,
F. BRATJN, Secretary.
Z. A. Lash, Esq., O.C., D.M.J., Ottawa.
Ottawa, 27th December, 1881.
(Re-Contract, C.F.R.)
Sir,—I return priated proof of draft contract, lump sum system. This draft I
settled after consultation with Mr. Schrieber respecting the details of the work.
I have followed the form of contract which has been in use for several years
making the necessary changes required by the lump sum system instead of that of
the schedule of prices.
Attention is specially called to the addition to clause 28, which I have prepared
at the suggestion of the Hon. J. H. Pope, who was acting as Minister of Railwavs
and Canals a few weeks ago. "
Attention is als:> called to clause 36, which is new, but which, I think will be
found of very great service in certain events.
I also enclose the printed form of agreement respecting the securities to be
•deposited, sent to me for approval.   The alterations made are, I think, desirable.
I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,
•p   -r \       T7      H Z- A- LASH, D.M.J.
F. Braun, Esq., Ottawa. '
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
From Emory's Bar at the west end of Contract 60 to Port Moody
(Burrard Inlet), British Columbia.
Specification for the Construction of the Work.
in m
clearing, close
ed
3ing
1. This specification refers-to the works of construction and materials reauir
akmg and budding the railway as comprehended by the wSSSdS^SSni
•mg, close cutting, grubbing, eross-loffsrinff tern™™™ wu««^^ comprising
excavation, draining, diuhing, foundation wofkswater7J? Pjmanent fencing,
farm road crossroad Jd stream ^^^S^i^^S^SSi
retaining wall masonry, concrete, paving, rin-ran crib wnrt «^v „i. 2s ' c?1lvert and
truss and swing bridges and viaducts, log S^tnZ^ I£whlttfl?«» P^ ***fle.
spikes, taking*delivtry of the rails 'an! fishes TSb'^STL^? ^ *!*
laying, points, crossings, switches, signals, turn-outs siS ^Je^^'J™?'
station buildings, water tanks and wafer ^o^Sf^^J^^ 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
fittings and other works of every description, whether temporary or permanent,
which may be necessary for the entire completion according to the following specifi
cation, profiles and drawings hereto attached, of that portion of the Canadian Pacific
Railway above named and referred to, and more particularly shown on the plan of the
same (drawings Nos. 1 and 2,) being a distance of about 85f miles of single track
with the requisite turn-outs and station sidings, and also the maintenance of all the
works during their construction and until the final estimate is issued and the works
formally accepted as complete by the Minister of Railways and Canals.
2. The contractor is to enclose all the open or cultivated ground as delivered to
him by the Minister of Railways and Canals for the purposes of this contract with a
good fence, which, if he prefers, may in the first instance be temporary, and shall
keep the same enclosed during the progress of the works until the termination of the
contract, including the period for maintenance of the works, so as effectually to preserve
the adjoining land from trespass and prevent any injury whatever to any parties
by reason of the want of sufficient fences to separate their lands from the works, and
the contractor shall be wholly responsible for all damages to crops and all the consequences of insufficient fencing.
3. Before the termination of the contract the contractor shall construct a permanent fence throughout such parts of the line as indicated on the plans and profiles.
Clearing, Etc.
4. Where the railway passes through wooded sections, the land must be cleared
to the width of sixty-six feet on each side of the centre line, or such further width
as may be required for slopes of cuttings and fences ; also for a width of 300 feet on
each side of the centre line at stations, for a length of 2,000 feet.
5. The clearing is to be done so that all the brush, logs, and other loose material
within its limits shall be burned or removed. In no case shall any of the brush or
logs be cast back upon the adjacent timber lands; they must invariably be made into
piles near the centre of the space to be cleared, and if not removed for fuel or otherwise used, they must be entirely consumed. All brush or trees accidentally or otherwise thrown into the adjacent woods, must be dragged out and burned or removed.
The land must be left in a clean condition.
Close Cutting.
6. Where embankments are to be formed less than four feet or more than two feet
in height, all the standing timber and stumps must be chopped close to the ground
within the limits of the embankment, and burned.
Grubbing.
1. Where excavations will not exceed three feet in depth, or embankments two
feet in height, all stumps must be grubbed out, and if possible burnt; those that will
not burn, must be carried beyond the limits &f the cuttings and embankments, where
directed, and there piled. Directions will be given at the proper time, as to the
extent of ground required to be cleaned, close cut, and grubbed. The side ditching
and offtake drains must also be grubbed.
Fencing.
8. The railway grounds, where they adjoin occupied or pasture lands, will be enclosed with a strong snake fence, made with round or split rails of Douglas fir or cedar
12 to 15 feet in length, and having a cross-section of not less that 12 square inches.
The lower rails will be laid on blocks so as to raise them 6 inches above the general
level of the ground. They will be secured at the angles by two slanting posts set
not less than one foot in the ground, and crossing each other above the top rait.
5 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
These posts may be round or split, and shall have a cross-section not less m dimensions than that of the rails, and they shall he of cedar or Douglas fir; they will be
held in place at the top by aheavy rail or rider laid in the angle above the posts. The
fence, when completed, shall be not less than 5 feot high above the general level of the
ground, as per drawing No. 11.    Over
erounc
subject to overflow a strong post and
barb wire fence will be substituted and placed where the Engineer may direct.
Grading.
9. Under this term is included all excavations and embankments and surface forming, whatever may be the materials, and whether the same be required for the line
of railway, or for the diversion or forming of water-courses, roads, approaches to
bridges or level crossings, draining and off-take ditches, station grounds and all other
works, contingent upon, or relating to excavations and embankments, as required by
the nature of the contract or described in this specification.
Time of commencement and Damage to Crops.
10. In woodland the grading will be commenced after the clearing, close cutting
and grabbing required is completed to the satisfaction of the Engineer, and in cultivated sections, the Contractor will be held responsible for damages to crops.
Profile.
11. The red line on the profile exhibi ted, according to drawings JSos. 3 and 4, in
dicates the formation level, that is, the surface of the tops of embankments and the
bottoms of cuttings previous to the laying and ballasting of the permanent way.
The black undulating line represents the present surface of the ground, and the blue
line the level of the top of rail which is 16 inches above formation level.
Cuttings.
12. The cuttings shall be formed to the cross-section exhibited according to
drawings Nos. 6 and 7. The width at formation level wiil be 22 feet, and the inclination of the slopes in earth will be one and a half horizontal to one perpendicular.
In rock cuttings the slopes will be, as a rule, one horizontal to four perpendicular.
In cuttings partly earth and partly rock, a berm of six feet shall be left on the surface of the rock. But these proportions may be varied by the Engineer to suit the
nature of the materials to be excavated and ensure the stability of the slopes.
Pitches in Cuttings.
13. The whole of the grading shall be carefully formed to the levels given, and
the roadway in cuttings shall invariably be rounded, and left at not less than six
inches lower at the sides than in the centre. There shall be a side ditch at the foot
of each slope throughout the whole length of the cuttings, the bottom of which shall
be kept 12 inches below the roadway on the centre line, and lower if necessary, with
a fall towards the ends of the cuttings so as thoroughly to drain the same. The cuttings shall be widened a little at the ends, and these ditches carried into the ditches
at the sides of the embankments, so as not to injure the latter.
Drains in Cuttings.
14. In very wet cuttings, arising from springs or soakage, drains shall be formed
at the foot of the slopes averaging about four feet deep, formed with a bed of three
poles, two to three inches in diameter, laid breaking joint in the bottom of the trench
and then filled up with coarse gravel or broken stone not larger than ordinary road
metal. In level cuttings the trenches must be dug to a greater depth than four feet
at the ends, so as to give sufficient flow for the water.
6 -45 Victoria.
Sessional
Papers
(No.48.)
A. 1882
Catch-water Ditches.
15. Ditches shall be formed at one or both sides of the cuttings, as the inclination of the ground may require, so as to exclude from them any water draining offer
flowing from the adjoining lands. They shall not be nearer than twenty feet from
the top of the slopes, and shall be graded to such depths as to carry the water clear
of the cutting and into the ditches at the sides of the embankments, or to the nearest
water-course.
Slope Drains.
16. The cuttings shall, in all cases, during the progress of the work as well as
afterwards, be kept perfectly dry; and whenever the slopes are wet and the material
seriously affected by springs, soaks, heavy rains or thaws, they shall be thoroughly
drained by forming oblique drains up the slopes, not less than 3 feet deep, and at
such intervals as the Engineer may direct; such drains to be filled with broken stone
or coarse gravel as already described.
Slips.
1*7. When slips occur in the cuttings after they are properly formed, the material
must be immediately removed by the Contractor, the slopes re-formed, and such precautions adopted as the Engineer may deem necessary.
Embankments.
18. The embankments shalljbe formed according to drawing No. 8. The materials
taken from the cuttings or borrow pits to be used in forming the embankments and
road approaches must be approved by the Engineer ; ice or snow must be excluded.
When the quantity of the cutting is more than sufficient to make the embankment
of the specified width, the surplus material may be wasted ; but in every case where
either borrowing or wasting is resorted to, the material must be taken and deposited
asjthe Engineer may approve.
Dogging Embankments.
19. In places where the natural surface of the ground upon which the embankment is to rest, is covered with vegetable matter which cannot be burned off in clearing, and which would, in the opinion of the Engineer, impair the work, the same
must be removed to his entire satisfaction. In the event of the line crossing muskegs
or morasses, it may be deemed by the Engineer expedient that a platform of logs
shall be formed under the embankment, of such width as will extend through and to
not less than six feet beyond the side slopes, and 16 inches deep. The logs to range
from 6 inches to 15 inches in diameter, and must be laid close together laterally and
also longitudinally, as may be directed.
Under Drains.
20. Where the embankment is to be formed on side hill ground covered with
pasthre, the ground shall be deeply ploughed before the work is commenced; and
where the slope is so steep as to endanger the slipping of the embankment^ benches
shall be cut in such a manner as the Engineer may direct. If the ground is wet or
spongy through springs or soaks, it shall first be thoroughly underdrained as the
Engineer may see expedient. These drains will be constructed in a similar way to
that in which ordinary land drains are sometimes made. A trench will first be dug
to a minimum depth of four feet, and in the bottom of this trench, four or five cedar
or spruce poles about three inches in diameter will first be laid by hand, breaking
joint; over the poles will then be placed not less than three feet of small broken
stone, not larger than ordinary road metal or good gravel ballast, over which will be 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
deposited such material convenient to the place as the Engineer may approve of. The
Contractor must find all the material required in these drains, and do all the work
described. These drains must always be made with a sufficient longitudinal fall for
the easy flow of the water.
Allowance for Shrinkage.
21. The embankments shall be IT feet wide at formation level, and the slopes will
generally have an inclination of one and a-half horizontal to one perpendicular, but
in their formation, whether for the railway or approaches to bridges or level crossings,
ample allowance must in the first instance be made by the Contractor, for all subsequent settlement or shrinkage, and particularly in the top width ; and for this purpose the top, besides being kept higher than the levels given, shall be formed in the
first instance wider than the specified dimensions, to such extent as may be deemed
necessary, according to the height of the embankment and the nature of the materials
of which it is formed, so that when it is thoroughly consolidated it will stand at least
the full width required.
Borrow Pits.
22. The embankments will be made up with the materials from the line cuttings
and from side ditches, except where otherwise directed ; when these are insufficient,
the line cuttings will be widened, or materials procured from borrowing pits. All
materials placed in the embankments must be approved by the Engineer; no stumps,
logs or other perishable or unsuitable material shall be used, and no material shall be
supplied without his concurrence until the cuttings are completed.
Side Ditches.
23. The ditches at the sides of the embankments shall be cut with slopes not
steeper than one and a-half feet base to one foot perpendicular height. The top of the
slopes nearest the Railway shall not be less than six feet from the foot of the embankments. These ditches shall be graded so as to carry off the water to the next natural
water-course, and where there is so much water as to form a strong current, the ditch
shall be formed as far from the embankment as the Engineer may deem necessary for
the safety of the latter. Special attention is called to those long stretches of the line
on low lands subject to overflow to the depth of several feet from high floods in the
rivers, as shown on the profile; no side ditches will be allowed in such places, and
the embankments will have to be made from the most convenient borrow pits ■ that
can be found at either end. This can only be done by train, and a temporary track
will be required. In some cases where the overflow is shallow, as on part of Maria
Island, borrow pits may be dug at intervals, but not nearer the embankment than 50
feet. No continuous ditch will be allowed as it would form a leading channel for the
overflow and certainly prove destructive to the embankment within a very short,
period.
Berm.
24. In flat sections a berm shall be left between the roadway and ditch of such
width as may be deemed expedient, but it shall in no case be less than six feet.
Where drainage cannot be conveniently carried off by the side ditches, it will be
necessary to excavate off-take ditches to a considerable distance beyond the limits of
the Railway grounds. These off-take ditches shall be of such widths and depths as
may be required and directed by the Engineer. They shall be sloped not steeper
■than one and a-half horizontal to one perpendicuiar, and the materials shall be cast
out so as to leave a berm of six feet between the deposit ond the top of the slopes of
the ditches. The Contractor shall also construct all other drains and ditches which
the Engineer may deem necessary for the perfect drainage of the railway and works,
he shall also make all necessary diversions of roads and streams as directed by the-
Engineer.
8 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
Tunnelling.
25. The tunnelling will consist of | Line Tunnels" and | Stream Tunnels; " the
former shall be formed to an exact minimum section according to drawing No. 9, and
the latter to drawing No. 10. For the purpose of tendering, the sectional area of
" Line Tunnels" shall be calculated at 405 superficial feet, equal to 15 cubic yards to
the lineal foot of tunnel. The " Stream Tunnels," where formed, shall be driven
through the solid rock which in some places forms the sides of ravines ; they must be
formed in the manner to be pointed out in each case. Open cuttings at the ends wjjLl
be excavated, to give an easy flow to the water; these open cuttings may be slightwy'
curved, but the tunnels proper must be perfectly straight from end to end, with the
sides as smooth as practicable. The up-stream end in each tunnel must generally be
one foot lower than the bed of the stream opposite, and they must be driven with •a,
proper inclination. Care must be taken to leave a solid pillar of rock between the
tunnel and the sides of the ravine, equal (except in special cases) to not less than
about double the diameter of the tunnel. The thickness of solid rock over the tunnel
shall be similarly proportioned.
Crib Wharfing.
26. Crib wharfing will have to be resorted to at some points as noted on profile
according to general drawing No. 42.
Rip-rap.
27. Whenever the slopes of the embankments are liable to be washed by the
overflow of streams, they will require to be protected by a rip-rap wall of stones carefully laid by hand to such thickness and height as may be directed by the Engineer,
generally about 18 inches above high water level.
Rock Facing.
28. Special attention is called to those long stretches of embankment to be made
on low lands subject to overflow to a considerable depth. The slopes of these will
require to be protected with rock facing, the stones for which will have to be quarried and brought by train or by water from a considerable distance.
Embankment at Port Moody.
29. The slope of the embankment at Port Moody extends below water
tide and will have to be protected with rip-rap of  large, well-formed stone
hand.
Public Roads.
at high
laid by
30. At all public roadways, cattle-guards will be established and will be constructed according to drawing No. 13. The roadway between cattle-guards will be
planked and the public road properly graded and gravelled as far as the limits of the
railway right of way. Under this heading the bridging of side ditches, fences from
cattle-guards to the line fences of the Railway, also post and sign board, and everything necessary to complete the crossing, will be embraced. The fences connecting
cattle-guards with right of way fences, will be post and board, or post and wire as per
drawing^.
Farm Crossings.
31. Farm crossings will be established wherever required and directed. They
will be graded, so as to form easy and convenient passages for farm traffic across the
rails, and planked to the full extent of the Railway ties. The ditches will be
properly bridged, and gates of an approved design and with proper fastenings will be
placed in the fences according to drawing No. 12.
9 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
Temporary Roads.
32. Roads constructed to and from any point on the line of Railway for the convenience of the Contractor, for the conveyance of material or otherwise, must be at
his own risk, cost and charges.
Existing Roads.
33. Wherever the line is intersected by public or private roads, the Contractor must keep open at his owji cost convenient passing places, and ho shall be
held responsible for keeping all crossings during the progress of the works in such
condition as will enable the public to use them with perfect safety, and such as will
give rise to no just ground for complaint. Contractors will be held liable for any
-damages resulting from negligence on their part or that of their men.
Truss Bridges.
34. The Railway will in most cases be carried over the larger streams by wooden
superstructures, supported on abutments and piers, of timber framing on pile
foundations. The pile foundation will, wherever practicable, be made suitable for
permanent structures.
Crib Work.
35. In some cases crib abutments and piers filled with stone may be allowed.
The cribs must be constructed in the most substantial manner of tamarac or other
suitable timber; outside timbers to be not less than 12 inches square, halved together
at the angles, and properly secured with drift bolts of iron ; the ties maybe of flatted
timber, dove-tailed into face timbers and bolted. The sloping faces of the cutwaters
to piers must be of square timber laid with one side in the line of the rake of the cutwater, and be halved at angles; the faces of the cutwaters will be covered with
hardwood timber 8 inches thick, well fastened to the crib work with spikes or rag-
bolts. The whole of the abutments and piers to be finished in accordance with plans,
.and to the satisfaction of the Engineer.
Superstructures of Timber.
36. The superstructures will be of the most approved Howe or Pony Truss pattern, the former built of Douglas fir of approved quality, with cast-iron or white oak
keys, cast iron prisms and wrought iron rods with up-set ends, the whole to be first-class material and workmanship.    The parts that are inaccessible after the structures
are erected, are to receive one good coat of paint of approved quality as soon as
framed, and a second coat when the work is put together. Drawings Nos. 20, 21,
22, 23 and 24- are prepared to suit each span or bridge, and to which the Contractor
must work. These bridges must be executed in a thoroughly substantial and workmanlike manner, and shall be completed in every respect, including painting.
Pile Bridges.
37. Wherever the circumstances of the case require the adoption of bridges on
piles, they will be erected according to the following, drawing No. 19, or special
-drawing. Each bent will be composed of piles, as shown in the drawings. The piles
shall be of tamarae, Douglas fir, or other approved timber, and of sufficient size at
the butt or larger end to square not less than 12 inches, and for long piles 14 inches.
They must be perfectly sound and straight, sawed or hewed to these dimensions, and
be of such lengths as circumstances may require. The piles must be driven by a
hammer weighing 1,500 lbs. or upwards, until they reach perfectly firm ground,
They will generally be tested by the hammer falling 24 feet at the last blow, under
which they should not yield more than two inches.   Care must be taken to have
10 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
them driven truly, so that the caps and braces may be properly framed and bolted to
them. The spur piles must be curve-pointed, so that as they are driven they will
gradually come to the proper inclination. Before being driven the -piles must be
sawed or chopped off square at the butt, and tapered to a blunt point at the smaller
•end. Should there appear to be any danger of splitting, the heads must be bound
with iron hoops, and if necessary the points be properly shod: The stringers, which
will be of Douglas fir or other approved timber, must be bolted together, and to the
-corbels and caps. The stringers must be of sufficient length to reach over two spans,
-and break joints alternately inside and out. The bank stringers will be 12 inches by
12 inches.    The whole to be covered by special ties 9 inches by 8 inches.
Trestle Bridges.
38. The structures for the passage of small streams, or for crossing dry ravines,
will generally be trestle work built in accordance with the general drawings Nos.
14, 15, 16, 17, and 18. The timber used in these bents may be Douglas fir, pine,
tamarac, or other suitable timber, in proportions approved by the Engineer, and of
the dimensions shown on the drawings. They will be set on mud sills placed in
trenches of sufficient depth to insure a foundation that will not be affected by frost
or the wash of the streams, and when properly levelled as to the grade height, &c,
-earth and stones shall be firmly packed round them. The bents will be spanned by
stringers as described above for pile bridges. In marshy or springy ground, a single or double row of piles shall be driven for each bent. The piles will average not
less than 12 inches diameter, of suitable timber approved by the Engineer and driven
home so as to afford a secure foundation.
Log Culverts.
39. In some cases log culverts will be adopted according to the general drawings, No. 25.
Masonry.
When to be Commenced.
40. The masonry shall not be started at any point before tho foundation has
been properly prepared, nor until it has been examined and approved by the Engineer, nor until the Contractor has provided a sufficient quantity of proper materials
and plant to enable the work to be proceeded with regularly and systematically.
Stone.
41. The stone used in all masonry on the line of Railway must be of a durable
-character, large, well proportioned, and well adapted for the_construction of substantial and permanent structures ; parties tendering must satisfy themselves as to
where fitting material for the masonry can be most conveniently procured.
Bridge and retaining wall Masonry.
Tegular
al joints will be^dressed, so'as to form quarter-inch joints.    The vertical joints
>e dressed  back square 9 inches, the beds will be dressed perfectly parallel
The  work will be left with the "quarry face," except the outside
42. Bridge and nearly vertical retaining wall masonry, shall generally be in
courses of large, well-shaped stones, laid on their natural beds; the beds and
vertical
will be
throughout.
.arrises, strings and coping, which will be chisel-dressed.
Courses.
43. The courses will not be less than 12 inches, and they will be arranged in preparing the plans to suit the nature of the quarries, courses may range up to 24 inches,
-and the thinnest courses invariably be placed towards the top of the work.
11 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
Headers and Stretchers.
44. Headers will be built in every course not further apart than 6 feet; they will
have a length in line of wall of not less than 24 inches, and they must run back at
least three times their height, unless when the wall will not allow this proportion, m
which case they will pass through from front to back. Stretchers will have a minimum
length in line of wall of 30 inches, and their breadth of bed will at least be If times
their height. The vertical joints in each course must be arranged so as to overlap
those in the course below 10 inches at least. The above dimensions are for minimum
courses of 12 inches, the proportions will be the same for thicker courses.
Quoins.
45. The quoins of abutments, piers, &c, shall be of the best and largest stones,
and have chisel drafts properly tooled on the upright arris, from two to three inches
wide, according to the size and character of the structure.
Coping.
46. Coping stones, string courses and cut waters shall be neatly dressed in
accordance with plans and directions to be furnished during the progress of the work.
Bed Stones for Girders.
47. The bed stones for girders shall be the test description of sound stone, free '
from drys or flaws of any kind, they must be not less than 12 inches in depth for the
smaller bridges, and eight feet superficial area on the bed. The larger bridges will
require bed stones of proportionately greater weight; these stones shall be solidly
and carefully placed in position, so that the bridge will sit fair on the middle of the
stones.
Backing and Bond.
48. The backing will consist of flat-bedded stone, well shaped, having an area of
bed equal to four superficial feet or more. Except in high piers or abutments, two
thicknesses of backing stone, but not more, will be allowed in each, course, and their
joints must not exceed that of the face work. In special cases, where deemed necessary by the Engineer to insure stability, the backing shall be in one thickness; the
beds must, if necessary,- be scabbled off, so as to give a solid bearing. No pinning
will be admitted. -Between the backing and face stones there must be a good square
joint, not exceeding one inch in width, and the face stones must be scabbled off to
allow this. In walls over three feet in thickness, headers will be built in front and
back alternately, and great care must be taken in the arrangement of the joints so as
to give perfect bond.
Culvert Masonry, general description.
49. Culvert masonry shall be built of good, sound, large flat-bedded stones, laid
in horizontal beds. It may be known as Random, or broken coursed work. The
stones employed in this class of masonry will generally be not less in area of bed
than three superficial feet, nor less in thickness than eight inchess, and they must be
dressed so-as to give good beds with half inch joints. In smaller structures, and in
cases where stones of good size and thickness cannot be had, they may, if in other
respects suitable, be admitted as thin as five inches. All stones must be laid on their
natural beds.
Headers and Stretchers.
50. Headers shall be built in the wall, from front and back alternately, at least
one in every five feet in line of wall, and frequently in the rise of wall.   In the-
12 45 Victoria,
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
smallest structures headers shall not be less than twenty-four inches in length, and the
minimum bed allowed for stretchars shall be twelve inches. In the larger structures
all stones must be heavier in proportion. Every attention must be paid to produce a
perfect bond^and to give the whole a strong, neat, workmanlike finish.
Coping and Covering.
51. Wing walls will generally be finished with steps, formed of sound, durable
stone, and not less than from 10 to 12 inches thick, and 6 feet superficial area; other
walls wdl be covered with coping of a similar thickness, and of seven feet or upwards,
superficial area. These coverings will be neatly dressed when required, and as may
be directed. The walls of the box culverts will be finished with stones the full
thickness of wall, and the covers will be from 10 to 15 inches thick, according to the
-span ; they must have a bearing of at least 12 inches on each wall, and they must be
fitted sufficiently close together to prevent the earth from falling through.
Paving.
52. The bottoms of culverts will be paved with stones set on edge, to a moderately even face, packed solid, the interstices being also well packed. The paving
will be from 9 to 12 inches deep.
Mortar.
53. Mortar shall be of hydraulic lime or cement, and common lime.
Cement.
54. Hydraulic lime mortar will be used unloss otherwise directed in building all
masonry, from the foundations up to a line two feet above the ordinary level of the
stream. It will be used also in laying girder beds, coping, covering of walls generally, in lipping and in pointing. The hydraulic lime or cement must le fresh ground,
of the best brand, and it must be delivered on the ground, and kept till used in good
order. Before being used, satisfactory proof must be afforded the Engineer of its
hydraulic properties, as no inferior cement will be allowed.
Common Lime.
55. Common lime mortar must be made of the best common lime and will be
- employed in all masonry (except dry) where cement is not directed to be used.
Mortar.—Mow made.
56. Both cement and lime must be thoroughly incorporated with approved proportions of clean large-grained sharp sand. The general proportions may be one part of
lime to two parts of sand, but this may be varied .according to the quality of the lime
or cement.    Mortar will be only made as required, and it must be prepared and used
Grouting.
57. When mortar is used, every stone must be set in a full bed and beaten solid ;
the vertical joints must be flushed up solid, and every course must be perfectly level
and thoroughly grouted. F
\ttiHltK*rr*:'~"~~iitl ' '      '    '"'
45 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.48.) A. 1882
Lipping.
68.   In all walls built in common lime, the exposed faces will have a four-inch,
lipping of cement.
Pointing and protection in winter.
59. All masonry must be neatly and skilfully pointed, but if done out of season,.
or if from any other cause it may require repointing before the expiration of the contract, the Contractor must make good and complete the same at his own cost. Work
left unfinished in the autumn must be properly protected during the winter by the
Contractor, at his risk and cost.
Retaining Walls.
60. Retaining wall (with a sharp batter on the face) shall be built of dry masonry, and shall be formed of large, well-shaped stones hammered to form good beds
and carefully laid to bond as in bridge masonry, but without mortar.
Foundations.—Depths of Pits.
61. Foundation pits must be sunk to such depths as the Engineer may deem
proper for the safety and permanency of the structure to be erected; they must in all
cases be sunk to such depths as will prevent the structures being acted on by the
frost, or by nature; in some cases coffer-damming, pumping and baling will be necessary. The material excavacated therefrom to be deposited in embankment, unless
the Engineer directs otherwise.
'b'
Artificial Foundations.—limber.
62. Foundation timbers, where required, will be of such dimensions and of such
kinds as the Engineer may direct. The timber employed will be tamarac, hemlock,
pine or Douglas fir from 3 to 6 inches thick, or timber flatted on two sides only and
ranging from 6 inches to 12 inches thick. The faces of the flatted timber will at
least measure as much as its thickness, and the bark will be removed from the sides-
not flatted.
Iron.
63. All spikes, bolts, straps or other iron work found necessary to be used on
timber foundations, must be of the best quality of iron usually employed for similar
purposes.
Piling.
64. Whenever the Engineer may direct piling to be done, the timber shall be in
every respect sound and of such description as he may approve. Where he may think
it necessary trial piles shall first be driven.
How to be Driven.
65. The piles shall be carefully and truly pointed, shod and hooped with iron as-
may be directed. They shall be driven to any depth the Engineer may deem expedient, and the weight of the hammer shall be 1,500 lbs. or upwards. They will
generally be tested by the hammer falling 24 feet at the last blow, under which they
ehall not yield over 2 inches. The greatest care must be taken to drive the piles
plumb or battered in such position and distances apart as are shown on the plan, and
as he may direct; any pile that may be damaged or too short or out of proper' line
when driven, shall be taken up and replaced by another; the heads of the piles must
not be injured in driving
14 45 Victoria.
[sessional Papers (No.48.)
A.
CQ«>.
188
Concrete.
66; Whenever concrete is employed, it will be composed of hydraulic lime, clean
sharp sand, and good gravel of approved quality and proportions. The proportion
of sand and lime will be about the same as in mortar, and in making the concrete a
sufficient quantity will be used with the gravel to fill up the interstices and render
the mass when set perfectly solid and compact.
Track.—Road Bed.
67. Before track-laying and ballasting is commenced, the Contractor will fill up
with dry material all hollows and wheel ruts in the road bed arising from settlement,
or from being used as temporary roads by the Contractor, or other causes, and trim
the surface to formation level rounded, as before described.
Sleepers.
68. The sleepers or cross-ties must be of tamarac, hemlock, Douglas fir or other
approved sound timber, smoothly hewed or sawed, free from all score-haeks, and
chopped or sawed square at the ends, 8 feet long, flatted on two opposite sides to a
uniform thickness of 6 inches, the flatted surface being not less than 6 inches on either
side, at the small end, and when sawed they shall be 8 in. wide and 6 in. in depth.
They must be placed as nearly as possible at a uniform distance of 24 inches between
centres, and at right angles to the rails. Joint sleepers must have both an upper and
under purface bearing of at least 8 in., and be placed directly under the joint according to drawing No. 40.
Fish Plate Bolts.
69. The bolts, fin. in diameter, and 3f in. long, tot be made with cupped heads
and square necks, in accordance with the drawing No. 41. The nuts are to be square.
Iron.
70. The iron is to be of a tough fibrous quality, equal to " best refined iron,,r
and shall be subject to the approval of the Inspecting Engineer.
Workmanship.
71. The workmanship and finish must be of the best description, great care
being taken that the internal faces of the head and nut are exactly square with the
axis of the bolt.
How Made.
72. The bolt heads and necks must be solid. The threads of screws to be Whit-
worth's standard, ten to the inch, cleanly cut, to fit tightly into the nuts, and made
so as to hold throughout their entire length.
Samples.
73. Samples to be submitted to and approved by the Engineer before the work is-
commenced, and the whole must be subject to close inspection at all times.
74. The bolts and nuts are to be heated and dipped in oil to prevent rusting.
Track Spikes.
75. The spikes are to be made from the best refined iron f-ths of an inch square,
and must on test be equal to being bent to a double without fracture.
15 St
45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1S82
Description.
76. The spikes are to have a pressed head of the usual size and form, and the
points chisel-sharpened. They will be 6 in. long over all and similar to sample to
be seen in the office of the Engineer.
Points and Crossings.
77. The points, crossings, switches and signals are to be well and truly made of
the best materials of their several kinds in accordance with the drawings Nos. 38 and
39 ; t e points and crossings may be made out of the steel rails supplied by the Minister of Railways and Canals.
Gauge.—Curves.
78. The rails shall be laid to a gauge of 4 feet 8£ in. clear between the rails, and
they shall be well and carefully fastened at the joints, which must be as near as possible opposite each other and on the same tie; special care must be taken at points
and crossings to have the rails laid to a tight guage. The rails must be full spiked,
and on curves the outer rail shall be elevated according to the degree of curvature as
follows, that is to say, on one degree curves 0-05 feet, on two degrees curves 0-10 feet,
on three degrees curves 0-15 feet, on four degrees curves 0'20 feet, on five degrees,
curves 0-25 feet, on six degrees curves 0*30 feet. The rails shall be handled with,
■care, and before being run over by either engine or cars shall be full sleepered and
surfaced.    Every precaution shall be taken to prevent them getting bent during the
progress of the ballasting.
Sidings.
79. The Contractors shall lay all sidings and put in all points and crossings complete, embracing wing and guard rails, connecting rods,   head blocks,  switch, signal
! !      aa       a;   «arige generally from 1,200 to 2,000 feet in
frames.
length.
and gearin&
The sidings will
Bent Rails.
80. The Contractors shall remove from the track and straighten all bent and
damaged rails, and make good all injuries done before the works are finally accepted;
vand further, they will be held responsible for all materials provided them, and give a
receipt for the same upon taking delivery.
Ballasting.—Stripping.
81. The surface of ballast pits shall be stripped of soil where such exists, and no
material whatever shall be placed on the road bed but good clean gravel, free from
earth, clay, loam, or loamy sand; no large stones shall be allowed. The maximum
size of gravel must not be greater in diameter than 3 in. In unloading the ballast,
the train must be kept moving to and fro so as to thoroughly mix the different qualities of ballast, until a sufficient quantity is deposited. The track must then be raised
so that there will be not less than 6 in. beneath the sleepers, and the ballast must be
well beaten and packed under and around them. As the raising proceeds the end of
the life shall extend over not less than three rails lengths, and before trains are allowed
to pass over the inclined portion of track, it must be made sufficiently solid to prevent
bending the rails, or twisting the rail joints. After the lift, the track shall be centred, lined, topped, surfaced and trimmed off to a proper form and width, according
to drawings No. 41.
• Wharf at Port Moody.—Description.
82. A wharf shall b^ constructed at Port Moody, in accordance with plan No. 26.
The piles shall be of tamarac or other approved timber, and of sufficient size at the
16 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
butt or larger end to square not less than 12 to 14 inches and not less than 10 inches
in diameter at the small end. They must be perfectly sound and straight, and be of
such lengths as circumstances may require. The piles must be driven by a hammer
weighing 1,509 lbs. or upwards, until they reach perfectly firm ground. They will
generally be tested *by the hammer falling 24 feet at the last blow, under which they
should not yield more than 2 inches. Care must be taken to have them driven truly,
so that the caps and braces may be properly framed and bolted to them. The spur
piles must be curve-pointed, so .that as they are driven they will gradually come to •
the proper inclination. Before being driven the piles must be sawed or hewed to
these dimensions, chopped off square at the butt, and tapered to a blunt point at the
smaller end. Should there appear to be any danger of splitting, the heads must be
bound with iron hoops, and if necessary the points be properly shod. The stringers,,
which will be of Douglas fir or other approved timber, must be bolted together and
to the corbels and caps. The stringers must be of sufficient length to reach over
two spans, and break joints alternately inside and out. The whole will be covered
as shown in the plan, and well spiked down.
Station Buildings, &c.— Way Stations.
83. A combined Passenger and Freight House shall be erected at each Way
Station, in accordance with drawing No. 34.
Terminal Stations.
84. A Passenger Station in accordance with drawing No. 35, and a Freight
House in accordance with drawing No. 36, shall be erected at the terminus at Port
Moody.
Water Service.
85. An ample supply of good water shall be provided at Port Moody, and at each
alternate Way Station, with frost-proof Elevated Tank fitted up with the requisite
machinery, pumps, pipes, valves, and all other necessaries, and in complete running*
order in accordance with drawing No. 37.
Drawings.
86. The list of plans referred to in the specification is composed of 43 drawings.
General Provisions.—Finishing Track.
87. The track shall be left by the Contractors with everything complete, and
well surfaced. The ballast shall average not less than 1,500 cubic yards per mile,
and shall be dressed off to the form required, and the whole shall be executed
according to the directions and to the approval of the Engineer or other ofncer duly
appointed.
Government may use Line.
88 At any time after the rails are laid and the track be required for public
traffic, the Government will be at liberty to use it for that purpose and to regulate
the running of all trains, so as to ensure safety.
Station Ground.
89 All station grounds shall be cleared to the extent' herebefore mentioned and
graded'to the levels given by the Engineer, and drained to his satisfaction.
Maintenance.
90 Before the works are finally accepted, the Contractor shall make good all
slides, slips and defects, and shall finish up all cuttings and embankments, repair all
r 17
48—2 2&SS
W8ES2B&        REEKS
45 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.48.) A. 1882
damages by frost, freshets, or other causes ; dress slopes to the required angle; clean
out all ditches and drains; and complete all the works connected with the formation
of the railway and covered by the contract, in a creditable and workmanlike manner,
in accordance with the directions and to the entire satisfaction of the Engineer.
Work to be completed.
91. The works are to be commenced and proceeded with as soon as practicable,
after the person or persons whose " Tender " may be accepted, shall have entered
into the contract. The whole of the works shall be completed and the line in good
running order by the thirtieth day of June, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-
iive.
Tenders, &c.
92. No tender will be entertained unless on one of the printed forms prepared
for the purpose, and with the Schedule of Prices filled in ; nor unless a Bank Cheque,
marked good by the Bank for $20,000, accompanies the Tender, which shall be
forfeited if the party tendering, declines oi fails to enter into the contract for the
works when called upon to do so, upon the tender being accepted. In the event of a
tender not being accepted, the cheque will be returned.
93. The tender must specify the bulk sum for which the work described and
shown on the plans, profile and specification, will be constructed. The Schedule of
Prices attached to the Tender is to assist the Engineer in preparing the monthly
progress certificates and to be applied to the diminutions of, and increases in the
quantity of work caused by the change of grade or line of location ; but such schedule
is in no way whatever to vary the condition of the contract, which is the payment of
a bulk sum for the entire completion of the whole section contracted for in accordance with the plans, profiles and specification.
Security Deposit.
94. For the due fulfilment of the contract, satisfactory security will be required
■immediately on a tender being accepted, by deposit of money, or Canadian Pacific
Railway Land Grant Bonds at 90 per cent., to the amount of five per cent, on the
bulk sum of the contract, of which the sum sent in with the tender will be considered
a part.
Contract.
95. The person or persons whose tender is accepted shall execute at once a
contract under seal, similar in its provisions to the form of indenture hereto annexed,
and it will be assumed that parties tendering have made themselves perfectly familiar
with its contents ; and further, may contain such special provisions as the said
Minister may determine.
COLLINGWOOD SCHREIBER, Chief Engineer.
"Canadian Pacific Railway Office, Department of Railways and Canal*,
Ottawa, 1st December, 1881.
Port Moody to Emory's Bar.
List of Drawings referred to in Specification' and attached to the Contract.
No. 1.—Plan of the line of location from Port Moody to Harrison River.
2. do do Harrison River to Emory's Bar.
3.—Profile of the line of location from Port Moody to Harrison River.
4- do do Harrison River to Emory's Bar.
5.—Ground plan of the terminal station and wharf at Port Moody
18 J'
II 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
-General cross-sections of the line in earth cutting.
do do rock      do
do do embankment.
-Cross-section of line tunnels in rock.
do stream tunnels in rock.
-Plan of fencing.
do and gates for farm road crossings.
-Plans of level crossings and cattle-guards at public roads.
-General plan and section of trestle-bridging with bents 10 ft. apart.
do do do 15 ft. single deck.
do do do 15 ft. double  do
do do do 20 ft. single
do do do 20 ft. double
-General plan and section of pile-bridging.
do Howe truss-bridge," 100 ft. span.
6.-
7.
8.
9.-
10.
11.-
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.—
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
Pony truss.,
log culvert.
125 ft.
150 ft.
200 ft.
do
do
do
33
34
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41,
42.
43
Plan and sections of wharf at Port Moody,
do bridging at Pitt River,
do do        Stave River,
do do Harrison River,
do do Maria Slough Station, 577 to 585.
Plan and sections of bridge over ravine and stream at Station 1,506 (Harrison River and Emory).
Plan and sections of bridge over ravine and river at Station 1,664 (Harrison River and Emory).
,—Ground plans of station grounds.
—General plan of combined passenger and freight-house.
,—Plan of passenger station at Port Moody.
do
do
do
do
do
do
freight-house atPort Moody.
water-tank.
crossings.
switch-gear.
track and ballast,
fish-plate bolts.
-General plan of crib-wharfing.
do swing-bridge.
COLLINGWOOD SCHREIBER, Chief Engineer.
Canadian Pacific Railway Office, Department of Railways and Canals,
Ottawa, 1st December, 1881.
This Indenture made the •
day of. One thousand eight hundred
and •	
Between • • • ••*
19
48—2£ I
KEHH3
45 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.48.) A. 1882
hereafter called " the Contractor," of the first part, and Her Majesty Queen Yictoria
represented herein by the Minister of Railways and Canals of Canada of the second
part, witnesseth, that in consideration of the covenants and agreements on the part
-of Her Majesty hereinafter contained, the Contractor covenant and agree with
Her Majesty as follows:
Work.—Engineer.
1. In this Contract the word "work" or "works," shall, unless the context
require a different meaning, mean the whole of the work and materials, matters and
things required to be done, furnished and performed by the Contractor under this
Contract. The word " Engineer," shall mean the Chief Engineer for the time being
having control over the work, and shall extend to and include any of his assistants
acting under his instructions, and all instructions and directions, or certificates given,
or decisions made by any one acting for the Chief Engineer, shall be subject to his
approval, and may be cancelled, altered, modified and changed, as to him may seem fit.
Minister.
The word " Minister," means the Minister or acting Minister of Railways and
Canals for the time being, and extends to and includes his lawful Deputy.
This Contract is made upon the distinct understanding that the Contractor has
satisfied himself respecting the nature of the country through which the works are to
be built, the character and formation of the soil, both on the surface and underneath,
the climate and kind of weather to be expected, the quantities of the various embankments, excavations, foundations and all other works whatsoever; the means of access
and egress, to and from the works, the nature, kinds, qualities and cost of the various
materials, plant and labor required for the works, and generally, respecting every
matter or thing which may in any way affect the carrying out of this Contract or the
cost of the works contracted for. No information obtained by or for the Contractor
from any of Her Majesty's Ministers, Officers, Engineers, Agents and servants, or from
any other person, shall relieve the Contractor from any risks or from the entire
fulfilment of this Contract, or shall give him any claim or right, equitable or otherwise, against Her Majesty in addition to his claims and rights under the express
provisions of this Contract.
On whom binding,
2. All covenants and agreements herein contained shall be binding on and extend
to the Executors and Administrators of the Contractor and shall extend to and be
binding upon the successsors of Her Majesty, and wherever in this contract Her
Majesty is referred to, such reference shall include her successors, and wherever the
Contractor referred to, such reference shall include Executors and
Ad ministrators.
Labor, plant and material.—Time of completion.—Material and workmanship.
3. The Contractor    will, with the exceptions hereinafter named, at
own expense, provide all and every kind of labor, machinery, plant, lands for borrow
pits, ballast pits, spoil banks apd other purposes temporary or otherwise, required
for the works or in the construction thereof, and materials, articles and things whatsoever necessary for the due execution and completion of all and every the works set
out or referred to in the specifications hereunto annexed, and set out or referred to
in the plans and drawings prepared and to be prepared for the purposes of the work
and will execute and fully complete the respective portions of such works and deliver
the same complete to Her Majesty, on or before the...	 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48 )
A. 1SS2
finished in the best and most workmanlike manner, in the manner required by and
in strict conformity with the said specifications and drawings now prepared and
which may from time to time be furnished, and to the complete satisfaction of the
Engineer.
Exceptions.
4. The exceptions above alluded to are (1) the land for the right of way and
station grounds, (2) the rails and fish-plates for the track. The said land is to be
procured by Her Majesty from time to time as the Engineer may think it is required
for the prosecution of the works, and the rails and fish-plates are to be delivered to
the contractor at the ship's rail, at Port Moody, from time to time, as the Engineer
may think they are required for the works.
Omissions to be made good,
5. The aforesaid specification, plans and drawings, prepared and to be prepared,
and the.several parts of this contract shall be taken together, to explain each other,
•and to make the whole consistent; and if it be found that anything has been omitted
or mis-stated, which is necessary for the proper performance and completion of any
part of the work contemplated, the Contractor will, at own expense, execute the
same as if it had been properly described, and the decision of the Engineer shall be
final as to any such error or omission, and the correction of any such error or omission
shall not be deemed to be an addition to, or deviation from, the works hereby contracted for.
Changes and extra work.
6. The Engineer, with the sanction of the Minister, but not otherwise, shall be
at liberty at any time, either before the commencement or during the construction of
the works or any portion thereof, to order any work to be done, and to make any
-changes which he may deem expedient in the grades, the width of cuttings and fillings,
the dimensions, character, nature, location, or position of the works, or any part or
parts thereof, or in any other thing connected with the works, whether, or not, such
changes increase or diminish the work to be done, or the cost of doing the same,
and  the Contractor   shall immediately comply with all written requisitions of the
Engineer in that behalf, but the Contractor    shall not make any change in or addition
to, or omission, or deviation from the works, unless directed  by the Engineer, with
the sanction of the Minister, and shall not be entitled to any extra payment by reason
of any change, addition, or deviation, unless such change, addition or deviation, shall
have been first directed in writing by the Engineer, with the sanction of the Minister,
and notified to the Contractor   in writing, nor unless the Engineer certifies in writing
that such change, addition or deviation increases the cost of the work,  and specifies
in writing the nature of the increase and the quantities and measurements thereof.
The decision of the Engineer m that behalf shall be final, and the obtaining of his
certificate shall be a condition precedent to the right of the Contractor    to be paid
therefor.    If the Engineer certifies in writing that such change, addition or deviation
increases the cost of the work, and specifies in writing the nature of the increase and
the quantities and measurements thereof, the Contractor    shall be paid, in addition to
the contract price mentioned in this contract for  the works,  such sum as may be
certified to by the Engineer as being tho value of such increase, calculated according
to the rates for the various classes of work set out in the schedule hereto annexed,
and should the increase contain work of a class not specified in the said schedule,
such unspecified work shall be calculated according to a rate therefor to be fixed by
the Engineer.    If the Engineer certifies in writing that any such change, addition,
omission or deviation diminishes the cost of the work, and specifies in writing the
nature of the decrease and the quantities and measurements thereof, the decision of the
Engineer in that behalf shall be final, and there shall be deducted from the contract
21 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
raice mentioned in this contract for the works, such sum as may be certified to by
the Engineer as being the amount of such decrease, calculated according to the rates
for the various classes of works set out in said schedule or fixed by the Engineer, as
aforesaid, as the case may be.
Changes shall not invalidate Contract.
7. That all the clauses of this contract shall apply to any changes, additions or
deviations, in like manner, and to the same extent, as to the works at present projected, and no changes, additions, deviations or variations shall annul or invalidate this-
contract.
Engineer to be sole Judge of Work, Material, dec.
8. That the Engineer shall be the sole judge of work and material in respect of
both quantity and quality, and his decision on all questions in dispute with regard to
work or material, as to the meaning or intention of this contract and the plans,
specifications and drawings, shall be final, and no works, or extra or additional works-
or changes shall be deemed to have been executed, nor shall the Contractor be entitled
to payment for the same, unless the same shall have been executed to the satisfaction
of the Engineer, as evidenced by his certificale in writing, which certificate shall be
a condition precedent to the right of the Contractor   to be paid therefor.
Schedule of Prices.
9. It is hereby distinctly understood and agreed, that the respective portions of the
works set out or referred to in the schedules of rates or prices for the different kinds
of work mentioned in paragraph No. 6, include not merely the particular kind of
work or materials mentioned in said schedule, but also all and every kind of work,
labor, tools and plant, matorials, articles and things whatsoever necessary for the full
execution and completing ready for use of the respective portions of the works to the
satisfaction of the Engineer. And in case of dispute as to what work, labor, materials,
tools and plant are or are not so included, the decision of the Engineer shall be final
and conclusive.
Foreman.
10. A competent foreman is to be kept on the ground by the Contractor during
all the working hours, to receive the orders of the Engineer, and should the person so
appointed be deemed by the Engineer incompetent, or conduct himself improperly,
he may be discharged by the Engineer, and another shall at once be appointed in his
stead; such foremen shall be considered as the lawful representative of the Contractor -r
and shall have full power to carry out all requisitions and instructions of the said
Engineer.
Unsuitable Material or imperfect Work.
11. In case any material, or other things, in the opinion of the Engineer, not in
accordance with the said several parts of this contract, or not sufficiently sound, or
otherwise unsuitable for the respective works, be used for or brought to the intended
works, or any part thereof, or in case any work be improperly executed, the Engineer
may require the Contractor to remove the same, and to provide proper material or
other things, or properly re-execute the work, as the case may be, and thereupon the
Contractor shall and will immediately comply with the said requisition, and if twenty-
four hours shall elapse and such requisition shall not have been complied with, the
Engineer may cause such material, or other things, or such work, to be removed;
and in any such case the Contractor shall pay to Her Majesty all such damages and
expense as shall be incurred in the removal of such material, materials, or other
things, or of such work; or Her Majesty may, in Her discretion, retain and deduct
.such damages and expenses from any amounts payable to the Contractor.
22 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
All Plant and Material to Become Property of Mer Majesty.
12. All machinery and other plant, materials and things whatsoever, provided.
by the Contractor for the works hereby contracted for, and not rejected under the
provisions of the last preceding clause, shall, from the time of their being so provided, become, and until the final completion of the said works, shall be the property
of Her Majesty for the purposes of the said works, and the same shall on no account
be taken away, or used or disposed of except for the purposes of the said works,
without the consent in writing of the Engineer, and Her Majesty shall not be answerable for any loss or damage whatsoever which may happen to such machinery or
other plant, material or things; provided always, that upon the completion of the
works and upon payment by the Contractor of all such moneys, if any, as shall be due
from to Her Majesty, such of the said machinery and other plant, material
and things as shall not have been used and converted in the works, and shaU remain
undisposed of shall, upon demand.be delivered up to the Contractor , but if the
Contractor be indebted to Her Majesty, the same may be held by Her Majesty as
security for such indebtedness, and may be sold and disposed of, and the proceeds
applied towards payment of such indebtedness.
Insufficient Plant.—Material or Labor to be Increased.
13. If the Engineer shall at any time consider the number of workmen, horses,
or quantity of machinery or other plant, or the quantity of proper materials respectively employed or provided by the Contractor on or for the said works, to be insufficient for the advancement thereof towards completion within the limited times,
or that the works are, or some part thereof is not being carried on with due diligence, then in every such case the said Engineer may, by written notice to the Contractor , require to employ or provide such additional workmen, horses,
machinery or other plant, or materials, as the Engineer may think necessary, and in
case the Contractor shall not thereupon within three days, or such other longer
period as may be fixed by any such notice, in all respects comply therewith, then
the Engineer may, either on behalf of Her Majesty, or if he see fit, may, as the
agent of and on account of the Contractor , but in either case at the expense of the
Contractor , provide and employ such additional workmen, horses, machinery and
other plant, or any thereof, or such additional plant and materials respectively, as he
may think proper, and may pay such additional workmen such wages, and for such
additional horses, machinery or other plant, and materials respectively, such prices
as he may think proper, and all such wages and prices respectively, shall thereupon
at once be repaid by the Contractor , or the same may be retained and deducted
out of any moneys at any time payable to the Contractor ; and Her Majesty may
use in the execution or advancement of the said work, not only the horses, ma-
chinQ*"CT OT1^ ntKor nlnnt: ftnH materials an in n.iw case nrovided bv anv one on Her
beh*
said Contractor
SC     111     LIIO     CAC^UUUU     Ul     aUViUlUOUlCUU    Ul     uuo    ouiu.     rrvi.i».,     muu  v/ii.j      «~~ ,	
linery, and other plant, and materials so in any case provided  by any one on Her
ihalf, but also all such as may have been or may be provided by or on behalf of the
Delay in Execution.— Work may be Taken out of Contractor's Hands.
14. In case the Contractor    shall make default or delay in diligently continuing
to execute or advance the works to the satisfaction of the Engineer, or in case the
Contractor    shall  become  insolvent,  or  make   an
assignment
for  the benefit of
creditors, or neglect either personally or by a skilful and competent agent to superintend the works, then in any of such cases Her Majesty may take the work out of
the Contractor's hands and either stop the same or employ such means and at such
times as she may see fit to complete the work, and in such cases the Contractor shall
have no claim for any further payment in respect of the works performed, but
shall i evertheless remain liable for all loss and damage which may be suffered by
Her Majesty by reason of the non-completion by the Contractor of the works; and
all material and things whatsoever, and all horses, machinery and other plant pro-
23 45 Victoria.
^BHBBBH
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
vided by for the purposes of the works, shall remain and be con
sidered as the property of Her Majesty for the purposes and according to the provisions and conditions contained in the twelfth clause hereof.
of them, until  the  same be fully and finally completed. ar._   L
accepted by the Minister; and if any such loss or damage occur before such fanal
completion, delivery and acceptance, the Contractor   shall immediately at
own expense, repair, restore and reexecute the work so damaged, so that the whole
works or the respective parts'thereof, may be completed within the time hereby
limited.
Contractor to have no Claim for Delay.
16. Tbe Contnu-tor shall not have or make any claim or demand, or bring any
action or suit or petition against Her Majesty for any damage which may
sustain by reason ef any delay in the progress of the work, arising from the acts of
any of Her Majesty's agents, and it is agreed that in the event of any such delay th©
Contractor shall have such further time for the completion of the works as may be
fixed in that behalf by the Minister.
Contractor not to Make Assignment.—Workmay be Taken out of Contractors Hands.
17. The Contractor shall not make any assignment of this contract, or any subcontract, for the execution of any of the works hereby contracted for; and in any
event no such assignment or sub-contract, even though consented to, shall exonerate the
Contractor from liability, under this contract, for the due performance of all the
work, hereby contracted for. In the event of any such assignment or sub-contraot
being made, then the Contractor shall not have or make any claim or demand upon
Her Majesty for any future payments under this contract for any further or greater
sum or sums than the sum or sums respectively at which the work or works so
assigned or sub-contracted for shall have been undertaken to be executed by the
assignee or sub-contractor; and in the event of any such assignment or sub-contract
being made without such consent, Her Majesty may take the work out of the Contractor hands, and either stop the same or employ such means and at such times as
she may see fit to complete the same; and in such case the Contractor shall have no
claim for any further payment in respect of the works performed, but shall nevertheless remain liable for all loss and damage which may be suffered by Her Majesty
by reason of the non-completion by the Contractor of the works ; and all materials
and things whatsoever, and all horses, machinery and other plant provided by
for the purposes of the works, shall remain and be considered as the property of Her
Majesty for the purposes and according to the provisions and conditions contained in
the twelfth clause, hereof.
18. Time shall be deemed to be of the essence of this contract.
Contractor Responsible for Damage.
19. Tho Contractor shall be responsible for all damages claimable by any person
or corporation whatsoever, in respect of any injury to persons or to lands, buildings,
ships or other property, or in respect of any infringement of any right whatsoever,
occasioned by the performance of tho said works, or by any neglect or misfeasance or
non-misfeasance on part, and shall and will at own expense, make
such temporaey provisions as may be necessary for the protection of persons, or of
lands, buildings, ships or other property, or for the uninterrupted enjoyment of all
rights of persons or corporations, in and during the performance of the said works.
24 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
Failing to Pay Salaries or Wages.
20. Hthe Contractor fail at anytime in paying the salaries or wages of any person employed by upon or in respect of the said works, or any of them, and
any part of such salary be one month in arrear, or if there be due to any such persson
-one month's wages or salary, the Engineer may notify the Contractor to pay such
salary or wages, and if two days elapse and the same be not paid in full up to the
-date of payment or to such other date ar may be in accordance with the terms of
employment of such person, then Her Majesty may pay to such person salary or »
wages from any date to any-date, and to any amount which may be payable, and.
may charge the same to the Contractor, and the Contractor covenant with Her
Majesty to repay at once any and every sum so paid.
Stakes and Marks to be Protected.
21. The Contractor will protect and will not remove or destroy, or permit to be
removed or destroyed, the stakes, buoys and other marks placed on or about the said
works by the Engineers of the works, and shall furnish the necessary assistance to
correct or replace any stake or mark which through any cause may have been
removed or destroyed.
Contractors Address.
22. Any notice or other communication mentioned in this contract to be notified
■or given to the Contractor shall be deemed to be well and sufficiently notified or
given, if the same be left at the Contractor office, or mailed in any Post Office to
the Contractor or foreman, addressed to the address mentioned in this contract or to
the Contractor last known place of business.
23. And Her Majesty, in consideration of the premises, hereby covenants with
the Contractor , that subject to the terms of this contract, will be paid for and in
respect of the works, and in the manner set out in the next clause hereof, the sum of
subject to the increase or
decrease thereof, according to the terms of the sixth clause hereof.
Except as provided in the sixth clause hereof,  the  Contractor  shall  have  no  claim
for additional   price  or  remuneration in respect of any materials or workmanship
alleged to be of a quality or cost superior or greater  than those required by the
specifications.
Payments.
24. Cash payments equal to about ninety per cent, of the value of the work done
approximately made up from returns of progress measurements and computed at the
prices set out on the schedule hereto annexed, or fixed by the Engineer for work not
specified in said schedule, will be made to the Contractor monthly on the written,
certificate of the Engineer that the work for or on account of which the certificate is
granted, has been duly executed to his satisfaction, and stating the value of such
work computed as above mentioned—and upon approval of such certificate by the
Minister, and the said certificate, and such approval thereof shall bo a condition precedent to the right of the Contractor to be paid the same ninety per cent, or any
part thereof. The remaining ten per cent, shall be retained until the completion of
the whole work to the satisfaction of the Engineer and acceptance thereof by the
Minister and within two months after such completion and acceptance the remaining ten per cent, will be paid. And it is hereby declared that the written certificate
of the Engineer certifying to the final completion of said works to his satisfaction shall be a condition precedent to the right of the Contractor to receive or bo paid
the said remaining ten per cent., or any part thereof.
25 r
-■-'.UHMR
45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No. 48.)
A. 1882
Monthly Estimates.
25. It is intended that every allowance to which the Contractor fairly
entitled, will be embraced in the Engineer's monthly certificates; but should the Contractor at any time have claims of any description which consider are not included in the progress certificates, it will be necessary for to make and repeat)
such claims in writing to the Engineer, within fourteen days after the date of eacl>
and every certificate in which           allege such claims to have been omitted.
Claims.
26. The Contractor, in presenting claims of the kind referred to in the last clause,
must accompany them with satisfactory evidence of their accuracy, and the reason
why think they should be allowed. Unless such claims are thus
made-during the progress of the work, within fourteen days, as in the preceding
clause, and repeated, in writing, every month, until finally adjusted or rejected, it
must be clearly understood that they shall be forever shut out, and the Contractor
shall have no claim on Her Majesty in respect thereof.
Progress Measurements.'
27. The progress measurements and progress certificates are not to be taken as
binding upon the Engineer or as final measurements, or as fixing final amounts, they
are to be subject to the revision of the Engineer when making up his final certificate,
and they shall not in any respect be taken as an acceptance of the work or a release
of the Contractor from responsibility in respect thereof.
Operations may be suspended.
28. Her Majesty shall have the right to suspend operations from time to time at
any particular, point or points or upon the whole of the works, and in the event of
such right beiug exercised so as to cause any delay to the Contractor, then an extension of time equal to such delay or detention, to be fixed by the Minister
as, above provided for, shall be allowed to complete the contract, but no
such delay shall vitiate or void this contract or any part thereof or the obligation
hereby imposed or any concurrent or other bond or security for the performance of
this contract, nor shall the Contractor be entitled to any claim for damages by
reason of any such suspension of operations. And at any time after operations have
been suspended either in whole or part—such operations may be again resumed and
again suspended and resumed as Her Majesty may think proper. And upon the Contractor receiving written notice on behalf 11 er Majesty that the suspended operations are to be resumed, the Contractor shall at once resume the operations and diligently carry on the same.
If, after a consideration of all the circumstances connected with the suspension
and resumption of operations as above provided for, the Governor General in Council
thinks proper to allow the Contractors a sum of money on account of any extra
expenses to which they may have been put by reason thereof, the same shall be paid
over to the contractors only upon a leceipt aiid release in full being given for all
damages and claims in respect of such suspension and resumption of operations.
Appropriation by Parliment
29. Should the amount voted  by  Parliament and applicable towards payment
for the work hereby contracted for, be at any time expended previous to the
completion of the works, the Minister for the time being may give the
Conti actor written notice to. that effect. And upon receiving such notice, the
Contiactor  may,  if think   fit,  stop  the  woik—but in  any  case  shall  not
be entitled to any payment for work done, beyond the amount voted and applicable
as aforesaid—unless and until the necessary funds shall have been voted- by Parlia?
26
as 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
ment in that behalf. And in no event shall the Contractor have or make any claim.
upon Her Majesty for any damages or compensation by reason of the said suspension
of payments, or by reason of any delay or loss caused by the stoppage of work.
Spirituous Liquors.
30. The Contractor shall not permit, allow or encourage the sale of any spirituous-
liquors on or near the works.
J¥o Sunday Labor.
31. No work whatever shall at any time or place be carried on during Sunday*
and the Contractor shall take all necessary steps for preventing any foreman, or
agent, or men from working or employing others on that day.
Chief Engineer to be Arbitrator.
32. It is hereby agreed that all matters of difference arising between the parties
hereto, upon any matter connected with or arising out of this contract, the decision
whereof is not hereby especially given to the Engineer, shall be referred to the award
and arbitration of the Engineer, and the award of such Engineer shall be final and
conclusive ; and it is hereby declared that such award shall be a condition precedent
to the right of the Contractor to receive or be paid any sum or sums on account or
by reason of such matters in difference.
33. It is distinctly declared that no implied contract of any kind whatsoever, by
or on behalf of Her Majesty, shall arise or be implied from anything in this contract
contained, or from any position or situation of the parties at any time, it being clearly
understood and agreed that the express contracts, covenants and agreeme
contained and made by Her Majesty, are and shall be the only contracts,
and agreements upon which any rights against Her are to be founded.
34. This contract is hereby, pursuant to the provisions of the 8th section of the
Statute, 41st Victoria (1878), chapter 5, made subject to the express condition that
no Member of the House of Commons of Canada shall be admitted to any share or
part of such contract, or to any benefit to arise therefrom.
herein
covenants
Contract may be Cancelled.
35. In the event of it becoming advisable in the interests of the public to suspend
the work hereby contracted for, or any portion thereof, at any time before its completion, and to put an end to this contract, the Minister shall have full power to stop
the work and to cancel this contract, or giving due notice to that effect to the Contractor . The Contractor , however, will be entitled to receive payment for all
sums then due for the work already done, materials used or delivered, or ready to be
used or in course of preparation, together with such reasonable compensation as will
cover all bona fide damages, if any, resulting therefrom, and as may then be agreed
upon ; or, in case of disagreement, as may be determined by the Official Arbitrators-
of the Dominion of Canada; it being understood, however, that no compensation will
be allowed to or claimed by the Contractor for materials procured for the works,
after the date of the service of the notice above referred to, or for any loss of anticipated profits, either in respect of the works so. suspended as aforesaid, or of the
"materials then procured for said works. . .
36 It is distinctly declared and agreed that none of Her Majesty s Ministers,
officers' engineers, agents or servants, have or shall have power or authority m any
wav whatever to waive on the part of Her Majesty any of the clauses or conditions of
this contract, it being clearly understood that any change m the terms of this
contract be binding upon Her Majesty must be sanctioned by order ol the
Governor General in Council.
27
w0M 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
In Witness whereof, the Contractor    ha    hereto set hand
«nd seal and these presents have been signed and sealed by the said Minister, and
-countersigned by the Secretary of the Department of Railways and Canals, on
behalf of Her Majesty.
•Signed, Sealed and Delivered by (
the Contractor     in presence of J
i
I
-Signed, Sealed and Delivered by «
the Minister, and countersigned
by the  Secretary of Railways
and Canals in the presence of
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
From Emory's Bar at the West End of Contract 60 to Port Moody (Burrard Inlet),
British Columbia.
Memorandum for Contractors.
As some doubt appears to have arisen in the minds of Contractors respecting the
-schedules of prices referred to in sections 6 and 24 of the1 form of contract, I may
explain that the schedule referred to in section 6 is that mentioned in the 93rd clause
of the specification as the schedule of prices attached to the Tenders; and the schedule
referred to in section 24 of the form of contract is a schedule to be prepared by me
after the Tenders are received, for the purpose of computing the value of work done,
-approximately made up from returns of progress measurements upon which cash
payments will be made to the Contractor monthly on the written certificate of the
"Chief Engineer.
COLLINGWOOD SCHREIBER, Chief Engineer.
Otta
IWJ
25th January, 1882.
FORM OF TENDER.
Canadian Pacific Railway.
From Emery's Bar at West End of Contract No. 60 to Port Moody,
(Burrard Inlet), British Columbia.
Tho undersigned having seen the specifications, plans and profiles, prepared for
"the purposes of the construction of the section of the Canadian Pacific Railway from
Emory's Bar to Port Moody, and having also visited the ground or caused the same
to be visited, hereby tender to construct the said Section in accordance with the said
specifications, plans and pi
onies, and u
to the
I
specification for the lump sum of
pon the terms of the form of contract annexed
subject to increase or decrease thereof under the terms of said contract, and submit
4he accompanying schedule of pricessfor the purposes of the 6th and 24th clauses of
said contract.
And agree, if this tender be accepted, to execute a contract for the construction
of the said Section, in the form of that annexed to the said general specification !with
such additional special provisions as may be determined by the Minister of Railways
-and Canals, and. to deposit to the credit of the Receiver-General, within eight days
after being notified of the acceptance of this tender, a sum of money or'Canadian
Pacific Railway land bonds at 90 per cent, equal to 5 per cent, of the sum above men-
28 '  '"" 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1SS2
tioned, to be held as security for the due fulfilment of the contract, upon the terms-
set out in the agreement hereto'annexed. Failing in this the .tender will be*passed
over and deposit forfeited.
Actual Signatures, Occupations
and Residences of Parties
Tendering.
Dated the day of 1881.
Schedule of Prices referred to in the hereto annexed Contract.
Description of Work.
Clearing ,
Close cutting ,
Grubbing	
Cross logging 16 in. thick covered with brush	
Fencing	
Solid rock excavation	
Loose rock excavation (boulders 9 cubic ft. and over)	
Earth excavation	
Under-drains	
Tunnelling	
" Line tunnels " in rock ■
"Twelve feet—Stream tunnels''	
" Six feet—Stream tunnels "	
Bridge masonry t	
Culvert masonry	
Dry niasonry (retaining walls, &c.)	
Paving	
Concrete	
Rip-rap	
Gast-iron pipes, 3 ft. diameter inside, 1 in. thick, laid in concrete (the
concrete not included in this item) j
(150 ft. clear...
125     "      ...
Timber bridge superstructure \ 100     "
60     "      ...
I  40     "      ...
Timber, best quality, for Beam Culverts, £c.
12 ft. x 16 ft	
12 ft. x 12 ft	
8 ft. x 16 ft	
8ft. x 12ft	
Other dimensions of timber (if required to be used) at proportionate
prices.
Piles driven	
Round timber for crib wharfing, &c, not less than 12 in diameter	
Platted timber in road diversion culverts, 12 in. thick	
Plank	
Per acre.
do   ..
do   ..
do   ..
L. ft	
C. yard..
do   ..
do ..
L. ft	
L. ft	
do 	
do 	
C. yard,
do .
do .
do .
do .
do   .
L. ft..
Each.
do   .
do   .
do   .
do
L. ft.
do .
do .
do .
Wrought iron.
Oast iron	
Ties	
..Crossings	
Pull set ot switch gear and signal	
Track-laying	
Ballasting	
Setting points and crossings	
Public road level crossings, comprising timber cattle-guards, planking, small timber culverts under approaches, and notice boards,
complete	
L. ft	
do 	
do 	
P. B M.
Lbs	
do	
Each	
do   ....
do   ....
Mile	
O. yard.
Each	
do
Actual Signatures, j f
Occupations and Resi- j
dences of the Parties }
Tendering. I
Price.
cts.
29 j
45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
Hiist of Tenders for work—Emory's Bar to Port Moody—received 1st February, 1882.
Number.
Classification.
9
10
11
12
13
Opening.
10
6
7
J
P
G
13 M
11 K
8 H
3 C
14 N
2
1
4
12
9
5
B
A
D
L
I
E
Name of Tenders.
D. McDonald & A. Oharlebois	
Andrew Onderdonk	
James Murray &  Co	
Ryan,  Purcell & Ryan ■	
Denis O'Brien & Co	
James Goodwin	
William Davis -A Co	
The Railway Improvement Comp'y of N. A.
F. J. Beemer,	
E. J. Charlton & Co	
William Ede & Co	
A. Manning & A. McDonald	
J. B. Montgomery	
John Hebert & Co	
Address.
Montreal	
Yale, B.C	
Ste. Catherine	
Ottawa	
Montreal	
Ottawa	
do     	
New York 	
Montreal	
Quebec	
San Francisco	
Toronto	
Portland, Oregon.
Toronto	
Amount.
2,2(7,
2,486,
2,864,
2,970,
2,999,
3,062,
3,169,
3,190,
3,195,
3,349,
3,389,
3,389,
3,488
3,531
cts.
000 00
255 00
242 00
000 -oo
735 00
000 00
880 00
000 00
705 00
000 00
000 00
000 00
394 00
832 00
Note.—The estimated cost of this work made by me in January, 1880 ...$2,560,000 00
C. S. SCHRIEBER.
Ottawa, 1st February, 1882.
s@*Note—The Form of Tender hereunder printed being a facsimile of those attached to the following Fourteen Schedules of
Prices, it is considered unnecessary to repeat them, and tiiey are,
therefore, omitted
FORM OF .TENDER.
Opened by T. Trudeau, G. Schreiber, F. Braun, 1st February, 1882.
-Canadian Pacific Railway.—From EMORY'S BAR at West End of Contract No. 60
to PORT MOODY, Burrard Inlet, British Columbia.
The undersigned having seen the specifications, plans and profiles, prepared for
"the purposes of the construction of the Section of the Canadian Pacific Railway, from
Emory's Bar to Port Moody, and having also visited the ground or caused the same
to be visited, hereby tender to construct the said Section in accordance with the said
specifications, plans and profiles, and upon the terms of the form of contract annexed
to the specification, for the lump sum of
(For the Lump Sums of each of the several Tenders, see the following Schedules of Prices.)
subject to increase or decrease thereof under the terms of said contract and submit
the accompanying Schedule of Prices for the purposes of the t>th and 24th clauses of
said contract.
And agree, if this Tender be accepted, to execute a contract for the construction
of the said Section, in the form of that annexed to the said general specification
with such additional special provisions as may be determined by the Minister of Railways and Canals, and to deposit to the credit of the Receiver-G-eneral within eight
days after being notified of the acceptance of this Tender, a sum of money or Canadian Pacific Railway land bonds at 90 per cent., equal to five per cent, of the sum
above mentioned, to be held as security for the due fulfilment of the contract, upon
the terms set out in the agreement hereto annexed. Failing in this the Tender will
-be passed over and the deposit forfeited,
30 45 Victoria.
[sessional Papers (No.48.)
Schedule op Prices referred to in the hereto annexed Contract, the Lump Sum of
which amounts to Two Millions Two Hundred and Seventy-seven Thousand
Dollars.
Description of Work.
Clearing	
'Olose cutting.
Grubbing	
Cross logging 16 in. thick covered with brush-
Fencing |
Solid rock excavation	
Loose rock excavation (boulders 9 cubic ft. and over).
Earth excavation	
Under-drainB 3	
Tunnelling 	
" Line tunnels " in rock ;....
"Twelvefeet—Stream tunnels"	
"Six feet—Stream tunnels"	
Bridge masonry	
'Culvert masonry	
Dry masonry (retaining walls, &c.).....'.	
Paving.,
Per acre
do     .
do     .
do     .
L. ft	
C. yard.
do    ..
do ..
L.ft	
Concrete	
Rip-rap	
Cast-iron pipes, 3 ft. diameter inside, 1 in. thick, laid in concrete (the concrete not included in this item)	
fl50 ft. clear	
125       "     	
Timber bridge superstructure -{100       "     	
'   60       I     	
40       "     	
Timber, best quality, for Beam Culverts, $c.
12 ft. X 16 ft..
12 ft. X 12 ft.
8 ft. X 16 ft..
8 ft. X 12 ft.
Other dimensions of timber (if required to be used) at proportionate prices.
L.ft	
do 	
do 	
C.yard.
do   .
do   .
do   .
do   .
do   .
L.ft...
Each.
do .
do .
do
do
L. ft.,
do .
do ..
do .
Piles driven	
Round timber for crib wharfing, &c, not less than 12 in. diameter	
Flatted timber in road diversion culverts, 12 in. thick	
Plank j	
Wrought iron	
Cast iron	
Ties	
-Crossings	
Snll sett of switch gear and signal	
Track-laying	
Ballasting	
letting points and crossings ••; ••
Public road level crossings, comprising timber cattle-guards, planking, small
timber culverts under approaches, and notice boards, complete	
M.
do ..
do ..
do ..
F. B.
Lbs	
do 	
Each...
do ...
do ...
Mile	
C.yard
Each...
do
Price.
$    cts.
150 00
170 00
200 00
700 00
0 08
1 75
0 75
0 30
0 50
75 00
32 00
12 00
3 00
9 00
6 00
3 00
8 00
3 00
20 00
7,500 00
6,250 00
4,000 00
2,000 00
1,200 00
0 30
0 30
0 25
0 25
0 50
0 30
0 25
25 00
0 12
0 10
0 30
25 00
200 00
300 00
0 30
40 00
250 00
Actual Signatures,
Occupations and Residences
of the Parties Tendering.
DUNCAN MACDONALD,
A. CHARLBBOIS,
Montreal.
31 15 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
Schedule op Prices referred to in the hereto annexed Contract, the Lump Sum of
which amounts to Two Millions Four Hundred and Eieditv-six 'J • "
Hundred and Fifty-five Dollars.
Description of Work.
Clearing	
-Close cutting ..'.	
Grubbing	
Cross logging 16 in. thick covered with brush.
Fencing	
Solid rock excavation	
Loose rock excavation (boulders 9 cubic ft. and over)
Earth excavation	
Under-drains	
Tunnelling	
"Line tunnels " in rock	
"Twelve feet—Stream tunnels "	
"Six feet—Stream tunnels"	
Bridge masonry	
Culvert masonry	
Dry masonry (retaining walls, &c.)	
Paving	
Concrete	
Rip-rap „	
Rock faced embankments	
Cast-iron pipes, 3 ft diameter inside, 1 in. thick, laid in concrete (the concrete not included in this item)	
[150 ft. clear	
125     do     	
100     do     	
Timber bridge superstructure -j 100 deck	
60   do 	
Swing.
40 do .
Timber, best quality, for Beam Culverts, $c.
12 ft. xl6ft	
12 ft. xl2ft	
8 ft. x 16 ft	
8 ft. x 12 ft	
Other dimensions of timber (if required to be used) at proportionate prices.
Piles driven, ordinary	
Piles driven, special ;	
Crib work in piers and abutments	
For crib wharfing, &c	
Flatted timber in road diversion culverts, 12 in. thick	
Plank	
Wrought iron.
Cast iron	
Ti
L'les
Farm crossings	
Full set of switch gear and signal	
Spikes	
Track-laying a	
Fish plates and bolts	
Ballasting	
Setting points and crossings	
Public road level crossings, comprising timber cattle-guards, planking, small
timber culverts under approaches, and notice boards, complete	
Passenger station, Port Moody	
Freight house, do  -.	
do Pet River	
Combined passenger and freight building	
Water tanks	
Per acre.
do     .
do    .
do    .
L. a	
C. yard..
do     .
do .
L. ft	
L.ft	
do   ...
do   ....
C. yard.
do    .
do   .
do   .
do   .
do   .
do   .
L. ft..
Each.
do .
do .
do .
do .
do .
do ,
Cubic feet.
Lin. ft...
do   ...
C. yard.
do   ...
L. ft	
F. B. M.
Lbs	
Lbs	
Each ....
do 	
do 	
Tons	
Mile	
Tons	
C. yard..
Each.. .
do
Actual Signature,
Occupation and Residence
of the Party Tendering.
I
ANDREW ONDERDONK,
Civil Engineer and Contractor,
Yale, B.C.
Price.
$ cts.
35 00
50 00
60 00
1,500 00
0 06
1 05
0 50
0 27
0 20
80 00
10 00
6 00
8 00
10 00
1 50
0 75
5,900 00
3,000 00
3,500 00
6,000 00
1,000 00
0 26
0 20
0 25
4 00
3 50
20 00
0 18
0 10
0 30
50 00
200 00
100 00
250 00
150 00
0 30
100 00
100 00
5,000 00
5,000 00
1,000 00
3,500 00
2,000 00 -
45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1SS2
Schedule op Prices referred to in the hereto annexed Contract, the Lump Sum of
which amounts to Two Millions Eight Hundred and Sixty-four Thousand Two
Hundred and Forty-two Dollars.
Description of Work.
Clearing	
Close cutting	
Grubbing	
Cross logging 16 in. thick covered with brush..
Fencing	
Solid rock excavation	
Loose rock excavation (boulders 9 cubic ft. and over) ,
Earth excavation	
Under-drains	
Tunnelling	
'•Line Tunnels " in rock	
| Twelve feet—Stream tunnels"	
"Six feet—Stream tunnels" 	
Bridge masonry	
Culvert masonry	
Dry masonry (retaining walls, &c.)	
Paving	
Concrete	
Rip-rap 	
Cast-iron pipes, 3 ft. diameter inside, 1 in. thick, laid in concrete (the concrete not included in this item) ;
f 150 ft. clear..
|125     do
Timber bridge superstructure -{100     do
60     do     ..
I 40     do
Timber, best quality, for Beam Culverts, $c.
12 ft.' X 16 ft	
12 ft. X 12 ft	
8 ft. X 16 ft	
8 ft. X 12 ft	
Other dimensions of timber (if required to be used) at proportionate prices.
Piles driven	
Round timber for crib wharfing, &c, not less than 12 in. diameter	
Flatted timber in road diversion culverts, 12 in. thick	
Plank 	
Per acre.
do     .
do     .
do     .
ft	
yard..
do     .
do     .
L.ft	
L. ft	
do   ....
do   ....
C. yard.
do
do
do
do
do
L.ft..
Each.
do
do
do
do
L. ft.
do
do
do
Wrought iron.
Cast iron	
Ties	
Crossings	
Full set of switch gear and signal	
Tracklaying ■.	
Ballasting.* ._	
Setting points and crossings ••; •:•
Public road level crossings, comprising timber cattle-guards, plankmg, small
timber culverts under approaches, and notice boards, complete	
do   	
do   ....
do   	
P. B. M.
Lbs	
do 	
Each. ...
do   ...
do   ...
Mile	
C. yard.
Each. ...
do
Price.
$   cts.
60 00
160 00
160 00
800 00
0 05
1 60
0 60
0 30
0 50
100 00
1,280 00
1,000 09
800 00
10 00
12 00
00
6 00
7 00
2 50
10 00
7,000 00
6,000 00
5,000 00
4,000 00
3,000 00
0 30
0 25
0 20
0 20
0 60
0 25
0 30
14 00
0 12
0 12
0 40
25 00
60 00
350 00
0 40
50 00
40 00
Actual Signatures,
Occupations and Residences
of the Parties Tendering.
{
JAMES MURRAY, Contractor,
St. Catharines, Ontario.
J. A. COTJ1N, Ottawa.
33
48—3 45 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 48.)
A. 1882
Schedule op Prices referred to in the hereto annexed Contract, the Lump Sum of
which amounts to Two Millions Nine Hundred and Seventy Thousand Dollars.
Description of Work
Clearing	
Close cutting	
Grubbing	
Cross logging 16 in. thick covered with brush,
fencing.,
Solid rock excavation	
Loose rock excavation (boulders 9 cubit ft. and over).
Earth excavation	
Under drains	
Tunnelling	
" Line tunnels " in rock	
"Twelve feet—Stream tunnels"	
" Six feet"—Stream tunnels "	
Bridge masonry	
Culvert masonry	
Dry masonry (retaining walls, &c.)	
Paving	
Concrete	
Rip-rap.
Cast-iron pipes, 3 ft. diameter inside, 1 in. thick, laid in concrete (the concrete not included in this item)	
| 150 ft. clear	
| 125     do     	
Timber bridge superstructure \ 100     do      	
ys.;. i 60   do    	
[  40     do      	
|L. feet...
I do ....
\ do ....
iC. yards.
do     .
do     ..
do     ..
do     ..
do     ..
L. feet.
Each..
do    .
do   .
do   .
do   .
L. feet,
do .
do .
do    .
do   .
Timber, best quality, for Beam Culverts, $c.
12 ft. X 16 ft , ,	
12 ft. X 12 ft	
8 ft. X 16 ft	
8 ft. X 12 ft 1	
Other dimensions of timber (if required to be used) at proportionate prices
Piles driven	
Round timber for crib wharfing, &c, not less than 12 in. diameter I   do    ...
Flatted timber in road diversion culverts, 12 in. thick      do    ...
Plank  F.B.M..
Wroughtiron      |Lbs	
Cast iron ;    do 	
Ties Each....
Crossings    do
Pull set of switch gear and signal    do
Tracklaying ; "|... Mile.....
Ballasting  C.yard!
Setting points and crossings 'Each	
Public road level crossings., comprising timber cattle-guards, planking, smaill
timber culverts under approaches, and notice boards, complete    do   ....
Price.
$     cts.
75 00
50 00
150 00
100 00
0 30
1 60
0 75
0 33
0 20
105 00
15 00
6 00
4 00
3 00
6 00
'2 25-
40 00
7,000 00
5,000 00
3,800 00
1,800 00
600 00
0 40
0 35
0 25
0 18
0 35
0 18
0 15
16 00
0 12*
0 12$
0 32
65 00
65 00
250 00
0 30
15 00
50 00
Actual Signatures, \
Occupations and Residences <
of the Parties Tendering.     /
HUGH RYAN,
P. PURCELL.
JOHN RYAN.
Contractor, Perth.
34 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No. 48.)
A. 1882
Schedule oe Prices referred to in the hereto annexed Contract, the Lump Sum ot
which amounts to Two Millions Nine Hundred and Ninety-nine Thousand Seven
Hundred and Thirty-five Dollars.
Description of Work.
Price.
over).
do     	
do     	
L. ft	
C. yard	
do    	
do    	
L. ft	
Clearing     Per acre
Close cutting         <j0
Grubbing	
Cross logging 16 in. thick covered with brush
Fencing	
Solid rock excavation	
Loose rock excavation (boulders 9 cubic ft. an
Earth excavation	
Under drains .	
Tunnelling 	
" Line tunnels" in rock  }
"Twelve feet—Stream tunnels "'  I
"Sixfeet—Stream tunnels" J
Bridge masonry	
Culvert masonry 1
Dry masonry (retaining walls, &c.)  j
Paving t.	
Concrete 	
Rip-r.ap	
Cast iron pipes, 3 ft. diameter inside, 1 in. thick, laid in concrete (the concrete not included in this item) jL. ft.
2 (two) swing bridges  fl50ft. clear... Each
3 (three) Howe truss bridges     125     do     ...j  do
11 (eleven) timber bridge superstructure \ 100     do     ...I  do
j   60     do     ...    do
26 (twenty-six) bridges  (_ 40     do     ...   do
C.
yard....
do    ....
do ....
do ....
do    ....
Timber, best quality, for Beam Culverts, §c.
400,000 cubic feet pine timber  C. ft	
91 tons fish-plate bolts    Per lb...
273 tons spikes    do 	
165,000 cubic yards rock-faced embankments, &c  0. yard.
Other dimensions of timber (if required to be used) at proportionate prices.
Piles driven L. ft	
226,000 lineal feet special driven    do 	
Round timber for crib wharfing, &c, not less than 12 in. diameter | do 	
Flatted timber in road diversion culverts, 12 in. thick	
45,040 crib work on piers and abutment
Plank	
Wrought iron	
Cast iron	
Ties :	
Crossings	
Full set of switch gear and signal	
Track laying	
Ballasting	
Setting points and crossings •	
Public joad level crossings, comprising timber cattle-guards, planking, small
timber culverts under approaches, and, notice-boards, complete	
1 (one) passenger-depot at Port Moody	
1 Cone) freight do do       	
1 (one)     do do     Pet River	
7 (seven) combined passenger and freight depots	
5 (five) water tanks and services	
C. yard.
F. B. M.
Lbs	
do 	
Each....
do   ....
do   ....
Mile	
C. yard.
Each....
do
Each
$      cts.
40 00
100 00
145 00
1,000 00
0 05
1 45
0 50
0 29
0 40
90 00
10 00
5 00
5 00
7 00
1 80
10,000 00
5,000 00
3,009 00
1,000 00
0 35
0 09
0 09
1 90
0 30
0 30
0 25
3 50
25 00
0 09
0 09
0 25
70 00
450 00
200 00
0 25
30 00
140 00
8,000 00
4,000 00
3,000 00
3,000 00
2,000 00
Actual Signatures, \
Occupations and Residences-j
' of the Parties Tendering.     ^
DENIS O'BRIEN, Contractor, Montreal.
JOHN P. WHELEN, Contractor, Montreal
M. C. MULLIN, Merchant, Montreal.
do
48-
-31 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
Schedule of Prices referred to in the hereto annexed Contract, the Lump Sum of
which amounts to Three Millions and Sixty-two Thousand Dollars.
Description of Work.
•Clearing	
Close cutting	
Grubbing	
Cross logging 16 in. thick covered with brush.
Fencing	
Solid rock excavation	
Loose rock excavation (boulders 9 cubic ft. and over).
Earth excavation	
TJnder-drains	
Tunnelling :	
-"Line tunnels" in rock	
" Twelve feet—Stream tunnels "	
"Sixfeet—Stream tunnels"	
Bridge masonry	
Culvert masonry	
Dry masonry (retaining walls, &c)	
Pa  "
■"avins
-Concrete.
Rip-rap.
Cast-iron pipes, 3 ft. diameter inside, 1 in. thick, laid in concrete (the concrete not included in this item)	
f 150 ft. clear	
I 125     do     	
Timber bridge superstructure -! 100     do     	
I   60     do	
(. 40     do     	
Tin
best quality, for Beam Culverts, £c.
12 ft. X 16 ft  	
12 ft. X 12 ft	
8 ft. X 16 ft.....	
8 tt. X 12 ft	
■Other dimensions of timber (if required to be used) at proportionate prices.
Piles driven	
Round timber for crib wharfing, &c, not less than 12 in. diameter	
Flatted timber in road diversion culverts, 12 in. thick	
Plank	
Wrought iron
Cast iron	
Ties	
Crossings	
Full set of switch gear and signal ,	
Track-laying	
Balla-ting	
Setting points and crossings	
Public road level crossings, comprising timber cattle-guards, planking, small
timber culverts under approaches, and notice-boards, complete	
Per acre.
do     .
do     .
do .
L. feet...
C. feet...
do   ..
do ..
L. feet...
L. feet ..
do   ..
do   ..
C. yard..
do     .
do     .
do    .
do    .
do    .
L. feet.
Each..
do   .
do   .
do   .
do   .
L. feet,
do ..
do ..
do   ..
M.
do
do
do
F. B
Lbs	
do 	
Each...
do   ..
do ..
Mile....
C. yard
Each...
do
Price.
$
$     cts.
30
SO
80 00
1,500 00
0 05
1 65
0 80
0 29
0 50
100 00
65 00
35 00
15 00
9 00
4 00
3 00
7 00
2 00
37 00
5,400 00
4,200 00
3,200 00
1,400 00
800 00
0 55
0 40
0 37
0 30
0 40
0 30
0 25
25 00
0 12
,0 10
0 23
30 00
35 00
225 00
0 38
20 00
125 00
Actual Signature, \
Occunation and Residence -^
of the Party Tendering.      /
JAMES GOODWIN, Contractor,
Ottawa, Ontario,
36 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
Schedule op Prices referred to in the hereto annexed Contract, the Lump Sum of
which amounts to Three Millions One Hundred and Sixty-nine Thousand Eight
Hundred and Eighty Dollars.
Description of Work.
Clearing	
Close cutting  ""
Grubbing |
Cross logging 16 in. thick covered with "brush".
Fencing ,,,
Solid rock excavation	
Loose rock excavation (boulders 9 cubic ft. and over).
Earth excavation	
Under-drains	
Tunnelling	
" Line tunnels" in rock	
" Twelve feet—Stream tunnels"	
" Six feet—Stream tunnels "	
Bridge masonry	
Culvert masonry	
Dry masonry (retaining walls, &c.)	
Paving	
Concrete ,	
Rip-rap	
Cast-iron pipes, 3 ft. diameter inside, 1 in. thick, laid in concrete (the concrete not included in this item)	
15.0 ft. clear	
Timber bridge superstructure.
125 do
100 do
60 do
40 do
Timber, best quality, for Beam Culverts, §c.
12 ft. X 16 ft	
12 ft. X 12 ft	
8 ft. X 16 ft	
8 ft. X 12 ft  	
Other dimensions of timber (if required to be used) at proportionate prices.
Piles driven.
Round timber for crib wharfing, <&c, not less than 12 in. diameter.
Flatted timber in road diversion culverts, 12 in. thick,
Plank perM.
Wrought iron	
Cast iron ■	
Ties :	
Crossings	
Full set of switch gear and signal	
Track-laying	
Ballasting	
Setting points and crossings	
Public road level crossings, comprising timber cattle-guards, planking, small
timber culverts under approaches, and notice boards, complete	
Per acre.
do    .
do    ..
do    ..
L.ft	
0. yard...
do     .
do .
L. ft	
L.ft	
do ....
do ....
0. yard,
do .
do .
do .
do .
do   .
L.ft..
Each.
do .
do .
do .
do .
L.ft.
L.ft	
do ....
do ....
F. B. M.
Lbs	
Lbs	
Each. ..
do ....
do .-...
Mile	
C. yard.
Each....
do
Price.
$   cts.
35 00
55 00
110 00
1,300 00
0 06
1
1
0
40
40
32
0 40
95 00
45 00
20 00
12 00
12.00
7 00
6 00
8 00
2 75
50 00
9,000 00
5,625 00
4,500 00
2,500 00
1,000 00
0 30
0 37$
0 30
0 30
40 00
0 10
0 10
0 25
30 00
75 00
400 00
0 35
50 00
75 00
Actual Signatures,
Occupations and Residences
of the Parties Tendering.
WILLIAM DAYIS,
W. H. DAVIS,
M. P. DAVIS,
J. T. DAVIS,
Contractors, Ottawa.
37 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
Schedule of Prices referred to in the hereto annexed Contract, the Lnmp Sum of
which amounts to Three Millions One Hundred and Ninety Thousand Dollars.
Description of Work.
Clearing	
Close cutting -.	
Grubbing	
Cross logging 16 in. thick covered with brush	
Fencing '..-.
Solid rock excavation	
Loose rock excavation (buulders 9 cubic ft. and over).
Earth excavation	
Under drains	
Tunnelling	
"Line tunnels " in rock	
" Twelve feet—Stream tunnels"	
"Six feet—Stream tunnels"	
Bridge masonry	
Culvert masonry	
Dry masonry (retaining walls, &c.)	
Paving	
Concrete 	
Rit
Per acre.
do .
do .
do     .
L. ft	
C. yard-
do ..
do     ..
L.ft	
tip-rap	
Cast iron pipes, 3 ft. diameter inside, I in. thick, laid in concrete (the concrete not included in this item)	
f 150 ft. clear	
I 125     do     	
Timber Bridge Superstructure -{ 100     do     	
|   60     do     	
t 40     do     	
Timber, best quality, for Beam Culverts, Sfc.
12 ft. X 16 ft	
12 ft. X 12 ft	
8ft. X 16ft	
8 ft. X 12 ft	
Other dimensions of timber (if required to be used) at proportionate prices.
Piles driven	
Round timber for crib wharfing, &c, not less than 12 in. diameter	
Flatted timber in road diversion culverts, 12 in. thick	
Plank	
L.ft	
do 	
do 	
C. yard,
do .
do .
do .
do .
do     .
L. ft..
Each.
do  .
do  .
do  .
do .
Wrought iron.
Cast iron	
Ties	
Crossings	
Full set of switch gear and signal	
Track laying	
Ballasting !..."".."!"!."!!!"
Settingpointsand crossings "."...!!.".
Public road level crossings, comprising timber cattle-guards, planking,"smaii
timber culverts under approaches, and notice-boards complete	
L. ft.
do .
do .
do .
do 	
do 	
do 	
F. B. M.
Lbs	
do 	
Each	
do   ....
do   ....
Mile	
C. yard.
Each....
do
Prioe.
$   ctg.
125 00
60 00
220 00
660 00
0 03$
1 48
0 70
0 28
0 30
98
00
45
00
18
00
10
75
8
75
6
50
2
50
6
00
1
80
30
00
5,100
00
3,900
00
3,000
00
1,550
00
875
00
0 50
0 39
0 32
0 27
0 33
0 16
0 22
22 00
0 08
0 06
0 22$
24 00
46 00
245 00
0 30
6 50
120 00
Actual Signature,
Occupation and Residence
of the Party Tendering.
The Railway Improvement Co. of North America,
By JAS. O. BLOSS, President,
123 Pearl Street, New York.
88 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
Schedule of Prices referred to in the hereto annexed Contract, the Balk Sam of
which amounts to Three Millions One Hundred and Ninety-five Thousand Seven
Hundred and Five Dollars.
Description of Work.
Clearing	
Close cutting , ""
'Grubbing	
Cross logging 16 in. thick covered with brush'.
Fencing	
Solid rock excavation	
Loose rock excavation (boulders 9 cubic ft. and over).
Earth excavation	
Under-drains	
Tunnelling	
v Line tunnels " in rock ,	
■" Twelve feet—Stream tunnels "	
" Six feet—Stream tunnels"	
Bridge masonry	
■Culvert masonry	
Dry masonry (retaining walls, &c.)	
Paving	
Concrete,
o-ra
Rip-rap	
Cast-iron pipes, 3 ft. diameter inside, 1 in. thick, laid in concrete (the concrete not to be included in this item)	
f 150 ft. clear.......
125     do     	
"Timber bridge superstructure i 100     do     	
60     do     	
I. 40     do
Timber, best quality, for Beam Culverts, $c.
12 ft. X 16 ft  	
12 ft. X 12 ft	
8 ft. X 16 ft  	
8 ft. X 12 ft	
Other dimensions of timber (if required to be used) at proportionate prices.
Piles driven	
Round timber for crib wharfing, &c, not less than 12 in. diameter	
flatted timber in road diversion culverts, 12 in. thick	
Plank per M
Wrought iron	
Cast iron	
Ties •	
Crossings	
Full set of switch gear and signal	
Tracklaying	
Ballasting ,	
Setting points and crossings • •—••■; •;
Public road level crossings, comprising timber cattle-guards, planking, smal!
timber culverts under approaches, and notice-boards, complete	
do 	
do 	
do 	
F. B. M.
Lbs	
do 	
Each	
do   	
do   	
Mile ,
|C. yard.
Each	
do   	
Price.
$   cts.
30 00
50 00
80 00
500 00
0 06
2 00
0 80
0 30
0 40'
100 00
40 00
20 00
14 00
8 00
6 00
4 00
10 00
3 00
30 00
5,500 00
4,000 00
3,000 00
2.000 00
1,200 00
0 40
0 30
0 28
0 35
0 25
0 20
0 25
20 00
0 10
0 08
0 25
50 00
150 00
250 00
0 30
40 00
200 00
^t
Actual Signature,
Occupation and Residence
of the Party Tendering.
H. J. BEEMER,
Windsor
Hotel,
Montreal
3« 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
Schedule of Prices referred to in the hereto annexed Contract, the Lump Sum of
.which amounts to Three Millions Three  Hundred and Forty-nine Thousand
Dollars.
Description of Work.
Clearing	
Close cutting.
Grubbing.
Cross logging 16 in. thick covered with brush.
Fen
cmg.,
Solid rock excavation	
Loose rock excavation (boulders 9 cubic ft. and over).
Earth excavation	
Under-drains	
Tunnelling '..
"Line Tunnels" in rock	
" Twelve feet—Stream tunnels"	
"Six feet—Stream tunnels"	
Bridge masonry, with mortar, and in retaining walls...
Culvert masonry	
Dry masonry (retaining walls, &c.)	
Paving	
Per acre.
do     .
do     .
do     .
L.ft	
C. yard.,
do     ..
do ..
L.ft	
Concrete	
Rip-rap, hand laid	
Rock facing to embankment piers	
Cast iron pipes, 3 ft. diameter inside, 1 in. thick, laid in concrete (the concrete not included in this item)	
Timber, best quality, for Beam Culverts, $c.
Crib-work in piers and embankments	
do      wharfing with rough logs	
26 Perry improvement bridges  40 ft. clear...
11 Howe truss bridges 100     do
2 deck sparr       do 100     do
3 Howe truss      do    125     do
2 swing do    150     do
Other dimensions of timber (if required to be used) at proportionate prices.
Frame timber, 400,000 ft., briders	
Plank	
L.ft.
0. yard.
do     .
do .
do .
do .
do .
do
do
Each.
do
do
do
do
Piles driven, ordinary trestle work	
Round timber for crib wharfing, &c, not less than 12 in. diameter, special
drawing	
Flatted timber in road diversion culverts, 12 in. thick	
Wrought iron	
Cast iron	
Ties  .....   .,.	
C.ft	
F. B. M.
L.ft	
do
Tracklaying j	
91 tons fish-plate bolts	
91 do spikes	
Setting points and crossings	
Full set of switch gear and signal ,
Ballasting #.	
Public road level crossings, comprising timber cattle-guards, planking, smail
timber culverts under approaches, and notice-beards, complete	
Crossings	
Passenger station, PortMoody	
Freight house do    " "I..!!!!..!!!..."!...
do Pelt River	
Combined passenger and freight buildings.
Water tank services	
Lbs	
do 	
Each....
Mile	
Ton	
do 	
Each....
do   ....
C.yard.
Each....
do   ....
Each,
do  .
Price.
$   cts.
90 00
90 00"
150 00
1,200 00
0 05-
1 60
0 80'
0 30
1 00
110 00
12 00
5 50
4 00>
6 00
2 50-
2 00
3
2
1,200
3,500
3,500
4,000
6,500
00
50
00-
00
00
00
00
0 35
25 0O
C 40
0 50
0 12
0 10
0 25
200 00
200 00
200 00
^40 00
250 00
0 30
150 00
0 30
8,000 00
3,500 00
3,000 00
3,000 00
3,500 00-
Actual Signatures,
Occupations and Residences-
of Parties Tendering.
'E. J. CHARLTON, Contractor, Quebec:
T. J. O'BRIEN, Contractor, San Francisco, California.
JAMES FAIRNS, Banker, New York City.
LN. J. PURPORE, Chichester.
40 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
Schedule of Prices referred to in the hereto annexed Contract, the Lump Sum of
which amounts to Three Millions Three Hundred and Eighty-nine Thousand
Dollars.
Description of Work.
Clearing	
Close cutting "".
Grubbing _"___
Cross logging 16 in, thick covered with brush.
Fencing	
Solid rock excavation	
Loose roek excavation (boulders 9 cubic ft. and over).
Earth excavation	
Under-drains	
Tunnelling	
" Line tunnels " in rock	
" Twelve feet—Stream tunnels "	
" Six feet—Stream tunnels"	
Bridge masonry	
Culvert masonry	
Dry masonry (retaining walls, &c.)	
Paving	
Per aere.
do .
do .
do    .
L.ft	
C. yard..
do   -.
do ..
L. ft	
Concrete	
Rip-rap	
Cast-iron pipes, 3 ft. diameter inside, 1 in. thick, laid in concrete (the concrete not included in this item)	
f 150 ft. clear	
Timber bridge superstructure.
125 do
100 do
60 do
[ 40 do
Timber, best quality, for Beam Culverts, Afc.
12 ft. X 16 ft perM. Ft. B. M
12 ft. X 12 ft	
8 ft. X 16 ft	
8 ft. X 12 ft	
Other dimensions of timber (if required to be used) at proportionate prices.
Piles driven	
Round timber for crib wharfing, &c, not less than 12 in. diameter	
Flatted timber in road diversion culverts, 12 in. thick	
Plank	
Wrought iron	
Cast iron	
Ties	
Crossings ;	
Full set of switch gear and signal	
Tracklaying >	
Ballasting 4 '
Setting points and crossings	
Public road level crossings, comprising timber cattle-guards, planking, small
timber culverts under approaches, and notice-boards, complete	
L.ft	
do 	
do 	
C. yard,
do .
do .
do .
do .
do   .
L. ft..
Each.
do   .
do   .
do   .
do   .
L.ft.
do .
do .
do .
M-
do
do
do
F. B
Lbs	
do 	
Each....
do   ....
do   ....
Mile	
C. yard
Each...
do
Actual Signatures,
Occupations and Residences
of the Parties Tendering.
WM. EDE, San Francisco, Cal
J. McMULLEN,     do
Price.
$   ets.
50 00
30 00
50 00
500 00
0 06
1 60
0 80
0 35
0 40
120 00
50 00
20 00
12 00
6 00
5 00-
5 00
5 00
3 00
10 00
4,000 00
3,500 00
3,000 00-
1,500 00
1,000 00
9 30
0 30
0 30
0 30
0 30-
0 20
0 25
30 00
0 06-
0 05
0 25
50 00
70 00-
250 00-
0 40
15 00-
o
0 00-
Contractors*
41 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No. 48.)
A. 1882
.Schedule of Peices referred to in the hereto annexed Contract, the Lump Sum of
which amounts to Three. Millions Three  Hundred and Eighty-nine Thousand
Dollars.
Description of Work.
•Clearing	
Close cutting	
Grubbing	
■Cross logging 16 in. thick covered with brush.
Fe
fencing
Solid rock excavation	
Loose rock excavation (boulders 9 cubic feet and over)
.Earth excavation	
Dnder-drains	
Tunnelling	
" Line tunnels " in rock	
" Twelve feet—Stream tunnels "	
" Six feet—Stream tunnels "	
Bridge masonry	
Culvert masonry	
Dry masonry (retaining walls, &c.)	
Paving	
Concrete	
Rip-rap	
Cast-iron pipes, 3 ft. diameter inside, 1 in. thick, laid in concrete (the concrete not included in this item)	
f 150 ft. clear	
| 125      do      i
Timber bridge superstructure ■{ 100      do     	
j   60      do     	
I 40      do     	
Timber, best quality, for Beam Culverts, $c.
12 ft. X 16 ft	
12 ft.  X 12 ft	
8 ft.  X 16 ft	
8 ft.  X 12 ft	
Other dimensions of timber (if required to be used) at proportionate prices.
Piles driven	
Round timber for crib wharfing, &c, not less than 12,in. diameter	
Flatted timber in road diversion culverts, 12 in. thick	
Plank	
Wrought iron
Cast iron	
Ties	
Crossings	
Full set of switch gear and signal	
Tracklaying	
Ballasting ,	
Setting points and crossings 	
Public road level crossings, comprising timber cattle-guards, planking, small
timber culverts under approaches, and notice-boards, complete	
F. B. M.
Lbs	
do 	
Each. ...
do   ...
do   ...
Mile	
C. yard.
Each. ...
do    ...
Price.
cts.
80 00
160 00
400 00
800 00
0 06
2 00
1 00
0 32
0 50
105 00
105 00
105 00
14 00
10 00
9 00
15 00
8 00
2 50
6,250 00
4,000 00
2.500 00
1,000 00
0 40
0 40
0 40
0 36
0 30
0 15
0 20
25 00
0 12
0 10
0 30
50 00
100 00
300 00
0 32
100 00
300 00
Actual Signatures,
Occupations and Residences
of the Parties Tendering,
ALEX. MANNING, Toronto,
A. MACDONALD, Toronto,
Contractors.
42 . -;• -.^nr.'—-*T"
■HHp
45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No. 48.)
A. 1882
Schedule o? Prices referred to in the hereto annexed Contract, the Lump Sum of
which amounts to Three Millions Four Hundred and Eighty-eight Thousand
Three Hundred and Ninety-four Dollars.
Description  of Work.
	
Price.
Per acre	
do
do
do     	
L.ft	
C.yard	
do
do
L. ft	
100 00
Close cutting	
48 00
"Grubbing	
200 00
Cross logging 16 in. thick covered with brush	
800 00
0 07
Solid rock excavation	
1 60
Loose rock excavation (boulders 9 cubic ft. and over)	
0 70
Earth excavation                                                                          	
0 40
Tinder-drains	
0 36
Tunnelling	
"Line Tunnels " in rock	
L.ft	
90 00
"Twelve feet^Stream tunnels"	
"Six feet—Stream tunnels"	
do 	
do 	
do
do     	
do
do     .,,
do    	
L. ft	
36 00
24 00
Bridge masonry                                                                       	
15 50
12 00
Dry masonry (retaining walls, &c)	
6 00
3 60
8 00
2 00
Cast iron pipes, 3 ft. diameter inside, 1 in. thick, laid in concrete (the con-
f 150 ft. clear	
125     do     .   ,,.
60     do     	
[ 40     do     	
Timber, best quality, for Beam Culverts, §c.
12 ft. X 16 ft	
30 00
5,400 00
do   	
4,000 00
do  	
3,000 00
do    •
1,400 00
do  . 	
L.ft	
do 	
060 00
0 43
12 ft. X 12 ft. .                                                                                 	
0 32
8ft. Xl6ft             	
do 	
do 	
do 	
do 	
0 29
8 ft. X 12 ft                       	
0 22
•Other dimensions of timber ( if required to be used) at proportionate prices.
0 26
0 12
do 	
F. B. M
Lbs	
0 18
Plank                                         ,	
18 00
0 12
do 	
0 08
Ties                                                                                                     	
Each	
0 30
do   	
200 00
do  	
Mile	
100 00
480 00
C.yard	
0 50
30 00
Public road level crossings, comprising timber cattle-guards, planking, small
do  	
190 00
Actual  Signature, (
Occupation and Residence <
Of the Party Tendering.      /
J. B. MONTGOMERY,
Rutland, Oregon,
United States.
43 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
Schedule of Prices referred to in the hereto annexed Contract, the Lump Sum of
which amounts to Three Millions Five Hundred  and Thirty-one Thousand,
Eight Hundred and Thirty-two Dollars.
Description of Work.
Clearing	
Close cutting	
Grubbing	
Cross logging 16 in. thick covered with brush.
Fenc"
icing
Solid rock excavation	
Loose rock excavation (boulders 9 cubic feet and over).
Earth excavation	
Under-drains	
Tunnelling 	
" Line tunnels " in rock	
" Twelve feet—Stream tunnels "	
" Six feet—Stream tunnels" ,	
Bridge masonry	
Culvert masonry	
Dry masonry (retaining walls, <fcc.)	
Paving	
Per acre.
do     .
do     .
do     .
L. ft	
C  yard..
do     .
do .
L. ft	
Concrete	
Rip-rap	
Cast-iron pipes, 3 ft. diameter inside, 1 in. thick, laid in concrete (the con;
crete not included in this item,)	
f 150 ft. clear	
125        do     	
Timber bridge superstructure -{ 100       do    	
60  do 	
[  40  do  	
L. ft	
do ...
do ...
C. yard,
do
do
do
do
do
L.ft..
Each.
do
do
do
do
Timber, best quality, for Beam Culverts,
12 ft.  X 16 ft	
12 ft   X 12 ft	
8 ft.   X  16 ft	
8 ft.  X 12 ft	
Other dimensions of timber (if required to be used) at proportionate prices.
Piles driven ".	
Round timber for crib wharfing, &c, not less than 12 in. diameter	
Flatted timber in road diversion culverts, 12 in. thick	
Plank,	
Wrought iron
Cast iron........
Ties	
Crossings	
Full set of switch gear and signal	
Tracklaying	
Ballasting	
Setting points and crossings j	
Public road level crossings, comprising timber cattle-guards, planking, small
timber culverts under approaches, and notice-boards, complete	
Steam-pump, boiler and engine-house for water stations	
L.ft.
do
do
do
do   ....
do   ....
do ....
F. B. M.,
Lbs	
do 	
Each. ...
do   ...
do    ...
Mile	
C. yard.
Each.  ..
do
Price.
$   cts.
30 00-
50 00
100 00
1,000 00
0 05-
1 75-
0 65
0 35
0 45
100 00
80 00
30 00
20 00
16 00'
6 00
5 00'
8 00
3 00-
40 00-
7,500 00-
5,000 0O
3,560 00
2,400 00
750 00
0 40
0 30
0 30
0 25-
0 35
0 25
0 25
20 0O-
0 11
0 09
0 29
150 00
120 00
250 00
0 35
.50 00-
150 00-
;,000 0O
Actual Signatures,
Occupations and Residences
of the Parties Tendering.
JOHN HERBERT, Contractor, Toronto.
JOHN RENNIE, of Toronto, Merchant.
M. STARRS, Ottawa, Contractor.
44 45 Victoria.
bessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
Canadian Pacific Railway, Office of the Exqineer-in-Chief,
Ottawa, 6th February, 1882.
Sir,—I have the honor to report, in connection with the advertisement attached
hereto, inviting tenders for the construction of the section of the Canadian Pacific
Railway, between Emory's Bar and Port Moody :—
Fourteen tenders in all were received, ranging from $2,27'7,000 to $3,531,832.
Tho tender of Messrs. McDonald and Charlebois is the lowest, but is irregular,
inasmuch as the cheque accompanying it was marked by the Bank of Montreal on
the 24th tilt., good for two days only. The tender of A. Onderdonk, for $2,486,255,
•consequently becomes the lowest, and as he is possessed of the necessary skill and
resources and his tender is practically the same as the amount of my estimate submitted to the Hon. the Minister, last "year, viz:—$2,560,000, I recommend that his
tender be accepted.
I have the honor to be, Sir, your obedient servant,
COLLINGWOOD SCHREIBER, Engineer-in-Chief.
F. Braun, Esq., Secy. Railways and Canals.
Attached hereto will be found a copy of Messrs. McDonald and Charlebois'
-cheque herein referred to i—
Montreal, 23rd January, 1882.
To the Bank of Montreal.
Pay to tho order of the Honorable the Minister of Railways and Canals, twenty
-thousand dollars.
$20,000
Mcdonald & charlebois.
True copy of the cheque deposited by Messrs. McDonald and Charlebois with
~their tender for the construction of the section of the Canadian Pacific Railway
-extending from Emory's Bar to Port Moody, received and opened on the 1st February,
1882.
T. TRTJDEAU.
COLLINGWOOD SCHREIBER.
F. Braun, Secretary.
Canadian Pacific Railway, Office of the Engineer-in-Chief.
Ottawa, 2nd February, 1882.
^Memorandum.)
Port Moody and Emory Section. I have made a rather hurried estimate of the
-cost of constructing this section at the lowest prices I considered safe. This amounts
in round numbers to $3,000,000 (including station and wharf at Port Moody). I do
not think that this can be much reduced in strict accordance with the plans.   But I
45 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No. 48.)
A. 1882
am going over the whole matter, carefully checking the quantities and noting points-
where a possible reduction can be made by slight changes in the line and other
modifications.    This will occupy several days.
MARCUS SMITH.
C. Schreiber, Esq , C.P.R.
Department Railways and Canals, Minister's Office, 6th February, 1882.
(Memorandum, Monday, 6th February, 1882).
Re Tender, Emory's Bar and Port Moody.
Under instructions from the Minister on Saturday last, I called at about half-past
ten o'clock this morning on Mr. Drummond, manager of the Bank of Montreal here,
and handed him a certain cheque drawn by Macdonald and Charlebois on the Bank of
Montreal, dated 23rd January, 1882, for $20,000, and stamped on the 24th of same month,
" good for two days only," asking him whether he would pay it. On finding the cheque?
was marked | good for two days only, " he shook his head, and said it would be necessary to enquire at the head office, tie suggested making enquiry, to which I assented.
At about one o'clock this day Mr, Drummond called at my office and handed me, in
presence of Mr. Trudeau, the telegram from the head office, Montreal, which I this,
afternoon handed to the Minister, and which is attached hereto, marked with my
initials.
A. P. BRADLEY.
Montreal, 6th Februarv. 1882.
(Telegram.)
To Bank of Montreal.
Banker requisite to-day,  please strike out for two days only from  our acceptance stamp.    The cheque will be good until paid.
SHADBOLT.
Handed to me by Mr. Drummond in my office about 1 p.m., 6th February.
A. P. BRADLEY.
Ottawa, 'Zth February, 1882.
(Memorandum.)
The undersigned has the honor to report that in response to an advertisement
inviting tenders, to be delivered in this Department up to noon on Wednesday, the
1st day of February, 1882, for the construction of the section of the Canadian Pacific
Railway between Emory's Bar and Port Moody, the following offers were received :—
From For the sum of
D. McDonald & A. Charlebois  $2,2*77,000 00
Andrew Onderdonk  2,486,255 00
James Murray & Co  2,864,^42 00
Ryan, Purcell & Ryan  2,970,000 00
Dennis O'Brien & Co  2,999,735 00
James Goodwin  3,062,000 00
William Davis & Co      3,169,880 09
The Railway Improvement Co. of North America... 3,190,000 00
T. J. Beemer  3,195,705 00
E. J. Charlton & Co  3,349,000 00
William Ede & Co  3,389,000 00
A. Manning & A. McDonald..  3,389,000 00
J. B. Montgomery  3,488,394 00
John Herbert & Co  3,531,832 00
46 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No. 48.)
That the 92nd clause of the specifications of the works embraced in this section
states that no tender will be entertained "unless a bank cheque, marked good by the
bank, for $20,000, accompanies the tender."
That the lowest tender as above, that from Messrs. D. McDonald and A. Charlebois,
is irregular, inasmuch as the cheque which accompanied it is marked by the Bank of
Montreal on the 24th January, 1882, as good for two days only.
That the lowest tender made in conformity with the conditions of the specifications, is that by Mr. Andrew Onderdonk for the sum of $2,486,255.00.
That this amount is lower than the Engineer's ostimate of the value of the works
to be performed, but the Chief Engineer, in a report dated the 6th February, 1882,
states that Mr. Andrew Anderdonk has the necessary skill and resources to carry out
the undertaking.
The undersigned accordingly recommends the acceptance of Mr. Andrew Onder-
donk's tender for the construction of the section of the Canadian Pacific Railway
between Emory's Bar and Port Moody, under the terms and conditions of the
specifications for the said work, for the sum of $2,486,255 00.
Respectfully submitted,
CHARLES TUPPER, Minister Railways and Canals.
Copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honorable the Privy Council, approved by Mis
Excellency the Governor-General in Council, on the 8th February, 1882.
On a memorandum dated 7th February, 1882, from the Minister of Railways
and Canals, stating that in response to an advertisement inviting tenders, to be
delivered in the Department of Railways and Canals up to noon on Wednesday, the
1st day of February, 1882, for the construction of the section of the Canadian Pacific
Railway between Emory's Bar and Port Moody, the following offers were received:—
From For the sum of
D. McDonald & A. Charlebois  $2,27*7,000
Andrew Onderdonk     2,486,255
James Murray & Co     2,884,242
Rya*i, Purcell & Ryan     2,970,000
Dennis O'Brien & Co :     2,999,>735
James Goodwin j     3,062,000
William Davis & Co '•     3,169,880
The Rail way Improvement Company of North America    3,190,000
T. J. Beemer     3,195,705
E. J. Charlton & Co     3,34y,00l»
William Ede & Co     3,389,000
A. Manning & A. McDonald    3,389,000
J. B. Montgomery     3,488,394
John Herbert & Co     3,531,832
That the 92nd clause of the specification of the works embraced in this section
states that no tender will be entertained '•' unless a bank cheque, marked good by
| the bank, for $20,000, accompanies the tender."
That the lowest tender, as above, that from Messrs. D. McDonald & A.
Charlebois, is irregular, inasmuch as the cheque which accompanied it is marked by
the Bank of Montreal on the 24th January, 1882, as good for two days only.
That the lowest tender made in conformity with the conditions of the specification is that by Mr. Andrew Onderdonk, for the sum of $2,486,255.
'That this amount is lower than the Engineer's estimate of the value of the work
to be performed, but the Chief Engineer, in a report dated the 6th February, 1882,
Btates that Mr. Onderdonk has the necessary skill and resources to carry out the
undertaking.
41 45 Victoria,
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
The Minister accordingly recommends the aeeeptance of Mr. Andrew Onderdonk's
tender for the construction of the section of the Canadian Pacific Railway between
Emory's Bar and Port Moody, under the terms and conditions of the specification
-for the said work, for the sum of two millions four hundred and eighty-six thousand
two hundred and fifty-five dollars ($2,486,255).
The Committee submit the above recommendation for Your Excellency's
approval.
Certified, J. O. COTE, Clerk P. C.
Hon. Minister of Railways and Canals.
.Ottawa, *7th February, 1882.
Sir,—I am directed by the Honorable the Minister of Railways and Canals to inform you that your tender for the construction of the section of the Canadian Pacific
.Railway between Emory's Bar and Port Moody, has been accepted.
I have now to call upon you to deposit to the credit of the Honorable the Receiver-General, within eight (8) days from this date, the sum of one hundred and
twenty-five thousand dollars ($125,000,) representing the five per cent, required un-
-der the specifications.
I am, Sir, your obedient servant,
F. BRAUN, Secretary.
Andrew Onderdonk, Esq., at Mr. May's, Metcalfe St.
Ottawa, 8th February, 1882.
Sir,—I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your esteemed favor of the 7th inst.,
in which you inform me that my tender for the construction of the Canadian Pacific
Railway between Emory's Bar and Port Moody, has been accepted, and calling upon
>me to deposit within eight days the required guarantee of one hundred and twenty-
five thousand dollars.
I would state in reply that I am prepared to comply with this requirement, and
-enter into contract as soon thereafter as it may best suit the convenience of the Honorable the Minister of Railways and Canals.
Respectfully submitted,
ANDREW ONDERDONR.
F. Braun, Esq., Secretary Railways and Canals.
(Telegram.) lOth-February, 1882.
'To Sir Charles Tupper, Montreal.
| This morning's Gazette says that we were the lowest tender for Port Moody
Section, and as we failed to make the deposit the contract was awarded to Onderdonk. This is incorrect; we are only waiting notice from the Department to complete deposit.    Waiting answer.
Mcdonald & charlebois.
(Telegram same date.)
To F. Braun.
Any decision in B. C. tenders; awaiting notice to make deposit.    Answer.
Mcdonald & charlebois.
Ottawa, 10th February, 1882.
McDonald & Charlebois, Montreal.
Contract was awarded to Onderdonk, whose tender was lowest, as yours could
aiot be considered for want of cheque marked good, as required by specification.
48
F, BRAUN, Secretary. 4.5 Victoria.
Sessional tapers (No.48.)
A. 1882
To the Honorable the President of the Council, Ottawa.
Sir,—We have the honor to submit the enclosed petition to His. Excellency the
Governor-General in Council.
We have the honor, Sir, to be,
Your obedient servants,
McDONALD & CHARLEBOIS, per F.M.M.
To His Excellency tho Governor-General in Council:
The petition of Duncan  McDonald and Alphonso Charlebois, of the City of
Montreal, Contractors,
Humbly sheweth,—
1. That during the month of October tho Government of Canada advertised for
tenders for the construction of one of the sections of the Canadian Pacific RajBray
between Port Moody and Emory's Bar, in the Province of British Columbia.
2. That on the first of February instant your petitioners filed, with the proper
officer in the Department of Railways and Canals, in the City of Ottawa, a tender $»
the construction of said works.
3. That the deposit required by the advertisement and specifications was duly
made with the proper officer of the Department of Railways and Canals at the sanm
time as the said tender.
4. That other tenders for the said work by other contractors were filed in the
Department of Railways and Canals at the same time, and in like form with that of
your petitioners.
5. That the tender of your petitioners was the lowest of all the tenders so made
and fyled with the said Department for the construction of the said work.
6. That the amount or difference in favor of the public between the tender of
your petitioners and the lowest tender was about two hundred thousand dollars. ;
7. That on the tenth of February instant your petitioners wore notified by the
Department of Railways and Canals that their tender had not been accepted because
a cheque upon the Bank of Montreal for the amount of the deposit was not marked
good as required by specifications, and that the contract was awarded to a higher
tender, as shown by exhibit No. 1 herewith.
8. Your petitioners, complaining of this decision of the Department of Railways
and Canals, humbly represent to your Excellency in Council that the said cheque was
duly accepted by the Bank of Montreal, at Montreal, on the 24th of January last.
9. That on the 6th of February instant it was presented to the Bank of Montreal,
in the City of Ottawa, by Mr. Bradley, the Private Secretary of the Minister of Railways and Canals, that the answer of the manager of the Ottawa branch of said Bank
was that this cheque was good till paid, and good from the date; that the Secretary
of the Minister of Railways and Canals replied to the manager of the said branen.
that his statement was satisfactory to the Department, as shown by exhibits 2, 3 and
4 herewith.
JO. That the said cheque is still good, that it would have been cashed or paid at any
time, and the same is now in possession of the Department of Railways and Canals.
Therefore, your petitioners pray:
1st. That the Order in Council setting aside tho tender of your petitioners for
want of a cheque marked " good as required by specifications," and ^warding the
contract of Messrs. Onderdonk and Company, be reconsidered by your Excellency in
Council.
2nd. That the tender of your petitioners being the lowest regular tender, be
accepted by the Department of Bailways and Canals, and the contract awarded to
your petitioners, who are willing and ready to execute the same.
And your petitioners will ever pray.
.    McDONALD & CHARLEBOIS.
Ottawa, February 14th, 1882.
49
48—4 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
COPY  OF  EXHIBITS.—EXHIBIT NO. 1.
Telegram from F. Braun, Secretary of the Department of Railways and Canals,
to McDonald & Charlebois, the petitioners.
, Ottawa, 10th February, 1882.
"McDonald & Charlebois, Montreal.
" Contract was awarded to Onderdonk, whose tender was lowest, as yours could
not be considered for want of cheque marked good as required by specification.
" F. BRAUN."
• '    p® EXHIBIT NO. 2.
Telegram drafted and franked by Mr. Bradley, Seoretary of the Minister of
Railways and Canals, who has called upon the Manager of the Bank of Montreal at
Ottawa, to ascertain the validity of the cheque deposited by tho petitioners, and
sent by the manager at Ottawa to the manager at Montreal.
" Ottawa, 6th February, 1882.
"The Bank of Montreal, Montreal.
I Department of Railways hold McDonald & Charlebois' cheque for $20,000
certified by Montreal Branch, 24th January. Is it still good, and how long will it be
guaranteed ? "
« A. DRUMMOND, Manager."
EXHIBIT NO. 3.
Telegram in reply to Exhibit No. 2, received and deposited with Mr. Bradley
the same day.
" Montreal, 6th February, 1882.
"To Bank of Montreol, Ottawa.
" Referring to your telegram to-day—' Please strike out for two days only' —
from our acceptance stamp.   The cheque will be good until paid.
" SHADBOLT, Manager."
EXHIBIT NO. 4.
Copy of extract from a letter written by the Manager of the Bank of Montreal,
Ottawa, to the Manager at Montreal.
Ottawa, 6th February, 1882.
Dear Sir,— * * * $
II telegraphed you at the request of the Department of Railways relative to
the certified cheque of McDonald & Charlebois, $20,000, put in with their tender
recently, and which was accepted for J two days only.' Your reply to strike out the
restriction clause as stamped, and that the cheque will be good until paid, is satisfactory to the Department.
"A. DRUMMOND, Manager."
•P-:>'« EXHIBIT NO. 5.
Letter from the Manager of the Bank of Montreal, at Montreal, to the petitioners,
Messrs. McDonald & Charlebois, Montreal.
"Dear Sirs,—In reference to the telegram from Ottawa to-day, your contract
could not be considered for want of cheque marked good, as required by the specification. I beg to state that on the 6th instant I telegraphed to our Ottawa Branch
to strike out frcm our acceptance stamp the words "for two days only," and
intimated that the cheque would be good until paid.
I Our Ottawa Branch advised me by mail on that day, that they had done as
requested and that it was satisfactory to the Department.
" Yours truly,
"E. N. SHADBOLT, Manager."
50 * 45 Victoria.
SSMivaiwR^bM^H^IisJEggSS^msSBE
Sessional Papers (No.48,)
A. 1882
g?!*i tT"^"*' V i<SfW.»^g^s*«rJayj
Bank of Montreal, Ottawa, 17th February, 1882.
T. Trudeau, Esq., Deputy Minister Railways and Canals.
Dear Sir,—I have read tho memorial of Messrs Charlebois & McDonald, and with
the view of correcting an apparent misapprehension or error in Exhibit No. 2, I
have to remark that the telegram of enquiry, dated 6th inst., was drafted by me.
Mr. Bradley merely franked a blank for the purposo, which was filled in after he left.
In reference to the 9th clause, and Exhibit No. 4, wherein the reply by telegram
from Montreal Branch, stating that the cheque was good and would be good until
paid, was expressed as satisfactory to Department.
I enclose copy of letter to Montreal Branch, dated 11th inst., explanatory of this
and the circumstances of the case under which the enquiry was made; which led me
naturally to infer the reply to be quite satisfactory when I communicated it to the
Secretary; but no one in the Department then expressed anything in regard to it,
further than tho Secretary requested the telegram to be left with him, which I presumed was with the view of being attached to the cheque, and being submitted with
it, as the requisite authority for dealing with it as expressed in the telegram.
Your obedient servant,
A. DRUMMOND, Manager.
Ottawa, 11th February, 1882.
The Manager, Montreal.
Dear Sir,—I have your letter of the 10th inst., in re McDonald & Charlebois'
cheque.
The enquiry by telegram on 6th inst., was by request of Mr. Bradley, Secretary
to the Minister, who called and exhibited the cheque stamped as good for two days
only from 24th inst. He desired to know if it was still good, merely; but while telegraphing for a special reply from you as to this, in order to inform the Department,
I said I would further ask for how long it would be held so; this he said I might do
at same time, although his enquiry was only if it was still good.
On receipt of your reply that it was so. and would be good until paid, I went
over personally to the Department and mentioned your reply to the Secretary.
The cheque I did not again see; but by request I left your telegram with him,
as the authority to deal with or treat the cheque as it stated.
I had no knowledge at the timo as to whether any decision or not had been
arrived at in respect of the tenders to which this cheque had reference, and which
were given in and opened on the 1st inst.; nor until the 9th was I made aware that
it had been awarded to Mr, Onderdonk, by his calling hore in reference to his
security through head offices.
I naturally inferred, after leaving your telegram with the Department, that it
would be quite satisfactory, and that, as authorized, the restrictive clause would be
struck out, but I infer from an expression of the Deputy Minister yesterday, that
while in their possession it was held, such an alteration of the terms could not
legally be done, and that the cheque at the time of opening tenders was informal
from the time it was limited to having previously elapsed.
I presume, therefore, that under the circumstances their tender under tho
regulations was excluded from consideration.
The difference is not great, however, between their tender and that of Onderdonk, and both being low, they might have had an unprofitable or losing contract,
while he, having a large amount of plant there already, could make it pay with his
appliances and means.
Mr. McDonald, along with Judge Coursol, called this morning about the matter,
apparently desirous to remove any impression with the Department that the cheque*
was eo limited, with any design on their part.
This, no doubt, occurred inadvertently, and without being known when issued,
which I explained to the Department previously.
Yours truly, & DRUMMOND, Manager,
51 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No,48.)
A. 1882
(Memorandum.) February 20th, 1882.
Upon reference of a petition dated the 14th instant, submitted to His Excellency
the Governor-General in Council, by Messrs. McDonald & Charlebois, whereby they
ask that a certain tender for the work of constructing the portion of the Canadian
Pacific Railway between Emory's Bar and Port Moody, passed over on account of
: informality, be considered, the undersigned has the honor to report as follows : —
That upon the first day of the current month there were received by this
Department, in response to advertisements issued, fourteen tenders for this work in
question, including one from Messrs. McDonald & Charlebois.
That the specification supplied to intending contractors, and upon which they
hased their offers, contained in its 92nd clause, provision respecting a cheque to bo
furnished with the tender, the clause reading as follows :—
" 92. No tender will be entertained unless on one of the printed form3 prepared
" for the purpose, and with the schedule of prices filled in; nor unless a bank
" cheque, marked good by the bank, for $20,000, accompanies the tender, which shall
" be forfeited if the party tendering declines or fails to enter into the contract for
| the works when called upon to do so, upon the tender being accepted."
?that, although, as required by the said clause of the specification a cheque for
$20,000, on the Bank of Montreal, dated the 23rd January, 1882, accompanied the
tender sfent in by Messrs. McDonald & Charlebois, such cheque was marked by the
bank on the 24th January, "good for two 'days only," the tender being thus rendered
inicomplete in an essential particular.
That on the 6th of February, Mr. Bradley, the private Secretary to the undor-
signesd, called upon the Manager of the Ottawa Branch of the Bank in relation to the
said cheque, the result of his interview being embodied in the following memorandum :
Monday, 6th February, 1882.
fjRe Tenders,.Einory's Bar and Port Moody. Under instructions from the Minister, received on Saturday, I called at about half past ten o'clock this morning on Mr.
Drummond, Manager of the Bank of Montreal here, and handed him a certain cheque
drawn by McDonald & Charlebois, on the Bank of Montreal, dated 23rd January,
l8fi2,dor $20,000, and stamped on the 24th of same month, good for ' two days only,'
asking him whether he.would pay it. On finding tho cheque was marked good for
AJsmo days only,' he shook his head and said it would be necessary to enquire at the
head office. He suggested making enquiry, to which I assented. At about one
o'clock this day Mr. Drummond called at my office and handed me, in presence of Mr.
Trudean, the telegram from the head office, Montreal, which I this afternoon handed
to the Minister, and which is attached hereto, marked with my initials, A. P. Bradley.
The telegram from the head office above referred to, read as follows : —
From Montreal,-
"To Bank of Montreal.
Ottawa, 6th February, 1S82,
Banker requisite to-day, please strike out for two days only from our acceptance
stamp.   The cheque will be good until paid.
SHADBOLT.
On the facts having been submitted to Council, it was decided that no chango
Mnld.be made in the wording of the cheque, after the tenders had been received, and
the contract was accordingly awarded to the next lowest tenderer, without reference
to the informal tender sent in by Messrs. McDonald & Charlebois.
That on the 10th instant the following telegrams wero received from Mossro.
McDonald & Charlebois:—
Received at Montreal
To Sir Charles Tuppper
10th February, 18£2.
T^i§ jporning's Gazette says that we were tho lowest tender for Port Moody sec-
ion, iM as we wled to make the deposit, the contract was awarded to Ooderdopk
$2 a 5 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. 1882
This is ihoorrect, as we are only waiting notico from the Departmeht to complete deposit.    Waiting answer.
DUACAN McDONALD,
A. CHARLEBOIS."
Received at Montreal. 10th February, 1882..
To F. Braun, Secretary Railways and Canals.
Any decision in British Columbia tenders; awaiting notice to make deposit.
Amwor.
McDONALD & CHARLEBOIS.
In reply the following telegram was sent by tho Department:—
McDonald & Charlebois, Montreal. 10th February, 1882.
Contract was awarded to Onderdonk, whose tender was lowest, as yours could
not be considered for want of cheque marked good, as required by specification.
F. BRAUN, Secretary.
The present petition of Messrs. McDonald & Charlebois having been shown to
the Manager of the Ottawa Branch of the Bank of Montreal, tho following explanatory lettor has been received from him, togother with a copy of a letter sent by him
to the head office on the Hth instant, correcting a misapprehension into which that
office appeared to have been led by a previous communication addressed to it by him
on the 6th instant.
Bank of Montreal, Ottawa, 17th Fobiuary 1882.
T. Trudeau, Esq., Deputy Minister Railways and Canals.
Dear Sir,—I havo read the memorial of Messrs. Charlebois and McDonald, and
with the view of correcting an apparent misapprehension or error in exhibit No. A.,
I have to remark that the telegram of enquiry, dated 6th instant, was drafted by me.
Mr. Bradley merely franked a blank for the purpose, which was filled in after he
left.
In reference to the 9th clause and exhibit No. 4, wherein the reply by telegram
from Montreal Branch, staling that the cheque was, good and would be good until
paid, was expressed as satisfactory to Department, I enclose copy of letter to Montreal
Branch, dated 11th instant, explanatory of this and the circumstances of the case under
wijich the enquiry was made, which led me natural Ly to infer the reply to be quite
satisfactory when I. communicated it to the Secretary, but no one in the Department
then expressed anything in regard to it, further than the Secretary requested the telegram to be left.with him, which I presumod was with the view of beingfattached to
tho cheque, and being submitted with it as the requisite authority for dealing- with it,
as expressed in the telegram.
Your obedient servant,
A. DRUMMOND, Manager.
Bank of Montreal, Ottawa, 11th February, 1882.
your letter of tho 10th instant in re McDonald and Cbarle-
The Manager, Montreal.
" Dear Sir,—I havo
boi&' cheque.
Tho enquiry by telegram on 6lh instant was by request of Mr. Bradley, Secretary
to the Minister, who called and exhibited tho cheque stamped as good for two days
only, from 24th ult. He desired to know if it was.still good merely, but. while telegraphing for a special reply from you as to this, in order to inform the Department,
1 said I would further ask for how long it would be hold so. This, he said, I might
do at same time, although his enquiry was only if it was still good.
" On receipt of your reply that it was so, and would bo good until paid, I went
oyer personally to tbo Department and mentioned your reply to the Secretary,-
53 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48 )
A. 1S82
" The cheque I did not again see, but by request I left your telegram with him
as the authority to deal with or treat the cheque as it stated.
" I had no knowledge at the time as to whether any decision or not had been
arrived at in respect of the tenders to which the cheque had reference, aDd which
were given in and opened on the 1st instant, nor until the 9th was I made aware that it
had been awarded to Mr. Onderdonk, by his calling here in reference to his security
through head office.
" I naturally inferred, after leaving your telegram with the Department,-that it
would be quite satisfactory, and that, as authorized, the restriction clause would be
struck out; but I infer, from an expression of tho Deputy Minister yesterday, that
while in their possos&ion, it was held such an alteration of the terms could not legally
be done, and that the cheque at the time of opening tenders was informal, from the
time it was limited to having previously elapsed.
" I presume, therefore, that under the circumstances their tender, under the
regulations, was excluded from consideration.
" The difference is not great, however, betweon their tender and that of Ondo* -
donk, and both being low, they might have had an unprofitable or losing contract,
while he, having a large amount of plant there already, could make it pay with his
appliances and means.
| Mr. McDonald, along with Judge Coursol, called this morning about the matter,
apparently desirous to remove any impression with the Department that the cheque
was so limited with any design on their part.
" This, no doubt, occurred inadvertently and without being known when issued,
which I explained to the Department previously.
" Yours truly,
" A. DRUMMOND."
The undersigned recommends that Messrs. McDonald & Charlebois be informed
that having failed to comply with the terms of the specification, the application contained in tbeir present petition cannot be entertained.
Respectfully submitted,
CHARLES TUPPER, Minister of Railways and Canak.
Copt of a Report of a Committee of the Honorable the Privy Vouncil, approved by
His Excellency the Governor General in Council on the 2l$t February, 1882.
On a memorandum, dated 20th February, 1882, from the Minister of Railways
and Canals, upon reforence of a petition, dated the 14th inst., by Messrs. McDonald
& Charlebois, whereby they ask that a certain tender for the work of constructing
the portion of the Canadian Pacific Railway between Emory's Bar and Port Moody,
passed over on account of informality, be considered, and reporting that upon the
first day of the current month there were received by his Department, in response
to advertisement issued, fourteen tenders for the work in question, including one
from Messrs. McDonald & Charlebois.
That tho specification supplied to intending contractors, and' upon which they
based their offers, contained in its 92nd clause provision respecting a cheque to
be furnished with the tender, the clause reading as follows :—
I 92. No tender will be entertained unless on one of the printed forms prepared
" for the purpose, and with the schedule of prices filled in, nor unless a bank cheque,
" marked good by the bank, for $20,000, accompanies the tender, which shall be
" forfeited if the party tendering declines or fails to enter into contract for tho works
" when called upon to do so, upon the tender being accepted."
That, although, as required by the said clause of the specification, a cheque for
$20,000 on the Bank of Montreal, dated the 23rd January, 1882, accompanied the
tender sent in by Messrs. McDonald & Charlebois, such cheque was marked by the
bank on the 24th January " good for two days only," the tender boing thus rendered
incomplete ip ap ©s^ntjal particular,
H 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No.48.)
A. lfigfi
That on the 6th of February Mr. Bradley, the Private Secretary to the Minister
of Railways and Canals, called upon the Manager of the Ottawa Branch of the Bank,
in relation to tho said cheque, the result of this interview being embodied in the
following memorandum :—
" Monday, 6th February, 1882.
" Re Tenders Emory's Bar and Port Moody.
" Under instructions from the Ministor, received on Saturday, I called at about
half-past ten o'clock this morning, on Mr. Drummond, Manager of tho Bank of
Montreal here, and handed him a certain cheque drawn by McDonald and Charlebois
on the Bank of Montreal, dated 23rd January, 1882, for $20,000, and stamped on the
24th of same month, " good for two days only," asking him whether he would pay it.
On finding that the cheque was marked " good for two days only," he shook his
head and said it would be necessary to enquire at tho head office.
" We suggested making enquiry, to which I assented. At about one o'clock this
day, Mr. Drummond called at my office and handed me, in presence of Mr. Trudeau,
tho telegram from the head office, Montreal, which I this afternoon handed to the
Minister, and which is attaohed hereto, marked with my initials.
"A. P. BRADLEY."
That tho telegram from tho head office above referred to, read as follows:
" Ottawa, 6th February, 1882.
" From Montreal, to Bank of Montreal.
" Bankor requisite to-day. Please strike out for two days only from our
.acceptance stamp.   The choque will be good until paid.
" SHADBOLT."
That all the facts having been submitted to Council, it was decided that no
change could be made in the wording of the cheque after the tenders had been
received, and the contract was accordingly awarded to the next lowest tenderer,
without reference to the informal tender sent in by Messrs. McDonald & Charlebois.
That on the 10th inst. the following telegrams were received from Messrs.
McDonald and Charlebois:—
"February 10th, 1382.
(Reoeived at Montreal.)
" To "Sir Charles Tupper.
" This morning's Gazette says that we wore the lowest tender for Port Moody
section, and, as we tailed to make the deposit, the contract was awarded to Onderdonk. This is incorrect, as we are only waiting notice from the Department to
complete deposit.    Waiting answer.
"DUNCAN McDONALD,
"A. CHARLEBOIS."
" 10th February, 1882.
(Received at Montreal.)
"To F. Braun, Secretary, Railways and Canals.
" Any decision in British Columbia tenders?   Awaiting notice to make deposit.
Answer.
"MoDONALD & CHARLEBOIS."
In reply the following tolegram was sent by the Department:—
"February 10th, 1882.
" McDonald & Charlebois, Montreal.
I Contract was awarded to Onderdonk, whose tender was lowest, as yours could
not be considered for want of cheque marked good, as required by specification.
F. BRAUN, Secretary.
55 That the present petition of Messrs. McDonald & Charlebois having been shown
to the Manager of the Ottawa Branch of the Bank of Montreal, the following
explanatory letter has been received from him, together with a copy of a letter sent
by him to the head office on the 11th instant, correcting a misapprehension into
which that office appeared to have been led by a previous communication addressed
to it by him on the 6th instant.
" Bank of Montreal, Ottawa, 17th February, 1882.
" T. Trudeau, Esq., Deputy Minister of Railways and Canals.
" Dear Sir,—I have read the memorial of Messrs. Charlebois & McDonald, and
with the view of correcting an apparent misapprehension or error in exhibit No. 2,
I have to remark that the telegram of enquiry, dated 6th instant, was drafted by me,
Mr. Bradley merely franked a blank for the purpose which was filled in after ho
left.
" In reference to the 9 th clause a,nd exhibit No. 4, wherein the reply by telegram from the Montreal Branch, stating that the cheque Was good until paid was
expressed as satisfactory to Department, I enclose copy of letter to Montreal
Branch dated Hth instant, explanatory of this and the circumstances of the case
under which tho enquiry was mado which led me naturally to infer the reply to be
quite satisfactory when I cammunicated it to the Secretary, but no one in the
Department then expressed anything in regard to it further than the Secretary
requested the telegram to be left with him, which I presumed was with the view of
being attached to the cheque and being submitted with it as the requisite authority
for dealingwith it as expressed in the telegram.
" Your obedient servant,
"A. DRUMMOND, Manager."
per-
him
"Bank of Montreal, Ottawa, 11th February, 1882.
" The Manager, Montreal.
" Dear Sir,—I have your letter of the 10th instant in re McDonald & Charlebois'
cheque. The enquiry by telegram on 6th instant was, by request of Mr. Bradley,
Secretary to the Minister, who called and exhibited the cheque, stamped as good for
two days only from 24th ultimo. He desired to know if it was still good merely,
but while telegraphing for a special reply from you as to this, in order to inform the
Department, I said I would further ask how long it would be held so. This, he said,
I might do at the same time, although his enquiry was only if it was still good. On
receipt of your reply that it was se*«ind would be good until paid, I wont over
sonally to the Department and mentioned your reply to the Secretary.
" The cheque I did not again see, but by request I left your telegram with
as the authority to deal with or treat the cheque as it stated.
" I had no knowledge at the time as to whether any decision or not had been
arrived at in respect of the tenders to which the cheque had reference, and which
were given in and opened on the 1st inst.; nor until the 9th was I made aware that
it had been-awarded to Mr. Onderdonk, by his calling here in reference to his security
through head office:
" I naturally inferred, after leaving your telegram with the Department, that it
I would be quite satisfactory, and that, as authorized, the restrictive clause would be
I struck out, but I infer, from ah expression of the Deputy Minister yesterday, that
'• while in their possession it was held such an alteration of the terms could not
" legally be done, and that the cheque at the time of opening tenders was informal,
" from the time it was limited to having previously elapsed. I presume, therefore,
" that under the circumstances their tender, under the regulations, was excluded from
I consideration,
56 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No. 48.)
A. 1882
" The difference is not great, however, between their tender and that of Onderdonk,
<{ and both being low they might have had an unprofitable or losing contract, whilo
" he, having a large amount of plant there already, could make it pay with his
*' appliances and means.
" Mr. McDonald along with Judge Coursol called this morning about the matter,
v-' apparently desirous to remove any impression with tho Department that the cheque
" was so limited with any design on their part.
I This, no doubt, occurred inadvertently and without being known when issued
f* which I explained to the Department previously.
" Yours truly,
"A. DRUMMOND."
The Minister recommends that Messrs. McDonald and Charlebois be informed
that having failed to comply with the terms of the specification, the application contained in their present petition cannot bo entertained.
The Committee submit the foregoing recommendation for Your Excellency's approval.
Certified. J. O. COTE, Clerk P.O.
20th February, 1882.
Sir,—I have the honor to forward herewith, for your examination and approval,
a form of indenture proposed to be executed by Mr; Andrew Onderdonk, being his
contract for the work of constructing that portion of the Canadian Pacific Railway
between Emory's Bar and Port Moody. Also, a form of indenture relating to tho
five per cent, security to be given by him under such contract.
I have the honor to be, Sir, your obedient servant
F. BRAUN,
Z. A. Lash, Esq., Deputy to the Minister of Justice.
ieeretary.
Ottawa, 21st Febnuary, 1882.
Sir,—I havo tho honor to return herewith, the drafts of the contract of Mr.
Onderdonk, for the construction of that portion of tho Canadian Pacific Railway
between Emory's Bar and Port Moody, and the agreement to be signed by him
respectively, the five per cent, security to be deposited with the Receiver-General.
Both documents appear to be correct in point of form.
Your obedient servant,
A. POWER, for Deputy Minister of Justice.
F. Braun, Esq., Socretary of Railways and Canals.
Bank of Montreal, Montreal, 10th February, 1882.
Sib,) I have tho honor to inform you that this bank holds at its office in the city
of New York, for account of the Receiver-General of Canada, the sum of one hundred
and twenty-five thousand dollars ($125,000) as security for the faithful performance
by Mr. Andrew Onderdonk of his contract for the construction of section of the
Canadian Pacific Railway from Emory's Bar to Port Moody, and the bank hereby
undertakes to transfer the said amount of one hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars to tho credit of the Hon. Receiver-General's ordinary account at its Ottawa
Branch, free of charge, upon application to that effect.
I have the honor to be, Sir, your obedient servant,
W. J. BUCHANAN, General Manager.
Hon. Sir Charles Tupper, C.B.,
Minister of Railways and Canals, Ottawa.
5*7
48—5 45 Victoria.
Sessional Papers (No. 48.)
A. 1882
Ottawa, 13th February, 1882.
Sir,—I am directed to transmit you herewith, to be retained in your office, a
deposit receipt of the Bank of Montreal for the sum of $125,000, being the amount
of the 5 per cent, security given by Mr. Andrew Onderdonk, under his contract for
the construction of the section of the Canadian Pacific Railway from Emory's Bar to
Port Moody.
I am, Sir, your obedient servant,
F. BRAUN, Secretary.
J. M. Courtney, Esq., Deputy Minister of Finance.
21st February, 1832.
Sir,—I beg to return herewith the cheque for $20,000 which accompanied your
tender for the construction of the section of the Canadian Pacific Railway from
Emory's Bar to Port Moody.
I am, Sir, your obedient servant,
F. BRAUN, Secretary.
Andrew Onderdonk, Esq., Contractor, Yale, B.C.
Enclose cheque for $20,000, on the Bank of Montreal, Ottawa, dated Ottawa,
January 31st, 1882, and signed "A. Onderdonk."
Ottawa, 25th February, 1882.
Sirs,—With reference to the petition addressed by you to His Excellency the
Governor-General in Council on the 14th instant, praying that the decision awarding
the contract for the construction of the portion of the Canadian Pacific Railway
between Emory's Bar and Port Moody, may be reconsidered, and that the contract in
question be awarded to yourselves, I am instructed to state that by an Order in
Council dated the 21st instant, based on a full reconsideration of the facts of the case,
it has been directed that your firm be informed that having failed to comply with the
terms of the specification, the application contained in the petition referred to cannot
be entertained.
I am, Sirs, your obedient servant,
F. BRAUN, Secretary.
Messrs. McDonald & Charlebois, Montreal.
58  

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