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Europe The Travel Guild 1932

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 IP yM.
The Greatest Travel Values of the Year
THE  TRAVEL  GUILD. Inc.
CHICAGO NEW YORK MILWAUKEE
SAN FRANCISCO
EUROPE
VIA   THE   CANADIAN   PACIFIC —THE   WORLD'S   GREATEST   TRAVEL   SYSTEM At Your
Service!
THE WIDE WORLD OVER
•WHETHER you want a summer of educational
travel in Europe ... a carefree cruise around the
World or the Mediterranean ... or perhaps to
Africa or the West Indies or the Land of the Midnight Sun ... a "land cruise" that will show
you America first ... a mid-winter dash to
Quebec or Florida or Cuba . . . just name your
desire . . . our Travel Staff will make suggestions, prepare suitable itineraries, arrange, every
bothersome detail... tickets, accommodations,
sightseeing, shopping-arrangements, etc.
See Mexico—Land of
Enchantment
LjET'SGO! Northern climates
blow hot and cold. Freezing
one month and sweltering the
next! In three days you may
be in Mexico City, where it's
springtime forever! Gay as
Paree . . . picturesque as Barcelona . . . romantic as Venice
. . . more beautiful than the
gardens of the Orient! Mexico
will win you . . . with her sunshine, flowers, tinkling guitars,
laughter, life! Enjoy them all
. . . now ... on a carefree
Guild House Party.
Through Texas . . . then
Monterrey and Mexico City.
Visit Xochimilco; Guadalupe;
the Pyramids, larger and nearly as tall as those of Egypt and
older. Glorious motor trips
. . . Cholula, Puebla, Cuerna-
vaca.    Also   visit   Guadalajara.
Ask your agent for the Guild,
20-page, "Mexico" book.
For Independent Travelers
A 0 ENABLE you, alone or with a group of friends, to go
where you please, when you please, as you please . . . but
to have all arrangements planned, to have reservations
made in advance, tickets in hand . . . that is the ideal and
the purpose of The Travel Guild's Foreign Independent
Service, available through the Travel Agent whose name
appears on the back cover.  The Service provides:
1. Expert counsel in planning your itinerary.
2. The purchase, at regular tariff rates, of your steamship, railroad or motor car tickets, your hotel accommodations and sightseeing trips.
3. Service en route abroad by The Travel Guild's
staff men operating from the Guild's own European offices.
Only those who have experienced it can realize the bitter
annoyance of wasting precious holiday moments standing
in line for tickets, struggling for information from foreign
hotel porters, arriving at midnight in strange cities with
no hotel accommodations. How much better to plan each
detail of your journey before you depart.
Ask the Guild agent whose name appears on the back
cover for a copy of "Journeys Abroad."
Visit the Western
Wonderlan ds
VFOWEST! Take your choice
of many fascinating itineraries.
Visit the Canadian Rockies,
Yellowstone, the Royal Gorge,
the Pacific Northwest, Alaska,
California, Yosemite, Grand
Canyon, Colorado, Salt Lake.
The Travel Guild has
chosen "the best of the West"
for you on the all-expense plan.
You stop at the best - hotels.
You travel in an escorted party,
with an experienced courier.
No worries! Everything is
handled for you by Guild experts; your Certificate of Membership becomes a magic carpet.
Go West! You'll love it!
Ask for "House Parties Through
the Wonderland of the JPest."
IN WINTER bask in southern
sunshine. While business takes
its January and February lull
... . go South! Play in Cuba
... cruise the Caribbean . . .
seek the Fountain of Youth in
Florida . . . find the key to
California's enchantment.
For winter suggestions ask
for "House. Parties to California" and "House Parties to
the Sunny South."
House Parties
J? IVE glorious motor routes are offered you for 1932.
House Parties show you Europe in all its glory. . . .
The fascinating wayside spots as well as the great capitals.
See   and   know   Europe   as   only   the   motor   traveler   can.
rjf\ Flawje   "The Great Circle" Route
« V JLFcljO House Party No. 1
$860
NINE   COUNTRIES:   England,   Belgium,   Holland,   Germany,   including   Berlin,    Czecho-SIovakia,   Austria,    Italy,
wm
rla
France.    I
age
II   to  14.
56 Days
$695
"The Popular" Route
House Party No. 2
SEVEN COUNTRIES: England, Belgium, Holland, Ger-
3iDay7r>":iLlTSii? 7 $423
SIX    COUNTRIES:    England,    Holland,    Belgium,   Ger-
48 Dayr^lia]rEipeN?4nte $623
NINE  COUNTRIES:   England,  Belgium,  Holland,   Ger.
many, including Berlin. Czecho-SIovakia, Austria, Hungary,
rland, France.    Pages 18 and 19.
"The  Scenic"  Route
House Party No. 5
POUR      COUNTRIES:      France,      Germany,      Austria
Switzerland.    Pages 20 and  21.
Preliminary and Extension Itineraries
SCOTLAND, $35—A special program that may preced
any  House Party—see page 43.
IRELAND,   $95—A   seven-day   program.     See   page   42
SPAIN, $195—A fifteen-day  trip.    See page 23.
FRANCE—Extension   trips   from   Paris,    See   page   22
SCANDINAVIA  and   NORTH   CAPE—See  page 44
30 Days
$357
INDEX
Page
APPLICATION BLANK—Use to Register.. 48
BAGGAGE—Suggestions   and   Regulations. ... 46
BATTLEFIELDS—Excursions to      22
BRITTANY—Itineraries   to   22
CABLE MESSAGES   47
CANADA        4
CANADIAN   PACIFIC—Services        4
CHATEAU COUNTRY—Excursions to 22
COLLEGE ORCHESTRAS       5
COLLEGIATE PARTIES—Service    26
HOTELS USED—Collegiate Parties  26
—House  Parties     6
HOUSE   PARTIES—Standards   of   Service...    6
—Advantages of       17
HOW TO REGISTER  48
MAIL—How Handled     47
MOTOR   TRAVEL—Advantages         6
—Distances    17
NIAGARA   FALLS—Free  Trip     4
ORCHESTRAS        5
PARIS—Excursions  Out   of   22
PASSPORTS—How   to   Secure 46
SAILING HOURS   46
ST. LAWRENCE -ROUTE     4
SHIPBOARD—Life   Aboard 24-25
TESTS—To  Apply  to Travel  Services     3
TRAVEL   GUILD—Organization        2
USEFUL INFORMATION    4647
VISAES—How   to  Secure   46
WHEN TO  SEE EUROPE  37
Collegiate Parties
V7 UILD Collegiate Parties have been planned to include
more of Europe at nominal costs for quality service than
has ever before been offered. All by motor travel is used
in   Scotland,  England   and   Switzerland.
AA Tiovo "the Grand Tour" Route dfTQl
OO   Uflja    Collegiate Party No. 21   W «OX
ELEVEN   COUNTRIES:
Holland,     Germany,     including     Berli
Austria, Hungary,  Switzerland, Italy,  .
France.    Pages 27 to 30
The Italian Route—$600
Collegiate   Party   No.   22
49 Days—See Pages 31 to 34
EIGHT   COUNTRIES:   Scotland,
England,     Belgium,     Holland,     Ger.
many,     Switzerland,    Italy,    France.
The Guild Special—$398
Collegiate   Party   No.   23
35 Days—See Pages 35 to 37
SEVEN   COUNTRIES:   Scotland.
England, Holland, Belgium, Germany,
Switzerland,   France.
Heart of Europe—$625
Collegiate   Party   No.   24
49 Days—See pages 38 and 39
TEN COUNTRIES: Scotland, England, Belgium, Holland, Germany, including Berlin, Czecho-SIovakia, Austria,    Hungary,    Switzerland,   France.
Vacation Special—$308
Collegiate  Party   No.   25
28 Days—See Pages 40 and 41
FIVE  COUNTRIES:   Scotland,
England,   Holland,   Belgium.   France.
England,   Belgiuu
I,     Czecho-Slovokii 'TRAVEL—The Greatest Educator'
THE
TRAVEL GUILD
INCORPORATED
ANNOUNCES
HOUSE PARTIES
ALL BY MOTOR TRAVEL
COLLEGIATE PARTIES
BY RAIL AND MOTOR
TRAVEL GUILD OFFICES
CHICAGO NEW YORK MILWAUKEE
PARIS LONDON
EUROPE
Via the Canadian Pacific
World's Greatest Travel System
Note that The TRAVEL GUILD crest; its slogan, "TRAVEL—
The Greatest Educator": and the trade name, "The TRAVEL
GUILD   House   Party   Tours,"   are   Reg.   U.   S.   Pat.   Off.
1932
I
Your 1932 Travel Dollar
F you ever hope to go abroad, this is the year of all
years to do it . . . because you'll get the biggest values
for the money you spend!
You've heard seasoned travelers talk about the low
cost of living abroad in the days before the World War.
You've heard of the marvelous food and beverages that
used to cost so little ... of the marvelous times you
could enjoy for so little money ... of the marvelous
bargains to be had in every shop!
Well . . . those "good old days" of before the War
have come again in Europe. European hotel "managers,
restaurant proprietors, dressmakers and others who cater
to American trade have cut their prices to attract your
patronage. As &. result, The Travel Guild is able to
present for 1932 the most sensational range of travel
offerings we have ever planned! Long, delightful journeys abroad ... on the all-expense plan ... at prices
unbelievably low!
Take advantage of them—this year! In the words of
our slogan: "Take your dollars to Europe in 1932—for
the biggest dollars you've ever seen!"
President,
The Travel Guild, Inc. JMi \m% \. t. i
A Symbol of Quality
A HE Guild trademark is the crest illustrated above—
symbol of Guild activities and interests. Here are combined the brush and palette of the artist, the quill of the
writer, the tool of the craftsman, the book of culture, the
lamp of learning . . . and the ship which blends them
all into our dominant interest—travel.
"A great educational institution," The Travel Guild
has been called. This is literally true. The slogan
which we hold constantly before us is "Travel—the
Greatest Educator." The executive heads of the organization are college men; all have traveled widely; members of the staff have visited every corner of the earth.
Initiative, purposeful travel, educational background,
the desire to make every Guild service superior to anything that has preceded it, the ability to find joy in their
work, and the knack of getting the best for Guild travelers—that explains why, since 1925, The Travel Guild
has become one of the world's foremost travel agencies.
One makes no mistake in dealing with a company
whose chief interest is to advance standards of service.
The Travel Guild is an American organization operating in the interests of Americans by making available
for them the delights and wonders of the world for
business, for pleasure, for culture. There is no need for
worry or care on the part of Guild travelers. They visit
the most intriguing spots without sacrificing convenience
and comfort; at costs no greater than that for old-
fashioned service.
The Guild has accomplished this because its only
interest has been the organizing of travel for the profit
and enjoyment of its clients. Its success and continued
prosperity depend entirely on the quality and character
of its travel offerings; not on activities which make
the offering of a travel service a convenient sideline.
Page 2
Travel Earns a Trademark!
-i- OR the first time in the history of the travel business, travel
offerings have been trademarked with a sign of quality . . .
and that symbol is the Guild crest! The Travel Guild is a
real guild . . . with a name reminiscent of medieval times,
when craftsmen organized to advance their crafts, to supervise
the quality of wares produced, to secure good workmanship.
When you consult us about travel arrangements, you secure
our expert knowledge and resourceful experience . . . save
yourself time, trouble and expense. Your arrangements are
made and your comfort assured by an organization of known
financial responsibility with world-wide representation.
The Travel Guild has 5,000 sales agencies in the United
States and Canada. Thousands of our clients travel abroad
and in this country every year. Unhampered by precedent,
The Travel Guild has created innovations which have revolutionized travel methods—popular-priced motor coach travel
throughout Europe—"House Parties" in America, traveling on
special trains equipped with a recreation car for dancing,
movies and bridge. We handle many groups each year, traveling abroad under distinguished leadership.
Financial Responsibility
J. HE financial soundness of a travel organization and its ability to render a complete service throughout your journey is a
matter of as great importance to you in the
purchase of travel services as it is in the
purchase of any other commodity of like cost.
The Guild refers prospective travelers to
former clients for testimony as to its service.
As for financial responsibility The Travel
Guild refers clients to any steamship, railway, or hotel company with which it has
done business and to the following banking
institutions:
Bank of Montreal. Chicago, Montreal, Paris and
London; Mercantile Trust and Savings Bank, Chicago;
Continental Illinois Bank & Trust Company, Chicago;
Harriman National Bank, New York; City National
Bank & Trust Company, Evanston; Banco Commercial
Italiana, Rome; Deutsche Bank und Disconto-Gesell.
schaft, Cologne; Credit Suisse, Geneva; Banque de
Bruxelles, Brussels; Nederlandsche Handel-Moatschoppif
IV.  V., The Hague.
Guild Offices
M.HE Travel Guild is an international  travel  service  with
major operating offices in London and Paris and with special
agents in every travel center of
the world.   The European operating offices are staffed by the
outstanding travel men in their
respective countries as well as by American  executives.    So  clients,  wherever
they are booked, are under the care of
The Travel Guild.
In America the Guild activities are
directed by major offices in Chicago,
New York and Milwaukee. Also, all the authorized Guild travel
offices and agencies are
an integral part of the
Guild. Thus, with an
irreproachable chain of
travel service offices, the
Guild girdles the world. Page 3
A Complete American Organization
Directing the Activities of Trained
European Travel Experts Is Your Assurance of a Carefree
Vacation Abroad.
am
Making a Lifetime Decision
A HE prospective European traveler
will do well to choose wisely in selecting
the company with whom he is to travel.
Some people can afford to be casual
. . . some even careless ... in their expenditures. But in the selection of a journey abroad, with its reward of years of
happy memories, with convenience and
satisfaction at stake, it is essential for
those who must buy wisely and well,
that a scale of standards be set up to
guide in the selection of the right journey. The scale does not alone measure
value, but it measures advantages and
satisfaction as well. It is intended to be
a safeguard against regrets.
We do not make comparative statements concerning our services or our
organization, although we invite comparison, so we publish our scale in fairness
to all, urging you to apply it to others
as well as to The Travel Guild. Then
let sound, practical judgment guide you
on this once-in-a-lifetime decision. Here
are the points you should consider in
choosing your service.
1. Does the service offer clean, comfortable accommodations on fast ships,
enabling you to spend the maximum
number of days in Europe?
2. Are good hotels, most of them
classifying as first class and even some
de luxe, used by the service?
3. To what extent is travel in Europe
done by motor, so that you get many intimate glimpses of the various countries
which would be impossible were travel
by rail only?
4. Do itineraries show definitely the
time devoted to rail and motor travel—
the time spent in going from one city to
the next, or does it appear that no time
is required for such travel?
5. Are you personally conducted by
expert couriers and arranged for by a
permanent European organization, which
is always at your service on the spot?
6. Are detailed itineraries presented
to you which enable you to know exactly
what points you visit, how long you stay
and what services are included?
7. Are the services offered economical, complete, and on the "all-expense"
basis; is there a clear statement as to
what costs include?
8. Are references available from former clients, banks or members of trade
organizations as to the conduct of its
business and its financial responsibility.
9. Is the service operated as a sideline or as the main business of the company, with proper experience in the
travel field?
10. Are the services offered sufficiently varied so that you can find a
route to fit your exact desires—at the
time you wish to go?
11. Does the growth of the company
indicate complete satisfaction with its
service?
12. What is the best sea way to
Europe? How do ships and steamship
services compare?
You should consider all these points
when selecting the travel organization
with which you expect to see Europe.
Compare itineraries day by day; compare accommodations, at sea and on land,
noting especially the number of days
which you actually have in Europe. It
has not been our object to offer the
cheapest service to Europe, but the best
at the price. Everything considered, there
is no greater travel value anywhere than
a Guild House Party or Collegiate Party.
Why are you planning to visit Europe?
It is our business to know so that we may
prepare routes and plans that will most
satisfactorily fulfill your objectives. How
Guild itineraries are planned is told in
the next column.
iMMf
We Await You
XHE Guild travel routes combine in a
happy blend for you the attractions of
Europe—not accidentally, but consciously.
Fun—The art of enjoyment has been
highly developed in Europe. They have
had time to learn how to play. Spots where
you, too, can play are detailed on page 45.
Art—After a trip to Europe you'll know
the works of the great masters. In Florence, Milan, London, Amsterdam, Paris,
Dresden, Munich, you see great masterpieces.
Music—In Vienna, Berlin, Munich,
Rome, Paris, you may attend marvelous
concerts. You see the homes of many
famous composers.
Politics and Economics—Your interests may be in economic, political and
social experiments in the working. Italy,
Czecho-SIovakia, France, Germany and
England will hold your attention.
History—History becomes graphic.
Trace the story of the Roman conquerors
from Chester on the west coast of England
to Rome itself. Many great, world-moving
epochs are reconstructed for you.
Architecture—Modernistic trends are
best exemplified in the Scandinavian countries; in Nuremberg and Carcassonne are
preserved medieval structures; visit pre-
Christian structures in Rome. Visit, too,
cathedrals and magnificent palaces.
Much More—Famous viands; wines and
beverages; people; sports of other lands;
religious shrines; ancestral backgrounds—
the spots where each of these excel are
included in Guild itineraries.
Scenery and Spots of Beauty—The
flowered Dutch lowlands, the majestic Alps,
the colorful vineyards of France, the
charming Italian Hill Towns, the Route des
Alpes, the Riviera reflected in the blue
Mediterranean, the Black Forest, the
castled Rhine, the curious Dolomites, tho
Tyrol ... to enable travelers to extract in
full this beauty, House Parties by motor were
inaugurated. Even our Collegiate Parties
have a surprising amount of motoring. "When Good Fellows Get Together" on Shipboard, Life Becomes a Happy Cycle of Gay Adventures
See Canada En Route to Europe
-T».DD another country to your trip abroad! If you've never been to Canada
. . . and if you have, you'll want to go again! ... by all means sail to
Europe from Montreal or Quebec, and add the Canadian experience to your
trip abroad!  Via Montreal, Quebec and the St. Lawrence seaway to Europe,
Canadian Pacific travel lanes treat Americans to the joys of Canada
en route—another country added to your trip!
. Montreal, although a thousand miles from the ocean, is 315 miles
nearer to Liverpool than is New York!  It is a bustling, modern city
—unique mixture of English and French—with a French quarter which
makes it the fourth largest French-speaking city in the world!
Quebec, that ancient walled city which was the cradle of New
France, is distinguished for the grandeur of its site, the beauty of its
scenery, the romance of its checkered history—and that marvel of
hotels, the palatial Chateau Frontenac! Narrow, twisted streets climb
steep hills to the walls of cloistered convents—cannons frown harmlessly from ancient fortresses and donkeys pull two-wheeled carts
with a seeming aimlessness over cobbled roads.
A FREE trip to Niagara Falls may be enjoyed by Travel Guild
members from the West, holding Canadian Pacific rail transportation
reading through Detroit and Toronto to Montreal. Such members may
make a side-trip from Toronto to Niagara Falls and return without
additional cost. Full details of this stop-over privilege and free trip
will be given you when you enroll for your European trip.
Page 4
A Scenic Seaway
Route to Europe
J. HE Travel Guild—for the seventh
consecutive season—has again selected Canadian Pacific ships to carry
its European travel parties—for many
good reasons:
The ships themselves are marvels
of comfort, convenience,, speed and
cuisine. We are using the famous
world-cruising Empress of Britain,
Empress of Australia and Empress of
France . . . the popular new Duchess
ships, Duchess of Bedford, Duchess of
Atholl, Duchess of Yorksaid Duchess
of Richmond . . . and a few sailings
' on the comfortable Cabin liners, Montrose, Montclare and Montcalm. Tourist accommodations are provided on
all of these ships—well ventilated,
spotlessly clean cabins . . . comfortable berths . . . pleasant-furnishings
. . . commodious lounges . . . broad,
sunny decks .. . and wonderful meals!
Sailing from Montreal or Quebec,
you have two days on the smooth St.
Lawrence River to acquire your "sea-
■ legs," before the Atlantic is reached.
A third of your voyage to Europe is
thus along the sheltered shores of the
St. Lawrence—past story-book villages
and  green   river  banks   dotted  with •'
• quaint French-Canadian towns. Forty-
eight hours out, you're still glimpsing
headlands and fishing schooners. The
' transition from river to ocean is so
gradual as to be hardly noticed—then
days so full of pleasure that you almost regret the cry of "Land, Ho!"
Nature created the St. Lawretoce
ocean boulevard—Canadian Pacific
service and ships have made it famous!
The Impressive Silhouette of Historic Old Quebec Is Just Oni Page 5
Music by the Ten
Best College Bands
J.N a national contest, sponsored
jointly by The Travel Guild, College
Humor magazine and a group of well-
known radio stations, the ten best college dance, bands in America are now
being selected to accompany our
parties on The Travel Guild summer
sailings to Europe.
No House Party is complete without music . . . and no dance music is
so vibrantly gay as the music you
hear on a college campus, at varsity
hops and fraternity parties! That is
why The Travel Guild, co-operating
with College Humor and radio stations in the United States and Canada,
is selecting campus dance bands for
our 1932 sailings.
The winning bands will be awarded
trips abroad—with the proviso that
they play for a tea-dance every afternoon aboard ship, and another dance
every night! How they will contribute
to those gala masquerade parties!
The Travel Guild was a pioneer
in this endeavor. We first took campus
dance bands to Europe on Canadian
Pacific ships in the summer of 1926.
Clever, musical, social groups of college fraternity men, they were—from
great universities in the Middle West.
This season, in a national contest,
we're selecting campus bands from
every part of the United States and
Canada. . . .   You'll enjoy the best!
You can be sure of lively entertainment—plenty of lounge and deck
space for dancing—lots of music—
and delightful partners—when you
sail with a Guild party in 1932.
of the Many Beautiful Panoramas Alone; the St. Lawrence
Nowhere Can One Enjoy Such Thrills of Anticipation as When a Liner Pulls Out from Port
Thrills Can't Be Put Into Words!
O,
'H, for the life of a sailor—modern style!   The joys of a voyage
trimmed with white-capped waves and salt air from the broad Atlantic!
Wide, white decks . . . and nice people in sport clothes!   An appetite that
doesn't grow on land!   Sleep that goes down as deep as the seaweed!
Obsequious stewards who awaken you when you're ready in the
morning, to say with cheerful English accent: "Your bawth is ready!"
Attentive stewards in the dining salon—to bring you just what you
want for breakfast!   A deck steward to bundle you comfortably in
your steamer rug, as you relax in your chair after a vigorous morning walk on deck!   More stewards, polite and solicitous, serving you
bouillon on deck at eleven in the morning. Then a brisk game of deck
tennis—or shuffleboard—or a bit of reading!   Then luncheon!   How
do they serve all this food and make a profit out of your passage?
After luncheon, a nap, perhaps ... or a game of bridge in the lounge
... or a sociable visit in the smoke room! Four o'clock brings music
and tea-dancing . . . and first thing you know it's time to dress for
dinner! What gay meals! . . . with the ship's orchestra playing lively
tunes ... brilliant conversation all around your table . .. alert stewards
at your elbow to serve you delicious food and sparkling beverages!
. . . And in the evening, a dance in the lounge . . . music by gay college
orchestras ... a ship's concert, a masquerade ball, church services if
it's Sunday ... or long, quiet conversations as you snuggle in a deck
chair .. . then walk on deck in the moonlight! So pass the breathlessly
happy hours as you speed ever nearer to Europe. Page 6
If If**
^P^i
Five
Wonderful
.i*mm-
House
Party
Itineraries
First
Used
Class Hotels. Some of Europe's Finest* Are
for House Parties ... The Palace. Lucerne
The
Can
Black
Only
Forest (above) and the Hill Towns of Italy
Be Seen by the Motor Traveler in Europe
Pages 7 to 21
Motor Through Europe
with a House Party
RAVEL GUILD House Parties by Motor for 1932 are undoubtedly the greatest travel values yet known in the history of quality
travel services. We have had the experience of sending thousands of
Americans through Europe in this manner. What we know from our
experience in pioneering motor travel, others must learn.
The journeys between cities are as much a part of a trip through
Europe as the cities themselves. Travel by motor makes these journeys more exciting and interesting than a city sightseeing trip. You
see the real Europe. Take particular notice of Guild itineraries.
They show you just what days are spent in cities and on what days
you travel. Compare Guild itineraries with those of organizations
which describe their routes as follows: "July 2 and 3—Venice; July 4
and 5—Florence." Such descriptions are inaccurate because thpy
fail to tell you that one day must be spent traveling between cities.
In addition to the opportunity of extended sightseeing, motor coach
travel automatically restricts the size of each party to a maximum
of twenty-five.   Each coach used is handled independently.
Guild couriers are all carefully selected, as are the expert drivers who know the roads. With them you travel as safely as by train
and yet have the flexibility of travel that only automobiles can give.
All you need do is to pack and unpack—the Guild takes all further
care of luggage. It will be put in the car and delivered to your room
at the next hotel without a thought or worry on your part. This is a
regular service and, therefore, requires no tipping.
House Party hotels are! first class, assuring Guild travelers of the
finest quality of hotel services. This is a point to keep clearly in mind
when comparing House Parties.
Listed herewith are several of the European hotels—typical of those used by the
Guild for House Parties. Inasmuch as this
list was prepared in October, it is altogether possible that a few changes will be
necessary later. When European travel is
at its peak, accommodations at several hotels in certain cities may be required. Each
hotel in the following list was used by The
Travel Guild in 1931. In keeping with its
policy of using famous hotels these and
even finer hotels will be used in 1932.
Paris, Commodore and Royal Monceau;
Brussels, Palace; Hague, Victoria; Amsterdam, Carlton; Duisburg, Duisburgerhof;
Mannheim, Mannheimerhof; Montreux,
Suisse Majestic; Lucerne, Metropole-Mono-
pole; Munich, Bayerischerhof; Berlin, Central; Prague, Ambassador; Innsbruck, Ty-
rolerhof; Stresa, Regina Palace; Venice,
Bauer Grunwald; Florence, Savoy; Rome,
Regina Carlton; Naples, Grand; Nice,
Metropole; Oxford, Park End; London,
Victoria and Metropole. Page 7
House
Party
No. 2
In a hotel fronting
on the Grand Canal,
where you witness
unique activity by
day, and a colorful
pageant of dreamy
beauty by night —
that is what awaits
you in Venice.
42 Days
in Europe
W* O      |«ivfi       The Popular Route
OO MWCMJ& Seven Countries
I
T is difficult to tell in mere words the myriad
advantages offered the traveler who sees
Europe with a Guild House Party by motor.
In England you see rolling fields, whole
villages of thatched houses, such oddly named
roadside inns as "The Silent Woman," quiet
streams, gardens of flowers, old castles, the
Shakespeare country. Then the glorious
hybrid that is London . . . Buckingham Palace
. . . East India docks .. . Trafalgar Square . . .
Westminster Abbey . . . Tower of London . . .
Dicken's Old Curiosity Shop.
Belgium, though small, holds interest for
you out of all proportion to its size. Ostend,
Brussels, Antwerp, is a journey of never ending interest.
Fat windmills with long, sweeping arms
. . . tiny houses set in beds of tulips . . . silvery canals between green banks, quaint
bridges . . . wooden shoes clattering over cobble stone streets . . . old-blue china . . . much-
patched pants and patched magenta sails . . .
bicycle traffic jams . . . that is Holland. You
see, Rotterdam, The Hague and Amsterdam.
A trip up the Rhine is a memorable event
even in the most exciting of lives. Your motor
road from Cologne to Coblenz and Mainz
trates the blue route of the Rhine between its
terraced, canyon-like banks. You sit in your
motor as in a comfortable theater watching a
moving picture of magnificent scenes.   Then
Heidelberg, Mannheim, and the Black Forest.
It is a wonderful sensation to arrive at some
spot which you think is the most beautiful on
earth, only the next day to find one still more
beautiful! That is Switzerland as you motor
from flowered valleys to icy summits.
Italy . . . the "land of all men's past!"
Stresa; Milan; Venice "throned on her hundred isles." Spellbound, you slip down the
"Canale Grande." By day . . . rainbow hues;
by night . . . gleaming lights, movement and
loveliness caught in the translucence of the
Canals. Venice holds a thing unique and of
astounding beauty—a gondola in motion. Then
to Florence and through the Hill Towns to
Rome, beauty, but beauty of another sort. In
the City of the Seven Hills was cradled the
civilization of the Western World. Here the
sense of what antiquity connotes first steals
over us. After Naples with its many charms,
northward again to Pisa, Genoa, the Italian
and French Rivieras.
The entry to France is a glorious excursion
over the Grand Corniche. On the blue Mediterranean's shores bask Mentone, Monte Carlo
and Nice. The Route des Alpes, new thrills
to the Guild motorist. Up cool heights, the
air as stimulating as wine; swoop around great
curves; views of sun-painted valleys; narrow
passes. Digne, and Grenoble, each setting perfect. Autun and Paris!   City of dreams!
England
Belgium
Holland
Germany
Switzerland
Italy
Riviera
France
$721
See Page 10 for Other Rates
1
- * Z*4yWr0^* p/'Ih
W't'zMmf'    W
??**•>'.*-&#K i ( it
fi-Ttt ISP    'ffl
I
L The Uffizi Art Gallery   in    Florence
The Nelson Monument;
St.    Peter's    in    Rome
 1
Page 8
55 to
05 Days
House Party No. 2—Glamorous Days
Only by motor can the most fascinating regions be thoroughly
seen. On this itinerary you come
in in lima te contact, with Rural
England, the Shakespeare Country, Rural Holland and Belgium,
mil"111
This, th* Most Popular
Route Through Europe, with
All-By-Motor Service and
Fine Hotels, Has Never
Before Been Offered at so
Low a Cost. Her* Is the Da y
by Day Story.
Brussels Sightseeing
Brussels is one of the brightest
of Europe's capitals. Its beautiful parks and wide boulevards
will delight us on our sightseeing drive through the city Many
will be the spots we enjoy, but
those we remember best dre the
Guild Halls, the Town Hall, the
Palace of Justice, the Cathedral
of Ste Gudule and Prison of St
Gilles The skill of the lace-
maleers will thrill us
■&%&&&
23rd
Day
The Simplon to Stresa
Motoring past the vineyards
and fine forests of the Rhone
Valley and through villages of
magic charm, we come to the
Simplon Pass and lunch on its
top We catch glorious views
ot the Rhone Valley The Gan-
ter-Tal and the Wasenhorn.
Then on into Italy we descend
and say Farewell to the Alps
Then Stresa—one. of the loveliest spots on the Italian Lakes
Pompeii and Amalfi
The Ruins of Pompeii! We
make a special excursion from
Naples to see thero. Buried beneath the destruction of Vesuvius, one-half this ancient city
has been uncovered and here
again preserved ruins make his-*
tory real. Then to Sorrento and
along the Amalfi Drive loathe
region called the "Sun-trap" of
Italy. We note the marvelous
blue of the Mediterranean.
Sightseeing in Paris
With our lecturer-guide we
motor over the -boulevards—
Paris becomes ours. A few of the
spots we see are Notre Dame,
the Louvre, the Pantheon, Palais
du Luxembourg, Madeleine,
Cluny, Napoleon's Tomb, Garden of Tuileries, Champs Ely-
sees, the Latin Quarter, Mont-
martre Hill- We are carried
away with the personality of
this marvelous city.
Up the Gangplank
What a thrill to march aboard
our beautiful city-like ship at
Montreal orQuebec The gangplank is drawn ashore happy
throngs throw colored streamers
and confetti- The silhouette of
quaint old Quebec fades into
the horizon and the colorful village-bedecked shores of the
lovely St. Lawrence River glide,
past. Our romantic adventures,
have begun auspiciously!
14th
Da
ay
Brussels to Amsterdam
We motor today and make the
acquaintance of two more famous Belgium cities, Malines and
Antwerp Then the port city of
Rotterdam becomes our first center of interest m Holland By
way of Delft we continue to The
Hague for a drive about the
city Then on to Amsterdam by
way of Leiden and Haarlem
Our journey through Belgium.
and Holland is delightful
Milan and Venice
A short motor journey today
brings us to Milan where we
lunch and visit the famous Cathedral In Milan see Raphael's
"Sposalizio" and Leonardi da
Vinci s celebrated fresco. Last
Supper " Then through Brezica
and Verona we continue on our
way to Venice At Mestro we
transfer to motor launches which
carry us to the "Gem of the Adriatic," and the doors of our hotel
The Isle of Capri
We drive to the Capri pier
then sail by steamer to the beautiful Isle of Capri to visit, with
the permission of the weather,
the Blue Grotto We stoop low
as the boat soes through the entrance Our reward is the fantastic lights like streaks of blue
flame that play upon the cavernous walls. We return to Naples
for another evening of adventures    A gypsy-like city'
Beautiful Versailles
Today's motor excursion takes
us to Versailles, important in the
history of the past and present
We visit the palaces, the gardens,
the stables, and the Trianons.
We also drive to Malmaison,
where Josephine lived after
leaving Napoleon At Versailles the Hall of Mirro.rs, in
which such significant treaties
have been signed, we are filled
with awe
Nature's Ocean Highway
Down the ever-broadening
river through the soft Canadian
summer Past towering cliffs,
against which snuggle toy-like
fishing villages In the background the mountains. The first
third of the way to Europe by
river makes even our ocean
crossing a real sightseeing tour.
This is also the shortest route to
Europe We trz experienced
sailors when we reach the sea-
Amsterdam—The Ruhr
Amsterdam s many interesting
attractions and its splendid art
gallery, where we see the works
of famous Dutch Masters, make a
fascinating morning program
Then we cross the plains or Holland . . . their charm is indescribable- Motoring we meet
the people intimately. Then into
Germany and a night in Duisburg,
the shipping center for the famous Ruhr region
Venice by Gondola
Our sightseeing trip is made
by gondola and on foot in this
marvelous "City in the Sea." We
cruise from palace to cathedral
with our special lecturer. We
visitSt Mark's, the Ducal Palace,
and cross the Bridge of Sighs to
visit the dungeons. In the evening, dancing, lights and dreamy
music, and perhaps a visit to the
Lido We expect much of Venice, but it surpasses
Return to Rome
Regretfully we leave Naples to
return to Rome, motoring along
roads through vine-clad countrysides and olive groves. The life
of the people fascinates , . *
their singing, their natural grace,
their courtesy win us. We cannot resist the tempting delicacies
that they offer for sale.' Then the
early arrival in Rome makes this
day another day of delightful
independent adventures.
We Explore Paris
Pans to ourselves! We hardly
know what to do first. Visit
the galleries or museums,- stroll
through the parks or along the'
boulevards; window shop; buy
souvenirs. At night certainly the
opera, the theatres, Montmartre
or Montparnasse. No matter
what our tastes or our interests,
Paris will keep every moment of
our day filled. It is the world's
storehouse of treasures
4th
6th
Good Fun, Good Food
Games and sports in the open
air. Bridge and lazy chats in
snug deck chairs And to satisfy
that glorious hunger that only
the sea air can stimulate . three
delicious Canadian Pacific meals
daily besides bouillon in the
morning, tea in the afternoon
and sandwiches at night Dancing to the music of America's
best College dance orchestras
. . . strolls under the stars
iAJ
, -S.
16th \r
Day «
Cologne and Coblenz
Through  the  old   fashioned
city of Dusseldorf, with its wonderful foliage, we drive to Cologne for lunch and for a visit to
the "Dom, ' loveliest Gothic
cathedral in all Germany Then
begins our romantic journey
along the shores of the storied
Rhine to Bonn and Coblenz,
which we enter over the bridgehead occupied by American
troops at the close of the war
26th EdfcP
Day mmm
Across the Apennines
We leave Venice early in the
morning to visit the brilliant
towns of Padua, Ferrara and Bologna on our way to Florence.
Each town catches us more
deeply in the spell of this land
of history, art and beauty. Then
Florence, which once was the
capital of Italy now the world's
storehouse or art treasures. We
stroll along the Amo in the
evening.
Pisa's Leaning Tower
We follow the famous coasi
road, still called the "Via Aure-
lia," and delight in ihe mild sea
breezes which tempt us to Join
the crowds of young Fascists
sporting in the warm blue waters. Through Orbetello, Gros-
seto and Livorno our route goes.
To the left we can see the Elbe
and Corsica, made famous by
Napoleon. At Pisa we visit the
Leaning Tower, and  Baptistry.
46th
Shopping Adventures
For some the shops grow more
and more intriguing: Rue de la
Paix . . . Avenue de I'Opera . .
the great department stores . . .
wonderful specialty shops!
Others perfect their newly acquired skill at bargaining with
visits to some of the shops along
the Rue Rivoli Still others wifl
shop for etchings, for old books,
and everywhere are to be found
splendid souvenirs.
Then Foreign Shores "i
Tour days of open sea... then
the thrill of the first glimpse of
land ... the French coast of
Brittany for those who sail on an
Empress ... the Donegal Highlands of Ireland for those who
sail on a Duchess . both beautiful. Those who sail on the
swift Empress of Britain see land'
two days earlier. 'And what a
night.. that last glorious night
on shipboard)
17th
Day
Heidelberg and Mannheim
Our drive today takes us past
the. most intriguing of the Rhine
castles to'Mayence for lunch.
Then we drive to Heidelberg,
city of song and story, with its interesting traditions of German
student life We visit the University and the romantic castle,
and from its commanding elevation gain an extensive view of!
the beautiful Neckar valley-
Then on to Mannheim.
27th jg%^^
Day ^^-^O^
A Day in Florence
Today we visit the Uffizi and
Pitti Galleries. We see the
"Wrestlers" and Michelangelo s famous David" and many
more of the great masterpieces.
After viewing the Campanile,
the Cathedral and other place:
of major interest, we motor to a
high hill, where we gain a wonderful panoramic view of the
city. We are loathe to leave but
carry away many souvenirs.
Memories of Columbus
Bright sandy lowlands, olive-
clad hills, Foamy sea waves, perfumed breezes and deep blue
skies all blend to make beautiful
the Italian Riviera through which
we tour on our way to modem,
bustling Genoa, once the home
of Columbus. Our day's journey is broken by a luncheon stop
at La Spezia, one of the important Italian military posts. We
pass many interesting cities.
Visiting Rural France
Some there are who will take
a day or two or three to visit
some of the famous regions
around Paris . . the Battlefields
... the Chateau Country . .
Normandy . . Brittany ... each
with distinct charms and different appeals. See page 22. Soma
will attend the races. There is
only one fault with Paris—one
never has time enough to do all
one would like to-do- Page 9
by Motor Over the Popular Route
the German Rhine, the Black
Forest, the Alps, the Italian Lake
Country, the Hill Towns of Italy,
the environs of Naples, the
French and Italian Rivieras,
Routes des Alpes, Rural France.
'695 to
769
We Land in England
Today, the pleasurable excitement of watching on deck while
the great liner is docked by energetic tugs,- if a Duchess at
Liverpool ... an Empress at
Southampton Down the gangplank; board our waiting motors
For a drive through the unsurpassed beauty of rural England
To historic, spired Oxford,
we go Our first wonderful
evening on .foreign shores!
The Black Forest
We leave Mannheim, espe
dally famed for its magnificent rose
garden, for a glorious journey
through Bruchsal and Ettlingen,
where we leave the main highway for our drive through the
heart of the Black Forest, land of
lore and curious costumes- Evening brings us to the "capital of
the Black Forest," Freiburg. We
love this attractive, picturesque
city—famed for Its gardens.
Hill Towns to Perugia
By motor we come to the sequestered Italian HillTowns,not
accessible by rail and therefore
lost to most of the world We
pass a night within hoary walled
Perugia, hidden on a vine-clad
hill. During the day we make
frequent stops to visit points of
interest. From Perugia we gain
wonderful views of the Umbrian
region. Only by motor can we
see the Hill Towns.
The Grand Corniche
Today we enjoy another memorable drive along the famous
Corniche, past orange and lemon
groves, over the border into
France. Then along the Riviera,
to Mentone, and the Grand
Corniche Drive high over the
Mediterranean We stop at
Monte Carlo in the Principality
of Monaco, the celebrated
gambling resort, after which we
continue to fashionable Nice.
Paris Night Life
This day perhaps we sleep
late—well, if you must know.
we didn't get in until 5 a. m,!
Oh hum! ! I The artists of the
Montparriasse,- then at Zelli's, or
was it Pi gall's:. . oh well .. .
that is our own affair. And, oh,
so many places, and finally onion
soup at the Halles But this Is
our last day We mustn't forget
to pack up our purchases and
newly acquired treasures.
In Shakespeare Land
We acquire the lore of Strat
ford-on-A von, Ken i I worth,
Warwick, and Shottery. We
visit Shakespeare's house .... sit
in his chair; the Stratford Church
where" the bard is buried; War
wick Castle; the thatched cot-
tage of Anne Hathaway Then
through Burnham Beeches and
Eton, past Windsor and its huge
castle into that magnificent city,
London.  Perfect days, these!
The Rhine Falls
Our journey through the
Black Forest continues up to
Schaffhausen and Switzerland,
by way of Neustadt and Donan-
eschigen No.picture can portray the beauty of the Rhine
Falls which we visit. Three tremendous leaps churn the water
to an incredible whiteness.
Then by way of Zurich, through
a region of mountains and lakes,
we come to Lucerne.
Orvleto and Kome
We continue our motoring
through the Hill Towns and the
land of Browning's "The Ring
and the Book." Our journey.
includes Assisi, where we see
two churches, one on top the
other, through Orvieto, set on
the cone of an extinct volcano,
and along Lake Bolsena through
the fascinating towns of Monte-
fiascone, Niterbo, Ronciglione
and Monterosi.  Then Rome!
At Leisure in Nice
We stop right in the center of
the famous French Riviera to
spend a day in cosmopolitan
Nice. No lack of adventures.
Some will give way to the temptation of a dip in the sea waters
and a day of leisure to lie on the
sun-bathed beaches of this famous resort. Out of Nice, too,
are many charming excursions.
Others of us will enjoy another
visit to Monte Carlo.
Cherbourg and Sail
How we hate to take the*
boat tram for Cherbourg! But
what a charming six-hour ride
through beautiful Normandy.
Then the busy port, the transfer
to a tender, and up the gangplank and on board ship We
pack away the treasures we have
accumulated and prepare for
another happy week on shipboard. And again we find life
a round of endless fun.
Sightseeing In London
These are a few of the places
we see or visit during our day of
sightseeing in London—Piccadilly Circus, the Strand, Trafalgar Square, Buckingham Palace,
Westminster Abbey, the Houses
of Parliament,*^! Paul's, the
Tower of London We learn
our way, about this day We
note the places we wish to revisit on the morrow We like
this wonderful  metropolis
20th |
Day
!**i*#
In Lovely Lucerne
Cosmopolitan Lucerne is always thronged with travelers
from the world over—it is the
real gateway to the splendor of
the Alps. We adore this day of
wandering, through old covered
bridge, mentioned in Longfellow s Golden Legend" •.. we
see, too, the Lton of Lucerne,
hewn out of rock. We relax in
the calm beauty of the Lake of
the Four Cantons.
30th
Rome—History's Drama
With special lecturer today,
we set out to see the glories of
Rome—past and present We
visit the ancient ruins, the Forum,
the Arch of Titus, the Colosseum, the Pantheon—stage for
so much of the world s history
Here history is not a dull subject, but a fascinating drama,
made real by the spots we visit
and the fascinating narrative of
our excellent lecturer.
40th
The Route des Alpes
Constantly changing and thrilling experiences make this a day
of rare adventure as we motor
over that most thrilling of highways, the Route des Alpes.
Through Grasse with its famed
perfumeries, the Gorges of the
Mescla, Digne to Grenoble We
are fascinated by the beauty of
the Alps, which encompass this
world famous educational center
and beauty spot
50th
54th
Gay Days at Sea
How easily we drop into the
happy routine of shipboard life.
Concerts, sports, bridge games,
afternoon teas, again those
peppy Collegians with their
irresistible music. The infectious
chat of the returning travelers.
We spend long hours on deck
recalling the pleasures of our
trip. The days pass with the
incredible swiftness that characterizes days of enjoyment.
London's Secrets
Everyone to one s own taSte
during our second day in London. We are free to poke about,
explore and leisurely satisfy our
own hobbies. Some of us shop
along Regent; Bond and Oxford
Streets; others spend a satisfying
day in the British Museum or the
galleries; still others will enjoy
the rare loveliness of Hampton
Court or Kew Gardens. We
take part in the night life.
21st ^jjjggfr
The Bernese Oberland
We motor past Mount Pilatus,
then soar over the Brunfg Pass to
Interlaken where we have luncheon. Afternoon excursion to
-Lauterbrunnen to visit the Trum-
melbdch Falls; we motor to Spiez.
then upward through Simmenthal
and Zweisimmen to cross the
pass. We descend through the
wi Id beauty of the Sarine Valley
and glide down to Lake Geneva
and Montreux.
More of Rome's Delights
Another day is needed to
complete our study of the story
of Rome We find ourselves enthralled with St. Peter's, the
Vatican Museum' and the splendor of the Palace, the Latern,
the museums The modern Rome
and its social and political experiments interest us too—the
history of tomorrow- The shops
of Rome and its amusement places
call to us in the evenings.
Motor Through Burgundy
Our route of grandeur and
daring gives way to the vineyards of Burgundy as we follow
along the Isere Valley Exceptionally fine roads enable us to
enjoy all the beauty of the land
The charming towns and village
of Voiron, les Abrets, Bourg-
en-Bresse, where we stop for
lunch. Montrevel and Cuisery
keep our day filled with varied
interests.
55th
56th
The St Lawrence
Again two beautiful, tranquil
days on the beautiful St. Lawrence How full of energy and
enthusiasm we are That extra
hour of sleep we had each night
on our return voyage was just
what we needed. It is fun to be
able to stay up late and then
have the clocks set back each
night, A perfect arrangement
that makes up for our eastbound
trip.   Isn't life wonderful?
Cross to Belgium
To Dover we go by a swift
English train and board the channel steamer, which lands us in
Belgium at Ostend- What a
wonderful view we get of this
gay playground' Then we journey across our first country in
which everyone speaks a foreign language •• . . French or
Flemish we go through Bruges
and Ghent to Brussels, the light-
hearted capital of Belgium.
22ndS£5f
Day
Montreux and Chillon
After the thrills and excitement of our Grand Alpine tour
we spend a leisurely day .in
Montreux on the shores of crescent-shaped Lake Geneva. We
visit the Castle of Chillon of
Byronic renown. The structure
seems so small from the outside
and so large when once we are
inside. The glorious charm of
beautiful Montreux casts a magic
spell that is lasting.
Southward to Naples
What a drive this is from Rome
to Naples' We motor along the
Alban and Sabine Mountains
Pass ancient city walls built of
polygonal stones, through Fro-
sinone, Ceprano, Roccasecca,
we reach Naples in the afternoon in time for a sightseeing
drive around the city. In the
background we see frowning
Vesuvius. The charm of this
place will linger
PARIS at Lastl
Now to Paris! Excited as we
are we cannot fail to enjoy the
beauty of the French countryside
or to take interest in the fascinating wayside towns as we pass
through Searlien, Ayallon, Aux-
erre, Sens and ancient Moret
After a drive through the Forest
of Fontamebleau, we pause to
enjoy the charm of the great
castle, which was the favorite
residence of Napoleon
57th
Day
Our Party Ends
Before we realize that we
could possibly, have had time to
cross the ocean, we are again
packing Then at Quebec or
Montreal we disembark. We've
been to Europe! Our trip :s
over, but we shall never forget
it. What memories are ours.
Already we are planning our
next trip to Europe, but first we
must go home and tell them all
about the fun we've had
Ancient   'Bologna
Has  Quaint Streets
Eiffel Tower . . .
Street in Farrara The Charming:, Comprehensive Route Followed
by No. 2 House Party Is Shown on This Map
The Old Bridges of Lucerne Are Most Fascinating:
You Are Fascinated by Their Curious Decorations
You'll Spend a Day on Famous Beach at Nice and
the Busy Canals of Amsterdam WiH Intrigue You
Page 10
House Party No. 2—Time Table
2B   2C  2D  2E   2F  2G  ...House Party Number...   2H  2J   2K   2L 2M 2N
$728 $769 $743 $708 $722 $71 8  ... Price   of   House   Party ...   $71 2 $708 $721 $695 $726 $730
60    65    63    55    60    57   ..Total  Number of Days..   58    56    58    56    59    58
47     49     50     43     47     45     . Number of Days OI1  Land .    45     43     42     43     43     43
o o~o
•> •* o
-g-y -5J -fjj  ««
so =».¥    a?    B
Q>. den   Q<   iu<
E     • c t» «
a*s o e
£ 3     E= E S
'CD LULL.
THE POPULAR ROUTE
For detailed  route and  day-by-day
description see pages 7, 8 and 9.
# a
UJCQ
Oca
V We
5 O     3«
S"0
Qffl
May May June June June June
SO     27       3     11     16     S3
28 June 4 11
29 5      12
30
31
June 1
S
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
SO
21
SS
S3
18
19
SO
S1
SS
S3
21     30
SS   July 1
23        2
to
S9
30
24 July 1
25 S
26
27
28
29
30
24 July 1
25 S
26
S7
28
S9
30
24 July 1
25 S
26
S7
28
29
30
24 July 1
25 2
26
27
28
29
30
July 1
S
3
4
5
6
to
12
13
25 Aug. 1
26 S
S7
28
S9
30
31
25 Aug. 1
26 2
27
28
29
30
July July Aug. Aug. Aug. Aug.
18     30      4        4     14     18
Sail—Quebec   (Empresses)   or July July
Montreal (other ships) .   ... 2     S
Land—Motor to Oxford .... 7
Shakespeare Country  8
London—sightseeing  9
In London  to
In London  13
To Brussels via Ostend     .... 14
Brussels—sightseeing  15
Via Hague to Amsterdan     ... 16
Motor to Duisburg  17
Via Cologne to Coblenz    ... 18
To Heidelberg and Mannheim    . 19    S6
To Freiburg in Black Forest ... SO    27
To Lucerne via Rhine Falls   ... 21     28
Lucerne—sightseeing  SS    S9
To Montreux via Interlaken ... 23    30
In Montreux visit Chillon     ... 24    31
To Stresa via Simplon Pass    .   .   . 25 Aug. 1
To Venice via Milan  26      2
Venice—sightseeing  S7      3
To Florence via Bologna  .... 28      4
Florence—sightseeing  29      5
Hill Towns to Perugia  30      6
Hill Towns to Rome  31      7
Rome—sightseeing Aug. 1   8
Rome—sightseeing  2
To Naples—sightseeing    .... 3
Visit Pompeii and Amalfi .... 4
Excursion to Capri  5
Return to Rome  6
To Pisa—sightseeing       7
To Genoa—Italian Riviera   ... 8
French Riviera to Nice  9
Nice—sightseeing  10
Route des Alpes  11
From Grenoble to Autun     ... 12
Motor to Paris  13
Paris—sightseeing  14
Versailles and Malmaison    .   .
In Paris    .
In Paris	
In Paris	
In Paris ....'..   7.
Rail to Cherbourg—Sail   .   .   .
Land Quebec (Empresses) or
Montreal (other ships) .   .   .
July
16
24
25
July
22
30 Aug. 613
July
29
Aug.
5
16
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Aug.
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Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept.
1      11      15     25
9
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Oct.
1
: o E.5   c.r
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UJCQ
'House Party No. 2-C will sail from
.Liverpool on July 22. Leaves Paris
on July 21  For England. Page 11
House
Party
No. 1
Through Bavaria,
Bohemia, Austria
and the Land of the
Magyars We See a
Rural Life That Is
Fascinating in Its
Differences from Our
Own Rural Regions.
59 Days
in Europe
72 Days
The
M<
LOTOR through six thousand miles of the
finest scenic regions, the most historic sections,
the countries whose rural life is most remarkable . . . this you do on House Party No. 1.
Inspiring views of the mountains will mark
your journey through Switzerland, through
Bavaria, through the Tyrol, through the Dolomites and over the Route des Alpes ... all
memorable, never to be forgotten trips! You
will see the Hill Towns of Italy . . . the Italian
Lakes ... as only the motor traveler can!
Along the Rhine you'll motor past castles,
towns, cities, vineyards, you enjoy close-up,
intimate views. Through mediaeval Germany,
Nuremberg . . . the Black Forest . . . the
French and Italian Rivieras! The Rhine Falls
. . . the Trummelbach Falls.
The introduction by the Guild of popular-
priced House Party motor trips through
Europe has opened up to Americans a new
Europe—one hitherto known only to the few
who could travel in costly private automobiles.
It is now possible through this inauguration
of travel by comfortable motor coaches, each
carrying a party of not more than 25 people,
to see the real Old World at a price no higher
than  was  formerly  charged  for  rail  tours.
Each day's journey is a really delightful
sightseeing trip. Motoring from city to city
you wind through the narrow cobbled streets
of ancient villages—villages that have never
Great Circle Route
Nine Countries
heard the screech of speeding trains. You see
the peasants at work in the fields wearing their
native costumes—barefooted girls and stooped
grandmothers harvesting the crops just as they
did centuries ago. You enter the great capitals
by their most beautiful boulevards. You visit
fascinating districts hitherto lost to most travelers. Regions that have remained unchanged
through the centuries. Your route takes you by
way of the interesting in-between spots.
The ancient Italian Hill Towns hidden with
their rare art and achitectural treasures atop
vine clad hills. The rich green depths of the
Black Forest with its wealth of folk-lore and
strange traditions. Across the dizzy heights of
the spectacular passes rather than through the
mountains in darkened tunnels. The ancient
trail of Hannibal's elephants over the Route
des Alpes.    Such thrills await you!
There is no more comprehensive and inclusive program of Europe than is offered by
House Party No. 1. For materially less than
a thousand dollars and during a two months'
vacation period you see Europe and learn to
know it as only the most seasoned traveler has.
Each day's journey is carefully planned. Days
of leisure are frequently interspersed so that
there will be no monotony in the program.
House Party No. 1 is the pride of The
Travel Guild. It offers luxurious hotels, the
finest service—all at a nominal price.
England
Belgium
Holland
Germany
Switzerland
Czechoslovakia
Austria
Italy
Riviera
France
$864
See Page 14 for Other Rates
{
i|-IIl-a>-~ij ||
I IS   tH\   nnn IH!f»ar.-^"    <    ! .V -_v Page 12
House Party No. 1—Great Circle Route
House Party No. 1 Motors oyer
the   Thrilling   Route   des  Alpes
1ST TO 7TH DAYS—AT SEA
8TH  DAY—LAND—MOTOR TO  OXFORD
The wonderful charm of rural England makes this
a day of sheer delight. We roam the historic streets
of Oxford in the evening.
9TH   DAY—SHAKESPEARE  LAND—TO  LONDON
Motoring through the region made famous by the
great bard is an experience that none can fail to
enjoy. Stratford-on-Avon is a shrine of world-wide
interest, Shottery, Warwick and Kenilworth, each delightful, each different. Then past Eton and Windsor
to the London we've so long wanted to see.
10TH TO 12TH DAYS—IN LONDON
A comprehensive sightseeing program visits all the
places we want most to see. We see palaces, the
museums, the great churches, the famous drives, the
parks, the parliament buildings, the Thames and its
great bridges. Then we have two days for individual
sightseeing or shopping along Regent, Bond, Oxford
Streets. London theatres offer glorious attractions.
13TH  DAY—TO   OSTEND AND  BRUSSELS
We leave London for Dover—our journey to the
port is made on a swift and fascinating train that
whisks us through the beautiful countrysides. A
short journey by steamer is followed by a wonderful
view of the Belgian coast. From Ostend we continue through Bruges and Ghent to Brussels.
, 14TH DAY—A DAY IN BRUSSELS
A morning motor tour shows us the attractions of
this charming city. The medieval square, characteristic of the Old World, is found here in its most,
glorified form—the "Grand Place." On one side is
the Hotel de Ville, architecturally the most magnificent structure in Brussels. Across the market place
is the Maison du Roi, dating from 1514. Surrounding the rest of the square are the ancient Guild
Halls, the homes of medieval master craftsmen. We
see too the Church of Ste. Gudule; Palais du Roi;
Church of Notre Dame du Sablon; Palais de Justice.
15TH DAY—TO THE HAGUE AND AMSTERDAM
Out of Brussels we take the new road through
several industrial centers, to Malines, the best known
lace center of Belgium. Soon we cross the Dutch
border and at Zundert see the first windmill. On
reaching Dordrecht we are in the real canal district.
In the seaport of Rotterdam, a busy and modern city,
we first notice the seeming millions of bicycles that
one finds all over Holland. Soon we reach the Hague,
with its wonderful broad streets, parks, gardens,
ponds and flowers, looking more like a millionaire's
estate than an ordinary city. Entering Amsterdam
we drive past new modernistic apartment houses.
16TH DAY—AMSTERDAM—DUISBURG
Amsterdam on the Zuider Zee is connected with
the North Sea by the Noord Zee Kanaal. Canals and
streets are equal in number and vie with each other
as traffic lanes. Our morning tour rewards us with
magnificent treats. The Rijks Museum proves delightful. After lunch we follow the River Amstel,
passing Naarden, a picturesque, fortified city, motor
through the Japanese Woods, where we pass the road
that leads to Doom (four miles away), residence of
the former Kaiser of Germany. We follow the Rhine
through the industrial Ruhr district to Duisburg.
17TH DAY—COLOGNE AND  COBLENZ
Leaving Duisburg we continue through the mining
district to Dusseldorf and at Benrath we view an 18th
century stronghold. Soon we enter Cologne for
lunch and a visit to the famous cathedral. Our afternoon trip to Coblenz is most interesting, as we follow
the Rhine out of Bonn, we see on our left the little
village of Hochkreuz, and at Oberwinter we obtain
the best panoramic view of the Rhine Valley.
18TH DAY—MORE CASTLES AND HEIDELBERG
Today we see the most interesting of the celebrated
castles of the Rhine—the castles of Stolzenfels and
Marksburg; the Convent of Bornhofen, a well-known
pilgrimage center; ruins of the twin castles of Ster-
renberg and Liebenstein; the medieval castle of
the Ma us; and the imposing ruins of the Rheinfels
Castle. At St. Goar we see on the right bank the
ruins of the Neu-Katzenelnbogen Castle and further
on the famous Lorelei Rock. At Nieder-Heimbach,
we see the Castle of Hoheneck with its tower, then
the medieval castle of Sooneck, the Castle of Fakken-
burg, the Rheinstein Castle, and. the Mausethrum.
After lunch we visit Heidelberg. Then to Mannheim.
19TH DAY—BLACK FOREST TO FREIBURG
From Mannheim we follow a picturesque and hilly
road bordered with apple orchards. Bruchsal we
enter through a magnificent Renaissance gate. Soon
we leave the main road for the Black Forest. At
Freudenstadt, the wonderful capital of the Black
Forest, we enjoy a magnificent view from the hotel
where we stop for lunch. Then we drive to Freiburg.
20TH  DAY—RHINE   FALLS  TO  LUCERNE
This day will take us into the magnificence of
Switzerland. Our day is one of increasing mountain
beauty;  at Schaffhausen we visit the Rhine Falls.
21ST DAY—TO INTERLAKEN AND MONTREUX
We climb into the perpendicular heights of the
Bernese Oberland, passing over magnificent gorges
and along thrilling ledges we witness glorious panoramas. From Interlaken we motor to Lauterbrunnen
and the Trummelbach Falls. Then as we climb again
to the Oberland heights we enjoy wonderful views
of the whole range of the Alpine peaks. We descend
to Montreux on the shores of Lake Geneva.
22ND DAY—TO  BERNE AND  LUCERNE
Almost every adjective designating beauty has been
applied to Montreux and its setting—yet they all lack
that something which leaves one satisfied. After a
visit to the famed Castle of Chillon, we return to
Lucerne over another Alpine Route which takes us
through Berne, the capital of Switzerland.
23RD DAY—BEAUTIFUL LAKE CONSTANCE
Today we leave the Swiss Alps for the Bavarian
Alps—every mile of the route deserving of the thoroughness that only motor travel can give. Past Ziig
and Zurich, through lovely landscapes, to Lindau.
24TH DAY—THE BAVARIAN ALPS TO MUNICH
Today toward Munich . . . rolling hills, snow clad
peaks, shepherds with their flocks. Quaint Bavarian
costumes . . . green hats with a feather, bare knees,
broad belts . . . Oberammergau . . . more regions of
breath-taking beauty.
25TH DAY—WE SEE MUNICH
With our lecturer we explore this handsome German city, visit its art galleries, cathedrals, gardens.
26TH DAY—IN ANCIENT NUREMBERG
Through Ingolstadt and colorful rural Germany to
Nuremberg for a sightseeing drive in this beautiful
city which has preserved its ancient architecture . . .
the city walls with seventy guarding towers, the old
castle and the Rathaus . . . everywhere the charm
of the Middle Ages.
27TH DAY—LEIPZIG, HOME OF FAIRS
Bayreuth, home of Richard Wagner, and famed for
its musical festivals . . . lunch in Plauen . . . con-
,, tinue through picturesque countryside to Leipzig.
28TH DAY—POTSDAM AND BERLIN
First a morning tour of Leipzig with a guide, then
motor to Potsdam, where we visit the palaces and
gardens of former Emperors.  Then Berlin!
29TH AND 30TH DAYS—IN BERLIN
We tour Berlin, the most modern of the great cities
of Europe.   With our lecturer we motor up Unter
den Linden, see the Schloss, the Neues and Kaiser
Friedrich Museums, the galleries, monuments, and
visit Charlottenburg.   Follows a day of leisurely exploration ... a chance to satisfy personal whims.
Berlin night life offers much that is novel.
31ST DAY—SEEING DRESDEN
A  short  morning   drive  through   Herzberg   and
Grossenhain brings us to Dresden, capital of Saxony,
art center of Germany.    After lunch we enjoy a
fascinating tour in which we see Raphael's "Sistine
Madonna" and the jewels in the Green Vault. Page 13
—A Perfectly Planned Itinerary—
Rates on
Page 14
32ND DAY—THROUGH "SAXON  SWITZERLAND"
This is one of the most beautiful days of our summer. We motor through "Saxon Switzerland," past
Pilloritz, one-time summer palace, and through the
gorge of Lieblater Grand to Prague.
33RD DAY—IN  FASCINATING  OLD PRAGUE
In Prague, capital of Czecho-SIovakia, we see the
famed Cathedral, the old Karlsbrucke, the Monument
of Francis II, the Abbey of Strahow, the Bohemian
Museum and beautiful panoramas of the whole city.
34TH DAY—INTO AUSTRIA
We motor through charming Bohemia, seeing intimately the rural life and pleasant villages.
35TH DAY—VIENNA—CITY OF SONG
Few cities have the fascination of gay Vienna. We
circle Ring Strasse, lined with beautiful buildings,
and visit the city's delightful environs.
36TH DAY—CASTLE GUARDED SALZBURG
As we leave Vienna over smooth highways through
St. Polten, Melk, Linz, we enter increasingly rugged
country until we reach the Tyrolean Alps and Salzburg.   Its castle presents a striking picture.
37TH DAY—MOTOR  ON  TO  INNSBRUCK
Our route from Salzburg is through the heart of
the Tyrol . . . one awe-inspiring scene follows another . . . towns of delightful quaintness . . . towering castles.   Then Innsbruck, guarded by bold peaks.
38TH DAY—THROUGH THE DOLOMITES
We enter today the heart of the Dolomites with
their strange beauty and unique colorings . . . the
effect is gorgeous and continue to Cortina, queen of
the Dolomites, at the foot of Monte Tofano.
39TH DAY—TO VENICE—CITY OF THE SEA
Another day of rare scenery is ours as we continue our journey through the Dolomites to Pieve di
Cadore and Belluno. At Mestre we board launches
which carry us to Venice.
40TH DAY—WE SEE VENICE BY GONDOLA
Of Venice much is expected, and more is received.
This city has a charm, a history and a personality
nowhere duplicated. Our sightseeing journey is made
by gondola and by foot. We visit St. Mark's, the
Ducal Palace, cross the Bridge of Sighs. In the evening . . . but who can describe a Venetian night?
41ST DAY—FERRARA, BOLOGNA AND FLORENCE
We leave Venice by launch and then board our
motor coaches for Florence. En route we see Ferrara,
once one of the most aristocratic cities of Italy; and
Bologna, in the Apennine foothills, where we stop for
lunch. Florence, the chief city of Tuscany, has a
population of 255,000 inhabitants.
42ND DAY—A CITY OF MASTERPIECES
In Florence, the art capital of the world, we visit
the Pitti and Uffizi galleries to see the masterpieces
of   Raphael,   Michelangelo,   Giotto,   Del   Sarto   and
others.   Then an evening of shopping and concerts.
43RD DAY—HILL TOWNS TO PERUGIA
The road from Florence is through hills and vineyards. We lunch in Siena, which has preserved its
medieval aspect. During the afternoon pass Buono-
venuto; Monastery of Monte Aliveto Maggiore, an old
Benedictine Convent founded in 1320; Castiglione
aul Lago and then follow the shores of Lake Trasi-
meno. Then a long climb brings us to Perugia.
44TH DAY—HILL TOWNS TO ROME
Leaving Perugia, we pass by Volumnii's Tomb,
an old Etruscan Necropolis; cross the River Tiber
and continue to Assisi, made famous by St. Francis.
At Orvieto, wonderfully situated and with treasures of
medieval and Etruscan arts, we lunch. Then we continue through hilly countrysides and regions of volcanic nature; follow along Lake Bolsena; see Monte-
fiascone; Viterbo and Sutri. Then that first glimpse
of the Dome of St. Peter's and Rome.
45TH AND 46TH DAYS—IN ROME
With a special lecturer we deyote two days to seeing
the glories of  Rome—past  and present  .  .  .  the
the
the
Forum, the Arc of Titus, the Colosseum, the Pantheon, pagan temples and modern statues . . . stage
for so much of the world's history. We are enthralled with St. Peter's, the Vatican Museum, the
Lateran, the splendor of the Palace of the Vatican,
the museums, the fountains and the ancient catacombs.  Between times we shop in the smart stores.
47TH DAY—SOUTH TO NAPLES
We leave Rome by the Porta Maggiore and drive
through the Campagna Romana, passing near Mount
Albani, where we see the Roman villas. We see, too,
some curious villages on the tops of hills. On our
arrival in Naples we tour the city.
48TH AND 49TH DAYS—POMPEII—CAPRI
On our first day we start early. By use of the
Autostrade we reach Pompeii in half an hour. A
competent guide explains to us the excavations. Next
we cross the mountains to Amalfi, the "Suntrap" of
Italy. After lunch we drive to Sorrento along the
famous Amalfi Drive. Fields of orange and lemon
trees, at Positano the remains of pirates' houses are
among the sights we see. On our second day we
drive to Capri pier, then by boat we reach the Island
of Capri to visit the Blue Grotto if weather permits.
50TH DAY—RETURN TO ROME
From Naples we return to Rome over the same
picturesque route, arriving in Rome for lunch.   The
afternoon is free for personal excursions.
51ST  DAY—TO  PISA
We leave Rome over "Via Aurelia," then follow the
sea past San Marinella, Civitavecchia and the Tolfa
Hills. In clear weather we see on our left the islands
of Napoleonic fame, Elba and Corsica. At Grosseto,
whose fortified walls have been transformed into
gardens, we lunch. We reach Pisa for dinner.
52ND DAY—FROM PISA TO GENOA
Before leaving Pisa, we visit the Cathedral,
Leaning  Tower and  the  Baptistry.   We spend
night at Genoa, Italy's most important port.
53RD DAY—GENOA TO NICE
As we leave Genoa we pass the birthplace of Columbus, and the old lighthouse built in his memory.
We follow along the beautiful French and Italian
Rivieras through Menton to Monte Carlo. After a
stop we continue to Nice, along the Corniche Drive.
54TH DAY—WE  GO BATHING AT NICE
In Nice we have a day of leisure.   Many of us
bathe in the Mediterranean; others make excursions
to the Gorges-du-Loup or revisit Monte Carlo.
55TH DAY—NICE TO GRENOBLE
From Nice we follow the Var Valley to St. Martin
du Var and Puget Theniers, climbing towards the
Alps. We enjoy many thrilling mountain views. We
arrive in Grenoble for dinner.
56TH  DAY—GRENOBLE TO  AUTUN
Departing from  Grenoble,  guarded  by mountain
heights, we follow the Isere Valley.   Then through
pretty and hilly country to Autun for the night.
57TH DAY—FONTAINEBLEAU—PARIS
As we leave Autun we pass a Roman gate built
in 69 A.D. We drive through hilly, picturesque
countrysides, to Auxerre for lunch. Then we see
Moret, an attractive town with medieval remains;
the Forest of Fontainebleau, the town and castle. We
arrive in Paris for dinner.
58TH TO 63RD DAYS—SIX DAYS IN PARIS
Our first! day is devoted to a comprehensive tour
of Paris and the second to an excursion to Versailles
and Malmaison. The glories of Paris are more marvelous than we even dared hope. We have four days
in which to fill in the gaps of our official program.
What a wonderful life we lead!
64TH DAY—CHERBOURG—SAILING DAY
Our rail journey through Normandy is really wonderful; the harbor view at Cherbourg delightful.
65TH TO 71ST DAYS—AT SEA
72ND DAY—LAND AT QUEBEC OR MONTREAL
We Are Charmed  by Ancient
Nuremberg   and   Unique   Pisa ..»•—'—*
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Page 14
House Party No. 1 —
Time Table
1B 1D 1F . House Party Number. 1G 1H 1J
$895 $886 S874 .. Price of House Party .. $870 $864 $860
77   73   74 .. Total Number of Days.. 71    78    70
64    57    61 ... No. Days on Land.... 59    59     57
The Map Can Merely Suggest the Magnificence of the European Route Followed by
House Party No. 1 ... In Cologne We Stop to Visit the Wonderful Gothic Cathedral
Our   Tour   Through   Switzerland   Is   a   Series   of   Panoramas,   Each   Breath   Taking
ill Its Beauty ... Below Is a View of Lauterbrunnen and the Trummelbach Falls
^_
,J
^
^
^
For a detailed day-by-day         -
8
S c
Stacy of this nine-country trip           9 JJ
S s
•3
3 O
June
see pases 10 to 13.
as
"Sb
o*
UJCQ
June
I1JU.
rum
July
Qffl
May
Sail—Quebec (Empresses)   im*
July
SO
3
16
or Montreal (Duchesses)      *'
2
8
28
11
21
_and—Motor to Oxforr.
i  .      30
7
16
29
12
22
Shakespeare Country
July 1
8
17
30
13
23
_ondon—sightseeing
2
9
18
31
14
to
to
to
19
June
15
29
6
13
20
2
16
30
Via Ostend to Brussels
7
14
21
3
17 Julyl
Brussels—sightseeing
8
15
22
4
18
2
Via Hague to Amsterda
Hi .        »
16
23
5
19
3
Vlotor to Duisburg    .
10
17
24
6
20
4
Via Cologne to Coblen
z .      11
18
25
7
21
5
Heidelberg/ Mannheim
12
19
26
8
22
6
To Freiburg    ....
13
20
27
9
23
7
To Lucerne     ....
14
21
28
10
24
8
nterlaken; Montreux
15
22
29
11
25
9
16
23
30
12
26
10
To Lindau via Zurich
17
24
31
13
27
11
To Munich	
18
25 Aug.1
14
28
12
Munich—sightseeing
19
26
2
15
29
13
Nuremberg—sightseein;
!   •       *>
27
3
16
30
14
.eipzig via Beyreuth .
21
28
4
17
Julyl
15
Via Potsdam to Berlin
22
29
5
18
2
16
n Berlin—sightseeing
23
.30
6
19
3
17
n Berlin	
24
31
7
20
4
18
Dresden—sightseeing
25 Aug.1
8
21
5
19
To Prague	
26
2
9
22
6
20
'rague—sightseeing  .
27
3
10
23
7
21
To Vienna	
28
4
11
24
8
22
n Vienna—sightseeing
29
5
12
25
9
23
Via Linz to Salzburg .
30
6
13
26
10
24
nnsbruck—The Tyrol
31
7
14
27
11
25
To Cortina D'Ampezzo
Aug.1
8
15
28
12
26
dolomites to Venice .
2
9
16
29
13
27
n Venice—sightseeing
3
10
17
30
14
28
tologna to Florence .
4
11
18
Julyl
15
29
Florence—sightseeing
5
12
19
2
16
30
Hill Towns to Perugia
6
13
20
3
17
31
Hill Towns to Rome .
7
14
21
4
18 Aug.1
tome—sightseeing
8
15
22
5
19
2
tome—sightseeing
9
16
23
6
20
3
To Naples—sightseeing
10
17
24
7
21
4
tompeii and Amalfi
11
18
25
8
22
5
excursion to Capri
12
19
26
9
23
6
13
20
27
10
24
7
To Pisa—sightseeing .
14
21
28
11
25
8
To Genoa	
15
22
29
12
26
9
16
23
30
13
27
10
n Nice	
17
24
31
14
28
11
toute des Alpes    .   .
18
25 Sepi.1
15
29
12
■rom Grenoble to Autur
1   .        1»
26
2
16
30
13
Motor to Paris   .   .   .
20
27
3
17
31
14
n Paris—sightseeing .
21
28
4
18
Aug.
15
Versailles; Malmaison
22
29
5
19
2
16
n Paris	
23
30
6
20
3
17
n Paris	
24
31
7
lo
4
18
n Paris	
25 Sept.-
8
29
5
19
n Paris	
26
2
9
30
6
20
Jail to Cherbourg—Sail
27
3
10
Aus.
Aus.
Aug.
.and Quebec (Empress
es)    Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
4
14
6)
28
■
Montreal (other ships
)   •          1
11
15
*o
This is one of the most cor
B-             *S
"3
u e
J
prehenslve tours of Europe
lo           |.
—
a «
e
be found—nearly two and
*           2*
e
a j
UJCQ
2
2
hair months in length.
UJCQ
2
UJffl Page 15
House
Party
No. 3
It Is Difficult in
Words to Describe
the Advantages of
Motor Travel, But
Those Who Take
House Party Trips
Are Rewarded by
Lovely Scenes Such
as This French Village Affords
22 Days
in Europe
38 Days
Old Favorite Route
Six Countries
d
rLAMOUR, romance and beauty mark this
incomparable route through western Europe.
First England! Leave the ship in the exquisite freshness of an English morning, motor out
into the dew-soaked, fragrant meadows. Tudor,
Queen Anne, Georgian, Elizabethan, warm piles
of brick and stone, amid velvety lawns, shaded
by ancestral Elms. Then Oxford, home of culture, wins your heart straightway.
Motoring on again through hedge-rows of
hawthorne, a lark pouring a pasan of praise
into the misty morning, you come to Strat-
ford-on-Avon. Then follow Warwick, Kenil-
worth Castle—Stoke Poges, Burnham,
Beeches, Eton, Windsor. In staggering contrast comes the plunge into the hugeness of
London. Read the names on the bus signs and
streets—Wormwood Scrubbs, Elephant and
Castle, Hornsey Rise, Tooting, Crouch End—
quintessence of things English.
Then follow Belgium and Holland! Gay,
bustling Brussels—charming and beautiful
Holland. Can they really be real? The farm
houses, the cattle, the streets, the villages look
as though they had tumbled into position from
a child's • box of toys. There is a delicate
loveliness to these Dutch waterways, infinitely
appealing, their banks are fringed with reeds
and haunted by birds, their depths reflect old
houses leaning along the quayside of some
busy  town,  their  waters  ripple  against  the
barges heavily laden with glistening milk cans.
Next comes Germany! The very rectilinear
perfection of the plow furrows tells of the
native efficiency and unfailing neatness.
Cologne, Bingen, Coblenz. Motoring alongside the wide and beautiful Rhine through
dark forests or sunny fields, through country
teeming with legend. Heidelberg, close above
the River Neckar, breathes the essence of
ancient Germany. Frowning down on the city
and river are the Donjon keeps, the watch towers and the great Tun of Heidelberg—black
and forbidding rise the towering cliffs, but indulgent and kindly seems the city itself, as
though it had learned the gracious lesson of
tolerance from its blithe scholars. Mannheim.
Through the Black Forest.   Freiburg.
Towering Switzerland! Steeped now in the
grandeur of lofty peaks, robed in mist,
crowned with a snowy diadem. Lucerne. Soar
over the Brunig Pass. Interlaken, the Bernese
Oberland, Montreux.
France and Paris! Motoring through the
golden countryside of Burgundy—to slip
into the City Beautiful when the sunset flashes
roseate on the Dome of the Sacre Coeur, Paris!
The sparkling tonic, laughing exhilaration of
her boulevards, her shops, her restaurants, her
people. Gay days in the globe's greatest center of all things cultural—they change the
rest of life for us.
England
Belgium
Holland
Germany
Switzerland
France
$464
See Page 17 for Other Rates
""\
BKf** *.
Z*%>$L. Page 16
By Motor We Really See the Colorful Regions That
We Want to Record  on  Our  Filmo Movie  Cameras
We Visit the Home of Shakespeare and Then After
Our Stay in London We Enjoy a Perfect Day in Gay
Brussels . . . Onr Stop in The Hague Is Another
Delightful Experience . . . What a Perfect Trip
The Favorite Route by Motor
1ST TO 7TH DAYS—THE VOYAGE
Sail from Montreal on a Duchess or from
Quebec on an Empress.
8TH DAY—MOTOR TO OXFORD.
Today we land early in the morning . . . the
Duchesses at Liverpool, the Empresses at Southampton. Our motor coach route to Oxford takes
us through rural scenes of endless charm . . .
every view a perfect picture. Then a wonderful
evening strolling along High Street.
9TH DAY—THROUGH SHAKESPEARE LAND
After visits to renowned colleges, libraries
and historic spots, we motor to Kenilworth and
Warwick Castles, Shottery and Stratford-on-
Avon. We continue by motor past Stoke Poges
and Windsor and so to London.
10TH TO 12TH DAYS—LONDON'S SECRETS
We see on our day of sightseeing in London,
Piccadilly Circus, the Strand, Trafalgar Square,
Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey, the
Houses of Parliament, St. Paul's, Tower of
London, and other places of interest. Then we
have at least two or more days in London to
satisfy leisurely our own hobbies.
13TH DAY—OSTEND AND BRUSSELS
Today we have one of our few rail journeys
... a swift passage from London for Dover.
Then across the channel to Belgium. We proceed through animated Ostend, quaint old
Bruges and historic Leige to gay Brussels.
14TH DAY—A DAY IN BRUSSELS
A sightseeing tour of Brussels with special
lecturer occupies our morning. Then a gay
carefree afternoon.
15TH  DAY—ON TO  HOLLAND
Now  for  a  lovely,  varied  day  of  motoring
through Antwerp,  Rotterdam  and  The  Hague
to Amsterdam.  Bicycles we find as popular in
Holland as cars are at home.
16TH DAY—AMSTERDAM AND INTO GERMANY
In Amsterdam, the "Venice of the North,"
we see the famous Dutch masters in the Ryks
Museum and the diamond cutters at work; then
after lunch we drive through the famous Ruhr
to Duisburg for the night.
17TH DAY—COLOGNE AND COBLENZ
Our first spot of major interest on leaving
Duisburg is Benrath, where we see a marvelous
castle, similar to Sanssouci at Potsdam, one of
the architectural jewels of Germany. We arrive
in Cologne for luncheon, after which we see
the city. Coblenz, our home for the night, we
find most interesting.
18TH DAY—COBLENZ TO MANNHEIM
Today we see the most fascinating portions
of the Rhine and its celebrated casdes. The
Castle of Stolzenfels; the village of Rhens,
Marksburg Castle; then Niederspay; Oberspay;
Boppard-a-Rhein, situated on the largest curve
of the Rhine; Salzig; Nieder-Hirzenach; the
old medieval castle of the Maus; the imposing
ruins of Rheinfels; the Lorelei Rock; Ober-
wesel with the ruins of the Castle of Schon-
burg; Caub and the Castle of Gutenfels; on a
rock in the middle of the Rhine, an old 14th
century fortress; Bacharach-a-Rhein; Rhein-
diebach; the Rheinstein Castle, rebuilt during
the 19th century ... all this and more do we
see. Our afternoon drive takes us to Heidelberg
for a delightful tour and then to Mannheim, the
largest city in Baden, for the night.
19TH DAY—A DAY OP VARIED SCENES
Today's journey carries us through a land
of beauty and fables . . . the Black Forest,
with colorful homes, curious customs and
strange costumes; then to the major city of
the   region,   charming   Freiburg.
20TH  DAY—THE   GREAT   RHINE   FALLS
Our  road  takes  us  up   the  mountains  and
through    wonderful    gorges   to    Schaffhausen.
Beside the Rhine Falls we lunch. Then through
Winterthur, Zurich and Adliswil, we continue
to Lucerne, where we arrive for dinner.
21ST  DAY—IN   FASCINATING  LUCERNE
Lucerne provides us with endless things that
we want to do. We glory in its beauty.
22ND DAY—THROUGH THE ALPS
We leave Lucerne, having ahead of us the
Pilatus Mountain, we pass through Hergiswill
where the road becomes very picturesque, on
through Alpnachstadt, across the River Sarnen,
past Lake Sarnen, to ascend the Brunig Pass,
a magnificent trip through forests with wonderful panoramic views. From the Brunig Pass
we have a wonderful view of the Alps and especially'of the Jungfrau. Then go down through
more regions of beauty past Brienz, to enter
Interlaken and proceed immediately to Lauter-
brunnen and Trummelbach Falls where lunch is
taken. We leave Lauterbrunnen to enter French
Switzerland to Pass les Granges, Chateau d'Oex,
le Pre, where we cross a bridge over a magnificent gorge. We see Gruyere, famous for its
cheese, then an "airplane view" of Montreux,
our destination.
23RD  DAY—MONTREUX  AND  CHILLON
- The beauty of Montreux is all embracing.
Mountains, valleys, snow-capped peaks and.
beautiful trees, fertile vineyards, the lovely
Lake Geneva, make a perfect blend. After
yesterday's exciting Alpine adventure, we spend
a leisurely day in Montreux. We take time,
however, to visit with a guide the Castle of
Chillon, immortalized by Byron.
24TH DAY—THROUGH THE JURAS TO AUTUN
Another day over charming mountain routes,
through fertile vineyards, and delightful little
villages to Autun in Burgundy.
25TH DAY—ON TO PARIS
A delightful day motoring through rural
France takes us through Avallon and Auxerre,
an interesting little town where we stop for
luncheon. Then the afternoon brings us to
the Palace of Fontainebleau and on into Paris.
26TH TO 28TH DAYS—A PERFECT FINALE
Our first day in Paris is devoted to sightseeing
with a competent and entertaining lecturer-
guide with whom we motor along the famous
boulevards, and visit the finest treasures of
Paris. The Pantheon, Notre Dame, the Tuile-
ries Gardens, the Arc de Triomphe, Madeleine Church, the Hotel des Invalides; these
and many other places we see. The next day
we motor to Malmaison and Versailles, most
beautiful and romantic spot in France. We
visit the Palace, the Hall of Mirrors, the Grand
and the Petite Trianons, the courtyards, gardens and fountains. Then two perfect days of
our own to see Paris as we wish.
29TH DAY—TO CHERBOURG—SAIL
All things end, so today we journey by train
through the lovely green fields of Normandy to
the busy French port of Cherbourg to sail.
30TH TO 38TH DAYS—WESTWARD BOUND
Now  we  realize  how  truly  remarkable  has
been   The  Travel  Guild   and  the   Canadian
Pacific    co-operation    to    make    possible    so
fascinating    a    trip    through    Europe   at    so
low  a  cost—yet  without  sacrifice  of  comfort.
38TH DAY—BOTH A  SAD AND  GLAD DAY
And now our House Party comes to an end!
We  disembark  at  Quebec  or   Montreal.    Our
trip abroad is a reality.  We've been to Europe!
Tour Travel
Dollars Will
Do Double
Duty on House
Party No. 3 Page 17
House Party No. 3—Time Table
3A 3B 3C 3D 3E   3F 3G 3H . . House Party Number.. 3J   3K 3L 3M 3N 3P 3Q 3R
$456$464$464$468$465$493$490$423 , . Price of HoUSe Party >. $471 $432$463$437$463$437$463$467
T 37    38     38     37     38    45    43     34    . Total  Number of Days .   38    34    38     35    38     35    38    37
22   22   22   22   26   32   31   24   Number of Days on Land 22   21   22   22   22   22   22   22
0-0    o
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&%
May May May June June June June
14    SO    27       3     11     16    23
21 28 June 411     18     21     30
22 29       5    12    19    22 July 1
23 30      6    13    20    23       2
24 31       7    14    21     to      to
25 June 1    8    15     22     29      6
26 2      9    16    23    30      7
17 24 Julyl    8
18 25 2
19
20
21
22
23
27
28
29
30
31
June 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
9
10
11
26
27
28
29
30
24 July 1
25'     2
26 3
27 4
28 5
29 6
30 to
24 Julyl 12
25 2 13
Jane June July July July July Aug.
19    26      3       9 18    30       4
Ufi
July
2
7
9
to
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Aug
4
Empress shlpt Mil From end
return to Quebec. All other ships
Mil from end return to Montreal.
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Sail from Quebec (Empresses) July
or Montreal (Duchesses) .   . 8
Land—to Oxford  16
Shakespeare Country .... 17
London—Sightseeing .... 18
In London  19
In London  20
To Brussels  21
Brussels by motor  22
Motor to Amsterdam  .... 23
Motor to Duisburg ..... 24
Cologne to Coblenz  .... 25
Heidelberg/ Mannheim  ... 26
Freiburg  27
To Lucerne  28
In Lucerne  29
Montreux; Interlaken   .... 30
In Montreux  31
To Autun  Aug
To colorful Paris  2
Paris—sightseeing  3
In Paris  4
In Paris  5
Cherbourg—Sail  6
Aug.
Land Quebec or Montreal.   . 14
July July July Aug. Aus. Aug. Aug
16    22    29      5
24 30Aug.613
25 31       7    14
26 Aug.1    8
27 2      9
Delightful   Variety  Marks  the  Above   Route.
Motor Along Mountain .Bordered Swiss Lakes
28
29
30
31
Aug.1
2
3
4
5
6
7
1   8
9
10
11
12
13
21
22
23
17     24
18
19
29
30
31
25 Sept.1    8
26 2       9
20    27      3    10
.Aug.Aug.Sept.Sept.Sept.Sept. Oct.
18    28       1     11     15    25       1
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
At the Paris Book Stalls .Along the Seine Ton -
Shop  Around   for   "That   Something"   Unusual
a c   o.s   o^   aj   o. *
ES    E=    =S    Si   It
Ulll.    LUQD    QfiQ    UJQD   UJCQ
* Party 3F will leave Paris for
England on July 21 and will Mil
from Liverpool on July 22.
House Parties Are Expertly Planned
\XUILD House Parties by motor are carefully
planned in every detail. With them you see
Europe more thoroughly, than you can by any
other mode of travel except by the use of the
very expensive private car plan. Many Guild
clients tell us that our coaches with big, deeply
upholstered seats, each with individual arms and
wide leg room, are far more comfortable than
a crowded private car with folding seats.
We know just how long you will enjoy riding without becoming fatigued. Every road to
be covered has been gone over by us many
times before—we know just how many motor-
hours Mainz is from Coblenz. The Hague from
Brussels, Rome from Perugia, etc. We know
just the place that can be reached conveniently
for lunch and how to get you to your night
stops in time to clean up before dinner—how
frequent to make stops en route for the comfort of the passengers.
Every House Party motor program offered is
each year tested by the head of The Travel
Guild's European organization. All the routes
have been covered and old difficulties eliminated
in preparation for 1932. The Guild seeks to
work out problems before they arise.
Many of the journeys which may appear in
the skeletonized itineraries as a whole day, in
reality only require half a day's traveling. You
have, therefore, much more time in many of the
cities  than  the  skeletonized  itineraries  show.
Sightseeing in the various cities will be done
in your motorcoach. In each city you are accompanied by an experienced guide-lecturer
(not the courier), who is a resident of the city
and knows its history as only a native can.
The number of coaches is, of course, limited.
Therefore, seats are reserved for you at the
time booking is made. When coaches are filled
further bookings for House Parties must be
refused.
The Guild courier who accompanies each car
understands and knows the countries visited,
and is thus able to attend efficiently to all the
details necessary to enjoyable travel.
When comparing Guild itineraries consider
honesty of facts; number of days in Europe
(slow ships make itineraries seem long but
days in Europe constitute the basis for judging
values); type of hotel accommodations; and
method of travel. Such analysis will convince
you that Guild House Parties by motor are exceptional travel values.
It is well to know in advance that European
hotels do not furnish soap. You may either
bring some from home or buy it over there.
Towels are, of course, furnished.
In European restaurants unlike American
cafes, the price of a meal excepting breakfast,
does not include coffee, tea or milk. But if you
desire a beverage you may order it in addition
to your meal at a nominal charge.
Things are different in Europe! That's why
you're going!
The Beauty of Rural  England is Suggested
by This Church Tard Made Famous by Gray In            oP^'"
Page 18
|S                                                                               1
52 Days
1
House Party
No. 4
ffP
England
Holland
Belgium
Germany
Czecho-SIovakia
Austria
Hungary
Switzerland
France
38 Days in Europe
A Fascinating Route Through Central Europe
1ST TO  7TH  DAYS—EUROPE  BOUND
8TH  DAT—MOTOR TO OXFORD
We land to find our motors waiting to carry
us through beautiful England to Oxford.
9TH DAY—SHAKESPEARE COUNTRY
We visit the colleges then motor into the
heart of the Shakespeare Country to Warwick,
Kenilworth, Stratford, then to London.
10TH TO 12TH—LONDON DAYS AND NIGHTS
In London, the capital of the world's greatest Empire, a day is devoted to seeing the city.
Two  days in London  are free for shopping
and to satisfy special interests.
1STH DAY—TO  BELGIUM
Through England to Dover, a short steamer
trip,  and  we  are  in  Belgium  and  Brussels.
14TH DAY—BRUSSELS TO AMSTERDAM
A   morning   sightseeing   tour   of   Brussels
shows us the charm of this delightful place.
15TH DAY—MOTOR TO "TULIP LAND"
We   motor  to   Antwerp   and   compare   the
Guild Halls with those of Brussels, then to
Rotterdam, The Hague and Amsterdam.
16TH DAY—AMSTERDAM TO GERMANY
Amsterdam is seen in the morning with a
guide.   Then we motor to Duisburg.
17TH DAY—THE RHINE TO COBLENZ
We motor to Cologne for lunch and a visit
to "The Dom," loveliest Gothic cathedral in
Germany.   Then begins the "Rhine trip."
18TH DAY—THE RHINE OF LEGEND
Through   the  legend  land  of   the   Lorelei
Rock and the Castles.   Then we visit Heidelberg before we go to Mannheim.
19TH DAY—VISIT MEDIAEVAL CITIES
The twin cities of Mediaevalism, are visited
today . . ■ Rothenberg and Nuremberg.
20TH DAY—THROUGH  BUSTLING GERMANY
We weave in and out among thrifty farms
and thriving towns via Bayreuth to Leipzig.
21ST DAY—THROUGH POTSDAM TO BERLIN
First a drive through Leipzig then we motor
to Berlin, stopping at Potsdam en route.
22ND AND 23RD DAYS—BERLIN
One   day   of   sightseeing   includes   all   the
places of interest in this great city.   Then a
day for independent program.
24TH  DAY—A  TOUR  OF DRESDEN
A  morning   drive  to  Dresden,  capital  of
Saxony, is followed by afternoon sightseeing.
25TH DAY—"SAXON SWITZERLAND"
One of the most beautiful days of our summer . . . our drive through "Saxon Switzerland" takes us to Prague, in ancient Bohemia.
26TH DAY—PRAGUE—AN ANCIENT CITY
A tour of the city includes the mediaeval
streets,   the   ancient   Jewish   Synagogue   and
Cemetery and the venerable Hradcany.
27TH DAY—BOHEMIA HAS CURIOUS NAMES
From romantic  and  picturesquely  situated
Prague we motor to glorious Vienna.
28TH DAY—IN VIENNA
Vienna is  a  favorite city  with  Americans
who travel abroad.    Few cities offer so much
as we see on this day's program.
29TH  DAY—ALONG  THE   DANUBE
From Vienna we follow the Danube River
to Budapest, the "City Charming."
30TH DAY—BUDAPEST IN GYPSY-LAND
We are delighted with our morning tour of
the twin cities Buda and Pest, their beautiful
new buildings their bridges and the Old Fortress.  At night, haunting melodies, gay life!
31ST DAY—RETURN TO VIENNA
We return to Vienna for another gay evening.
32ND DAY—VIENNA—THEN LINZ
After a free rnorning in Vienna to do as we
please we motor to Linz for the night.
33RD DAY—SALZBURG AND MUNICH
Into increasingly rugged country we ride
until we reach the Tyrolean Alps and Salzburg.
Then our route takes us to beautiful Munich.
S4TH  DAY—TO  LAKE  CONSTANCE
Today, motoring through scenes of grandeur,
through Oberammergau to Lindau.
85TH DAY—AND TO LUCERNE
Now   through   Switzerland   where   nature
seems to have carved out the Alps for no other
reason than to furnish beauty. We go" through
Zurich and Zug to Lucerne for the night.
36TH DAY—A DAY OF MAGNIFICENCE
Over the Brunig Pass to Interlaken and the
Trummelbach Falls which has cut its way in a
mad  torrent through mountainous  strata of
solid rock.  Montreux is our destination.
37TH DAY—INTO BURGUNDY
After a visit to the Casde of Chillon we
motor through the vine clad Jura mountains
to Autun in the heart of Burgundy.
S8TH DAY-^TO PARIS!
Through Fontainebleau, the forest and city
. . . visit the castle. Then a major goal, Paris.
39TH TO 43RD DAYS—PARIS IS WONDERFUL
First we enjoy a day sightseeing in the city
with a guide, which we find complete and
satisfying. Then a day's excursion to Versailles and Malmaison is followed by glorious
days and evenings for independent programs.
44TH DAY—WE MUST START HOMEWARD
47TH TO 53RD DAYS—HOMEWARD BOUND
Never Before
Has Such a
Trip as This
Been Available
for So Small a
Cost Page 19
Central Europe    tiftfi'yi
Nine Countries tfjf O # JL
AERHAPS you have been to Europe many times, but
do you know the thrill of motoring through Germany,
Czecho-SIovakia, Hungary, Austria, the Tyrolean Alps,
and Switzerland! If you've never been to Europe you
should visit these countries by motor with a House Party.
Enroute you also visit England, Belgium, Holland, and
the Rhine Country and learn their charms as only the motor
traveler can know them. From Mannheim you go to Rothen-
burg and Nuremberg, the most striking and interesting of
medieval towns in Germany. Within their walls every street,
building and house is an object of beauty and interest.
Berlin will amaze you. What a city "Such buildings!"
you'll say. The Reichstag, the Brandenburgertor, the former palace of the Kaiser, the Kurfursten Bridge and the
Cathedral, the National Gallery!  And you'll love Dresden.
Then on by motor through fascinating countryside—
quaint peasants working with crude implements . . . tiny
rural villages—clumsy hay wagons . . . roadside shrines
. . . each day's motor journey becomes more interesting-
than the one before as we go farther into the Continent.
Prague is the interesting old city of the Czechs and the
Slovaks . . . now capital of the energetic new Republic.
Vienna, too, is visited; here the Imperial Palaces tell of
the former glory of the brilliant Austrian court life. And
Vienna is truly the musical capital of Europe! Here lived
Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Lanner and Strauss.
After you've motored down the valley of the Danube
to Budapest, you'll know the charm of old Hungary. Sightseeing in Budapest will give you a new appreciation of
the solidity of Magyar character. At night you'll learn
why Budapest is "the city charming!" Salzburg and Munich
are followed by the magnificence of Switzerland . . . Zurich,
Lucerne, Interlaken, Montreux.
Rural France—then Paris. What a glorious climax!
The Beautiful Setting of Salzburg and the Surrounding Tyrol Defy All Description
The Wonderful Route Followed by House Party No. 4 Is Shown Above
House Party No. 4—Time Table
4C
4E
4G
... House Party Numb
ZX
4H
4J
4K
$665
$680
$681
. . . Price of House Party . .  .  $623
1671
$637
53
55
53
. . Total Number of Days   .  .     48
52
48
40
43
38
. Number of Days on Land  .     38
36
35
Oil
» O
I'
OS
13
o
* u
E S
Empress ships will land at South-'
anipton.   Duchess ships will land at
Liverpool.
o
S e
a's
Ex
o
ST)
o
B
3   O
July
May
June
June
Sail—Quebec   (Empresses)   or July
July
27
11
23
Montreal (other ships)   ...      2
8
16
June 4
18
30
Land—Motor to Oxford
7
16
24
5
19
Julyl
Shakespeare Country
8
17
25
6
20
2
London—sightseeing
9
18
26
7
21
22
23
to
6
7
to
13
14
19
20
21
8
9
Via Ostend to Brussels .
28
10
24
8
Brussels—sightseeing .   .
15
22
29
11
25
9
Via Hague to Amsterdam
16
23
30
12
26
10
17
24
31
13
27
11
To Cologne and Coblenz
18
25
Aug.1
14
28
12
To Heidelberg and Mannhei
m
19
26
2
15
29
13
To Nuremberg—sightseeing
20
27
3
16
30
14
To Leipzig via Bayreuth.   .
21
28
4
17
Julyl
15
To Berlin via Potsdam    .   .
22
29
5
18
2
16
Berlin—sightseeing    .   .   .
23
30
6
19
3
17
24
31
7
20
4
18
To Dresden—sightseeing   .
25
^ug. 1
8
21
5
19
To Prague through Bohemia
26
2
9
22
6
20
Prague—sightseeing   .   .   .
27
3
10
23
7
21
To Vienna—Austria  .   .   .
28
4
11
24
8
22
Vienna—sightseeing .   .   .
29
5
12
25
9
23
To Budapest along Danube
30
6
13
26
10
24
Budapest—sightseeing   .   .
31
7
14
27
11
25
Return to Vienna   ....
Aug. 1
8
15
28
12
26
To Linz along Danube   .   .
2
9
16
29
13
27
To Salzburg and Munich   .
3
10
17
30
14
15
28
29
4
5
11
12
Julyl
o Lucerne via Zurich   .   .   .
19
2
16
30   To Montreux via Interlaken   .
6
13
20
3
17
31    Montreux, visit Chillon     .   .
7
14
21
4
18   Aug. 1 To Autun in Burgundy   .   .
8
15
22
5
19
2   To Paris	
9
16
23
6
20
3    Paris—sightseeing  .   .   .   .
10
17
24
to
to
4   Excursion to Versailles .   .
11
18
25
12
29
5
n Paris	
12
19
26
13
30
6   Rail to Cherbourg—Sail    .
13
20
27
July
Auj.
Aug. Land Quebec (Empresses) or      Aug.
Aug.
Sept
18
4
14
Montreal (other ships)  ...    18
28
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A perfect route through the heart
of  Europe—enloy  the  thrills that
motor travel alone can give you.
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Ex Page 20
37 Days
House Party
No. 5
24 Days
in Europe
Luxembourg
Germany
Austria
Switzerland
France
Spot in Nuremberg Is a Mere Hint of the Beautiful Spots Along Onr Route
Through Scenic Europe by Motor
1ST TO 7TH DAYS—EN ROUTE TO FRANCE
8TH DAY—LAND AT CHERBOURG
Rakish red sails of French fishing boats, the
nearer approach of quaintly terraced hillsides
—Cherbourg! We board a French train which
carries us through' Normandy—a beautiful prelude to that stellar event—Paris!
9TH  TO  15TH  DAYS—WE  SEE PARIS
Most of the Scenic Route House Parties
have a full week in Paris—some have a longer
period. Every minute is perfect. Our first
day we tour the city. To contemplate Paris is
to thrill to the approach of adventures new.
Eagerly we start, onr. sightseeing trip . . .
guide-lecturers show us the high-lights of Paris.
The second day we make a trip to Versailles,
important in the history of both the past and
present. We visit- also Malmaison. Then follow days when we do as .we please. Whatever
our personal tastes, Paris satisfies them.
16TH DAY—THROUGH THE BATTLEFIELDS
Now starts our motor tour through Europe
over a route of -unsurpassed -and varied
beauty. The first, day. is of interest because
of the world war and our journey through the
region in which our "Yankees" fought. We
go to Rheims, 12,000 of its 14,000 houses were
destroyed during the war. Here we visit the
champagne cellars,. mammoth underground
cities, and stop for lunch. Then we continue
until we cross the border into the beautiful
Duchy of Luxembourg.' The capital, on a high
plateau which ends in precipitous cliffs.
17TH DAY—DOWN THE MOSELLE
On leaving Luxembourg we drive northeast
to the Moselle River at Grevenmaher. We
follow the river to Coblenz. Many consider the scenery along this route superior
to that of the Rhine. But we shall have the
opportunity to. judge for ourselves,  '
18TH DAY—THE BEST OF THE RHINE
We journey leisurely up the valley of the
Rhine through the region that is most famed.
We view terraced banks, medieval castles on
the heights, the Lorelei Rock, the old Pfalz
Castle. Through a land of legend to Mannheim.
19TH DAY—EXCURSION TO HEIDELBERG
There are few cities in the world that can
vie with the natural surroundings of Heidelberg—it should on no account be missed, so
we take a day to visit this famous university
city on the River Neckar. We see its castle,
and visit the university.  Return to Mannheim.
20TH DAY—ROTHENBURG AND NUREMBERG
Each day we find distinctive. This will be
no exception as we journey through Rothen-
burg-ob-der-Tauber to Nuremberg—the two
most picturesquely preserved medieval cities
of Europe. Only by motor can this, journey
be made conveniently and only by motor can
one appreciate the charming and industrious
countrysides through which we pass. We arrive
at Nuremberg in time for a sightseeing drive.
21ST  DAY—TO   HANDSOME  MUNICH
Through fertile, progressive, beautiful rural
regions our route today takes us through Neu-
markt, Ingolstadt,  Pfaffenhofen into  Munich,
one of Germany's handsomest cities.
22ND DAY—SIGHTSEEING IN MUNICH
A lecturer accompanies us through Munich.
Sightseeing in the city will include the large
Town Hall, the steeple of which contains a
famous clock with performing mechanical
figures, the Bavarian National Monument, the
Pinakothek Art Gallery, and the extensive
parks and gardens at Nymphenburg.
23RD DAY—OBERAMMERGAU—INNSBRUCK
Today   we   motor   through   the   Bavarian
Highlands into  the Austrian Tyrol to Innsbruck, attractively situated on the River Inne.
Every mile of the journey is one of beauty.
24TH  DAY—TO   BREGENZ ON  LAKE
This is a day of delightful panoramas as we
motor through striking scenery to Bregenz,
one of the most charming towns on the shores
of Lake Constance. We enjoy the splendid
promenade along the lake shore.
25TH  DAY—TO   COSMOPOLITAN  LUCERNE
Our route takes us through St. Gallen, one
of the most elevated towns in Switzerland;
Zurich, the largest city in Switzerland, and
Zug, a most picturesque old city. Our destination is Lucerne, whose loveliness is indescribable. We arrive early enough to roam its
streets, to visit the lion and the old bridges,
and to be captivated by its shops.
26TH  DAY—TO  INTERLAKEN
We have become convinced that no sights
as beautiful as those we have seen can ever
be ours again unless we turn back, and then
comes the ride over the Brunig Pass to Interlaken and the drive to Trummelbach Falls.
27TH  DAY—THROUGH  THE  BERNESE
We leave Interlaken and pass through Wim-
mis, Zweisimmen, Saanen, chateau d'Oex, and
descend through a wild, rugged beauty to
lovely Montreux. Anything less beautiful
would spoil a perfect day — anything more
beautiful would be incredible.
28TH DAY—THROUGH THE  JURAS
Today we motor through the Juras to Autun.
29TH DAY—RETURN TO PARIS
To Fontainebleau—then Paris again!
30TH DAY—AND NOW WE MUST DEPART
31ST TO 37TH DAYS—SAILING HOMEWARD
An Amazing
Motor Trip
into Lands of
Beauty for
Surprisingly
Few Dollars. Page 21
The Scenic Route
Five Countries
$395
-IHE average American, deeply engrossed in business affairs, is rarely a
skillful traveler. Usually, he is so busy with his own work that he thinks
of traveling only when he has surplus money, when vacation time arrives,
or when ordered away for a rest. To get about is not to travel. How can he
enjoy a gorgeous sunset or an enchanting landscape or thrill to the masterpieces when annoyed by the thought of no hotel reserved for that night?
This de Luxe European Motor Party has been planned for those who love
natural beauty spots ,of rarest charm, and who want a real vacation filled
with new experiences and adventures. How better start such a journey than
with a week in Paris! Here is more of interest to the visitor than any other
city in the world—whatever the visitor's interests. Art? The Louvre,
Luxembourg Galleries, the Academy of Fine Arts. Architecture? Eiffel
Tower, the Cathedral of Notre Dame, the Madeleine, Sacre Coeur—
magnificent gestures of French faith. History? The Cluny Museum, the
Bastille, Napoleon's Tomb, Arc de Triomphe, the Tuileries. Fashion? The
world's smartest shops and most chic mademoiselles. Gay Life? Mont-
martre, Montparnasse, theaters, cafes, cabarets!
Then a motor tour through rural France, Luxembourg, along the Rhine
to such cities as Rothenburg, Nuremberg, Munich, through Bavaria, Austrian
Tyrol and the Alps. One of the world's most charming motor routes!
House Party No. 5—Time Table
5C  5D   5E   5F   5G  5H   5J .. . House Party Number...  5K  5L 5N   5P 5Q   5R   5S
$395 $420 $417 S447 S441 $402 $424 .... Price of House Party . . . .$357 $416 $403 $369 $403 $420 $377
37 38 38 45 43 35 39 ... . Total Number of Days ... 30 39 37 30 37 38 34
24    23    26     32     31     23     23  . . Number of Days on Land . .    20    23     24    18    24     23    24
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The Route Through Europe Shown Above Is Perhaps
the   Most   Charming   to   Be   Found   in   the   World
High Passes Carry Us Into the Beautiful Heights of
the  Alps   in   Switzerland   ■   .   •   Onr   Drive  Along
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31
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8
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2
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To Nuremberg—sightseeing
3
10
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To Munich through Bavaria
4
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8
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Julyl
8
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5
12
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To Innsbruck in the Tyrol
6
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To Bregenz on Lake Constance   .
7
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20
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To Lucerne via Zurich .   .
8
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To Interlaken     	
9
16
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To Montreux on Lake Geneva
10
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13
20
Oct.1
July
July
July
July
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
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♦NOTE:   Party 5F will leave
July 21 for England and will sai
Liverpool on July 22.
Paris
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The Famous Rhine River Is Another Exciting Event
As Is Our Visit to Innsbruck in the Glorious Tyrol Amboise, above, and Chaumont, below. Are Two
of the Chateaux Seen in "The Garden of France"
Page 22
Night Life
Battlefields
Normandy
Brittany
Chartres
Chantilly
Fontaine-
bleau
Chateau
Country
Mont   St.   Michel,   below,  Captivates   All   by
Its Unique Setting and Its Fascinating History
M,
Trips In and Around Paris
lANY of the House Parties and Collegiate
Parties stop for a week or more in Paris. For
those Guild travelers who wish to make journeys into the. regions surrounding Paris during
this period we have listed some of the available
excursions. That these Guild services are
genuine values is demonstrated by their popularity with those who live in Paris.
THE CHATEAUX—3 Days—$32
Leave Paris 'every Wednesday and Saturday-
price includes first class hotels, meals, entrance
fees and services of a guide-lecturer.
1st Day—Paris to Tours: Versailles; Saint
Cyr; Ramboullet (visit when the President of
France is not in residence); Maintenon;
Chartres (visit cathedral); Chateaudun; Ven-
dome.
2nd Day—Tonrs-Blois: Liunes (castle is
said to have inspired Mark Twain's The Prince
and the Pauper); Langeais, Azay-LeRideau-
vivit; Chenonceau (visit); Amboise, Chaumont.
3rd Day—Blois-Paris: Chateau of Blois;
Cheverny; Chambord (a marvel of the Renaissance period, 365 rooms, 63 staircases); Clery;
Orleans (lunch);  Paris.
NORMANDY—3 Days—$40
Leaves Paris every Tuesday—price includes first
class hotels, entrance fees and lecturer.
1st Day—Paris, Saint-Germain, Poissy,
Mantes, Vernon, Les Andelus (Chateau Gail-
lard), Point Saint-Pierre, Boos, Rouen (lunch),
Jumieges, Caudebec, Pont-Audemer, Hon-fleur,
Trouville, Deauville.
2nd Day—Deauville, Dives-sur-Mer, Cabourg,
Caen, Bayeux, Avranches, Pontorson, Mont-
Saint Michel.
3rd Day—Mont-Saint Michel, Sourdeval,
Tinchebray, Falaise, Lisleux, Evreux, Paris.
BRITTANY—7 Days—$90
Leave Paris every Wednesday—price includes first
class   hotels,   meals,   entrance   fees,   and   lecturer.
1st Day—Paris, Dreux, Verneuil (lunch),
Alencon to Fougeres.
2nd Day—Reenes, Ploermel, Chateau of
Ker-a-Beg  (lunch), Guennbo to Vannes.
3rd Day—St. Anne-D'Auray, Carnac, Lor-
ient, Pont-Aven, Concarneau (Chateau of Keri-
olet) to Guimper.
4th Day—Points du Raz, Andierne Dour-
anenez, Plougastel-Daoulas, Lampaul, Guimiliau,
Sainte-Thegonnec to Morlaix.
5th Day—Morlaix, Treguier, Saint-Brieuc,
Saint Malo to Dinard.
6th Day—Dinan to MagnoIes-de-1'Orne.
7th Day—Laigle, Evreux, Mantes, Paris.
BATTLEFIELDS—1 Day—$9
Leaves Paris Daily—price includes lunch and fees.
Leave Paris 7:30 a. m.—Claye, 'Iribardoux,
Meaux, La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre, Montreuil-aux-
Lions, Belleau Wood, Chateau Thierry, Rheims,
Cholera Farm, Chemin des Dames, Soissons,
Compiegne, Le Bourget. (Two-day Battlefield
trip, $30.)
FONTAINEBLEAU—$3.40
Leaves Paris daily—price does  not include  lunch.
Leave Paris 10:30 a. m.—Fromenteau,
Chailly, Barbizon, after lunch detailed-visit to
the Palace*and its magnificent park. Return to
Paris through- Forest of Fontainebleau.
CHANTILLY—SENLIS—$3.60
Thursdays only—price does  not  include lunch.
Leave .Paris 10:30 a. m.—Place Vendome,
Rue La Fayette, Cattle Markets, Gate of Pantin;
Le Bourget; Louvres; Plailly; Mortefontaine;
Ermenonville; Chaalis; Senlis. After lunch:
Chantilly-Palace, park, stables and town, thence
via La Morlaye, St. Denis to Paris.
CHARTRES—1 Day—$5.40
Sunday only—price does not include luncheon.  -
Leave Paris 9:30 a. m.—Through Valley of
Chevreuse, Dampierre, Rambouillet.  Maintenon
to Chartres—many fascinating stops on this the
most popular excursion of the French. people.
PARIS BY NIGHT DRIVE—$1.60
Daily—price  includes   refreshments   at  Place  da
Tertre  in the heart of  gay   Montmartre.
Start at 9:15 p. m.—Place Vendome, rue de
la Paix, Place de I'Opera, Grande Boulevards,
Place de la Republique, Bastille, rue St.-
Antoine, Church of St. Gervafs, Hotel de Ville,
Pantheon, Luxembourg Gardens, Avenue de
TObservatoire, Bal Bullier, Montparnasse District and Latin Quarter, La Rotonde, Le Dome,
Capitole, Eiffel Tower, Trocadero, Arc de
Triomphe, Wagram, Pare Monceau, Place
Clichy, quaint and gay Montmartre, Place du
Terte, Sacred Heart, from the steps of which
the lights of the city of Paris spread out before
one's vision, thence via Place Pigalle, Place
Blanche, Moulin Rouge, Trinity Church, rue
Lafayette to Place Vendome..
PARIS NIGHT LIFE—$10
Price includes all refreshments, entrance fees,
guides, taxis, etc.
A special de luxe trip visiting the principal
cabarets, dance halls and night clubs in the
Montparnasse (Latin Quarter) and Montmartre,
including le Moulin Rouge (cancan and famous
quadrilles), le Neant, Lido, Joe Zellis, Pigalls,
Mosquee and Cafe Orinetal. Page 23
Barcelona
Saragossa
Madrid
Burgos
San Sebastian
Carcassonne
Biarritz
Lourdes
The Children of Burgos Compete with the Lovely
Old     Cathedral     for     Interest     and     Attention
Spain and Southern France
OPAIN! The Land of Don Juan! What
memories of medieval culture, story and song
its very name calls to mind! And what joys
of the present it implies! This extension is a
"two-country" program since it includes Avignon, Carcassonne, Lourdes, and fashionable
Biarritz.
But it is over the Pyrenees into one of the
most charming of all old-world countries where
we see life essentially unchanged since Don
Juan's day. We see the water wheel of the
Moor turned by the patient donkey; and catch
glimpses of a wild and fascinating countryside.
Time Table
No. 40 Spanish Extension Itinerary  No. 41
July    TO AVIGNON—Leave Paris by rail through
18 pretty rural France.
19 TO CARCASSONNE—Via Nimes, Montpe-
lier. The old town has been completely remodeled by the French architect, Viollet-le-
Duc, so that it is now an exact reproduction
of its medieval appearance.
20 TO BARCELONA—Via Perpignan by rail.
21 IN BARCELONA—One day sightseeing in
the city which is the commercial and industrial
center of Spain. Famous for its 13th century
Cathedral.
22 TO SARAGOSSA—By morning express. Afternoon free.
23 TO MADRID—The most elevated of European
capitals.
24 IN MADRID—Sightseeing in the city with spe-
25 cial lecturer.   Spacious squares, planted with
26 trees and ornamented with flowers and fountains abound. We see the Royal Palace, the
Prado Gallery, the Royal Armory, the Bullring.
Two days for independent programs.
27 TO BURGOS—The city associated with the
"Cid," national hero of Spain.
28 IN BURGOS—Visit the Cathedral, and proceed by afternoon train to San Sebastian.
29 SAN SEBASTIAN.—Morning sightseeing.
Afternoon train to Biarritz.
30 IN BIARRITZ—Famous French seaside resort
and center of fashion.
31 TO LOURDES—By morning train. Afternoon
free to visit the Grotto where the Virgin is believed to have appeared to a peasant girl in
1858 and where miraculous cures are attributed to a spring.
Aug.   By rail to Paris.   Tour ends for those who are
1 not members of standard  parties.   For party
members the schedule continues as follows:
2 IN PARIS—-Complete sightseeing tour of Paris
3 by motor with special lecturer.   Motor excur-
4 sion to Versailles. Ample time free for shop-
5 ping, recreation, amusement.   For those who     19
have already had sightseeing programs there
will be two additional days for independent
programs.
6 By rail to Cherbourg and sail.   Members of     20
No. 40 on the S. S. Monlclare, members of
No. 41 on the S. S. Montcalm.
Aug. Aug.
14     Due to arrive Montreal. 28
Barcelona, commercial capital of Spain, contrasts with Burgos and other sleepy Spanish
towns which seem far removed from the present. And Barcelona at night is something you
dream about forever!
Madrid, the beautiful capital of Spain, has
been for centuries the center of Spanish life
and culture. Wander through jh& fascinating
stores, bargaining for a shawl or some piece of
handiwork.
In old Burgos, home of national hero, The
Cid, there is no thought of the morrow; life
moves serenely in its typically Spanish, never-
hurrying way.
Connections—Costs
Below are listed the House Parties and Collegiate Parties
that connect with the Spanish Extensions and the cost for the
^ug.
Extension wh
ich is to be added to the Party Indicated. These
1
2
costs take care of adjustments for days lost from or added to
the
regular program and fo
differences in
the cost of steam-
ship
accommodations when
such differences exist.   Merely
add the cost
noted below
o the cost of your tour to deter.
3
4
mint
the tota
cost of your
tour plus the
extension.
Leave Stan
Point of
Join Spanish
Additional Cost
dard Party
Departure
Extension
for Extension
No.
1B
Paris
No. 40
$189
No.
1D
Paris..
No  41
191
5
No.
2C
Paris
No. 40
189
No.
2D
Paris
No. 40
189
6
No.
2E
Paris
No. 41
251
No.
2F
Paris
No. 41
191
7
No.
3F
Paris
No. 40
189
8
No.
3G
Montreux
No. 40
207
9
No.
3G
Paris
No. 41
251
No.
3J
Montreux
No. 41
210
No.
4E
Montreux
No. 40
207
No.
4G
Montreux
No. 41
210
10
No.
5F
Paris
No. 40
189
No.
5H
Paris
No. 41
251
11
No
21C
Avignon
No. 40
197
No
21E
Avignon
No. 41
200
12
No.
22D
Paris
No. 40
189
No.
22E
Avignon
No. 40
197
13
No.
22F
Paris
No. 41
251
No
22G
Avignon
No. 41
200
14
No
23F
Paris
No. 40
189
No.
23G
Paris
No. 40
251
No
23H
Paris
No. 41
251
No.
23J
Paris
No. 41
191
No
24D
Paris
No. 40
189
15
No.
24F
Paris
No. 41
251
No.
24G
Paris
No. 41
191
No.
25G
Paris
No. 40
189
16
17
1ft
No.
25H
Paris
No. 40
251
No.
25J
Paris
No. 41
251
No.
25K
Paris
No. 41
195
Paris Back (o Paris—$195
The cost of either of the Spanish Extensions from Paris
back to Paris, starting on the morning of departure and terminating on the evening of the return to Paris, is $195.00.
This price is quoted for persons who plan to make an extended
stop in Paris and who wish to take the Spanish Extension trip
during that period.
Madrid Has Been for Centuries the- Center of
Spanish Culture ... A Real Shopping Center
Lourdes, Above, and Carcassonne, Below, Are
Fascinating Spots Visited in Southern France In the Smoke Room We Enjoy Pleasant Chats, a Quiet Afternoon of Reading, or Perhaps We Go There Just to Relax
Your Prelude to Euro]
XOU have a serious purpose in going abroad, of course!
You want to see the famous places you've read about . . . you
want to "do" the important art galleries, castles, cathedrals,
museums . . . you want to get that first hand knowledge of
Europeans which will make you the true cosmopolite. But
while you're about it . . . you also want to have some FUN!
You want to travel with jolly companions. You want to go
places! ... do things! . . . see people! You want expediences
that will make your European jaunt the complete and perfect
trip you've always dreamed about!   In a word, you want your
trip to be a real House Party... with
happy associations, good food, lively
music and full enjoyment of the
niceties of living!
All these are yours when you go
abroad with a Travel Guild party.
Your fellow travelers are the sort of
people you want to meet. Friendships are begun that will endure.
The ship on which you sail is one
of the finest on the Atlantic . . •
Canadian Pacific Empresses and
Duchesses or one of the "Monts."
Your comfortable cabin is your
own nook in a huge floating palace.
Your meals are delicious . . •
Canadian Pacific Cuisine is famous!
And your life on shipboard is one
continuous round of gaiety ...
providing   you   want   to   be   gay! pe Is an Ocean of Fun!
Parties, dances, shuffleboard tournaments, deck tennis and
bridge games are organized for your entertainment ... in a
whirlwind week you'll never forget! Or ... if you prefer solitude in a deck chair, with a fascinating book . . . it's yours to
enjoy for seven sunny days! You'll delight in the zestful
music of the College Dance Orchestra.
Then you land in Europe! . . . Serious and studious as you
may try to be, you just can't help having FUN! Somebody
always knows of a fascinating little shop you just must visit.
So shopping you go! Somebody always organizes theater
parties, or trips to the opera, or
something else exciting! ... In fact,
Ithat somebody is quite apt to be the
Guild, in the person of a courier with
a fascinating fund of information
about places to go and places to see.
Years later, when somebody mentions the Arc d'Triomphe in Paris,
you'll agree rather absently that it is
magnificent . . . and recall with a
wishful sigh a certain evening you
once spent on Montmartre! A friend
will speak of St. Paul's in London,
and you'll testify as to its architectural merit—remembering meanwhile the fun you had at Cochrane's
Revue! And the Atlantic Ocean, forever after, can mean only one thing:
A moonlit ocean of fun which twice
you crossed in the summer of 1932!
And When One of America's Ten Best College Dance Orchestras Starts Playing:, the Floor Will Soon Be Crowded Page 26
Five
Great
Collegiate
Travel
Values
High Street in Oxford, the City of Spires, We Agree
Is  One of the Most Beautiful -Streets  in the World
We Are Delighted with the Electric Trains of Switzerland
and  the   Fine  Railroads   of   England   and   the   Continent
Pages 27 to 41
Gay Collegiate Parties
by Rail and Motor
V>eOLLEGIATE Parties offer the gay and happy way to see Europe
at unbelievably low costs. Students and artists began it—this increasingly popular fad for Collegiate traveling. People of intelligence,
culture and ambition, but of moderate means, who refused longer to
be denied the joys and the values of European travel. So, since the
introduction by The Travel Guild of Collegiate rail trips, thousands of broad-minded people with a Bohemian flare for adventure
—writers, musicians, educators, business men, students and members
of the professions have trouped gaily through Europe on Collegiate
trips that cost them very little money but which proved not only
adventurous and romantic but also of educational value.
For the summer of 1932, the Guild again offers these popular
rail trips, each of which has a surprising amount of motoring, to a
travel public who await them each year as the ultimate in travel
values. Note also that Collegiate Party No. 21 covers more than
half of its route by motor. You'll find no mere itinerary can half
picture the glorious thrills you have with a Collegiate Party.
For absolute travel values Collegiate trips have no rival.
Though, they are not so luxurious as our motor parties, they are of as
high a type and quality as many organizations present for their only
standard offerings at prices above those quoted in this book.
Second class rail, used on Collegiate trips, is generally considered superior to ordinary American rail travel. European trains,
separated into compartments, give our parties greater privacy.
Sightseeing by charabancs is provided in the various cities.
Each group is accompanied by an experienced guide-lecturer who
is a native of the city and knows it as only a native can. Then there
are extensive motor trips in Scotland, England, Holland, Switzerland
and Italy. There are no gaps in Guild service—no possibility of
confusion.  Yet there are plenty of days free for independent action.
Collegiate hotels are all clean, comfortable, excellent, though
moderate-priced. In some cities they are first class, in others carefully selected second class hotels. The Guild prides itself on the
reputation it has earned for using hotels of surprising quality. Page 27
Collegiate
Party
No. 21
The Wonderful
Views of Bavarian
Alps Constitute
Merely a Fraction of
AH the Beauty and
Thrills That Await
the Guild Travelers
Who Accompany
This Glorious Collegiate Party.
51 Days
in Europe
66 Days
The Grand Tour Route
Eleven Countries
Ml ROM Montreal, the second largest French
speaking city, or Quebec, with its incomparable skyline, our giant liner glides out onto
•nature's most wonderful ocean boulevard, the
sheltered St. Lawrence, which makes one-third
of our journey to Scotland become a scenic
cruise. Then comes another river journey up
the Clyde—superlatives prove inadequate.
Scotland—Land at Glasgow, a great industrial center, and then travel through the Tros-
sach country, the beauty of which has remained
unaltered since Sir Walter Scott wrote, "The
Lady of the Lake." From Edinburgh, a fortunate city with more than its share of beauty,
we go southward through the highlands.
England—The ancient walled Roman city
of Chester, rural England, the Shakespeare
country, Oxford, London, come in delightful
sequence.    Every pause becomes memorable.
Belgium—The marvelous view of Ostend
from the sea, a thrilling journey across Belgium, and the joyous city of Brussels.
Holland—Hague with its air of distinction,
and Amsterdam, "Venice of the North," the
canals, windmills, quaint farms—almost a
"land of make-believe"—we love it.
GERMANY—Industrious, efficient, and unfailingly neat. Our motor jaunt embraces spired
Cologne, guardian of the Rhine; the luxurious
journey along the broad smiling Rhine through
sunlit fields  and  forests  of darkest green,
through country of romance and legend, past
castles and cities long noted; Mannheim;
Heidelberg; ancient Nuremberg; Leipzig;
monumental Berlin; Potsdam's palaces and
gardens, and Dresden, center of German art.
Czecho-Slovakia, Austria, Hungary—We
make the acquaintance of Eastern Europe—
Prague's sharply silhouetted skyline and
dazzling animation; Vienna's unduplicated
loveliness though wan from the vicissitudes of
the great war, its superb music, the gracious-
ness of its people, its surpassing architecture;
Budapest, "the city charming," its lingering,
gypsy melodies; Innsbruck in the Tyrol.
Switzerland—To the majesty of the Alps
homage is due. Lucerne, Interlaken and Montreux, such beauty, such splendor! We'll
never forget this magnificent country.
Italy—After Stresa, bright jewel in the
Italian tiara of lakes, come Milan; Venice,
unique, lovely, dream-like; Florence with its
art treasures; historic Rome and its monuments
of the past; fascinating Naples; Pompeii;
Amalfi;   Capri;   Genoa,  home   of   Columbus.
France—The languorous Riviera, Nice,
Monte Carlo, historic Avignon and finally we
enjoy our great climax, Paris—its magic defies
care. Then across Normandy to Cherbourg
and once again joyous, all too short days on
shipboard—a life that rests, that stimulates,
that soothes, that rejuvenates.
Scotland
England
Belgium
Holland
Germany
Czechoslovakia
Austria
Hungary
Switzerland
Italy
France
f7»l
*%y{ i
jO*2S
w/y
Stm In Edinburgh We're Reminded of Its
Tempestuous Past ... In London
We'll  Be  Thrilled by  the  Dashing
Horse Guards • . . On the Continent
rm^ti
We See Quaint Holland, Above, and the
Magnificent  Bridges  of  Old   Budapest
Page 28
Collegiate Party No. 21—The Grand Tout
1ST DAY—SAILING DAY
Your ship glides out into the St. Lawrence and
down  nature's  boulevard  to   Europe.    Before you
reach the open sea you have acquired your sea legs.
2ND TO 7TH DAYS—OCEAN ADVENTURES
Life on shipboard is just one happy moment after
another. Then the wonderful sight of the Donegal
heights—green hills with patchlike farms. This is
followed by the marvelous journey up the Firth of
Clyde and the River Clyde.
8TH DAY—THROUGH THE TROSSACHS
We land at Glasgow, the busy industrial city of
Scotland, then follows a day of wonderful scenery
as we journey through Scott's "Lady of the Lake"
country to Edinburgh.   ■
9TH DAY—SIGHTSEEING IN EDINBURGH
A half day's motor tour takes us to all of the
places of interest—Scott's Monument, the National
Gallery, the Castle, Holyrood, Princes and other
streets. During the afternoon our special interests
dictate the nature of our adventures.
10TH DAY—THROUGH THE BURNS COUNTRY
Our glorious travel adventures continue as we
journey southward through the fascinating highlands
and the regions made famous by Robert Burns, and
through the beautiful English Lakes district. The
night is spent at Chester, a quaint city with curious
double-decked shops and historic old walls.
11TH  DAY—THROUGH  SHAKESPEARE LAND
In Shakespeare Land we visit Kenilworth Castle
—marvelous old ruins—Warwick, where we visit
the Castle, and its gardens; and Stratford-on-Avon
. . . Shakespeare's spirit still lives here. Soon we
are in its spell. Shakespeare's House, the room in
which he was born, his desk, his chair—we sit in it.
We go to Shottery to visit the home where Anne
Hathaway lived and to sit on the bench on which
William wooed her. Oxford and its colleges. Then
we continue to London, passing Stoke Poges, Eton
and Windsor Castle.
12TH AND  13TH DAYS—IN LONDON  TOWN
Now a tour of London! By dinner time we have
seen Piccadilly Circus, Charing Cross, Trafalgar
Square, Nelson's Column and the National Galleries;
the famous thoroughfares, Oxford Street, the Embankments, Holborn, Bond Street, Regent Street,
Fleet Street, and the Strand; Westminster Abbey;
Houses of Parliament; St. Paul's Cathedral; the
Tower; the bridges; St. James Palace, and Buckingham Palace. Many of the places we saw in our
tour we want to see again. Our day for independent
programs passes as if by magic.
14TH   DAY—TO   ENERGETIC   LITTLE   BELGIUM
A short rail journey brings us to Dover. We step
off the train onto the channel steamer and soon we
are waving a greeting to gleaming Ostend, gay with
its animated beaches.    And then to Brussels.
1STH DAY—A DAY IN BRUSSELS
After our previous evening's adventures we are
thrilled by this day in Brussels. Its gaiety gives us
a clew to the fun that will be ours when we arrive in
Paris. Our tour of Brussels shows us its many and
varied attractions, including the wonderful Palace
of Justice, and the famous Guild Halls.
16TH DAY—WE MOTOR INTO HOLLAND
We  see  many  of   Holland's  interesting  centers
today—Rotterdam; The Hague, the capital of Holland . . . we see the Peace Palace and the House
in the Woods; and then Amsterdam.
17TH DAY—AMSTERDAM—COLOGNE
Our morning tour of this city, built on ninety-
seven islands, which are connected by 600 bridges,
takes us to Rijk's Museum; Rembrandt's Square.
See the bicycles—a real traffic problem! In the
afternoon we motor into Germany, to Duisburg.
18TH  DAY—THE  HOME  OF COLOGNE  WATER
We arrive at Cologne for luncheon. In our two-
hour stop in this city of turrets and towers we visit
[dj*T?
Visit Eleven
Countries at an
Average Cost of
$70 per Country
the Cathedral of Cologne, considered by many the
grandest Gothic Church in the world. We then
start our journey up the famous Rhine, motoring to
Coblenz, a most delightful spot to spend the night.
19TH DAY—THE RIVER RHINE AND HEIDELBERG
Into this day on the most celebrated of Europe's
rivers we condense a review of centuries of history
and romance. We see Mouse Tower; the picturesque
Rheinstein; Soo neck; Heimberg; Furstenberg;
Staneleck; Pfalz; Gutenfels; Schloss of Schonburg;
the Rock of Lorelei; "The Cat and the Mouse";
and other famous spots. In Heidelberg we enjoy
a wonderful sightseeing program. Then to Mannheim.
20TH   DAY—TO   MEDIEVAL  NUREMBERG
We  motor through a most delightful region of
Germany . . . one that can be seen satisfactorily only
by motor.   To Rothenburg and then to Nuremberg
we go—twin cities of medieval days.
21ST DAY—BAYREUTH AND LEIPZIG
Another glorious day through industrious, beautiful, fertile, well-kept, colorful countrysides and
through intriguing cities. Two stops of especial interest mark our journey to Leipzig—at Bayreutb,
famed for its music festivals and the home of Wagner, we see spots made memorable by him; at Plauen
in the Vogtland, situated on the ridge of a hill on
the bank of White Elster, where there are many remarkably fine old buildings. We arrive in Leipzig in
time for a drive about the city.
22ND DAY—THE PALACES OF POTSDAM
Our short motor tour for today assures us of an
opportunity to enjoy the wonderful charms of Potsdam, where we see Sans Souci; the New Palace; and
the wonderful gardens.   Then Berlin for two days.
23RD AND  24TH DAYS—BERLIN
A day of motor sightseeing with our guide-lecturer.
includes: Unter den Linden; Academy of Arts; the
huge Staats-Bibliothek; the University of Berlin; the
Palace of Kaiser Wilhelm I; the Cathedral, and
many other places of interest. And then a day for
independent programs—how quickly it passes!
25TH DAY—DRESDEN CHINA
A morning motor trip from Berlin to Dresden is
followed by an afternoon tour of the Saxon capital
and the art center of Germany.  Visits are made to
the gallery of the Zwinger (the "Sistine Madonna,"
by Raphael) and to the Green Vault of the Schloss
(intriguing exhibits of jewels and treasures.)
26TH DAY—TO  BOHEMIA
From Germany we go into Czecho-SIovakia through
the fascinating "Saxon Switzerland."
27TH DAY—SEEING PRAGUE
Prague, seat of a government, so 'tis said, run by
college professors. During the forenoon our guide
shows us the Cathedral, Teynkirche, Wallenstein's
Palace, and spots of beauty that make us wish we
were artists.   In the afternoon we are free to roam.
28TH  DAY—THROUGH BOHEMIA  TO  AUSTRIA
The route to Vienna, the lovely capital of Austria,
passes through interesting rural regions of Czechoslovakia and Austria.  A day of scenic surprises.
29TH DAY—VIVACIOUS VIENNA
The acquaintance of this magnificent city is made
on a morning drive which circles Ringstrasse and
passes the Rathaus, Hofburg, Reichsrath, Imperial
Museums, Cathedral of St. Stephen, the Prater, and
other places of interest in both the old and new
cities. After lunch we tour the environs of the city. Page29
f-The Europe of Your Dreams—
Rates on
Page 30
AH by Motor Travel Through the Shake,
speare Country to London and on the
Continent from Brussels to Montreux—
Nearly Three-Fifths of Your Trip. Never
Before Has Such a Bargain Been Offered
30TH DAY—TO THE LAND OF THE GYPSIES
The journey to Budapest, the home of the'Magyars,
is made along the shores of the "Blue Danube."
31ST DAY—SURPRISING BUDAPEST
A motor tour through the twin cities of Buda and
Pest includes the interesting Hungarian Museum of
Fine Arts, Akademia, Vigado, Nemyeti Museum,
Royal Palace, and many fine bridges and boulevards.
82ND DAY—RETURN TO VIENNA
Again we traverse the beautiful landscapes along
the Danube, and return to Vienna.
33RD DAY—A MORNING IN VIENNA
A free morning -enables us to  complete our activities in Vienna then we .drive to Linz.
34TH  DAY—THE AUSTRIAN TYROL AND MUNICH
Today! takes us. into the Austrian Tyrol. The
beauty of the setting enjoyed in Salzburg we'll never
forget. Then we go into the Bavarian Alps on our
way to Munich.
35TH DAY—TO  LINDAU ON LAKE CONSTANCE
A charming journey, a day of magnificent, changing mountain scenery takes us to Oberammergau for
luncheon and then to Lindau.
36TH DAY—ZURICH AND LUCERNE
Today we visit Switzerland's chief commercial
city, Zurich, on our way to Lucerne. Our evening
here is one interesting experience after another . . .
the shops . . . curious covered bridges adorned with
pictures . . . the Lion with its floodlights.
37TH DAY—INTERLAKEN AND MONTREUX
We leave Lucerne to climb high above the Lake of
the Four Cantons to cross the Brunig Pass and to
descend to the cluster of lakes surrounding Interlaken. Here we enjoy the majestic views of the
Jungfrau, and make a glorious motor trip to Lauter-
brunnen and the Trummelbach Falls. After luncheon
we cross the Bernese Oberland to Montreux, another
of .the famous of the Swiss resort towns.
38TH DAY—IN MONTREUX
We enjoy a wonderful day in the serene beauty of
Montreux. We visit the Castle of Chillon. From
here on our travel will be by rail.
S9TH DAY—OVER THE SIMPLON TO STRESA
Today we go through the Simplon Tunnel, the
longest in the world. As the train climbs to the
pass we catch glorious views of the Rhone Valley,
the Ganter-Tal and the Wasenhorn, then through
Domodossola to Streso on Lake Maggiore.
40TH DAY—MILAN AND THEN VENICE
A short ride brings us to Milan, where we visit the
renowned Cathedral and we see Leonardo da Vinci's
famous fresco, "The Last Supper," on the wall in an
old monastery which was once used by Napoleon as
a stable for his horses. We again board our train to
continue to Venice across the fertile countryside.
41ST DAY—DOWN A MARINE MAIN STREET
We "voyage" Venice by gondola. The Grand Canal
is the marine Broadway of this city of 200,000 which
has neither a horse nor an automobile within its
confines. From time to time we take shore leaves
to visit the Church of St. Mark's with its five
great domes; St. Mark's Square; the Palace of the
Doges, connected by the Bridge of Sighs with the
old prison; The Rialto; Santa Maria deUa Salute;
and handsome residences and places. Never a city
so curious, so interesting, so lovely.
42ND DAY—TO WORLD'S ART GALLERY
Over the Apennines we go today, through moun
tain passes and across the valley of the Po—passing
Padua, Ferrar, Bologna.. Florence is our destination.
4SRD DAY—NOW WE SEE FLORENCE
We never dreamed that we were so interested in
Art, but after our day's tour of Florence with our
guide we wish we' could stay on and on. We want
to linger in the Uffizi and Pitti Galleries. In the
afternoon, we visit the Campanile, the Baptistry,
and motor through city's environs.
44TH DAY—TO HISTORIC ROME
Up the Arno Valley, down the Tiber Valley and
we are in Rome.
45TH AND 46TH  DAYS—HISTORY  BECOMES  REAL
Our guide cannot show us Rome, the "Eternal
City," in one day—we motor with him for two days.
He has been selected and trained for us by the
history department of the University of Rome. The
Colosseum, begun in 72 A.D. and dedica'ted by Titus
in 80; the Forum; the Arch of Cons tan tine; the best
preserved and most elaborate of the Roman arches;
the Pantheon; the Baths of Caracalla; the weird
hour in the Catacombs; Capitoline Hill; Corso;
Italy's most celebrated street; St. Peter's the largest
church in the world; the Palace of the Vatican,
residence of Popes; the Appian Way, the oldest and
most famous of the old Roman roads, started in 312
B.C.; the Sistine Chapel-r-all these make your days
memorable. Rome is of interest because of its present, too . . . the Fascist! movement . . . Mussolini.
47TH DAY—TO NAPLES—SIGHTSEEING
What a journey this is from Rome to Naples!
Past the Alban and Sabine Mountains, past ancient
cities, and then an afternoon sightseeing trip.
48TH AND 49TH DAYS—MOTOR AROUND NAPLES
i The;Ruins of Pompeii! We make a special excursion from Naples to see them. Though buried for
centuries beneath the destruction of Vesuvius, one-
half this ancient city is now uncovered. Then to Sorrento along the Amalfi Drive. Then the next day we
go by steamer to the Isle of Capri to visit, weather
permitting, the Blue Grotto.
50TH DAY—TO GENOA
We leave the gypsy-gaiety of Naples for Genoa.
Our train closely follows the coast of the Mediterranean most of the way. The mild sea breezes make
us wish we could join the crowds of youths sporting
in the warm waters. At Pisa we see the famous
Leaning Tower from the train. In the evening we
stroll past the House of Columbus.
5IST DAY—TO NICE—QUEEN OF THE RIVIERA
From  Mentone, after crossing the Italian-French
border, we enjoy the gorgeous sight of the blue Mediterranean and the charm of the Grand Corniche.
S2ND   DAY—IN  NICE—VISIT   MONTE   CARLO
We enjoy a delightful excursion by motor along
the Grand Corniche road to Monte Carlo—perhaps
we try our luck—and return richer in wisdom.
63RD DAY—AVIGNON AND ROMAN WALLS
From Nice we pass through Marseilles on our way
to Avignon. In the afternoon we make a walking
tour of the Palace of the Popes.
S4TH DAY—SOON WE'LL BE IN PARIS
Now Paris bound.  We see much of France.
55TH TO 57TH DAYS—PARIS BECOMES A REALITY
The first day a guide shows us Paris and when
the day is over we've seen the Opera; les Halles,
the great market place; Louvre; Luxembourg; le
Pantheon, Palais de Justice; la Saint-Chappelle;
Notre Dame; Eiffel Tower; Napoleon's Tomb; and
Rue de la Paix, and ever so much more.
On our second day we motor to Versailles and
Malmaison. We will treasure the mental pictures we
carry away with us. Then that final day in which
we try to do all of the things in Paris that we simply,
must do—of course it can't be done, but why be in
Paris without trying?
58TH DAY—TO CHERBOURG AND SAIL
By special boat train we now start homeward, and
our wonderful ship provides an ideal climax.
59TH TO 66TH DAYS—HOMEWARD BOUND
In  Italy  We  Visit  Milan's  Wonderful
Cathedral and Then in Rome We  See
Avignon,  too. Has Historic Ruins;
the   Gardens   of   Versailles, below. At Prices Ranging from $737 to $791 Yon May Make a Grand Tour of Europe,
Following the Above Route . . . All-by-Motor Travel from Glasgow to Montreux
The Colosseum, Setting for Spectacles in the Past, Is Another of the Spots We
Will Visit in Rome . . . And Below Is a Milkman Such as We'll See in Belgium
mz%^£
Page 30
Collegiate Party No. 21
—Time Table
21C21E21G .  Col legate Party Number  . 21H 21J 21K
$791 $776 $781 . .. Price of House Party . . .  $745 $781 $737
70    65    66 . . Total Number of Days. .   6!    66    62
58    50    51 . Number of Days on Land .    49    51    49
o-xj
5 0
9U
OS
o-o
ll
May
June
June
87
11
24
June j
Julyl
4
2
5
18
3
6
19
4
7
20
5
8
21-22
6
9
23
7
10
24
8
11
25
9
12
26
10
13
27
11
14
28
12
15
29
13
16
30
14
17
Julyl
15
18
2
16
19
3
17
20
4
18
21
5
19
22
6
20
23
7
21
24
8
22
25
9
23
26
10
24
27
11
25
28
12
26
29
13
27
30
14
28
Julyl
15
29
2
16
30
3
17
31
4
18
Aug.1
5
19
2
6
20
3
7
21
4
8
22
5
9
23
6
10-11
24-25
7-8
12
26
9
13
27
10
14
28
11
15
29
12
16
30
13
17
31
14
18 Aua.1    15
19 2      16
3
4
5
6
20
17
18
19
20
Aug.   Aug. Aus.
Parties 21E, 21H, and 21K do not
visit Scotland/ 21E lands at Southampton; 21H and 21K land at Liverpool.
Sail—Quebec (Empresses) or
Montreal (other ships) ....
Land Glasgow—through Trossachs
Edinburgh—sightseeing    .   .   .
To Chester via English Lakes    .
Land Liverpool—to Chester    .
Land Southampton—to Oxford
Through Shakespeare Country
London—sightseeing
In London	
Via Ostend to Brussels
Brussels—sightseeing
Via Hague to Amsterdam
To Duisburg	
To Cologne and Coblenz
To Heidelberg and Mannheim
To Nuremberg—sightseeing
To Leipzig—sightseeing   .
To Berlin via Potsdam   .   .
In Berlin—sightseeing   .   .
In Berlin	
To Dresden—sightseeing .
To Prague through Bohemia
In Prague—sightseeing .   .
To Vienna through Austria
In Vienna—sightseeing
To Budapest along Danube
In Budapest—sightseeing .
Return to Vienna  ....
To Linz along Danube .   .
To Salzburg and Munich .
To Lindau	
To Lucerne via Zurich .   .
To Montreux via Interlaken
In Montreux	
By rail to Stresa     ....
To Venice via Milan    .   .
In Venice—sightseeing
To Florence over Apennines
In Florence—sightseeing  .
To Historic Rome ....
In Rome—sightseeing    .   .
To Naples—sightseeing
Visit Pompeii and Amalfi .
Excursion to Capri    .   .   .
To Genoa—Italian Riviera
To Nice—French Riviera .
Sightseeing—Monte Carlo
To Avignon—sightseeing
To Paris	
In Paris—sightseeing
Excursion to Versailles
In Paris	
Rail to Cherbourg—sail
Land Quebec (Empresses) or
Montreal (other ships) .   .
July   July   July
2        8      16
Motor travel used throughout Up to
Montreux except from London to
Brussels. From Montreux on travel Is
by rail.
15
16
17
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
25 Aug.1
26 2
27
28
29
30
31
25 Aug.1
26 2
27
28
29
30
31
Aug.1
2
3
4
5
6
7
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
14-15 21-2228-29
16      23      30
24 31
25 Sept.1
9
10
12
13
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
26
27
28
29
30
31
25 Sept.1
26 2
27 3
Sept. Sept. Sept.
1       11       15
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 Page 31
Collegiate
Party
No. 22
No church in the
world has a finer approach than St.
Peter's in Rome, the
great masterpiece of
Michelangelo. Its
yastness will awe
and astonish you.
37 Days
in Europe
51 Days
SCOTLAND and England in summer! Our
days here are full to overflowing as we journey
through the wondrous freshness of Scottish
highlands and English lanes, fields and hedgerows. Glasgow, Trossachs, Edinburgh, Chester,
Oxford, Kenilworth, Stratford-on-Avon. Then
to London, greatest of world capitals. We leave
them with regret as we watch the Dover cliffs
vanish as our steamer bears us to Ostend.
Within narrow limits Belgium offers great
attractions—noble mediasval architecture, a
wealth of the painter's art, modern industrial
development, cities with beautiful squares and
elm-shaded streets, a strange rural architecture. Street names are shown in both French
and Flemish in many towns, for Belgium is a
bi-lingual country. Brussels, one of the most
noted shopping centers.
Holland stands apart. There is a fascination in the monotony of her flat fields, regular ditches and quiet canals, but the real spell
of Holland lies in changing light of sky and
water. Hague has an air of quiet distinction;
in its famous wood the gossipy Pepys stepped
curiously. Amsterdam has no less charm.
Indulgent and kindly seem the towns of
Germany—Cologne, Coblenz, Mannheim, Freiburg. On our Rhine trip we pass through a
land of tradition and legend. Frowning down
on the river are many an ancient donjon keep
or watch-tower.
Switzerland's mountains, valleys, waterfalls,
The Italian Route
Eight Countries
lakes, and vineyards give her more than
her share of beauty. Nowhere in Europe can
be found a more thrilling view than from
Montreux—the Rhone Valley on the one side,
the blue waters of the Leman at one's feet, and
the grandeur of the Dents du Midi beyond.
Lucerne is equally endowed.
Then Italy and Stresa in the Lake Region;
Milan, its giant Cathedral tipped with myriad
spires; thence to Venice—like a soft-toned
pastel of varied but most delicate colors. Slipping in and out of the network of her canals
in one of her gondolas is a never-to-be-forgotten experience. The appeal of Venice is
romantic, that of Florence is spiritual . . .
we yearn to know the story of the Ponte
Vecchio. We must see Rome . . . stand on
Pincian Hill and in one sweeping glance
behold the magnificent scheme of avenues,
temples, cathedrals, fountains, trees, monuments and homes that lie beneath you . . .
see the "Eternal City," as beautiful today as
it was when Roman pagans climbed this same
hill to better behold their beloved city.
Naples with its gypsy-like gayety . . . Blue
Grotto . . . Pompeii . . . Amalfi.
France—seeing first the fashionable Riviera
—Nice, Monte Carlo, Mentone. Then to Avignon to wander awhile about her old, old
streets, and dream awhile on her famous
Bridge. Finally Paris: Gay, happy, short days
that become lifelong, joyous memories.
Scotland
England
Belgium
Holland
Germany
Switzerland
Italy
France
f631
See Page 34 for Other Rates Page 32
St. Peter's Dome as Seen from the Banks of the Tiber
For Enjoyment • . . Real
There's Never Been Such
IOur Adventures   '
Begin on Shipboard
Up the gangplank—down with care
and worry—we're off to cruise on
summer seas! We stow away our baggage and rush on deck to wave goodbye to those left behind. The gang
plank is drawn ashore. Our ship glides
down a wonderful ocean boulevard.
14
Cross the Channel
to Belgium
To Dover we go, to a channel steamer
for Ostend, famous continental bathing resort. Then by train through
Bruges and Ghent to Brussels, light-
hearted capital of Belgium. We enjoy the evening of exploration in
this gay city, "Little Paris."
•ji
in
24
Marvelous Montreux
and Castle of Chillon
When we first glimpsed Montreux
yesterday from high up the mountain
pass we were caught in its spell. Again
we think we've found the most wonderful place we have ever seen. How
we glory in its setting! How fascinating we find the famous Castle of
Chillon.
2-3
A Wonderful
River Cruise
4-6
Down the ever-broadening St. Lawrence through the soft Canadian Summer. Past towering cliffs against which
snuggle toy-like fishing villages. One-
third of the way to Europe by river
makes even our ocean crossing a real
sightseeing cruise.
15
Brussels—Sightseeing
Then to The Hague
In the morning we tour Brussels by
motor to see its many and varied interests; the wonderful Palace of
Justice/ Guild Halls, etc. In the afternoon we go by train into Holland
the land of windmills, canals, tulips
and bicycles. The charming Hague is
our destination—in the evening perhaps we swim at Scheveningen.
25
The World's
Longest Tunnel
Today we cross more Alpine Passes
and then go through the Simplon tunnel (longest in the world) into Italy.
Afternoon brings us to Stresa on Lake
Maggiore, where we look out on
the celebrated Borromean Islands.
Here is another city with a perfect
' ikeside setting.
Romance,
Fun, Good Food
Life on shipboard is an end I ess round of
good times and good food. Singing in
the moonlight, games and sports.
Naps in our deck chairs. And every
afternoon and evening we dance to
the irresistible music of our college
orchestra—one of America's best!
16
See the Hague Then
to Amsterdam
A morning motor excursion takes us
to the great Peace Palace, and the
other places of interest in this delightful capital. We also visit the
delightful and historic "House in
the Woods." After lunch we go by
train to Amsterdam.
26
Milan's Cathedral a
Then to Venice
Along the shores of Maggiore we
journey on our way to Milan, where
we stop for lunch and to visit the
great cathedral. Then across the fertile plain of Lombardy we continue
our journey to the "city of the sea,"
to be followed by our first un forge t-
able night in Venice.
OfL Along the Coast Past
*■*"        Pisa to Genoa
A long day's journey is this; but a
glorious one! We skirt the shores of
the Mediterranean from Rome on.
We get a good view of Pisa's famous
Leaning Tower from the train windows. Later we glimpse the Island of
Elba. And at dusk we arrive in Genoa.
7       Then We See the
Coast of Ireland
Our six days on board have been
happy ones, but who can resist the
thrill of nearing land? Land looms
through the haze off starboard! New
experiences are near, new sights in
the offing. We call at Belfast and then
go up the River Clyde into Scotland.
"I ^7       See Amsterdam
-*• ' and Cologne
Our day begins with a short sightseeing drive in Amsterdam. We then
go by train to Cologne where we
visit the "Dom," loveliest Gothic
cathedral in Germany. Once more
we entrain for a short journey along
the Rhine to Coblenz. Here we enjoy an evening of private explorations
in this delightful German city.
27
We Tour Venice
with a Gondolier
Today a guide-lecturer shows us the
places of interest. Venice has only
four modes of transportation—gondolas, motor boats, wheel barrows
and walking. Nowhere will we find
another city so unique. Inthe evening
we may make an independent excursion to watch the crowds at the Lido.
37
Through the
Italian Riviera
From Genoa we continue to Nice,
through "a radiant world of blue and
green and gold and silver; one of the
loveliest regions of a lovely land."
The glories of the Italian Riviera are
followed by the more rugged beauty
of the French Riviera—gay playgrounds of the world.
44
To Cherbourg
Sail Homeward
Our last breakfast in Europe and
then the boat train for Cherbourg! A
six-hour ride through Normandy—
and then on board ship we go to
steam homeward! We watch the
lights of the shore vanish in the night.
We are homeward bound.
8
The Trossachs
to Edinburgh
We arrive in Glasgow, the commercial capital of Scotland, passing some
of the largest shipbuilding yards in
the world. Through the TrossachsySl
rugged and romantic mountain defile
. . . one of the loveliest districts in
Great Britain ... to Edinburgh.
18
Up the Rhine
by Steamer
Now comes a glad holiday we shall
always remember—the famous "Rhine
trip" by steamer—through the legend
land of the Lorelei Rock and the
Rhine Castles. On our arrival in May-
ence we complete the day with a
short journey by train to Mannheim,
where we spend the night.
OO  Cross the Apennines
"" to Florence
Over the Apennines we go today,
through mountain passes and across the
va I ley of the Po—passing the bri 11 iant
towns of Padua, Ferrara, and Bologna
on our way to Florence. We buy luscious Italian fruit en route and admire
the scenery from our car windows.
38
We Drive Over the
Grand Comiche
The Grand Corniche by motor leads
us today along the Mediterranean to
Mentone. On our return we stop,aJ
Monte Carlo to visit the Casino and
those who wish wager a few francs
for the thrill. Then perhaps on our
return to Nice an evening swim.
45-50
Happy Days
at Sea
We spend long hours on deck,
watching the phosphorescent glow
of the deep Atlantic, recalling- the
pleasures of the trip, reenactlng in
our minds the little comedies ana
tragedies en route. We compare notes
and purchases, and plan our next trip. Page 33
Pleasure... and Economy
a Program-51 Day s-f 631
9 Now a Day
in Edinburgh
On a  morning sightseeing trip in
Edinburgh, we visit the Castle, St.
Giles' Cathedral, Parliament Hall,
John Knox's House, the Burns, Nelson and Scott monuments, and Holy-
rood Palace and Abbey, where lived
the ill-fated Mary, Queen of Scots.
10
English Lakes
to Chester
We travel from Edinburgh via Moffat,
Carlisle, Penrith, Keswick; through
the beautiful English Lake District,
Windermere and Keswick; Lancaster
and Preston to Chester. We see the
unique "Rows," and walk the top
of old Roman walls.
19
Visit "Old Heidelberg" and Freiburg
A short journey from Mannheim along
the banks of the Neckar River brings
us to Heidelberg for a motor excursion. We visit the ancient Castle of
Heidelberg and the famous University. After a drive about the city, one
of the most attractive in all Germany,
we continue to Freiburg.
29
Florence — Sightseeing and Shopping
Today we visit the Uffizi and Pitti Galleries; we see the Duomo, the Campanile, and the Baptistry; the church of
Santa Croce. We buy Florentine jewelry on the Ponte Vecchio/and leather
goods and linens, and mingle with
the happy, ever-singing natives.
39
To Avignon and
Its Palace
After breakfast we leave by train for
Avignon, passing through Toulon,
Marseilles and Aries. Our afternoon
in Avignon is occupied with a visit
to the Palace of the Popes and the
14th Century Cathedral next to it.
We find the gay evening throngs
filled with a carnival spirit.
51
Home Again—
Today We Land
Our trip comes to an end ... our last
few hours on the St. Lawrence, then
wedisembarkatMontrealorQuebec.
We've been to Europe! And how
we'll thrill the home folks! How
they'll laugh about "that" adventure
—wa< it in Heildelberg? And"that"
evening in Naples?
20
Through the Black
Forest to Lucerne
"Freiburg, En Baden"—called the
"capital of the Black Forest," is famed
for its roadside gardens. Our train
takes us through the Black Forest region which has furnished the world
with so many folk tales, legends, and
weird superstitions. We continue
through Basle to Lucerne.
30
We Feel the
Spell of Italy
We journey via Arezzo and Orvieto
to Rome. We feel Italy's spell! We
love this land of art and history, of
azure skies and golden light, or gay
colors and picturesque people. Then
In the afternoon we reach another
major goal—the great city on the Po.
40
Soon We'll Be i
"Gay Paree"
Today we leave Avignon and go by
train through Lyons to Paris. On our
way we see the neat vineyards of
Burgundy, and the Forests of Fon-
tainebleau. Our first evening demonstrates that our stay in Paris will indeed prove to be a perfect climax to
our trip.
*£      £&£«~^
J,      '"ft^A
And   so   ends   another
Travel   Guild  European
Party that gives a surplus
in value I
See page 34 for a Table of Rates
11
Through Shakespeare
Land and Oxford
This day we visit Kenflworth and
Warwick Castles, Shottery and Strat-
ford-on-Avon—rich in historical and
literary lore. Then through Oxford to
London, passing Stoke Poges and
Windsor en route. We reach London
in time for the theatres that night.
21
A Glorious Day
in Lucerne
In Lucerne, thronged with travelers
from the world over, we see the old
covered bridge mentioned in Longfellow's "Golden Legend," and the
Lion of Lucerne hewn out of rock.
We have an entire day free to relax
in the calm beauty of this enchanted
spot.
31
We Start the Story of
the "Eternal City"
We motor with our lecturer, to see the
wonders of Rome: the ancient ruins,
modern palaces, glorious churches,
the museums, which make Rome marvelous. We see the Forum in which
Caesars walked, thebalcony at Palace
Chigi from which Mussolini speaks.
SffiB?3'^B
41
Today We See the
Treasures of Paris
To wake up in Paris is to thrill at the
approach of adventures new. There's
an indescribable sparkle, an infectious
feeling in the air. We are eager to
start our sightseeing tour—a bird's-
eye-view of the city. Experienced
lecturers show us all about Paris.
It's a wonderful city.
The Small Arc de Triomphe, Pare da Carrouscll,  Paris
1 2        °ur First Day in
-"-"* London—Sightseeing
We rise bright and early for a sightseeing trip about London, visiting the
places about which we have always
heard; Piccadilly Circus, the Strand,
Trafalgar Square, Buckingham Palace,
Westminster Abbey, the Houses of
Parliament, the Tower of London and
other sights.
f "" A
llll*
22
To Interlaken; Visit
Lauterbrunnen
Now we climb by narrow gauge railway over the far-famed Brunig Pass,
descending to lovely Interlaken where
we lunch and glory in the beauty of
this city, with its beautiful vistas and
superb views of the Jungfrau. We
make an afternoon excursion to Lauterbrunnen and theTrummelbach Falls.
32
Rome's Story
Continued
A second day's formal program is
necessary to complete the circuit of
Rome's outstanding treasures. It includes a trip through the Vatican
Museum and St. Peter's. Our three
evenings in Rome are free for inde-
pendent programs. We find much todo.
fifiinr
42
Visit Versailles
and Malmaison
Today we go by motor to Malmaison;
and then to Versailles—steeped in
French history. We picture its gaieties,
and sigh at the tragic role it played.
Built to please a French Queen, the
cottages and the old Dutch mill in
the woods remain idyllic.
■M.
London—Amusement
Capital of the World
Places that were heretofore merely
names become realities. How we
revel in the shops of the great metropolis! Such lovely leather goods
and woolens! London is the theatre
capital of the world. Most of us will
want to see a typical English play.
23
We Cross Over the
Bernese Oberland
We journey first by standard gauge
rail to Zweisimmen where we take
the famous Montreux-Obertand electric railway for one of the world's
mostbeautiful train rides. We marvel
at the wild beauty and at chalets high
up the mountain sides—how do they
transport food and water?
33
Now We Must
See Naples
Today we go to another immortal city
—Naples. The city is situated on a
beautiful bay, with a background of
green hills dotted with red-roofed
houses and with a foreground of picturesque peninsulas. On our arrival
we take a motor trip through the city.
43
Now We Have Our
Private Adventures
This day is free for independent programs—a final visit to the Louvre, once
more down the Champs Elysees, one
final night of gaiety on Montmartre or
the Monpamasse, our final shopping
expeditions. No city offers such a rare
combination of historic memories,
gaiety and achievement.
—CAVE    VIMS     Wtf£^
On Our Way to London from the Shakespeare Country We See This View of Windsor Castle QAvsS, i^ilSZ~—r.     **     "WSSfe*
<#g5^jg^~ .-iv
Page 34
The Perfection of the Route of Collegiate Party
No. 22 Is, at Best, Merely Suggested by the Map
Collegiate Party 22—Time Table
22B 22C 22D22E 22F 22G
$631 $628 $669 $643 $608 S634
51  53  58  55  49  52
37  41  43  43  37  37
otj
o-o
May May June June June June
20     27       3     11      17     24
27 June 3 10 24 Julyl
28 4     11     Sm     25       2
29 5      12   N°'e    26        3
30
6
13
19
27
4
31
7
14
20
28
5
June'
8
15
21-22
29
6
2
9
16
23
30
7
3
10
17
24
Julyl
8
4
11
18
25
2
9
5
12
19
26
3
10
6
13
20
27
4
11
7
14
21
28
5
12
8
15
22
29
6
13
9
16
23
30
7
14
10
17
24
Julyl
8
15
11
18
25
2
9
16
12
19
26
3
10
17
&is
13
20
27
4
11
18
1*
14
21
28
5
12
19
**s
15
22
29
6
13
20
16
23
30
7
14
21
17
24
Julyl
8
15
22
.gioi
i            18
25
2
9
16
23
19
26
3
10
17
24
20
27
4
11
18
25
21
28
5
12
19
26
22
29
6
13
20
27
23
30
7
14
21
28
24
Julyl
8
15
22
29
25
2
9
16
23
30
^•■y
26
3
10
17
24
31
27
4
11
18
25 Aug. 1
r;
28
29
5
6
12
13
19
20
26
27
2
■*
3
h
30
lo
lo
to
28
4
£•'*.
Julyl
2
12
13
21
29
30
29
30
5
6
July   July  July Aug. Aug- Aug.
9      18     30       4       4     14
K"0     S
l»tJ       Q.,2
Collegiate Party Number . 22H22J22K22L22M22N
. Price of Collegiate Party .  . S598 S634 $590 $626 $600 S626
. . Total Number of Days ... 48     52    48     52    49    52
. Number of Days on Land .  . 35     37     35     37     37     37
NOTE:
Pa
rty
22E does
not visit
o
o
o
"3-D.
o
0
Scotland.
It land
at Souths
■npton
on
*   m
8*B
8
a
3-D
June   18
and
proceeds
dl
rectly
to
Jo
• $ s
?«
ts
fa
Oxford.
n<
a!
Oca
a o
a£
a<
Sail—Quebec (Empresses) or
Montreal (other ships) .   .   ,
Land Glasgow—throughTrossa
In Edinburgh ....'-...
To Chester Via Lake Country
Land Liverpool—To Chester
Shakespeare Country
London—sightseeing
In London	
Brussels via Ostend  .
Brussels—to Hague  .
Hague—to Amsterdam
Via Cologne to Coblenz
Rhine steamer—Mannhei
Heidelberg—Freiburg .
To wonderful Lucerne .
A day in Lucerne .   .   .
Brunig Pass to Interlaken
To Montreux     ....
In Montreux—Castle Chillon
To Stresa via Simplon Pass
To Venice via Milan    .
In Venice—sightseeing
By rail to Florence    .   .
In Florence—sightseeing
To historic Rome   .   .   .
In Rome—sightseeing
In Rome—sightseeing    .
To Naples—sightseeing
Visit Pompeii and Amalfi
Excursion to Capri    .   .
To Genoa via Pisa    .   .
To Nice—French Riviera
In Nice—sightseeing
To Avignon—sightseeing
Rail to Paris	
In Paris—sightseeing
Versailles and Malmaison
In Paris	
Rail to Cherbourg—sail
Land Quebec (Empresses) o
Montreal (other ships) .   .
July  July July July  July Aus-
:hs
*Party 22D will leave Paris for
England on July 21 and will sail from
Liverpool on July 22.
2
8
16
22
29
5
15
29
Aug. 5 12
16
30
6
13
17
31
7
14
10
11
18
24
Aug,
I    8
15
12
19
26
2
9
16
13
20
27
3
10
17
14
21
28
4
11
18
15
22
29
5
12
19
16
23
30
6
13
20
17
24
31
7
14
21
18
25
Aug.'
8
15
22
19
26
2
9
16
23
20
27
3
10
17
24
21
28
4
11
18
25
22
29
5
12
19
26
23
30
6
13
20
27
24
31
7
14
21
28
25
Aug.
8
15
22
29
26
2
9
16
23
30
27
3
10
17
24
31
28
4
11
18
25
Sept.
29
5
11
19
26
2
30
6
13
20
27
3
31
7
14
21
28
4
Aug.
8
15
22
29
5
2
9
16
23
30
6
3
10
17
24
31
7
4
11
18
25
Sept.1
8
5
12
19
26
2
9
6
13
20
27
3
10
7
14
21
28
4
11
8
15
22
29
5
12
9
16
23
30
6
13
10
17
24
31
7
14
11
18
25
Sept
8
15
12
19
26
2
9
16
13
20
27
3
10
17
Aug.
Aug.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept
18
28
1
11
15
25
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2 Page 35
Collegiate
Party
No. 23
Mount Pilatus, called
the Sleeping Giant,
stands guard over
lovely Lucerne. In
ancient times Pilatus
was believed to be
the abode of fire-eating dragons whose
depredations were
opposed by kindly,
beneficent elves.
23 Days
in Europe
38 Days
.TORTUNATE indeed is this special itinerary
for those who have longed to see Europe, who
have hut a short vacation, who must be sparing with their funds, yet withal who desire
comfort and a high standard of service.
Age-old, insistent, not-to-be-denied, comes
the call—the call to see and know, to have the
character of experience given to story and
picture-book knowledge of strange scenes and
distant cities—to have imagination rejoiced by
reality. The ecstasy of preparation, the dusty
but thrilling decisiveness of hauling down suitcases, the grave but delicious hesitancies as to
what to take, what to leave, what to wear.
Montreal and Quebec—sentinel cities guarding the St. Lawrence, semi-medieval, foreign-
tongued, rock-girt. Two days on the blue
mirror of the St. Lawrence . . . two thousand
odd miles of tumbling Atlantic ... a thrilling
journey up the Clyde to Glasgow.
Through the Trossachs, Edinburgh, wonderful adventures along the beautiful heather
lined highways of Scotland. Our first glimpse
of England—the Lake Country—is breath taking. Chester, Oxford, Shakespeare Land, the
environs of London, London itself. As a child
we visioned princes' palaces—towers and turrets—enormous banquet halls—fine tapestries
—rare paintings—green lawns given life by
sparkling fountains. Maybe in after years we
decided our childhood. imagination was extravagant.    England is that story come true!
Travel Guild Special
Seven Countries
Gallant Belgium! Brussels, its capital, one
of the finest cities of Europe. Northward
through Antwerp, Rotterdam to The Hague,
tree-shaded, canal-threaded capital of Holland.
Amsterdam, a commercial center, more canals,
more beauty, the diamond-cutting industry,
noble houses, galleries of great pictures.
Yes, to Germany! To Cologne—its celebrated cathedral. Coblenz. Up the Rhine
through wild, deeply cleft rocks of slate;
castle ruins; legend haunted, mountain strong-t
holds; terraced vineyards; picture villages; the
Seven Hills; the Lorelei Rock. All reflected
in the Rhine's silvery waters.   Heidelberg.
Switzerland's strange combination of overwhelming beauty, traditions of antiquity and
modern progress. Towering peaks rooted in
flowers, crowned with snow; gem-like lakes;
the people. We soar up passes to unseen lands.
Crystal  streams, great gorges,  leaping falls.
Paris—golden hours of adventure, experience, education, fun, beauty! Paris of the Rue
de la Paix and the Rue Royal—windows flashing with jewels, perfumes, gowns, pictures!
Paris of the Quai d'Orsay—almost somber!
Paris of Montmartre—great houses sleeping
throughout the day, waking after sunset to
music, laughter, dancing feet! Paris of the '
Monceau-Etoile — beautiful homes, lovely
parks, exquisite French children! Paris of the
Latin Quarter—intriguing cafes and arty
"types!"
Scotland
England
Belgium
Holland
Germany
Switzerland
France
f427
See Pane 37 for Other Rates
kill HI'   ^IS/M <""£#**
'4-
Vt,
g^p^ff^ Page 36
A Remarkable 7 Country Trip
1ST TO 7TH DAYS—GOOD TIMES AT SEA
We're off to cruise on summer seas! The
gangplank is lifted and our ship glides out into
the St. Lawrence. Past quaint fishing villages
we go, down the widening St. Lawrence toward
the open sea and Europe. Dancing to the music
of a college band; games and sports; group
singing in the moonlight! It is indeed like a
big collegiate party, with youth in the role of
undergraduates and those who are older exemplifying the carefree spirit of graduates at a
class reunion—a vacation you'll never forget!
8TH DAY—THROUGH THE LAND OF HEATHER
Yesterday we thrilled at the beauty of the
Irish coast. We now know why it is called the
Emerald Isle. Then this morning we go up the
beautiful Clyde. Shores are lined with huge
factories—in the background the beautiful highlands. At times the river is so narrow it seems
that we could jump to the shore. Rrom Glasgow, we journey through the glorious Trossachs
of Scotland—lovely lake and mountain country
—the most popular region in all Scotland.
9TH DAY—IN EDINBURGH
Today we make a morning motor tour through
this delightful Scottish metropolis. In spite of
its growth, Edinburgh still preserves the charm
of a village. As we pass along the quaint
streets of the old town, we see, unspoiled by
restoring hands, the relics of the mighty past—
St. Giles' Cathedral, with its fairylike spire,
High Street and Canon-gate, old Parliament
Hall, the great castle on its frowning rock, the
houses where Scott and Burns once lived, the
imposing pile of Holyrood Palace.
10TH DAY—THROUGH THE HIGHLAND
Today we journey southward through the
rugged highlands of Scotland, the land made
famous by Burns, to Carlisle. Thence we continue southward through the beloved English
lake district made famous by Wordsworth. The
beauty of the region, however, needed no poet
to make it noteworthy. Then Chester, the ideal
gateway to England. It was one of the chief
military stations of the ancient Romans.
11TH DAY—THE SHAKESPEARE COUNTRY
We continue our tour by motor through the
region made famous by Shakespeare, visiting
Stratford-on-Avon, Shottery, Warwick, Kenil-
worth Castle, then to Oxford, where we see its
venerable colleges. Our route to London takes
us by way of Eton and Windsor Castle.
12TH AND 13TH DAYS—IN GIGANTIC LONDON
We motor with a guide-lecturer through London—somber, majestic. We see the Parliament
Buildings, Westminster Abbey, Buckingham Palace, the Horse Guards, Trafalgar Square, Strand,
Dickens' Old Curiosity Shop, London Bridge,
Tower Bridge, Tower of London (Crown Jewels,
White Tower, Armouries, etc.), St. Paul's
Cathedral, Thames Embankment, Hyde Park,
and a great deal more. Then follows a day of
glorious independent adventures.
14TH   DAY—TO   THE   CONTINENT—BELGIUM
We embark on our Continental adventures by
way of Ostend. Through Bruges and Ghent we
go, and soon we are in Brussels. Here to enjoy
another thrilling evening.
15TH DAY—BRUSSELS AND HOLLAND
A colorful drive through Brussels precedes
our excursion into the land of Picturesque
Dutch Costumes. We see the Guild Hall, the
marvelous Hotel de Ville, the Peace Palace, and
many other beautiful and imposing spots. Then
we board our train for The Hague. We see
dykes and canals, windmills, quaint villages.
16TH DAY—THE HAGUE AND AMSTERDAM
The principal center of The Hague is an artificial lake, the Vijvir.  Our sightseeing trip also
includes a drive out to the "House in the Woods"
with its unique art treasures.   After this fas-:
cinating trip we go to Amsterdam.
17TH DAY—AMSTERDAM—ON TO GERMANY
During our morning in Amsterdam we see the
attractions of this Dutch commercial capital,
which was for centuries the mercantile capital
of Europe. It is famous for its canals, its''
beauty, its diamond cutting industry, its noble
houses and its rich picture galleries. Then follows a journey by train with a stop at Cologne
to visit the cathedral—and on to Coblenz.
18TH  DAY—UP THE  RHINE RIVER
Our journey by steamer up the Rhine toj
Mayence becomes a memorable event even in
the most exciting of lives. The gigantic Lorelei
Rock. The beautiful, turreted castles on the
heights—the strongholds of the feudal lords,
now empty symbols of medievalism. The picturesque Pfalz Castle, built in midstream. From
Mayence we continue by train to Mannheim.
19TH DAY—VISIT HEIDELBERG—TO FREIBURG
A short train ride brings us to Heidelberg.
Here we laugh at the enormous wine tun with I
a stairway built to its top and the trick clock in
the basement of Heidelberg Castle. The university and old prison on whose walls the students
have proudly left their portraits, autographs and
philosophical slogans. Then through the ominous Black Forest by train to Freiburg.
20TH  DAY—INTO  SWITZERLAND
By train we continue through the Black Forest
region up the Rhine to Basle where we enter
Switzerland, a land of concentrated beauty.
21ST  DAY—IN   LUCERNE—A  PERFECT  CITY
Lovely Lucerne, built around one end of the
"Lake of the Four Cantons," provides us with
many enchanted hours;  behind her the jutted
heights   of   the   Alps;    fairy-white   steamers
quietly   speeding   along   the  blue,  blue  lake;
peaked roofs that came right out of the Middle
Ages.   Lucerne's  attractions are so  many and
yet so compact that the greatest enjoyment may
be had here without a formal program.
22ND DAY—OVER ALPINE PASSES
Over the famed Brunig Pass we proceed to
Interlaken, in the heart of the Bernese Oberland
and in the shadow of the magnificent Jungfrau.
Then by one of the most scenic rail journeys
in the world we ride through heights of the
Bernese Oberland to Montreux, another delightful city included in our itinerary of Switzerland.
The chief attraction here, next to the magnificent scenery, is the Castle of Chillon, made
famous by Byron in his "Prisoner of Chillon."
23RD  DAY—THROUGH   BURGUNDY  TO  PARIS
Across the Jura Mountains, through the vineyards of Burgundy, through the Forest of Fon-
tainebleau and then in Paris for dinner.
24TH TO 29TH DAYS—THE SECRETS OF PARIS
How could an itinerary such as we have followed be made more perfect, than to conclude
with almost a week in Paris? The gay capital
of France, situated on both banks of the River
Seine, is connected by 31 bridges. On our tour
of the city by motor with our guide we visit
all the places of greatest interest.
On our second day we make an excursion by
motor to Versailles and Malmaison.
Now we know our way about—the days that
follow are our own to do with as we please—
we do much, but that is another story!
SOTH DAY—ALL GOOD THINGS MUST END
Expectation mounts high as we awake this
morning to pack our purchased treasures and
take the boat train for Cherbourg! A six-hour
ride through Normandy, our last meal on a
French dining car—then on board ship.
S1ST TO 38TH DAYS—OUR RETURN VOYAGE Pose 37
Collegiate Partv Xo.23—Time Table
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51 Days
Collegiate
Party
No. 24
Scotland
England
Belgium
Holland
Germany
Czechoslovakia
Austria
Hungary
Switzerland
France
37 Days in Europe
Budapest Is One of Europe's Most Charming Cities
Ten Countries — Each Wonderful—Each Different
OINCE the Collegiate Party No. 24 features
the Central Europe region, emphasis will be
given to that portion of the route. The same
comprehensive programs that characterize the
other Collegiate itineraries are offered in Scotland, England, Belgium and France.
1ST TO 7TH DAYS—SAIL ACROSS THE SEA
8TH  DAY—THROUGH THE TROSSACHS
9TH  DAY—SIGHTSEEING  IN   EDINBURGH
10TH DAY—ENGLISH LAKES—CHESTER
11TH   DAY—THE   SHAKESPEARE   COUNTRY
12TH AND 13TH DAYS—SEEING LONDON
• One day of comprehensive sightseeing and
a day of delightful independent programs.
14TH DAY—TO OSTEND AND BRUSSELS
15TH  DAY—BRUSSELS AND THE HAGUE
16TH DAY—THE HAGUE AND AMSTERDAM
17TH DAY—COLOGNE AND COBLENZ
Amsterdam sightseeing then to Cologne—visit
the cathedral.  Continue up Rhine to Coblenz.
18TH  DAY—THE  RHINE  BY  STEAMER
Into  this   day  on  the  most  celebrated  of
Europe's rivers you condense a review of centuries of history.  To Mannheim for night.
19TH   DAY—VISIT   COLORFUL   HEIDELBERG
Heidelberg is reached by train. We visit
its romantic castle, see its commanding view
of the Neckar Valley. Traditions of German
student life cluster about the oldest of German universities located in the old town. Then
an ideal evening in ancient Nuremberg.
20TH DAY—SIGHTSEEING IN NUREMBERG
Nuremberg, one of the quaintest old towns
in all Germany, retains much of its medieval
architecture, with its high gables, stone balconies, and curious carvings.
21ST DAY—THEN WE SEE LEIPZIG
Another trip through industrious, efficient
Germany. Its farms are beautifully kept.
Then we reach Leipzig in time for a motor
sightseeing trip.
22ND DAY—A MORNING IN  LEIPZIG-BERLIN
The journey to Berlin is a short one so we
have a free morning in Leipzig.
23RD AND 24TH DAYS—SEEING BERLIN
"We see Berlin, the magnificent, famed for
its beautiful civic centers. Then follows a day
free for independent programs.
25TH   DAY—YOU   EXPLORE   DRESDEN
A short rail journey brings us to Dresden
for lunch. Then we take motor cars for
another journey of exploration. We visit the
Green Vault. We see the famous painting, the
Sistine Madonna.
26TH DAY—A MORNING IN  DRESDEN
Our morning is free for independent adventures.  Then we depart for Prague.   Our journey  is  through  the  most  fascinating  scenic
region   of    Germany,    "Saxon   Switzerland."
27TH DAY—MOTOR THROUGH PRAGUE
Prague, capital of the ancient Bohemia, now
the capital of Czecho-SIovakia, situated on
both banks of the River Vltavai, is a city of
great historical and religious interest. We
see in our morning sightseeing by motor the
city's individuality of architecture and life,
its picturesque skylines, its medieval streets,
the heights crowned by venerable Hradcany.
28TH DAY—TO VIENNA—CITY OF SONG
Today   we    continue   the   journey   across
Czecho-SIovakia into Austria, and to Vienna.
29TH   DAY—A   TOUR   OF  VIENNA
On today's sightseeing trip we admire the
great wide boulevards and beautiful parks.
Ringstrasse is not surpassed in architectural
magnificence in any city. We love this city,
once the gayest capital of Europe. Its people
are cultured, aristocratic, courteous. The
fashionable old city. The beautiful modern
section surrounding it.
30TH DAY—THE HOME OF THE MAGYARS
After the Rhine journey what could be more
lovely than to follow the banks of the Danube
from Vienna to Budapest?
31ST DAY—A DAY IN BUDAPEST
Now we learn the charm of old Hungary,
home of the Magyars. A day of sightseeing
gives us a new appreciation of the solidity of
Magyar character. You'll see the Royal
Opera House, the Elisabeth Bridge, the Petofi
monument, the National Museum and the
countless monuments to Hungary's heroes—
all symbols of patriotic achievement. But at
night we know why they call Budapest "the
city charming!" We have two nights in
Budapest! The capital, always diverting and
amusing, is at its best in the tourist season.
32ND DAY—INTO AUSTRIA'S TYROL
We journey today into the heart of the Tyrol
to Innsbruck on the River Inn. Wonderful"
views of this fine, bold mountain region are
seen in every direction. The houses with
carved gables, and bright paint.
33RD DAY—INTO  SWITZERLAND
We enjoy continuous mountain scenery to
Lucerne.  Never have we seen so many interesting shops and the Lion of Lucerne by night!
34TH DAY—INTERLAKEN AND MONTREUX
Now we board a cog railway train. Lunch
in Interlaken. By way of Spiez to Montreux.
How can people live in the chalets perched so
perilously on the mountain sides?
S5TH DAY—VISIT CASTLE OF CHILLON
36TH   DAY—PARIS!    HERE   WE   COME
37TH TO 43RD DAYS—SEVEN DAYS IN PARIS
One day of sightseeing. We see what we
should. A day for Versailles and Malmaison.
Then we really do see Paris with the best
guide in the world . . . ourselves.
44TH DAY—DEPART  FOR CHERBOURG
45TH TO 50TH DAYS—HOMEWARD BOUND
51ST DAY—WHAT A TRIP WE'VE HAD!
— Page 39
Heart of Europe
Ten Countries
$648
-I-HE right trip to Europe is a glorious thing. It is getting
away from the monotony of every day to a completely new
world with a completely new life ... an exchanging of
humdrum for adventure, friends, thrills, romance ... a
complete change—it is an impetus to new thoughts, new
interests, new efforts ... it is a dramatized education in
history, politics, economics, art ... it is a course in living.
It is an adventure that will provide you forever with pleasant memories.
The pleasures of traveling alone in strange lands can
never compare to the joys of traveling with a select party
of congenial people. An inexperienced traveler could never
plan as comprehensive program as this one planned by
travel experts. The party leisurely visits England; Belgium; Holland; Germany (including Berlin and Dresden)
as well as the Rhine region, Czecho-SIovakia, Austria, Hungary, Switzerland and France. The outstanding features
of each country are included. You visit nine of the greatest of Europe's capitals. Their famous boulevards, their
shops, their great museums and galleries, their interesting
people, their playgrounds—all this will be yours.
No other single factor has more to do with the pleasure of a tour than its leadership. The party will enjoy
throughout the elaborate and efficient service of The Travel
Guild's organization in Europe.
This delightful tour has been planned for travel lovers yearning for a summer of adventure and romance which
will take them through the fascinating central European
countries at a surprisingly nominal cost. Every possible
detail for comfort and enjoyment has been anticipated.
U        y   POLAN
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This Is the Delightful Route We Will Follow
Party No. 24—Time Table
24B 24D
$648 $686
51      58
37      43
-C_* -CO
a>. d<
May June
SO 3
27 10
28 11
29 12
24F
S625
49
37
June
17
24
25
26
30 13      27
31 14      28
Junel   15      29
2     16     30
17 Julyl
18 2
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Collegiate Party Number
. . Price of Collegiate Party . .
. . . Total Number of Days . . .
. . Number of Days on Land. .
Note: Party 24H will not villi Scot,
land. It will land at Liverpool and then
proceed to Chester.
Sail from Montreal on a Duchess
ship	
Land Glasgow—through Trossachs
Edinburgh—sightseeing    ....
Journey to Chester	
Land Liverpool—to Chester    .   .
Through Shakespeare Country
London—sightseeing r	
In London ....'.	
To Brussels via Ostend     ....
Visit Brussels—to Hague     .   .   .
Visit Hague—to Amsterdam    .   .
Via Cologne to Coblenz    .   .   .
Rhine steamer—Mannheim    .   .   .
Via Heidelberg to Nuremberg .
In Nuremberg—sightseeing .   .   .
To Leipzig—sightseeing   ....
To monumental Berlin	
In Berlin—sightseeing	
In Berlin	
To Dresden—sightseeing ....
To Prague through Bohemia     .   .
In Prague—sightseeing	
To charming Vienna	
In Vienna—sightseeing    ....
To Budapest along Danube .   .   .
In Budapest—sightseeing ....
To Innsbruck—in Tyrol     ....
To Lucerne via Zurich	
Via Interlaken to Montreux     .   .
In Montreux	
Rail to Paris	
In Paris—sightseeing	
Versailles and Malmaison    .   .   .
In Paris	
In Paris	
In Paris	
Paris	
.In Paris	
Rail to Cherbourg—Sail   ....
Land  Quebec (Empresses  or
Montreal (other ships) ....
24G 24H 24J
S651
S636 $651
52
50
52
37
34
37
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o
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?o
as
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OCQ
June
July
July
24
2
8
Julyl
15
2
See
Not*
16
3
10
17
4
11
18
5
12
19
6
13
20
7
14
21
8
15
22
9
16
23
10
17
24
11
18
25
12
19
26
13
20
27
14
21
28
15
22
29
16
23
30
17
24
31
18
25 Aug. 1
19
26
2
20
27
3
21
28
4
22
29
5
23
30
6
24
31
7
25 Aug. 1
26 2
27
28
29
30
31
Aug.1
2
3
4
5
6
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
12
Aug. Aug. Aug.
14      20      28
"Party 24D will leave Pails lor England on July 21 and will sail from
Liverpool July 22. Page 40
31 Days
Collegiate
Party
No. 25
Scotland
England
Holland
Belgium
France
16 Days
in Europe
Anne Hathaway's Cottage—A Lovely Spot as Well as a Literary Shrine
A Perfect One Month Vacation Trip
1ST TO 7TH DAYS—THE OCEAN VOYAGE
Sailing day! The activity!' The thrill of it
all.. Your ship glides out into the St. Lawrence. Handkerchiefs flutter. Flags wave.
Whistles blow. Such a gay flurry. Down nature's boulevard to Europe. This is the way
to go to Europe. Picturesque villages along
the shore. Some perched on bluffs; some
snuggling under cliffs. Each distinctive. What
a treat is this St. Lawrence trip! The open
sea—but you don't realize it. There's so much
to do. So many likable companions. Before
you realize it you glide to the end of your
voyage up the River Clyde.  Scotland.
8TH  DAY—ACROSS   SCOTLAND
And here is Glasgow—off the ship!   Then
that wonderful drive through the Trossachs.
Our first night on land we spend in Edinburgh
9TH   DAY—AND   NOW   WE   SEE   EDINBURGH
Among the beautiful cities of the world
Edinburgh holds an honored place. Its enduring charm has won universal recognition.
"Mine own romantic town," was Sir Walter
Scott's appreciative description. It has been
the center of Scottish national life for centuries. Edinburgh in many ways is incomparable. Its beauty of situation and environment
delights us.
10TH  DAY—TO  CARLISLE  AND THE  LAKES
Southward we travel. More gorgeous scenery. We come to Carlisle which.has attracted
visitors—welcome and unwelcome—ever since
it was founded, and the date of its foundation
goes back to the days of William the Conqueror. Continue past the English Lakes to
the ancient Roman fortress, now the charming
city of Chester. Here you spend the night.
No more colorful spot can be found in all England than this Welsh border town.
11TH   DAY—HOMAGE   TO   SHAKESPEARE
A  swift  journey  by  motor  takes  you  to
Shakespeare land.  You visit Kenilworth Castle,
marvelous old ruins.   The great banquet hall.
Reminders of past glories. You love the place.
You decide to read again Sir Walter Scott's
"Kenilworth;'' Before your visions of Kenilworth die, your motor has carried you to delightful Warwick, with its crooked streets and
quaint timbered houses. You visit the castle
described by Scott as "that fairest monument
of ancient and chivalrous splendour which yet
remains uninjured by time." The castle gardens. You feel the romance of them. History,
stranger, far more fascinating than fiction.
Stratford-on-Avon. Shakespeare's spirit still
lives here. It soon has you in its spell. Shakespeare's House, the room in which he was
born, his desk, his chair. Stratford Church.
Shakespeare's Tomb. Everything centers
around Shakespeare, and you feel that Stratford has changed but little since his day.
On to Oxford. Its colleges. Unlike anything in America. Some of these colleges
established centuries before America was discovered. Rich in tradition. Then, past Stoke
Poges, the churchyard where poet Gray wrote
his Elegy. A ride through Burnham Beeches.
Eton, Windsor—its great castle frowns down
on you. At last London.
12TH TO 14TH DAYS—YOU "TAKE" LONDON
You want to see everything. You tour the
city with a guide who knows his London. How
fascinating he makes your day. By dinner
time you, too, know London. You could write
a book on London. But you still have volumes
more of material to collect. Your next two
days are left open for independent programs.
What a lot you crowd into these days.
15TH   DAY—OVER  THE  NORTH  SEA
Leave London after breakfast. Harwich by
noon. Five thirty o'clock and you are in a
new country—Holland; you spend the night
at Flushing, on the Island of Walcheren, a
delightful seaside resort. The air is magnificent, the surroundings characteristically Dutch.
16TH DAY—EXCURSION TO MIDDLEBURG
From  Flushing you make an  excursion to
Middleburg, a peculiarly Dutch town. You
see the fine abbey, magnificent town hall, and
picturesque dress of the people. You adore
this wonderful spot, you see bicycles everywhere. Then you go by ferry and train to
Belgium . . . Brussels.
17TH DAY—SIGHTSEEING IN BRUSSELS
You tour this city of beautiful vistas. The
Hotel de Ville, the Market Place, and famous
Guild Halls, the King's Hall, the Chqrch of
St. Gudule, the Palais de Justice—one of the
largest and most beautiful buildings in the
world—the Mannekin—the best known inhabitant of Brussels. Then an afternoon free
in Brussels. The gloves you buy—what size
does Aunt Mary wear? Then by late afternoon
train you leave for Paris. How thrilled you
are to arrive. Now for a week of adventure.
You expect much of Paris and you will not
be disappointed.
18TH TO  22ND DAYS—SIX DAYS IN PARIS
Your first day you tour the city with a guide.
He knows how to show you Paris. Among the
items recorded in your notebook after the day
is over are all the places you've heard about
and that you've wanted to see and many more.
It is amazingly easy to find your way about
Paris after the day's program.
The second day you motor to Versailles.
You will always treasure the mental pictures
you carry away.   You see Malmaison, too.
Then follow days of independent programs.
You do see it all. The Paris of Fashion. The
museums. The galleries. The life and sparkle
on the Boulevards. You never were so happy.
23 RD DAY—PACK UP YOUR TREASURES
Through Normandy . . . Cherbourg . . .
shipboard again. Such a vacation. And such
a glorious time on shipboard.
31ST  DAY—MONTREAL  ONCE  MORE
You're back in Quebec before you want to
be. Montreal. Home. Thirty-one days, a month
of adventures you'll never forget. Page 41
The Vacation Special
Five Countries
R,
$327
-EALIZE your dreams—see Europe! Enjoy a life time of cherished
memories.  You can do this—visit five countries—for as little as $295.
Through Scotland—Glasgow, the Trossachs, Edinburgh! A visit to
the Scottish Highlands is more than a holiday tour; it is a great experience.
To see the sun set over mountain peaks, rising like giant stalagmites in a
grotto of the skies, is to witness an ever-memorable scene.
England! Land of rolling hills, patched vari-colored fields* cottages
and gardens, verdant forests all laced together with hedge-lined highways.
You motor through it all. Shakespeare Land with its shrines . . . Stratford-
on-Avon, home and scene of the great Bard's busy life; Shottery; Magnificent Kenilworth, destroyed by Cromwell's frown; Warwick Castle;
Oxford; Windsor and the Thames. Then London! Its traffic terrifies until
you learn to look to the left. Names on every hand from history.
Enter the Continent by way of Flushing. . . . Holland! Windmills,
winding slowly; immaculate farmhouses; beds of tulips or hyacinths—riots
of lovely colors; sail boats in the distance, apparently traveling overland;
the traffic jammed bicycle paths; the endless varieties of things unusual.
Amazing little Belgium! Brussels, called the "Little Paris" because
of both her beauty and worldly gaiety. With its cafes, bustling citizens,
it is without doubt one of the most striking of the smaller European capitals.
Paris has been for centuries beloved by the traveler! Its magic
defies care; it generates in us an appreciation of beauty, a zest for adventure,
a love for romance. City of dreams! The boulevards, the shops, the
museums, the people.  Days of adventure!   Nights of excitement!
Collegiate Party No. 25—Time Table
25B 25C 25D 2SE 25F 25G 25H . Collegiate Party Number .   25J 25K 25L 25M 25N 2SP 2SQ 2SR
$327$327$327$326S328$369 $333 . . .  Price of Collegiate Party . . . $308$316$321 $326 $295 $326 $295 $326
31    31     31     29    32    37    34   .... Total Number of Days ....    28    30    30    31     28    31     28    31
16    16    16    15    20    22    21    ... Number of Days on Land .. .   16    14    15    16    16    16    16    16
Duchess ol
York
Duchess ol
Richmond
Duchess ol
Atholl
Empress ol
Australia
Duchess ol
York
Duchess ol
Richmond
Duchess ol
Atholl
May May June
June June June July
20    27      3
11     17    24      2
27 June 3 10
See    24 July 1   . .
28      4    11
Note   25       2     . .
29      5    12
19    26      3
 10
Party 25E will not visit Scotland.
Land in Southampton June 18 and will
continue to Oxford on that day.
30
31
June 1    8
2      9
27
28
29
30
24 July 1
25 2
12 19 26      3
13 20 27      4
14 21 28      5
15 22 29       6
16 23 30 to
10 17 24 Julyl 12
11 18 25 2 13
June June July July July July Aug.
19    26 3 9 18    30      4
Sail from Montreal .....
Land Glasgow—Trossachs . .
Edinburgh—sightseeing    .   .   .
Rail to Chester	
Land at Liverpool—To Chester
Through Shakespeare Country
London—sightseeing    ....
In London	
In London	
To Flushing—Holland ....
Middleburg—To Brussels    .   .
Brussels—to Paris	
Paris—sightseeing	
Excursion to Versailles    .   .   .
In Paris	
In Paris	
In Paris	
Rail to Cherbourg—Sail   .   .   .
Land Quebec (Empresses) or
Montreal (other ships) .   .   .
O O O-D     O O
JJ -2., -2 e .So £1
s? st sjj s* s?
dm Q>« ate OS Gm
July July July July Aus.
8    16    22    29      5
15 . .     29 Aug.5 12
16 . .    30      6    13
17 . .     31        7     14
V fl    £       • —
■§■« -Si   oi
3 o   = .a   = -:
Q>- OS Q<
Aus. Aus. Aus.
12    19    26
19 26 Sept. 2
20 27       3
21 28       4
18
19
20
21
24
25 Aug.1
26
27
28
22 29
23 30
24 31
25 Aug.1
26 2
27
28
29
30
22 29
23 30
24 31
25 Sept.1
JS       £       H        V V    « c
2    2    2    if J -■
■O    aS
-   « *    E'=
co um ujm
* Party No. 25G will leave Paris July
21 for England and will sail from
Liverpool July 22.
Aug. Aus. Aus. Aus. Sept.
4 14 20 28  1
5 5 2
26
27
28
29
30
31
Sept.1  8
2 9
3 10
Sept. Sept. Sept
11     15     25
So        E
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
BRITISH ,,;'yW '•       ',"""
K     ISLES    ^'^-rf&^L
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1*1
Janet*,. x\s£z Js'.jom    \l        wqaim
'kHS"* Maw Rsim*    ^~2sz>
This Map Shows the Surprising Completeness of
This Party . . . An  Engineering Marvel  Is the
Firth of  Forth  Bridge  in  Scotland .  .  .  Bat
of Most Interest Are the Highlands and Lakes
In  Paris  the  Opera  Is  the  Hub  of  the  City's
Activities . . . Belgium too Has Quaint Windmills Page 42
Sail a
Week
Earlier
Visit the
Beautiful
Emerald
Isle
Rural Ireland Is One of the Most Colorfnl Regions You'll Find in All Your Journeys
Visit Ireland—$95
FRIDAY—Arrive in Belfast.
SATURDAY—By rail to Cork via Dublin.
SUNDAY—Visit Blarney Castle.
Excursion by motorcoach with guide to the well-known
Blarney Castle, an ancient medieval stronghold, where
visitors may or may not acquire the gift of persuasive
speech which the kissing of the Blarney Stone is supposed
to impart.
MONDAY—To  Killarney.
By rail to Bantry, deep in the recesses of Bantry Bay and
motor to Glengarriff. Drive down the Glen, where the
myrtle and the aloe flourish and the fuchsia blossoms with
wanton extravagance, then through a succession of tunnels
cut through the rock of the mountains to Kenmare. The
famous Kerry "home-spuns" are produced in this district,
the wool being derived locally from the mountain sheep,
spun by peasant labour in cottages and woven into cloth.
Continue to Killarney through Windy Gap, a narrow five-
mile cleft in the mountains.
TUESDAY—Killarney and Lake District.
Excursion by motorcoach with guide through the Lake
District via the celebrated Gap of Dunloe and the Lower
Lake to Kate Kearney's Cottage. Here the traveler proceeds by boat via Upper Lake and Long Range River to
the Eagle's Nest Mountain and under the rustic Old Weir
Bridge to the "Meeting of the Waters" and then to Ross
Castle, where the motor coach will be waiting for the
return  to  Killarney.
WEDNESDAY—By rail to Dublin.
THURSDAY—Sightseeing in Dublin.
Sightseeing includes many historic buildings, the old
Parliament House, Castle, Trinity College, Leincester House,
Cathedral and Phoenix Park.
Members of Collegiate
Parties and House Parties
who visit Scotland go by
evening steamer for Glasgow.
FRIDAY Arrive Glasgow.
Collegiate Party members
join their tour groups. A
combination Irish-Scottish
tour for House Party members is given on page 43.
Members of House Parties
who do not wish to visit
Scotland and members of
Collegiate Parties that do
not visit Scotland go by
evening steamer to Liverpool.
FRIDAY—Liverpool.
Continue by rail to London.    Join  House  Party  or
Collegiate to
ir on arrival
Who Hasn't Longed to See the River Shannon?
You'll Kiss the Blarney Stone
SOUTHERN Ireland is essentially a holiday land. Its people have a genius
for hospitality which would invest the most unpromising countryside with
charm. Allied to the infinite loveliness of the storied land of Ireland, it makes
for a holiday of glorious memories, gilded with the fairy gold of kindly
actions and warmly welcoming smiles. The rich, soft Irish brogue, gives a
heart-warming tenderness to every sentence. Though every foot of the country
has seen centuries of fighting, and every city and village has its long and
eventful history of sieges and raids, the green beauty of Southern Ireland is
invested with serenity.
From Belfast the party journeys first to Cork, capital of Munster, and
one of the most picturesquely placed towns of the four' kingdoms, full of
grand panoramas, wooded hillsides studded with fine villages and watered by
fine rivers. From Cork you will have the delightful experience of traveling by
jaunting-car to Blarney and its far-famed castle, and there to kiss the "Blarney
Stone."
The program then takes us by rail to Bantry and thence by motorcoach
to Glengarifif. No less lovely are Killarney and the Kerry Coast, reached
through Kenmare, a quiet resort amid glorious scenery. Killarney cannot be
adequately described. The fame of this spot has spread through the civilized
world, where travelers recall with reverence her various features—Innisfallen,
the Gap of Dunloe, Tore, Muckross and the rest.
Up to Dublin town you'll go from Killarney by train. Close to lake, mountain and shore scenery, Dublin has a situation equal to the finest. It contains
Trinity College, which is a university founded by Queen Elizabeth; Dublin
Castle; Christchurch Cathedral and St. Patrick's Cathedral, the latter containing the body of Dean Swift; Leincester House; National Museum and the
National Gallery. After two nights and a day in Dublin, you leave the
"Emerald Isle" regretfully behind.
It is recommended that those who wish to visit Ireland during the Euchar-
istic Congress join one of the regular Congress Parties.
Di
Eueharistic Congress Tours—$226 up
DEPARTING on June 14 from Montreal
on a special ship, the Canadian Pacific S.S.
MELITA, The Travel Guild offers five remarkable tours to the Eueharistic Congress.
These trips vary in length .from 27 to 68
days. Briefly summarized they are as follows:
Congress Tour No. 1—Length 27 Days—Visits the
Shakespeare Country, Oxford and London after termination of the Congress.   All expenses, $226 up.
Congress Tour No. 2—Length 27 Days—By motor,
rail and boat through Ireland, visiting the Irish Lakes
and  Blarney  Castle.    AU expenses, $236 up.
Congress Tour No. 3—Length 33 Days—Including
Tour   No.   1   and   Holland,   Belgium,   France;   Brussels,
Middelburg, Antwerp, Paris, Versailles and Lisieux.   All
expenses, $295 up.
Congress Tour No. 4—Length 62 Days—Including
in addition to Tour No. 3, Cologne, The Rhine, Coblenz* Mayence, Mannheim* Freiburg* Lucerne, Montreux
Stresa, Venice, Padua, Florence, Assist, Rome, Genoa,
Avignon, Carcassonne, Lourdes and Paris. Extensive
motor  sightseeing   throughout.    All   expenses,   $595  up.
Congress Tour No. 5—Length 68 Days—Tours No.
2 and 4 combined to make an exceptional travel
offering to those attending the Congress who desire to
"do" Europe thoroughly after its termination. All
expenses,  $665 up.
For complete details send for the
Special Travel Guild Eueharistic Congress Book of Tours. Page 43
Include
Bonnie
Scotland
on Your
Trip
Through
Europe
The Magnificent Setting of Edinburgh Castle Will Be One of Your Memories of Scotland
Scotland and the English Lakes        Ireland—Scotland
Be
Eleven Days—COST, $130, AH Expenses
'ONNIE Scotland! Who has not sung its praise? Every district of Scotland
is touched with the magic fingers of history. You will see towns and castles
and lakes whose names ring down the corridors of time like clarion calls.
The land of Scott and Bobbie Burns is reached by way of Glasgow, the
natural starting place for a tour of the Trossachs region to Edinburgh. You
pass through Stirling, dominated by its historic castle on your way to Edinburgh. No day's journey was ever more lovely.
Few cities can really vie with Edinburgh in natural advantage of site,
in architectural distinction or in magnificence of thoroughfares. Its chief thoroughfare, Princes Street, is one of the finest in the world. Few cities, indeed,
can boast a street so wide, so attractive and so imposing. It is the pride of all
Scotsmen. The Scott Monument—the Castle—the National Gallery—the Royal
Institution—Princes Street—you'll see them all. In George Street are the Assembly Rooms where Sir Walter Scott confessed the authorship of the Waverly
novels. Edinburgh is in fact a veritable store-house of Scottish tradition.
In the spring of the year, when thoughts are gay and fancy roams, it is
well to think of Scotland. For Scotland as indeed is all of the British Isles,
is delightful then. The Lakes are lovelier, bluer, more enchanting than ever.
The superb panorama of lochs, caverns, glens and mountains with rich tones
of heather, and patches of mountain greenery are entrancing.
Then southward through highland into the English Lake country equally
famed, equally beautiful. Keswick, Windermere and Grasmere are the land of
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Southey, Ruskin, Thomas de Quincey and others. Shut
in by mountains on all sides, Keswick is the center of the Cumberland Lake
District. Then follow on successive days, Chester, the "queen of old-world
cities," with rambling old houses and quaint architecture of interesting origin,
the Shakespeare Country and London.
Most Collegiate Parties visit Scotland. Below is an itinerary that will
provide an ideal preliminary tour for House Party members at nominal cost.
Start Your House Party in Scotland
Belfast—write     for     details    en
FRIDAY—Arrive   Glasgow.
Through the Trossachs region, via Stirling to
Edinburgh.
SATURDAY—Edinburgh—Sightseeing.
Sightseeing in and around the city by motor*
coach with guide visiting the world-famous Princess
Street, and Gardens, the Castle, "Mons Meg"
(a cannon built, in 1435), St. Margaret's Chapel,
die ' ancient Palace and Parliament Hall, John
Knox's House, White Horse Close, and Queen
Mary's   Bath.
SUNDAY—Through the English Lakes.
Journey via Carlisle to Keswick, thence through
the heart of the English Lake District, via Thirl -
mere, Grasmere, and Ambleside to .Windermere
continuing via Kendal and Preston to Chester, the
most  medieval  town  in  England.
MONDAY—Shakespeare Country.
By rail to Leamington for a motor excursion
through the Shakespeare Country, visiting Stratford -
on-Avon, Shakespeare's birthplace; Shottery, Anne
Hathaway's Cottage; Warwick Castle; and the ruins
at Kenil worth. Continue journey to London via
Oxford.
TUESDAY—Join regular House Party.
Join any motor tour except No. 5 on arrival in
London. City sightseeing program with regular
party.
Scottish Preliminary—$35
The cost of the above program is $35. In case
of question as to how connections can best be
made write for information.
FRIDAY—Due     to    arrive
sailings and connections.
SATURDAY—By rail to Cork via Dublin.
SUNDAY—One day excursion by motorcoach with guide to
the well-known Blarney Castle, an ancient medieval stronghold, where viators may or may not acquire the gift of
persuasive speech which the kissing of the Blarney Stone
is  supposed   to impart.
MONDAY—By rail to Bantry and continue by motor over
the Prince of Wales route to Killarney.
TUESDAY—One day excursion by motorcoach with guide
through the Lake District via the celebrated Gap of
Dunloe and the Lower Lake to Kate Kearney's Cottage.
Here the traveler proceeds by boat via Upper Lake and
Long Range River to the Eagle's Nest Mountain and under
the rustic Old Weir Bridge to the "Meeting of the Waters'*
and then to Ross Castle, where the motorcoach will be
waiting for   the return  to   Killarney.
WEDNESDAY—Leave Killarney by rail for Dublin.
THURSDAY—Sightseeing includes many historic buildings,
the old parliament house. Castle, Trinity College, Leincester House, Cathedral and Pheonix Park. Leave by
evening steamer for Glasgow.
the    Trossachs    region,
Stirling    to
FRIDAY—Through
Edinburgh.
SATURDAY—Sightseeing in and around the city by motorcoach with guide visiting the world-famous Princess Street,
and Gardens, the Castle, "Mons Meg" (a cannon built in
1435), St. Margaret's Chapel, the ancient Palace and
Parliament Hall, John Knox's House, White Horse Close,
and Queen Mary's Bath.
SUNDAY—Via Carlisle to Keswick, thence through the heart
of the English Lake District, via Thirl mere, Grasmere, and
Ambleside to Windermere, continuing via Kendal and
Preston   to   Chester,   the   most  medieval   town  in   England.
MONDAY—By rail to Leamington for a motor excursion
through the Shakespeare Country, visiting Stratford -on-
Avon, Shakespeare's birthplace; Shottery, Anne Haihaway's
Cottage; Warwick Castle; and the ruins at Kenilworth.
Continue journey  to London via  Oxford.
TUESDAY—Join regular House Party on arrival in London.
You'll Be Delighted with the "Rows" in Chester
&1" mm ffiL. nnjii
i.l|£tll . Page 44
Visit
Sweden
Norway
Denmark
See the
Beautiful
Northlands
The Wild, Majestic Loveliness of the Norwegian Fjords
Between Mile High Cliffs Will Provide Yon with Thrills
...
#     .
w
Ml?
I
fe-i- -V^Vv|
flljj
E$i
'■ys
The Blond Beauty of the Maidens of the North Lands Is
as  Striking and Memorable  as  the Gorgeous  Scenery
The Interesting Danish Capital, Copenhagen, above, and
the Unique Gota Canal Are Highlights on Your Trip
Land of Bright
-I. HE fascinating byways of Scandinavia
are made possible to you now in an ideally
planned program and at a sensationally low
price. For as little as $450 you can visit
the intriguing "Land of Bright Summer
Nights"—a far away region not frequented
by tourists and one which, therefore, still
possesses all its Old World charm.
Many of your friends have been to Europe,
•—as no one considers himself truly educated
today unless he has been abroad, but have
they been to Scandinavia? The trip described on this page brings you not only
the Europe your friends have seen but also
a more fascinating Europe—a Europe of
startling beauty and fascinating old customs
—a Europe few travelers have seen.
Terminating in London
Persons wishing to take one of these
Scandinavian Tours may terminate their formal program on arrival in London. They
may then remain in England or travel on the
Continent independently for such a period
as they choose. The rates on this basis,
including a westbound steamship ticket,
tourist cabin, are as follows:
Itinerary No. 51 $465
-  Itinerary No. 52... -j  495
Itinerary No. 53  450
Scandinavian Preliminary
Any of the three Scandinavian itineraries
may be made a preliminary program for any
House Party or Collegiate Party. On arrival
in London members will connect with the
regular party group. Write The Travel
Guild for rates indicating the standard program with which you wish to connect. Note
also that two of the Collegiate Party itineraries, No. 21 and No. 24, may be adjusted
to connect with the Scandinavian Parties at
Copenhagen from Berlin.
North Cape Cruise
Visit the North Cape, the land of the
Midnight Sun this summer. The Canadian
Pacific has scheduled its ideal cruise ship,
the S.S. "Empress of Australia" for a journey through the Northland with calls at all
the most interesting Scandinavian ports.
Booklets will be available February 1.
This North Cape journey may be made as
a part of your trip to Europe—it makes excellent connections with a number of the
House Parties and Collegiate Parties.
Write for complete information.
Summer Nights
51
52
$488 $558
40
43
23
28
«
E
o
nB
a
61
V)
June
July
71
2
30
11
July
12
2
Itinerary Number 53
Price of Tour $460
Total Number of Days 40
Number Days on Land 24
STEAMSHIP ACCOMMODATIONS: Tourist class used on all ships
except on the Gripsholm, on which
second class accommodations are
used.
o—
oi
July
16
25
26
3    13
4 14
5 15
9   19
10   20
12
13
22
23
14
24
15
25
27
28
29
30
31
19
29
20
30
21
31
[If. I
2
3
4
22
5
July Aug.
30
13
Sail from New York.
Arrive at Gothenburg.
GOTHENBURG—Sightseeing,   visiting
Horticultural Gardens, Slottskogen Park,
Art Gallery and Rohss Museum of Art
Handicraft, etc.
Morning train to Helsingborg and by
ferry to Helsingor, "Hamlet's^Elsinore"
—visit Kronborg's Castle and "Hamlet's
Grave." Arrive Copenhagen.
In COPENHAGEN, Sightsee;ng, visiting
Glyptothek and Ihorvaldsen's museums,
Zoological Garden, etc. One day at
disposal. Leave Copenhagen in the
evening by steamer for Malmo, Sweden,
thence by sleepers for Stockholm.
Arrive STOCKHOLM in the morning.
Sightseeing visiting Royal Palace, Open-
Air Museum at Skansen, etc. On second Aug.1
day an excursion to Saltsjobaden.
On the GOTA CANAL. Here we
traverse the Gota Canal as far as Kattegat. This entire trip is an unrivalled panorama of beauty. Our steamer calls at
Motala, Vadstena, Venersborg, etc.
Arrive at Trollhatten on the thlra day in
the afternoon, thence by train to Oslo.
OSLO—Sightseeing, visiting Viking
Ships, Open-Air Museum and Frogner-
saetern, Bygdo, etc. One day at leisure.
By rail to MYRDAL. By carriage through
the beautiful Flaam Valley to Flaam.
Cruise on the famous Sognefjord and
Naeroefjord to Gudvangen, "The Playground of the Gods." Thence by motor
through the Naero Valley via Stalheim
and Voss to Ulvik at the Hardangerfjord.
By steamer on the Hardangerfjord to Eld-
fjord, thence by automobile through the
Maaboedal Canyon to the very famous
Voeringsfos Waterfall and within sight
of the Hardanger Glacier.
BERGEN—Visit the Hanseatic Museum,
the unique fish market and German Quay.
Excursion by mountain rail to Floien.
Leave on the new motorliner "VENUS"
for Newcastle.
By rail to London.
IN LONDON.   Sightseeing in the city
by   motor   coach   with   guide,   visiting
Trafalgar   Square,    Strand,    Kingsway,
Cheapside, Dickens' Old Curiosity Shop,
Westminster Abbey, St. Paul's Cathedral,
London Bridge, Tower of London, Hyde
Park and Buckingham Palace.
Rail to Liverpool to sail on the Duchess,
or Southampton to sail on an Empress.
Land   Quebec  (Empress)   or Montreal Aug
(Duchess). 24
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
o
*8^
Any
of these itineraries may be
S"D
combined with
a Hooh
Party or
Col-
J! °
-S ■
legiate
Party-
■Write
or rates
and
W-O
S"6
conned
ons.
Qm
q£ Page 45\
There Is
Fun to Be
Found in
Europe as
Well as
History
and
Culture
The World's Gayest Playgrounds!
The Principality of Monaco, Monte Carlo. Is One of
the World's Most Celebrated and Famous Flay Places
JL HERE'S a lighter side to the serious business of seeing Europe, too, and of course
you'll want to hear your favorite operas . . .
attend famous old theatres and music-halls
. . . and perhaps make the rounds of the
gay native cafes and cabarets and other
night "spots" about which you've heard.
Plenty of free time has been included in
every Travel Guild trip for this very thing
and, moreover, we've made it easy for you
to relax and entertain yourself in just the
manner you desire. Tickets for "Tristan und
Isolde" or the Casino? Just ask the Travel
Guild's representative and you'll have them!
Want a peek at night life? We can show
you just where to go for the best music and
dancing and the most fun. Pol Roger or
Vichy, poulet a la Normandie or just plain
ham and eggs . . . and we will tell you
what, when, and how!
London is not the dull and gloomy city
that you might suppose. There's much to
entertain the Guild traveler there—whatever
your desires might be. Let us suggest the
theatre, first, for many splendid shows feature every summer season. Go to the Drury
Lane or the Haymarket, for instance, because
these theatres themselves are historically significant. Then barge across the brilliantly
lighted Strand to one of London's smart
night clubs, the Kit Kat, the Casino de Paris,
or maybe to one of those quaint native places
in the Soho.
Such good restaurants in London, too.
Dear old Simpsons with its mighty roast beef
. . . the Cheshire Cheese up on Fleet Street
. . . Oddenino's . . . Gennaro's ... or a
Lyons' Corner House, a unique institution
found nowhere else. And we nearly forgot
tea . . . and tea-time. You'll learn to love
this fine English custom, we're sure, and a
cup of tea along in the afternoon does brace
one up after a busy day of shopping or
sightseeing with an exciting evening ahead.
In Brussels, that bustling capital of Belgium, you'll want to promenade along the
many tree-lined boulevards . . . listen to concerts in the park and in the Bois de la
Cambre . . . see the Moulin Rouge . . . the
Opera ... or merely dream at a sidewalk
cafe near the" Place. But not very late, for
this interesting city goes to bed early.
Every minute there's plenty to do in
Berlin. Afternoon tea-dancing at one of its
famous hotels is an event, we assure you.
Then to dinner at your hotel or perhaps
at .one of Berlin's noted restaurants. Fine
German food, it is.
Then the visits to the Wintergarten . . .
to the theatres ... or for a walk along Unter
den Linden! Afterwards to sip at a street-
side cafe and watch the brilliant night life
on Frederichstrasse. Don't forget the Zoo,
either, or the many splendid cinema and
vaudeville houses wherell you eat delicious
hot-dogs between acts.
Maybe Vienna is not the city of song
and gayety it was but there's still music in
its war-torn soul. You must spend an evening at the Stadtpark ... enjoy its orchestras
. . . have coffee and thick cream and pastry
at one of its great cafes . . . shops ... or
perhaps attend a Max Reinhardt theatre.
Perhaps, too, a visit to gay Luna Park.
Buda and Pest on the Blue Danube are
equally fascinating. Here the gypsy's tambourine still crashes to the click of dancing
feet in a thousand native cafes . . . here
bright-eyed little beggars with their fiddles
proffer a song for a pengo . . • here are fine
theatres . . . great coffee houses . . . grand
boulevards. Here is genuine gayety in a
Slavic tempo ... a capital you'll never forget.
Then, too, youll visit the fashionable
Riviera . . . Nice and Monte Carlo. And
Venice is an epoch in the life of any person.
It's impossible to describe the countless
things to do and see in Paris, that city of
cities, and so we'll just hit the highlights.
Of course, the National Theatre Opera
and the Opera Comique by all means. To a
typical French revue, the Casino or the
Folies Bergere. Up on Montmartre for a
whirl at la vie Boheme. To La Mere Catherine near the Place du Terte for dinner,
shall we say . , . and then to Lapin Agile,
reputably the oldest cafe in Paris and certainly one of the most interesting. Don't
miss the Left Bank either. Here it's du
Dome, la Rotonde, Chez le Vikings and
many others just as thrillinc
Dinner in Paris? Mon dieu! Try the
roast duck at Tour d'Argent, the Crepes Suz-
ette at Foyofs and Sole Marguery at Mar-
guery's and youll rhapsodize about French
food the rest of your days. And don't forget onion soup in Les Halles (the Market)
some morning after your night's Paris program is  fine.
Yes, Europe is made for play, too, and
when you get home again . . . and can blend
memories of its mighty cathedrals and galleries and museums with days and nights
of glorious fun in its capitals . . . then
youTl realize' the well-rounded and thoroughly sensible summer it's been.
Bright Night Lights Are Not Restricted to Broadway
as  This   View   of  Piccadilly   Circus,   London,   Shows Page 46
Impressive Indeed
Is This View of
the Palais des
Papes, Residence
of the Popes from
1309 to 1418. As
Seen from Across
the Rhone Avignon Is Fascinating I
PASSPORTS—VISAES—BAGGAGE SUGGESTIONS—TIME AND PLACE OF SAILINGS
Passports
.ASSISTANCE in securing passports and
visaes will gladly be given all Guild travelers
upon application to the executive offices of
The Travel Guild or the travel agent through
whom you booked your tour.
Briefly a passport is permission for a traveler to leave his country. A visa is a permit
for him to enter a foreign country.
Regardless of nationality, all travelers are
required to he in possession of passports, issued by the country of which the traveler is
a citizen and visaed before starting by the
consuls of the countries to be visited. Visaes
must be stamped in your passport so your
passport must be secured first.
How to Apply: U. S. citizens should make
application to die Clerk of the nearest District
Court, except in cities where there is a passport agency representing the Federal State
Department. Personal application must be
made for your passport.
If you have an old passport, take with
you when applying for a new passport:
1. Your old passport.
2. Two unmounted photographs (head and
shoulders) about three inches square and
on thin paper.
3. Application fee of $6.00.
Your passport is valid for a period of two years from
date of issue unless limited to a shorter period. If you
have a passport which was valid on July 1, 1930, you
can have this extended for another two years (or for
a total period of four years from date of issue) upon
payment of a $2.00 fee* Then, after this two-year
period is up, you can get it renewed for another two
years (making it six years in all from date of issue) by
paying another  $2.00  fee.
If you do not have an old passport,
take
1.
2.
3.
with you:
Birth certificate, or affidavit from a U. S.
citizen, preferably a relative, who has
known you for at least twenty years.
An American citizen, who has known
you at least two years, to identify you.
Two unmounted photographs (head and
shoulders) about three inches square and
on thin paper. A man and wife wishing
to travel on one passport should have
their pictures taken together; minors
traveling on parents' passports should be
shown in the picture.
Application fee of $6.00.
Important: Three weeks
should be allowed to secure
p—, your passport after application has been made. It is best
to apply immediately. In
order to allow time to secure
visaes, it is desirable to secure
passports at once.
Canadian Citizens secure
passport from the Passport
Officer, Department of External Affairs, at Ottawa. Two
unmounted photographs, 3x3
inches (head and shoulders),
must accompany application
together with proof of citizenship. Application blanks and
full information may be secured from any Canadian
Pacific office.
Visaes
When you have received your passport from
Washington, should you desire us to do so,
we will secure your visaes for you. Follow
these instructions:
1. Send check or money order for the
amount of the visa fees plus 20 cents
for return postage and registration.
2. The visa fees must be accompanied by
your passport, as visaes are seals or
stamps, that must be affixed directly
upon the passport by the consulate of
the country to be visited.
3. Send list of visaes wanted.
4. Send these by registered mail to protect your passport against loss.
5. Address your letter to a Guild office or
representative.
The cost of visaes for the various countries included in Guild itineraries follow:
Country (Subject  to  Change) Cost of Visa
AUSTRIA (if secured by mail, 25c additional) {2.00
BELGIUM No   visa   required
CZECHOSLOVAKIA     $0.25
(Transit  visa  good   for  4  days,   for  longer   stay   $1.00)
DENMARK Visa required—no charge
FRANCE  (good only for 14 days) 80.20
If the Guild traveler enters and then leaves France
not to return, a transit visa, which costs 20 cents, is
required. But if you enter, leave, and re-enter France,
a regular $2.00 visa is recommended for it will save
the trouble of securing additional transit visaes when
crossing frontiers. If you will be in France more than
14 days secure a $2.00 visa.    Kindly remember this.
GERMANY Visa required—no charge
GREAT BRITAIN  $10.00
Minors over 18 years of age traveling with parents
will require a separate visa for Great Britain. A transit
visa costing $1.00 will suffice for all standard House
Parties and Collegiate Parties. Travelers taking the
Scottish   Extension  can  also  use  $1.00  visa.
The $1.00 transit visa applies only on escorted tours
and special parties, provided the traveler is using tourist
cabin or third class accommodations. Persons traveling
First or Cabin class must pay $10 for British visa.
Guild travelers using $1.00 transit visa must enter British
Isles and depart with the tour party. A $1.00 transit
visa is good for only 12 days, not including day of
entrance or day of departure.
HOLLAND ».*. No visa  required
HUNGARY    .. * $2.20
The special visa costing $2.20, listed above, is valid
for one year and permits only one entry. A standard
visa costing $10.60 is valid for one year and can be
used for any number of entries during that period. The
other special is a transit visa which permits the traveler
to go through Hungary without stopping except to
change trains. This transit visa costs $1.15. Study your
itinerary and be sure which visa you require.
ITALY No visa required
IRISH FREE STATE Visa required
No charge if $10 visa for Great Britain has been obtained.
NORWAY No   visa   required
SPAIN    .....$2.72
SWEDEN Visa required—no   charge
SWITZERLAND No   visa   required
British subjects will not require regular or
transit visaes while visiting the above mentioned countries except Hungary where visa
charges are $1.85 for one entry good for one
year, or $1.00 for a transit visa.
Important. Though no fee is charged for
certain visaes as stated above, it is necessary
that visa be secured. It is best to secure all
visaes before leaving for abroad. You absolutely must have visa for the country which
you will first visit, otherwise it will be next
to impossible to land. It will be possible to
secure the other visaes abroad but this is
added trouble.
Baggage Suggestions
Collegiate Parties: The Travel Guild
cares for one large suitcase for you without
charge. This suitcase should not exceed 26 by
15 by 9 inches in size—and such a case is
ample for all the traveling, sports and formal
clothes you need. For your own happiness do
not take things you will not be likely to use—
it simply makes for more work for you.
We recommend a special tourist suitcase
of black vulcanized fibreboard, which we have
had built to our specifications to withstand the
severe usage of European travel. The Guild
can furnish such a case through your agent
at production cost—$10.00 plus wrapping and
shipping costs.
House Parties by Motor: The Guild will
furnish you, free of charge, a suitcase especially designed for convenience in motor coach
transportation. These cases are of unusual
durability and have ample room for all necessary clothing. They are 23 by 16% by 8%
inches in size. The Guild will take care of
this bag for you.
Important: Members of either House Parties or Collegiate Parties may in addition to
this large suitcase take an overnight bag (not
larger than 16 by 10 by 5 for the House Parties
by motor) with the understanding that they
will personally care for it. It is to your advantage to bring as small a bag as possible
as you must care for it yourself.
Members of rail parties bringing more luggage than the amount specified above will be
required to pay an excess luggage fee. Members of motor parties are definitely restricted
to the one suitcase as there is no room in the
motorcoaches for any excess baggage.  -
While we do not recommend your taking a
trunk, it is possible to do so, checking it from
your ship to either Paris or London, leaving
it there while on your trip, and checking it to
your ship for the return voyage on completion
of your trip. Trunks are taken entirely at
your own expense, and storage must be arranged for by you.
Baggage Insurance is worth many times
its cost and should be purchased by every
Guild traveler before departure* Of course,
we know you'll be careful and not forget any
of your belongings along the way, and besides
the Guild takes every reasonable precaution
in the handling of your luggage—-nut sometimes things do happen and you want to be
amply protected. You can obtain insurance
from your travel agent or The Travel Guild.
Time and Place of Sailing
The Empress of Britain, Empress of France
and Empress of Australia sail from the Canadian Pacific docks at Quebec, at 1:30 p. m.,
Eastern Standard Time.
The ships sailing from the Canadian Pacific
docks at foot of St. Sulpice Street, Montreal,
at 10 a. m., E. S. T., are the Duchess of Atholl,
Duchess of Bedford, Duchess of York, Duchess
of Richmond, Montclare, Montrose, Montcalm.
Venice Art Exposition
Special attention is called to the Biennial
Art Exposition in Venice. This is the most
important exhibit of modern art in Europe.
America has its own building. Page 47
World Famous Is
the Ancient
Bridge, "Ponte
Vecchio," Rebuilt
in 1362. Its Double Row of Shops
Is a Magnet That
Draws All Visitors in Florence.
MAII^CABLES—STOP OVERS—REFUNDS—CUSTOMS—CONDITIONS
Mail and Cables House Party members must make all per- officials usually board incoming ships at Father
Tl sonal extensions on the continent from Paris Point, and the examination of passengers and
HE Travel  Guild  has  arranged for the or Lucerne.  If you desire to make stop-overs baggage is  conducted  on  board  before, the
delivery of mail at frequent intervals along at any other point and join up with a later ship docks at Quebec.  This eliminates delay
any route that you may follow.   Advise your party you may do so but you must join the at the pier,
correspondents to allow at least twelve days following party at London, Brussels, Lucerne i"  connection with  ships  terminating at  Montreal,
,          ;,        ,.    .            .,             lr             ,.J                    t»    •             •                                            _.*x  customs  inspections  are  sometimes  performed alter  the
from New York or Montreal from the tune or Paris, paying your own transportation from ship  docks_the  Canadian Customs inspection in the
they write to the time you are to receive the point of deviation to that center. This regula- landing shed on the dock, and the u. s. inspection at
mail. The various cities to which mail may be tion is necessary to the efficient running of the Windsor railway station.
sent and the manner in which it should be ad- your  program.    AU  motorcoach  reservations yJ° «£«• ™j£ I'S £jj£ tt" !S
dressed are listed below.  Your mail at these are made at these points,    were people to y„Ur purchases are packed in one container.   Deciara-
various points should be addressed as follows: attempt to join elsewhere there could be no tion forms are supplied you by the purser and all pur-
(YOUR NAME)                                                 . .. assurance of a place for them in the coach chase> m»8t b,e fe1*"'1-   Articl" you h7e b°u*ht
ixuun HAivii.;     S   .       1 abroad and used while there are not exempt from duty.
Tour Number   and  the  trUILD  obviously cannot run a  coach Eo   snre  to  Bocllr(.  at   ,he   time  of   purchase  receipted
c/o The Travel Guild, Int'l. with   empty   seats  Over   a   great   portion   of   an hills,   and   keep   them,   as  your purchases  are   appraised
(Street Address  or  Other Address) (As Shown | itinerary.    The   GUILD   will   gladly   aid   yOU   in °? ^^r values at the time bought.   Exemption for U. S.
(City. Country)     (     Below     1              i •       "                       .    i          ?;_      _j    .  citizens will be allowed on articles aggregating not over
„,    **""■"" .... making arrangements for extensions and stop- ,100 ,      ,     if    it bl   f    „„«„„., or household u>e
The   street,   city   and   country   addresses   along   your „      °        j*.„          i    - ,lw ln    . ue " suitame ror personal or nousenoia use,
- t ..A   1...1,™,. Overs according tO your desires. as   souvenirs   or   curios,   and   whether   intended   for  per-
route  are listed   below. ° ,     J      ,            ...              r              , ,                          ...       n              .  ,    -   .,     ■-,„„        '
,,. „  .     ... .   ,,n„  All members have the privilege of remain- s°nai use or as gifts.   Do not deduct the sioo exemp-
P)  33 Avenue de 1 Opera  J.„„.:„„ „x ,u„;» .„;„„ tion, as such deductions are made by the officials.
Paris,  France Ulg in Europe after the duration of their trips Expensive jewelry and   fur  garments,  etc.,   should not
(2)  32 St. James Street, for  any   length   of   time  Without   lOSS   Of   the be  taken   from   home   without   first   securing  from   the
,.\   i°J!do5' i.Engl,n*/. return  passage  money.   If you  have  such  in- proper Customs officer a certificate.
(8) Holland Express Co., .       .         i .   ii     .   .                     ,                  ,      ,
Amsterdam, Holland tentions kindly inform us when you book. Tramaliwo* Plioto
(4)  Mannheimerhof Hotel, Arrange Deviations Before You Start: xia-vcicis   i/iiei&s
... Mannheim, Cermany Refunds are a ticklish subject and we hope We use and recommend Canadian Pacific
( ' i?T8 UnteraCden Sen,'1"* that you'll bear with us and understand why Express Company Travelers' Checks.   Avail-
Berlin, Germany it is impossible to reimburse you, dollar for able in convenient denominations.   Self-iden-
(6) Canadian Pacific Steamships, dollar, for services which you may not use. tifying by means of duplicate signature. May
Vienna™ Arfatria First oi aI1' the rate oi foreign exchange be  cashed  anywhere  at  favorable  exchange
(7) Hotel'Suisse Majestic, and transfer and carrying charges must be rates. Handy. Convenient. Safe. Secure them
Montreux, Switzerland considered. Many hotels on the Continent from any Canadian Pacific Agent, your Local
Vialucn M.™"1 22!"iM' char«e a fee if rooms which were r«er™d are Travel Agent, or from The Travel Guild.
Venice, Italy    '       ' not used.   Remember, the room you use in The cost is 75 cents per $100.
(9) Ameritalia Travel Service, July was reserved for you in January contracts «      ....                 ,   _               .«•!••
ia urgo Tritone. and specifically at the time you book. Conditions and Responsibility
(10) EiSfe' Pari 0n a CoileSitte Party, your railway tickets In common with other travel bureaus The
9 Rue Croix deMarbe, are part of group tickets.   And therefore it Travel Guild, Inc., acts only in the capacity
(in v-"' Mance      s   a makes no difference to the railroad if you ac- of agent for tho passenger in matters relative
36 CarVeTde8'San Jeronimo, company  party  or  not.   They  collect  for  a to all travel arrangements and as such holds
Madrid, Spain ticket covering a group of 25, we shall say. itself not responsible for any delay, loss, acci-
(12) Swedish State Railways, If you had canceled your tour and there are dent or sickness occasioned by fault or'negli-
StocSKlm8 Sweden ""ty 2,4' the cost % the same:, Funnvj   But gence of any person or company.
(13) Hewitt's Travel Agency, that S how we must buy party tickets in Europe. AU itineraries, prices for tours, etc., are published in
Corner D'Olier Street, The cost per day of all tours varies widely. accordance with present arrangements and rates, hut in
Dublin,  Ireland One day of your trip may COSt US $8.77  and ?" ?Tent of ""crease such additional fare must be paid
Ship Letters: Mail to be sent you for re- the next $17.98.   Refund will be given for JSo»d ITH'msae.™       "eM °£ decrease e,uiteWe
ceipt on the ship either when sailing or re- the cost of the exact services missed, not for it is not usual for travel bureaus to be responsible for
turning should be addressed thus: the average per day cost (tour price divided personal injury, loss of life, etc., and consequently we
(YOUR NAME)      by number of days). assume   no  responsibility in such   cases,   nor   for  deten-
SaUing (or arriving) S.S  No refunds will be made for absences from SeumstaTce,' f™ stS. nr„..°^„» JSF? Tler any
n.,A .  .           ,                     .            n   r       i         -ii circumstances.   *or sucn protection accident and baggage
"         tour Of less than two days.   Kefunds Will not insurance are recommended.
Canadian Pacific Docks, )je made in Europe; yOU must Secure an order We   reserve   the   right   to   withdraw   and   cancel   any
Montreal   (or  yuebec),  Canada fr()m  ^  p^  Q&c^  statjng  the  gj^^^   to tour  should   circumstances arise  which   in  our  opinion
Cables: If you wish to have messages that which you are entitled.    This order will be Tke•." advlsable- ™..,*lct CT
have been cabled to you at the Pans office honored only upon presentation to The Travel prenger"^^^!" ShouW
sent on to your point en route by telegraph, Guild executive office,  180 North Michigan It be deemed necessary „r'desirable
send us a deposit of $5.00 before sailing to Avenue, Chicago, either by mail or in person, by the management to make changes
coyer the telegraphic charges, otherwise cables within 30 days of termination of your trip at ™ itineraries or arrangement, or to
will be forwarded by mail.  If the deposit is t|je American Port    The great values which omit *ny ■Kli,a °f the tours, such
not used it will be refunded upon your return. Guild services offer make this necessary. *6"sos TJ be m.",d<•and 1>assc,"-'"s
...           ^..*...        ...... t.   .       •       ..j.          ii                        i   / snail   not  be   entitled   to  any   com.
Address Cards: Full and detailed instruc- It is simplest for all concerned to ar- pensation on such account.  No al-
tions regarding mail are supplied to all Guild range for any contemplated absence from iwance will be made for absences
members when final deposit is received. This the party at the time you buy your trip. from tour for less than two days'
information is supplied on handy printed cards It is much easier to make adjustments in duration. As it is not always possible
which members may distribute. the cost of your program BEFORE you to secure refunds from transportation
make your journey than afterward.  We companies for unused  tickets, we
Stop-Overs and Refunds thns  avoid contracting  for  rooms,  rail assume  no  responsibility   for  the
Collegiate Party members who wish to break tickets>  etc->  wnich cannot be canceled. am°unt °f ™b lrfund9-
.!,«:_ i          _.                 ...i.i         tj We reserve the right to decline to
tneir journey at any point other than London fi..*,*,.***.  I„fn™,oi;A„ .          ...
„ p„„.     tit       .•       ■       •            ..."       x         • CUStOmS   lnlOrmatlOn accept   or   retain   any   person   as   a
Or Paris   (if notice  IS   given   at time  Of   regis- ,              ,                         .       ,      TT   .     , member   of   any   tour,   but   in   such
tratipn)  for a stop-over with the object to Passengers destined to points in the united ca,es  wIlere „,oney  has becn  re.
joining a later tour may do 60 for a serv- States are examined on arrival by U. S. Cus- ceived, the full or equitable refund
ice fee of $10.00. toms and Immigration officers.   In Canada U. S. will be made. Page 48
Send Your Registration Early
OTEAMSHIP reservations are allotted to Travel Guild members in the order of their
applications. Passengers who book early thus secure the most desirable cabins on shipboard.
As soon as you have selected the House Party or Collegiate Party itinerary that you
prefer make your application for membership by filling out the blank at the
bottom of this page, and send it together with a $25 deposit to the agent whose
name appears on the back cover of this book.
. Bookings for Guild Parties may be made through The Travel
Guild at any of its offices or branches; through any Canadian Pacific
agency; or through authorized steamship agents or travel bureaus.
A booklet giving the latest information on foreign exchange;
useful suggestions on clothing, what to take and what not to take;
postage regulations and instructions concerning mail; customs regulations; interesting facts about navigation; will be sent you in ample
time to aid you in making your preparations for your jourriey.
What Costs Include and What They Do Not Include
J. HE cost of Guild House Parties
and Collegiate Parties commencing with departure from Montreal
or Quebec and terminating upon
the return to these points, includes:
1. Ocean Passage—Round trip ocean
passage, Tourist Cabin except in the case
of the Empress of Britain, where the Third
Cabin forward section which is superior to
the tourist cabin on many vessels will be
used exclusively. The use of this space at
regular third class rates makes possible surprisingly economical travel rates to Europe.
The prices of parties vary according to
the dates of sailing eastbound and westbound, according to the ships, according to
the ports of arrival and departure, and according to the number of additional days
in London or Paris.
Rates for persons desiring to remain in
Europe at their own expense after the completion of a tour will be adjusted according to ship, date and port of their return.
2. Transportation—Note the differences in transportation for House Parties
and Collegiate Parties.
For House Parties: European transportation by motor throughout, except for runs
between London and Dover, and between Paris and Cherbourg. In
France railway transportation is second class; in England, where second
has been abolished, third class; on
North Sea steamers, first class.
iYIYi^y.yiYiy.yiriyi',-|yiyrm-r^^
For Collegiate Parties: European transportation as per itinerary; second class rail
on the Continent; third class in England;
first class on local river, lake and channel
steamers; and extensive transportation by
motor coach in Scotland, England, Switzerland and around Naples as per itinerary.
Note also that Collegiate Party No.
21 travels by motor from its arrival
at Brussels up to Montreux.
3. Hotels—Accommodations at first
class hotels are provided members of House
Parties and at good moderate priced hotels
for members of Collegiate Parties. These
are double room without private bath. No
tips are necessary for standard service.
4. Meals—Usual meals according to the
custom of the country. Continental breakfasts consist of rolls and coffee or chocolate. Lunches and dinner are as a rule
more elaborate  than in America.
5. Sightseeing — Sightseeing arrangements and motor excursions as specified
with conveyance provided. Entrance fees
to galleries, museums, etc., included in
programs. Services of English-speaking
lecturer guides.
6. Couriers—^Services of a courier who
attends to all travel and baggage matters.
7. Gratuities—AU tips and gratuities
needed iu connection with travel outlined
in itineraries.
8. Care of Luggage—Note the different arrangements for House Party members
and Collegiate Party members. Baggage is
picked up   at your hotel room  and   deliv
ered to your room at the next hotel.
For House Parties : The Guild will fur-
nidi free one large suitcase, 23 by 16^
by 8%, especially built for convenience in
motor travel. These bags have unusual
durability and ample room for all clothes
yon will really need. One will be reserved
for you on receipt of your application and
will be sent to you on receipt of final
payment for tour. Transportation of this
suitcase is provided throughout in Europe.
An overnight bag, not larger than 16 by 10
by 5, may be taken with the understanding
that it is to be cared for by the owner.
Fob Collegiate Parties : Transportation
of one large suitcase not exceeding 26 by
15 by 9 inches. An overnight bag may be
taken with understanding it is to be cared
for by owner.
9. Transfers—Transfers between railway stations and hotels,   etc.
10. Montreal to Quebec—Free railroad
transportation between Montreal and Quebec, if sailing departs from or terminates
at the port of  Quebec.
11. To Montreal -via New York—
All standard tours in this book are priced
from Montreal, but where the rail rate to
New York is lower than the rate to
Montreal, The Travel Guild agrees to
equalize the rates. Thus you may enjoy
the advantages of the St. Lawrence seaway at no additional cost.
12. Niagara Falls—See conditions on
page 4 for a  free trip.
What Is Not Included
The cost of House Parties or Collegiate
Parties does not include:
X. Passport and Visa Expenses—
The Travel Guild will secure visaes at
actual cost.
Complete instructions concerning these are
given on page 46.    The Travel Guild will '
secure visaes at actual cost.
2. U. S. Tax—U. S. Government rev-1
enue tax of $5 on eastbound tickets.
3. French Port Taxes—Cherbourg embarkation or debarkation taxes which are
S1.25 each for tourist third passengers,
$2.75 each for Cabin class passengers, and
$5 each for first class passengers. There is
no charge for persons using third class
accommodations, nor is a tax charged for
passengers debarking from or embarking
for a channel crossing to England.
4. Tips on Shipboard—Gratuities to
stewards or rental of deck chairs and rugs.
5. Meals Not Specified—Meals not
specified a la carte meals and beverages.
In Europe hotels serve coffee or tea with
breakfast only.
6. Personal Expenses—Purely personal expenses such as laundry, baths, entertainment,  theatre  tickets, etc.
7. Rail Fare to Port—Railroad fare
to and from Montreal or hotel accommodations there or at Quebec. (Note item 11
in "What Costs Include.)
All Prices Quoted in This Book Are Based on United States Dollars
Mail this application   Application for Membership in Guild
to address shown Honse Party or Collegiate Party
on back cover •> ° ^
Date-
Gentlemen :
Enclosed please find check or money order for $ — —as deposit to hold reservations on Tour No.	
Please register the following persons for membership on this tour and for the additional features checked: □ Spain;
 ,«....  J[  All prices quoted in this book 11
□   Scandinavia;   Q    \ are in United States dollars. Jj
Full Names (Print or Typewrite)
(State whether Mr., Mrs., or Miss)
Street and Number
City or Town
State
TERMS OF RESERVATIONS: A deposit of $25 for eacff
person is required to hold reservations. Because of the
demand which will quickly engage all reservations, this
deposit should be paid at once. If notified five weeks before
sailing, the steamship company will release the deposit
(should circumstances arise making it impossible for you to
go) and we will return same to you. The balance of the
cost of the trip is due four weeks before sailing. Assignment
of cabins on shipboard is made in the order of application.
Members are accepted for Guild Parties in accordance with
conditions outlined on membership certificates and, on page 47,
:T.VT.LM.M.r,i.riM.M.i.i.i.l.m..^^
Copyright, 1931—Printed in U. S. A. The  Blakely   Printing Co.,  Chicago 33%fti»5Swg<
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Zagreb
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BELGRADE
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oJCariaqena
T  E   R  R   A   N   E
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S©©   JLOlfl?                  M RAVEL GUILD agents are to be found Only those agents are allowed to repre-
Tl*nvpl  i^llil«l     'n  Practica"y   every   major   city.    You sent the GUILD who qualify as to ability
have a representative near you who will and who  insure   their  clients  against
AjJ©Dt                           be delighted to serve you in any and misrepresentation.   Your local agent's
every way in planning your travels. name appears on the hack cover. awyw.
wuuirUi4-,*-u.w
Travel Guild Values—Th© Standard of Comparisons
Collegiate
VACATION
SPECIAL
An Amazing
Travel Value
jFoR THOSE desiring
the absolute in travel
values, the Collegiate
trips by rail are unrivaled. Less expensive
than the House Party
jaunts by motor, they
offer the same expertly
routed itineraries and
provide splendid accommodations. An
unusual amount of
Travel by motor is one
of the delightful features. With a Collegiate Party you see
Europe comfortably
and thoroughly, at
moderate cost.
Visits
SCOTLAND
ENGLAND
HOLLAND
BELGIUM
FRANCE
See pages 40 and 41
m
5 Countries
28 Days
All
Expenses
%
Motor
Through
Europe
The Great Circle Route
Travel Guild House Parties
Use the Finest of Services
A. NEW Europe has been opened to American
travelers by The TRAVEL GUILD popular-priced
motor-coach travel abroad. The intimate
Europe of "dreaming spires," divine Gothic,
moss-grown castles, quaint villages, folk
songs, gay peasant costumes, wayside shrines
—the Europe hitherto seen only by the few.
Now you may see it by motor the GUILD way
—as a happy member of a small, congenial
House Party, motoring leisurely through
Europe, at a price anyone of moderate income
can afford to pay. Each motor journey from
city to city is an intriguing trip.
ENGLAND
HOLLAND
BELGIUM
GERMANY
CZECHOSLOVAKIA
9 Countries—70 Days
All Expenses
$860
See pages 11 to 14
AUSTRIA
HUNGARY
SWITZERLAND
ITALY
FRANCE
The TRAVEL GUILD House Parties and Collegiate
Parties Are Offered in Cooperation with the Better
Collegiate
ITALIAN
ROUTE
A Genuine
Travel Bargain
Thefamous GUILD
Collegiate quality serv
ice includes all by
motor travel in many
j
of the  most  scenic
regions.   Throughout
the countries  visited
by rail there is likewise
far more motor travel
than with ordinary
tours. This itinerary is
surprisingly complete
and is   recommended
for those who wish to
see the real Europe.
Visits
SCOTLAND
ENGLAND
BELGIUM
i
HOLLAND
GERMANY
SWITZERLAND
ITALY      i*m
FRANCE
See pages 31 to 34
8 Countries
48 Days         £^
„ ft!©15"
W9               AU
ii
*^\\                Expenses
(Br        'Ei                   ' VtF
m

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