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Motor to Canada Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Canadian Pacific Hotels 1937

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Array QUEBEC-NEW BRUNSWICK
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ALGONQUIN HOTEL
St. Andrews-by-the-»S@a, N.B.
ANADIAN
PACIFIC
ALGONQUIN
HOTEL *
IIIII!
Fine Hotels and Low Rates in
Old French-Quebec, Toronto,
St. Andrews-by-the-Sea, Digby,
rarmouth, Kentville, Halifax.
:   B The   CHATEAU   FRONTENAC   at   OLD   QUEBEC
Famous Hotel Overlooking the St. Lawrence River
AT the eastern-end of a splendid esplanade known as
-/x Dufferin Terrace, rises the majestic Chateau
Frontenac. From its coppered spires, to the great, stone-
vaulted archway, this hotel is one of the show places of
the world and dominates the skyline of old Quebec,
the only walled city in America.
Commanding a delightful vista of the St. Lawrence
River as far as the eye can reach, — down past the
He d'Orleans, and to the north across beautiful St.
Charles Valley to the purple Laurentian Mountains, the
Chateau Frontenac has a location which, for grandeur
and diversity of scene, is unsurpassed.
A medieval-style chateau, whose massive walls, turrets
and towers carry out the Norman architectural motif of
the old Chateau St. Louis occupied by Frontenac, this
famous Canadian Pacific hostelry unites the beauty of
16th century France with the comforts and luxury of
the 20th century.
There are some 700 guest rooms. For special functions, banquets and receptions there are the magnificent
"Jacques Cartier," "Champlain" and "St. Lawrence"
rooms. A Convention Hall or Ballroom suite accommodates 800 people. Four splendid suites occupy the
Round Tower, facing Dufferin Terrace—the "Dutch,"
"Habitant," "Colonial" and "Chinese"—each with a
large sitting room, two double bedrooms and bath.
There are also sixteen suites in the Central Tower.
The Chateau is famous for its cuisine, and its wine
cellars cater to the tastes of the most discriminating
epicure. Perhaps nowhere else have ultra-modern comfort and convenience been so enchantingly intermingled
with the romantic atmosphere of Old France.
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MOTOR  VACATIONS 'ABROAD7
In Your Own Gar>—To Nearby Canadian Resorts
Enjoy all the thrills that a trip abroad offers—
right next door in "foreign" Canada! Motor up in
your own car and delight in the customs of old colonial
England. Hear the gay, lilting language of provincial
France. See quaint, 300-year-old cities and hamlets set
beside silvery rivers and lakes . . . You may reach them
all so quickly and easily over wide, modern highways.
You'll delight in the romantic scenes of Acadian
Grand Pre, home of Longfellow's Evangeline ... of
ancient, sea-faring Yarmouth ... of old French Quebec
—only walled city in America ... of Toronto, the one
time "Meeting Place" of Pontiac's proud red warriors.
You'll gain 'pep"—rejuvenate in Canada's untram-
meled wilds—even snapshot its big game.
Sports are even more invigorating in Canada's tangy
Northern air—whether it's tennis, riding, bathing,
fishing off Digby in sea-encircled Nova Scotia—playing inspired golf at the New World's own St. Andrews,
motoring along Lake Ontario, luring red-speckled
trout or bass, or hunting, canoeing, camping.
You need no passports. Also, each member of your
family is permitted to bring back $100 worth of goods
duty-free from among such attractive bargains as
English tweeds, Irish linen, habitant homespuns,
Hudson Bay blankets  and choicest Canadian furs.
And note—to save driving time to or from Canadian points, you may ship your car by rail and travel
on the same train. No crating, no delay. VISIT TORONTO AND ONTARIO
TORONTO, beautifully situated on the northern
shores of Lake Ontario but a few miles from the
international border, is the capital of Ontario and the
second largest city in the Dominion of Canada. Being a large and important commercial and industrial
center in no way detracts from its merits as a convention city as well as an all-year-round vacation spot.
Its beautiful residential section and tree-lined
avenues, scores of parks and playgrounds, lakes and
islands, bathing beaches, and the palatial Royal York
combine to make the city and its environs one of the
finest recreational districts in North America.
Centrally located, so that it overlooks both lake
front and city, this magnificent hotel, The Royal York
Hotel, largest in the British Empire, provides for the
comfort and convenience of Toronto visitors, offering
1,200 guest rooms, each with shower, bath and radio
loud speaker. With its spacious Convention Halls,
Ball Rooms, Lounges and Dining Rooms, it may
well be termed "a city within a city." All public
rooms are air-conditioned. Further cosmopolitan
atmosphere is added by the shops and bazaars featuring
chic modes, fabrics, toilettes, jewelry and perfumes.
Real "old English service" is a characteristic of The
Royal York. Its luxurious suites provide everything
the most fastidious could desire. Its moderately priced
single and double rooms, all with bath, meet the requirements of economical vacation budgets. Inexpensive table d'hote and a la carte meals are served in
the Imperial Dining Room, the Venetian Cafe and
the Sandwich Shop.
Hotel guests have the privileges of The Royal York
Golf Course, There are 25 other courses within the
metropolitan area.
Toronto is the locale of the National Exhibition,
the world's largest annual fair. Also of the Annual
Royal Winter Fair which includes a famous Horse
Show under Vice-Regal patronage. Here, too, is old
Fort York, renowned during the War of 1812. And
in the Royal Ontario Museum is a world-famed collection of oriental art. 4
The Province of Ontario, lying to the north of the
border states from New Y)rk to Minnesota, is the
CANADIAN    PACIFIC     HOTELS -y
second largest, most populous, richest of the Canadian
Provinces: 412,512 square miles in all. And the
accessibility of Ontario to U. S. motorists is indicated
by the fact that the boundary between the Province
and the United States is crossed by a vehicular tunnel,
6 highway bridges and 25 ferries. Over 50,000 miles
of well-paved motor roads lead to almost every nook
and corner of the Province, and provide access to its
41,000 square miles of lakes and rivers.
Delightfully interesting side-trips may be made to
the country and orchard districts west of Toronto; or
to the famous game fishing sections such as Georgian
Bay, Nipissing and Lake Temagami. Good roads to
the east of Toronto lead to the Kawarthas, a region
of 14 magnificent stretches of shimmering lakes,
where disciples of Izaak Walton find the muscalunge,
or "muskies," the champion fresh water heavyweights,
also bass and other varieties of sporting fish. As a
hunting and fishing center, the Province of Ontario is
hardly equalled by any other similar locality on the
American continent.
The main highway leading north from Toronto,
passing through picturesque wooded country and skirting the north channel of French River, brings the
tourist to the Chalet-Bungalow Camp of that name.
Or a shorter way is to drive to Parry Sound, store
your car at a nominal rate, and go by Canadian Pacific
train to French River. High above the river nestles a
group of bungalows with a central community chalet.
For a decade or more, the French River Chalet-
Bungalow Camp has so successfully appealed to
anglers—expert and novice—that many of its guests
are annual visitors. A sporty, 9-hole golf course and
tennis court are close by; and every facility for boating, canoeing and swimming is available at this camp.
Not far off is Callander, the home of the Dionne Quintuplets.
Big, hard-fighting game fish afford, naturally, the
major attraction of a sportsman's holiday in Ontario's
wilds. But fishing is only one angle of the varied
thrills of out-of-door adventuring that Ontario offers
the motor vacationist. No two trips need be quite the
same in their experiences, for the country, beautiful,
restful and invigorating beyond words, stretches
bountifully east and west, and north until it reaches
the frozen tundras of the Last Frontier.
IGH    STANDARD    AT    LOW    COST THE  NEW  MERCIER  BRIDGE, MONTREAL
PEACE  BRIDGE,  BUFFALO
ENTERING   CANADA   BY   AUTOMOBILE
Customs Regulations—Provincial Motor Vehicle Laws
IT IS easier for the United States tourist to enter Canada
than any other country; across the longest, friendliest
international boundary in the world. Eastern Canada
offers the tourist 135,000 miles of motor highways,
77,500 of which are hard surfaced and well paved. The
"formalities" are brief and simple, for no passports are
required. Canadian customs officials are courteous and
considerate.
A customs form, covering the tourist's car, is filled out,
one copy being held by the local customs office; two
copies are retained by the motorist to be surrendered when
leaving. Permit form E 50 for tourist's automobile to
enter Canada will be issued by the Canadian Customs at
the boundary, for a period not exceeding six months, no
bond or deposit being required. The same conveniences
are afforded the visitor traveling by rail under the new
"Passenger-with-Automobile" plan.
Wearing apparel and articles for personal use are admitted free of duty; also smoking material up to 50 cigars,
200 cigarettes, and 2 lbs. of tobacco. Hunting dogs or
animals imported as pets are admitted duty free; and guns
or hunting * rifles, fishing tackle, golf clubs, cameras,
canoes, tents, camping equipment, radios, musical instruments, etc., if brought into Canada for personal use.
Please attach to all copies of folder, "MOTOR TO CANADA!'
OLDEST CANADIAN  HOUSE,  SILLERY
ERRATA
The following should be substituted for U. S. Customs
infnrrmHnn on n^crp 4jinrlpr th* W^inir
or more articles exceeding $100.00 in value. Exemptions may be claimed only once in a 30-day period;
they do not apply to purchases bought on commission
or for resale, and are restricted as to the quantity of
liquor and cigars which may be included.
Litho'd in U. S   A
of the age of
any children included in the
party. Many
tourists make
purchases of
interesting values in furs,
habitant homespuns, linens and hooked rugs, blankets, Indian beaded
moccasins, basketry, semi-precious jewels, maple sugar.
United States paper money and coins are accepted
everywhere in Canada except the Dominion Post Offices.
AUTOMOBILE REGULATIONS. Motor vehicle laws in the
Eastern Provinces of Canada are similar to the laws in the United
States. Because the average tourist is so intent upon the historical
value or natural beauties of the surrounding territory, he need
never speed unnecessarily. The provinces have regulations regarding non-glaring headlights of not more than 21 candle power.
In most cases a car on the right has the right of way. Motorists
may use their State driver's licenses for a period of 90 days.
SHORT CUTS BY FERRY AND STEAMER. Between Saint
John, N. B., and Digby, N. S., the Canadian Pacific "Princess
Helene" maintains a ferry service daily except Sunday. Rates for
motor cars are made on wheel-base measurements, as follows
(when accompanied by at least one passenger holding valid transportation ): 115 ins.      115 to 125 ins.   Over 12 5 ins.
Oneway    $8.00 $10.00 $12.00
Round trip ... .     14.40 18.00 21.60
Passenger Fare—One way $2.25 ; Round trip—$4.00
Upon payment of charge for space used, staterooms may be
occupied night prior to sailing from Saint John, N. B.
The Eastern Steamship Lines maintains a steamship service to
Yarmouth, N. S.; 22 hours from New York; 15 hours from Boston.
Automobiles are carried.
There is a short cut by ferry from Robbinston, Maine to St.
Andrews, N. B. Charges for passengers and car are nominal, and
approximately 30 miles are saved.
[CE    TO    ALL    PARTS    OF    CANADA Four hundred years of romantic history lie behind Quebec, oldest and
largest of the Canadian Provinces.
Motor highways from Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and New
York, in addition to Ontario and New Brunswick adjoining, lead into
Quebec with its thousands of miles of vacation land, historically the most interesting part of Canada. Unusual interest centers in and around the City of
Quebec, capital of the Province, founded 330 years ago.
A SPINNER AT HER WHEEL
Old French Canada
at its best is within a
few miles' radius of
Quebec City — quaint
provincial life, dog carts, open air markets, narrow streets.
The glorious military history of the city is personified by its
rock-incased ramparts, loopholed for cannon, and by the
Citadel atop Cape Diamond.
Nowhere in North America are to be found so well preserved the manners and customs of ancient Normandy
blended with early Colonial life. Topping the City's sky
line, rise the Norman towers and spires of the Chateau
Frontenac, a palatial Canadian Pacific hostelry erected on the
site of the ancient Chateau Saint Louis.
Here stands, as a masterpiece in architectural accomplishment, a 16th century-style chateau endowed with the beauty
and splendor of that time and the spirit of Old France in a
New World—and withal, endowed with all the comfort,
luxury and conveniences demanded by the 20th century
traveler.
Princely suites in the great towers command unsurpassed
views of the mile-wide St. Lawrence River, while to the
north may be seen the purple-hued mountains of the Lauren-
tides National Park. To the west lie the Plains of Abraham
where the tide of New World history changed its course, and
where two gallant leaders, Generals Montcalm and Wolfe,
BELOW: QUEBEC'S FAMOUS SKYLINE
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met heroic deaths at the head of their respective French
and English forces.
Below nestles the Lower Town of Quebec with its
scores of narrow winding streets and byways, old
houses, open-air markets and busy docks. Here, too,
in the Lower Town, we find the famous Church of
Notre Dame des Victoires, a patriotic memento of the
early defense of the French against two British naval
squadrons.
In the Upper Town we find the great Parliament
Buildings, the Basilica, the Cardinal's Residence, Laval
University, the splendid monuments to French and English leaders, and above the level of Dufferin Terrace
rises the Citadel, designed by the Duke of Wellington,
to be as strong as Gibraltar, for "the only walled city
in North America."
Side trips may be made by motor car to ancient Indian
Lorette; or to Ste. Anne de Beaupre, the rival of
Lourdes. Another interesting trip may be made to Kent
House, for golf and tea where Queen Victoria's father
once lived. Montmorency Falls close by, 100 feet
higher than Niagara, is a major suburban attraction for
those visiting Quebec. A new, single-arch bridge offers
a superb view of the Montmorency River as it makes a
274-foot plunge into the St. Lawrence. A seven-mile
drive brings the motorist back to the palatial comforts
of the Chateau Frontenac.
North of the city stretch the Laurentians; and the
3,700 square miles of virgin mountains, lakes and rivers
comprising the park of that name. Splendid motor
roads, camps, and plainly marked trails and portages
make the region a sports Paradise for fishermen as well
as lovers of the great out-of-doors.
Though older than the Rockies—older even than the
Himalayas, for they were formed when the earth was
very, very young, the Laurentians retain a freshness and
greenness unsurpassed elsewhere, and it is small wonder that they have come to be known as the "Switzerland of Eastern Canada." This charming section of
the Province is but a comparatively short motor ride
from the Chateau Frontenac, in Quebec.
Lovers of athletic sports will find three excellent golf
courses within the immediate vicinity of Quebec, and
its parks and quaint environs will lure the motorist to
many a delightful hour.
The He d'Orleans, in the St. Lawrence River, just
below Quebec City, affords another interesting side trip.
ROYAL QUEBEC GOLF  COURSE
CANADIAN    PACIFIC-WORLD'S First called the Isle of Bacchus, and by the more credulous, the Isle of Sorcerers, it is easily reached by ferry
and a modern bridge. Here are oxen-drawn ploughs
and farm vehicles as in the days of Champlain. Here,
too, one finds three-century-old stone houses with walls
three feet thick; while in the fields huge stone baking
ovens are still in use.
The ferry from Quebec lands the visitor at St.
Petronille, at the southwestern extremity of the island.
The distance round the He d'Orleans is 42 miles, and
the circuit may be made in comfort over excellent highways, either in private car or by autobus. The visitor
rides through five parishes, each with its interesting old
church around which are clustered the habitant homes.
The He d'Orleans is as famed for its strawberries as
other parts of the Province of Quebec are for their maple
sugar and syrup. From the northern reaches of the
island a magnificent view of the St. Lawrence shoreline
and Cape Tourmente may be obtained.
Returning to Quebec, a 22-mile drive over a picturesque, winding highway, brings the motorist to Ste.
Anne de Beaupre, a pilgrimage place of world-wide
repute and site of the famous miracle shrine.
For the angler, Canada's largest Province has much
to offer. Its lakes, rivers and streams are well stocked
with such varieties of game fish as Atlantic salmon,
black bass, ouananiche, muscalunge, pike, pickerel, and
lake or gray, speckled and red trout. The south shore
and Rimouski, the Saguenay River, the Laurentides,
Gatineau, Pontiac and Kipawa districts are especially
favored and that portion of Highway No. 15 which encircles Lake St. John, is 144 miles in length and close
at all times to good fishing waters.
Quebec issues a special, non-resident's 7-day fishing
license, good for the tourist, his wife and all children
under 18 years of age; costing $5.25.
A motor tour vacation to and through the Province
of Quebec may occupy from three days to three weeks
and at all times prove a source of intriguing enjoyment
and restful relaxation. Nearly half the size of Europe,
through which flows, for a thousand miles the St. Lawrence, the grandest river in North America, this province
has an untold wealth of beauty to offer the tourist.
From Quebec several main highways may be followed
through the Province into Maine or New Brunswick to
St. Andrews-by-the-Sea, on Passamaquoddy Bay, an arm
of the mighty Bay of Fundy.
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BATH CABINS AND  PAVILION
LYING ^between Quebec and Nova Scotia, New Brunswick's
coastline is dotted with quaint fishing hamlets. Colorful
marshlands, rolling hills and prosperous farms vary the landscape,
also trim little villages with fresh painted homes. Beyond these
are densely wooded lake and forest regions. Summer days are brilliant, the air is tempered by ocean breezes and humidity is unknown.
The Province has long been noted as a hunting and game fish
region. Its streams and waterways abound with salmon, trout,
and bass. Of its vacation playgrounds, the best known is that which
centers around old St. Andrews and The Algonquin, built in Queen
Elizabeth style. This hotel offers real old English service and an
unsurpassed cuisine. Here, too, is a golf course, patterned after
its prototype in Scotland and overlooking Passamaquoddy Bay.
A 15-minute ride by ferry from Robbinston, Me.,to St. Andrews,
saves the motorist some 30 miles of driving. St. Andrews has
been named Canada's "Newport of the North" and it is immune
from hay fever. Its out-of-doors sports include tennis, riding,
yachting, fresh water and deep sea fishing. A sheltered cove with
sandy beach provides excellent bathing, the average temperature of
the water is 65° and it is unusually safe for children. There are
attractive bath cabins and an orchestra is in attendance every morning. Golf is a favorite diversion—on either the famous '18" or
9-hole course. A Casino provides dancing and varied entertainment, also the latest "talking pictures."
St. Andrews' water front is reminiscent of a period when its
wharves were lined with "square-riggers" and its beautiful homes
housed famous captains whose ships voyaged through the world's
"Seven Seas." No one should miss "the bed of the ocean" drive
to Minister's Island or a climb up towering Chamcook Mountain.
A short journey now brings the motorist to Saint John. Here,
one may take the Canadian Pacific ferry across the Bay of Fundy
to Digby, Nova Scotia. The "Princess Helene" makes a round
trip daily except Sundays, transporting passengers and cars. MARITIMES
and Other Sports
GOLF
*"pHE golfer need never be at loss for a good
•*" sporty game in New Brunswick or Nova Scotia,
for in the two Provinces there are 39 excellent
courses at his disposal.
The best known course in Eastern Canada is the
famous '18" at quaint St. Andrews, N. B., patterned after its namesake in Scotland, and adjacent
to the Algonquin Hotel. St. Andrews-by-the-Sea
also has a sporting 9-hole course. Here, too, within
a sheltered cove, is a small but excellent sandy
beach for bathing, with bath houses and pavilions.
Crossing by Canadian Pacific Ferry from Saint
John, N. B., to Digby, N. S., the golf enthusiast
finds the Pines Hotel "18" the finest in the Province, and nearby to the hotel. At Yarmouth, an
interesting 9-hole course, not far from the Lakeside Inn, commands a superb view of the Atlantic
Ocean and the Bay of Fundy.
Annapolis Royal, oldest Canadian town, offers a
9-hole course attractively situated in the Annapolis
Valley, 19 miles from Digby. Kentville has a
tricky, 9-hole course, not far from the modern
Cornwallis Inn. Halifax, capital of Nova Scotia,
boasts two 18-hole courses, also a good 9-hole
course. Devotees of the ancient Scotch game will
find that the centrally located Lord Nelson Hotel
suits their comfort and convenience.
The "Maritime" resorts, St. Andrews, Yarmouth,
Digby, Kentville and Halifax have numerous fine
tennis courts. Horseback riding is a favorite diversion, as are swimming, fishing and boating.
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NOVA   SCOTIA
Land of Evangeline
TJOR one hundred and fifty years the military and naval
forces  of  France  and  England  fought  bitterly  for
possession of the territory now known as Nova Scotia.
No Canadian province is more closely welded to early
American history than is "New Scotland." The immortal
poem of "Evangeline" from the pen of Henry W.
Longfellow has cast a halo of interest 'round it and has
enshrined the land in an almost sacred romanticism of
hallowed memories.
Nova Scotia is "Evangeline Land."
From the "French Shore," at the southeast, populated almost entirely by the returned Acadian settlers, to Halifax,
garrisoned and fortified "against French designs" in 1749,
the countryside fairly "breathes" the story of the Acadian
settlers, their triumphs and their tragedy. Interest centers
chiefly, of course, around the village of Grand Pre where a
Memorial Park is maintained by the Dominion Atlantic
Railway, admission to which is free. The original willow
trees still grow and the well remains today as it did in the
days of Evangeline and Gabriel. An interesting stone
replica of the old church stands in the center of the park.
A few miles away, over excellent motor highways to
Kentville, the tourist finds the new and spacious Cornwallis Inn, a modern, fireproof Canadian Pacific hostelry
built in Tudoresque style, catering to his every wish and
whim. Kentville is the logical center for trips to Evangeline Land; Cape Blomidon where Windsor, with its
50-foot tides may be seen; the Gaspereau Valley and
apple orchard country, and Parrsboro via the ferry from
Wolfville.
Sixty miles southeast of Kentville lies Annapolis Royal,
founded by Champlain, and the oldest settlement in
America north of St. Augustine, Florida. The fort's museum
contains a wonderland of priceless historic treasures.
Midway between Kentville and Yarmouth lies Digby
on the beautiful Annapolis Basin, at Digby Gut. Indisputably the Pines Hotel at Digby, with its open-air,
salt-water  swimming  pool,   is  Nova  Scotia's  premier
GLASS-ENCLOSED  POOL AT THE  PINES HOTEL
;•■.■:■■.■*&£•.■■■■ ;•:■:■•:■:■:■ summer resort. Located most picturesquely, amid the
pines and hardwood trees, and its surrounding bungalows, the hotel commands a marvelous view overlooking the 50 square miles of Digby Basin.
Convenient to the Pines Hotel is the 18-hole Pines
Hotel Golf Course, the finest in the province and available to summer visitors. Devotees of tennis will find
excellent courts nearby the hotel.
Digby is the terminus of the Canadian Pacific Ferry
operating between Saint John, N. B., and Nova Scotia.
The modern steamer, "Princess Helene" makes the
round trip across the blue Bay of Fundy daily except
Sundays, providing direct connections at the Digby,
N. S., docks with fast, comfortable Dominion Atlantic
Railway trains.
Yarmouth, but 240 miles from Boston by Eastern
Steamship Lines and reminiscent of the days when it
was the "port of wooden ships and iron men," is likewise the southern terminus of the Dominion Atlantic
Railway and a port of call for The Eastern Steamship's
New Y)rk service.
The attractive Lakeside Inn, facing Milo Lake, offers
golf, tennis, fresh and salt-water bathing, yachting,
fishing, woodland trails. It is near the far-famed tuna
fishing waters of Wedgeport and Soldier's Rip where
some 175 great tuna were taken with rod and reel during the past season. Their average size was around 450
pounds. The hotel management will arrange for comfortable boats and expert guides under the direction of
Capt. Bill Grey, the noted authority on deep-sea fishing.
At some stage of a Nova Scotian motor trip the
tourist should take in Halifax, capital of the Province,
visiting the historic sites, its magnificent park gardens,
Point Pleasant and the Citadel, overlooking Halifax's
"world's largest harbor." And while here, the motorist will enjoy stopping at the Lord Nelson Hotel
(operated by the Lord Nelson Hotel Co.).
FORT ANNE -AT ANNAPOLIS
DEEP-SEA FISHING-OFF  YARMOUTH N  CANADA   -   SPORTSMAN'S   PARADISE
TN Eastern Canada, stretching from the Atlantic
A Ocean to the western boundary of Ontario, there is
offered to the sportsman and out-of-door enthusiast
exceptional hunting and fishing attractions.
In Nova Scotia, for instance, the forests cover three-
quarters of its area and wild life—upland game birds
and waterfowl offer fine sport in season. Nova
Scotia also excels in the quality of its fishing. Its
inland waters are generously stocked with gamy
speckled trout. Its many seaward rivers admit a tremendous run of Atlantic salmon, while unsurpassed
tuna fishing is afforded in its coastal waters.
New Brunswick's well considered and rigidly enforced game laws have been a decidedly important factor in sustaining the excellence of big game hunting
there. Deer and bear are numerous according to district and, properly directed, the visitor is assured of
good sport. Partridge, woodcock, geese and ducks
are abundant in season. Salmon fishing is notably
good, while speckled trout are freely taken throughout
the Province.
Quebec has been long and favorably known to the
sportsman. Not only are moose, deer and bear plentiful in many districts but a generous open season allows
outstanding opportunities for hunting. Partridge,
woodcock, geese and duck shooting is good each fall.
Game fish include Atlantic salmon, ouananiche,
speckled trout, black bass, muskies, wall eyes, lake
trout and Great Northern pike, and the visiting angler
is very seldom disappointed.
Ontario has 260,000 square miles of heavily-wooded
fish and game territory, with 41,000 miles of enticing
waterways. Many successful hunters come year after
year to take back magnificent trophies of the chase.
Anglers, too, find unsurpassed fishing for speckled
trout, muskies, black bass, wall eyes, lake trout and
Great Northern pike.
Eastern Canadian Provinces appeal to anglers and
hunters not only because of their wonderful sporting
opportunities, but also by reason of moderate license
fees, generous open seasons and bag limits. Publications titled "Fishing Waters and Game Haunts,"
"Open Seasons for Fishing" and "Open Seasons for
Hunting" (the two latter giving a summary of the
Provincial fish, and game regulations), can be obtained
from your nearest Canadian Pacific agent. HOTEL ACCOMMODATION
Summer Rates
ONTARIO,  QUEBEC,   NEW  BRUNSWICK,   NOVA  SCOTIA
ROYAL YORK HOTEL, Toronto, Ont.
European Plan
Single Room—$4.00 up
Suites from
Imperial Room
Club Breakfast. .$.50 & $ .75
Table d'Hote Lunch $1.00 up
Table d'Hote Dinner. . . .$1.50 up
(Open All Year)
-$7.00 up
Double Room-
-$12.00 up
Venetian Room
Club Breakfast. . . .$.40 & $.65
Table d'Hote Lunch $.65 up
Table d'Hote Dinner $.65 up
(Meals also a la Carte.   Also moderately-priced sandwich shop)
CHATEAU FRONTENAC, Quebec, Que.
European Plan
(Open All Year)
Single room without bath $3.50 up
Single room with bath. . . $5.00up
Dining Room
Club Breakfast $ .75
Table d'Hote Lunch .$1.00
Table d'Hote Dinner $1.50
Double room without bath $6.00 up
Double room with bath. . $9.00up
Coffee Shop
Breakfast a la Carte
Lunch $.75
Dinner    $.75
(Also a la Carte)
ALGONQUIN HOTEL, St. Andrews-by-the-Sea, N. B.
(June 30 to Sept. 5)
American Plan
Single room and meals, without bath $9.00 up; with bath $10.00 up
Double room and meals, without bath .. . .$8.00 up per person
Double room and meals, with bath $9.00 up per person
Weekly and Monthly rates for families on application
Dining Room—Breakfast. .$1.25        Lunch..$1.75        Dinner. .$2.00
Rates for Golf—$2.00 per day.        $12 per week.      $35 per month.
$45 per season.   $20 per season for juniors.
THE PINES HOTEL, Digby, N. S. (June 24 to Sept. 7)
American Plan
Single Room and meals—$9.00 up per person
Double Room and meals—$8.00 up per person
Weekly and Monthly rates for families on application
Individual Meal Rates Rates for Golf
Breakfast $1.00        $1.50 per day.       $7.50 per week
Lunch $1.25        $30 per month.     $40 per season
Dinner    $1.50 $20 per season for juniors
(Open All Year)
CORNWALLIS INN, Kentville, N. S.
American Plan
July and August Sept. 1 to June 30
Single  Room-meals:   $7.00 up Single   Room-meals:   $6.00 up
Double Room-meals: $6.00 up Double Room-meals: $5.00 up
per person.                                                per person.
Reduced Weekly and Monthly rates for families.
Individual Meal Rates:
Breakfast $1.00       Lunch $1.00       Dinner $1.25
(June 27 to Sept. 7)
LAKESIDE INN, Yarmouth, N. S.
American Plan
Single Room and meals—$7.00 up per person
Double Room and meals—$6.00 up per person
Weekly and Monthly rates for families on application
Individual Meal Rates
Breakfast $1.00       Lunch $1.00       Dinner $1.25
LORD NELSON HOTEL, Halifax, N. S. (Open All Year)
(operated by the Lord Nelson Hotel Co.)
European Plan
Single Room $3.00 and up        Double Room $5.00 and up
Dining  Room and  Coffee Shop — Breakfast,  lunch and dinner —
at correspondingly low prices.
For reservations apply to Hotel Manager at the above addresses
or to your nearest Canadian Pacific agent. Dominion and Provincial Auto Tourist Bureaus
Canadian Travel Bureau .Parliament Buildings, OTTAWA, Ont.
Bureau of Tourist Travel Parliament Bldgs., FREDERICTON, N. B.
Department of Highways Government Offices, HALIFAX, N. S.
Tourist and Publicity Bureau Parliament Bldgs., TORONTO, Ont.
Dept. of Roads Information Bureau, Parliament Bldgs QUEBEC, Que.
Other Provincial Bureaus—1013 Dominion Sq.,  MONTREAL,  Que.;
Hotel  General  Brock,   NIAGARA FALLS,   Ont.;   also  at the
Hotel Norton Palmer,  WINDSOR,  Ont.
NOTE—You can obtain itineraries, maps and information from your own
Automobile Club; from Travel Bureaus of your Board of Trade or Chamber of
Commerce; from local Travel Agents; from any Canadian Pacific Agent;
or from travel information desks in Canadian Pacific Hotels.
THE  'PASSENGER-WITH-AUTOMOBILE" PLAN
The "Passenger.tvith-Automobile" Plan will enable you to travel in
comfort by train and ship your automobile by fast freight service at
low cost. This eliminates the necessity of driving to and from the resort
territory, and yet gives you the pleasure of your own automobile for touring
at destination. For further information, fares, schedules, etc., communicate
with nearest Canadian Pacific representative.
OFFICES-AGENTS IN U. S. CITIES INCLUDING-
Atlanta, Ga W.
Boston, Mass L.
Buffalo, N. Y W
Chicago, 111 T.
Cincinnati, O A.
Cleveland, O G.
Dallas, Tex P.
Detroit, Mich M.
Indianapolis, Ind. . . D.
Kansas City, Mo. . . R.
Los Angeles, Cal. . . H.
Milwaukee, Wis. ... J.
Minneapolis, Minn..H.
New York, N. Y. ... J.
Omaha, Neb H.
Philadelphia, Pa. .. E.
Pittsburgh, Pa W
Portland, Ore W
St. Louis, Mo G.
St. Paul, Minn W
San Francisco, Cal.. S.
Seattle, Wash E.
Tacoma, Wash L.
Washington, D. C. . C.
, A. Shackelford, 404 C. & S. Nat'l Bank Bldg.
R. Hart, 405 Boylston St.
, P. Wass, 22 Court St.
J. Wall, 71 E. Jackson Blvd.
D. Macdonald, 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
H. Griffin, 1010 Chester Ave.
G. Jefferson, 1212 Kirby Bldg.
E. Malone, 1231 Washington Blvd.
W. Allan, Merchants Bank Bldg.
G. Norris, 201-2 Waldheim Bldg.
A. Lee, 621 Sq. Grand Ave.
A. Millington, 1014 Warner Theatre Bldg.
M. Tait, 611 2nd Ave. So.
E. Roach, Madison Ave. at 44th St.
J. Clark, 803 W. O. W. Bldg.
A. Kenney, 1500 Locust St.
. N. McKendry, 444 Seventh Ave.
. H. Deacon, 626 S. W. Broadway
P. Carbrey, 418 Locust St.
. H. Lennon, Fourth and Cedar
E. Corbin, 152 Geary St.
L. Sheehan, 1320 Fourth Ave.
N. Jones, 1113 Pacific Ave.
E. Phelps, 14th & New York Ave. N. W.
OFFICES-AGENTS IN CANADIAN CITIES INCLUDING-
1
Banff, Alta E.
Calgary, Alta. ..... J.
Edmonton, Alta. . . . W.
Fort William, Ont. . H.
Fredericton, N. B. .. F.
Halifax, N. S .A.
Hamilton, Ont A.
Kingston, Ont J.
London, Ont H.
Montreal, Que F.
North Bay, Ont. ... R.
Ottawa, Ont J.
Port Arthur, Ont. .. F.
Quebec, Que C.
Regina, Sask J.
Saint John, N. B. . . C.
Saskatoon, Sask. .. R.
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. J.
Sudbury, Ont. ..... J.
Toronto, Ont C.
Vancouver, B. C. .. .F.
Victoria, B. C.  .... J.
Windsor, Ont W.
Winnipeg, Man. ... E.
Officer, Can. Pac. Station (Summer)
W. Dawson, Can. Pac. Station
L. Mitchell, Can. Pac. Bldg.
Lyall Martin, 108 So. May St.
E. M. Edgecombe, 410 Queen St.
C. MacDonald, 413 Barrington St.
Craig, 4 King St., West
H. Welch, 180 Wellington St.
J. McCallum, 417 Richmond St.
C. Lydon, 201 St. James St. W.
Y. Daniaud, 87 Main St. W.
A. McGill, 83 Sparks St.
C. Gibbs, Can. Pac. Station
A. Langevin, Palais Station
C. Pike, Can. Pac. Station
E. Cameron, 40 King St.
G. West, 115 Second Ave.
O. Johnston, 529 Queen St.
Campbell, Elgin and Elm
B. Andrews, Can. Pac. Building
H. Daly, 434 Hastings St. W.
Macfarlane, 1102 Government St.
, C. Elmer, 196 Ouellette Ave.
A. McGuinness, Main and Portage ^>vv:v:  \m>>>#«&&■■'■
SKYLINE OF BEAUTIFUL TORONTO SHOWING THE ROYAL YORK IN LEFT CENTER OF PICTURE
TORONTO, in the old Indian language, meant
"Place of Meeting",—a name applied to the site
where winding forest trails and water routes converged
at an island-rimmed bay on the north shore of Lake
Ontario. This title adequately describes today the
metropolitan area of three-quarters of a million
people, in the heart of which stands the palatial Royal
York Hotel, largest in the British Empire.
Visitors from every part of the known world meet
here, and from the upper floors of this perfectly
appointed hotel, an unsurpassed view of the city,
harbor and lake may be obtained.
Located within easy reach of the boardwalk, Lake
Shore Boulevard, and Sunnyside Park, the Royal York
has a special appeal to vacationists who desire the opportunity of out-of-doors sport and recreation and at
the same time retain all the luxurious comforts a modern hostelry in a great, metropolitan city has to offer.
Magnificent suites are available to Royal Y)rk guests,
furnished to meet the most discriminating tastes.
Among these suites are the ''Art Moderne," "Flower,"
"Dutch," "Venetian," "Italian," "Colonial"; the
"Queen Anne," "Tudor," "Louis XVI," "Chinese,"
"Russian," "Spanish," "Georgian," "William and
Mary"; the Jacobean" and the "Vice-Regal" (the
last, comprising two suites in one).
There are 1200 guest rooms, each with private bath
and shower and radio loudspeaker, in this most recent
of the great coast-to-coast chain of Canadian Pacific
hotels.
In the Venetian Cafe and Imperial Dining Room
everything from a club breakfast to a full course dinner
may be had at popular a la carte or table d'hote prices.
A modern Sandwich Shop and Soda Fountain is open
day and night—at reasonable prices. All public
rooms are air-conditioned.
CANADIAN    PACIFIC   TELEGRAPHS,   EXPRESS   AND   TRAVELERS   CHEQUES
Printed in U. S. A., 1939 RESORTS   NEAR   AT   HAND
RESORTS   NEAR   AT   HAND
FINE HOTELS
AT LOW RATES

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