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The lure of the Spanish main Canadian Pacific Steamships Limited 1920

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  jrom
Kewyorh,
January 26 and
February 29,1928
QAwayJoiMt
Summer
^jJan adian Pac I f I c
:'':'i/ai;';.ft^s;Aa^
II
mw
Printed in Canada, 1927 1
Page Two
Westward hoi with a rum-below9
And hurrah for the Spanish Main Ol "
MAKE IT "Southward ho!" instead—the old, fascinating adventure of the
West Indies and the Spanish Main still tempts you, as it tempted Columbus,
Ponce de Leon, Drake, Cortes, Hawkins, and a hundred others. True,
there are no pirates now, no rich galleons to sack, no buried treasures to
seek; but there is still the lure of sun-kissed seas, the beauty of coral isles, the charm
of tropical life, the countless memories of the storied past*
How these names stimulate your imagination! Cuba, that lovely island that
was once the pride of Spain? Or Jamaica, headquarters, in the bad old days, of famous
buccaneers? Or Panama, formerly the highway of Spanish treasure trains, now
synonymous with the greatest canal of history?
To these places you can cruise this winter; and to others—Colombia, stronghold
of Hispaniola; Curacao, a little bit of Holland in the Caribbean; the South American
land of Venezuela, with its sky-nestling capital of Caracas; Trinidad, "the land of the
humming bird"; Barbados, the beautiful coral island; Martinique, an outpost of France,
remembered for the devastation wrought by Mont Pelee; the black republic of Haiti;
Porto Rico, where Columbus rested and whence Ponce de Leon set forth to find the
Fountain of Youth; Nassau, in the Bahamas, with its wonderful coral formations and
sea-gardens; and Bermuda, the "Isles of the Blest."
To this great Hispaniolean region, in the centuries that immediately followed
the voyages of Columbus, flocked the adventurous
spirits of Europe; here were fought some prodigious
sea-fights, or ambitious colonization schemes were
launched* Spain, England, France—these three
jealous kingdoms clashed in the West Indies, and
part of their world-wide four-hundred-year strife
was fought in these island-strewn waters*
Page Three THE  LURE
OF THE
A.NISH   MAIM
•-
THERE will be two Canadian Pacific cruises in 1928, by the luxurious oceangoing   steamship   Montroyal.    These   cruises   will   appeal   particularly   to
those whose business compels them to take a vacation during the winter, as
they offer a splendid opportunity of avoiding the cold blasts and snow of the
northern cities, and of spending the time amid the glorious sunshine and balmy
breezes of the tropics in lands abloom with warmth and color.
Nautical
Miles
Port
Country
FIRST CRUISE
Depart
SECOND
Arrive
CRUISE
Depart
IN PORT
Days   Hrs.
New York United States	
681     Hamilton .... Bermuda Jan.
840    San Juan Porto Rico Feb.
374    St. Pierre Martinique Feb.
11     Fort de France... Martinique Feb.
130    Bridgetown Barbados Feb.
203    Port of Spain Trinidad Feb.
354    La Guayra Venezuela Feb.
149    Willemstad Curacao Feb.
449    Cartagena Colombia Feb.
268    Cristobal Panama Feb.
551    Kingston Jamaica Feb.
270    Port au Prince Haiti Feb.
662    Havana Cuba Feb.
390    Nassau Bahamas Feb.
962    New York United States. .. Feb.
6,294
 Jan. 26, 12 noon
28,    8 a.m. Jan. 29,    3 p.m.
1,    7 a.m. Feb.    2, 6 a.m.
3,   7 a.m. Feb.   3, 11 a.m.
3, 12 noon Feb.   3, 6 p.m.
4, 7 a.m. Feb.   4, 6 p.m.
5, 8 a.m. Feb.   6, 6 a.m.
7, 7 a.m. Feb.   7, 6 p.m.
8, 8 a.m. Feb.   8, 5 p.m.
10, 7 a.m. Feb. 10, 2 p.m.
11, 8 a.m. Feb. 12, 5 p.m.
14, 8 a.m. Feb. 15, 5 p.m.
16, 9 a.m. Feb. 16, 2 p.m.
18, 7 a.m. Feb. 20, 6 a.m.
21, 6 a.m. Feb. 21, 6 p.m.
24     9 a.m.
Mar.    2, 8 a.m.
Mar.   6, 7 a.m.
Mar.   8, 7 a.m.
Mar.   8, 12 noon
Mar.   9, 7 a.m.
Mar. 10, 8 a.m.
Mar. 12, 7 a.m.
Mar. 13, 8 a.m.
Mar. 15, 7 a.m.
Mar. 16, 8 a.m.
Mar. 19, 8 a.m.
Mar. 21, 9 a.m.
Mar. 23, 7 a.m.
Mar. 26, 6 a.m.
Mar. 29, 9 a.m.
Feb. 29, 12 noon
Mar.   3, 3 p.m.
Mar.    7, 6 a.m.
Mar.   8, 11 a.m.
Mar.   8, 6 p.m.
Mar.   9, 6 p.m.
Mar. 11, 6 a.m.
Mar. 12, 6 p.m.
Mar. 13, 5 p.m.
Mar. 15, 2 p.m.
Mar. 17, 5 p.m.
Mar. 20, 5 p.m.
Mar. 21, 2 p.m.
Mar. 25, 6 a.m.
Mar. 26, 6 p.m.
7
23
4
6
11
22
11
9
7
9
9
5
23
12
10        14
The Montroyal has already made twelve cruises to the West Indies and
South America. The experience gained has enabled the Canadian Pacific to
fit her in such a way as to make the ship ideal for such a trip. One outstanding
feature is that her engines are oil-burning, a feature that will appeal to all those
who have experienced the dust and dirt of coaling at tropical ports.
Representatives of the Canadian Pacific will accompany the cruise to
look after the comfort of passengers afloat and ashore.
Shore excursions are arranged for many of the
ports, and the time allotted at each is sufficient to
see the principal points and objects to the best
advantage, while the intervals of sailings between
ports of call afford time for rest. Full particulars
of these shore excursions, and much other useful
information, are contained in a supplementary
folder issued by the Canadian Pacific.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
WEST   INDIES    CRUISES
:: A At
v./ :'■
BERMUDA
THE BERMUDAS, a cluster of islands in the
Gulf Stream, with an even temperature that
rarely descends below 60 degrees, will surely
tempt the cruise traveller to return to these
enchanting isles, for the wonderful colors of the
water, the gleaming white of the coral-built
houses, the green of cedars and palms, the beauty
of sea-gardens, and the brilliant-hued fish swimming amongst coral formations, have made
Bermuda a dream of delight.
Of the 350 islands, only fifteen are inhabited,
with Hamilton as the capital. Bermuda is the
northern limit of the coral builders.
The Bermudas were discovered by Juan Ber-
mudez, a Spaniard wrecked on their shores in
1527. Exercising for many years thereafter a
legendary influence upon the imagination of
mariners—they are by tradition the scene of
Shakespeare's "Tempest"—they were first settled
in 1612.
Queen Street, Hamilton
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Page Four
Page Five THE  LUKE
OF  THE
SPANISH   MAIN
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
WEST   INDIES    CRUISES
The Governor's Residence, San Juan
Mtiil
PORTO   RICO
PORTO RICO, sometimes called a second
Garden of Eden, was discovered by Columbus
in 1493, on his way to San Domingo. In
1508 Ponce de Leon established a settlement near
the present San Juan; it was from San Juan, in
fact, that he started on his famous search for
the  "fountain of youth."
With a stormy past, harassed by pirates, in
1898 Porto Rico became a storm centre of the
Spanish-American War. The island was captured by American troops, and later ceded to the
United States. Its progress under American
rule has been rapid.
SAN JUAN, the capital, is a walled city with
a number of fortifications. There are several
plazas, and here the population of San Juan is
wont to gather to hear the evening band concerts.
MARTINIQUE
MARTINIQUE belongs to France; of very
irregular shape, and with a very uneven and mountainous surface, it was
discovered by the Spanish in 1493, and colonized
by the French in 1635. Martinique was the
birthplace of Josephine, the Empress of Napoleon,
and her statue adorns the Savanna at Fort de
France.    The population is mainly colored.
Until 1902 the principal town of Martinique
was St. Pierre, but an eruption of the volcano
Mont Pelee in that year entirely obliterated that
town and destroyed a population of 26,000 lives.
The steamer calls at St. Pierre, before proceeding to Fort de France, and passengers have the
opportunity of going ashore to visit the ruins of
the once beautiful city, which was built in
terraces on the sides of the mountain, with
charming residences, public squares and a fine
cathedral. All this was blotted out in the space
of a few hours, and only the gaping ruins left.
Fort de France
Page Six
&fe
Page Seven Trafalgar Square, Bridgetown
THE CORAL ISLAND of Barbados, the most
easterly of the West Indies group, is a beautiful one. It is the home of the flying fish,
many of which are taken from its waters by the
natives, cured, and offered for sale. Flowers
made from the scales of fish, and walking canes
made from the vertebrae of the shark, are also
sold.
Barbados is the trade mart for the Windward
Isles, and the headquarters of the British forces
of the West Indies. Its capital, Bridgetown,
stretches along the shores of Carlisle Bay—a
well-built town that might aptly be called a
"little bit of Old England," for it has a Trafalgar
Square, even with a statue of Lord Nelson. Surrounding Bridgetown are many sugar plantations
BARBADOS HAS an area of some 166 square
miles; outside of China, it is the most densely
populated country of the world, supporting
about 1,180 people to the square mile. Practically every square foot that is not occupied by
buildings is under cultivation, the chief product
being sugar. The island is well furnished with
such conveniences as street-cars, a railway, and
telephones.
The date of the discovery of Barbados is not
definitely known, but it is first mentioned in
the year 1518, and was occupied by the British
in 1625. It is said that the only foreign journey
ever made by George Washington was to Barbados, which he visited during the winter of
1751-52 with his brother Lawrence.
-^«^^«^^«^^^^^^*^
W^*^^-^^^^^-^ ^ ^^-^ W^ ^4^«^«^^
Page Eight
Page Nine THE  LURE
OF THE
SPANISH   MAIN
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
WIST   INDIES    CRUISES
Marine Square, Port of Spain
S%«
PORT   OF   SPAIN
TRINIDAD is the most southerly of the
West Indies. Situated off the coast of
Venezuela, within ten degrees of the equator,
it is truly tropical, with flowers and fruits in
profusion. It is an island that was well known
to the old explorers; both Columbus—who discovered it in 1498—and Raleigh wrote of Trinidad and of "the oysters that grew on trees."
Port of Spain, the capital, lies on a semicircular plain backed by beautiful hills. There
is a large Savanna, Queen's Park, on one side
of which stands the Governor's residence and
on the other many fine residences, each with its
own tropical setting. The Botanical Gardens
are also very lovely. Near Port of Spain is the
coolie village of St. James, which seems almost
like a transplanted section of Ceylon.
TRINIDAD
TRINIDAD HAS an area of 1,754 square
miles, with a population of nearly 400,000,
mostly colored. Its contour varies greatly;
the west coast is low, with many harbors, but
from here the land rises gradually towards the
interior, with fertile plains, hills and valleys.
Three mountain ridges traverse the island from
east to west, continuations of similar ranges in
Venezuela, of which Trinidad originally formed
part.
The island produces cacao and copra in
abundance, and cocoanut palms and plantations
of cacao are on every side. Sugar and asphalt
are also exported, the latter obtained from the
great lake of pitch in the interior for which the
island is well-known. The Gulf of Paria, which
separates Trinidad from Venezuela, forms one
vast harbor; and Port of Spain handles the
produce not only of the island, but also of the
Orinoco region of Venezuela.
-•^^^*-^'w'»-<—^ —-hTih^,,^*^,»r^,,t
Government House, Port of Spain
Page Ten
Page Eleven THE  LURE
OF THE
SPANISH   MAIM
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
WEST   INDIES    CRUISES
'::y-:- :y.^ym:y
y :
a        ■       ....Sa::v         m
■■     a,'-:''.'     a'
These'..'are scenes aboard the
Canadian Pacific *Montroyal*
during last winter's cruise to
the West Indies
The passenger accommodations of the Montroyal are most attractive
Many of the rooms are fitted with beds, and have private bath and toilet
attached. A number of them are connected so as to form suites. No
more than two passengers will be placed in a room, unless it is desired
to accommodate a family party, while those who wish to be alone will
find a good proportion of single rooms. The rooms are fitted with electric
fans, insuring comfort at all times.
The ship is given over entirely to the cruise. Her spacious promenade
decks insure the fullest enjoyment of outdoor life, while her public rooms
provide facilities for music, dancing, reading or card playing. Special
entertainments during the voyage will be arranged. An orchestra will
be carried to play at meal times, assist at concerts and provide music
for dancing. A fully-equipped gymnasium will afford exercise and
recreation, while those who enjoy a dip will appreciate the salt-water
swimming pool on deck.
The cuisine and service will be of Canadian Pacific standard throughout, which means the best. The tropical delicacies of the season will
be purchased at the different ports en route.
Page Twelve
^^^^^^^^^^^^■»^«^«^^^^'»
'v&l'W ,'
Page Thirteen THE LURE
OF THE
SPANISH   MAIN
CANADIAN
.   PACIFIC
WIST   INDIES    CRUISES
THE PORT OF La Guayra is the landing
place for Venezuela, a republic on the
mainland of South America. Towering
above the harbor rises La Silla Mountain; three
thousand feet up this peak nestles Caracas, the
capital. The "air-line" distance between La
Guayra and Caracas is only six miles—there is,
in fact, a mule path trodden for centuries, which
is twelve miles in length—but it takes twenty-
three miles of railway to connect the two places!
Venezuela was the first part of the mainland
of America sighted by Columbus, and its early
history is connected with the piracy and slave
trade of the Spanish Main. Although Caracas
is within ten degrees of the equator, its elevation
gives it a climate of almost perpetual spring.    It
a beautiful and modern city of about 90,000
people, with broad and well-built streets, a
cathedral, library, university, and other notable
buildings.
CURACAO, the principal island of the Dutch
West Indies, has had an unusually long
succession of owners. Discovered in 1527
by Spanish explorers, it was captured by the
Dutch in 1634, but from 1713 to 1815 its possession was variously in the hands of the French,
Dutch and English, until restored to Holland by
the Treaty of Paris.
Willemstad, the chief town, is "a little bit oi
Holland dropped in the Caribbean," for the
buildings and environment are almost an exact
replica of the atmosphere of the Netherlands.
The population of the island is about 35,000,
and the language is called Papiamento, a mixture
of Dutch, Spanish and Portuguese. The soil is
largely unproductive; but sugar, aloes, and
tobacco are cultivated in some tracts. The
liqueur named Curacao was originally made
here, but is now manufactured chiefly in Holland.
^■^^^^-^ *^^- »^^«^«^<g»g E   LURE
F  THE
ISH   MAIN
A Back Street in Cartagena
COLOMBIA
CARTAGENA DE INDIAS, seaport of the
South America republic of Colombia, has
had a romantic history. For three centuries
the Spanish flag flew from her grey towers, which
were built with desperate and constant care to
keep her wealth from the buccaneers. Here
came the great Spanish galleons every year, to
take away the rich treasure that was so tempting
to the roving pirates; here, too, gathered the
merchants of the interior, and hither came
priests and inquisitors to gather in their turn a
harvest of souls. Conquistadores in armour,
governors, bishops, Spanish nobles and their
ladies—all graced in its pride this ancient stronghold of the Caribbean.
Among the many points of interest are the
Fortress of San Filipe de Barajas, completed in
1657; the Monastery of Santa Cruz, completed
in 1608; the Monastery of the Jesuits; and Fort
of Pastelillo, built in 1568, and captured in 1741
by Admiral Vernon.
A    N   A    M    A
PANAMA IS THE most southerly point
reached on the cruises. The port of Cristobal is connected with the old city of Panama
bv a railroad, from which views of the most
prominent features of the canal may be obtained.
It was across the Isthmus that the old Spanish gold
trains of heavily laden mules made their way
towards the Atlantic. Portions of this road still
exist. The City of Panama was founded in
1516. Here came the gold and silver from Peru
for shipment to Spain. The city has an interesting Cathedral, built in 1760; but probably
the greatest attraction is the Sea Wall, a part of
the old fortification, the top of which now forms
a promenade. Of the Panama Canal, little
need here be said, such is its fame as an
engineering feat.
A Canadian Pacific Steamship in Miraflores Locks
<   *^h^tolll*fr^^'^^,-
■HhTtoHn^lfclim,h*Hi^ThVl>li THE  LURE
OF THE
SPANISH   MAIN
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
WEST   INDIES    CRUISES
■i:f!::&^.m^m^
Native Huts
JAMAICA
JAMAICA, largest island of the British
West Indies, is without doubt amongst the
most fascinating points touched on the cruise.
Its natural scenery is wonderful. Its mountains
rise to high altitudes, reaching, in Blue Mountain
Peak, 7,423 feet; from its green-clad hills pour
down countless rivers and streams, breaking
into beautiful cascades and waterfalls.
Kingston, the capital, is very interesting in
many ways. A visit to its markets, which contain
supplies of tropical fruit, vegetables, souvenirs
made from lace bark, and strings of red and
brown beans, will serve as an ideal means to
study the manners and customs of the Jamaicans,
for these markets are the great gathering places
of natives from the interior.
KINGSTON
GOOD ROADS connect Kingston with the
interior villages, offering many opportunities for excursions. This picture is of the
road to Spanish Town. At the entrance to
Kingston Harbor is Port Royal, closely associated
with the early history of Jamaica. It was at
one time the most important place on the island.
Here came the Spanish, who took possession of
it in 1509, followed by the English in 1655. Since
1670 it has been a British possession. Afterwards Port Royal became the rendezvous of
noted pirates and buccaneers, who brought
such treasures as to make it one of the richest
places in the world. It was destroyed by earthquake in 1692.
The soil of Jamaica is very rich and fertile.
Many kinds of trees are grown, including mahogany and ebony, and there is a flourishing
trade in oranges, bananas, pineapples and other
fruits. Very fine coffee, tobacco and ginger are
cultivated.
The Cathedral, Spanish Town
^«ww^^^^^^ »
.-fc.Hh^'to-ifcMhU'hurhi OF THE
SPANISH   MAIN
^&
y
The President's Palace, Port au Prince
H
I
-A^-^S,
HAITI, THE "Black Republic," covers an
area of some 10,000 square miles and has
slightly over two million inhabitants. A
land of densely-wooded mountains and beautiful
valleys, it is a heavy producer of sugar-cane,
cotton, cacao, tobacco and coffee—coffee, indeed,
of world-wide renown. In the interior are
considerable mineral deposits that merely await
transportation to be developed. Port au Prince,
the capital and largest city, possesses a splendid
natural harbor.
Haiti was discovered by Columbus on his
first voyage, and for two hundred years was a
Spanish possession. In 1697 it was ceded to
France. Later, negro slaves were introduced
from Africa; in 1806 the negroes, defying Napoleon, obtained their independence and founded
a republic, which—with the exception of a
temporary kingdom—it has since remained.
Haiti is one of the most thickly populated countries of the Americas.
-friT^Hilh^
^a*a
Page Twenty
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
WEST   INDIES    CRUISES
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HAVANA
HAVANA, CAPITAL of Cuba, has been
called variously the Paris of the western
hemisphere and the key of the new world.
Occupying a lengthy peninsula, and backed by
an amphitheatre of hills, its promenades, drives,
public parks, clubs and cafes are filled at all
times with gay and pleasure-loving crowds
living a life that is apparently care-free. In
customs and in architecture, too, the Cuban
metropolis is typically a Spanish city.
Steaming into the fine harbor—which gives
shelter to large vessels of all descriptions—the
dominant features that will be seen on the left
are Morro Castle and Cabanas Fortress, while
on the right stretches the city. The chief trade
is the tobacco industry, and there are numerous
cigar factories; sugar is also one of the principal
products.
*Jt»*aC5S3[
Page Twenty'One THE   LURE
OF  THE
SPANISH   MAIN
The President's Palace, Havana
The Colonial Hotel, Nassau
41
THE FINEST STREET in Havana is the
Prado, a central avenue that connects a
system of parks with the seashore. About
Central Park, the Prado and the Malecon the
traveller can best study the life and ways of the
people of Cuba. The Plaza de Armas, or Military
Square, dating back to 1519, was really the
beginning of Havana.
Havana is well supplied with churches, the
oldest being the Cathedral, the foundations of
which were laid in 1656. It is called the Columbus Cathedral, for it is claimed that in 1795 the
bones of the great discoverer were brought here
from San Domingo.
Tfc.HhTMfc<fc<toHfc^,fc<fc
Page Twenty-two
H
THE GROUP KNOWN as the Bahamas
contains altogether about 3,000 islands, of
which only twenty are inhabited. Possessing so temperate a climate that they have come
to be a popular winter resort, the islands are
exceedingly fertile. The chief products are
corn, cotton, oranges, pineapples, grapes, olives
and spices. Sponges are found in large quantities
along the shores.
Nassau, the capital, on New Providence
Island, is built upon coral, its white walls gleam,
ing amongst cocoanut palms and silk cotton
trees. Its perpetual sunshine and continuous
fine weather have made it a favorite resort. Its
sea-gardens are of more than passing interest,
and the fish market and the sponge market will
most certainly be visited — and also, if time
permits, the surf bathing at Hog Island. THE  LURE
OF THE
SPANISH   MAIN
>^3
A    G   E    N    C    LES
UNITED STATES AND CANADA
Atlanta, Ga E. G. Chesbrough 59 North Forsyth St.
Boston, Mass L. R. Hart 405 Boylston St.
Buffalo, NY  H. R. Mathewson 160 Pearl St.
Calgary, Alta R. W. Greene Canadian Pacific Station
Chicago, 111 . . .R. S. Elworthy 71 East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati, Ohio M. E. Malone 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
Cleveland, Ohio G. H. Griffin 1010 Chester Ave.
Detroit, Mich G, G. McKay 1231 Washington Blvd.
Indianapolis, Ind J. A. McKinney Merchants Bank Bldg.
Kansas City, Mo R. G. Norris , 723 Walnut St.
Los Angeles, Cal W. Mcllroy 621 South Grand Ave.
Minneapolis, Minn H. M. Tait 611 Second Ave. South
Montreal, Que D. R. Kennedy 141 St. James St.
Nelson, B.C J. S. Carter Baker and Ward Streets
North Bay, Ont L. O. Tremblay 87 Main St. West
New York, N.Y E. T. Stebbing Madison Ave. at 44th St.
Omaha, Neb. H. J. Clark   727 W. O. W. Bldg.
Ottawa, Ont J.A. McGill 83 Sparks St.
Philadelphia, Pa J. C Patteson Locust Street  at 15th
Pittsburgh  Pa C L. Williams 338 Sixth Ave.
Portland, Ore W. H. Deacon 55 Third St.
Quebec, Que C A. Langevin Palais Station
Saint John, N.B G. B. Burpee 40 King St.
St. Louis, Mo G. P. Carbrey 412 Locust St.
San Francisco, Cal F. L. Nason 675 Market St.
Seattle, Wash E. L. Sheehan 1320 Fourth Ave.
Tacoma, Wash D. C O'Keefe 1113 Pacific Ave.
Toronto, Ont J. E. Parker Canadian Pacific Bldg.
Vancouver, B.C J. J. Forster Canadian Pacific Station
Washington, D.C C. E. Phelps 905 Fifteenth St., N.W.
Winnipeg, Man W. C. Casey Main and Portage
EUROPE
Antwerp, Belgium A. L. Rawlinson 25 Quai Jordaens
Belfast, Ireland Wm. McCalla 41 Victoria Street
Birmingham, England W. T  Treadaway 4 Victoria Square
Bristol, England A. S. Ray 18 St. Augustine's Parade
Brussels, Belgium L. H. R. Plummer 98 Boulevard Adolphe Max
Glasgow, Scotland W. Stewart 25 Bothwell St.
Hamburg, Germany T. H. Gardner Gansemarkt 3
Liverpool, England T. McNeil Pier Head
London, England W. H. Powell 62-65 Charing Cross, S.W.I.
London, England G. Saxon Jones 103 Leadenhall St., E.C. 3
Manchester, England J. W. Maine 31 Mosley Street
Paris, France A. V. Clark 7 Rue Scribe
Rome, Italy , Canadian Pacific 130 Via del Tritone
Rotterdam, Holland J. Springett 91 Coolsingel
Southampton, England H. Taylor 7 Canute Road
Vienna, Austria A. W. Treadaway Opernring 6
ASIA
Yokohama, Japan A. M. Parker 1 Bund
Kobe, Japan E. Hospes 7 Harima Machi
Shanghai, China T. R. Percy 4 Bund
Manila, P.I J. R. Shaw. 14 Calle David
Hong Kong, China G. E. Costello Opposite Blake Pier
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NEW YORK
GULF OF
MEXICO
HAVANA
AUSTRALIA AND   NEW ZEALAND
Sydney, N.S.W J. Sclater	
Auckland, N.Z A. W. Essex	
BERMUDA
.Union House
• Auckland, N.Z.
E. STONE
General Passenger Agent
Hong Kong
H. B. BEAUMONT
Steamship General Passenger Agent
Montreal
H. G. DRING
European Passenger Manager
London, Eng.
W. G. ANNABLE
Assistant Steamship Passenger
Traffic Manager
Montreal
C. E. E. USSHER
General Passenger Traffic Manager
Montreal
OR LOCAL AGENTS EVERYWHERE
J. J. FORSTER
Steamship General Passenger Agent
Vancouver
WALTER MAUGHAN
Steamship Passenger Traffic
Manager
Montreal
CANADIAN PACIFIC EXPRESS
TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES
EXPERIENCED TRAVELLERS
CARRY THEM, BECAUSE OF THEIR
CONVENIENCE AND SAFETY. . . .
GOOD THE WORLD OVER. ASK
ANY CANADIAN  PACIFIC AGENT.
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Page Twenty-four
KINGSTON
MEXICO
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POP.T
AU PRINCE
SAN JUAN
CARIBBEAN SEA
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/CARTAGENA
CRISTOBAL1*
CURACAO
LA   GUAYRA
FORT DE FRANCE
BARBADOS
PORT OF SPAIN
PAN A**\A CANAL
I   COLOMBIA
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VENEZUELA
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