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Round the world cruise : 1930-1931 Canadian Pacific Steamships Limited 1930

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 K*Wr.-  wvv-
CANADIAN PACIFIC
ROUND
I WORLD
CRUISE
EMPRESS i AUSTRALIA
9 30   -  19 3
CANADIANiPACI FIC
world's    qreatest    travel   system PACIFIC ROUND EWORLD CRUISE
ITINERARY
PLACES VISITED
Included in Cruise Pare
COUNTRIES
Miles
PORTS
ARRIVE
LEAVE
TIME IN PORT
Dav*     Hours
NEW YORK
U.S.A.
New York
DEC     2    Tue    12 noon
FUNCHAL
TERREIRO DA LUCTA
Madeira
2769
Madeira
DEC     9   Tue    6 pm
DEC   10   Wed   5 pm
23
GIBRALTAR
ROS1A BAY
Gibraltar
615
Gilbraltar
DEC   12    Fri      7 am
DEC   12    Fri      6 pm
11
ALGIERS
Algeria
419
Algiers
DEC   13   Sat     5 pm
DEC   14   Sun 12 midn.
1
7
MONTE CARLO
CORNICHE ROAD
LA TURBIE
NICE
VILLEFRANCHE
BEAULIEU
Monaco & France
461
Monaco
DEC   16   Tue   7 am
DEC   17   Wed   ^ >m
!fj
NAPLES
POMPEII
Italy
364
Naples
DEC   18   Thu   7 am
DEC   20   Sat     7 am
2
ATHENS
ACROPOLIS
Greece
717
Athens
DEC   22   Mon   7 am
DEC  22   Mon  6 pm
11
HAIFA
JERUSALEM
BETHLEHEM
MOUNT OF OLIVES
Palestine
640
Haifa
DEC   24    Wed   7 am
DEC   24   Wed   1 pm
8
Pa
leaf*
at Ha
24 an
at Su
12
PORT SAID
CAIRO
PYRAMIDS
SPHINX
RIVER NILE
BEDRECHEIN
SUEZ
Egypt
170
SS
Port Said
DEC   25   Thu   6 am
DEC   26    Fri      6 am
DEC  25   Thu   6 pm
Jan      1   Thu   7 pm
he ship
fa Dec.
z Jan 1
BOMBAY
ELEPHANTA ISLAND
DELHI
AGRA
TAJ MAHAL
FATEHPUR SIKRI
India
2961
Bombay
JAN    10   Sat     7 am
JAN    17   Sat     8 pm
7
13
COLOMBO
MOUNT LAVINIA
PERADENIYA
KANDY
Ceylon
883
Colombo
JAN   20   Tue    7 am
JAN   24    Sat     6 pm
4
11
PADANG
PADANC-PANDJANG
Sumatra
I3S4
Padang
JAN   28   Wed   6 am
JAN    28    Wed   7 pm
12
TANDJONG PRIOK
BATAVIA
WELTEVREDEN
BUITENZORG
Java
582
Batavia
JAN   30   Fri      6 am
FEB     2    Mon   6 pm
3
12
SINGAPORE
JOHORE
St ra i t • Set 11 e m e n t*
Fed. Malay State.
526
Slwp<«
FEB     4   Wed   8 am
FEB     S   Thu   6 am
22
PAKNAM
BANGKOK
Siam
820
Bangkok
FEB     7   Sat     4 am
FEB     7   Sat    9   pm
17
MANILA
MONTALBAN GORGE
Philippine Island*
1460
Manila
FEB   11    Wed   6 am
FEB   12    Thu   6 pm
1
12
KOWLOON
HONK KONG
NEW TERRITORIES
REPULSE BAY
China
631
Hong Kong
FEB   14   Sat     8 am
FEB   17    Tue    10 pm
3
14
KEELUNG
TAIHOKU
Formosa
477
Keelung
FEB   19   Thu   6 am
FEB   19   Thu   6 pm
12
WOOSUNG
SHANGHAI
China
452
Shanghai
FEB   21    Sat     7 am
FEB   21   Sat   11 pm
16
CHINWANGTAO
PEIPING    Peking;
GREAT WALL
China
648
Chinwongtao
FEB    24    Tue     S am
MAR    1    Sun    8 pm
5
15
BEPPU
INLAND SEA
Japan
822
Beppu
MAR   4    Wed   6 am
MAR    5    Thu   6 am
1
KOBE
KYOTO
NARA
Japan
215
Kobe
MAR   5   Thu   $ pm
MAR   9   Mon   7 am
3
11
YOKOHAMA
TOKYO
KAMAKURA
Japan
346
Yokohama
MAR 10   Tue    7 am
MAR 13   Fri      8 pm
3
13
HONOLULU
WAIKIKI BEACH
Hawaii
3394
Honolulu
MAR 21    Sat     4 pm
MAR 23   Mon  5 pm
2
I
HILO
KILAUEA VOLCANO
Hawaii
225
Hilo
MAR 24   Tue    7 am
MAR 24    Tue    5 pm
10
SAN FRANCISCO
U.S.A.
1999
San Fran.
MAR 30   Mon   6 am
MAR 31    Tue    4 pm
1
10
BALBOA
ANCON
PANAMA CITY
OLD PANAMA
PANAMA CANAL
COLON
CRISTOBAL
Panama Canal Zone
3245
38
Balboa
Cristobal
APR     9   Thu    7 am
APR   10    Fri      2 pm
APR   10   Fri      6 am
APR   10   Fri      7 pm
23
5
HAVANA
Cuba
1003
Havana
L APR  13   Mon   7 am
APR   14   Tue    1 pm
1
6
NEW YORK
U.S.A.
1213
New York
APR   17   Fri    10 am
29537                       DURATION: At sea 78 Day.; in Port 59 Day.:    Total 137 Day..
For included and Optional shore excursions, see 56 and following pages
SI Ports and Places in 24 Countries. All included in Cruise Fare
3 ' c4n4djan pacific
IT IS amazing the amount of energy burned up in meeting the
common needs of individual travel. However much accustomed to
travelling one may be, the sheer "mechanics" of getting about
make tremendous inroads on one's time, patience and strength.
Every port, every country visited, meets the individual traveller with
new, unaccustomed conditions, port rules, health, immigration and
customs officials, strange languages, unfamiliar ways of life, conveyances, guides, hotels.
These are the "mechanics" of travel and must be dealt with,
either by the individual traveller, or by a properly organized travel
system in direct contact, through responsible local representatives,
with the varied problerns offering themselves. Only those who have
met abroad the thousand and one travel matters that present themselves can form any conception of the time thus expended.
Even your experienced traveller approaches a new port or country,
braced to meet new problems and conditions, which experience
has taught him await him there. He must inform himself first of
every problem, then prepare the ways and means to meet it—
landing, officials, what to do, where to go, what to see, where to
dine, conveyances and guides. Precious hours are burned up before
the traveller sets out on the initial step, probably already more or
less "fed up" with the whole business.
We repeat, you cannot get away from the sheer "mechanics" of
travel. There is no royal road for the individual traveller. The
problem is undoubted but susceptible of simple treatment. Organized groups travel under the auspices- of a travel organization
which knows its job—and does it. To have been everywhere and
seen nothing, is the curious paradox presented by the travel history
of unnumbered individual travellers. To go everywhere and see
everything, untroubled, carefree and foot free—that is the ideal of
the world traveller, an ideal fulfilled in advance by booking under
the organized travel system.
A cruise trip is really the least expensive way to girdle the world,
for you are dealing with a responsible organization that gives you
full value for every dollar, and you know definitely in advance just
what you pay for.
That is why a Canadian Pacific Cruise is so smoothly pleasant.
That is why so many people, having gone once, go again. It is one
of the most delightful ways of spending the inclement months of
winter. ROUNDWORM)CRUISE AN  PAC I FllC
NEW YORK'S INCOMPARABLE SKY-LINE 1 HE Eighth Annual Round the World Cruise
of the Canadian Pacific departs from New York
on Tuesday, December 2, 1930, and arrives back
in New York on April 17, 1931. It embraces a
total of 137 days, 78 of which are spent at sea,
59 in port. The number of miles covered, exclusive of shore excursions, is 29,537.
Many unusual features serve to make this
cruise the most significant event of the 1930-
1931 travel season. Among these are the calls
at Algiers, Athens, Padang (Sumatra), Bangkok,
(Siam), Keelung, (Formosa), Beppu, (Japan);
the call at Haifa and the included-in-fare excursions to Jerusalem, Bethlehem and surrounding points of religious interest; Christmas
Eve and Christmas Day spent in the Holy Land;
New Year's Eve in Cairo; included-in-fare
steamer-excursion on the Nile; included-in-fare
excursions to Delhi, Agra, the Taj Mahal and
Fatehpur Sikri.
The early starting-date also serves to distinguish this cruise from others. Winter has
barely set in when the cruise-ship slips away to
warm lands. The Mediterranean ports are
visited during the spectacular opening of the
Riviera season. Palestine is visited when the
weather is cool. Egypt is at its gayest when the
cruise-members arrive. India, at some seasons
insufferable, is reached in the cool season,
January being the ideal month for visiting this
amazing land. And cruise-members see in turn
Ceylon, Sumatra, Java, Straits Settlements,
Siam, Philippine Islands, China, Formosa and
Japan at the height of their attractions and are
spared the trying weather that sets in later.
Of just as much interest is the cruise-ship,
the Empress of Australia, the gleaming white
leader of the Canadian Pacific's Atlantic fleet,
a speedy, safe, luxuriously appointed steamship
that is everything required for delightful, effortless cruising in every clime. It is internationally
famous for sumptuous comfort and spaciousness. An oil-burner, soot and smoke do not soil
the cool cleanliness of its decks and interiors and
make sailing on it an unalloyed pleasure.
Trim of line, the Empress of Australia is 21,850
tons gross register, 32,800 tons displacement,
615 feet in length and 75 feet in breadth. Its
turbine engines give it a speed of 19 knots.
Details of its construction include seven passenger-decks, battery of elevators, gymnasium,
swimming pool. CANADIAN  PACIFIC
SITTING ROOM OF PRIVATE SUITE ROUND^WORLD CRUISE
LOUNGE AND BALL ROOM
DINING SALOON ImiiX
W
THE EMPRESS
OF  AUSTRALIA
OWING TO the limited membership, only
six decks will be used on the cruise and five of
these are served by two elevators.
The staterooms are handsomely furnished and
the majority have regular beds. Not more than
two persons will be placed in a room unless by
request to accommodate a family or friends.
There are plenty of single rooms for those who
prefer to be alone.
JUouble rooms with private bath and toilet are
provided in abundance, and there are suites consisting of bedroom, sitting room, sun room,
baggage room, private bath and toilet. Plenty
of bathrooms are available for members occupying the regular staterooms not having a private
bath. More than 80% of the stateroom accommodation is outside and the majority of the
rooms have hot and cold running fresh water.
All rooms have electric fans, and the ship is
equipped with the most modern apparatus for
forced ventilation. The air in the public rooms
and staterooms is changed automatically every
few minutes without creating a draught.
THE LOUNGE on the Promenade Deck is
decorated in the Empire style. The furniture is
satinwood, with carved and gilded enrichments,
upholstered in silk, and the draperies are in
complete harmony. The appointments include
a magnificent concert grand piano, beautifully
enriched with bronze. This room has a splendid
dancing floor and a special feature is the absence
of pillars, the roof being on the cantilever principle, with large decorated glazed dome. Four
large gilt torchieres, together with the ceiling
lights, provide brilliant illumination.
THE DRAWING ROOM, which adjoins the
Lounge, is decorated in the Louis XVI style and
furnished in white enamel with gilt enrichments.
The furnishings include china cabinets, bookcases and writing tables in addition to easy
chairs  and  settees.
THE WRITING ROOM is off the main Entrance
Hall on the Promenade Deck, near the elevators.
It is treated in the Louis XVI style with tinted
walls and white enamelled ceiling, and the
furniture is  mahogany.
THE SMOKE-ROOM, also on the Promenade
Deck, is in the Louis XIV style with oak-panelled
walls and white ceiling. Tapestry and leather-
covered chairs and settees, card tables and writing tables comprise the furnishings of this room.
10 ROUNDieWORLD CRUISE
MASQUERADERS
HORSE RACES
11 CANADIAN  PACIFIC
DECK SPORTS
SWIMMING POOL ON DECK
12 ROUND^WORLD CRUISE
13 The DINING SALOON is on Deck B and accommodates 368 persons at one sitting, the tables
being arranged for small parties of two to six
persons. It is decorated in French Regency
style, the walls and ceiling being white enamelled
with gilt enrichments, and the furniture is
mahogany. It has a large dome extending up
through Deck A, and altogether is one of the
most luxurious rooms in any ship. Immediately
adjoining are two private dining rooms, each
accommodating 20 persons.
THE MAIN ENTRANCE HALL on the Promenade Deck is finished in white enamel and
has a large circular dome light. Two wide staircases and two elevators lead from this entrance
down to the other decks.
THE PROMENADE DECKS provide ample space
for deck chairs, promenading, deck sports and
dancing. The forward end of the Promenade
Deck is enclosed with detachable glass screens,
thus ensuring comfort on deck in all weather.
On an extensive cruise of this kind, sufficient
promenade space is an essential feature, as a
great many people prefer to spend the major
portion of their time on deck.
On THE AFT END of the Promenade Deck is
the Verandah Cafe. This delighful rendezvous,
with its beamed ceiling and wicker furniture,
will be a great favorite in the tropics.
THE GYMNASIUM is on the port side of the
Promenade Deck aft and is furnished with all
latest appliances for exercise, including rowing
machines, bicycle machines, horse machines,
camel machines, pulley weight machines, punching bag and Swedish wall bars. Regular classes
are held daily for both ladies and gentlemen,
and private lessons may be arranged with the
Physical Instructor free of charge.
THE POMPEIIAN SWIMMING POOL is on
Deck D and there are individual showers and
dressing rooms. In the mild climate there will
also be a Swimming Pool on deck. The Electric
Bath is on Deck B.
THE KITCHENS AND PANTRIES are situated
on Deck C and will compare with the best arrangements afloat or ashore. The most modern
electrical and other appliances enable the staff
to supply a perfect cuisine. The Canadian
Pacific is famous throughout the world for the
meals furnished on its steamships, and that
high standard will not only be maintained on
the cruise but will be excelled if possible.
14 ROUND^WORLD CRUISE
GYMNASIUM
15 CANADIAN PACI F§l C
HERE'S December the second. Thanksgiving Day hardly gone a
week. Winter has set in, with its gray skies and ice and snow and
chilly breezes. Indoors is the best place. Outdoors you see furs
and more furs, galoshes and more galoshes. Furnaces roar. Radiators hiss.    The Empress of Australia'flees eastward . . .
But Tuesday, December the ninth, how attractively different!
Not America now, but Madeira. Not lowering dull skies, but a
blue vault inverted, dipped at its edges into the surrounding quietude
of a sea just as blue. Not a thousand up-ended checkerboards of
lighted windows, but hillsides, green, golden, red. Roofs you can
actually see. Contrasts on every side with all you've ever known.
Madeira, just Madeira, a week away from New York, from winter ...
And what a week, what a pleasure-crowded week, beginning with
that breathless rush from hotel or railway station or home to the
dock, where the gleaming-white Empress of Australia was being
laid storm to by hundreds of fellow-adventurers and their relatives
and friends . . .
You remember the excitement of finding your stateroom,
hurriedly admiring the seemingly endless contrivances for your
comfort, the decorations, and then, rushing back to the promenade
deck to lose yourself in the streamered maze. You remember the
good-byes as the bugle blew, good-byes that began aboard-ship
and ended only when the crowd on the dock became an indistinguishable dot over the widening water. Tea-time in the Lounge, that
first day, how restful it was after all the rush and bustle, how
preparatory for the task of unpacking your clothes and getting
settled in the attractive quarters which would be your home for the
next four-and-a-half months! Wednesday, you rested, when you
weren't investigating the ship-decks and interiors, when you weren't
eating and getting acquainted with your table-companions and
deck-chair neighbors. Thursday evening, there was an Identification Progressive Bridge Party, another really clever device to banish
that initial strangeness which afflicts so many people in a crowd.
The next day you started your daily mile along the wide, breeze-
swept deck. That was in the morning. You also discovered the
best shuffle-board spaces, the pleasure of a dip in the Pompeiian
Pool, and the amazing variety of apparatus in the Gymnasium.
And what else was there in that crowded week? There was the
classical concert by the competent salon orchestra; the amusing
Masquerade Ball; the Lecture on Madeira; the EMPRESS, the
little newspaper packed so full of world and ship news; the amusing
Memograms, with their apropos and clever drawings and comments
designed, produced and delivered to you from the studio on board
ship. You remember the gradual-increasing warmth of the breezes,
the gradual unveiling of the sun, the—but there, one late afternoon, was Madeira .  .  .
16 ROUND^W )RLD CRUISE
MADEIRA
J-/ATE on the afternoon of Wednesday, December the ninth, the
cruise-ship skirts the beautiful shores of Madeira for two hours,
makes a giant swing, and there before you is Funchal, a pink town,
a blue town, a white town, rising in terraces from the worn stones
of its  ancient  quay.
Close to the old fort crowning Loo Rock, the anchor drops and
a host of tiny boats swarms round. From translucent depths,
diving boys retrieve seemingly vanished coins that passengers have
flung; then one more look at Funchal, and you are away to your
room to dress.    For tonight there is a ball at the Casino.
Taxi? Madeira has something better, and since Madeira offers
you little choice you take it—a carroe, the strangest of vehicles,
sired by a bob-sled and dam'd by a four-poster bed! It has even a
canopy and curtains! Bullocks pull it, a boy proceeds it, an older
edition of the boy runs alongside; and away you go, around startling
corners, up narrow, tilted streets, the staccato of Portuguese half-
shouted, half-sung, in your ears, the pelting of tropical flowers
into your lap; until at long last you slide into the Casino's gardens
and disembark beneath the thousands of colored lights that twinkle
magically from every bush and tree. From this fairyland of color
and warm, flower-scented air you step into the fairyland of the
Casino itself, brilliant with its immense crystal chandeliers . . .
Back to your room, then, to sleep, and away again in the morning
to burrow in the markets, old castle, fort and treasure-filled 14th
century cathedral. Later, when your appetite for the ancient and
historic and curious has been satisfied, there is an entrancing
ride awaiting you by rack-and-pinion railway up through the luxuriant foliage of the mountainside to Terreiro da Lucta, 3285 feet
above sea-level, whence you look across marvellous terraced slopes
and toylike bay outspread below. While you ascend by railway,
it is by gravity you descend! Carrinhos-do-monte, so they call
them, these wicker basket sleds into which you and your companions climb, and which drop, literally drop, down the twisting road,
to make the journey of four miles inside of twenty minutes!
In the afternoon, it is go-as-you-please, with enjoyment as your
only impelling motive. Go to sit and sip, if you like, in the friendly
little open-work cafes on the Prac da Constituicao. If inclined,
inspect and bargain for some Madeira lace and embroideries, extolled the world over for fineness. Or visit Rua Pereita and read
what you can of the tablet marking Columbus' home and listen
to the tale of Menino Perestello, whom he woo'd and wed here . . .
.17 CANADIAN  PACIFIC
18 ROUND^WORLD CRUISE
19 GIBRALTAR
ALGIERS
MONACO
JCjARLY on December the twelfth, the cruise-
ship drops anchor before Gibraltar, most famous
of all the world's fortresses. Three miles long,
three-fourths of a mile wide, fourteen hundred
feet in height, Gibraltar looks every bit as formidable as history paints it.
Riding up and over The Rock, you make contact with the Mediterranean's medley of races,
and come face to face with thrilling history,
mirrored in scarred walls, ubiquitous "Tommy",
old Moorish castle built as far back as 711,
galleries and tunnels which, if you are fortunate,
you may inspect somewhat, but only somewhat ! Stories come back to mind: of Hercules,
Phoenicians, Athenians, Romans, Moors,
Spaniards, English; of siege and counter-siege.
For them to whom history is not everything there
are the view from Rosia Bay, the sub-tropical
gardens; and Algericas, the little Spanish town
across from "Gib", where it is nice to have tea
and nice, too, to buy at surprisingly low prices
handicraft from Egypt, Morocco, India and elsewhere. . . .
Another day, and the cruise-ship comes to
Algiers and the promenade-girdled harbor built
by Barbarossa for his galleys. Algiers, Paris of
Africa, is a city of smart shops and cafes and
hotels, of gemlike villas, but behind this veneer
it is still the Algiers of pre-French days, African,
baffling, Mohammedan, puzzling. The narrow
streets of the native city swarm with haggling
merchants, Bedouins in from the desert, children, veiled women, donkeys, goats. You are lost
to the modern world, as you peer down gloom-
dark alleys, up at shading balconies, in at hole-
in-the-wall shops with their amber, filigree,
brass, jewels, leather. But a day is a day, and
within its span you can see all Algiers' beauties
and squalors .  .  .
Now, it is across the Mediterranean to Monaco,
with Monte Carlo like a jewel above the lazing
blue waters. In the bright sunshine, you set
out for the Cathedral, Oceanographic Museum,
Prince's Palace; and for that most famous drive
in all Europe, the Grande Corniche, that climbs
dizzyingly up to La Turbie, drops dizzyingly
down to Nice and its Promenade des Anglais,
centre of the smart Riviera season now just beginning. When Monte Carlo's myriad lights
come aglow, you probably trail away to the
Casino where the world flirts with Fortuna to
the whir of colored wheels and the casual flip
of cards  .  .  .
20 ROUND^WORLD CRUISE
21 CANADIAN  PACIFIC
22 ROUND^eWORLD CRUISE"
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23 NAPLES, ATHENS
HAIFA        1
J. hen, on the morning of December the
eighteenth, Naples itself bursts upon your vision,
lighting your soul with its breath-taking panorama of azure waters, circle of white buildings
and sombre amphitheatre of mountains dominated by the smoke-plumed summit of Vesuvius.
The world holds no lovelier sight, no more ravishing and beautiful a picture.
But there is more, much more to Naples than
this marvellous introductory view. There is
Neapolitan life at its freest and gayest in the
park of the Villa Nazionale; the National Museum
with its unique collection of bronzes, sculpture,
wall-paintings from Pompeii and Herculaneum;
the strange sea-life in the Aquarium, the
scribes beneath the arches of San Carlo Theatre
taking down the love-letters of girls unable to
write; Pompeii itself with its ruins of the House
of the Faun, the House of Glaucus, Temple of
Isis and other buildings which reconstruct for
us Roman life shortly after Christ; Herculaneum,
another victim of Vesuvius; the thrilling beauty
of the Amalfi-Sorrento Road ... a massing of
scenes, man-made and natural, that overwhelms your eyes and mind . . .
Now, Athens calls you still farther back into
the beginnings of our civilization, and as you
stand on that immortal hilltop of the Acropolis
you come to a new understanding of the meaning
of beauty, and utter a prayer of thanksgiving
that the hands of Time have dealt so gently with
these historic ruins. There to the right is Nike,
Temple of the Goddess of Beauty. Shrines and
statues stand forested before your eyes in the
Propylaea. There is the famous Porch of the
Caryatides, part of the beautiful Erectheum.
Above you rises the most perfect of all man-made
beauties, the Parthenon. Far below is modern
Athens, a lovely marble city; Mars Hill where
St. Paul preached; across the small stream of
Ilissus stands the marble Stadion, nearby are
the Royal gardens, the Theatre of Dionysius and
Temple of Zeus. It is worth a life-time's effort
just to stand here and open one's eyes to the surrounding loveliness.   Years could well be spent. .
At Haifa, fez'd and pantaloon'd boatmen surround the cruise-ship as she anchors within sight
of Mount Carmel, -where Baal's four hundred
priests stood confounded by Elijah's miracle,
and of Acre,with its old Crusaders' Wall. Here
is the gateway to the Holy Land. Ashore in flat-
bottomed barges, cruise-members now embark
on what to many of them will be the spiritual
climax of the cruise.
24 ROUND EWORLD CRUISE
25 CANADIAN  PACIFIC
^(ftxbu djfa&uut>$juM*ut fljxArrfc* , (ZtfanJ
26 ROUND^WORLD CRUISE
27 HOLY LAND
EGYPT
F OR two and a half memorable days cruise-
members remain in and near Jerusalem, visiting every spot made familiar by legend and
history. Here is the City of David, demolished
and rebuilt so often in the course of eventful
centuries, that some of the original streets are
now eighty feet underground. Where Abraham
once offered Isaac as a sacrifice, and where
Solomon's Temple in its glory once stood, there is
now the great Mosque of Omar on top of Mount
Moriah. Close to it is Gethsemane, and over
there is Calvary with the Church of the Holy
Sepulchre that guards the Tomb of Christ.
But it is Christmas time, and all ways lead to
Bethlehem. From Jerusalem the road the
Magi followed is of engrossing interest; past the
field of Boaz, past Rachel's Tomb, past the scene
of David's conquest of Goliath, until finally
Bethlehem is reached. Here is the Church of
the Nativity above the grotto where tradition has
it Christ was born.
Optional excursions include Nazareth, Tiberias
and the Sea of Galilee, Jericho and the Dead
Sea, and everywhere are memories, echoes of
the past, associations with Christ and Mary,
with prophets and warrior kings, with the men
and women of Biblical and later times. On the
morning of December 27, cruise-members board
the special train that takes them to Cairo. . . .
Then follow four half-days of most interesting
sight-seeing and that most unforgettable of experiences, New Year's Eve, merrily popping
corks and most up-to-date of music; in this
largest city of Africa, with its mixed population,
its smart hotels—where cruise-members will
put up.
You motor to the museum, to tread dim
aisles lined with mementoes of long-defunct
civilizations, to see the treasures from Tut-Ankh-
Amen's Tomb; you continue on to El Azhar, the
Moslem University; to the Citadel, the Tombs
of the Mamelukes, the Mosques, the bazaars
with their hammered brass, inlaid furniture,
red and black glazed pottery from Assiut, silks
and other exquisit'ries. On another day,' you
are in a motor car bound for the Zoological
Gardens and Mena House on the fringe of the
desert, where you choose a camel, a donkey or a
sand-cart for the trip to the Pyramids "and
Sphinx. Yet another day, you board a Nile
steamer to sail up the Nile as far as Bedrechein.
If you wish to see more, you take the optional-
excursion to Luxor, Thebes, Karnak and the
Valley of the Kings ... to sit enwrapt while
civilization after civilization parades its glories
before  you . . . there  is  only  one  Egypt .  . .
28 ROUND^WORLD CRUISE
PYRAMIDS, AND THE OASIS AT GIZEH
MOSQUE OF MOHAMMED ALL CAIRO
29 CANADIAN  PACI FIC
30 ROUND^WORLD CRUISE
wM&it
INDIA'S RICHLY CAPARISON'D ELEPHANTS
PILGRIMS AT JUMNA MUSJID MOSQUE, DELHI
31 INDIA
ON New Year's Day, the Empress of Australia,
having made the passage through the Suez
canal, re-embarks her passengers at Suez and
steams down the Red Sea and across the Indian
Ocean to Bombay, where she anchors off the
Apollo Bunder. Two half-days of sightseeing
are provided for members in Bombay, and every
hour of the motor rides is packed with interesting scenes of the Oriental pageant that unrolls
without ceasing in this huge city of two million
people. Malabar Hill, the Hanging Gardens,
the Towers of Silence where the Parsees place
their dead; the shops; these and a hundred,
other places clamour for attention. Then, all
go by boat to the Caves of Elephanta, dim,
weird temples of a million Hindu gods.
After Bombay, roads divide. The main party
leaves by special train for Delhi, capital of British
India as it was capital of the Afghan and Mohammedan Empires, with marvellous Shah
Jehan's Palace, Royal Baths, the Painted Palace,
Jumna Musjid - India's most beautiful mosque,
and the Kashmere Gate, its walls eloquent of
Mutiny days. Agra comes next with its great
walled citadel, its palaces and its mosques, its
incomparable Taj Mahal-India's jewel of jewels;
Fatehpur Sikri follows, city of echoing streets,
left to eternal silence by the whim of a monarch;
and those taking the optional excursion to
Benares journey on to that sacred Hindu city,
the holy of holies to whose thousand temples
and bathing ghats a million pilgrims come each
year.
India, after all, is not a country but a continent, not a single race but a hundred races,
and for those 'who wish to secure a comprehensive view of this strange, mystic land an Across
India optional excursion is provided. To Delhi,
Agra and Benares first, then to Calcutta of the
Jain Temple and the Black Hole, then north
across Bengal's fertile plains to Siliguri at the
foothills of the towering Himalayas; then upwards in twists and turns to Darjeeling, 7000
feet above sea-level, within sight of Kinchinjun-
ga, the Snow Range, and distant Mount Everest,
highest of world's mountains. At Darjeeling
more than a day is spent, and you ride in a ricksha to see the sights and arise before dawn to
ride out to Tiger Hill and its view of the sun rising
above Mount Everest. Return is made to Calcutta, then southwards along the Bay of Bengal
to Madras, to Madura with its strange temples,
and then across the Strait of Palk to the evergreen, always happy paradise that the world
knows as Ceylon. Here the Empress of Australia is rejoined.
32 ROUND EWORLD CRUISE
IN THE TAJ MAHAL-THE CENOTAPHS OF
MUMTIZ-I-MAHAL AND SHAH JEHAN CANADIAN  PACI FIC
TEMPLE OF THE "TOOTH", CEYLON
34 CEYLON
W HAT an amazing succession of glories this
cruise is providing! And how smoothly, how
easily, one country gives way to another! From
January the tenth to January the seventeenth,
you were in India for a whole spell-bound
week; now, on January the twentieth, after
three nights and two days of sailing down
India's west coast, you are approaching Ceylon,
and stealing an early morning glance at Adam's
Peak that looms in the background of happy
Colombo,   the  capital  city.
Colombo is a vividly interesting city of red
roads, gorgeous flowers, green palms and a
strange racial conglomerate. Its streets present
ever-shifting panoramas of life, wherein shaven
Tamils from southern India, graceful Singhalese,
Arabs, white-capped Moors, Malays and Parsees
meet and mingle with one another in a kaleidoscope of colorful costumes. If the days you
are in Ceylon happen to be festal days, you will
see the elephants parade in long, undulating
lines; but festal day or work-day, the picturesque
bullock-bandies go in and out from Colombo
along the green-fringed roads, passing and repassing to the swaying of their cocoanut-Ieaf
hoods and the rumbling of their heavy wheels.
Since 1795 Ceylon has been a Crown Colony
of Great Britain, and today it is one of the
British Empire's most prized possessions; for it
is one of the leading tea-growing countries,
and one of the greatest pearl-producing countries of the world. The "spicy breezes" attributed to Colombo by the ancient hymn are
real, you will find, and January has no terrors
in this glittering jewel of a clime, in this so
unimprovable small island that smiles all
day long in brilliant. sunshine and at night
lures you to sleep with the perfumed softness
of its winds.
You motor all morning, the first day you are
in Ceylon, then speed away to Mount Lavinia
for luncheon. Mount Lavinia, in case you
don't know, is the veriest gem of all seaside
resorts, so exotically lovely that you will be more
than loath to leave it. But, luckily for your arrangements, back in Colombo there are shops that
compensate, shops that gleam with the sparkle
of zircons, rubies, moonstones sapphires . . .
and the next day you depart, happy and satisfied,
on a thrilling seventy-five-mile drive to Kandy,
the ancient capital, that lies 1380 feet above
sea-level in the midst of a luxuriant wonderland.
A rubber factory, the spices growing in Pera-
deniya Gardens, and Maligwa Temple with its
huge Buddha's tooth—all these you see	
35 N  D I  A N
OCEAN
ANTARC   TIC
36 ROUND&WORLD CRUISE
OCEAN
37 SUMATRA JAVA
J STRAITS   I
SETTLEMENTS
t_/N JANUARY the twenty-eighth, the cruise-
ship threads its way up a lovely bay, strewn
thickly with islands that sit like emeralds on
the satin-like waters. This is Sumatra;
Sumatra that is fourteen times as large as its
owner, Holland; Sumatra, that has twelve
active and eighty eight inactive volcanoes, dizzy
gorges, great waterfalls, magnificent trees, and
sweeping mountain views.
You come to Emmahaven and board the
special train for Padang and Padang-Pandjang,
where you see such wonders of pointed roofs
and intricate decoration that in exotic charm
surpass anything you have ever seen. You
marvel at the handicraft in the Exhibition
Building, watch the fluid-like native dancing
and fencing . . . and leave with memories of
a spectacle almost too strange to be real  .   .   .
TANDJONG PRIOR is where the cruise-ship
docks on January 30, and a motor car speeds
you away to Batavia, Dutch enough in appearance to be on the banks of the Zuyder Zee.
Past the quaint canals, where native women
wash clothes on the stone banks, through
Weltevreden, the garden suburb, out to that
most beautiful of botanical gardens, Buitenzorg;
and it is luncheon-time, at a hotel with a
balcony that looks across a deep verdured
valley to the volcanic cone of a mountain in
the distance. Two days more of Java life before
you to spend shopping for wayang dolls or
batik, to take any of the optional excursions to
Bandoeng, Garoet, to see volcanoes, native
dances to bamboo music, a diadem of lakes,
entrancing bazaars, and a temple eleven hundred
years old	
More days at sea below the equator, and on
February the fourth the cruise-ship comes alongside a Singapore dock. You board a motor-car,
flash through the teeming streets and out to
a rubber estate, securing en route a comprehensive idea of this great shipping cross-roads
of the East, full of industrious coolies, rubber,
tin, and the site of the gigantic new naval base.
38 ROUND^WORLD CRUISE"
QUEER SUMATRAN RICE BARNS
39 CANADIAN  PACIFIC
BATIK IN THE MAKING, JAVA
JAVANESE DANCERS AND ORCHESTRA ROUND^WORLD CRUISE
IN SINGAPORE
41 ■AN AD IAN  PACIFIC
SIAM PHILIPPINES 1
HiLEPHANTS, sacred as sacred can be; temples with golden spires;
streets multi-colored with the brilliant costumes of Siamese and
Chinese, Japanese and Javanese, Malays, Annamites and Indians;
canals that display every type of thing floatable; dancing girls
stiff and tilted of movement, in costumes stiff with jewels and
gold; equatorial warmth; all these go to make up the Oriental
flavour of Bangkok, capital of Siam, which you reach on the morning
of February the seventh, from Paknam. As usual, motor-cars
are waiting, and away you go sightseeing in the new city and the
old city that was founded by Rama I in 1782. In a crowded, happy
day you pass from one wonder to another; from the Porcelain
Temple to the Temple of the Sleeping Buddha, to the Grand Palace,
the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, Dusit Park, Throne Hall
Square, National Museum, Royal Library, Temple of Inlaid Pearl
Doors, the residence of the Supreme Patriarch of the Buddhist
Church of Siam. Luncheon at the leading hotel is the one touch
of Occidentalism in your progress through this most interesting
of the Orient's capitals . . .
You have seen the British, the French, the Dutch in their overseas domains; here in Manila, on February the eleventh and twelfth,
you have a chance to see America in the tropics.
You come ashore at a steel and concrete dock. You motor
through a modern city, with up-to-the-minute office buildings,
handsome clubs, pleasant homes, the great parkway of the Luneta
and views of the rolling sea. You look. You are properly amazed.
But it is the Intramuros you really wish to see, the old Spanish
town of the 16th and 17th centuries where there are narrow, flagged
streets, iron-grilled windows and massive ancient churches. Inside
the old bastion is the modern Aquarium. In the moat is the
municipal golf course. Farther out is Fort Santiago, and then
it is time for luncheon on board ship. Another ride in the afternoon
takes you to Fort McKinley and to Bilibid Prison, claimed to be
world's model penitentiary. Next morning, still another ride
introduces you to the glories of Montalban Gorge; that afternoon,
you introduce yourself to the pleasure of shopping for Filipino
needle-work . . .
42 ROUND^WORLD CRUISE
CHINA AND JAPAN
43 PACIFIC
JZL^J^JL   n    "UHajHu    Ijil^tff^A^ fXiZUn^. CHINA
xVND now for nineteen adventurous days of
contact with China and the Chinese! On
February the fourteenth, the cruise-ship comes
to Hong Kong. You ascend the Victoria Peak
and gaze down upon the beautiful city that
clings to the mountainside above the ship-
strewn waters of a matchless harbor. You
take a 60-mile motor ride through the New
Territory. You ride out to the Repulse Bay
Hotel for luncheon or tea. You have dinner
at the Hong Kong Hotel on the night of your
arrival, and then motor to Repulse Bay to dance
and enjoy that superb view from the hotel
terraces. You shop for jade and laces, silks
and porcelains and blackwood furniture in
Queen's Road. If you take the optional excursion to Canton, you meet four thousand years
of history in a city of four million people who
crowd canyonlike streets and the surface of
a  yellow  river . . .
Keelung, on February the nineteenth, gives
you a taste of Japan mixed with China! Laws
come from Tokyo, most of the people are Chinese. An hour's ride on a train, and you are in
Taihoku, capital of this island of Formosa, which
grows rice and camphor, makes opium, and has
a Governor's Garden that opens to the permit
you have . . .
Fourteen miles of Whangpoo River water intervene between Shanghai and Woosung, where
the cruise-ship drops anchor on February the
twenty-first. By tender you go up to Shanghai,
past the docks and factories and warehouses,
up to the magnificent buildings of the Bund,
to the busy little European colony of twenty
five thousand souls, settled in the midst of two
millions of Chinese. Rickshas to the Lunghwa
Pagoda, Mandarin Garden, and the other sights
of Shanghai; silk shops, Chinese-owned departmental stores, theatres, Chinese Coney Islands,
rabbit-warren bazaars; luncheon at the famous
Astor House . . . and in the afternoon, Nanking
Road and hours for care-free wandering and
shopping.
On February the twenty fourth you come to
Chinwangtao. On March the first you depart
from Chinwangtao and China. Of the enter-
vening days you spend four and half in Peiping,
the Peking of old, four cities in one, athrob
with the noise and bustle of Chinese life, athrob
with beauty and squalor, magnificence and
ugliness, opposite qualities that somehow harmonize. Two days of excursions by motor-car
and ricksha show you the Summer Palaces,
Forbidden City, State Museum, Picture Gallery,
Winter Palace, Temple of Confucius, the prayer-
inducive Temple of Heaven, the shiver-inducive
Lama Temple . . . and all the other worthwhile sights of this ancient, mysterious hive
of humanity . . . CANADIAN  PACIFIC
ydMsYYvmeS pA^- ^pMzj>isrL%/
46 ROUND^WORLD CRUISE
HONG KONG
CANAL AT CANTON, CHINA
47 ^■■f   *      »   1    ^
PACIFIC
CHIEN-MEN GATE, PEIPING
PORCELAIN GUARDIANS, WINTER PALACE, PEIPING JAPAN
vfN MARCH the fourth, you come to Beppu'on
Kyushu on the Inland Sea. Tiny kimono'd
figures smile and gesticulate a welcome, and you
begin your stay of ten days in Japan, Land of
the Rising Sun, land of cherry blossoms, grotes-
queries and contrarieties, of thousand-year-old
temples, torii, kimono'd men, festivals, geisha,
toylike houses, jinrickshas, verdant hillsides,
rice fields—land of fantastic history and legends.
One entire day you spend in Beppu, a bright,
clean little town at the foot of Aso-San. the great
volcano which supplies heat to three hundred
inns and hotels; supplies them, too, with their
famous mineral baths, and dots the countryside with colored pools, ponds, streams and
geysers of bubbling, boiling water. You see
all these on a motor trip in the morning, and in
the afternoon you are free to explore Beppu's
interesting temples, and to bargain with smiling,
bowing shop-proprietors for fans, boxes, lanterns
and silks of exquisite design.
The next day brings you the changing beauty
of the Inland Sea, as the cruise-ship wends its
way to Kobe, past the intricate patterns that
islands and hills and jutting peninsulas trace
on the rippling silver of this famous passage.
On arrival in Kobe, you ride in a jinricksha
through the busy streets of this cosmopolitan
city, and leave the next morning by special train
for Kyoto, the ancient capital that sits among
the trees and flowers of a green cup-like valley.
Kyoto's festivals! Kyoto's fans, dolls, silks,
brocades and porcelains! Kyoto's temples, pagodas and Mikado's Palace! A month would
not be too long to spend in Kyoto, sipping at
tea in little tea-houses, dreaming and watching
the little river slip by beneath its countless
bridges. But Nara lies ahead, with its unique
temples, shops, festivals, costumes and customs,
its deer that nibble cakes from your hand . . .
Then follows Yokohama, city of Big Business,
and you speed by special train to Tokyo and the
New Japan of department stores and smart
Imperial Hotel—in the midst of Old Japan,
with the moat,' grey walls, twisted pines of
the Palace Grounds. Toyko's parks are filled
with drifting figures, like ambulatory flowers;
small sisters carry smaller brothers on their
backs; bead-eyed children fly along on bicycles
—and Tokyo is Japan of the present and the
past ... a prelude to Kamakura and the great
Buddha, and the optional excursion to peaceful,
unforgettable Nikko of the giant cryptomeria,
Tombs of the Two Shoguns, and Sacred Red
Lacquer Bridge which you may look at, but never
cross.
kvJV
49 CANADIAN  PACIFIC
^rpt^Zfizx^l SjzXMfkt
50 ROUND4WORLD CRUISE
51 PACIFIC
A CURIO DEALER'S COURTYARD, JAPAN
. I HAWAII
SAN FRANCISCO
PANAMA HAVANA
JJOWN sunny Pacific waters the cruise-ship
speeds to Honolulu, city of everlasting spring,
swaying palms and the fragrance of flower-
bordered streets. Off you go on a ninety-mile
drive through the city, up to the 1200-feet top
of Pali where the view catches at your heart,
around the island with its countless amazements—glimpses of seas as blue as Peking
glass, flowers, trees, mountains, valleys; sugarcane and pineapples blooming to the alchemy
of Hawaii's sun. Then, luncheon at the Royal
Hawaiian Hotel, and swimming or watching a
bronzed Adonis shoot shorewards on a catapulting surf-board at Waikiki. Dinner and
dancing, and a night's rest; and a whole day
free to shop, to visit Bishop Museum, to return
to Waikiki . . . and now Kilauea, the volcano
whose cone rises 4000 feet above the sea and
whose heart is Inferno . . .
You've seen Naples. You've seen Hong Kong.
At San Francisco, city of the Golden Gate,
you see their beauty surpassed by the circled
loveliness of this Californian port. Before the
cruise-ship leaves San Francisco, there's nothing
of the city that you don't see, from Mission
Dolores to the seals at Cliff House, Golden
Gate Park's one thousand acres of beauty,
the Presidio and its Riviera scenery, Chinatown.
. . .Still more contrasts of scenery, history,
peoples. Old Panama, sacked in the 17th
century, still in ruins. Panama City, a Spanish
city of twisting streets and balconied houses.
Balboa, modern and American, with wide,
palm-lined thoroughfares and comfortable
homes. You dine and dance at the Tivoli Hotel,
and in the morning the ship passes through the
Panama Canal, monument to American engineering skill. From Balboa to the first lock at
Miraflores, Pedro Miguel, and the Gaillard Cut;
Gatun Locks, the drop to Cristobal, and
shopping in Colon's bargain-giving shops . . .
Havana is our last port of call, and quite the
gayest of all, for Havana is what Paris used to
be, beautiful, nonchalant, alive. Havana's
shops sell you French perfumes for nothing
almost, convent-stitched linen for somewhat
more. At the races you can wager on your
favorite horse. At the Casino on your lucky
number. There's Jai Alai, to see; there's polo,
golf, the brewery where beer is free; an endless
array of cabarets, theatres, roof gardens—and
everywhere, gayety and laughter rampant in
the midst of beauty . . .
53 CANADIAN  PACIFIC
m
CHOZU-YA SHRINE AT NIKKO, JAPAN
JAPANESE GIRLS, KYOTO ROUND^WORLD CRUISE
Jfiifl
iMi'l&MilWr^
>2ax S^lc^^/- WqjJ&Ju^. //*k^t£A^
55 AN  PACIFIC
General Conditions
CANADIAN PACIFIC acts only as agent for the passenger in matters relating
to travel away from the Empress of Australia, whether by steamship, railway,
automobile or any other means, and as such is free of responsibility for any delay,
loss, accident or sickness occasioned by fault or negligence of any person or
company, or from whatever cause.
The right is reserved to withdraw the cruise, subject to refund of net fare
received by the Company. Should it be deemed'necessary or desirable by the
management on any account to make changes in the itinerary, or to omit any
section or port named in the program, such change may be made, and no member
shall be entitled to compensation on such account.
Right is also reserved to decline to accept or retain any person as a member
of the cruise, at any time, but in such cases where money has been received the
full or a proportionate amount will be returned, according to circumstances.
In the possible contingency of quarantine, any additional expenses, living
or otherwise, must be defrayed by the member.
No refund can be made in the case of members wishing to omit any of the
included shore excursions.
Fares
f ROM New York and return to New York, fares are from $2000, according to
location of stateroom, for 137 days. Ship's plan and details of fares for each
room will be sent on request—see agency list on inside back cover.
CHILDREN five years and under ten years occupying room with two adults,
fare is $1290, irrespective of accommodation occupied. A child occupying a
bed or berth in a double room with one adult will be charged adult tariff fare.
SERVANTS accompanying employers, $1560, when berthed and served with
meals in special accommodation set apart for their use. This fare covers railway
transportation Haifa to Jerusalem, Cairo and Suez, also Chinwangtao to Peiping
and return, with hotel accommodation and meals (no sightseeing) at Jerusalem,
Cairo and Peiping, but does not cover included excursions elsewhere. If servants
are participating in included excursions at aU ports, fare is $2000, provided they do
sightseeing with employer or other servants. When servants are berthed in other
than servants4 accommodation, tariff fare will apply.
The Fare Includes
FIRST CLASS passage with stateroom accommodation and meals; landing and
embarkation charges; shore excursions as designated; accommodation where
noted at leading hotels with meals; transfers between stations, quays and hotels;
entrance fees and gratuities; services of guides and interpreters, one to each
small group, while ashore with the excursions. More than 58 days are spent
in port.
The Fare Does Not Include
GOVERNMENT REVENUE TAX on tickets issued in the United States,
personal items, such as beverages not ordinarily served on board and at hotels
without charge, laundry, baggage insurance, passport and vises, private bathrooms at hotels, conveyances or guides specially ordered by members on
individual excursions and not ordered by the Cruise Director, gratuities to
stewards on the ship.
Deposit
10 SECURE -reservation, a deposit of $200 per person is required at time of
acceptance of accommodation offered. A second payment, to bring the amount
to 25% of the passage money, is due on or before September 1, 1930, and final
payment on or before October 15, 1930.
Deck Chairs and Rugs
JjECK CHAIRS and Rugs may be rented for entire cruise, New York to New
York, for $5 each.    Cushions for deck chairs are $2 each.
56 ROUND4wORLD CRUISE
Limited Membership
MEMBERSHIP will be limited, which ensures comfort for all, both aboard and
ashore. There will be no crowding or confusion, and the facilities at the various
ports, which in some instances are limited, will not be overtaxed, The Empress
of Australia has a capacity of 1177 passengers, but only about one-third of that
number will be accepted for the cruise*
Passports and Vises
JrASSPORTS are necessary. Married couples may travel on one passport.
Most countries still require passports to be vised by their consulates or representatives. Full information regarding passports and vises will be furnished to
members in due time and every assistance rendered by Canadian Pacific representatives in completing necessary details
Mail—Cables
J.O FACILITATE delivery of mail matter at the various ports of call, there is
a Post Office on board ship, in charge of experienced postal clerks. Members
will be furnished, when tickets are issued, with instructions regarding addressing
of mail and cables to reach them en route.
Messages to Relatives and Friends
OFFICES of the Canadian Pacific will receive cable advice of the arrival of the
Empress of Australia at each port, and will notify relatives and friends of members
by mail, if list of names and addresses is supplied.
Facilities
THE EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA has every facility of the modern hotel: stenographer, barber, ladies' hairdresser, manicurist, masseur, masseuse, surgeon,
professional nurses, laundry, valet service, photographer, novelty shop, daily
newspapers, etc
The ship is equiped with long range radio capable of maintaining communication with land at all times.
The Shop—Photography
ON BOARD SHIP there is also a well-equipped shop at which may be purchased
articles, such as books, candy, toilet articles, films, souvenirs, post cards, fancy
goods and dolls.
As a cruise offers exceptional opportunities for photography, a staff of experts
is carried to develop and print films for members. Cruise members should not
take a large supply of photographic films with them, as hermetically sealed
films are required in the tropics and may be purchased at The Shop at regular
prices.
Laundry
THE EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA is equipped with a modern laundry, and members' work will be given preferred attention.
57 Management
THE EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA is owned and operated
by the Canadian Pacific; shore excursions are arranged
and carried out by Canadian Pacific; and Canadian Pacific
representatives, experienced in world-cruising, accompany
the cruise to attend to the comfort and entertainment of
members aboard and ashore.
Entertainment
ABOARD ship there are many interests—deck tennis,
quoits, shuffleboard, sports tournaments, bridge, concerts,
birthday parties, fancy dress and masquerade balls,
dancing, gymnasium, swimming pool, lectures, fraternal
meetings, camera club, travel club, and moving pictures.
The library contains a varied assortment of books on
travel, adventure and foreign countries in addition to a
representative collection of current literature. Two high
class orchestras will be carried for classical music and
dancing.
The Directress of Entertainment and the Staff Captain
will assist in arranging the various functions. Lectures
will be delivered prior to arrival at many ports, by a globe
trotter thoroughly familiar with the history and customs
of each country. Members will be particularly interested
in his tips on shopping.
Travellers Cheques
JtIEMBERS will find Canadian Pacific Express Travellers
Cheques convenient. Issued in denominations of $10,
$20, $50, $100 and $200, they may be obtained from any
Canadian Pacific office at regular rates.
Baggage and Baggage Insurance
JLjARGE trunks and other baggage which cannot be
conveniently accommodated in the stateroom, will be
placed in large baggage-rooms accessible throughout the
cruise. Trunks for staterooms should not exceed fourteen
inches in height. On inland excursions baggage will be
limited to suit cases,hand bags and other portable baggage.
Every care is taken in connection with baggage, but on
board, the liability of the Canadian Pacific is limited,
and it assumes no responsibility ashore. Members are
recommended to protect themselves by insuring baggage
against loss, damage and theft.
Proceeding to Europe in Advance
of Cruise
JVlEMBERS desiring to proceed to Europe in advance
and join the Empress of Australia at Madeira, Gibraltar,
Algiers, Monaco, Naples or Athens, will be provided with
passage from Montreal or Quebec by any Canadian Pacific
steamship to Europe, such members to provide their own
transportation and maintenance from European port of
landing to port where they join the cruise.
During the off-season on the Atlantic, accommodation
similar to cruise will be provided, as far as possible, but
during the busy season it may be not possible to assign
such accommodation, although every effort will be made
to do so.
Members joining the Empress of Australia at Mediterranean ports will be required to pay any Government
embarkation charge in effect at such ports.
58 ROUND^WORLD CRUISE
MIRAFLORES LOCKS, PANAMA CANAL
THE FISHING FLEET, PANAMA
59 Stop-overs in Philippines, China
and Japan
MEMBERS booking for entire cruise who desire additional time in the Philippines, China and Japan, may
leave the Empress of Australia at Manila, Hong Kong,
Shanghai, Kobe or Yokohama and proceed by a later
sailing of the Canadian Pacific White Empresses, which
maintain regular service between the Philippines, China,
Japan and Vancouver. First class passage will be provided
with accommodation similar to cruise, as far as possible,
on any Canadian Pacific sailing to Vancouver up to
December 31, 1931, and first class railway ticket from
Vancouver to any point in United States or Canada via
direct route, members to pay for sleeping-car berth
and meals on trains.
Leaving the Cruise at San Francisco
.MEMBERS booking for entire cruise who desire to leave
the cruise at San Francisco are requested to give notice
on or before October 15, 1930, and an allowance of $125
per adult member will he made.
Religious Services
DlVINE SERVICE will be held on Sundays when the ship
is at sea. An altar set is also provided for the celebration
of Holy Mass. There is usually a Roman Catholic priest
among  the  members.
Foreign Currency and Postage
I HE CURRENCY of each country,  also postage stamps,
will be on sale with the purser before members go ashore.
The following shows the approximate value of the various
foreign coins, which is subject to fluctuation:
Equivalent Equivalent
U.S. and Sterling
Monetary                       Canada
Unit                           About About
Madeira Escudo                               5 cents 2}4d.
Gibraltar Shilling                           25 cents Is. Od.
Algiers Franc                                 4 cents 2d.
Monaco Franc                                 4 cents 2d.
France Franc                                 4 cents 2d.
Italy Gold Lira                         5 cents 2}4d.
Greece Drachma                      \yi cents J^d.
Palestine Palestine Pound              4.86^ £1.
(100 Mils)
Egypt Egyptian Piastre           5 cents 2l/id.
India Rupee                            36 cents Is. 6d.
Ceylon Rupee                            36 cents Is. 6d.
Sumatra Dutch Guilder             40 cents Is. 8d.
Java Dutch Guilder             40 cents Is. 8d.
Singapore Straits Dollar               57 cents 2s. 4d.
Bangkok Baht                                 45 cents Is. lOd.
Manila Peso                                  50 cents 2s. Id.
Hong.Kong H. K. Dollar                 50 cents 2s. Id.
Formosa Yen                                   46 cents Is. lid.
China Chinese Dollar             50 cents 2s. Id.
Japan Yen                                  46 cents Is. lid.
Hawaii U.S. Dollar                   100 cents 4s. 2d.
San Francisco..U.S. DoUar                  100 cents 4s. 2d.
Panama U.S. Dollar                   100 cents 4s. 2d.
Havana U.S. Dollar                  100 cents 4s. 2d.
60 ROUND^WORLD CRUISE
GREAT WALL OF CHINA, NEAR PEIPING
IMPERIAL BRIDGE, SUMMER PALACE, PEIPING
61 WW
CANADIAN  PACIFIC
SHORE EXCURSIONS
"VI ADFIR A—hicludod excursion by special train from Funchal to top Terreiro da Luota, 3,285 feet; visit
Casino in evening.
GIBRALTAR—Included carriage drive around town and to Rosia Bay, visit Galleries and Fortifications.
ALGERIA—Included motor drive through modem and Arab sections of Algiers. Optional to Blidah.
MONAfO   Rr   FRANfF—Included motor trip over Grand Cornlohe Road, via La Turhlc, to Nice,
iTi\/iin.v<\/   ul   in'vi^ij    returning via VUlefranche and Beaulieu; visit Monte Carlo Casino ha evening.
TTP A T Y—Included motor drive around Naples; included excursion by special train to Pompeii.    Optional
excursion by motor car to Amalfi and Sorrento.     Optional excursions to Vesuvius  and  Caserta.
GREECE—Included motor drive around Athens and  to Acropolis.
PAF FSTINF—CHRISTMAS IN HOLY LAND.      Included excursion by special train   to Jerusalem for
m. A^uoiiiiu    2 H days with Included motor trip to Mount of Olives and Bethlehem, also included sightseeing trips around Jerusalem, thence by special train to Cairo for 4' 2 days.    Optional excursions by
motor car to Nazareth, Sea of Galilee, Tiberias and Jerusalem.  Optional excursion by motor car to Jericho.
EGYPT—NEW YEARS1 EVE IN CAIRO.    Included excursion by special train to Cairo with five nights at
hotels;  included motor trips to the Pyramids and  Sphinx; included sightseeing   trips around
Cairo; included Nile River trip to Bedrechein. Optional excursion by special train to Luxor, Thebes and
Kamak.    Optional excursion Night in the Desert.
T]\DIA—Included  motor drive around Bombay;   included excursions by steamer to Caves of Elephantat
included  excursion   by special   train  to Delhi,  Agra and Fatehpur Sikri, including  Taj   Mahal.
Optional extension from'Agra by special train to Benares, returning to Bombay.    Optional extension
from Agra by special train across India to Benares* Calcutta, Darjeeling, Madras and Madura, rejoining
ship at Colombo.
CFYION—Included motor drive around Colombo;  included  motor  trip  to Mount Lavinia;  included
motor trip to Peradeniya and Kandy.    Optional excursion by motor car to Nuwara  Eliya.
oUlVlA I KA—Included excursion by special train to Padang-Pandjang.
JAVA—Included motor drive around Batavia and Weltevrcden: included motor trip to Buitenzorg.   Optional
** excursion by motor car to Bandoeng.    Optional excursion by motor car to Garoet.
ound    Singapore   and    Island;   included
Opi
STRAITS SETTLEMENTS-,ncIl,ded1 ■»*.'*'
motor trip to Johore.
FED. MALAY STATES
SI AM—Included motor drive around Bangkok.
PHILIPPINE   ISLANDS—'nc'u<^ motor drive around Manila; included motor trip  to Montalban
Gorge.
CHINA—Included daily excursions to. Hong Kong; included motor trip around New Territories; included
motor drive to Victoria  Peak;  included  motor trip around  Island via Repulse Bay.    Optional
excursion by train to Canton
rUliMOsA—Included,excursion by special train to Taihoku, with sightseeing around the city.
C HI IN A —Included motor drive around Shanghai; included jinricksha drive through Native City.
CHINA—Included excursion by special train to Peiping.(Peking) for 4 H days with hotels and sightseeing;
included excursion by. special train to Great Wall of China at Chunglungchao.
JAPAN—Included motor drive around Beppu.     Sail through Inland Sea of Japan by daylight.
TAP AN—deluded ricksha drive around  Kobe; Included excursion by special train   to Kyoto and Nara,
** with hotel accommodation at Kyoto.
J APAN—Included ricksha drive around Yokohama; included excursion by special train to Tokyo; included
J motor trip to Kamakura for Great Buddha.   Optional excursion by special train to Nikko.
HAWAII—Included motor drive through Honolulu and around Island; visit Waikiki Beach.
HAWAII—Included motor trip to Kiluuea Volcano, Lava Tubes and Fern Forest.
CALIFORNIA—Included motor drive around San Francisco, also to Golden Gate Park and Twin Peaks.
PANAMA   CANAL   ZONE—Inc*u<led motor drive around Balboa, Ancon and Panama City, also to
historic ruins of Old Panama.  Sail through Panama Canal by daylight.
CUBA—Included motor drive around Havana.
62 ROUND^WORLD CRUISE
FOUNTAIN IN FRONT OF CASINO, HAVANA
63 AN ad Ian paciIfIc
Optional Excursions
WHILE the program of included excursions is comprehensive, it is felt that
members should be offered facilities, where time permits, to visit, at their
own expense, certain places impossible to include in the regular excursions. Where
included excursions overlap optionals, due allowance has been made in the fare
for the latter.
Members are urged to avail themselves of these excursions, as they have
been carefully organized with a view of seeing all that is worth seeing. Furthermore, in the case of motor trips, it should be borne in mind that each group
of cars is accompanied by a Canadian Pacific representative and in some cases
by police escort; cars are not filled to capacity, additional cars are employed
for the carrying of baggage, and spare cars are supplied to avoid delays in event of
break-down. Meals and hotel accommodation, where required, are also included.
Local drivers in many places offer similar trips at reduced rates but members
are warned to beware of such "bargains" as they afford none of the protection
or service outlined above and the cars are usually crowded.
Children will be charged full fare for optional excursions.
General Conditions of Optional Excursions
THE ITINERARIES and dates may be affected by alterations in steamship or
railroad services of the various countries, or by other causes. The right is reserved to withdraw any optional excursion in this program and to make such
alterations in the itineraries as may be found desirable for the convenience of
the parties and the proper carrying out of the tours; also to decline to accept or
retain any person as a member of any party, at any time. In all such cases where
money has been received, the full or a proportionate amount will be refunded.
The Canadian Pacific gives notice that all tickets and coupons are issued by
them and all arrangements for transport or conveyance or for hotel accommodation are made by them as agents upon the express condition that they shall not
be liable for any injury, damage, loss, accident, delay or irregularity which may
be occasioned either by reason of defect in any vehicle, or through the acts or
defaults of any company or person engaged in conveying the passenger, or any
hotel proprietor or servant, or of any other person engaged in carrying out the
arrangements of the tours, or otherwise in connection therewith.
The Canadian Pacific accepts no responsibility for losses or additional expenses due to delays or changes in train or steamer services, sickness, weather, strikes,
war, quarantine or other causes, and all such losses or expenses will have to be
borne by the passenger.
In the possible contingency of quarantine, any additional expenses, living or
otherwise, must be defrayed by the passenger.
All fares for Optional Excursions shown in this program are subject to change,
and are payable in gold dollars or their equivalent.
As the Canadian Pacific is governed in the matter of special trains by regulations as to minimum numbers laid down by foreign railway companies, the Canadian Pacific retains the right in each case to substitute for special trains mentioned
in Optional Excursions named herein the regular train service of the Company
concerned, should numbers insufficient to warrant special service be secured.
The Optional Fares Include
Jr IRST CLASS TRAVEL TICKETS, with sleeping accommodation where required,
all meals while travelling with the Cruise Director; motor cars and other conveyances required in connection with the sightseeing program, together with the
services of guides and interpreters; fees for sightseeing, admission to public
buildings and temples and gratuities to hotel servants, porters, chauffeurs, drivers,
ricksha boys, etc., and the services of competent tour managers.
s round£world cruise
POMPEIIAN SWIMMING POOL
65 CANADIAN  PACIFIC
The Optional Fares Do Not Include
mt ERSONAL ITEMS, such as beverages not ordinarily served on steamers, trains
and at hotels without charge, laundry, private bathrooms at hotels, conveyances
or guides specially ordered by members on individual excursions and not ordered
by the Cruise Director; and baggage insurance, which is strongly recommended.
Cancellation of Optional Bookings
I HE CANADIAN PACIFIC makes arrangements in advance for the Optional
Excursions and is required to pay for all facilities ordered, therefore no cancellations or- alterations may be made in connection with such excursions after the
books are closed, the date for which will be announced on the ship.
Optional No. 1—Limited to 100 persons.
Blidah
Sunday, December 14.
Half-day trip by motor car from Algiers
to the noted Algerian town of Blidah,
thence to theGorgesof theChiffa. Lunch
will be served at the new hotel at Rocher
des Singes. Return to Algiers about 5 p.m.
Members taking Optional No. 1 are
given the complete program of sightseeing in Algiers..
Extra Cost per Person $10
Optionals No. 2 and 2a—Limited to 125 persons each day.    Thursday, December
18, and Friday, December 19.
Amalfi—Sorrento Drive
Full-day trip by motor car from Naples
over the famous Amalfi-Sorrento Drive.
Luncheon will be served at Amalfi and
afternoon tea at Sorrento.    Return to
the ship for dinner. Members taking
Optional No. 2 or 2a are given the complete program of included excursions at
Naples and Pompeii.
Extra Cost per Person $16
Optional No. 3—Limited to 100 Persons.    Thursday, December 18.
Caserta
Half-day trip by motor car from Naples
to Caserta, known as the Versailles of
South Italy and famous for its enormous palace, erected in 1692 by Charles
HI of Bourbon, containing over one
thousand rooms. The extensive gardens
are richly decorated with cascades and
groups of marble statues. Return to ship
for dinner. Members taking Optional
No. 3 are given the complete program
of included excursions at Naples and
Pompeii.
Extra Cost per Person $1
Optional No. 4—Limited to 60 persons.
Vesuvius
Friday, December 19*
Half-day trip from Naples by motor car,
railway and funicular railway to the
crater of Vesuvius. Return to the ship
for luncheon. Members taking Optional
No. 4 are given the complete program of
included excursions at Naples and
Pompeii.
Extra Cost per Person $8
66 ROUND EWORLD CRUISE'
TWO-BED ROOM
SITTING ROOM OF PRIVATE SUITE
67 AN AD I AN  PACIFIC
Optional No.- 5—Limited to 125 Persons
Nazareth and Sea of Galilee
(See map on page 30)
Wednesday, December 24
Morning—Leave Haifa by motor car,
arriving Nazareth about 9.30 a.m. Visit
the Church of the Annunciation, Work
Shop of Joseph, Jewish Synagogue and
the Virgin's Well. Proceed to Tiberias
for  luncheon.
Afternoon—Drive by motor car along
the Sea of Galilee to Magdala, Bethsaida
and Capernaum. Weather permitting, a
trip will be made on the Sea of Galilee.
Dine and sleep at Tiberias.
Thursday, December 25
Morning—Leave Tiberias by motor car
for Nablus where luncheon will be
served. Afternoon—Proceed by motor
car, visiting Jacob's Well and Mount of
Olives, arriving Jerusalem about 5 p.m.
Friday, December 26
Sightseeing in Jerusalem.
Saturday, December 27
Leave Jerusalem by special train with
main cruise party for Cairo.
Members taking Optional No. 5 are
given the full program of included excursions in Palestine, but are required
to complete it in one day.
Extra Cost per Person $30
Optional No. 6—Limited to 100 Persons
Jericho, Dead Sea, River Jordan
(See map'on page 30)
Half-day trip by motor car from Jerusalem to Gethsemane, Bethany, Jordan
Valley, Jericho, Dead Sea and the River
Extra Cost per Person
Jordan. Members taking Optional No.
6 are given the complete program of
included excursions in Palestine.
Optional No. 7 and 7a—Limited to 75 Persons Each Day.
and Monday, December 29.
Sunday, December 28
A Night in the Desert
Motor cars leave Shepherd's Hotel,
Cairo, at 4.30 p.m. for the Mena House
Hotel on the edge of the Desert. Camels
will then convey members to the Desert
Camp about three miles beyond the
Pyramids. Tea, dinner, program of
native entertainment and a night's lodging are provided.    Sleeping tents each
Extra Cost per Person $13
contain two beds and other necessary
equipment. After breakfast, members
are provided with camels and motor cars
for the return to Cairo, arriving about
9 a.m. Members taking Optional 7 or 7a
are given the complete program of included excursions at Cairo.
Optional No. 8—Limited to 130 Persons
Special Train with Dining Car
Luxor, Thebes and Karnak
(See map on page 30)
Monday, December 29
Leave  Cairo  7  p.m.   in  sleeping  cars.
Dinner on train.
Tuesday, December 30
Arrive Luxor 7 am.   Breakfast on train.
Members   are   transferred   across   the
Nile River in small boats to the  west
bank. Here donkeys and motor cars
will be provided for the trip to the Valley
of the Kings with its temples and tombs,
including Tut-Ankh-Amen's.
Features of interest on the drive are the
gigantic Colossi, Temple of King Amen*
hotep; the Temple of Koorneh; Valley of
i
68 ROUND^WORLD CRUISE
Biban-el-Molook, with its Tombs of the
Kings of the 19th and 20th dynasties,
now lit by electricity; the hill of Abd-el-
Koorneh, and under the cliffs of the
Libyan Mountain, to the Temple Dayr-
el-Bahree, with its sculptures of floating
obelisks from Assuan and gigantic statue
of Rameses II; Dayr-el-Medeeneh; the
tomb of Queen Nefertari; Medinet-
Abou; luncheon will be served at the
Rest House in Thebes and the party
will then return to the east bank of
the Nile.
The afternoon will be devoted to visiting
the Temple of Luxor and the magnificent
Temple of Karnak. The route lies across
the plain and along the Grand Avenue
of Sphinxes.
The unfinished Propylon, or outer wall,
still more than 100 feet in height, and
the various courts having been inspected,
the great hall of the Temple is visited.
Tea at Luxor Hotel. Leave Luxor 7.30
p.m. in sleeping cars.      Dinner on train.
Wednesday, December 31
Arrive Cairo 7.30 a.m. Breakfast at hotel.
Members  taking   Optional   No.  8  are
given two days of sightseeing at Cairo
on Sunday and Monday or Wednesday.
Extra Cost per Person
t
Optional No. 9—Limited to 80 Persons
Special Train with Dining Car
(See map on page 36)
Benares—Taj Mahal
Saturday, January 10
Sightseeing in Bombay by motor car.
Luncheon at hotel. Leave ship 5.30 p.m.
by tender for Ballard Pier. Leave Ballard Pier 6.30 p.m. in sleeping cars.
Dinner on train.
Sunday, January 11
En route.    Meals on train.    Two-hour
stop at Sanchi Tope for sightseeing.
Monday, January 12
Arrive Delhi 9.0S.  a.m.      Breakfast on
train. Morning—Sightseeing by   motor
car. Luncheon at hotel.
Afternoon—Sightseeing  by   motor  car.
Dinner at hotel.   Leave Delhi 11.20 p.m.
Tuesday, January 13
Arrive Agra 5.20 a.m. Breakfast on train
at 7 a.m.
Morning—Sightseeing by motor car.
Luncheon at hotel.
Afternoon—Tonga (native two-wheeled
vehicle) to Agra Fort and the Taj Mahal.
Dinner at hotel.   Leave Agra 11.15 p.m.
Wednesday, January 14
Arrive Fatehpur Sikri.       Breakfast   on
train at 6.30 a.m.    Visit the Deserted
City. Leave at 10 a.m. for Benares.
Luncheon and dinner on train.
Thursday, January 15
Arrives Benares 4 a.m. Morning tea on
train at 6 a.m. Leave railway station
7 a.m. by motor car to join boats for
early morning trip on Canges River to
view Burning and Bathing Ghats. Proceed to hotel for breakfast at 9 a.m.
Balance of morning sightseeing by motor
car. Luncheon at hotel.
Afternoon—Sightseeing by motor car.
Tea and dinner at hotel. Leave Benares
10.30 p.m. for Bombay.
Friday, January 16
En route.    Meals on train.
Saturday, January 17
Arrive Bombay 7.40 a.m.    Breakfast on
Empress of Australia.
Morning free.   Luncheon on Empress of
Australia.
Afternoon—Local steamer from ship to
Caves of Elephanta.
Members taking Optional No. 9 are
given the complete program of included excursions in India.
Extra Cost per Person $98
69 CANADIAN  PACIFIC
Optional No. 10—Limited to 80 Persons
Special Train with Dining Car
(See map on page 36)
Across India
Including the Taj Mahal and Darjeeling
Saturday, January 10
Sightseeing in Bombay by motor car.
Luncheon at hotel.   Leave ship 5.30 p.m.
by tender for Ballard Pier. Leave Ballard
Pier 6.30 p.m. in sleeping cars.   Dinner
on train.
Sunday, January 11
En route.    Meals on train.    Two-hour
stop at Sanchi Tope for sightseeing.
Monday, January 12
Arrive   Delhi   9.05   a.m.     Breakfast  on
train.
Morning—Sightseeing   by   motor   car.
Luncheon at hotel.
Afternoon—Sightseeing by  motor  car.
Dinner at hotel. Leave Delhi 11.20 p.m.
Tuesday, January 13
Arrive Agra 5.20 a.m. Breakfast on train
at 7 a.m.
Morning—Tonga    (native    two-wheeled
vehicle)  to Agra Fort and the famous
Taj  Mahal.    Luncheon at hotel.
Afternoon—Sightseeing by motor car.
Leave Agra 7 p.m.    Dinner on train.
Wednesday, January 14
Arrive Benares 6.25 a.m. Morning tea
on train at 6 a.m. Leave railway station
7 a.m. by motor ear to join boats for
early morning trip on the Ganges River
to view the Burning and Bathing Ghats.
Proceed to hotel for breakfast at 9 a.m.
Balance of the morning sightseeing by
motor car. Luncheon at hotel.
Afternoon—Sightseeing by motor car.
Tea at hotel. Leave Benares 5.20 p.m.
Dinner on train.
Thursday, January 15
Arrive Calcutta 8.24 a.m. Motor car to
Firpo's Restaurant for breakfast.
Morning—Sightseeing   by   motor   car.
Luncheon   at   Firpo's  Restaurant.
Afternoon—Sightseeing by  motor car.
Leave Calcutta 5 p.m. Dinner on train.
Friday, January 16
Arrive Siliguri for early morning tea.
Change to mountain gauge railway.
Leave Siliguri 6.20 a.m. Arrive Kur-
seong for breakfast. (Dining cars are not
operated on mountain gauge railway
between Siliguri and Darjeeling.) Leave
Kurseong 10.00 a.m. Arrive Darjeeling
12.10 p.m. Transfer to Mount Everest
Hotel for luncheon.
Afternoon—Sightseeing     by     ricksha.
Dine and sleep at hotel.
Saturday, January 17
Proceed to Tiger Hill at 3.30 a.m. for
view of sunrise over Mount Everest.
Return to hotel for breakfast and
luncheon. Leave Darjeeling 2.20 p.m.
Afternoon tea at Kurseong. Arrive Siliguri for dinner. Change to broad gauge
railway. Leave Siliguri 9.30 p.m.
Sunday, January 18
Arrive Calcutta 10.30 a.m. Motor car to
Firpo's Restaurant for luncheon.
Afternoon—Sightseeing by motor car.
Leave Calcutta 5.16 p.m.    Dinner on
train.
Monday, January 19
En route.    Meals on train.
Tuesday, January 20
Arrive Madras 8.15 a.m. Breakfast at
hotel. Sightseeing by motor car. Luncheon at hotel. Leave Madras 2.30 p.m.
Dinner on train.
Wednesday, January 21
Arrive Madura 5.55 a.m. Breakfast on
train. Sightseeing. Leave Madura 10.35
a.m. Luncheon on train. Arrive Dha-
nushkodi Pier 3.10 p.m. Transfer to
ferry steamer. Arrive Talaimannar
Pier 7.20 p.m. Leave Talaimannar Pier
7.45 p.m.   Dinner on train.
Thursday, January 22
Arrive Colombo 7 a.m. Proceed to
Empress of Australia for breakfast.
Morning free for independent action.
Afternoon—Motor trip to Mount
Lavinia.
Friday, January 23
Motor trip to Peradeniya and Kandy.
Saturday, January 24
Morning—Sightseeing by motor car in
Colombo*, Luncheon at hotel.
Afternoon—Free for independent action in Colombo. Members taking
Optional No. 10 are given the complete
program of included excursions in India
and Ceylon, with the exception of the
Caves of Elephanta at Bombay, for
which due allowance has been made in
the optional fare.
Extra Cost per Person $348
70 ROUND^WORU) CRUISE
Optional No. 11
Kandy—Nuwara Eliya
Tuesday, January 20
Morning—Leave Colombo by motor
car for Kandy, 72 miles over an excellent
road, passing through cocoanut estates,
rubber plantations, tea gardens and
finally the famous Peradeniya Gardens.
A visit will be made to one of the rubber
factories, also a tea factory. The wonderful scenery around Kandy, which is
nearly 2000 feet above sea level, is beyond description. Luncheon at hotel.
Afternoon—Sightseeing in Kandy, including the Temple of the Tooth. Dine
and sleep at hotel.
Wednesday, January 21
Morning—Leave Kandy by motor car
for Nuwara Eliya, passing en route the
town of Gampola and the Rambodda
Falls. Luncheon at hotel.
Afternoon—Sightseeing in Nuwara
Eliya,  which is about 6000  feet above
Extra Cost per Person $70
sea level. The beauty of the place is
entrancing, it often being referred to as
"The Gem in a Mountain Setting."
Dine and sleep at hotel.
Thursday, January 22
Morning—Leave Nuwara Eliya by motor
car for Hatton. The distance is only
29 miles but it is one continuous panorama of scenery—mountain passes,
winding roads, tea plantations, rivers,
gorges and falls. Luncheon at hotel.
Afternoon—Leave Hatton by motor car
for Colombo via Ginigathena Gap, beyond which an excellent view may be
had of Laxapana Falls. Arrive Colombo
late in the afternoon and proceed to
Empress of Australia for dinner.
Members taking Optional No. 11 are
given the complete program of included
excursions at Colombo.
Optional No. 12—Limited to 75 Persons
Bandoeng
Friday, January 30
Full day sightseeing by motor car in
Batavia   and   Weltevreden.   Luncheon
at hotel. Dine and sleep aboard Empress
of Australia.
Saturday, January 31
Morning—Leave ship's side 8 a.m. by
motor car.
Arrive Buitenzorg 9.30 a.m. Sightseeing
in Buitenzorg, including the famous
Botanical Gardens. Luncheon at hotel.
Afternoon—Proceed to Soekaboemi.
Sightseeing in Soekaboemi. Proceed
to Bandoeng, a delightful mountain
resort.    Dine and sleep at hotel.
Extra Cost per Person $48
Sunday* February 1
Full day sightseeing by motor car in
and around Bandoeng, visiting Pen-
galengan, Lembang, Dago and the Volcano—Tangkoebanprahoe. Dine and
sleep at hotel.
Monday, February 2
Leave Bandoeng by motor car during
the    morning    for    Poerwakarta    and
Batavia.       Dinner   on   board.       Ship
sails at 6 p.m.
Members taking Optional No. 12 are
given the complete program of included
excursions at Batavia.
Optional No. 13—Limited to 75 Persons
Garoet
Friday, January 30
Morning—Sightseeing drive by motor
car through Batavia and Weltevreden*
Proceed to Buitenzorg for luncheon.
Afternoon—Sightseeing in Buitenzorg,
including the famous Botanical Gardens. Leave at 4 p.m. for Soekaboemi.
Dine and sleep at Soekaboemi.
Saturday, January 31
Morning—Leave Soekaboemi by motor
car for Bandoeng, a delightful mountain resort. Luncheon at Bandoeng.
Afternoon—Sightseeing in Bandoeng
and vicinity. Dine and sleep at hotel
in   Bandoeng.
71 AN AD SAN   PAC I F S C
Sunday, February 1
Morning—Leave Bandoeng by motor
car at 8 a.m. Arrive Garoet about
10 a.m. Sightseeing in Garoet. Luncheon   at   hotel.
Afternoon—Sightseeing in Garoet and
vicinity.    Dine and sleep at hotel.
Monday, February 2
Leave Garoet by motor car at 8 a.m.
for Batavia, visiting en route Bagendit
and Leles. Luncheon at Bandoeng.
Dinner on board. Ship sails 6 p.m.
Members taking Optional No. 13 are
given the complete program of included
excursions at Batavia.
Extra Cost per Person $62
Optional No. 14 and 14a—Limited to 100 Persons Each Day
Special Train with Dining Car
Canton
(See map on page 43)
February, 15 and 16
Leave Hong Kong 7 a.m. Arrive Canton
11 a.m. Luncheon on train.
Motor cars will be provided for sightseeing in the modern city and to the
Flowery Pagoda. Sedan chairs, carried
by coolies, will be used in the old city
where  the  streets  are very  narrow.
Leave Canton 3.30 p.m. Arrive Hong
Kong 7.30 p.m.
Canton, with its teeming millions and
marvelous shops, is considered one of
the show places of the world. Members
taking Optional No. 14 or 14a are given
the complete program of included
excursions at Hong Kong.
Extra Cost per Person $15
\
Optional No. 15 and 15a—Limited to 100 Persons each Day
Special Train with Dining Car
Nikko
(See map on page 43)
March 11 and 12
Leave Yokohama 9.10 a.m. Luncheon
on train. Arrive Nikko 3 p.m. Afternoon
free. Dine and sleep at hotel.
March 12 and 13
Morning—Sightseeing in Nikko. Luncheon at hotel.
Afternoon—Leave Nikko 2.40 p.m.
Arrive Yokohama 7.20. Dinner on board.
Members taking Optional No. 15 or loa
are given the complete program of included excursions at Yokohama, Tokyo
and Kamakura.
Extra Cost per Person $25
Photographs
Photographs reproduced in this book are copyright as follows:
I ted
By Associate Screen News Li
Montreal
Upper, p. 11
Lower, p. 11
Upper, p. 12
Lower, p. 12
Upper, p. 29
Lower, p. 29
Page 33
Upper, p. 40
Lower, p. 47
Lower, p. 48
Lower, p. 54
Upper, p. 59
Lower, p. 59
Upper, p. 61
Lower, p. 61
By. Publishers* Photo Service
Page 6
Upper, p. 31
Page 34 (L. Green)
Page 39
Upper, p. 47 (L. Green)
Page 52 (E. N. Newman)
Upper, p. 54 (E. N. Newman)
By Ewing Galloway
Lower, p. 31
Lower, p. 40
Page 41 (Burton Holmes)
Upper, p. 48
Printed in Canada
I CANADIAN PACIFIC AGENCIES
UNITED STATES AND CANADA
ATLANTA
Ga.
K. A. Cook
BOSTON
Mass.
L. R. Hart
BUFFALO
N.Y.
W. P. Wass
CHICAGO
III.
E. A. Kenney
CINCINNATI
Ohio
M. E. Malone
CLEVELAND
Ohio
G. H. Griffin
DALLAS
Texas
A. Y. Chancellor
DETROIT
Mich.
G. G. McKay
EDMONTON
Alia.
R. W. Greene
INDIANAPOLIS
Ind.
P. G. Jefferson
KANSAS CITY
Mo.
R. G. Norris
LOS ANGELES
Cal.
Wm. Mcllroy
MEMPHIS
Tenn.
M. K. Mc Dade
MINNEAPOLIS
Minn.
H. M. Tait
MONTREAL
Que.
D. R. Kennedy
MONTREAL    ■
Que.
G. S. Reid
NELSON
B.C.
J. S. Carter
NEW YORK
N.Y.
E. T. Stebbing
NORTH BAY
Ont.
C. H. White
OMAHA
Neb.
II. J. Clark
OTTAWA
Ont.
J. A. McGill
PHILADELPHIA
Pa.
J. C. Palteson
PITTSBURGH
Pa.
W. A. Shackelford
PORTLAND
Ore.
W. H. Deacon
QUEBEC
Que.
C. A. Langevin
SAN FRANCISCO
Cal.
F. L. Nason
SASKATOON
Sask.
G. R. Swalwell
SEATTLE
Wash.
E. L. Sheehan
SAINT JOHN
N.B.
ST. LOUIS
Mo.
G. P. Carbrey
SPOKANE
Wash.
E. L. Cardie
TACOMA
Wash.
D. C. O'Keefe
TORONTO
Ont.
J. B. Mackay
VANCOUVER
B.C.
J. J. Forster
VICTORIA
B.C.
L. D. Chetham
WASHINGTON
D.C.
C. E. Phelps
WINNIPEG
Man.
W. C. Casey
OVERSEAS
ADELAIDE
Australia
MacDonald. Hamilton & Co.
ALGIERS
Algeria
Atwater Shipping Co.
ATHENS
Greece
Crowe & Stevens
AUCKLAND
New Zealand
A. W. Essex
BALBOA
Canal Zone
Wm. Andrews & Co.
BANGKOK
Siam
Anglo-Siam Corp. Ltd.
BATAVIA
Java
Java-China-Japan Line
BOMBAY
India
MacKinnon. Mackenzie & Co
BRISBANE
Australia
MacDonald, Hamilton & Co.
CAIRO
Egypt
Anglo-Am. N. & T. Co.
CALCUTTA
India
MacKinnon, Mackenzie & Co
CHRISTCHURCH
New Zealand
Union S. S. Co. of N. Z. Ltd.
COLOMBO
Ceylon
MacKinnon, Mackenzie & Co
CRISTOBAL
Canal Zone
Wm. Andrews & Co.
DUNEDIN
New Zealand
Union S. S. Co. o f N. Z. Ltd.
GIBRALTAR
Gibraltar
The London Coal Co.
HAIFA
Palestine
Nasif Joly & Co.
HAVANA
Cuba
Santamaria y Ca.
HILO
Hawaii
Theo. II. Davies & Co.
HONG KONG
China
HONOLULU
Hawaii
Theo. H. Davies & Co.
JERUSALEM
Palestine
Jamal Bros.
KEELUNG
Formosa
Jardine Malheson & Co.
KOBE
Japan
B. G. Ryan
LONDON
England
W. H. Powell
LONDON
England
C. E. Jenkins
MADEIRA
Madeira
Blandy Bros & Co.
MANILA
P.I.
J. R. Shaw
MELBOURNE
Australia
II. F. Bover
MONTE CARLO
Monaco
A. Jules Doda
NAPLES
Italy
Wilmink. liorriello
PADANG
Sumatra
Haacke Company
PARIS
France
A. V. Clark
PEIPING (PEKING)
China
Wm. Forbes & Co.
PERTH
-Australia
MacDonald, Hamilton & Co.
PORT SAID
Egypt
Pt. Said & Suez Coal Co.
ROME
Italy
A. R. Owen
SHANGHAI
China
A. M. Parker
SINGAPORE
S.S.
Boustead & Co.
SUEZ
Egypt
Pt. Said & Suez Coal Co.
SYDNEY
Australia
J. Sclater
TIENTSIN
China
K. M. Felterly
TOKYO
Japan
Can. Pac. Railway
WELLINGTON'
New Zealand
J. T. Campbell
YOKOHAMA
Japan
E. Hospes
1017 Healey Building
405 Boylston Street
160 Pearl Street
71 East Jackson Boulevard
201 Dixie Terminal Building
1010 Chester Avenue
917 Kirby Building
1231 Washington Boulevard
106A Canadian Pacific Bldg.
Merchants Bank Bldg.
723 Walnut Street
621 South Grand Avenue
Porter Building
611 Second Avenue South
201 St. James Street, West
St. Catherine W. and Metcalfe
Baker and Ward Streets
Can. Pac. Bldg.. Madison & 44th
87 Main Street West
803 Woodmen of World Bldg.
83 Sparks Street
1500 Locust Street
338 Sixth Avenue
148A Broadway
Palais Station
675 Market Street
115 C.P.R. Bldg.
1320 Fourth Avenue
40 King Street
412 Locust Street
Old National Bank Building
1113 Pacific Avenue
Can. Pac. Bldg., King & Yonge
Can. Pac- Ry. Station
1102 Government Street
14th & New York Ave., N.W.
Main St. and Portage Ave.
Grenfell Street
5 Boulevard Carnot
Piraeus
32-34 Quay Street
Steamship Agents
Steamship Agents
Steamship Agents
Steamship Agents
Mary Street
8 El-Manakh Street
Steamship Agents
Steamship Agents
Steamship Agents
Steamship Agents
Steamship Agents
72 Irish Town
Steamship Agents
A part ado 770
Steamship Agents
Opposite Blake Pier
Steamship Agents
Jaffa Road
Steamship Agents
1 Harima-machi
62 Charing Cross
62 Charing Cross
Steamship Agents
14 Calle David
59 William Street
Courtier Maritime
62 Via Depretis
Steamship Agents
24 Blvd, des Capucines
Steamship Agents
St. George's Terrace
Steamship Agents
130-131 Via DelTritone
Union Bldg., 4 Bund
Steamship Agents
Steamship Agents
Union House
Agent
C-8 No. 8 Marunouchi
Curtis Building
21 Yamashita-Cho
G. T. FRAYNE
Wm. BALLANTYNE
II. M. MacCALLUM
J. J. FORSTER
P. D. SUTHERLAND
H. B. BEAUMONT
W. G. ANNABLE
Wm. BAIRD
General Agent, Cruise Department Montreal
Asst. Steamship General Passenger Agent Montreal
Asst. Steamship General Passenger Agent Montreal
Steamship General Passenger Agent Vancouver
General Passenger Agent, Cruises Montreal
Steamship General Passenger Agent Montreal
Asst. Steamship Passenger Traffic Manager Montreal
Steamship Passenger Traffic Manager Montreal
mted in Canada,  1930 

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