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Duchess of Bedford : West Indies cruises 1931 Canadian Pacific Steamships Limited 1930

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I  WEJT
INDIES
CRMES
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NEW YORK
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CANADIAN
PACIFIC   ♦
nted/i ITINERARIES
FROM NEW YORK JANUARY 9, 1931    29 DAYS DURATION
Duchess of Bedford       20000 Tons Gross Register
30000 Tons Displacement Oil Fuel
PORT      . j
ARRIVE
LEAVE
IN PORT
Days    Hours
FROM
TO
SEA
MILES
STEAMING
Days   Hours
NEW YORK
■;
',
Jan
9
Fri
12 noon
New York
Hamilton
681
1
20
HAMILTON
Jan
11
Sun
8 am
Jan
12
Mon
3 pm
1
7
Hamilton
San Juan
840
2
17
Bermuda
SAN JUAN
Jan
15
Tho
8 am
Jan
16
Fri
6 am
SS
San Juan
St. Pierre
374
1
1
Porto Rico
ST. PIERRE
Jan
17
Sat
7 am
Jan
17
Sat
11 am
4
St. Pierre
Fort da France
11
1
Martinique
FORT DE FRANCE
Jan
17
Sat
IS noon
Jan
17
Sat
6 pm
6
Fort dc Franca
Bridgetown
130
13
Martinique
BRIDGETOWN
Jan
18
Sun
7 am
Jan
18
Sun
6 pm
11
Bridgetown
La Brea
226
13
Barbados
LA BREA
19
Mon
7 am
Jan
19
Mon
8.30 am
1H
La Brea
Port of Spain
23
2
Trinidad
PORT OF SPAIN
Jan
19
Mon
10.30 am
Jan
SO
Tue
6 am
19' ■•
Port of Spain
La Guaira
354
1
1
Trinidad
LA GUAIRA
Jan
21
Wed
7 am
Jan
21
Wed
6 pm
11
La Guaira
Willemstad
149
14
Venezuela
WILLEMSTAD
Jan
22
Thu
8 am
Jan
SS
Thu
5 pm
9
Willemstad
Cristobal
697
2
15
Curacao
CRISTOBAL
Jan
25
Sun
8 am
Jan
S6
Mon
S pm
1
9
Cristobal
Kingston
551
1
16
Panama
KINGSTON
Jan
28
Wed
9 am
Jan
29
Thu
5 pm
1
8
Kingston
Port-au-Prlnec
270
16
Jamaica
PORT-AU-PRINCE
Haiti
HAVANA
Cuba
NASSAU
Jan
30
Fri
9 am
Jan
30
Fri
2 pm
5
Port-au-Prince
Havana
662
1
18
Feb
1
Sun
8 am
Feb
3
Tut
6 am
1
22
Havana
Nassau
390
1
Feb
4
Wed
6 am
Feb
4
Wed
6 pm
12
Nassau
New York
962
2
15
NEW YORK
Feb
7
Sat
9 am
Total
10
3
6320
18
18
FROM NEW YORK FEBRUARY 11, 1931    29 DAYS DURATION
Duchess of Bedford
20000 Tons Gross Register
30000 Tons Displacement
Oil Fuel
PORT
ARRIVE
LEAVE
IN PORT
FROM
TO
SEA
STEAMING
12 noon
Days  Hours
MILES
Days
Hours
NEW YORK
Feb
11
Wed
New York
Hamilton
681
1
20
HAMILTON
Feb 13
Fri
8 am
Feb
14
Sat
3 pm
1
7
Hamilton
San Juan
840
2
17
Bermuda
SAN JUAN
Feb 17
Tue
8 am
Feb
18
Wed
6 am
22
San Juan
St. Pierre
374
1
1
Porto Rico
ST. PIERRE
Feb 19
Thu
7 am
Feb
19
Thu
11 am
4
St. Pierre
Fort de France
11
1
Martinique
FORT DE FRANCE
Feb 19
Thu
12 noon
Feb
19
Thu
6 pm
6
Fort de France
Bridgetown
130
13
Martinique
BRIDGETOWN
Feb 20
Fri
7 am
Feb
20
Fri
6 pm
11
Bridgetown
La Brea
226
13
Barbados
LA BREA
Feb 21
Sat
7 am
Feb
21
Sat
8.30 am
1H
La Brea
Port of Spain
23
2
Trinidad
PORT OF SPAIN
Feb 21
Sat
10.30 am
Feb
22
Sun
6 am
19K
Port of Spain
La Guaira
354
1
1
LA GUAIRA
Feb 23
Mon
7 am
Feb
23
Mon
6 pm
11
La Guaira
Willemstad
149
14
Venezuela
WILLEMSTAD
Feb 24
Tue
8 am
Feb
24
Tue
5 pm
9
Willemstad
Cristobal
697
2
15
Curacao
CRISTOBAL
Feb 27
Fri
8 am
Feb
2S
Sat
5 pm
1
9
Cristobal
Kingston
551
1
16
Panama
KINGSTON
Mar   2
Mon
9 am
Mai
3
Tue
5 pm
1
8
Kingston
Port-au-Prince
270
16
Jamaica
PORT-AU-PRINCE
Haiti
HAVANA
Mar   4
Wed
9 am
Mar
4
Wed
2 pm
5
Port-au-Prince
Havana
662
1
18
Mar   6
Fri
8 am
Mar
8
Sun
6 am
1
22
Havana
Nassau
390
1
Cuba
NASSAU
Bahamas
NEW YORK
Mar   9
Mon
6 am
Mar
V
Mon
6 pm
12
Nassau
New York
962
2
15
Mar 12
Thu
9 am
Total
10
3
6320
18
18
Pase Two Chi
%
UNITED
m TA TE S
m
SHOWING ROUTE OF
29 DAY CRUISES
litPiANA
W.JBIBB JB A N
HAMILTON *
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CVHACAQ
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5/       :0 CARACAS
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WEST   INDIES   CRUISES
1931
Page Three r ERHAPS, last springtime, you noticed that some of your friends
were flaunting a brand-new lilt in their walk — had a most unusual
sparkle to their eyes- an anachronistic coating of tan—seemed happier
than ever to be alive—were actually enjoying work—were actually
enjoying play- when by every right the wintry climate should have succeeded in making them just as listless as you, just as bored, just as disinclined
to move.   Perhaps, too, you grew envious and began to think of miracles.
But there were no miracles. Not even one. Your friends had simply
been let in on that classic joke which the smart and sophisticated of this
continent perennially play on Old Man Winter. Into trunks and travelling
bags they had packed their most summery clothes. At shivering New York
they had flung a derisive handful of confetti and streamers. Then they had
sailed away southward, away from snow and slushy streets, to the warm,
dimpling seas of the Caribbean.   It was on their return that you saw them.
Truly joyous isles for a winter holiday, these West Indies, with their warm
sunshine and cool ever-blowing breezes, turquoise waters edged by
golden sands, exotic cities, pirate haunts, swaying palms, blue mountains,
green valleys, cane fields, coral reefs, submarine gardens, quaint native life
lending color and action to bizarre countrysides.
Page Four A February Scene in the West Indi
Page Five DUCHESS  OF BEDFORD
West Indies Cruise Ship
VvCARCELY more than two years in service, this first of the famous Duchesses of the Atlantic
*-' embodies in her design all the requisites of a perfect Cruise Ship .... the broad,
open decks, the spacious public rooms and the airy, luxuriously-furnished bedrooms that
are indispensable in tropic-sea voyaging.
The following details are of interest:
20000 tons gross register Length 600 ft., breadth 75 ft. Cruiser stern
30000 tons displacement Oil fuel; turbine engines 8 decks for passengers
Twin screws; speed 18 knots Elevator Service
Gymnasium Swimming pool on deck
VENTILATION
Special attention has been paid to the all
important matter of ventilation and the supply,
in full volume, of cool air. Powerful exhaust
fans change the ship's air eight times an hour.
The staterooms on the Boat Deck are equipped
with electric fans, which, in addition to the large
windows in these rooms, will ensure ample
ventilation. All staterooms on Decks A, B and C
are equipped with the latest ball-louvre type of
ventilators which provide a constant flow of cool
air. These ventilators, of which there are two or
three in each room, are under the control of the
occupants and may be regulated to any force
and in any direction. A special feature of many
of the staterooms is the louvre door and open
grill work in the bulk-heads which increase the
circulation of cool air.
STATEROOM ACCOMMODATION
The staterooms are distributed over six decks,
but, owing to the limited membership, only four
decks will be used on the cruise, and these
have elevator service. The staterooms are
remarkable for their comfort and the attractive
design of their furnishings, a notable feature
being the provision of modern beds. Some of
the double rooms on Decks B and C have one
bed and a sofa berth. The latter is converted
into a sofa in the daytime, making these rooms
even more desirable.
All rooms are fitted with modern open porcelain wash basins. Hot and cold running water
is provided with the exception of rooms in the
500 and 600 series, which have only cold
running water. Other notable features throughout all rooms are large wardrobes, reading lamps
for each bed or sofa berth, electric call bells,
steam radiators, and in the majority of rooms
electric heaters, full-length mirrors and chests
of drawers. Not more than two persons will be
placed in a room, except by request. There are
many rooms with only one bed for those who
prefer to be alone.
Rooms with private bath and toilet are provided
£p&bundance, and there are plenty of bathrooms
available   for   members   occupying   the   regular
staterooms not having a private bath.
MAIN ENTRANCE HALLS
are panelled in mahogany and walnut and the
electric passenger elevator is enclosed in a
handsome wrought iron casing with glass panels.
OBSERVATION ROOM - DRAWING
ROOM
is a long room at the forward end with deep
recesses panelled in sycamore, and at the front
and sides there is an abundance of long, low
windows through which members may obtain
extensive views. The window curtains are of old
gold and apricot colored material trimmed with
grey and gold; grey and fawn brocade hangings
decorate the recesses. The furniture is upholstered
in apricot, gold and grey brocade, and a mole-
colored carpet covering the centre floor completes   the scheme of decoration of this room.
GALLERY
has walls panelled in bleached and natural
mahogany, and forms an attractive lounging space
with large comfortable settees and t^f. chairs
upholstered in wine color and old gold, the
windows having curtains in harmony. Persian
rugs covering the floor complete the scheme of
decoration.
CARD ROOM - WRITING ROOM
is in walnut with panels of paroba, a new wood
of a golden mahogany appearance, and a rich
feature of the room is a mantelpiece with an inset
tapestry panel. The windows are shuttered on
the inside, the shutters being panelled with
needlework. The writing tables and other
furniture are of walnut, and the general color
effect is biscuit, blue and nut brown.
Page Six A Sinsle-Bed Room
Page Seven DUCHESS   OF   BEDFORD
West Indies Cruise Ship
DINING SALOON
is a spacious apartment seating about 300
people at one time, and has a large centre
well opening about 18 feet high and octagonal
in shape, with a musicians gallery at one end.
The woodwork of this room is in grey oak
with gold enrichments, the walls being of red
leather studded with large bronze nails of
Spanish type. The ceilings are a feature of the
room, especially the shallow dome of the
octagonal well opening, which has enrichments of gold on an ivory ground, with a richly
carved and gilt electric pendant light in the
centre. Colored tapestry hangings, divided
by carved, gilded mouldings, make a rich wall
treatment for the sides of the well opening.
The sidelights of the Saloon are screened by
sliding sash windows with amber glass, and a
color effect is obtained by the red brocade
curtains at these windows. The furniture is of
natural oak, the chair seats being covered with
leather. Mirror treatments and electric lantern
fittings are features worthy of notice in this
Dining Saloon.
SMOKING ROOM
is a large room, with columns and panelling in
natural oak, and large windows, one of the most
comfortable and stately rooms on the ship.
The fireplace recess at one end of the room,
together with the wall opposite, have mirror
panels in a marble wall surface set in bronze
panels. The octagonal columns, with their
carved and gilded capitals stand out against a
curtained background of blue and gold. The
floor is of teak parquetry covered with Persian
rugs, and the lighting of the room is obtained
from bronze lanterns set into octagonal ceiling
panels. The furniture is covered with tan
velvet leather and blue tapestry.
KITCHENS
LOUNGE - BALL ROOM
is decorated in Empire Style, the woodwork
being of silver grey sycamore, with bronze-gilt
enrichments. It has a large dome in the centre
covered with an engraved glass lay-light in
3§$ftched bronze frame. The windows of this
room are large and decorative and have hangings
of cerise and cream color. A handsome marble
mantelpiece, with gilt-bronze mountings in the
Empire style and with a large octagonal mirror,
is a feature at one end of this room, and facing
it at the other end there are recessed panels of
cerise|i§lk, forming a background for a specially
designed grand piano. The floor is of oak
parquetry, as this room will be largely used for
dancing, and it is also fitted with a large Empire
carpet and small rugs, all of which can be removed
for dancing. The furniture is of mahogany with
gilded mounts and upholstered in brocade of
cerise, green and cream shades.
PROMENADE AND SPORTS DECK
SPACE
is an important feature on a cruisjj|where members spend the major portion of their time on
deck. Unusually large space for deck sports
is provided on the Sun Deck. Open promenade
space is provided on the Boat Deck, and a large,
covered promenade on both sides of the Promenade Deck, with an open space also at after end
of this deck.
GYMNASIUM
is fitted with the latest appliances for health-
giving exercise, including electrical horses,
bicycles, sculling machine, pulley-weight
machines, weighing machine and punching bag.
There will be classes for ladies and gentlemen
and private appointments may be made with the
instructor.
are a model of efficiency, the equipment being
entirely electrical. Such modern appliances
enable the staff to supply a perfect cuisine.
The Canadian Pacific is famous throughout
the world for the meals furnished on its steamships, and that high standard will not only be
maintained on the cruise but will be excelled
if possible.
OPEN-AIR DANCING SPACES
are provided on both sides of the Promenade
Deck, the weather sides of these spaces being
protected with colored canvas, when necessary,
and colored electric lights are fitted overhead.
Page Eight Observation Room—Drawing Room
Page Nine
Lounge and Ball Room m
 m
Wz \ j
'  HI
■n
Two-Bed Room
Dining Saloon
Page Ten mm*
Two-Bed Room
Page Eleven
Smoking Room  PORTO RJCO
Thirteen A<^
fir,
MARTINIQUE
» . i>'
^ MARTINIQUE
Page Fifteen (Top Centre)—Duchess of Bedford
(Upper Left)—Promenade Deck
(Lower Left Centre)—Horse Racing
(Lower Left)—A Theatrical Presentation (Centre)—Fancy Dress Ball
(Upper Right)—Ball-Louvre Ventilators
in Stateroom 204
(Lower Right Centre)—Swimming Pool
(LowerRight)—Masquerade Ball  TON I DAD
^■^P
age Nineteen  VENEZUELA
Page Twenty-one TKUAW MCWJSE
rj-jBHfcS^
illr
i
fJU, PANAMA
Page Twenty-thre  HAITI
Page Twenty-five  BANAMAf
Page Twenty-seven SHORE   EXCURSIONS
Excursion No. 1 —
SAN JUAN, PORTO RICO
Motor cars leave the pier, passing over San
Antonio Bridge through the fashionable residential section. Morro Castle and San Cristobal
Fort will then be visited. The splendid Military
Road commences at the outskirts of San Juan and
is followed for most of the trip. At Rio Piedras,
seven miles from San Juan, is the University of
Porto Rico. Beyond Rio Piedras, the highway is
bordered by sugar and pineapple plantations
and then the road ascends into the mountains to
Cayuas, whose buildings are typically Spanish.
The trip then continues on to Caguas from which
point the return route is via Guaynabo, terminating at the Condado-Vanderbilt Hotel for
luncheon.
After luncheon, motor cars transfer members
to the pier or to the shopping district.
Membership in this excursion is limited to 250
persons, therefore early registration is suggested.
Extra Cost per Person $10
Excursion No. 2—
ST. PIERRE, MARTINIQUE
Members go ashore early, and after viewing
the ruins of St. Pierre, which was destroyed in
1902 by an eruption of Mont Pelee, motor cars
leave for the picturesque drive over the mountain
to Fort de France, which is reached about noon.
Luncheon is served aboard the DUCHESS OF
BEDFORD which arrives Fort de France at 12
noon.
Extra cost, on the basis of three passengers
in a five-seat car, and four passengers in a seven-
seat car, $8.50 per person.
Excursion No. 3—
BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS
Motor cars leave the pier, crossing Trafalgar
Square, thence via Palmetto Square, Bay Street,
Maxwell House, where George Washington
and his brother stayed in 1751, Crane Hotel,
Codrington College, St. John's Church, erected
in 1836 to replace one built in 1676 which was
destroyed by a hurricane, thence to the summit
of Hackleton's Cliff, where from a height of
1,000 feet a splendid view is obtained of an
immense plain stretching away to the sea. The
return trip is via Government Hill, Erdiston,
residential district of Belleville where the famous
Coral Caves are visited. The trip terminates at
the   Marine  Hotel  where  luncheon  is  served.
After luncheon the motor cars transfer members
to Bridgetown via the Savannah Club, Bush Hill
and Bay Street.
Extra Cost per Person $9
Excursion No. 4*—
PITCH LAKE, TRINIDAD
Motor cars leave Brighton Pier, La Brea,
immediately after members are landed. The
famous Pitch Lake, from which the world's
principal supply of asphalt is obtained, is visited,
also the asphalt refinery. The trip is then resumed
to Port of Spain over a splendid road. The route
is via San Ferjjjindo, the second largest town in
Trinidad; Union; Reform,- Williamsville; Mayo;
Tortuga, whose church contains a Black Virgin,
symbolic of the fact that Christianity applies to all
races; Freeport; St. Joseph,- San Juan,- Santa Cruz
Valley; Saddle Back Pass,- Botanical Gardens;
terminating at the Queen's Park Hotel for luncheon.
After luncheon, motor cars transfer members
to the wharf or shopping district.
Extra Cost per Person $14
Excursion No. 5*—
PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD
Motor cars transfer members to Queen s Park
Hotel for early luncheon. MotoPstfip will then
be taken round the Savannah, passing Government
House and the Botanical Gardens; through the
residential district; thence to San Juan; Santa '
Cruz Valley,- Saddle Back Pass, one of the
prettiest rides in Trinidad, embracing several
large plantations of cocoanuts; Maraval Village,-
St. James Village (Coolie Town),- thence to the
top of Lady Chancellor Road for a panoramic
view of the city. The Botanical Gardens are
visited on the return trip, after which the drive
ends at the wharf or shopping district, accordtlBB
to members' wishes.
Extra Cost per Person $9
Excursion No. 6—
LA GUAIRA, VENEZUELA
The trip from La Guaira to Caracas, the capital
of Venezuela, is made by motor car. The
distance in a straight line is six miles, but it takes
twenty-three miles of concrete highway to
connect the port and capital. The journey is a
fascinating one, along the brows of precipices,
zig-zagging, until the road reaches an altitude of
almost 4,000 feet before descending into Caracas,
which is 3,000 feet above sea level.
On arrival at Caracas, a motor tour is taken
around the city, before and after luncheon, and
stops made at the more interesting places. The
cars return to La Guaira in the afternoon and
members embark on the DUCHESS OF BEDFORD
in time for dinner.
Extra Cost per Person $13
•Members cannot be booked for both No. 4 and No. 5.
Page Twenty-eight SHORE   EXCURSIONS
Excursion No. 7—
PANAMA
Special train leaves Cristobal from alongside
the ship. The first stop is at Gatun, where the
party is conducted over the locks and spillway.
Members again board the train and proceed to
Gamboa. Here they embark on special steamer
for a trip through the Gaillard (Culebra) Cut
to Pedro Miguel, where the train is again joined,
and proceed to Panama, arriving in time for
luncheon at the Tivoli Hotel.
After luncheon, motor cars are provided
for a drive around Ancon, Balboa, Panama and
to Old Panama to visit the ruins of the city
sacked by Morgan in 1671, afterwards proceeding to the hotel. Members are then at liberty
for further sightseeing or shopping until departure
of the special train at 5.20 fKjfe'jP
Extra Cost per Person $15
Excursion No. 8t
KINGSTON, JAMAICA
First Day— Porl Antonio
Motor cars leave Kingston immediately after
landing and follow the Shore Road to Port
Antonio, where luncheon is served at the Titch-
field Hotel.
After luncheon, a short ride is taken around
Port Antonio and the return trip will be made
via Hope Bay, Buff Bay and Castleton. Here a
stop is made at the famous Botanical Gardens,
established by the Government about fifty years
ago, containing specimens of trees and plants
from all parts of the world. Leaving Castleton
the road follows the Wag Water River to Stony
Hill, where an interesting view is obtained.
The trip is then continued over a splendid road
lined on either side with forest and tropical
vegetation to the village of Constant Spring,
proceeding thence to Kingston in time for dinner
aboard ship.
Extra Cost per Person $17
Excursion No. 9
KINGSTON, JAMAICA
Second Day—Bog Walk
Motor cars leave Kingston and proceed along
the broad high road, passing the "Ferry Inn"
and the huge silk-cotton tree, to Spanish Town
or St. Jago de la Vega, once the capital of the
island laid out by the Spaniards in 1560. After
visiting the old cathedral and the Rodney Memorial, the route continues through the scenic Gorge
of the Rio Cobre to Bog Walk. The return journey
is made via Harker's Hall and Stony Point in time
for luncheon at the Myrtle Bank Hotel, where
the trip terminates.
Extra Cost
Excursion No. 10
per rerson
$9.50
HAVANA, CUBA
Motor cars leave the pier for a drive around
the city and through the residential districts,
including the numerous parks and parades for
which Havana is famous. Guides accompany the
party to lecture on the principal places where
stops are made.
Among the many places of interest seen en
route are the Chapel of Christopher Columbus,
where the first mass was celebrated on March 9,
1828; the Cathedral; Presidential Palace,- La
Punta Castle; the Malecon,- Maceo Park; Seventeenth Street, where may be seen some of the
most attractive residences,- Colon Cemetery,
famous for its monuments,- Tropical Garden;
Columbia Camp, where the American Army had
its headquarters in 1898; Marianao Village,-
Algibe Farm; Country Club; Casino,- and Yacht
Club, proceeding to the Hotel Almendares,
where luncheon is served.
After luncheon, the motor trip is resumed,
visiting Japanese Park, Fifth Avenue, Shopping
District, Central Park, Capitol and Cigar Factory,
terminating at the pier.
Extra Cost per Person $12.50
tThe Port Antonio trip is highly recommended, but members  taking it ire advised to refrain  from taking the
Walk trip on the second day.
Page Twenty-nine GENERAL   INFORMATION
GENERAL CONDITIONS
The Canadian Pacific acts only in the capacity
of agent for the passenger in all matters relating
to travel away from the DUCHESS OF BEDFORD,
whether by steamship, railway, automobile, or
any other means, and as such holds itself free
of responsibility for any delay, loss, accident
or sickness occasioned by fault or negligence
of any person or company, or from whatever cause.
The right is reserved to withdraw the cruise,
subject to refund of the net fare received by the
Company. Should it be deemed necessary or
desirable by the management on any account to
make changes in the itinerary or arrangements,
or to omit any section of or port named in the
program, such change may be made, and no
member shall be entitled to compensation on such
account.
The right is also reserved to decline to accept
or retain any person as a member of the cruise,
at any time, but in such cases where money has
been received the full or a proportionate amount
will be returned, according to circumstances.
In the possible contingency of quarantine,
any additional expenses, living or otherwise, must
be defrayed by the member.
MANAGEMENT
The DUCHESS OF BEDFORD is owned and
operated by the Canadian Pacific,- the Shore
Excursions are arranged and executed by the
Canadian Pacific—one management throughout—
one standard of service—the best.
Canadian Pacific representatives, experienced
in cruising, will accompany the cruise to attend
to the comfort and entertainment of members
aboard and ashore.
FARES
From New York and return to New York,
fares are from $306, according to location of
stateroom. Ship's plan, with details of each
stateroom, will be sent on request—see agency
list on back cover.
CHILDREN under ten years of age, occupying
room with two adults—fare is $153 irrespective
of accommodation.
SERVANTS accompanying employers, $306,
when berthed and served with meals in special
accommodation. When berthed elsewhere tariff
rate applies. Servants are required to do sightseeing with their employers or other servants.
GOVERNMENT REVENUE TAX on tickets
issued in the United States, $5 additional each
person.
FARE INCLUDES
Stateroom accommodation, meals, landing and
embarkation charges and the services of Canadian
Pacific representatives throughout the cruise,
both aboard and ashore.
FARE DOES NOT INCLUDE
Government Revenue Tax on tickets issued
in the United States, personal items such as
beverages not ordinarily served on board without charge, laundry, baggage insurance, gratui-
b'estestewards on the ship, conveyances or guides
specially ordered by members on individual
excursions and not ordered by the Cruise
Director.
DEPOSIT
To secure reservation, a deposit of 10 per
cent of the fare for accommodation selected is
required at time of acceptance of accommodation
offered. Balance of fare is payable three weeks
prior to sailing date.
PASSPORTS
Passports are not required by members taking
the entire cruise.
CANCELLATION
Accommodation cancelled after deposit
receipt, passage order or ticket has bee»,|ssued
will be placed on sale, and, when resold, refund
will be made of the amount paid, less expenses
incurred.
No cancellations or alterations may be made
in connection with Shore Excursions after books
are closed, date for which will be announced
on board the DUCHESS OF BEDFORD.
ENTERTAINMENT
Hours aboard ship will pass all too quickly
with so many interesting things to do—deck
tennis, quoits, shuffle-board, sports tournaments,
bridge, concerts, masquerade balls, dancing,
gymnasium, swimming pool and moving pictures.
The Library will contain a special collection
of books on travel, adventure and foreign
countries.
There will be two orchestras, one for classical
music and one for dancing.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES
Divine Service will be held on Sundays when
the ship is not in port. An altar set is also provided for the celebration of Holy Mass. There
is usually a Roman Catholic priest among the
members.
FACILITIES
The DUCHESS OF BEDFORD has all modern
facilities of a hotel — barber, ladies hairdresser,
manicurist, surgeon, professional nurses, valet
service, novelty shop, daily newspaper, etc.
The DUCHESS OF BEDFORD is equipped
with long range radio for the handling of news
dispatches and members  messages.
Page Thirty GENERAL   INFORMATION
CLOTHING FOR THE CRUISE
Light summer clothing is required for the
greater portion of the cruise. Ladies should take
plenty of wash dresses, and gentlemen white
wash, tropical worsted or Palm Beach suits.
Sports clothes and masquerade costumes will be
useful.
Gentlemen will find a dinner jacket meets all
ordinary requirements.
LAUNDRY
Laundry may be sent ashore at San Juan and
Cristobal. Apply to stateroom steward for
laundry bag and list, insert name of owner and
stateroom number, and deliver it to your steward
the day before arrival at above ports. Laundry
will be returned before the ship sails.
The Canadian Pacific suggests the above
merely as a convenience for members and accepts
no responsibility for §»ss, damage or delay.
Members are requested to check their laundry
immediately it is returned and report any discrepancy to the Chief Steward, who will render
assistance in obtaining adjustment.
BAGGAGE
Although there is practically no limit to the
amount of personal baggage which may be carried
on the steamship, it is inadvisable for members to
burden themselves with too many trunks and bags.
Large trunks and other baggage not regularly
needed or which cannot be conveniently
accommodated in the stateroom, will be placed
in the baggage room which will be accessible
throughout the cruise. Trunks for staterooms
should not exceed fourteen inches in height.
Every care is taken in connection with baggage,
but on board the liability of the Canadian
Pacific is limited, and no responsibility is assumed
ashore. Members are recommended to protect
themselves by insuring their baggage against loss,
damage or pilferage. This may be done at
reasonable rates.
Baggage may be checked from many points
through to the ship at New York upon payment
of the New York transfer charge. Consult your
Ideal Baggage Agent.
SAILING HOUR AND PIER NUMBER
The DUCHESS OF BEDFORD will sail at
12 noon. Definite advice of pier number will be
announced later.
DECK CHAIRS AND RUGS
Deck chairs and rugs may be rented
cruise at $3 each.  Cushions $1 each.
for the
PERSONAL FUNDS
Members will find Canadian Pacific Express
Travellers Cheques convenient on the cruise.
They are issued in denominations of $10, $20,
$50, $100 and $200, and may be obtained from
any Canadian Pacific office at the regular rates.
MAIL AND CABLES
Members of the cruise will be furnished, when
tickets are issued, with full instructions regarding
addressing of mail and cables to reach them en
route.
MESSAGES TO RELATIVES AND
FRIENDS AT HOME
The offices of the Canadian Pacific will receive
cable advice of the arrival of the DUCHESS OF
BEDFORD at each port, and will notify relatives
and friends of members by mail if list of names
and addresses is left with them.
THE SHOP
The DUCHESS OF BEDFORD has an attractive,
modern shop at which may be purchased a
variety of articles, such as books, candy, toilet
requisites, photographic films, souvenirs, post
cards and fancy goods.
PHOTOGRAPHY
As a cruise offers exceptional opportunities
for photography, a staff of experts is carried to
develop and print films for members. Cruise
members should not take a large supply of photographic films with them, as hermetically sealed
films are required in the Tropics and may be
purchased at The Shop aboard ship at city prices.
PHOTOGRAPHS REPRODUCED IN THIS BOOK ARE COPYRIGHT AS FOLLOWS:
By Underwood & Underwood
Page 26
Page 27
By Associated Screen News Limited, Montreal
By Publ
Page 13 Page 19
Page 15 Page 20
Page 16 Page 21
Page 18 Page 22
Upper Page 23
Lower Page 23
Page 24
shers
Photo
Serv
Page
5
Page
12
Page
14
Page
25
Page Thirty-one g&BBtw
sjBjteap   CANADIAN
PACIFIC
STEAMSHIPS
mPffiwwStt
PRINCIPAL AGENCIES—CANADA AND UNITED STATES
*^^A\\wMtWV%FMT         Atlanta
Ga.
K. A. Cook
1017 Healey Building
yZJratkfi?wrZWrtF           Boston
Mass.
L R. Hart
405 Boylston St.
i^M WFa //         Buffal°
N.y.
W. P. Wass
160 Pearl St.
^y^mrfK   Mm)                       Chicago
in.
E. A. Kenney
71 East Jackson Blvd.
W^kWm MM/nV                              Cincinnati
Ohio
M. E. Malone
201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
umfwMMwlIl    \ \                     Cleveland
Ohio
G. H. GrifUn    i
1010 Chester Ave.
"lit kwi i 1              Da||as
ill MM      A    ^t,           Detroit
Texas
A. Y. Chancellor
917 Kirby Building
Mich.
G. G. McKay
1231 Washington Blvd.
/ iJmmmm    Z^^^Sa  J     Edmonton
Alta.
R. W. Greene
106A Canadian Pacific Building
/ VV# wf WI^^MmW   R#        Indianapolis
Ind.
P. G. Jefferson
Merchants Bank Building
' V/l/uJ^ral      j     Kansas City
Mo.
R. G. Norris
723 Walnut St.
Los Angeles
Cal.
W. Mcllroy
621 South Grand Ave.
Memphis
Tenn.
M. K. McDade
Porter Building
Minneapolis
Minn.
H. M. Tait
611 Second Ave. South
Montreal
Que.
D. R. Kennedy
201 St. James St. West
4?Zn y*i/t n /\
Montreal
Que.
G. S. Reid
St. Catrterine W. & Metcalfe
Nelson
B.C.
J. S. Carter
Baker and Ward Sts.
!//]mWMI{
New York
N.y.
E. T. Stebbing
Can. Pac. Bldg., Madison at 44th
North Bay
Ont.
C. H. White
87 Main St. West
i   '     '   /sF ZlA\mll M rl\
Omaha
Neb.
H. J. Clark
803 Woodmen of World Building
Ottawa
Ont.
J. A. McGill
83 Sparks St.
yz z ay   ////
Philadelphia
Pa.
J. C. Patteson
1500 Locust St.
^MwJB'jBsYi  WW   71 if   ■          Pittsburqh
Pa.
W. A. Shackelford
338 Sixth Ave.
1 MM  W'aWn       Portland
Ore.
W. H. Deacon
148A Broadway
wJ0yMn\
(■I   txixIffSU       Quebec
Que.
C. A. Langevin
Palais Station
ywfwm t     Saint John
N.B.
G. S. Beer
40 King St.
\//fl/     San Francisco
ip  11         Saskatoon
Cal.
F. L. Nason
675 Market St.
Sask.
G. R. Swalwell
115 Canadian Pacific Builr|to8»
fWjmmmm
1   j I          Seattle
Wash.
E. L. Sheehan
1320 Fourth Ave.
11      1           Spokane
Wash.
E. L. Cardie
Old National Bank Bldg.
fiw w
'     I          St. Louis
Mo.
G. P. Carbrey
412 Locust St.
f            Tacoma
Wash.
D. C. O'Keefe
1113 Pacific Ave.
'    H              \\Ww\
Toronto
Ont.
J. B. Mackay
Can. Pac. Bldg., King & Yonge
Vancouver
B.C.
J. J. Forster
Can. Pac. Ry. Station
Iff
Victoria
B.C.
L. D. Chetham
1102 Government St.
Jff
Washington
D.C
C E. Phelps
14th & New York Ave., N.W.
Winnipeg
Man.
W. C. Casey
CRUISE PORTS
Main St. and Portage Ave.
Bridgetown
Barbados
DaCosta & Co., Ltd.
Cristobal
Panama
Wm. Andrews & Co.
Fort de France
Martinique
Plissonneau & Co.
Hamilton
Bermuda
Watlington & Conyers
Havana
Cuba
Kingston
Jamaica
George & Branday
La Guaira
Venezuela
A. Wallis Sucesores
Nassau
Bahamas
Solomon Bros.
Port-au-Prince
Haiti
J. Daalder, Jr.
Port of Spain
Trinidad
Archer Coal Depot Co., Inc.
St. Pierre
Martinique
Plissonneau & Co.
San Juan
Porto Rico
Behn Bros., Inc.
Willemstad
Curacao
S. E. L. Maduro & Sons
G.
T. FRAYNE
General Agent, Cruise
Department                 Montreal
WM. BALLANTYNE
Asst. Steamship Generc
I Passenger Agent       Montreal
W
C. CASEY
Steamship General Passenger Agent               Winnipeg
J.
J. FORSTER
Steamship General Passenger Agent              Vancouver
H.
M. MacCALLUM
Steamship General Passenger Agent                Montreal
P.
D. SUTHERLAND
General Passenger Agent, Cruises                  Montreal
H.
B. BEAUMONT
Steamship General Passenger Agent                Montreal
W
G. ANNABLE
Asst. Steamship Pass'gr
Traffic Manager           Montreal
WM. BAIRD
Steamship Passenger fr<
ffic Manager                Montreal
CANADIAN   PACIFIC   EXPRESS
TRAVELLERS'   CHEQUES
Experienced travellers carry
them because of their convenience and safety—Good the World over
Ask any Canadian Pacific Ac
ent
F
.  T.   S A N SO  CANADIAN
PACIFIC

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