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Pacific coast tours through the Canadian Rockies : season 1928 Canadian Pacific Railway Company 1928

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Snow Pea/c Avenue to Emerald Lake. THE   WONDERLAND  OF  THEWEST
I
The Route of the MOUNTAINEER
'-pHE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT has set aside nearly
A 10,000 square miles to be preserved and maintained for public
use in the enjoyment as national parks. This is an area two-thirds
as great as Switzerland and almost as large as Belgium. It insures that the finest parts of Canada's great mountain region,
with all their native plant and animal life, will be forever preserved in their pristine beauty and wildness for the use and enjoyment of the people.
These great reservations, declares T. G. Langstaff, the eminent
English Alpinist and traveler, are destined to become "the playground of the world." Nature, indeed, seems to have showered on
this country every beauty in her generous apron. Imagine if you
can a region where the sublimity of the scenery is matched by the
beauty, where tremendous peaks lift their foreheads beyond the
clouds and black canyons hide their feet in unimaginable depths,
where those great leviathans, the glaciers, creep down from the
frozen desolation of alpine heights and the black walls of precipices rise up so as to shut out the very light of day, but imagine
these softened and balanced by luxuriant pine forests, by smiling
green valleys "murmurous with streams," by the airy veils of
silvery waterfalls tumbling against black precipice or green forest
and tangling the rainbow in their folds, by the brilliance of Alpine uplands sparkling with millions of flowers, and by innumerable magically tinted lakes—imagine these under a sky, "blue as
the sky of fairyland," changing from moment to moment and
from hour to hour under varying light and drifting purple cloud
shadows, glorified at sunrise and sunset into almost unearthly
beauty and transformed by moonlight into a veritable palace of
dreams—and you reach some idea of the Canadian Rockies. Add
to all the above the glorious, life-giving mountain air, warm sunny
summer days and pleasantly cool nights, and you have all the raw
material for the perfect holiday land.
THROUGH THE ROCKIES
The route through these mighty mountain ranges is in itself a
visualization of human triumph over Nature. From Calgary, to
which it has been steadily climbing since it left Lake Superior, it
climbs another three-eighths of a mile to the Great Divide.
Thence, following the narrow Kicking Horse Pass, it dips down
to meet the majestic Columbia River; then it re-ascends another
quarter of a mile to the summit of the Selkirk Range before beginning its three-quarter mile drop to the Pacific. The Spiral
Tunnels through the Kicking Horse Pass, the Connaught Tunnel
through the Selkirks, are engineering feats of a magnitude matching the obstacles opposed to the passage of the railway. The trip
through the Thompson and Fraser canyons is of scarcely less interest than the journey through the mountains themselves.
ALTERNATIVE ROUTES
The Crow's Nest Pass line of the Canadian Pacific, and its
continuation, the Kettle Valley line, is a postscript, crossing the
Rockies farther south than the main line. The visitor who would
fully and faithfully see Canadian Pacific Rocky-land should go
by way of Banff and Lake Louise and then dip southward via
Golden, to Lake Windermere camp.
There are another two alternatives. One is to go by the main
line as far as Revelstoke, and thence branch southward through
the Arrow Lakes to Nelson and the Kootenays.   The other is to
Banff Springs Hotel Commands a Glorious Panorama of the Bow and Spray Rii
go to Sicamous, and southward through the charming, fertile
Okanagan Valley to Penticton. The southern route via Crow's
Nest Pass line ties together these beautiful lakes of British Columbia, and forms an alternative through route from the prairies
to Vancouver.
THE PACIFIC COAST
Vancouver—important port, large commercial center, and pleasant  summer  resort.    With  its  beautiful  beaches,   its  mountain
guardians, its perfect motor roads, its primeval  forest, and its
water sports and excursions, is the pivot where the traveler will
most willingly hesitate before he sets out on the trail again. Swift
liners will carry him across the Pacific to China, Japan or Australia. Across the Straits is Vancouver Island, with Victoria embowered in lawns, flowers and bays; at the south end of Puget
Sound, easily reached by steamer or rail, is Seattle. Beyond that
again is rose-garlanded Portland and California. Or north from
Vancouver by Canadian Pacific steamer is the wonderful trip to
Alaska. THE  WONDERLAND   OF  THE   WEST
I     i
: - -yyyyyyMMM'y :M-
I   On the Banff-Windermere Road 3   Emerald Lake
2   Over the Burgess Pass
4   Indian Days at Banff
5   Wapta Camp
Chateau Lake Louise Swimming Pool
THE NATIONAL PARKS
-p OCKY MOUNTAINS PARK, the easternmost and largest
V^ of these six, is bounded on the west by the interprovincial
boundary between Alberta and British Columbia, and on the east
by, approximately, the first big ranges of the Rockies. It has an
area of 2,751 square miles, its greatest length being about one
hundred miles.
Its principal mountain ranges are the Vermilion, Kananaskis,
Bourgeau, Bow and Sawback ranges; its principal river is the
Bow, which has for chief tributaries the Kananaskis, Spray, Cascade and Pipestone rivers. The Panther and Red Deer rivers flow
through the northeastern portion of the Park, which includes part
of the Bow River Forest Reserves. Of the many beautiful lakes
within the Park, the principal are Louise, Minnewanka, Hector,
Spray, Kananaskis and Bow Lakes. Banff and Lake Louise are
the chief centers, the former the administrative headquarters. The
Canadian Pacific runs through the middle of the Park, entering at
the Gap and following the Bow River.
YOHO PARK (area 476 square miles) immediately adjoins
Rocky Mountains Park on the west, and lies, broadly speaking,
on the descending slopes of the Rockies, with the President and
Van Home ranges as its western boundary. It is a region of
charm and winsome beauty, of giant mountains and deep forests,
of rushing rivers and sapphire-like lakes. Its principal river is
the Kicking Horse, with the Ottertail and Yoho as main tributaries; its chief lakes are Emerald, Wapta, McArthur, O'Hara
and Sherbrooke. The Yoho Valley, Emerald Lake, Burgess Pass
and other points are amongst the chief scenic features. The railway runs through the center of Yoho Park, following the Kicking Horse River.
From Yoho, while we are descending the Rockies and ascending into the Selkirk Range, there is an interval of about fifty
miles before we enter Glacier Park.  This Park (area 468 square THE  WONDERLAND   OF   THE   WEST
Lake O'Hara and Mt. Victoria
miles) includes part of the Hermit Range of the Selkirks, and
embraces some of the finest mountaineering country in North
America. With its massive peaks and giant glaciers it has an air
of grandeur and of mystery. Its chief rivers are the Beaver and
the Illecillewaet. The railway, coming from the north, runs
through part of the western half of this park, tunnelling under
Mount Macdonald and then following the Illecillewaet River.
MOUNT REVELSTOKE PARK (area 100 square miles), on
the western slopes of the Selkirks, lies about fifteen miles west of
Glacier Park, its southern border paralleling the Illecillewaet
River.   It is very easily reached from the city of Revelstoke.
KOOTENAY PARK (area 587 square miles) tucks in between
the southern portions of Rocky Mountains and Yoho Parks and
comprises the Vermilion, Mitchell and Briscoe Ranges. The
Kootenay River flows through its southern part, with a large
tributary in the Vermilion. At the southwest end it almost
touches the eastern bank of the Columbia River a little above
Lake Windermere. The nearest railway connection is at Lake
Windermere, but the Banff-Windermere motor-road that has been
constructed from Banff through Vermilion Pass traverses the
center of this Park.
WATERTON LAKES PARK (220 square miles) lies about
thirty miles south of the Crow's Nest Pass line of the Canadian
Pacific, adjoining the international boundary. Here the mountains, set close around the lakes, are warm and very friendly.
Adjoining Rocky Mountains Park is a new British Columbia
Provincial Park, Mount Assiniboine Park, covering an area of
twenty square miles and dominated by Mount Assiniboine, 11,860
feet high.
BANFF THE BEAUTIFUL —Banff is the administrative
headquarters of Rocky Mountains Park (area 2,751 square miles).
No part of the Rockies exhibits a greater variety of sublime and
romantic scenery, and nowhere else are good points of view and
Just Resting, Chalet at Wapta Camp
features of special interest so accessible. The town lies embowered
in pine forests and lawns, in a pocket of a wide circle of pearly-
grey limestone peaks. Warmed by clear sunshine and kissed by
clear air, exhilarated by the glacial-green Bow River, Banff bids
all welcome.
A PANORAMA OF PEAKS —From either the station, the
bridge or the Banff Springs Hotel a magnificent panorama is to
be witnessed. From the station first: to the north is the grey bulk
of Cascade Mountains, towering above the town like a grim old
idol. To the east are Mount Inglismaldie and the heights of the
Fairholme sub-range. Still farther to the east the sharp cone of
Mount Peechee closes the view in that direction. To the left of
Cascade rises the wooded ridge of Stoney Squaw. To the west
and up the valley are the distant snowy peaks of the main range
above Simpson's Pass. To the left is Sulphur Mountain, to the
southeast the isolated, wooded bluff of Tunnel Mountain and
the long serrated spine of Mount Rundle.
From the Bow Bridge the view is even more magnificent, for
the river runs through the center of the picture, and one who has
caught his first glimpse of this picture close to sunset will never
forget its breath-taking beauty. A little beyond the bridge the
river frolics over a series of rapids in a narrow gorge and then,
leaping in clouds of spray, falls almost opposite the Banff Springs
Hotel. From the high elevation of the hotel a somewhat different view is obtained, looking across the junction of the Bow with
the smaller and darker Spray River, to the distant snow-clad
barrier of the Fairholme Range.
BANFF SPRINGS HOTEL—Banff has been for many years
one of the most popular mountain resorts on the continent—due
not only to its environment, but also to the beautifully situated
and splendidly appointed Banff Springs Hotel.
At the hotel there is entertainment all the time. One could be
perfectly happy just  looking out towards  the enclosing moun-
Lake Louise from the Chateau
tains, watching the swimmers in the warm sulphur water pool,
swimming oneself, playing tennis, or studying the cosmopolitan
types which one meets at this great caravanserai. There is an excellent Turkish bath at the hotel, very popular with those who
come in after a game of golf or an hour in the saddle. The spacious luxurious lounges invite one to succumb to a contented
laziness. There is nearly always an orchestra playing somewhere,
and in the evening, when Banff, the mountains and the winding-
Bow are bathed in moonlight, the strains of dance music float out
from the ballroom.
There are numerous interesting spots in the vicinity, all easily
accessible by good carriage roads and bridle paths. A short distance from Banff Springs Hotel are the Bow Falls, a cataract of
wonderful beauty; Tunnel Mountain, from which a splendid view
of the valley is obtained, and the Cave and Basin, a remarkable
formation from which gush natural sulphur springs. Within a
radius of three miles are the Hoodoos, natural concrete pillars
of various shapes and sizes, Cascade Mountain, Stoney Squaw
Mountain, the beautiful Vermilion Lakes, the Buffalo Park, Sundance Canyon, a deep and curious cleft in the mountain, and the
Upper Hot Springs, on Sulphur Mountain. J
THE  WONDERLAND   OF  THE  WEST
The New Chateau c
MOTOR AND TRAIL TRIPS
At a distance of eight miles is Lake Minnewanka, a beautiful
sheet of water, sixteen miles long, extremely deep and walled in
by tremendous cliffs, and the home of huge fighting trout. A
wonderful river trip up the Bow can be made by electric launch.
There are attractive automobile trips, as for example, to Johnston
Canyon, where an excellent trail leads to a great waterfall, or to
Lake Louise and the Yoho Valley. Good climbing for both
amateur and experienced Alpinist can be obtained around Banff.
i Beautiful Lake Louise
■
For those seeking to get close to the heart of Nature there are
a variety of fine pony trips, such as to the Spray Lakes or the
Kananaskis Lakes, or to Mount Assiniboine. Indian Day, held
usually in the third week of July, attracts gorgeous cavalcades of
Indian braves and squaws from the Stoney Indian Reserve.
Buffalo, mountain sheep, mountain goat and other animals at
Banff are a never-failing source of interest.
Excellent golf links have been laid out at Banff and there are
beautiful river trips.
BANFF-WINDERMERE MOTOR ROAD
The new Banff-Windermere automobile highway over the Vermilion Pass has opened up a magnificent Alpine country, hitherto
known only to the trapper and the hunter, through a hundred
miles of pass and canyon. Threading Kootenay National Park
and reaching at its lower end the beautiful Windermere Valley,
this road is one of the most spectacular in America. At Castle
Mountain, Vermilion River, Radium Hot Springs and Lake
Windermere, there are rustic bungalow camps with comfortable
accommodation for motor tourists. Lake Windermere can also
be reached by rail from Golden.
TRAIL RIDING
THE MOUNTAIN PONY —A trail trio into the depths of
the mountains forms, indeed, the most enjoyable way of visiting
beautiful spots that would not otherwise be easily accessible. It
affords good scenery, often good fishing, and a glimpse into the
heart of nature which will be worth "more than many books."
The mountain pony, mountain-bred, fool-proof, untiring, can
be ridden by practically anyone, whether he or she has ever
before been on a horse or not. From all hotels and bungalow
camps in the Canadian Pacific Rockies, there are good roads and
trails radiating in all directions, which are kept up by the National
Parks Department. In Rocky Mountains Park alone there are
700 miles of good trails. Some trail trips are of one day's duration only; others stretch over several days, necessitating carrying camping outfit. It is customary on all long trips, and even on
some short ones, to engage guides who supply horses, tents,
food, etc., and do the necessary cooking.
TRAIL RIDERS — Those who have ridden fifty miles or upwards in the Canadian Rockies are qualified for membership in
the Trail Riders of the Canadian Rockies, which, by its annual
pow-wow, affords an unusual opportunity for those interested in oo
RhOC
THE   WONDERLAND  OF  THE   WEST
trail-riding to get together. The aims of the Trail Riders' Association are, principally, to "encourage travel on horseback through
the Canadian Rockies; to foster the maintenance and improvement of old trails and the building of new trails; to advocate and
practise consideration for horses, and to promote the breeding
of saddle horses suitable for high altitudes; to foster good-
fellowship among those who visit and live in these glorious mountains; to encourage the love of out-door life, the study and conservation of birds, wild animals and Alpine flowers; to protect
the forests against fire; to assist in every way possible to ensure
the complete preservation of the National Parks of Canada for
the use and enjoyment of the public; to create an interest in Indian customs, costumes and traditions; to encourage the preservation of historic sites as related to the fur-trade and early explorers, and to co-operate with other organizations with similar
aims."
Membership is of several grades, according to the distance
ridden, viz.:—50, 100, 500, 1,000 and 2,500 miles.
LAKE LOUISE
T AKE LOUISE (altitude 5,670 feet) is probably the most
perfect gem of scenery in the known world. "A lake of the
deepest and most exquisite coloring," says one writer, "ever
changing, defying analysis, mirroring in its wonderful depths
the sombre forest and cliffs that rise from its shores on either
side, the white gleaming glacier and snow-crowned peaks that
fill the background of the picture, and the blue sky and fleecy
clouds overhead."
THE CHATEAU—On the margin of this most perfect lake,
in a wonderful Alpine flower garden where poppies, violets, columbines, anemones and sheep laurel slope through terraced lawns
to the water's edge—the Canadian Pacific has placed its great
Chateau Lake Louise. The first hotel built by the Company on
this spot was an unpretentious log cabin. Some years later a
bigger  building  was   erected   and  this   has  been  repeatedly  en-
$*^m
Sunset, Valley of the Ten Peaks
larged to meet the demands of an ever-increasing stream of
tourists, until to-day there stands a fire-proof modern and luxurious hotel with accommodation for seven hundred guests.
Adjoining the Chateau is a new concrete swimming pool with
glacial water heated to a comfortable temperature. There are also
two splendid tennis courts attached to the hotel.
Encircling Lake Louise is an amphitheatre of peaks. From left
to right they are Saddleback, Fairview, Lefroy, Victoria, Collier,
Popes, Whyte, the Devil's Thumb, the Needles, the Big Beehive,
Niblock, St. Piran and the Little Beehive. At the far end of the
lake, catching for the greater part of the day the full glory of the
sun, their snow-fields standing out in dazzling whiteness, are the
glaciers that drop down from Mount Victoria and the lofty, ice-
crowned head of Mount Lefroy.
Lake Agnes, a thousand feet above Lake Louise, is reached
from the hotel by an easy trail. It is a three-mile trip to Saddleback Mountain, which affords an admirable view of the lovely
Paradise Valley. At a distance of about ten miles is Moraine
Lake, situated at the head of the Valley of the Ten Peaks and
reached over a good carriage highway. Consolation Lake, about
three miles further by trail, provides good trout fishing. The
Victoria Glacier, a great palisade of hanging snow; Abbott Pass,
a deep canyon between Mounts Victoria and Lefroy; O'Hara
Lake, Cataract Creek, Paradise Valley, and the Ptarmigan Lakes
are among the notable spots well worthy of a visit.
There are several good automobile trips from Lake Louise.
Swiss Guides are attached to the Chateau Lake Louise for those
who wish to visit the glaciers, climb mountains, or make some of
the more strenuous trips through the passes.
YOHO VALLEY
TT HE YOHO VALLEY—one of the finest in the whole Rock-
ies—can   be   reached   either   by   an   extremely   fine   11-mile
motor drive from Field, or by a motor drive from Wapta Lake.
The Mountaineer in the Valley of the Kicking Horse
At the end of the drive are the Takakkaw Falls, a silver thread
of glacial origin dropping 1,200 feet; facing them is Yoho Valley
Camp.
From the Camp a splendid trail trip, over a good trail, can be
made to Emerald Lake, over the Yoho Pass. Summit Lake, small
but beautifully colored, has a rest and tea house; and thence
descent is made to Emerald Lake.
Another route from Field to Yoho Valley is over Burgess
Pass—one of the most magnificent pony-trips of the mountains.
The upper Yoho Valley can be visited by a trail which continues from Takakkaw Falls, past Laughing Falls and the Twin
Falls to the Yoho Glacier. A rest and tea house has been built at
Twin Falls, where one can sleep overnight.
EMERALD LAKE
From Field, a railway divisional point, a good motor road
leads through a forest of balsam and spruce to Emerald Lake
(seven miles). This beautiful lake, of most exquisite coloring
and sublimity of surroundings, lies placidly under the protection
of Mount Wapta, Mount Burgess and Mount President. On its
wooded shore the Canadian Pacific has built a picturesque, cosy
chalet, a club-house and some charming bungalows.
A   very   attractive   two-day   riding  trip   can   be   made   from LOW ROUND TRIP
SUMMER EXCURSION FARES
TO AND VIA THE
NORTH PACIFIC COAST
( VANCOUVER, VICTORIA ]
\ SEATTLE
I TACOMA,        PORTLAND J
CHICAGO - - - $90.30
MILWAUKEE - - - 89. IO
DULUTH-SUPERIOR      - 75.60
ST. PAUL - MINNEAPOLIS    75.60
To
From
CALIFORNIA
CIRCLE TOUR
ONE WAY via
North Pacific Coast
$108.30 -
109.50      -
105.30 -
101.75
FROM
- CHICAGO -
-   MILWAUKEE   -
- DULUTH-SUPERIOR -
• ST. PAUL-MINNEAPOLIS.
BOTH WAYS
Via
North Pacific Coast
- $    99.00
V    91.90
VTo San Francisco; Fare to Los Angeles $99.00.
Tickets at these low fares will permit the choice of various
Soo-Pacific routes to and from the North Pacific Coast in combination with all other Transcontinental routes, and will allow
stop-overs at all points enroute within final limit.
Tickets on Sale daily, May 15th to September 30th, 1928,
Return limit, October 31st, 1928
To the RESORTS in the
CANADIAN PACIFIC ROCKIES
^— ROUND TRIP FARE FROM N
St. Paul Duluth
TO                                          Chicago     Milwaukee  Minneapolis Superior
Banff $67.50     $64.45     $57.75 $57.75
Field 70.00       66.95       60.65 60.65
Glacier 73.95       70.90       65.10 65.10
Lake Louise ....    69.05       66.00       59.60 59.60
Lake Windermere      .    75.25       72.20       66.70 66.70
Tickets at these low fares may be routed via Portal or
Emerson, returning either via same route or opposite gateway
and will permit stop-overs at any point, either going or returning, within final limit. Tickets will be on sale daily June 1st,
to and including September 30th, 1928, except that tickets to
Banff will be on sale daily, May 15th to September 30th, inclusive.    Final return limit will be October 31st, 1928.
!
PACIFIC COAST TOURS through the DOMINION of CANADA NATIONAL PARKS EFFECTIVE
From Chicago June 11th
From Vancouver June 15th
1928
Route of
W
DISCONTINUED
Last Train
From Chicago Sept. 8th
From Vancouver Sept. lOth
1928
Through the Dominion of Canada National Parks to Vancouver
AN ALL SLEEPING CAR TRAIN-FASTER TIME
WESTBOUND
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 Valley City	
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 Min ot.	
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 Kenmare	
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Ar.'
Lv..
 Flax ton	
 Portal, N. D (CT) Lv
 North Portal, Sask..(M T) Ar
Mon.
Mon.
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Sui.
Mon.
 Banff           	
Sun.
Mon.
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Mon.
 field (EmeraldLake)..(PT)..
Sun.
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 Revelstoke	
Sun.
Mon.
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Ar.
Ar.
Ar.
Ar.
Ar.
Lv.
Ar.
Sat.
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 Victoria Lv
Sat.
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 Seattle L v
 Tacoma Lv
 Portland! Lv
Sat.
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 Portland Ar
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 San Francisco Lv|
Thu.
A—Will stop on flag to take on or let off passengers to or from Twin Cities and heyond. C—Service between Milwaukee and St. Paul and Minneapolis is via Trains 3 and 4.
EQUIPMENT
OBSERVATION-COMPARTMENT CAR—Chicago Vancouver STANDARD SLEEPERS—Chicago-Vancouver, Chicago-Banff. St* Paul-Vancouver. St. Paul-
COMPARTMENT CARS—Chicago-Vancouver Banff.    Through Dining Car Service.    Open Top Observation Car—Calgary and Kamloops.
WESTBOUND
1-109-7
Daily
Read down
Via the "WINNIPEGER"
Schedule of Train No. 7, Winnipeg to Vancouver
Effective May 15th, 1 92S
Ry.
4-110-3
Daily
Read up
EASTBOUND
Sun.
Sun.
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*    12.30
4 00
Lv.. ...Cliica&o (<J T)...
Ar St. Paul.	
.Ar
.Lv
Soo
10.15
*      8.25
Wed.
Wed.
Tim.
Tim
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*     5 00
5.45
9.05
9.47
11.56
2.35
6.00
8.15
11.45
3.10
8.15
9.40
10.10
12.50
1.57
5.55
7.45
9.30
Lv St. Paul	
 Minneapolis	
.Ar
.Ar
CPE
7.45
7.05
3.55
3.19
1.15
10.10
7.15
5.10
5.00
1.50
6.10
4.55
2.35
11.35
10.20
3.30
1,10
*     9.00
Wed.
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1 ri.
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 Crlenwood	
'i ue.
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 Detroit Lakes	
 Thief River Falls      ■•:
  Emerson	
Tue.
Mon.
Mm.
Mon.
Mon.
Ar..
Lv  1
 Winnipeg: ;..........
 Winnipeg;	
.Lv
.Ar
Mon.
Mon.
Mon.
Mon.
Mon.
.. „; '... Resin a	
Mon.
Mon.
 Moose Jaw (MT)..
"R    flalsnrv 	
Mon.
Tue.
Sun.
Tue.
r , Banff..	
Sun.
Tue.
Ar
 Lake Louise.,	
Sun.
Tue.
 Glacier (PT)	
Sun.
Tue.
    Revelstoke 	
Sun.
Wed.
 Vancouver	
.Lv
Sat.
B—For Standard Sleeping Car passengers only. EQUIPMENT
Between ST. PAUL-MINNEAPOLIS-WINNIPEG
(Trains 109 ana HO)
Observation Compartment Cars Twin Cities and Winnipeg       Coaches Twin Cities and Winnipeg
Standard Drawing Room Sleepers... .Twin Cities and Winnipeg       Diner Twin Cities and Winnipeg
Not Responsible—We are not respc
sihle for errors in time tables, inconveniences
or damage resulting from delayed trains or
failure to make connections; schedules herein
are subject to change without notice.
* Daily.     Light face type A. M. and black face type P. M.     (CT) Central Time.      (M T) Mountain Time.     (P T) Pacific Time. ^
THE   WONDERLAND   OF  THE   WEST
SICAMOUS
At Sicamous, about equi-distant between Calgary and Vancouver, a very comfortable hotel is operated by the Canadian
Pacific, and is especially convenient either for those who wish to
stop  off  somewhere  so  as  to  make the trips  through both the
Canadian   Pacific  Rockies  and the great  Fraser-Thompson  canyons by daylight.
THE CANYONS
Kamloops, the junction of the North and South Thompson
rivers, is the beginning of the magnificent canyon country through
which we shall travel virtually all the way to Vancouver. The
canyons are second only to the Rockies in spectacular scenery,
and the traveler is well repaid if he will stay overnight at
Sicamous so that he can travel them in daylight.  The mountains
draw together as the train winds along ledges cut on their face;
tunnels penetrate the headlands and lofty bridges span the ravines.
At Lytton the canyon widens to admit the Fraser, the largest
river of British Columbia, which comes down from the north between two great lines of mountain peaks, and whose turbid flood
soon absorbs the bright green waters of the Thompson. The
scenery grows wilder than ever. The great river is forced between vertical walls of black rock, where, repeatedly thrown back
upon itself by opposing cliffs, it madly foams and roars. Ten
miles below North Bend is the famous "Hell's Gate," where two
jutting promontories suddenly compress the river and force it
to escape in a roaring cataract through a bottle-necked outlet.
VANCOUVER
T7ANC0UVER, the terminal of the Canadian Pacific trans-
▼ continental rail lines and its trans-Pacific steamship routes,
is the largest commercial center in British Columbia. It has an
excellent harbor nearly land-locked and fully sheltered, facing a
beautiful range of mountains.
The city is most picturesquely situated on Burrard Inlet.
Surrounding it are beautiful environs of varied character. All
kinds of water sports are available and are encouraged through a
mild climate and extensive bodies of water.
Some fine steamer trips can be made from Vancouver. Chief
amongst them, perhaps, is the 4^ hours' trip across the Juan
de Fuca Strait to Victoria. Then there is a particularly interesting trip to Nanaimo, a cruise amongst the Gulf Islands, and
others to Comox, Powell River, etc. An excellent circle tour
may be made by taking a "Princess" steamer to Victoria, the
E. & N. train from Victoria to Nanaimo, thence back to Vancouver by steamer.
VICTORIA
Charmingly situated at the southern end of Vancouver Island,
overlooking the Straits of Juan de Fuca across the blue waters to
the snow-capped Olympic Mountains on the mainland, is the Garden City of Canada, Its delightfully mild climate makes it a
favorite resort for both summer and winter. It is the provincial
capital of British Columbia, and owing to the characteristic
beauty of its residential district, has often been called "a bit of
England on the shores of the Pacific." It is distinctively a home
city, with fine roads and beautiful gardens, although its enterprising business district, composed of imposing stores and tall
office buildings, speaks of a rich commerce drawn from the fishing, lumber and agricultural industries of Vancouver Island.
There are as many good motor trips radiating from Victoria
as from any other place in America. The roads are excellent, and
car owners from the United States who wish to tour Vancouver
Island can bring their cars into Canada for one month by signing
a registration card at point of entry; if a longer stay is made the
usual bond is easily arranged.
VANCOUVER ISLAND
From Victoria delightful excursions may be made into the
interior of Vancouver Island either by the Esquimalt & Nanaimo
Railway or by automobile. Excellent hotels are to be found at
Shawnigan Lake, Cameron Lake and elsewhere. Excellent
fishing can be enjoyed at numerous places, for salmon and trout. THE  WONDERLAND
The immense Douglas fir forests of the interior and the balmy
climate make a trip into the  interior wonderfully attractive.
From Nanaimo, 72 miles north of Victoria, on the E. & N.
Railway, the Canadian Pacific Steamship Line gives a direct
service to Vancouver.
TO ALASKA
From Vancouver the palatial "Princess" steamers of the
Canadian Pacific will carry the traveller to Alaska. This exceedingly popular side-trip can be made in nine days, although
one with more time to spare will be well repaid if he spends
longer than this, and penetrates farther into the wonderful "Land
of the Midnight Sun."
The trip is a thousand-mile one through the beautiful "Inside
Passage," winding along between the long fringe of islands and
the mainland as through a fairyland. It introduces one to magnificent scenery of a character unknown elsewhere in North
America—long fiord-like channels, with looming glacier-clad
mountains dipping deeply into them, gaily painted totem poles,
Indians, gold mines, and always the purple glory of the Alaska
sunset.
Running out from Vancouver, the first stop is Alert Bay, a
little fishing town with some very picturesque totem poles. The
next day Prince Rupert is reached, and a few hours later Ketchikan, the first Alaskan port and a very flourishing community.
Then comes Wrangell, and beyond the Taku Glacier—a famous
glacier that extends back over ninety miles. Then, turning up
the Gastineau Channel, the ship reaches Juneau, capitol of
Alaska.
And then, eight hours north, up the beautiful Lynn Canal, is
our terminus, Skagway—Skagway the celebrated camp of the
Klondyke rush of '98, then the wildest and wickedest town in
the world, but now a model of propriety. In summer it is a
riot of color with its gay gardens. It, too, has good hotels, and
there are plenty of diversions to occupy the thirty-six hour layover of the steamer—such as the excursion to West Taku Arm.
THE YUKON
Those who wish to go farther can travel by rail from
Skagway—the White Pass & Yukon Route, which takes one
almost literally over the roof of the world. It is a run of about
eight hours by this line over the steep White Pass to Whitehorse, in the Yukon Territory, passing en route the beautiful
Lake Bennett. From Whitehorse, a little frontier town on a
tributary of the mighty Yukon River, the same company's steamer
can be taken still farther north to Dawson, center of the Klondyke gold mining region. This trip occupying, from Whitehorse and back, about seven days.
A shorter side-trip, which can be taken independently or in
combination with the Whitehorse trip, is to Lake Atlin. Taking
the train, a change is made at Carcross to a steamer which carries
one eastward to this lovely lake, which in magnificence of
scenery vies with any in the world. At the village of Atlin, the
W. P. & Y. has established a commodious and comfortable tourist
hotel, which every summer houses a large number of visitors.
1   Chalet at Emerald Lake 3   Down the Bow Valley at Banff
2    Bungalow Camp, Moraine Lake
4   Swimming Pool, Banff Hotel
5    Bow Falls THE   WONDERLAND   OF   THE   WEST
1    Cabin at Majestic Lake
2   On the Echo River, Banff
4   Saddle Horses, Lake Louise
5    Banff, Alberta
Motor Drives in the Rockies
Brewster Transport, Banff.
1. The Lariat Trail—Three Days, Three National
Parks
This magnificent ride takes you not only the same route as
the 24-hour Motor Detour mentioned on the opposite page,
but also over the far-famed Banff-Windermere Road. It
takes you through Rocky Mountains National Park, Kootenay
Park, the Columbia Valley, the Kicking Horse Canyon,
Yoho Park and the Great Divide.
Leave Banff 9:00 a. m. every Monday and Thursday (and on any day
with a minimum of 4 passengers) during summer season. First, day,
Castle Mountain Bungalow Camp, Vermilion River Crossing, Radium
Hot Springs. Second day, Golden, Emerald Lake. Third day, Yoho
Valley Camp, Wapta Camp, Lake Louise, Banff.
Ample time allowed at all points of interest. Distance 300 miles.
Price $30.00, not including meals or lodgings.
2. Lake   Windermere   All    Expense   Tour—Two
Days
This is a 208 mile tour over this splendid Government road.
Leave Banff 9:00 a. m. every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday
during summer season. Stop at Castle Mountain Bungalow
Camp, Marble Canyon, Vermilion River Crossing, Radium
Hot Springs and Lake Windermere Camp. Fare $25.00,
including meals and lodgings.    Minimum, 4 passengers.
3. Banff  General  Drive
Buffalo Park, Tunnel Mountain, Bow Falls, Spray Valley,
Zoo,   Cave  and  Basin,   Golf  Links.    Two  trips a  day,   22
miles, 2Y2 hours, $3.00.
4. To Lake Minnewanka
One trip a day, 33^ hours, $3.25.
5. Banff—Calgary
Double' Daily Service each way, $5.00 one way — $8.50
return.
Leave Banff   _ .  9:00 a.m
Arrive Calgary ._ 12:30 p.m
Leave Banff  7:0o p.m
Arrive Calgary  10:30 p.m
Leave Calgary  9:30 a.m
Arrive Banff... _  1:0o p.m
Leave Calgary ._  ,  3:00 p.m
Arrive Banff   _  6:30 pm
6. Banff—Lake Louise
Triple   Daily  Service  each  way,   with   stop  at  Johnston
Canyon, 3 hours, 42 miles, $5.00.
Leave Banff Springs Hotel 9:00 a. m., 2:00 p. m., 4:00 p. m.
Leave Chateau Lake Louise 9:00 a. m., 2:00 p. m., 4:00 p. m.
7. Lake Louise and Emerald Lake
Double Daily Service each way, 42 miles, 5% hours, $5.00.
Leave Lake Louise _ _. 9:30 a.m.
Arrive Yoho Valley   _ 11:00 a.m.
Arrive Emerald Lake  3:00 p.m.
Leave Emerald Lake _ ._  9:15 a.m.
Arrive Yoho Valley..  11:45 a!m!
Arrive Lake Louise..  3:30 p.m*.
8. Yoho Circle Tour
Daily, 36 miles, 7 hours, $5.00
Leave Field 10:00 a.m., Arrive Yoho Valley Camp 11:30 a.m.
Arrive Emerald Lake Chalet 3:30 p.m., Arrive Field 5:00 p.m
9. Moraine Lake Trip
Leave Chateau Lake Louise 10:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m., 4:00 p.m.
Time 2% hours, 18 miles, $2.50.
2:30 p.m,
4:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
6:00 p.m" THE   WONDERLAND   OF   THE   WEST
THE BREWSTER TRANSPORT, BANFF, ALBERTA
offers a delightful 24-Hour Motor Detour through the Canadian Pacific Rockies
TIME TABLE
40
This trip will run every day, in each direction, from June 15 to
September 5, 1928.
Motor Traveling Westward
Miles
0 Arrive Banff Mountain Time
From Chicago & Twin Cities (No. 1)    7:55 am
From Chicago & Twin Cities (No. 5)       (July    and
Aug.).     -"- 9:15 am
From Chicago & Twin Cities (No. 13) . ....11:35 am
2     Transfer to Banff Springs Hotel General Drive round
Banff  -- 1:30 pm
Returning to hotel at....'      3:30 pm
24 Leave Banff Springs Hotel      4:00 pm
40      Ar. Johnston Canyon, 40 minutes' stop—30 minutes'
walk
. Lv. Johnston Canyon
Ar. Lake Louise Station
65      Ar. Chateau Lake Louise   6:30 pm
STOP OVERNIGHT
65 Leave Chateau Lake Louise   8:30 am
Arrive The Great Divide
73 "      Wapta Bungalow Camp
11      Kicking Horse Pass
81 "      Meeting of the Waters
86 "      Yoho Valley Camp
97 "      Field Station 10:30 am
99          "      Natural Bridge
103 "      Emerald Lake Chalet 11:15 am
STOP FOR LUNCH
Leave Emerald Lake Chalet   12:30 pm
Arrive Kicking Horse Canyon
"      West Park Entrance
"      Golden Station  2:30 pm
Time changes at Golden to Pacific time—One
Hour Slower
Pacific
Leave Golden for Vancouver Time
The Mountaineer (No. 13)  3:45 pm
Trans-Canada (No. 7)   4:45 pm
Motor
Miles
Arrive Golden
Traveling Eastward
Pacific Time
103
142
From Vancouver (No. 4)   5:40 am
"     Vancouver (No. 8) . 12:00 noon
"    Vancouver (No. 14) 12:50 pm
(The above times are Pacific Time.
Motor Cars leave—and all times below this line
are—on Mountain Time.    One Hour Faster.)
Mountain Time
0 Leave Golden Station   2:30 pm
Arrive West Park Entrance
u      Kicking Horse Canyon
39 "      Emerald Lake Chalet  4:30 pm
39 Leave Emerald Lake Chalet    4:45 pm
43      Arrive Natural Bridge
45 "      Field Station...  . ... 5:30 pm
56 "      Yoho Valley Camp
61 "      Meeting of the Waters
'■      Kicking Horse Pass
69       *  "      Wapta Bungalow Camp
"      The Great Divide
77 "      Chateau Lake Louise    7:15 pm
STOP OVERNIGHT
77 Leave Chateau Lake Louise   9:00 am
Arrive Lake Louise Station
102 "      Johnston Canyon
40 minutes' stop—30 minutes' walk
102      Leave Johnston Canyon
118     Arrive Banff Springs Hotel 11:45 am
118     Leave Banff Springs Hotel  1:30 pm
General Drive round Banff returning to hotel at   3:30 pm
142 Transfer to Banff Station
Leave Banff
For Twin Cities & Chicago (No. 14).....    6:25 pm
For Twin Cities & Chicago (No. 6)  (July & Aug.).... 9:10 pm
For Twin Cities & Chicago (No. 2) 11:00 pm
COST
The cost of the above 24-hour Motor Detour in either direction is:
Transfer, Banff Station to Banff Springs Hotel $ 0.50
General Drive around Banff      3.00
Banff to Lake Louise      5.00
Lake Louise to Emerald LaKe     5.00
Emerald Lake to Golden      5.00
$18.50
BAGGAGE
One club bag or valise will be carried in the busses—no trunks or
heavy pieces.
Banff to Lake Louise...    $0.25 per piece
Lake Louise to Yoho     .25 per piece
Yoho to Emerald Lake     .25 per piece
Emerald Lake to Golden  50 per piece
Through trip, Banff to Golden  1.00 per piece
Not included—Meals en route or room at Chateau Lake Louise.
Any part of the above trip can be omitted, or the journey may be broken at any intermediate point and resumed at a later date.    The
latter is, however, subject to there being vacant accommodation on the busses.
SLEEPING CAR ACCOMMODATIONS
If you want sleeping car reservations made, so that when you come to the end of this 24-hour Motor Detour you will have reservations—
And if you have not already made them—you should:—
Going Westward—Apply on arrival at Banff, either Depot Ticket Office or Hotel Ticket Office, for space west of Golden.
Going Eastward—Apply on arrival at Chateau Lake Louise (Ticket Office) for space east of Banff.
Sleeping Car R
ates
(INCLUDING   THE  SURCHARGE)
Applying for Accommodations in
Standard Sleepc
jrs
information only and
These rates are published for general
are subject to change without notice.
BETWEEN                   Lower
Berth
Upper
Berth
Compartment
Drawing
Room
Chicago
or
Milwaukee
and Banff $16.50 $13.20 $46.50 $58.50
"    Lake Louise..   18.00    14.40    51.00    63.00
"    Field    18.00    14.40    51.00    63.00
"    Glacier    19.88    15.90    56.25    70.50
"   Sicamous   21.38    17.10    60.00    75.00
"    Vancouver....  23.63    18.90    66.75    84.00
Chicago
rand Omaha     4.50
"    Kansas City..    4.50
"    Denver    10.88
"   Salt Lake City 15.38
"    San Francisco.  23.63
t "    Los Angeles...   23.63
3.60
3.60
8.70
12.30
18.90
18.90
12.75
12.75
30.75
43.50
66.75
66.75
16.50
16.50
39.00
54.00
84.00
84.00
St. Paul
or
Minneapolis
and Banff    12.75
"    Lake Louise. .   14.63
"   Field    14.63
"    Glacier.    16.50
"    Sicamous    17.63
"   Vancouver....   19.88
10.20
11.70
11.70
13.20
14.10
15.90
36.00
41.25
41.25
46.50
49.50
56.25
45.00
52.50
52.50
58.50
63.00
70.50
St. Paul
or
Minneapolis
and Omaha      3.75
"    Kansas City. .     5.63
11    Denver    10.13
"   Salt Lake City 15.38
"    San Francisco.   23.63
"    Los Angeles...  23.63
3.00
4.50
8.10
12.30
18.90
18.90
10.50
15.75
28.50
43.50
66.75
66.75
13.50
21.00
36.00
54.00
84.00
84.00
Seattle
'and Portland      3.75
"   San Francisco.   10.13
t "    Los Angeles . .   14.25
3.00
8.10
11.40
10.50
28.50
40.50
13.50
36.00
51.00
fand San Francisco.    8.25
Portland \ "    Los Angeles...   12.38
6.60
9.90
23.25
35.25
30.00
43.50
San        [and Salt Lake City    9.00
Francisco J   "    Denver    16.50
or          ]  "   Kansas City. .   19.88
Los Angeles [ "    Omaha    19.88
7.20
13.20
15.90
15.90
25.50
46.50
56.25
56.25
31.50
58.50
70.50
70.50
San       f
Francisco \and Los Angeles...    4.50
3.60
12.75
16.50
fand Omaha    12.00
Salt        \  "    Denver     7.50
Lake City ( "   Kansas City..   12.75
9.60
6.00
10.20
33.75
21.00
36.00
42.00
27.00
45.00
fand Omaha      6.38
Denver     \ "    Kansas City. .     6.38
5.10
5.10
18.00
18.00
22.50
22.50
—ii■ 11 Bungalow    Camps
IN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC ROCKIES
At several points in the Canadian Pacific Rockies, bungalow
camps have been established which make a special appeal
to the trail-rider, the hiker and the climber. A "bungalow
camp" consists, speaking generally, of a cluster of buildings
of log or other wooden construction—the principal one, the
club building, used for dining and recreational purposes, the
others being individual sleeping cabins of various sizes. These
bungalow camps—which are supplemented by many outlying
"rest houses"—combine comfort, simplicity, and good food
with moderate charges—and always they have the magnificent background of wild Nature.
Wapta Camp—Overlooking beautiful Lake Wapta, just
west of the Great Divide. Center for Alpine climbing, drives,
pony rides, and hikes to Lake O'Hara, the Yoho Valley, the
Kicking Horse Canyon, etc.    Nearest station, Hector, B. C.
Lake O'Hara Camp—This Alpine lake, of exquisite
coloring and charm, is a splendid climbing, riding and walking
center. Excursions to Lake McArthur and Lake Oesa, or
over Abbot Pass to Lake Louise. Nearest station, Hector,
B. C.
Yoho Valley Camp—At the most delightful location in
Yoho Valley, facing Takakkaw Falls. Excursions to the
upper valley or over Yoho Pass to Emerald Lake. Nearest
station, Field, B. C.
Moraine Lake Camp—At the head of the Valley of the
Ten Peaks. Good trout fishing, climbing, riding and hiking
to Consolation Lakes, Paradise Valley, Wenkchemma Pass,
etc. Nearest station, Lake Louise, Alta. Open June 1st
to Sept. 30th.
Castle Mountain Camp—Reached via Banff or Lake
Louise, Alberta. Hiking, motoring, fishing and mountain
climbing.-    Nearest station, Banff or Lake Louise.
Vermilion River Camp—Fine fishing in the Vermilion
River, and magnificent mountain climbing. Nearest station,
Banff or Lake Louise.
Radium Hot Springs Camp—Swimming in Radium Hot
Springs Pool, hiking and climbing, and wonderful views of
the Selkirks.    Nearest station, Banff or Lake Louise.
Lake Windermere Camp—A popular bungalow camp on
the shore of the loveliest warm lake of British Columbia.
Riding, motoring, golf, swimming, boating and excursions to
the glaciers of the Selkirks. Nearest station, Lake Windermere, B. C.
The above camps are open (except where otherwise stated)
from June 15th to September 15th.
'00
I
Canadian Pacific Railway
Hotels
)
Alti
I
Name of Hotel
tude
SEASON
RECREATIONS
Winnipeg, Man.
\
\
The Royal Alexandra-E
760
All year
Golf, Motoring, center of
Canadian West (Site of
old Fort Garry).
\
Regina, Sask.
i
[
Hotel Saskatchewan- E
1896
All year
Golf, Motoring.
Calgary, Alta.
j
i
Hotel Palliser—            E
3425
All year
Golf,  Motoring,  Fishing
(Trout).
1
Banff, Alta.
!
i
Banff Springs Hotel—E
4625
Mayl5-Sept. 30
Mountain     drives     and
climbs, Golf, Bathing,
Fishing, Boating, Riding  (Rocky Mountains
Park).
Lake Louise, Alta.
Chateau Lake Louise-E
5670
June 1-Sept. 30
Boating,    Mountain
climbs,     Pony    trails,
Fishing.  Lakes in the
Clouds, Moraine Lake,
Glaciers.
Emerald Lake (near
Field, B. C.)
Emerald Lake Chalet-A
4282
June 15-Sept. 15
Boating,   Fishing,   Pony
trails to Yoho Valley,
Takakkaw Falls.
Riding to SummitLake
and Twin Falls.
■
Sicamous, B. C.
!
J
Hotel Sicamous—        A
1146
All year
Rowing, Canoeing, Motor
boats, Trout Fishing
(Sicamous Lake).
!
Vancouver, B. C.
|
Hotel Vancouver—      E
100
All year
Golf, Motoring, Fishing,
Steamboat  excursions.
'
Victoria, B. C.
Sea
All year
Golf,   Motoring,   Yacht
j
Empress Hotel—          E
Level
ing,   Sea   and   Stream
fishing.
HOTELS REACHED BY THE C. P. R.
Alti
Name of Hotel
tude
SEASON
RECREATIONS
[
Penticton, B. C.
Hotel Incola—              A
(
1132
All year
Boating     and     Fishing,
'
Owned and operated by
Okanagan Lake, Splen
the   Okanagan   Hotel
did Motor roads.
j
Company.
Cameron Lake, B. C.
604
May 1-Sept. 20
Fishing (Trout), Boating,
Cameron Lake Chalet-A
Splendid forests.   (Sal
Vancouver Island.
mon fishing adjacent.)
Strathcona Lodge
600
May 15-Oct, 1
Fishing   (Trout),   Swim
Station, B. C.
ming,   Tennis,   Moun
Strathcona Lodge—-
Vancouver Island.
tain Climbing, Motor
;
ing.
A—American plan.    E—European plan.
Double Daily Trans-Continental Service 1928
STATIONS
Lv (CT).Chicago. (CT) Ar
 Milwaukee	
.... Fond du Lac....
 Oshkosh 	
.. Neenah-Menasha..
.. . Stevens Point ...
 Marshfield	
.. .Chippewa Falls...
Ar St. Paul Lv
Lv St. Paul Ar
Ar... .Minneapolis Lv
Lv... . Minneapolis.     Ar
 Enderlin	
 Valley City	
 .. .Carrington	
 Harvey	
 .Minot	
 Kenmare	
Ar(CT)P'tal,N.D.(CT)Lv
Lv(MT)P'tal,Sas(MT)Ar
 Weyburn	
Ar.... Moose Jaw ... Lv
Lv Winnipeg.
 Regina . .
Ar.... Moose Jaw .
.Ar
Lv
Lv.
Ar.
. .Ar
.. Moose Jaw .
..Swift Current ...
.. /..Medicine Hat...
 Calgarv	
 •;..  Banff".......
  Lake Louise....
.(PT)...Field... (PT)
.'. Golden	
 Revelstoke ....
 Sicamous	
 Kamloops.....
......North Bend....
Ar..... Vancouver Lv
Lv.Vancouver (CPSS) .Ar
Lv..Victoria (CPSS)..Lv
Ar. . Seattle (CPSS)... Lv
2^;
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50 &
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05|
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,45^
15£
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No.
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A—Will stop on flag to take on or let off passengers to and from Twin Cities and beyond.
C—Service between Milwaukee and St. Paul and Minneapolis is via Trains 3 and 4.
Light face type A. M., and dark face type P. M. time.
(CT) Central Time.    (MT) Mountain Time.    (PT) Pacific Time.
Schedules subject to change without notice.
EQUIPMENT
THE   MOUNTAINEER   Nos. 13-14
Compt. Obs. Car Chicago and Vancouver
Compt. Sleeper Chicago and Vancouver
Standard Sleepers Chicago and Vancouver
™ ,  ^.  .      ~ . Chicago and Banff
Through Dinmg Car Service. St. Paul and Vancouver
No Coaches. st. Paul and Banff
Open Observation Car between Calgary and Kamloops.
The Mountaineer will not handle extra or special cars.
THE  SOO-PACIFIC  EXPRESS
Nos. 3-4, 107-8, 1-2
Observation Car. . Chicago and Moose Jaw
Moose Jaw & Vancouver
(Compartment Observation June 1
to Sept. 30)
Standard Sleepers. Chicago and Vancouver
Through Dining Car Service.
Coaches.
Open Observation   Car  between  Field
and Kamloops.
THE  SOO-PACIFIC   EXPRESS
Nos. 3-4, 107-8, 5-6
Obs.-Compt. Car. . Chicago and Vancouver
Standard Sleepers. Chicago and Vancouver
St. Paul and Banff
Through Dining Car Service.
Coaches.
Open Observation Car  between   Field
and Kamloops.
-  

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