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Canadian Rocky Mountain resorts Canadian Pacific Railway Company 1911

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Full Text

 Canadian
Rocky Mountain
Re s out s ..-m •
CANADIAN     ROCKY     MOUNTAIN     RESORTS
"Forth from the dust and din.
The crush, the heat, the many spotted glare,
The odor and sense of life and lust aflare,
The rangle and the jangle of unrests,
*     *     *     %
To quietness."
DAY BY DAY it is more and more apparent that some holiday
of rest and relaxation—call it by the good old-fashioned name
of holiday if you like—is rapidly becoming one of the essentials of
our exciting twentieth century existence. What was once a question
of caprice and luxury is now a necessity, if the danger of a breakdown
is to be avoided; and with the majority of those to whose health
of body and mind the annual outing is almost as needful as air or
food, the question where to go to get the necessary change of air
and surroundings to bring about the desired results, is a question
which is a trouble to not a few.
To those who find themselves confronted with this question,
let me turn your attention to
"THE CALL OF THE CANADIAN ROCKIES." CANAD   IAN
PACIFIC
R  A  I   L W A V
^pHE CANADIAN ROCKIES are unique
■*• for their abnormally high percentage of
sunny days, their corresponding minimum of
rain and the entire absence of foggy or misty
weather. From the 1st of June to the 1st of
October there is little rain, except passing
showers of short duration, preceded and succeeded by bright sunshine. No greater contrast is it possible for mortals to enjoy than
from the city with noisy, rushing tumult, and
the smoky, dusty streets, to the Canadian
Rockies with their pure clear air, blue skies,
emerald lakes and crystal streams.
A glance at the map will make it sufficiently |
obvious  that  the  system  of  the  Canadian
Pacific   Railway   is   the   key   to   the   great
11 play ground'' of Canada.    It is indeed the
"Holiday Line" -par excellence.
The Canadian Pacific Railway offers to the
tourist from the Pacific Coast every convenience of modern travel.    Its steamships are
Wireless Operator on Canadian Pacific Railway Company's Steamships.
the finest, fastest and most luxuriously fitted
vessels plying on the Puget Sound. Its
trains operating out of Vancouver to the
Canadian Rockies are among the best equipped
trains in Canada, and carry Compartment-
Buffet-Library-Observation Cars finished in
the most luxurious style and fitted with every
Canadian Pacific Ry. S. S. "Princess Charlotte. CANADIAN     ROCKY    MOUNTAIN    RESORTS
Interior Bufifet-Library-Observation Car.
convenience. The Canadian Pacific Railway
also owns and operates a magnificent chain
of hotels from Victoria to Banff, which provide
that high-class service which is characteristic
of all Canadian Pacific Railway undertakings.
From the time the stately "Princesses''
leave their moorings at Seattle to the time
the tourist reaches the coast again there is
not a dull moment. The panorama is continually changing and by the time the "Heart
of the Rockies " is reached Nature has unfolded
her beauties in such profusion and diversity as
is unequalled anywhere in such a short run.
The sail up the smooth waters of Puget
Sound, between the Olympics and the
Cascades, to the beautiful entrance to Victoria
Harbor is ever a delightful trip. On entering
the inner harbor, immediately in front is the
magnificent Canadian Pacific Railway Empress
Hotel. On the right are the fine Parliament
Buildings of British Columbia, which are
among the handsomest in America. To the
left is the Dominion Postoffice and Customs
House.
Leaving Victoria the "Princess'' wends her
way among the beautiful islands at the southeast of Vancouver Island, thence across the
Gulf of Georgia. On the right Mt. Baker is
seen, like a sentinel, raising its mighty snowcapped cone over  14,000 feet into the air.
Unexcelled Equipment of the Canadian Pacific Railway. CANAD   IAN
P A
C
>■-
I   F  I   C
R  A  I   L.W A Y
Cathedral Peak, Canadian Rockies.
After crossing the Gulf of Georgia and English
Bay, the First Narrows, a very narrow channel,
is reached. On the right is Stanley Park,
Vancouver's beautiful natural park, then
Burrard Inlet, which forms one of the best
harbors on the Pacific Coast.
To those who have plenty of time both
Victoria and Vancouver offer many attractions to the tourist, and several days might be
profitably spent in both cities, but those who
have only a short time at their disposal must
obey "THE CALL OF THE MOUNTAINS"
and press forward.
On boarding the train at Vancouver the
railway follows the south shore of Burrard
Inlet for several miles, and a short distance
further enters the Fraser Valley. At this
point the Fraser River is a smooth-running,
mighty stream and hardly recognizable as
the same river seen a few hours later in such
a reckless, sportive mood.
At Yale the Fraser Canyon is reached and
followed up to Lytton. The scenery of the
Fraser Canyon is intensely interesting. The
great river is forced between vertical walls of
rock through which it madly rushes and roars.
The railway is cut into the cliffs 200 feet or
more above, and the overhanging rocks which
occur in close succession are pierced by
tunnels. At Lytton the Thompson Canyon
is entered and followed for about sixty miles.
The Thompson Canyon is thought by many
to be superior to the Fraser Canyon, and by
none to be inferior.
At Savona is Kamloops Lake, a lovely
sheet of water with well-wooded slopes coming
down to the water's edge, and a little further
on the Great Shuswap Lakes are reached.
For fifty miles the line wends its way along
Empress Hotel, Victoria, B. C.
4< CANADIAN     ROCKY    MOU NTAI N     R E S O RT S
the south shore of these beautiful lakes which
bid well to rival even the Lakes of Bonnie
Scotland, and they do not lack song and story
in their praise. David Christie Murray wrote
of them, "And the Lakes on this side of
Sicamous, shall I ever forget them? I saw
them first at twilight, with one bright star in
the sky of deepest violet and a trail of starry
brightness in the shadows of the Lake. Such
a scene of peace and quietness after the
clamorous glories of the Mountains, that it
made my heart ache with sweetness."
At Sicamous there is a link in the chain of
hotels for the convenience of those passengers
who left Vancouver in the morning, and who
wish to continue their journey in daylight.
After two-hours' ride from Sicamous, Revelstoke is reached, where begins the ascent of
the western slope of the Selkirks. The line
enters the Selkirk Range by the valley of the
Illecillewaet River, the first portion of which
is a gorge with walls of rock only ten yards
apart. After climbing 800 feet the line runs
along the brink of several canyons, the most
striking of which is Albert Canyon, where the
Vancouver Hotel, Vancouver, B. C.
Mount Sir Donald, Glacier, B. C.
river can be seen 150 feet below the track, now
merely a boiling flume scarcely twenty feet
wide. Passing Ross Peak, at an altitude of
3,456 feet, a magnificent view is obtained of
the peaks at the summit of the Selkirks,
Mount Sir Donald towering above the rest.
Continuing up the valley the Illecillewaet
River is crossed for the thirteenth and last
time, and the line sweeps sharply to the right
and, turning back across the valley, makes a
double loop like a letter "S." Ascending still
higher to an altitude of 4,122 feet, Glacier is
reached. Here there is a charming hotel, the
Glacier House, another of the Canadian Pacific
Railway Company's hotels. CANAD   IAN
PACIFIC
R  A  I   L W A Y
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The Road to Emerald Lake.
A stop of at least a few hours should be
made at Glacier to visit the Great Illecillewaet
Glacier which stretches one of its octopus-like
tentacles to within thirty minutes' walk of the
hotel. Like most other glaciers the sun is
driving the Illecillewaet Glacier back, in this
instance at the rate of about thirty-five feet
a year.
From Glacier House several other interesting expeditions may be made. Marion Lake,
1,750 feet above the hotel, is reached by an
easy trail. There are also trails to the summits of Mounts Avalanche and Abbott. The
Great Caves of Nakimu (or Grumbling Caves)
Riding Party at Glacier, B. C.
are also within easy reach of Glacier, being
situated about six miles away, above the
snow line, at the head of a beautiful valley.
After leaving Glacier the summit of the
line through the Selkirks, 4,311 feet, at
Roger's Pass, is soon gained, and the descent
down the eastern slope through the Beaver
Valley is begun. The superb panoramic views
of the Selkirks during this descent are
never  forgotten.     Just  beyond  Golden  the
Glacier House at Glacier, B. C. CANADIAN     ROCKY    MOUNTAIN    RESORTS
View from Gallery of Emerald Lake Chalet.
train enters the Kicking Horse Canyon and
in less than two hours draws up at Field.
Right on the station and under the shadow
of Mount Stephen, which rises 10,450 feet
above sea level, is Mount Stephen House, a
charming Canadian Pacific Railway hotel.
At Field the most ambitious and enthusiastic mountaineer can find ample opportunity
to prove his prowess and skill, and the lover
of beauty is more than repaid by a short stay
The Great Glacier at Glacier, B. C, 37 Square Miles of Ice 500 Feet Thick.
Mount Sir Donald, Glacier, B. Q.
here. From Field there is a delightful seven-
mile drive to Emerald Lake, where there is a
chalet operated by the Canadian Pacific
Railway, where tourists who wish to visit the
far-famed Yoho Valley will find excellent
accommodation. Yoho Valley is one of the
beauty spots of the Canadian Rockies. It is
a delightful experience to ride from Emerald
Lake through the Yoho Valley and stay at the
comfortable camps provided by the Canadian
Pacific Railway for tourists. Here Nature is
seen in all her grandeur of towering peaks,
glistening glaciers, fantastic waterfalls, picturesque mountain lakes and enchanting streams. •*<»™,b0«{ ^j<
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PACIFIC
R  A I   L W A V
Mount Stephen and Hotel, Field, B. C.
The celebrated Takakkaw Falls, eight times
as high as Niagara, the Twin Falls and the
great Wapta Glacier are all to be found in
the Yoho Valley.
After leaving Field the train soon com-
mences./to climb the "Big Hill," the grade of
which has been reduced by one-half, by one
of the greatest engineering feats in Canada.
The new line has two spiral tunnels driven
through solid rock, both making a complete
loop of track. The railway enters the first
spiral tunnel under Mount Ogden and emerging, crosses the Kicking Horse Valley and
enters the second spiral tunnel under Cathedral
Mountain and after making another loop
emerges again and follows the Kicking Horse
River. Between Hector and Stephen the
summit of the railway line in the Rockies,
5,321 feet, and the Great Divide are passed.
The Great Divide is marked by a rustic arch
under which the mountain stream divides into
two branches, one running eastward into Hudson Bay, the other westward into the Pacific
Ocean. A very few miles from the Great
Divide is Laggan, the station for Lake Louise.
From Laggan Station there is a fine carriage drive two and a half miles long to Lake
Louise. The Canadian Pacific Railway have
built a lovely hotel, Chateau Lake Louise,
right on the verge of the lake. The beauties
of Lake Louise baffle description; it is called
"The peerless gem of the Canadian Rockies,"
and no words can describe the exquisite setting
of this peerless gem, so varied in color is
it and with such magnificent surroundings.
Many are the attractions around Lake Louise.
The Lakes in the Clouds, Mirror Lake and
Lake Agnes, two other gems set amid scenes
Verandah of Emerald Lake Chalet.
IO CANADIAN     ROCKY    MOUNTAIN     RESORTS
of wildest beauty, are within easy reach by a
good pony trail. Paradise Valley, the Valley
of the Ten Peaks, and Moraine Lake are all
well worth visiting. The climber can also
find plenty of scope for his energies on Mounts
Temple, Whyte and Niblock.
The line from Laggan to Banff is through
the beautiful Bow Valley, which is sentinelled
all along by mountains exceedingly grand and
prominent; Banff is reached in an hour's
ride from Laggan.
Banff is situated in the heart of the
Canadian National Park, a National Reservation of 5,732 square miles. The Park is the
largest in the world, being nearly half as
large again as the famous Yellowstone Park.
The Canadian Pacific Railway Company's
Banff Springs Hotel stands on the south bank
of the Bow River near the Bow Falls, and
commands a most magnificent view of the
Bow Valley from its balcony. This hotel, in
the refinement of its appointments, ranks
among the finest summer hotels to be found
anywhere.    No part of the Rockies exhibits
>m Field.
Lake Louise, the Gem of the Canadian Rockies.
a greater variety of scenery and nowhere are
good points of view and features of special
interest so accessible. It would be impossible
in this brief description to give any details of
the many expeditions which can be taken
from Banff. Among others there are Sulphur
Mountain, with its observatory on the summit,
the Hot Sulphur Springs, Bow Falls, Lake
Minnewanka, and many delightful drives
through the woods and valleys of this great
Park. Boating on the Bow River and bathing
in the Hot Sulphur Basin are among the
many attractions. There is also an interesting
museum at Banff. CANAD   IAN
PACIFIC
R  A I   L W A Y
Chateau Lake Louise, Laggan, Alberta—Canadian Rockies.
Those who want to make a circular tour
can continue down the Bow Valley to Calgary,
a very prosperous and busy western town,
thence down a branch line to Macleod, on
through the Crow's Nest Pass to Kingsgate
and across the international boundary to
Spokane. A choice of routes is offered between
Spokane and Portland, the Rose City and the
Metropolis of Oregon. Others may wish to
return from Banff by the same route in order
to revisit some of the many attractions of the
going trip and these can make a slight variation by using the all-rail line into Seattle via
Sumas.
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Coaching Party at Banff—Canadian Rockies
12 CANADIAN     ROCKY    MOUNTAIN     RESORTS
Boating at Banff, Canadian Rockies.
Banff Springs Hotel and Bow River Valley—Canadian Rockies,
SIDE TRIPS.
If time permits, a delightful side trip can be
made from Sicamous Junction, down a branch
line to Vernon and Okanagan Landing, at the
head of Lake Okanagan, a magnificent sheet
of water on which the steamer "Okanagan"
plies. Kelowna, Peachland, Summerland and
Penticton are all charming spots in a land of
vineyards and orchards.
Another side trip can be made from Revelstoke to Nelson or Rossland via the glorious
Arrow Lakes. The line from Revelstoke
follows the eastern bank of the Columbia
River to Arrowhead, at the head of the Upper
13 CANAD   IAN
PACIFIC
R  A  I   L W A Y
A Fair Mountaineer—Canadian Rockies.
Arrow Lake—an expansion of the Columbia
River—where one of the fine steamers of the
Canadian Pacific Railway is boarded. It is
a most delightful sail through the lakes and
river, the scenery having that picturesqueness
and charm characteristic of mountain waters.
On either side cliff and crag alternate with
wooded ravine, their beauty accentuated by
many wooded rills and cascades dropping
over the overhanging banks. From Robson,
at the foot of the Arrow Lakes, a short train
journey is made to Nelson, on an arm of the
Kootenay Lake, or to Rossland, in the
mining district.
Kootenay Lakes Hotel, Balfour, B. C.
Giant Trees in Stanley Park, Vancouver, B. C.
14- CANADIAN     ROCKY    MOUNTAIN    RESORTS
Buffalo at Banff.
/TVHE principal ticket agents of all railways in Washington, Oregon, and British Columbia
sell summer tourist round-trip tickets to the Canadian Rockies, and any Canadian Pacific
Agent (as per list shown herein) will also gladly quote fares, furnish itineraries, descriptive
literature, make sleeping car reservations and write in advance arranging hotel accommodation.
The following descriptive booklets may be had by application to Canadian Pacific Ticket
Agents: "Challenge of the Mountains," "Annotated Time Tables," "British Columbia,"
"Western Canada," "Fishing and Shooting," "Folder A," "British Columbia Coast Steamship
Schedules."
CANADIAN    PACIFIC   RAILWAY    CO.
AGENCIES
Bellingham, Wash 113 West Holly Street
W. H. GORDON, Passenger Agent
Everett, Wash 1515 Hewitt Avenue
A. B. WINTER, Ticket Agent
Los Angeles, Cal. 609 South Spring Street
A. A. POLHAMUS, General Agent, Passenger Dept.
Nanaimo, B. G.,
Nelson, B. C. .
 WM. McGIRR, Agent, C. P. Ry.
.W. J. WELLS, District Passenger Agent
Portland, Ore 142 Third Street
F. R. JOHNSON, General Agent  Passenger Dept.
H. W. BRODIE, General Passenger Agent
VANCOUVER, B. C.
San Francisco, Cal 645 Market Street (Palace Hotel)
G. M. JACKSON, General Agent, Passenger Dept.
Seattle, Wash 713 Second Avenue
E. E. PENN, General Agent, Passenger Dept.
Spokane, Wash 14 Woll Street
GEO. A. WALTON, General Agent, Passenger Dept.
Tacoma, Wash 1113 Pacific Avenue
C. H. READE, City Passenger Agent
Vancouver, B. C 428 Hastings Street
J. MOE, City Ticket Agent
Victoria, B. C 1102 Government Street
L. D. CHETHAM, City Passenger Agent
C. B. FOSTER, General Passenger Agent
WINNIPEG, MAN.
C. E. McPHERSON, Assistant Passenger Traffic Manager, Western Lines, WINNIPEG, MAN.
15 Canadian
Rocky Mountain
Re s out s

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