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Africa-South America cruise by the Empress of Australia Canadian Pacific Steamships Limited 1935

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EMPRESS of AUSTRALIA
• MEDITERRANEAN
• EAST   AFRICA 1
• SOUTH   AFRICA  I
• SOUTH   AMERICA
• WEST   INDIES
FROM   NEW YORK
JANUARY 25, 1936
ONE  MANAGEMENT ... SHIP  AND  SHORE
Canadian Pacific
WORLD'S      GREATEST     TRAVEL     SYSTEM
Printed in Canada, 1935 Maternal pride: this Zulu mother fondly studies the features of her son THE NEWEST TRAVEL THRILL
Do you want to go to strange, exciting places that the world seldom
visits ? Then take this cruise on the
EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA and
experience a real travel thrill . . .
There's so much to discover on a
trip like this. History, mystery,
contrast, glamour, romance.
HISTORY in the Mediterranean . . .
MYSTERY in East Africa . . . CONTRAST in South Africa.. .GLAMOUR
in South America... and ROMANCE
in the West Indies!
Visit famous cities of the Mediterranean, classic Greece and ancient
Egypt. . . then on to the intriguing
ports of East Africa . . . the kraals
and cities of South Africa . . . the
brilliant life of South America . . .
and home via the colourful West
Indies. What variety! And you've
seen the other half of the world,
and enjoyed a unique adventure
cruise!
23,000 MILES — 95 DAYS
23   PORTS —20   COUNTRIES
J :^!s2==fe£
X^lSi
w~
••     ••   •   ••     •
•     •     •
*MF*
•   •     .  • ■
*     • •    •■       ii ii ■■ ii
21,850 Tons Gross Register
EMPRESS  OF
The choice of a ship—your home for over three months—is of paramount importance. The
EMPRESS  OF  AUSTRALIA  answers  every requirement—size,   comfort,  beauty and service.
The EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA has a world-wide reputation. She is known in all the principal
ports of the world, and her spick-and-span appearance—gleaming white exterior and three buff
funnels—makes a beautiful picture as she comes up the harbour.
Admirably adapted to the comforts and joys of cruising, this great trans-Atlantic liner takes
you smoothly over the seas. Large, beautiful lounges and foyers—steward service and cuisine
unexcelled in any fleet—Pompeiian swimming pool, and outdoor pool in the tropics—modern
gymnasium.   Her spacious staterooms were built by sleep-specialists, and comfort is the keynote ,5t
Mill   ••
I • •  •        •       • • I
AUSTRALIA
615 feet in Length
throughout—regular beds—electric fans—rooms with private bath, suites and sun-room suites—
commodious wardrobes—everything that conduces to comfort and convenience.
However, these are not her only claims to distinction. The EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA is a
gay ship—a friendly ship—and offers her cruise-passengers a whole city of shipboard pleasures.
Ballroom, cafes, promenades, comfortable hours of deck-chair lounging—deck games, dancing,
concerts, masquerades, talkies—gay ship parties, interesting fellow-passengers and lasting friendships. Such will be your cruise-life while you journey eastward through the Mediterranean . . .
down the picturesque coast of East Africa to sunny South Africa . . . across to the gay life of South
America and the West Indies . . . truly, the Ideal Ship for the Ideal Cruise! AFRICA -  SOUTH    AMERICA
CRUISE
PORTS AND PLACES
COUNTRIES
MILES
ARRIVE
LEAVE
TIME IN POR1
Included in cruise  far*
Days
Hours
NEW YORK
U.S.A.
Jan.   25        12 noon
FUNCHAL
TERREIRO DA LUCTA
Madeira
2761
Feb.      1           7 p.m.
Feb.     2          6 p.m.
23
GIBRALTAR
ROSIA BAY
Gibraltar
611
Feb.      4          8 a.m.
Feb.      4          6 p.m.
10
MONTE CARLO
CORNICHE ROAD
LA TURBIE    NICE
VILLEFRANCHE
BEAULIEU
Monaco
and
France
767
Feb.      6          7 p.m.
Feb.      8          8 a.m.
1
13
NAPLES POMPEII
BAY OF NAPLES
Italy
36S
Feb.      9          8 a.m.
Feb.    10          6 p.m.
1
10
ATHENS   ACROPOLIS
PHALERON BAY
Greece
661
Feb.    12          8 a.m.
Feb.    12          6 p.m.
10
HAIFA    BAY OF ACRE
MOUNT CARMEL
Palestine
642
Feb.    14           7 a.m.
Feb.    14          8 p.m.
13
PORT SAID    CAIRO
PYRAMIDS    SPHINX
RIVER NILE
BEDRECHEIN
SUEZ CANAL
SUEZ   PORT TEWFIK
Egypt
169
88
Feb.     IS          6 a.m.
Feb.    21           7 p.m.
6
13
PORT SUDAN
Sudan
694
Feb.    23        12 noon
Feb.    23           6 p.m.
6
MOMBASA
Kenya
2283
Feb.    29          8 a.m.
Mar.      1            7 a.m.
23
ZANZIBAR
BUBUBU
East Africa
132
Mar.      1            7 p.m.
Mar.     2          7 p.m.
1
MOMBASA
Kenya
132
Mar.     3           7 a.m.
Mar.     3           5 p.m.
10
ZANZIBAR
East Africa
132
Mar.     4           5 a.m.
Mar.     5          2 a.m.
21
See   page   57   for  details   of  Included  Shore  Excursions.
NOTE:     The above itinerary  shows two  calls at Mombasa and Zanzibar.   The reason for these extra calls is the inclusion in  this Cruise of a
Zanzibar and return gives the remaining passengers a sea voyage while the Nairobi trip is being' made.   The second Zanzibar call -EMPRESS    OF    AUSTRALIA -  1936
PORTS AND PLACES
COUNTRIES
MILES
ARRIVE
l£ave
TIME IN
PORT
Included in cruise fare
Days
Hours
DAR-ES-SALAAM
Tanganyika
48
Mar.
5
6 a.m.
Mar.
5          5 p.m.
11
LOURENCO MARQUES
Portuguese East Africa
139S
Mar.
9
5 a.m.
Mar.
9          5 p.m.
12
DURBAN
ZULU RESERVE
VALLEY OF 1000 HILLS
MARINE DRIVE
South Africa
304
Mar.
10
12 noon
Mar.
14          6 p.m.
4
6
CAPE TOWN
FRANSCH HOEK    PAARL
CAPE POINT
TABLE MOUNTAIN
MUIZENBERG
South Africa
800
Mar.
16
6 p.m.
Mar.
23          6 p.m.
7
BUENOS AIRES
PALERMO
Argentina
3762
Apr.
2
6 a.m.
Apr.
3          8 p.m.
1
14
MONTEVIDEO
CARRASCO
POCITOS
Uruguay
125
Apr.
4
6 a.m.
Apr.
4           6 p.m.
12
SANTOS
SAO PAULO
Brazil
884
Apr.
7
6 a.m.
Apr.
7          7 p.m.
13
RIO DE JANEIRO
PETROPOLIS    TIJUCA
SUGAR LOAF
CORCOVADA
Brazil
208
Apr.
8
7 a.m.
Apr.
11           3.30 a.m.
2
20M
LA BREA
PORT OF SPAIN
Trinidad
3136
24
Apr.
Apr.
19
19
7 a.m.
10.30 a.m.
Apr.
Apr.
19          8.30 a.m.
19          6 p.m.
I'A
7M
KINGSTON
BOG WALK
HOPE GARDENS
Jamaica
998
Apr.
22
8 a.m.
Apr.
23           6 a.m.
22
HAVANA
MARIANAO TOWN
Cuba
741
Apr.
25
6 a.m.
Apr.
26           6 a.m.
1
NEW YORK
U.S.A.
1167
Apr.
29
7 a.m.
ew attractive optional  excursion to Nairobi,   in   Kenya Colony   (pronounced  "Keen-ya"),  disembarking at  Mombasa.   The run Mombasa to
nables the Nairobi Optional Excursion members to see the manifold attractions of Zanzibar, which they  would otherwise miss.
A
F
■
KHARTOUM «f|pl
MOMBASA
ZANZIBAR
CAPE TOW]
LOURENCO
MARQUES
TRISTAN DA CUNHA
DURBAN Gibraltar—the fabled Pillars of Hercules as seen from tender MEDITERRANEAN
MADEIRA is like a little bit of fairyland. Blessed with a warm climate that
would be languorous but for invigorating sea breezes, it is green with vegetation
that covers almost every square foot right up to the peak, and fragrant with vividly
coloured flowers. Here on this idyllic island, where the cultivation of the grape
and the manufacture of beautiful embroidery are the principal industries, the
atmosphere of Columbus9 time envelops us.
From the top of old Terreiro da Lucta, we slide down in carrinhos-do-monte,
through wonderful gardens, past quaint houses, and laughing children who shower
us with flowers. Through the old Cathedral we wander, through streets where
no one hurries, and bullock sleds wend their leisurely way over cobbled roads.
We hie to that fairyland of coloured lights set in a gorgeous garden, the Casino, to
woo Lady Luck, or dance to inspiring music. Or perhaps we ride in a carro, drawn
by soft-eyed oxen, through the star-lit night, perfumed with the scent of a million
blossoms. The loveliest gardens in the world are at the Palacio de Generalife—
orange trees, pomegranates, roses, terraces, fountains, tree-shaded walks, and
the haunting melody of the nightingale.
Peace, Old World charm, soft breezes, kindly people, flowers—such is Madeira!
GIBRALTAR—"As solid as the Rock of Gibraltar."
This stronghold of the British Empire guards the gateway to the Mediterranean : monster guns, strongly entrenched—wireless with fingers on the pulse of
the world—searchlights playing suspiciously on any strange craft in the harbour.
Below lies the old Moorish castle, built in the 8th century—grim relic of the days
when Islam ruled in Europe.
We visit Rosia Bay where lean, grey warships lie at anchor, and Alameda Gardens, with its little cemetery, where heroes of the Battle of Trafalgar are buried. MEDITERRANEAN
Odd carriages rattle through the stony streets, hawkers cry their wares, quaint
shops offer all kinds of perfume and novelties for sale.
MONACO—Onward, along the blue Mediterranean to Monaco, on the fashionable
Riviera, and Monte Carlo, of casino fame and justly celebrated opera. We motor
over the Grande Corniche Road—skirting the beautiful, blue bay—past La Turbie,
and quaint villages famed in song and story—our destination, Nice, paradise of
flowers. Returning via Villefranche and Beaulieu, we visit the Casino at Monte
Carlo in the evening, at the height of the play.
Strung out along the high white cliffs, laved by the blue waters of the sea,
are palatial hotels and stately villas, embowered in foliage, and the background
of high hills merging in the mountains beyond presents a view unforgettable as
the Empress of Australia steams away to the next cruise-port, Naples.
NAPLES—Under blue Italian skies, we drive through Naples' climbing streets,
meeting Fascist guards, and soldiers in their long, grey-green cloaks, housewives
going to market, priests in sombre robes, and peddlers crying their wares; from
Monte Carlo Casino at night MEDITERRANEAN
wall niches, images of the Virgin gaze down; and high above the streets hang lines
strung with washing.   There are historic churches to visit, and the Museum.
In Pompeii we see the city which flourished so magnificently until Vesuvius
buried it deep in dust and ashes in 79 A.D. The excavations give us an idea of how
life was lived 2,000 years ago in this old city of the Romans. We may journey up
the steep side of Vesuvius, its destroyer, and look down into its fiery, rumbling
depths! Other optional excursions are operated to Rome, "the Eternal City," and
along the world-famous Amalfi-Sorrento Drive.
ATHENS—Anchoring in the Bay of Phaleron, we land at Piraeus, to find ourselves in
a very modern port. A five miles' run through delightful pastoral country brings
us to Athens, that "violet-wreathed, brilliant, most enviable city." The Arch of
Hadrian rises before us; the Agora; the Temple of Jupiter; the Tower of the Winds,
and the Theseum! There stands Mars Hill where St. Paul, in 54 A.D., preached to
the Athenians the existence of the Unknown God.
The Acropolis exceeds our greatest dreams. So do the Propylaea, splendid in their
Victor Emmanuel Monument, Rome
.©galloway;
The Ruins of Pompeii
11 MEDITERRANEAN
Odd carriages rattle through the stony streets, hawkers cry their wares, quaint
shops offer all kinds of perfume and novelties for sale.
MONACO—Onward, along the blue Mediterranean to Monaco, on the fashionable
Riviera, and Monte Carlo, of casino fame and justly celebrated opera. We motor
over the Grande Corniche Road—skirting the beautiful, blue bay—past La Turbie,
and quaint villages famed in song and story—our destination, Nice, paradise of
flowers. Returning via Villefranche and Beaulieu, we visit the Casino at Monte
Carlo in the evening, at the height of the play.
Strung out along the high white cliffs, laved by the blue waters of the sea,
are palatial hotels and stately villas, embowered in foliage, and the background
of high hills merging in the mountains beyond presents a view unforgettable as
the Empress of Australia steams away to the next cruise-port, Naples.
NAPLES—Under blue Italian skies, we drive through Naples' climbing streets,
meeting Fascist guards, and soldiers in their long, grey-green cloaks, housewives
going to market, priests in sombre robes, and peddlers crying their wares; from
Monte Carlo Casino at night The stately beauty of The Parthenon at Athens
©NELUffl MEDITERRANEAN
ruins, the Erechtheum, with its porch of Caryatides; the little Temple of Athena Nike,
serenely beautiful; the Theatre of Dionysius, peopled with the ghosts of old tragedians.
HOLY LAND—Members of the Palestine Optional Excursions disembark at Haifa
to travel in the Holy Land, over hilly country, through groves of orange and
olive. Opposing armies have laid Jerusalem in ruins many times, but it is still the
Holy City of Christian, Jew, and Moslem. Passing along a crooked way, we find
the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, to which pilgrims come from every corner of
the earth. Set in an open square is the Dome of the Rock (Mosque of Omar), sacred
to the Mohammedans; and, almost lost in a maze of alley-ways, the Wailing Wall
of the Jews. We follow the route of the Via Dolorosa to the Ecce Homo arch, where
Pilate said: "Behold the Man!" visit the Mount of Olives, the Garden of Gethsemane,
and the Pool of Bethesda. Then a trip to Bethlehem takes us over winding roads
and through pleasant but rocky country. By the fields of Boaz we drive; stop a
few moments at Rachel's Tomb; catch a glimpse of the spot where David slew
Goliath; then on to Bethlehem—the shrine of all Christendom.
The hallowed Mount of Olives; Jerusalem
J Seeing the Pyramids in an Egyptian sand cart MEDITERRANEAN
Nearby lies the Sea of Galilee, beautiful and colourful, surrounded by flowers
and luxuriant grasses; and the Dead Sea, grim and deathlike, set in barren hills,
its shores encrusted with salt crystals.
EGYPT—Citadel Hill, Cairo, awakens memories of the great Saladin; from here we
gaze out over the fairy-like city, across the green waters of the Nile, to the
Pyramids and on, on, on, over the limitless desert! The labyrinth of narrow streets
which is old Cairo still retains the Oriental charm of the old days of the Fatimite
Caliphs. In the bazaars all the undiluted colour of the East greets us, and we
stop to bargain for beads, scarabs and other curios.
While in Egypt, much may be seen on the optional excursions—the mysterious
city of Thebes, with its stupendous relics of the Pharaohs, gigantic temples and
pylons; the Colossi of Memnon; the Temple of Luxor with its marvellous colonnade, the work of three great Pharaohs; the Valley of the Tombs of the Kings,
Egypt's great treasury of the ages; the Assuan Dam—keystone of Modern Egypt;
and Khartoum, chief centre of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan.
W^iM^khL EAST    AFRICA
PORT SUDAN—At Port Sudan the Empress of Australia re-embarks the passengers
who have taken the shore excursion up the Nile via Luxor, Thebes, Assuan, Abu
Simbel, Wady Haifa, Khartoum and Omdurman. It lies half way up the Red Sea
and is the port of a State of 6,000,000 people, exporting cotton, grain, oil seeds and
gum-arabic. It occupies the site of the old Suakin, and is essentially Arab in
character. Khartoum and Omdurman are scenes of historic battlefields on the
banks of the Nile.
The Blue Nile and the White meet at Khartoum and down the joined stream
their coloured waters flow side by side. In Omdurman, tom-toms throb, and white-
clad dervishes whirl and gyrate to wild, pulsating music. Other things are still
unchanged in spite of irrigation works and the imposed order and peace of the
white man. Lean white camels recline as of old on sands hot enough to buster any
skin not so leathery tough.
Siroccos blow across desert sands riotous-coloured in saffron, burnt orange and
sienna.   When the day begins, the sun, a brassy disk, slides upward; when the day
Backgammon in the Sudan—ardent players at a street cafe EAST    AFRICA
ends, it drops as quickly below the sands; a soft haze one minute, the heat of noonday vanished completely the next; brilliant light, and then quick dusk; with next
a high moon shining down on the golden dunes of the sands of Sudan.
Bee-hive shaped grass huts of native villages lie on the banks of the Nile. Above
Khartoum Arabs are few, and the country becomes that of the negroes where
cattle is currency. Hippopotami, crocodiles and river-birds are prolific. On the
west bank live the Shilluks, across the waters from them, the Dinkas, six feet tall,
who stand like cranes on one leg and carry knives handily strapped to the upper arm.
EAST AFRICA—The map of East Africa has changed since the Great War, and
German East Africa has given place to Tanganyika Territory. The native population
of East Africa, however, remains much the same, as colourful as ever, while modern
civilization has improved the sanitation of the ports of call. The first of these touched
by the Empress of Australia is Mombasa, the chief port of Kenya Colony.
Empress of Australia at Port Sudan
17
J EAST    AFRICA
sails majestically into the harbour of Mombasa, a gala event occurs ... we cross the
Equator and meet Old Father Neptune. On the night before reaching the Equator,
Neptune's Herald comes on board. Amid a blare of trumpets he reads Neptune's
proclamation and then disappears into the depths of the sea.
On the next day Neptune himself, "The Hoary Monarch," King of the Seven
Seas, rises from out his watery realm, accompanied by retainers. By royal command His Majesty then holds court—to the merriment of the cruise passengers.
MOMBASA—The very name Mombasa has a thunderous sound—as of a big drum
booming. Significantly so. Mombasa, a small coralline island, just below the equator, has been a war centre for centuries. The Portuguese captured Mombasa as
far back as 1505 and were driven out by Muscat Arabs only in 1729. In 1887 it was
handed over to Britain by the Sultan of Zanzibar.
The climate, though hot, is healthy. As one drives from the new deep harbour
at Kilindini along a one-and-a-half mile stretch of tarmac road, one sees delectable European homes, half hidden by the wealth of sub-tropical foliage.    Mangoes EAST    AFRICA
and oleanders, palms and jacarandas, ficus and bougainvillea flaunt their vivid
colour to the water's edge.
Mombasa is haloed with the romance of Africa, and one steps eagerly into its
vivid lights and shades. It has atmosphere—that indefinable something which
is a gift of Nature, and can never be artificially created by man. All this is felt
the moment one drives up its glaring white main street. Negresses with red
kerchiefs and vivid spotted skirts, Arabs in flowing robes, Indians with turbans,
semi-naked and still almost uncivilized Kavirondo tribesmen who have come in
over the highlands from the distant shores of Victoria Nyanza, immaculate white-
suited and helmeted officials and merchants fill the typically African scene with
life. Palms, mohur trees and masses of tropical blooms peep over sunlit stucco
walls, glimpses of blue sea and the greenest of green jungles, urbane and elegant
hotels with their deep and shady balconies, and the lines of Indian-owned shops,
give to this sea-gate of a great country a charm all its own.
An interesting sight, off the beaten track at Mombasa, is the camel reserve,
The King of the Beasts
Native Women, Mombasa
19 EAST    AFRICA
where, under tall trees, a group of native huts represent the,local flour mill. The
natives keep the camels to grind the grain, and homely scenes of domestic "pounding" may be witnessed. In Africa the native women do all the heavy work, using
as pestles long bamboo canes, the width of an arm in thickness. ..They sing, laugh,
and chatter as they grind, and greet the stranger with bright smiles. In the town,
the great red Fort of Jesus should be visited, if only because it has such a bloodcurdling history, harking back to the last decade of the sixteenth century. Outside
it are the ruins of a Portuguese chapel. The old native town of Mombasa is a mixture of sixteenth-century Portuguese and Arab quarters, huddled together in narrow irregular streets. A walk past high, barred windows, from within which come
strange sounds, leads one to imagine all manner of mysterious happenings.
There are interesting carved doorways in Mombasa and a finely proportioned
Arab mosque.    Makuti-thatched native huts of wicker-work  and clay line the
Salim road, on the way to Port Tudor.
NAIROBI, KENYA COLONY—Yet Mombasa is not the real Kenya, and within a
■
Sun-tanning on spacious decks
A Z^u EAST    AFRICA
few hours of landing there comes a mysterious and almost irresistible longing to
journey inland, to see the "darkest Africa" which has changed so little since the
days of Stanley and Livingstone. The spirit of the continent is only to be seen,
felt and heard far inland, on the vast African plains and in the great Highlands.
These lone lands of the broad horizon hold the secret of that mysterious lure
which can only be described as the call of the African wild.
Members of the Nairobi Optional Excursion will leave Mombasa by train.
After crossing the bridge connecting the island of Mombasa with the mainland,
the way for many miles lies through low hills, covered with groves of palm, banana,
mango and paw-paw trees, the orange glow of the African sunset glinting through
the aisles of this tropical jungle. Many fine views are obtained of blue sea-inlets,
running deep into vivid green mangroves and red-brown, forest-covered hills.
A night in one of the comfortable sleeping cars of the Kenya railway, and the
change is complete. The fresh clearness of the morning is an invigorating tonic
after the warmth of the coast.  The jungle has given way to hill-dotted plains, 4,000-
family
©acutt
Governor's Palace, Zanzibar
21 EAST    AFRICA
5,000 feet above sea level, forming the big game country of the Kenya Highlands.
Until Nairobi is reached (330 miles from Mombasa), the panorama is one of
the most amazing in the world. Here we find a stupendous zoological garden,
wherein the number of big game can only be estimated in thousands. The long
necks of giraffe appear above the bushes, only a few yards from the train; tiny dik
dik, the smallest of the buck species, race daintily across a clearing; guinea fowl
take flight over the train; then come the great herds of wildebeeste, gazelle, harte-
beeste, and zebra, with ostriches and waterbuck. A stampede of these lesser beasts
may occur at any moment, being followed by a few seconds of uncanny silence,
and then the sudden appearance of several lions, who seem to take little notice
of the passing train. Most typical of all Kenya's big game is the rhinoceros. Elephants, too, and the buffalo, are to be seen between Mombasa and Nairobi.
With the morning sun behind it, Nairobi appears outlined against a background of blue hills. Here is the edge of the Kenya Highlands, about 5,030 feet
above sea level, and blessed with a cool and healthy climate.
These modest native shops contain many treasures
^	 EAST    AFRICA
Although Nairobi seems essentially British in character, there are differences.
And nowhere are these curious contrasts more apparent than in Government
Road, the main shopping thoroughfare. A big store stands beside a primitive wood
and iron duka, or Indian shop, without windows and full of curios from the East
and from the remote interior of Africa. Fine hotels, with ballrooms, jazz bands
and swimming pool, intermingle with structures of corrugated iron. From one s
bedroom window, the snow-covered slopes of Mount Kenya may be seen rising
above the dark blue, forest-covered plains, only a few miles from the Equator.
Sixth Avenue, the second main artery, is a wide thoroughfare, adorned with
flower beds and grass plots. The Cathedral, Mosque, Legislative Building, Government House, are all fine buildings, but why occupy valuable time seeing these
customary edifices of a capital city when there are the people themselves to create
interest? Here is a Kikuyu woman, in a greasy goatskin coat, with a huge load on
her back, secured by a strip round her forehead. There, amid the motor cars, is
a Parsee woman from distant Bombay, with jewels in her nose and wrapped in a
vivid silk sari, embroidered with brilliants. The man in the green shirt and khaki
shorts, secured by a beaded belt, and wearing a broad sombrero decorated with
the plume of a tropical bird, is a young settler in from some far-away plantation
or ranch. The mutilated ears of a passing native indicate the barbarism that still
exists in the vast native reserves. The coloured robes of an Arab remind one of the
days, not so long ago, when these people were traders in "black ivory" (slaves).
But Nairobi and its surroundings have other sights. A few miles from the
town a safe close-up view is obtained of the big game which swarm over this great
reserve. Around the water pools of the river valley below is one of the most extraordinary sights in the world—herds of impala, families of wart-hog, zebra, kon-
goni, fierce-looking wildebeeste, hyenas, eland, and hosts of other wild life.
Away in another direction is the Great Rift Valley. The view from the summit
of the Escarpment is an unforgettable sight. The floor of the valley, some 2,000
feet below, appears hazy and bottomless. Hills and dales lying between the two
widely spaced buttresses, some fifty miles apart in places, seem dwarfed into
insignificance. This Great Rift in the earth's surface extends southwards into
Tanganyika Territory and northwards to the Dead Sea, in Palestine, a distance
of 4,000 miles.   It is, perhaps, the most stupendous natural feature in the world.
The extinct volcano of Longonot (altitude, 9,000 feet) is in the centre of this
colossal valley. Lakes, their surfaces flashing in the sunlight, flocks of pink-winged
flamingoes, and lonely "Rider Haggard's Chasm," where this famous author laid
the foundation of "Allan Quartermain," are among its more romantic features.
At Limuru and Kyambu one sees the green of coffee bushes covering the chocolate-coloured soil, and the bungalows of the white settlers—housing pioneers who
are subduing a wilderness. At Kikuyu there are low grass-roofed dwellings of
African natives, standing in clusters like giant mushrooms. In Nairobi itself an
evening should be spent with one or more of the "white hunters," whose tales will
23 EAST    AFRICA
linger as a memory for life. When the time comes to return to Mombasa, watch
for the appearance en route of Mount Kilimanjaro's snows, rising 19,710 feet into
the distant sky, above the dark haze of the forest. When the glittering waters of
the Indian Ocean again come into view, the Spirit of Africa will have whispered
to you much that is unforgettable.
ZANZIBAR—This bright island, a mean distance of twenty miles from the coast of
Tanganyika, is typical of the East. The natives call it "Unguja," and in its small
area are representatives of all the tribes of East Africa, and an Asiatic element.
Ivory and ebony, cloves and cocoanuts, gum copal, hides and skins, rice and
rubber are among its wares. Its narrow streets have houses almost touching overhead, spotlessly white, with great black brass-bossed doors and gardens ablaze
with the scarlet acacia.
Whilst in Zanzibar, everyone visits the Anglican cathedral (situated on the
site of the old slave market), in which there is a crucifix carved from the wood of
the tree under which Livingstone's heart is buried.    The bazaar also is a great
Polana Hotel, Lourenco Marques EAST    AFRICA
centre of attraction. The city was the headquarters of the Arabs who ravaged
East Africa for slaves and ivory during most of the nineteenth century, and was
once termed "a cesspool of wickedness." The life of the townspeople is carried
on quite publicly in the open streets, and when dhows from Arabia and the Persian
Gulf bring Arabs, Baluchis and Somalis to the port, the scene is vividly cosmopolitan.
A continuous stream of heavily-laden donkeys parade the streets.
To many visitors Zanzibar's harbour is specially intriguing. Side by side with
the great ocean liners, junks and dhows drop anchor. Swarms of lesser native
craft vie for trade. The sails of the larger dhows are marvels of construction, made
from rice sacks and odd pieces of canvas. Back and forth the craft ply with freight
and passengers, almost as heavily laden as the donkeys, and yet an upset is rare.
The two main sources of the island's wealth are beyond the town. Avenues of
clove trees and groves of graceful cocoanut palms luxuriate everywhere. In 1790
the first clove was planted. Today, seventy-five per cent of the world's supply of
cloves   comes   from  Zanzibar  and   Pemba.
Polana Beach, Lourenco Marques
25 126      Engaged Zulu belles, whose popularity is indicated by their beads and other ornaments EAST    AFRICA
DAR-ES-SALAAM  has  wide  streets,   churches,  hospitals,  Government administrative buildings and European residences.
In Main Street is the famous "Boma," or open-air prison, with blue and white
walls—perhaps the most comfortable prison in the East. Parallel to Main Street
is Acacia Street, the shopping centre. By going from the pier past the Post Office
and Government Building to the Mission at the harbour entrance, and crossing a
small casuarina wood, a delightful ricksha ride may be taken close to the seashore.
First, one comes to the Governor's Palace, magnificently situated amid tall palms,
and then to a large European hospital, near which are some gigantic baobab trees.
Continuing the trip through the groves of palms, one reaches the Msimbasi, and can
thence readily return to the town through
more palm plantations, passing the Sports
Ground and the Askari Monument. The
local botanical gardens are noteworthy for
their numerous specimens of larger tropical
plants.
©ACUTT
Three Zulu sisters and their little brother
A Swaziland beauty at the water hole of her tribe    27 Durban ricksha "boy." The headdress symbolizes speed/ the oxen horns, patience
*A Zuh EAST     AFRICA
To the south, in a tidal creek surrounded by mangrove swamps, lie the war
wrecks of various steamers. If one prefers to see and hear a native brewery (tanga)
in action, a short walk through the palms will take the traveller to the native
quarter in Dar-es-Salaam.
LOURENQO MARQUES—the capital of Portuguese East Africa—is a modern
city, with handsome thoroughfares and buildings, and brilliant electric lighting.
The Praga Sete de Marco, a handsome square, is the chief social centre, and the
Avenisa Aguiar is a fine thoroughfare. Trackless trams and smart policemen are
features of Lourengo Marques, and the market is a bustling multitude of humanity.
There is an air of health and wealth about the shores of Delagoa—the "Bay of
Lagoons." The harbour is one of the best natural harbours in southern Africa, and
Polana Beach is probably the finest stretch of sand on the entire coastline; while
in the Vasco da Gama gardens you will find quaint nooks, cloistered avenues and
pleasant shade. A delightful optional excursion will be operated up the Incomati
River, offering enchanting views en route and a unique visit to the "Hippo Pool"
where schools of hippopotami are often seen at play.
warrior pulled our ricksha SOUTH    AFRICA
DURBAN—most British of all the South African cities—is the chief centre of the
Province of Natal. Natal rises from the sea in undulating hills to the six-hundred-
mile long rampart of the Drakenberg Range, which divides it from Basutoland and
the Free State. The Boers won Natal from the Zulus, and the British won it from
the Boers. It was the epic ride of Dick King from Durban to Grahamstown, to
bring support for the beleaguered British garrison, that confirmed British rule;
and an equestrian statue at the foot of Gardiner Street bears witness to this feat.
Durban is the premier port on Africa's easterly seaboard. It is replete with
up-to-date shipping facilities, and has a grain elevator of 42,000 tons capacity.
The beauty of the city evokes admiration from all visitors; embowered in a wealth of
verdure, blossoming trees and sub-tropical flowers and plants, Durban is indeed
a "Garden City." Handsome public buildings, wide tree-shaded streets, fine
homes and splendid bathing beaches provide Durban with all the amenities that
go to make life in such a city attractive.
In colourful, cosmopolitan Durban every phase of African life is present.   The
"A marriage has been arranged." Zulu bride and attendants SOUTH    AFRICA
shifting picture of the streets shows ricksha "boys" wearing feathered headdresses,
symbolic of speed, and widespread horns of oxen, signs of surety; Kaffir girls in
beads and blankets; Mohammedans, Parsees, Hindus, Sikhs and Arabs; East Indian
coolie women clad in cotton, with golden ornaments; veiled and richly-garbed
women of rank; sturdy Zulus; Chinese and the ubiquitous white man.
Ships and peoples of all nations sail to Durban from Japan, India, Australia,
Ceylon, the Straits Settlements, Europe and America, the Argentine and Brazil;
freighters, rust-bitten tramps, palatial liners, whalers, barquentines, schooners,
and white, skimming yachts. To the panorama of ships sailing on the palm-fringed
bay in front of Durban is added the sight of the Berea—with its stately homes
amid a wealth of flower and foliage—the musical tinkle of ricksha bells; picturesque
mementoes from the "old Fort"; Indian flower sellers with their wares displayed
on the wayside curbs; bathing in a vast roped-off pool: the Borough Market; and
the brilliant sunshine which floods the city, warmed as is all Natal by the warm
Mozambique current.     Gorgeous flowers bloom outdoors in Durban in profusion,
A Zulu warrior and his robust affianced bride
©acutt
Aerial view of Durban
31 SOUTH    AFRICA
along with the native fruits, guavas, pawpaws, mangoes, grenadillas, tangerines
and pineapples. Pervading the city is a tropic languor, adding the last perfect
touch to the delights that are Durban's. Durban offers many other attractions—
beautiful motor drives in the city and surrounding country, a view of the Zulus
in their native surroundings, practically untouched and unspoiled by Western
civilization; and a view of£the world-famed Valley of a Thousand Hills.
Optional excursions will be operated to Pietermaritzburg—a serene, little city
on the route to the Transvaal gold fields; and to the majestic Howick Falls,
twenty miles north-west of Pietermaritzburg. Howick Falls are three hundred
and sixty-four feet high and have a note of natural pageantry. Other optional
excursions will include visits to Victoria Falls, Pretoria, Johannesburg and
Kimberley.
JOHANNESBURG is in the sixty-mile long Rand, where, in the last 44 years, just
over four billions in[gold have been taken from the ground. A visit to the gold mines,
where shafts have been sunk over 7,000 feet, to see the vast and wonderful plant
A Kaffir Festival at Johannesburg
^"•M**- SOUTH    AFRICA
necessary to win the gold, first from the reef, and then from the mined rock, alone
makes a visit to Johannesburg remarkable.
PRETORIA—Capital of the forrner Boer Republic—is now the administrative capital
of the Union of South Africa. (Cape Town is the legislative capital of the Union.)
Here Oom Paul Kruger ruled as President of the Boers, drinking black coffee and
smoking strong tobacco in deep-bowled pipes on his modest veranda in the early
morning hours, while he held informal democratic levees and adjusted the troubles
of his people. The home in which he lived in Church Street is to be seen. Twenty-
five miles from Pretoria is the famous Premier Diamond Mine, the largest of all,
and here the great Cullinan diamond was found, weighing nearly 1}Z$ pounds.
BULAWAYO—largest city in Southern Rhodesia—is situated on a tableland between the Limpopo and Zambesi rivers. It has grown to its present size from the
royal Kraal of Lobengula, who organized the Matabele into a powerful nation.
The indaba tree under which he rendered judgment still stands in the grounds
of Government House.   The successful defence of Bulawayo during the Matabele
Weighing gold bricks
Bedroom of DeLuxe Suite
33
urn Victoria Falls, entrancing in their sheer beauty SOUTH    AFRICA
wars of 1896 is commemorated by a monument to the settlers who died during
the siege. Cecil Rhodes, whose large bronze statue stands in the main street of
Bulawayo, lies buried, at his own request, amid the Matopo Hills, 27 miles from
Bulawayo, in a grave hewn in the massive granite, covered by a simple bronze
plate bearing the words: "Here lie the remains of Cecil John Rhodes."
THE VICTORIA FALLS—The great falls of the Zambesi River—are, without question, one of the wonders of the world: terrific in their force, awesome in the tremendous rush of their falling waters and the majestic solitude of their gigantic gorges.
The views from Danger Point, from the Knife Edge and the Rain Forest, are entrancing in their sheer beauty, while over all lies the spell of a majestic grandeur
that holds the observer speechless.
The Victoria Falls were discovered by Dr. Livingstone, the great African explorer, in November, 1855. Known of old by the name "Shongwe," or "boiling
water in a pot," the modern native appellation "Mosi-oa-tunya," or "the smoke
that thunders," conveys more nearly the poetic beauty of this majestic cataract.
Wild life abounds in Africa
35 K36
Kaffir girl with cereal headdress (Mabela—a breakfast food)
©ACUTT SOUTH    AFRICA
Comparative Figures:
Victoria Falls Niagara Falls
Height 343~feet 158~feet
Width 1,860 yards 860 yards
Discharge:      Gallons per minute
High Water 100,000,000 82,250,000
Low water 62,000,000 66,100,000
The Victoria Falls are on the border of Northern and Southern Rhodesia. The
Zambesi River is the geographic boundary between Southern and Central Africa.
Above the falls the Zambesi flows between lovely islands, and on them one glimpses
the queer baobab tree amid beautiful foliage. Seven miles above the falls is the
little township of Livingstone, and farther up is the enchanting Kandahar Island.
KIMBERLEY—on the edge of the Karoo plateau—is celebrated for the "Valley of
Diamonds," from which precious stones worth fabulous amounts have been collected. Modern mining here is carried on as methodically as in a coal-mine, and
the native miners are guarded as carefully as the diamonds themselves.
CAPE TOWN—the chief port and legislative capital of the Union of South Africa—
lies close to the Cape of Good Hope, the southernmost point of the vast, mysterious
continent of Africa. Perhaps nowhere in the world is there a city more delightfully situated, more perfectly environed, with more natural beauty, or breathing
more of the ancient spirit of adventure, than Cape Town. Bartholomew Diaz
discovered the Cape in 1487, naming it Cabo Tormentoso or "Cape of Storms,"
later changed to "Cape of Good Hope." Ten years later the Cape was doubled
by Vasco da Gama, and in 1580 Sir Francis Drake rounded the great headland in
his historic voyage around the world. Cape Town was always the stepping stone
for adventurous voyagers seeking the fabled riches of the East, until Jan van Rie-
beeck, in 1652, held it for Holland.
There is history and romance in the old-fashioned squares and streets of Cape
Town, in the old Castle built by the Dutch Commander, Wagenaar, in 1666, and
other ancient buildings that still stand as testimony to the work and handicraft
of past generations. The history of Cape Town is pictured in the throngs that
crowd her streets and in the architecture of her buildings.
Cape Town is bilingual, by the law's decree; on its streets one hears the English
and Afrikaans ("Cape Dutch") languages spoken. A large proportion of Cape
Town's 250,000 inhabitants are of Malay or coloured South African descent. Table
Mountain towers above Cape Town, the Stately. Mountain ranges reach to dim
horizons in the background; and in the foreground, Table Bay stretches seaward,
blue as any Pacific lagoon.
One of the famous mountain drives of the world leads past Groote Schuur,
now the home of the Prime Minister, once that of Cecil Rhodes, financier, statesman, Empire-builder, founder of the Rhodes Scholarships, who dreamed of an
All-Red Route by rail from Cape to Cairo.   A bronze statue of "Physical Energy"
37
w* SOUTH    AFRICA
dominates the Rhodes Memorial, which is a temple, white-walled and sun-caressed,
on a mountain-slope overlooking Cape Town, the Indian Ocean on one side and
the Atlantic on the other. The Rhodes Memorial stands majestically above the
Cape and its medley of races—symbolic of the great Rhodes, dreaming of a new
empire for his beloved England carved out of darkest Africa.
To appreciate thoroughly the beauties of sea and mountain, the varied
hues of South African flora, the cooling breezes and bright sunshine of the
Cape Peninsula, Cruise members will make a trip over the glorious Cape
Point Drive, the "Grande Corniche Road" of South Africa. This world-famous
drive, 100 miles in length, winds its tortuous way between rocky crag and spray-
splashed rock along practically the entire coastline.    Cruise members will   also SOUTH    AFRICA
visit the celebrated summer resort of Muizenberg, on the shores of False Bay.
Cape Town's climate is as mild as the Riviera's. Flowers bestrew this land,
from garden and woodland back to the sheer precipices of Table Mountain, and
luscious sub-tropical fruits and beautiful wild and cultivated flowers are sold on
the sidewalks. Cape Town, her suburbs, and the immediately surrounding country,
rank amongst the world's most beautiful places. Forest and mountain, sweeping
sands and blue seas, cultivated valleys and splendid fruit farms, make a picture
that will linger long in the memory.
"Out into the blue," the South African calls it when he leaves "The Cape."
"Into the blue" indeed, in a land where blue mountains rest beneath a cobalt-
blue sky and sunlight shines on the blue haze of the vast semi-desert of the Karoo. SOUTH    AMERICA
BUENOS AIRES—Next to Paris Buenos Aires is the largest Latin city in the world.
It rivals the lovely city on the Seine as a paradise of the pleasure-seeker. Not by
accident did Ibanez lay the early scenes of "The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse"
here when he needed to portray a wealthy, sophisticated society with its foundations
of grazing herds and ranches in the back country. Life runs with dazzling speed
by day and night in Buenos Aires, as the volatile estancieros pursue the colourful
pleasures of theatre, lottery, race track and casino. Streets come to life with brilliant lights as dusk falls, and at midnight the round of gayety has just begun.
Vibrantly Latin, for it was founded by Spaniards, Buenos Aires has engulfed the
immigrants from many countries.
The Basque game, Pelota, vies with the races, and the opera with both, as the
national diversions. Paris gowns are seen here as often as in Paris itself. The "season" brings to the city the great prima-donnas and maestros of music and song,
and throngs of music lovers from all over South America. Buenos Aires—the Paris
of South America—laughter and gayety and luxury crowning a great business
Santa Fe Street, Buenos Aires
An "Empress" custom— SOUTH    AMERICA
structure, as in London or New York—and, in the background, almost limitless
herds of cattle and miles of swaying wheat.
It is laid out in squares, on the North American plan, and its thoroughfares
are modelled after the boulevards of Paris. Its Avenida de Mayo and its Calle
Florida are vaunted institutions—along with the Plaza del Congreso and its Palace
of Congress; the spectacular race track (Hipodromo Nacional), the exclusive Jockey
Club and the fashionable Palermo Park. The Plaza de Mayo, at the end of the
avenue of the same name, frames the magnificent Government Palace with its
fine statuary and rich furnishings, the Banco de la Nacion, the Cathedral, famed
for its murals and as the resting place of San Martin, and the Municipal Buildings.
Scattered throughout the city are over one hundred parks and plazas, the National
Gallery with its famous paintings, the Historical Museum, the Opera House, the
Colon and other great theatres.
MONTEVIDEO—Montevideo, a homelike, happy city, is the capital of Uruguay,
the youngest and smallest in area of the South American republics, but the most SOUTH    AMERICA
densely populated. Montevideo has a population of nearly 400,000. The language
of the country is Spanish, and the currency unit is the peso. Montevideo was
the scene of the latest conference of the Pan-American Union, attended by many
American statesmen.
Sitting on "The Cerro," a rocky little hill where there was once a fort, the
city is the pride of all Uruguayan hearts. Hospitals look like palaces and every
vacant lot is fenced artistically; decorative iron grill-work is seen on all sides, and
brass-lined peep-holes in ponderous doors remind one of other and older days.
Life, gay and carefree, prevails on the bathing beaches at Los Pocitos, Carrasco,
Playa Ramirez and other resorts; the delightful climate, and the many facilities
for pleasure (including a government-run casino), drawing pleasure-lovers from
other South American cities. The Montevideans have in the Solis one of the great
theatres of the world.
Wide boulevards, great parks and stately plazas adorn this lovely city, and
formal and informal gardens add masses of riotous colour to  the perfection of
Quoits is one of the many shipboard sports Shuffleboard provides lots of fun
42
Covered Wagon Memorial, Montevideo
VJI SOUTH    AMERICA ■
public and private buildings. Exotic trees, with hedges of lilac, guelder-rose
and cineraria, form delightful backgrounds for flat-roofed houses, draped in
wistaria, honeysuckle, and bougainvillea; and peaceful pools of lilies alternate with great beds of pansies, carnations, marguerites and roses. In the
Prado, grow about eight hundred varieties of roses, the petals falling in exquisite
showers, and bedewing the wind with a thousand fragrances to perfume this
"City of Roses."
SANTOS —SAO PAULO —Nestling on an alluvial plain in the elbow of the
Santos River, Santos, the world's greatest coffee port, presents to us a business-like stretch of wharves dotted with hydraulic and electric cranes and
spider-like conveyors for handling the stream of coffee sacks. After arrival
alongside, the Empress of Australia passengers will disembark and board
special trains for Sao Paulo. The trains, in units of three cars, are hauled
up the steep "serras," five in number, by means of heavy steel cables. The
scenery en route is of marked beauty.   Sao Paulo, founded in 1554, the second
Uter-Dinner Coffee is a feature of the happy social life
Monument, Sao Paulo, Brazil
43 Pao de Assucar (Sugar Loaf Mountain) and cable car, Rio de Janeiro
li SOUTH    AMERICA
among Brazilian cities and capital of Sao Paulo State, has fa population of
approximately  1,400,000.
RIO DE JANEIRO—Rio de Janeiro is a great, modern city. It lies like a jewel in
a setting of verdant green, among mountains of fantastic shape: including the
great bald monolith of the Pao de Assucar (or "Sugar Loaf") guarding her beautiful harbour, the lofty. Corcovado ("the Hunchback"), and the higher range of the
Tijuca, backed by the distant blue of the Organ Mountains. From the summit
of the towering Corcovado, an eagle-like view may be obtained of incomparable
Rio, its harbour and the surrounding sea of deepest blue.
Rio is a city of magnificent buildings, of splendid private residences and fine
hotels. Avenida Beira-Mar, its shoreline boulevard, is of great charm, and it has
a shopping district peculiarly its own—the famous Avenida Rio Branco, Rua Gon-
calves Dias, Rua 7 de Setembro, Rua Uruguayana, the famous Rua do Ouvidor,
with its mosaic sidewalks, thronged with people, flanked with fine shops, where
you may purchase most of the costly wares of the world.
Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro
45 46
Rio de Janeiro, showing the race course Avenida Rio Branco, Rio de Janeiro
J WEST    INDIES
TRINIDAD—Trinidad, the richest island of the British West Indies, lies off the
Venezuelan coast.
Port of Spain, the capital, is a city of astonishing contrasts. Hindu women,
clad in gay-coloured cottons, glide along the streets, wearing golden nose-rings, the
flesh of their bare forearms hidden by masses of silver bracelets; while anklets,
also of silver, clink musically above their bare, brown feet. Chinese merchants
rub shoulders with British, French, Americans, Venezuelan, Portuguese, and
Spaniards, West Indian negroes and East Indian coolies. Clad in nondescript
European garb, natives in tiny donkey carts and with grunting little pack
burros jostle smart motor cars for room on the streets. Stone fences gleam
with a golden glow, caused by orange peel drying in the sun to be made into
Angostura Bitters.
Bell-shaped domes of snow-white Hindu temples show up by the side
of wattled huts of coolies; and in the Botanical Gardens are hedges of
red   hibiscus,   masses   of roses, poinsettias, crotons,  rare  orchids,   and tropical
The joys of cruising! A gala masquerade ball
Xfi WEST    INDIES
climbers   hiding  the branches  of   great trees.    The air is heavy with  jasmine
and patchouli.
St. Joseph, the ancient Spanish capital; Gasparee and its fine stalagmitic
caves; the Blue Basin, Chaquaramas Bay (where the Spanish fleet was sunk); the
famous Saddle Back Drive; Maracas Falls, 312 feet high; San Fernando, the Hindu
quarter; Montserrat with the statue of the Black Virgin and her Child; and the
great lake of pitch near La Brea, 114 acres in area, are all of transcendent interest.
In Alligator Village, nearly nude Hindus propel rafts of woven palm fronds to
hunt the cascadura, so delicious a delicacy that he who once tastes it must, in
native belief, return to end his days in the only place it can be procured—in Trinidad
—the "Land of Humming Birds."
The Empress of Australia will also call at La Brea to disembark passengers
who wish to visit the celebrated Pitch Lake.
KINGSTON, JAMAICA—Jamaica is the largest island in the British West Indies,
with an area of 4,207 square miles.    The climate is a great attraction. 50
Joyous relaxation after deck sports
VS& WEST
INDIES
Christopher Columbus
discovered Jamaica in 1494.
The Spaniards took possession of it in 1509; in 1655
Oliver Cromwell sent an expeditionary force that captured the Island; it was finally
ceded to England by Spain
in 1670, and has remained a
British Crown Colony ever
since. The population of
Jamaica is approximately
916,000, of which only two per
cent is white.
Kingston, the seat of
government, is the largest city
and port, with a population
of 62,560, mostly coloured. It
was founded in 1693; on
several occasions it was almost
entirely destroyed by fire,
and, on January 14, 1907, by
an earthquake.
We leave Kingston by
motor car along a broad high
road, passing the "Ferry Inn"
and a huge silk-cotton tree
of "Tom Cringle's Log" fame,
to Spanish Town or St. Jago
de la Vega, once the capital
of the Island, laid out by the
Spaniards in 1523. After visiting the old cathedral, quaint
streets and houses, and the
Rodney Memorial, we continue
through the Gorge of the Rio
Cobre to Bog Walk, a corruption,
of "boca de agua," or "Mouth
of the Waters."' En route we
visit the famous Hope Gardens.
Waving palms beside sunlit seas
©P.P.S.
51 WEST    INDIES
HAVANA — Havana — the capital of Cuba — is rich in history and dates from
the year 1514. With Punta Castle on one side, and Morro Castle on the
other, the Empress of Australia majestically glides into one of the most
beautiful harbours of the world. There are really two Havanas, each equally
attractive. The old city is grouped about the Plaza de Armas, in the customary Spanish fashion. Here are the famous Columbus Cathedral, the old
Governor's Palace, and the civil and administrative buildings. The ancient
streets and houses are Creole in style, with their rows of wrought-iron balconies,
carved doors and tiled
patios.
There is another
Havana — a city of
modern boulevards,
beautiful parks,
stately monuments
and imposing public buildings. These,
with the sidewalk
cafes on the Prado,
a Quartier Latin,
and the gay social
life, make of Havana
a new Paris.
An optional excursion enables us to
see the brilliant
night life of Havana,
and to join in the
gayety of this colourful city.
And now, back to
New York, skirting
the coast of Florida,
smart bathing beaches and green Everglades, with, on the
other side, the historic
isles of the Bahamas,
where once pirates
held sway, and which
still guard lost buried
treasure.
II
52
Calle Empeorado, Havana, Cuba
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He ha5tS« for tVv?v aSufh Aroen-
Tristan da Cunha — that lonely island in the South Atlantic
(Weather permitting, the 1936 Empress of Australia Cruise will land supplies at Tristan da Cunha) EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA • AFRICA-SOUTH AMERICA CRUISE
GENERAL INFORMATION
FARES
From New York and return to New York, fares are from
$1350, according to location of stateroom, for 95 days. Ship's
plan and details of fares for all rooms will be sent on request—
see agency list on last page. Children's fares are shown at the
ioot of page 55.
Servants accompanying employers, when berthed and
served with meals in special accommodation set apart for their
use, $1000 exclusive of shore excursions, or $1087 including
Cairo (no sightseeing). If servants are participating in included
excursions at all ports, fare is $1350, provided they do their
sightseeing with their employer or other servants. When servants
are berthed in other than servants' accommodation, tariff fare
- will apply.
DEPOSIT
To secure reservation, a deposit of $150 per person is
required at time of acceptance of accommodation offered. A
second payment, to bring the amount to 25% of the passage
money, is due on or before October 15, 1935, and final payment
on or before December 1, 1935.
CANCELLATION
Accommodation cancelled after deposit receipt, passage
order or ticket has been issued will be placed on sale, and,
when resold, refund gjpill be made of the amount paid, less expenses incurred.
THE FARE INCLUDES
First class passage with stateroom accommodation and meals;
landing and embarkation facilities, shore excursions as designated
on page 57, accommodation and meals at leading hotels, where
noted; transfers between stations, quays and hotels; entrance fees
and gratuities; services of guides and interpreters one to each
small group, while ashore with the excursions.
INCLUDED EXCURSIONS
Passengers who before ^tiling declare their intention of
omitting certain shore excursions in the included group may be
allowed not more than the actual cost of such excursions omitted.
Details on application.
Owing to the necessity for the Company making forward
contracts for included excursions, it must be clearly understood
that such allowances can only be granted at the time of the
original booking. No allowances can be made on board or after
termination of cruise for any included excursion omitted, either
in whole or in part.
THE FARE DOES NOT INCLUDE
Government Revenue Tax on tickets issued in the United
States, personal items, such as beverages not ordinarily served
on board and at hotels without charge, laundry, passport and
visas, private bathrooms at hotels, single compartments on trains,
conveyances or guides specially ordered by members on individual excursions and not ordered by the Cruise Director, gratuities
to stewards on the ship, and baggage insurance, which is strongly
recommended.
LIMITED MEMBERSHIP
Membership will be limited, which ensures comfort for all,
both aboard and ashore. There will be no crowding or confusion, and the facilities at the various ports, which in some
instances are limited, will not be overtaxed.
PASSPORTS AND VISAS
Passports are necessary. Married couples may travel on one
passport. Most countries still require passports to be vised by
their consulates or representatives.     Full  information will be
supplied to members in due time, and every assistance rendered
by Canadian Pacific representatives in completing details and
securing the necessary visas.
DECK CHAIRS, RUGS, CUSHIONS
may be rented for the cruise, at: Deck Chairs $4 each; Rugs $4
each; Cushions $2 each.
BAGGAGE AND BAGGAGE INSURANCE
Large trunks and other baggage which cannot be conveniently accommodated in the stateroom, will be placed in large
baggage-rooms accessible throughout the cruise. Trunks for
staterooms should not exceed fourteen inches in height. On
inland excursions, baggage will be limited to suit cases, hand
bags and other portable baggage. Every care is taken in handling
baggage, but on board, the liability of the Canadian Pacific is
limited, and the Canadian Pacific assumes no responsibility
ashore. Members are recommended to protect themselves by
insuring baggage against loss, damage or theft. Rates on application to any Canadian Pacific agent.
MODERN LAUNDRY
The Empress of Australia is equipped with a modern laundry,
and members' work will be given preferred attention at reasonable
charges.
TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES
Members will find Canadian Pacific Express Travellers'
Cheques convenient. Issued in denominations of $ 10, $20, $50,
$100 and $200, also sterling £5, £10 and £20, they may be
obtained from any Canadian Pacific office at regular rates. They
ar& negotiable the world over.
MAIL-CABLES
To facilitate delivery of mail matter at the various ports of
call, there is a Post Office on board the Empress of Australia
in charge of experienced postal clerks. Members will be supplied,
when tickets are issued, with instructions regarding addressing
;<3f1t$|il and cables to reach them en route.
EXCELLENT FACILITIES
The Empress of Australia has every facility of the modern
hotel: sterib|jrapher, barber, ladies' hairdresser, manicurist,
chiropodist, masseur, masseuse, surgeon, trained nurses, laundry,
valet service, photographer, novelty shop, daily newspaper, etc.
There are two passenger elevators.
MESSAGES TO RELATIVES AND FRIENDS
Canadian Pacific offices will receive cable advice of the
arrival of the Empress of Australia at each port, and will notify
relatives and friends of members by mail, if names and addresses
are supplied.
THE SHOP AND PHOTOGRAPHY
On board ship there is a well-equipped shop at which may
be purchased various articles, such as books, candy, toilet
articles, films, souvenirs, post cards, fancy goods and dolls.
As a cruise offers exceptional opportunities for photography,
a staff of experts is carried for developing and printing. Cruise
members should not take a large supply of photographic films
with them, as hermetically sealed films are required in the tropics
and may be purchased at The Shop at regular prices. Cine
Kodak films, in sizes 8 mm. and 16 mm., are also available, but
must be processed on shore.
WIRELESS
The ship is equipped with long range wireless capable of
maintaining communication with land at all times.
54 EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA • AFRICA-SOUTH AMERICA CRUISE
RELIGIOUS SERVICES
Divine Service will be held on Sundays when the ship is at
sea. An altar set is also provided for the celebration of Holy
Mass. There is usually a Roman Catholic priest among the
members.
ENTERTAINMENT
Aboard ship there are many interesting things to do—deck
tennis, quoits, shuffleboard, sports tournaments, bridge, concerts,
birthday parties, fancy dress and masquerade balls, dancing,
gymnasium, swimming pool, lectures, fraternal meetings, camera
club, travel club, and talking pictures. The library contains a
varied assortment of books on travel, adventure and foreign
countries in addition to a representative collection of current
literature. Two high-class orchestras will be carried for classical
music and dancing.
The Directress of Entertainment and the Staff Captain will
assist in arranging the various functions. Illustrated talks will be
delivered, prior to arrival at the various ports, by an experienced
traveller thoroughly familiar with the history and customs of
each country. Members will be particularly interested in his
tips on shopping.
PROCEEDING TO EUROPE IN ADVANCE OF CRUISE
Members desiring to proceed to Europe in advance and join
the cruise at Madeira, Gibraltar, Monaco, Naples, Cairo or Suez,
will be provided with passage from Montreal or Quebec (from
Saint John or Halifax in winter season) by any Canadian Pacific
steamship, including the Empress of Britain, to a United Kingdom or Channel port, such members to provide their own transportation and maintenance from United Kingdom or Channel
port of landing to port where they join the cruise. This arrangement does not apply to Athens due to prohibitive embarkation
tax at that port.
During the off-season on the Atlantic, accommodation similar
to cruise will be provided, as far as possible, but during the
summer season it may not be possible to assign such accommodation, although every effort will be made to do so.
Members joining the Empress of Australia at Mediterranean
ports will be required to pay any Government embarkation tax
in effect at such ports. This payment is to be made at time of
final payment for cruise ticket; details on application.
In cases where such passage may not be acceptable, a
reasonable allowance will be made for the portion omitted;
particulars on application.
CLOTHING FOR THE CRUISE
Warm clothing will be required for the first days of the
cruise, also frequently for evenings both on ship and ashore.
Clothing appropriate for summer and fall wear will be required
for the rest of the trip. A light coat or wrap should be kept handy
for use at sundown, especially in Egypt, where the temperature
takes a sudden drop at nightfall. Gentlemen will find a dinner
jacket will meet all ordinary requirements. A \p|te dinner jacket
is preferable for the tropics. Sport clothes and appropriate costumes for the fancy dress parties, which will be given aboard
ship, will be found useful. Shoes, rubbers, sweaters, and raincoats
should be taken from home, also an adequate supply of summer
clothing, but the latter may be replenished enroute.
FOREIGN CURRENCY AND POSTAGE
The currency of each country, also postage stamps, will be
on sale with the purser before members go ashore. The following
shows the approximate current value of the various foreign coins,
which is of course subject to fluctuation from day to day:
Current
Equivalent
Monetary U.S. and
Unit Canada
about
4 J4 cents
25     cents
6 Scents
MADEIRA Escudo	
GIBRALTAR Shilling	
MONACO Franc	
FRANCE JBpL Franc     6 \i cents
ITALY Lira &Zi     8K cents
GREECE |K| Drachma     1     cent
PALESTINE jj^t.-Palestine Pound H  $5.00
EGYPT Egyptian Pound  $5.00
PORT SUDANsBf.. Egyptian Pound $5.00
MOMBASA East African Shilling  25     cents
ZANZIBAR East Indian Rupee  38     cents
DAR-ES-SALAAM East African Shilling  25     cents
LOURENCO MARQUES Escudo  4K cents
SOUTH AFRICA fc^sa% Shilling	
BUENOS AIRES JSliij^i Paper Dollar	
MONTEVIDEO Zy G°ld Peso	
SANTOS :„..;.: Paper Milreis	
RIO DE IANEIRO Paper Milreis	
PORT OF SPAIN Shilling	
KINGSTON...... Z. Shilling	
25
cents
2634 cents
80>^ cents
6
cents
6
cents
25
cents
25
cents
HAVANA U.S. Dollar $1.00
ONE MANAGEMENT . . . SHIP AND SHORE
The Empress of Australia is owned and operated by the
Canadian Pacific; shore excursions are arranged and carried
out by Canadian Pacific; and Canadian Pacific representatives,
experienced in cruising, accompany the cruise to attend to the
comfort and entertainment of members aboard and ashore.
GENERAL CONDITIONS
Canadian Pacific acts only as agent for the passenger in
matters relating to travel away from the Empress of Australia,
whether by steamship, railway, automobile or any other means,
and as such is free of responsilpjity for any delay, loss, accident
or sickness occasioned by fault or negligence of any person or
company, or from whapiver cause.
The right is reserved to withdraw the cruise, subjecfcSp'
refund of net fare received by the Company. Should it be deemed
necessary or desirable by the management on any account to
make changes in the itinerary, or to omit any section or port
named in the programme, such change may be made, and no
member shall be entitled to compensation on such account.
Right is also reserved to decline to accept or retain any person
as a member of the cruise, at any time, but in such cases where
money has been received, the full or a proportionate amount will
be returned, according to circun^jpnces.
In the possible contingency of quarantine, any additional
expenses, living or otherwise, must be defrayed by the member.
CHILDREN'S FARES—EMPRESS WS AUSTRALIA AFRICA-SOUTH AMERICA CRUISE 1936
Sharing a double
room with, two adults
Ten years and. over Adult tariff rate for accommodation occupied including shore excursions.
Five years and under ten $850 including shore excursions.
One year and under five $600 including shore excursions.
Infants under one year .$100 excluding shore excursions.
Sharing a single
room with one adult
Adult tariff rate for accommodation occupied including shore excursions.
$850 including shore excursions.
$600 including shore excursions.
$ 100 excluding shore excursions.
Sharing a double
room with one adult
Adult tariff rale for accommodation occupied including shore excursions.
$850 including shore excursions.
$600 including shore excursions*
$100 excluding shore excursions.
Occupying a single
room alone
Adult tariff rate for accommodation occupied including shore excursions.
Adult tariff rate for accommodation occupied including shore excursions.
Adult tariff rate for accommodation occupied including shore excursions.
Adult tariff rate for accommodation occupied excluding shore excursions. Plenty of activity on bright sunny decks
ifi
I I N        UI   ID    SHORE    EXCURSIONS
THE CRUISE FARE INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAMME
OF SHORE EXCURSIONS:
MADEIRA—Ball at Casino; special train to top of the mountain Terreiro da Lucta; luncheon at Chalet Restaurant or hotel.
GIBRALTAR—Carriage drive around the town and to Rosia
Bay; visit Galleries and Fortifications.
MONACO—Transfer to and from Monte Carlo Casino. Motor
trip over the Grande Corniche Road, via La Turbie, to Nice;
luncheon at Nice; return via Villefranche and Beaulieu.
NAPLES—Motor drive around Naples and motor trip to
Pompeii.
ATHENS—Motor trip from Phaleron Bay to points of interest
in Athens, including the Acropolis; luncheon at hotel.
CAIRO—Special train from Port Said to Cairo, with 6 nights
at Cairo hotels; motor trip to Pyramids and Sphinx; sightseeing
trips around Cairo; Nile River trip to Bedrechein; special train to
Suez to rejoin Empress of Australia.
MOMBASA—Motor drive around Mombasa; transfer by motor
car to Ngoma Grounds for exhibition of Native Tribal Dancing.
ZANZIBAR—Motor drive around Zanzibar; motor drive to
Bububu and the clove gardens.
DARES SALAAM—Drive around Dar-es-Salaam by motor
and/or ricksha.
LOURENCO MARQUES—Motor drive around" Lourengo
Marques; luncheon at hotel.
DURBAN—Motor drive along the South Coast, visiting Native
Kraals in the Zulu Reserve; motor drive around Durban and to
Valley of a Thousand Hills; motor trip over the famous Marine
Drive, luncheon at hotel.
CAPE TOWN—Fransch Hoek-Paarl drive with luncheon en-
route; Cape Point drive with luncheon enroute; motor drive
around Cape Town; aerial cableway to top of Table Mountain;
train to Muizenberg for bathing.
BUENOS AIRES—Full-day trip by motor car around Buenos
Aires, including Zoological Gardens, Botanical Gardens and
Palermo Race Course; luncheon at hotel. Dinner dance at
hotel. Second day: luncheon at hotel.
MONTEVIDEO—Motor drive around Montevideo and along
the seashore to Carrasco and Pocitos; luncheon at hotel.
SANTOS—Excursion by special train to Sao Paulo; drive by
motor car around Sao Paulo; luncheon at hotel.
RIO DE JANEIRO—Motor drive around Rio de Janeiro, thence
to Petropolis; luncheon at Petropolis; return via Tijuca. Motor
car and aerial railway to Sugar Loaf; luncheon at hotel; motor
car and rack railway to Corcovada.   Dinner dance at hotel.
PORT OF SPAIN—Motor drive through the city and around
the Savannah and the Saddle; luncheon at hotel.
KINGSTON—Motor drive around Kingston and through the
Gorge of the Rio Cobre to Bog Walk; visit Hope Gardens;
luncheon at hotel.
HAVANA—Motor drive around Havana and to Marianao
Town.
OPTIONAL   EXCURSIONS
For the benefit of cruise members who desire to extend their inland travels beyond the included excursions
shown above, the following series of optional excursions has been arranged. These may be purchased on
shore before sailing or on board the Empress of Australia.
Shore excursion fares as below may be increased at any time on account of the instability of rates of exchange.
The Company will only protect bookings at these fares provided a deposit is paid prior to the date that an increase in fares is announced.
ROME    Number 1
Commencing at Naples, terminating at Naples.
Limited to 150 persons.    Special Train
FEBRUARY 9—Leave Naples 9.50 a.m. by special train.   Luncheon on train.   Arrive Rome 1.40 p.m.   Proceed to hotel.
Afternoon—Sightseeing in Rome, visiting points of interest,
including the Roman Forum, the Colosseum, Catacombs, Pantheon
and St. Paul's Basilica. Dine and sleep at hotel.
FEBRUARY 10—Sightseeing in Rome by motor in morning,
visiting Pincian Hill, St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican Museum and
Sistine Chapel. Leave Rome 12.25 noon. Luncheon on train.
Arrive Naples 3.47 p.m.
*Extra Cost per Person $36*
Members participating in Optional Excursion No. 1 must necessarily omit
included sightseeing programme in Naples and Pompeii. Due allowance has
been made in the optional fare.
AMALFI-SORRENTO DRIVE—Number 2
Limited to 125 Persons
FEBRUARY 10—Full-day trip by motor car from Naples over the
famous Amalfi-Sorrento Drive.    Luncheon at Amalfi and afternoon tea at Sorrento.   Return to the ship for dinner.
Extra Cost per Person $13
These fares quoted for Members booking with Included Excursions.
VESUVIUS—Number 3
Limited to 60 Persons
FEBRUARY 10—Half-day trip from Naples by motor car, railway
and funicular railway to the crater of Vesuvius.   Luncheon on
board.
Extra Cost per Person $8.50
SEA OF GALILEE AND NAZARETH—Number 4
See map on page 15
FEBRUARY 14—Full-day trip by motor car from Haifa to Nazareth,
Tiberias and Sea of Galilee with sightseeing; luncheon in Tiberias.
Dine and sleep on board.
Extra Cost per Person $14
SEA OF GALILEE, NAZARETH AND JERUSALEM—
Number 5
Commencing at Haifa, terminating at Cairo and Suez.
See map on page 15
Limited to 75 Persons
FEBRUARY 14—Morning—Leave Haifa at 9.30 a.m. by motor
car via Mount Carmel to Nazareth, thence to Tiberias on the Sea
of Galilee.   Luncheon at Tiberias.
57 OPTIONAL   EXCURSIONS-Continued
Afternoon—Motor to Capernaum and return. Weather permitting, a trip will be made on the Sea of Galilee. Dine and sleep
at hotel in Tiberias.
FEBRUARY 15—Morning—Leave Tiberias at 8 a.m. by motor car.
Luncheon at Nablus. Arrive Jerusalem 2.30 p.m. Sightseeing.
Dine and sleep at hotel in Jerusalem.
FEBRUARY 16—Sightseeing in Jerusalem, including trip to
Bethlehem.  Dine and sleep at hotel in Jerusalem.
FEBRUARY 17—Leave Jerusalem at 9 a.m. by train for Cairo.
Arrive Cairo 10.30 p.m. and proceed to hotel.
FEBRUARY 18-19-20—In Cairo with four half-days sightseeing.
FEBRUARY 21—Leave Cairo 11.25 a.m. by special train for Suez
to rejoin Empress of Australia.   Luncheon on train.
*Extra Cost per Person $95*
Members participating in Optional Excursion No. 5 are given the complete
programme of included sightseeing at Cairo.
JERUSALEM AND BETHLEHEM—Number 6
Commencing at Haifa, terminating at Cairo and Suez.
See map on page 15
Limited to 100 Persons
FEBRUARY 14—Leave Haifa at 9 a.m. by motor car via Nazareth
to Jerusalem.   Luncheon at Nablus.   Arrive Jerusalem 2.30 p.m.
Sightseeing in Jerusalem.  Dine and sleep at hotel.
FEBRUARY 15—Sightseeing   in   Jerusalem,   including   trip   to
Bethlehem.   Dine and sleep at hotel in Jerusalem.
FEBRUARY 16—Leave Jerusalem at 9 a.m. by trsgfefor Cairo.
Arrive Cairo 10.30 p.m. and proceed to hotel.
FEBRUARY 17-18-19-20—In Cairo with four half-days sightseeing.
FEBRUARY 21—Leave Cairo 11.25 a.m. by special train for Suez
to rejoin Empress of Australia.   Luncheon on train.
*Extra Cost per Person $75*
Members participating in Optional Excursion No. 6 are given the complete
programme of included sightseeing at Cairo.
LUXOR, ASSUAN, RIVER NILE AND KHARTOUM—
Number 7
Commencing at Cairo, terminating at Port Sudan
See map on page 15
Limited to 50 Persons
FEBRUARY 15—Leave Port Said 10.25 a.m. by special train for
Cairo.   Luncheon on train.   Arrive Cairo 2.10 p.m.   Proceed to
hotel.
FEBRUARY 16—Sightseeing in Cairo. Leave Cairo at 7.30 p.m.
by sleeping car train for Luxor.   Dinner on train.
FEBRUARY 17—Arrive Luxor 7.40 a.m. Breakfast at hotel.
Transfer across Nile River in small boats to the west bank. Motor
cars are provided for the trip to the Valley of the Tombs of the
Kings, including King Tut-ankh-Amen's Tomb. Luncheon at
hotel.
Afternoon—Visit the magnificent Temple of Karnak; the unfinished Proplyon, or outer wall, still more than 100 feet in
height, the various courts and the great hall of the Temple, thence
to the Temple of Luxor.   Dine and sleep at hotel.
FEBRUARY 18—Leave Luxor 8.15 a.m. by train for Assuan.
Arrive Assuan 11.55 a.m. After luncheon at hotel, an excursion
will be made to the Great Assuan Dam, Assuan Town and the
bazaars. Leave Assuan 4.30 p.m. by steamer and cruise around
the submerged Temples of Philae.   Dine and sleep on board.
FEBRUARY 19—On the Nile River. Call at Abu Simbel for visit
to Temple.
FEBRUARY 20—Arrive Wadi Haifa and proceed up the Nile;
thence by launch to the Second Cataract. Luncheon at hotel.
Afternoon—Visit Town of Haifa.   Dine and sleep on board.
FEBRUARY 21—Leave Wadi Haifa at 7.00 a.m. by sleeping car
train for Khartoum.  Meals on train.
FEBRUARY 22—Arrive Khartoum 7.00 a.m. Proceed to hotel for
breakfast. Sightseeing in Khartoum and Omdurman. Leave
Khartoum at 5.00 p.m. by sleeping car train for Port Sudan.
FEBRUARY 23—Arrive PortSudan4.30 p.m. and embark Empress
of Australia.
*Extra Cost per Person $175*
The operation of Optional Excursion No. 7 is contingent upon a minimum
membership of 50 being secured.
Members participating in Optional Excursion No. 7 are given the complete
programme of included sightseeing at Cairo with the exception of the river
trip to Bedrechein, for which due allowance has been made in the optional fare.
LUXOR, RIVER NILE AND ASSUAN—Number 8
Commencing at Cario, terminating at Cairo and Suez.
See map on page 15
Limited to 30 Persons
FEBRUARY 15—Leave Cairo 7.30 p.m. by sleeping car train
for Ltixor.   Dinner on train.
FEBRUARY 16—Arrive Luxor 7.40 a.m. and proceed to Nile
River steamer for breakfast. Steamer leaves Luxor at 10.00 a.m.
The first place of importance is Erment, noteworthy for the ruins
of the Temple erected by Cleopatra. About 3 p.m. the steamer
passes the Barrage of Esneh. The Temple of Esneh, which is
situated close to the river bank, will not take more than one hour
to visit, and passing El Kab the steamer arrives at Edfou about
8.30 p.m.
FEBRUARY 17—Edfou has the most perfect existing specimen of
an Egyptian Temple. Donkeys, or chairs carried by native sailors,
will be provided. Leave Edfou at 10.30 a.m. for Kom Ombo, which
is reached at 4 p.m. Visit Temples of Kom Ombo. Leave at 5 p.m.
for Assuan.
FEBRUARY 18—Arrive Assuan 7.00 a.K Morning excursion to
submerged Temples of Philae, the Great Assuan Dam, Assuan
Town and the bazaars. Luncheon on board. Leave Assuan 3.30
p.m. by train for Luxor. Arrive Luxor 7.15 p.m. Dine and sleep
at Winter Palace Hotel.
FEBRUARY 19—Breakfast at hotel. Transfer across the Nile River
in small boats to the west bank. Motor cars are provided for the
trip to the Valley of the Tombs of the Kings, including visit to
King Tut-ankh-Amen's Tomb. Luncheon is served at the Rest
House in Thebes and the party then returns to the east bank of
the Nile.
Afternoon—Visit the Temple of Luxor, the magnificent Temple
of Karnak and unfinished Propylon, or outer wall, still more than
100 feet in height, as well as the various courts and great hall
of the Temple. Tea at Winter Palace Hotel. Leave Luxor 7.55
p.m. by sleeping car for Cairo.   Dinner on train.
FEBRUARY 20—Arrive Cairo 7.30 a.m. and proceed to hotel for
breakfast.
*Extra Cost per Person $144.00*
Members participating in Optional Excursion No. 8 are given the complete
programme of included sightseeing at Cairo.
* These fares quoted for Members booking with Included Excursions.
58 OPTIONAL   EXCURSIONS—Continued
LUXOR, THEBES AND KARNAK—Number 9
Commencing at Cairo, terminating at Cairo and Suez.
See map on page 15
Limited to 100 Persons
FEBRUARY 18—Leave Cairo 7.30 p.m. by sleeping car train for
Luxor.   Dinner on train.
FEBRUARY 19—Arrive Luxor 7.40 a.m. Breakfast at hotel.
Transfer across the Nile River in small boats to the west bank.
Motor cars are provided for the trip to the Valley of the Tombs
of the Kings, including visit to King Tut-ankh-Amen's Tomb.
Luncheon is served at the Rest House in Thebes and the party
then returns to the east bank of the Nile.
Afternoon—Visit the Temple of Luxor, the magnificent
Temple of Karnak and unfinished Propylon, or outer wall, still
more than 100 feet in height, as well as the various courts and
great hall of the Temple. Tea at Winter Palace Hotel. Leave
Luxor 7.55 p.m. by sleeping car for Cairo.  Dinner on train.
FEBRUARY 20—Arrive Cairo 7.30 a.m. and proceed to hotel
for breakfast.
*Extra Cost per Person $80*
Members participating in Optional Excursion No. 9 are given the complete programme of included sightseeing at Cairo.
NAIROBI, KENYA COLONY—BIG GAME RESERVE
Number 10
Commencing at Mombasa, terminating at Mombasa.
Special Train with Dining Car
See map on page 17
Limited to 120 Persons
FEBRUARY 29—Sightseeing  in  Mombasa.     Leave by  special
train in afternoon for Nairobi.  Dinner on train.
MARCH 1—Arrive Nairobi early morning. Transfer to hotel.
Morning motor drive around Nairobi. After luncheon at hotel,
motor to Athi Plains for close-up view of the big game. Dine and
sleep at hotel.
MARCH 2—Leave hotel about 9 a.m. for seventy-mile drive
through the coffee estates, thence to Limuru to view the extinct
volcanoes. Cars then continue to top of the Escarpment for a
panoramic view of the Great Rift Valley. Luncheon at hotel. The
return route is via Kikuyu and Dagoretti. Leave Nairobi by
special train in afternoon for Mombasa.  Dinner on train.
MARCH 3—Arrive Mombasa in morning and proceed to Empress
of Australia.  Day free for independent action.
*Extra Cost per Person $66.50*
The operation of Optional Excursion No. 10 is contingent upon a minimum
membership of 75 being secured.
Members participating in Optional Excursion No. 10 are given the complete programme of included sightseeing in Mombasa, likewise Zanzibar as the
Empress of Australia makes a second call at Zanzibar for their benefit.
HIPPO POOL—Number 11
Motor launch from Lourenco Marques
Limited to 56 Persons
MARCH 9—Leave ship's-side at 8.30 a.m. by Michelin rail car.
Arrive Vila Luiz at 9.15 a.m. Leave Vila Luiz 9.30 a.m. by motor
launch for Hippo Pool about six miles up the Incomati River.
Here will be seen in their native haunts, the Hippopotami for
which Africa is noted. Return to Vila Luiz for morning tea. Leave
12.15 noon. Arrive Lourenco Marques 1 p.m. Motor to Polana
Hotel for luncheon.
Afternoon—Sightseeing in Lourenco Marques by motor car;
visit Botanical Gardens and Polana Beach. Return to ship at
4 p.m. for sailing at 5 p.m.
*Extra Cost per Person $5*
The operation of Optional Excursion No. 11 is contingent upon a minimum
membership of 50 being secured.
Members participating in Optional Excursion No. 11 are given the complete programme of included sightseeing in Lourenco Marques.
VICTORIA FALLS, BULAWAYO, JOHANNESBURG AND
KIMBERLEY—Number 12
Commencing at Durban, terminating at Cape Town.
Special Train with Dining Car
See map on page 29
Limited to 84 Persons
MARCH 10—Empress of Australia arrives Durban at noon. Afternoon—Sightseeing.
MARCH 11—Morning —Sightseeing. Leave Durban 2.30 p.m.
passing through the beautiful scenery in the Province of Natal
enroute to Victoria Falls.
MARCH 12 and 13—En route.
MARCH 14—Arrive Victoria Falls 6.45 a.m. Transfer to hotel.
Visit Eastern Cataract, Kandahar Island and Rain Forest.
MARCH 15—Drive by motor car to town of Livingstone. Leave
Victoria Falls at 8.15 p.m.
MARCH 16—Arrive Bulawayo 8.30 a.m. Motor to Matopos to
visit the grave of Cecil Rhodes and the Caves. Leave Bulawayo
12.30 noon.
MARCH 17—Arrive Johannesburg 5.30 p.m. Transfer to hotel.
Native dance in evening.
MARCH 18—Morning—Motor to Gold Mine.
Afternoon—City drive.   Leave Johannesburg 9.15 p.m.
MARCH 19—Arrive Kimberley 8.05 a.m. Motor to Diamond
Mine, "The Big Hole," thence to Pulsator and Direct Treatment
Plant.   Visit Diamond Room.   Leave Kimberley 12.10 noon.
MARCH 20—Arrive Cape Town 10.15 a.m. Proceed to Empress
of Australia.   Morning free.
Afternoon—Sightseeing.
MARCH 21 & 22—In Cape Town, sightseeing.
MARCH 23—Free day.   Sail at 6 p.m.
*Extra Cost per Person $370*
Members participating in Optional Excursion No. 12 are given the complete programme of included sightseeing in Durban and Cape Town with the
exception of the Marine Drive at Durban. Due allowance has been made in
the optional fare.
PRETORIA, JOHANNESBURG, BULAWAYO, VICTORIA
FALLS AND KIMBERLEY—Number 13
Commencing at Durban, terminating at Cape Town.
Special Train with Dining Car
See map on page 29
Limited to 84 Persons
MARCH 10—Empress of Australia arrives Durban at noon.   Afternoon—Sightseeing.
MARCH 11—Morning sightseeing. IRjteave Durban 3.30 p.m.
and proceed to Pretoria, passing through the beautiful scenery
in the Province of Natal.
* These fares quoted for Members booking with Included Excursions OPTIONAL   EXCURSIONS-Continued
MARCH 12—Arrive Pretoria 1.08 p.m. Drive by motor car
around city and to Klapper Kop, Country Club and Government
House. Leave Pretoria 4.40 p.m. for Johannesburg. Arrive
Johannesburg 6.15 p.m.   Dine and sleep at hotel.
MARCH 13—Morning—Motor to Gold Mine. Luncheon at hotel.
Afternoon—Motor to City Zoo.  Tea at Zoo.  Proceed to compound for exhibition of native dances.    Dine at hotel.    Leave
Johannesburg 10.30 p.m. for Bulawayo.
MARCH 14—Enroute to Bulawayo.
MARCH 15—Arrive Bulawayo 8.30 a.m. Motor to Matopos to
visit the grave of Cecil Rhodes and the Caves. Luncheon at
Grand Hotel.   Leave Bulawayo 3.30 p.m.
MARCH 16—Arrive Victoria Falls 6.45 a.m. Transfer to hotel.
Visit Eastern Cataract, Kandahar Island and Rain Forest.
MARCH 17—Drive by motor car to town of Livingstone. Leave
Victoria Falls at 4.15 p.m.
MARCH 18—Enroute to Kimberley.
MARCH 19—Arrive Kimberley 8.25 a.m. Motor to Diamond
Mine. "The Big Hole," thence to Pulsator and Direct Treatment
Plant.  Visit Diamond Room.  Leave Kimberley 12.40 noon.
MARCH 20—Arrive Cape Town 11 a.m. Proceed to Empress
of Australia.  Morning free.  Afternoon—Sightseeing.
MARCH 21 and 22—In Cape Town.  Sightseeing.
MARCH 23—Free day.  Sail at 6 p.m.
♦Extra Cost per Person $370*
Members participating in Optional Excursion No. 13 are given the complete programme of included sightseeing in Durban and Cape Town with the
exception of the Marine Drive at Durban. Due allowance has been made in
the optional fare.
DURBAN TO CAPE TOWN—Number 14
Regular Train with Dining Car
See map on page 29
Limited to 84 persons
MARCH 10—Empress of Australia arrives Durban at noon.    Afternoon—Sightseeing.
MARCH 11-12-13—In Durban, sightseeing and shopping.
MARCH 13—Leave Durban 2.30 p.m. for Pretoria, passing
through the beautiful scenery in the Province of Natal.
MARCH 14—Arrive Pretoria 10.24 a.m. Drive by motor car
around City and to Klapper Kop, Country Club and Government
House. Leave Pretoria 5.20 p.m. for Johannesburg. Arrive
Johannesburg 6.35 p.m.   Proceed to hotel.
MARCH 15—Morning free.
Afternoon—Motor to City Zoo.   Tea at Zoo.  Proceed to compound for exhibition of native dances.
MARCH 16—Morning—Motor to Gold Mine. Luncheon at
hotel. Afternoon free. Leave Johannesburg 10 p.m. for Kimberley.
MARCH 17—Arrive Kimberley 9.10 a.m. Sightseeing by motor
car around City and to Diamond Mine.   Dine and sleep at hotel.
MARCH 18—Leave Kimberley 9.16 a.m.
MARCH 19—Arrive Cape Town 9.26 a.m. Proceed to
Empress of Australia.  Morning free.  Afternoon sightseeing.
MARCH 20 and 21—In Cape Town.  Sightseeing.
MARCH 22 and 23—Free days.   Sail at 6 p.m., 23rd.
♦Extra Cost per Person $185*
Members participating in Optional Excursion No.  14 are given the complete programme of included sightseeing in Durban and Cape Town.
PIETERMARITZBURG AND HOWICK FALLS—Number 15
By Motor Coach
See map on page 29
MARCH 12—Leave Durban 8.30 a.m. by motor coach for Pietermaritzburg.    Arrive Pietermaritzburg about 11.45 a.m.    Sightseeing   around   city,   visiting  Old  Voortrekkers  Museum  and
Botanical Gardens.   Proceed to Town Hill for panoramic view of
city.   Luncheon at Imperial Hotel.   After visiting Natal Museum
opposite Imperial Hotel, motor coach will leave for trip to Howick
to view the falls of the Great Umgeni, which are 364 feet high.
Return to Durban will be made in time for dinner on board the
Empress of Australia.
Extra Cost per Person $7.75
The operation of Optional Excursion No. 15 is contingent upon a minimum
membership of twenty being secured.
PITCH LAKE, TRINIDAD—Number 16
APRIL 19—Motor cars leave Brighton Pier, La Brea, immediately
after members are landed. The famous Pitch Lake, from which
the world's principal supply of asphalt is obtained, is visited, also
the asphalt refinery. The trip is then resumed to Port of Spain,
over a splendid road. The route is via San Fernando, the second
largest town in Trinidad; Union; Reform Williamsville; Mayo;
Tortuga, whose church contains a Black Virgin, a replica of the
original in Spain, symbolic of the fact that Christianity applies
to all races; Freeport; St. Joseph; San Juan; Santa Cruz Valley;
Saddle Back Pass; Botanical Gardens; terminating at the Queen's
Park Hotel for luncheon.
After luncheon, motor cars transfer members to the wharf
or shopping district.
*Extra Cost per Person $4.50*
HAVANA NIGHT LIFE—Number 17
APRIL 25—Leave the ship about 8.30 p.m. and motor through
the city, stopping at the Centro Asturiano Club, reputed to be
one of the most beautiful in the world; thence through Chinatown.
Next point of interest is the famous JAI ALAI, the Spanish National
Game, for which box seats will be provided. Thence to the
National Casino—the Cuban Monte Carlo. Leaving the Casino
about 12.30 midnight, the party returns to the city for a visit to
one of the popular cabaret night clubs. Return to the ship about
2 a.m.
Transportation, admission fee, cover charge and guide
service are included in the fare. Party is accompanied by
Canadian Pacific representative.
Extra Cost per Person $6.25
GENERAL CONDITIONS OF SHORE EXCURSIONS
The itineraries and dates may be affected by alterations in
steamship or railway services of the various countries, or by
other caiftfes. The right is reserved to withdraw any excursion
in this programme and to make such alterations in the itineraries
as may be found desirable for the convenience of the parties
and the proper carrying out of the excursions; also, to decline
to accept or retain any person as a member of any party, at any
time. In all such cases, where money has been received, the
full or a proportionate amount will be refunded.
The Canadian Pacific gives notice that all tickets and coupons are issued by them and all arrangements for transport or
conveyance or for hotel accommodation are made by them as
* These fares quoted for Members booking with Included Excursions.
60 EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA • AFRICA-SOUTH AMERICA CRUISE
GENERAL  CONDITIONS  OF SHORE  EXCURSIONS—Continued
agents upon the express condition that they shall not be liable
for any injury, damage, loss, accident, delay or irregularity which
may be occasioned either by reason of defect in any vehicle or
through the acts or defaults of any company or person engaged
in conveying the passenger, or any hotel proprietor or servant,
or of any other person engaged in carrying out the arrangements
ashore, or otherwise in connection therewith.
The Canadian Pacific accepts no responsibility for losses or
additional expense due to delays or changes in train or steamer
services, sickness, weather, strikes, war, quarantine or other
causes, and all such losses or expenses will have to be borne by
the passenger. In the possible contingency of quarantine, any
additional expenses, living or otherwise, must be defrayed by
the passenger.
All fares quoted for shore excursions shown in this book are
subject to change, and are payable in United States dollars for
bookings made in U.S.A. or Canadian dollars for bookings made
in Canada.
As the Canadian Pacific is governed in the matter of special
trains by regulations as to minimum numbers laid down by
foreign railway companies, the Canadian Pacific retains the right
in each case to substitute for special trains mentioned in shore
excursions named herein the regular train service of the company concerned, should numbers insufficient to warrant special
service be secured.
OPTIONAL EXCURSIONS
While the programme of included excursions is comprehensive, it is felt that members should be offered facilities, where
time permits, to visit certain places impossible to include in the
regular excursions. Members are urged to avail themselves of
these optional excursions, rather than attempt to make their own
arrangements, as these have been carefully organized with a
view of seeing all that is worth seeing.  Furthermore, in the case
of motor trips, it should be borne in mind that each group of
cars is accompanied by a Canadian Pacific representative and
in some cases by police escort; cars are not filled to capacity,
additional cars are employed for the carrying of baggage, and
spare cars are supplied to avoid delays in event of breakdown.
Meals and hotel accommodation, where reguired, are also included. Local drivers in many places offer similar trips at reduced
rates but members are warned to beware of such "bargains," as
they afford none of the protection or service outlined above and
the cars are usually crowded.
OPTIONAL EXCURSION FARES INCLUDE
First class travel tickets, with sleeping accommodation where
required, all meals while travelling with the Cruise Director;
motor car and other conveyances necessary for the sightseeing
programme, together with the services of guides and interpreters,
fees for sightseeing, admission to public buildings and temples,
and gratuities to hotel servants, porters, chauffeurs, drivers,
ricksha "boys," etc., and the services of competent tour managers.
OPTIONAL EXCURSION FARES DO NOT INCLUDE
Personal items, such as beverages not ordinarily served on
steamers, trains and at hotels without charge; laundry; private
bathrooms at hotels; single compartments on trains; conveyances
or guides specially ordered by members on individual excursions
and not ordered by the Cruise Director; and baggage insurance,
which is strongly recommended.
CANCELLATION OF OPTIONAL EXCURSION BOOKINGS
The Canadian Pacific makes arrangements in advance for
the optional excursions and is required to pay for all facilities
ordered; therefore no cancellation or alterations may be made in
connection with such excursions after the books are closed, the
date for which will.be announced aboard ship.
Keeping, fit in the gym
61 EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA • AFRICA-SOUTH AMERICA CRUISE
SUGGESTED PREPARATORY READING
Most travellers desire to acquaint themselves with the customs and history of the foreign lands they are to visit.
The following comprehensive list of books is given in order that those who care to do so may prepare themselves by a course of reading prior to sailing.
SO YOU'RE GOING TO THE MEDITERRANEAN Clara E. Laughlin
ISLANDS  OF   THE  MEDITERRANEAN Paul Wilstach
ALL AROUND THE MEDITERRANEAN Warren H. Miller
BORDERLANDS OF THE MEDITERRANEAN J. Gray McAllister
BROWN'S MADEIRA, CANARY ISLANDS AND AZORES A. Samler Brown
THINGS SEEN IN MADEIRA J. Edith Hutcheon
THE FLOWERS AND GARDENS OF MADEIRA .Florence Du Cane
THINGS SEEN ON THE RIVIERA Leslie Richardson
THE LURE OF MONTE CARLO Mrs. C. N. Williamson
THE RIVIERA OF THE CORNICHE ROAD „...,  Sir Frederick Treves
RIVIERA TOWNS Herbert A. Gibbons
THINGS SEEN IN THE BAY OF NAPLES Albert G. Mackinnon
NAPLES. INCLUDES POMPEII, SORRENTO, AMALFI,
PAESTUM,   ISCHIA   AND   CAPRI Sybil Fitzgerald
THE SPELL OF ITALY Caroline Atwater Mason
ITALIAN CITIES I E.  H. and E.  W. Blashfield
ITALY, CENTRAL AND ROME .........Baedeker Guide Book
RENAISSANCE IN ITALY.   THE FINE ARTS John Addington Symonds
ROMAN SINGER F.  Marion Crawford
ITALY OF THE ITALIANS Helen Zimmern
HISTORY OF PALESTINE AND SYRIA Olmsted
GREECE AND THE AEGEAN Ernest A. Gardner
MODERN ATHENS iSj George Horton
A WANDERER IN THE PROMISED LAND I Norman Bentwick
A  MODERN  PILGRIMAGE .Mary Berenson
A PILGRIMAGE  TO  PALESTINE Harry Emerson Fosdick
■Jj?|THE STEPS OF THE MASTER H. V. Morton
A BIBLE ATLAS Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
THIS BELIEVING WORLD Lewis Browne
THINGS SEEN IN PALESTINE A. Goodrich-Freer
SEEING EGYPT AND THE HOLY LAND Newman
MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF THE MODERN EGYPT E. W. Lane
THINGS   SEEN   IN   EGYPT E. L. Butcher
HISTORY OF EGYPT (2 Vols.) Baikie
EGYPT Baedeker Guide Book
'lilpljiS. R. Talbot Kelly
EGYPT AND ITS MONUMENTS   Robert Hichens
THE ARTS AND CRAFTS OF ANCIENT EGYPT W. M. Flinders Petrie
TUT-ANKH-AMEN E. A. Wallis Budge
THE GLORY OF THE PHARAOHS Arthur E. P. B. Weigall
EGYPT OF THE EGYPTIANS W. Lawrence Balls
A CENTURY OF EXCAVATION IN THE LAND OF THE PHARAOHS
James Baikie
HUNTING IN AFRICA M. Chas. P. Curtis, Jr.
THRICE THRU  THE  DARK  CONTINENT J. Du Plessis
AN AFRICA FOR AFRICANS A. S. Cripps
HUNTERS' WANDERINGS IN AFRICA Selous
SPORT AND ADVENTURE IN AFRICA Capt. W. T. Shorthose
THE NATE^pj PROBLEHB IN AFRICA (2 Vols.) Buell
BANTU BELIEFSMND MAGSE Hobley
THE ESSENTIAL KAFIR Dudley Kidd
IN   BRIGHTEST   AFRICA Akeley
UGANDA TO THE CAPE Frank G. Carpenter
THE VANISHING TRIBES OF KENYA G. St. F. Browne
A CITY OF THE DAWN (ZANZIBAR) Robert Keable
AN   AFRICAN   ADVENTURE „ Marcosson
WONDERFUL AFRICA F. A. Donnithorne
CAMERA TRAILS IN AFRICA Martin Johnson
LITERARY AND HISTORICAL ATLAS OF AFRICA .-...Everyman's Library
CECIL RHODES Basil Williams
THE STORY OF AN AFRICAN FARM Olive Schreiner
THE SOUTH AND EAST AFRICAN YEAR BOOK Brown
SOUTH AFRICA Ian D. Colvin
SOUTH AFRICA G.   M.   Theal
SOUTH AFRICA W.   H.   Dawson
STORY OF THE ZULUS J. Y. Gibson
THE SOUTH AFRICANS Sarah Gertrude Millan
PYGMIES AND BUSHMEN OF THE KALAHARU Doornan
CAPE TO CAIRO Stella Court Treatt
SOUTH   AFRICA   CALLING   (2   Vols.)   '. Alys Lowth
RISE OF SOUTH AFRICA.    ITS HISTORY G. E. Cory
BLACK AND WHITE IN SOUTH-EAST AFRICA Maurice Smelhurst Evans
FIRST FOOTSTEPS IN EAST AFRICA Sir Richard Burton
THE   FLOWING  ROAD Caspar Whitney
ARGENTINA W.   H.   Hirst
ARGENTINE AND HER PEOPLE OF TODAY Nevin O. Winter
THE NEW  ARGENTINA W. H. Koebel
URUGUAY W. H. Koebel
BRAZIL AND HER PEOPLE OF TODAY Nevin O. Winter
THROUGH   THE   BRAZILIAN   WILDERNESS Theodore Roosevelt
THE REAL SOUTH AMERICA Charles Domville-Fife
HEAD  HUNTERS  OF  THE   AMAZON F. W. UP De Graff
SOUTH AMERICAN OBSERVATIONS AND IMPRESSIONS Bryce
SOUTH  AMERICAN   HANDBOOK J. A. Hunter
AMONG THE WILD TRIBES OF THE AMAZON Domville-Fife
SOUTH AMERICA .Peck
SOUTH   AMERICA .Martin
POCKET GUIDE TO THE WEST INDIES Jlspinall
THE  WEST  INDIES |k John Henderson
WHERE THE  TWAIN MEET  (JAMAICA) Mary Gaunt
HISTORIC  JAMAICA Frank Cundall
Photographs in this booklet are copyrighted as follows:
(c) Acutt      —Lynn Acutt, Durban
(c) Galloway—Ewing Galloway, New York
(c) Nelly's    —Nelly's, Athens
(c) P.P.S.     —Publishers' Photo Service, New York.
Other photographs are by the Associated Screen News Limited, Montreal, South
African Railways and Harbours, and Canadian Pacific Railway Company.
62
Expert advice from a ship's officer • Great Britain and Europe
AIR-LINE ROUTE . . . Frequent sailings via the short St. Lawrence
Seaway from Montreal and Quebec (summer).. . . Saint John, N.B.,
and Halifax, N.S. (winter)... to and from British and Continental
ports ... the majestic Empress of Britain and other great Empress,
Duchess and "Mont" ships of the CANADIAN PACIFIC fleet
set new standards of trans-Atlantic service.
FAST FREIGHT SERVICE provided by Empress, Duchess, "Mont"
liners and "Beaver" cargo ships.
• Canada and United States
THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (comprising 21,235 miles
of operated and controlled lines) reaches from the Atlantic to the
Pacific, across Canada and into the United States. The main line,
Montreal to Vancouver, 2,886 miles, passes through the heart of the
famous Canadian Rockies, with their crowning jewels of Banff, Lake
Louise and Emerald Lake, unsurpassed as vacation resorts. Modem
and comfortable trans-continental and local passenger train services
link the Important cities, Industrial sections, agricultural regions and
holiday resorts. Fast and efficient freight service. Convenient coastal
and Inland steamship services. Builds and operates own sleeping,
dining and  parlor cars.
• Honolulu, Orient and South Seas
Regular sailings to and from Vancouver and Victoria providing convenient passenger and freight schedules,
DIRECT EXPRESS ROUTE TO ORIENT... swift sister ships.
Empress of Asia and Empress of Russia ... Yokohama in 10 days flat!
VIA HONOLULU . . . The mighty Empress of Japan and her
running mate. Empress of Canada, make Honolulu In 5 days,
Yokohama In Just 8 days more.
SOUTH SEAS . . . Canadian Australasian Line fast modern liners to
Honolulu, Fiji, New Zealand and Australia.
Empress of Britain and Chateau Frontenac Hotel, Quebec
Canadian Pacific Trans-continental Train near Banff
• Round-the- World
ANNUAL WORLD CRUISE on the famous Empress of Britain,
perfectly timed to see world-renowned beauty spots at their best.. .
Other attractive cruises to Mediterranean—East and South Africa-
South America, West Indies, Norwegian Fiords, etc.
INDEPENDENT ROUND-THE-WORLD TOURS, choice of over
SOO Itineraries ... 179 offices maintained throughout the World to
assist CANADIAN PACIFIC patrons.
• Hotels, Express,Communications
HOTELS ... A chain of comfort across Canada from Atlantic to
Pacific .. . Sixteen hotels In leading cities and resorts. Including
Chateau Frontenac, Quebec; Royal York, Toronto; Banff Springs;
Empress Hotel, Victoria . . . Eight chalet-bungalow camps in the
Canadian Rockies and at Ontario fishing resorts.
COMMUNICATIONS AND EXPRESS ... owned and operated
by the CANADIAN PACIFIC .. . trans-Canada Service . . . worldwide connections ... travellers 'cheques—good the world over.
Empress of Japan    Largest and Fastest Ship on the Pacific
CANADIAN PACIFIC
WORLD'S       GREATEST       TRAVEL       SYSTEM
63 CANADIAN     PACIFIC
Traffic Agents in Canada and the United States for Canadian Australasian Line
General Agents in Canada for Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Company (P. & O.)
ATLANTA
Ga.
BOSTON
Mass.
BUFFALO
N.Y.
CALGARY
Alia.
CHICAGO
m.
CINCINNATI
Ohio
CLEVELAND
Ohio
DALLAS
Texas
DETROIT
Mich.
EDMONTON
Alta.
HALIFAX
N.S.
HAMILTON
Ont.
INDIANAPOLIS
Ind.
JjH&ISAS CITY
Mo.
LOS ANGELES
Cal.
MINNEAPOLIS
Minn.
MONTREAL
Que.
NEW YORK
N.Y.
NORTH BAY
Ont.
OMAHA
Neb.
OTTAWA
Ont.
PHILADELPHIA
Pa.
PITTSBURGH
Pa.
PORTLAND
Ore.
QUEBEC
Que.
REGINA
Sask.
SAINT JOHN
N.B.
ST. LOUIS
Mo.
SAN FRAHCISCO
Cal.
SASKATOON
Sask.
SEATTLE
Wash
SPOKANE
Wash
TACOMA
Wash
TORONTO
Ont.
VANCOUVER
B.C.
VICTORIA
B.C.
WAsmi&roN
D.C.
WINNIPEG
Man.
UNITED STATES AND CANADA
H. C. James
L. R. HartJ
W. P. Wass
G. D. Brophy
K. A. Cook
S. E. Corbin
G. H. Griffin
P. G. Jefferson
M. E. Malone
R. W. Greene
A. C. MacDonald
A. Craig
D. W. Allan
R. G. Norris
Wm. Mcllroy
H. M. Tait
D. R. Kennedy
E. T. Stebbing
R. Y. Daniaud
H. J. Clark
J. A. McGill
E. A. Kenney
W. A. Shackelford
|SP| H. Deacon
C. A. Langevin
J. W. Dawson
C. B. Andrews
G. P. Carbrey
F. L. Nason
G. R. Swalwell
E. L. Sheehan
E. S. McPherson
L. N. Jones
J. C. Patteson
J. J. Forster     «
J. Macfarlane
C. E. Phelps
W. C. Casey
404 C. & S. N. Bank Building
405 Boylston Street
22 Couri Street
Canadian Pacific Station
71 East Jackson Boulevard
201 Dixie Terminal Building
1010 Chester Avenue
1212 Kirby Building
1231 Washington Blvd. (Book Bldg
Canadian Pacific Building
413 Barrington Street
King & James
Merchants Bank Building
709 Walnut Street
621 South Grand Avenue
611 Second Avenue South
201 St. James Street, West
Can. Pac. Bldg., Madison at 44th
87 Main Street West
803 Woodmen of World Building
83 Sparks Street
1500 Locust Street
Koppers Bldg., 444 Seventh Avenue
626 S.W. Broadway
Palais Station
Canadian Pacific Station
40 King Street
418 Locust Street
152 Geary Street
Canadian Pacific Building
1320 Fourth Avenue
Old National Bank Building
1113 Pacific Avenue
Can. Pac. Bldg., King & Yonge
Can. Pac. Ry. Station
1102 Government Street
14th & New York Avenue, N.W.
Main and Portage Avenue
OVERSEAS
i
64
ATHENS
Greece
BUENOS AIRES
Argentina
CAIRO
Egypt
CAPE TOWN
South Africa
DAR-ES-SALAAM
Tanganyika
DURBAN
South Africa
GIBRALTAR
Gibraltar
HAIFA
Palestine
HAVANA
Cuba
JERUSALEM
Palestine
KINGSTON
Jamaica
LONDON
England
LONDON
England
LOURENCO MARQUES
Portuguese East Africa
MADEIRA
Madeira
MOMBASA
Kenya
MONTE CARLO
Monaco
MONTEVIDEO
Uruguay
NAPLES
Italy
PARIS
France
PORT OF SPAIN
Trinidad
PORT SAID
Egypt
PORT SUDAN
Sudan
RIO DE JANEIRO
Brazil
ROME
Italy
SANTOS
Brazil
SUEZ
Egypt
ZANZIBAR
East Africa
G. T. FRAYNE
General Agent, Cruise Department
Montreal
Crowe & Stevens
Lamport & Holt Line'Ltd.
Anglo-Am. N. & T. Co.
Union Castle Mail S.S. Co.
Smith, MacKenzie & Co.
Union Castle Mail S.S. Co.
The London Coal Co.
Henry Heald & Co.
Dussag Co. Ltd.
Jamal Bros.
George & Branday
W. H. Powell
C. E. Jenkins
Parry, Leon & Hayhoe, Ltd.
Blandy Bros. & Co., Ltd.
Dalgety & Co. Ltd.
Charles Joffredy
M. Real de Azua
Wilmink, Borriello  Ltd.
A. V. Clark
Archer Coal Depot Co. Inc.
Port Said & Suez Coal Co.
Gellatly Hankey & Co. Ltd.
Lamport & Holt, Ltd.
A. R. Owen
F. S. Hampshire & Co. Ltd.
Port Said & Suez Coal Co.
Smith, MacKenzie & Co.
J. J. FORSTER
Steamship General Passenger Agent
Vancouver
Navarinou St. 1, Piraeus
Calle Sarmiento 329
2 El-Manakh Street
Ltd.    Steamship Agents
Steamship Agents
Ltd.    Steamship Agents
72 Irish Town
Steamship Agents
Centro Asturiano Building
St. Julian's Road
54-56 Port Royal Street
62 Charing Cross
62 Charing Cross
Steamship Agents
Steamship Agents
Steamship Agents
6 Rue des Princes
Cerrito 382
62 Via Depretis
24 Blvd. des Capucines
78 South Quay Street
Quai Sultan Haussein
Steamship Agents
46, Avenida Rio Branco
130-131 Via Del Tritone
Rua 15 de Novembro No. 147
Steamship Agents
Steamship Agents
W. C. CASEY
Steamship General Passenger Agent
Winnipeg
*P. D. SUTHERLAND W. G. ANNABLE
General Passenger Agent, Cruises Asst. Steamship Passenger Traffic Manager
Montreal Montreal
tWM. BAIRD
Steamship Passenger Traffic Manager
Montreal
♦Cable Address: CAPACRUISE MONTREAL
tCable Address: WILBAIRD MONTREAL   1
1
MARLBOROUGH-BLENHEIM
1936 SPRING RATES     March 14th to July 1st
North Side Marlboroush
North Side Blenheim
i
Double. Rooms & Bath
2 Persons
American  European
13.00    6.00
Single Rooms & Bath
American   European
7.50    4.00
Suites of 2 Rooms & Bath in Marlboroush
3 Persons                       4 Persons
American  European   :  American  European
19.50    9.00    24.00 10.00
Facins City, Limited Number
)
West Side Marlborough
Ocean View
West Side Blenheim
i
14.00   8.00
8.00    5.00
21.00 11.50
26.00 13.00
East Side Marlborough          )
Facing Park with Ocean View   f
East Side Blenheim                 I
Ocean View                               *
16.00 10.00
9.00   6.00
10.00    7.00
23.00 13.50
28.00 15.00
Ocean Front Blenheim
Ocean Front Marlborough
i
18.00 12.00
13.00 10.00
Ocean Corner Blenheim
20.00 14.00
15.00 12.00
Rooms without Bath
Without Ocean View
11.00    4.00
6.50    3.00
With Ocean View
12.00    5.00
7.00    3.50
For a stay of 7 da
ys (
ot longer there
is a discount of 10% from the
above rates       over MARLBOROUGH
East Side, facing City Park

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