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Pacific coast tours through the Canadian Rockies Canadian Pacific Railway Company 1911

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Array E
BCIHCCOAST
TOURS
THROUGH THE
CANADIAN ROCKIES BANFF  SPRINGS   HOTEL  AND   BOW   RIVER   VALLEY
PACIFIC COAST TOURS
THERE are many attractive routes to the Pacific
Coast, but every traveller should select the
Canadian Pacific if he wishes his tour to
embrace the most interesting and remarkable
display of mountain scenery to be found anywhere in
the world.
From Montreal and Toronto, through trains are operated to Winnipeg and Vancouver, or, if desired, the
Company's   splendid  Great Lakes Steamships may be
used between Owen Sound or Sault Ste. Marie and Fort
William.    There is also direct train service from Montreal to St. Paul and Minneapolis, via Sault Ste. Marie.
From, or through Chicago, passengers make connection at the Union Station in St. Paul with the following
excellent through trains of the Soo-Canadian Pacific:
St. Paul-Seattle
St. Paul-Spokane-Portland
St. Paul-Winnipeg
When stops are made in the mountains, the
Montreal - Winnipeg - Vancouver
Toronto - Winnipeg - Vancouver
trains are also available. The hotels are so situated,
and train schedules arranged, as to enable passengers to
travel through the entire mountain district in daylight.
THROUGH THE CANADIAN ROCKIES
FOLLOWING a stretch of rolling wheat-bearing
prairie land, the route winds for some distance
through the foothills, before plunging into the
fastnesses of the mighty Rockies. Then for
over six hundred miles a continuous panorama of
bewildering magnificence is presented, which no pen
can adequately describe. Wondrous glacial fields,
startling precipices, snow-capped peaks, wide forest
areas, clear lakes, and peaceful valleys combine in
enchanting array.
That "there is not a dull or uninteresting moment
all the way " js the testimony of every one who has made
the journey.
The Canadian Rockies are the scenic climax of the
mighty Rocky Mountains, called "the backbone of
America." To the northward they gradually diminish
in height until the Arctic Circle is reached. Southward
they lack that ruggedness and glacial beauty which
give them their attractiveness to the lovers of Alpine
scenery.
The New York Tribune says: 'Tt is not generally
known that within four days' journey of New York City
there are waiting for the sightseer and scientific investigator some of the grandest and most impressive glacial
streams  in  the world.    Nothing in  Switzerland  is  to of the region will reveal
wonders undreamed of and
scenes that surpass conception.
Banff, the beautiful; Lake
Louise, the wonderful; Field,
the majestic; and Glacier,
the mighty, are terms used
by people who have remained
sufficiently long to catch the
full inspiration of these
matchless resorts. Unique
in „ their attractiveness, and
alluring in their beauty,
they draw their devotees
from all parts of the civilized
world. If time permits, the
pleasure afforded by a stay
at any or all of the resorts
mentioned should not be
missed.
-> .. ........ . ,,.,:..:,ft,.,,,     _
HOT  SULPHUR   SPRINGS   SWIMMING   POOL,  BANFF
be found more beautiful than the glaciers of the Canadian
Rockies and Selkirks, and one of the chief attractions of
the trip is the fact that one may journey there and back
in civilized luxury, and while enjoying the scenes, at the
very 'noses' of the wonderful glaciers themselves, may
be comfortable and remain in close touch with the
world."
While even a hurried trip through the Rockies is an
experience never to be forgotten, a leisurely exploration
BUFFALO AT BANFF
3
BOW FALLS, BANFF
4 At every hour of the day
the view is ever changing with
the shadows.
Picturesquely situated on
the very verge of the water
is the Chateau Lake Louise,
where comfortable accommodations and excellent service
are afforded.
SPIRAL TUNNELS
Between Hector, near the
summit of the Rockies, and
Field, one of the greatest
engineering feats of the century has been accomplished.
To reduce the steep grade
of the western slope of the
Rockies, the line has been
lengthened, and two immense
BANFF
Banff, the gateway to the Canadian
National Park, is the chief objective point
for tourists, and without a peer as a holiday
resort. The scenery in the vicinity is incomparably grand and diversified. Mountain peak
surmounts mountain peak; rock lies piled upon
rock; rushing waters and lakes, like gems among
the roughness, give color to the scene. Charmingly situated on the south bank of the Bow
River, near the mouth of the Spray, is Banff*
Springs Hotel of the Canadian Pacific Hotel
System, which ranks among the finest found
anywhere.
LAKE LOUISE
Of the beauty of Lake Louise there
is no divided opinion; every visitor to its
shores sings its praises, and it is acknowledged
by the most competent judges to be one of
the great masterpieces in Nature's picture
gallery. As a gem of composition and coloring it has no rival. Green, blue and purple
shadows, and   red-brown cliffs mix and   melt. THE  GREAT  G]
.ACIER, B.   C.
spiral tunnels have been driven through the
solid rock, each tunnel with approaches making
a complete loop of track. These grade-reduction loops add greatly to the scenic effects to
be obtained from passing trains.
FIELD
Surrounded by majestic peaks and tremendous glaciers, beautiful lakes and mighty
waterfalls, Field is a veritable paradise for
the mountain climber, sportsman and artist.
Under the shadow of Mount Stephen is
situated the spacious and comfortable
Mount Stephen House, of the Canadian Pacific
Hotel System, a splendid base from which to
make numerous expeditions ir ;o the surrounding region.
(See Side Trips from Field, page 21.)
GLACIER
Near the summit of the Selkirk Range,
lies Glacier in the midst of a region of mighty
peaks and glaciers, woods and waterfalls. The
Company's  hotel,  Glacier    House,  is  admir
ably situated and affords opportunity for a delightful
sojourn to view the many wondrous works of Nature in the
vicinity.
From the hotel it is only
an hour's walk to the Great
Glacier of the Selkirks,
larger than all the Glaciers
of Switzerland combined.      %
General Hamilton wrote
in the guests' book at the
hotel:
"My wife and I have
travelled for nearly forty
years all over the world,
and are both agreed the scenery  at  Glacier  House  is  the
IELD   AND   MOUNT   STEPHEN
8 finest   we    have    seen    in   Europe,   Asia,   Africa    or
America."
From Glacier, the route, descending the western
slope of the Selkirks, follows the valley of the Illicil-
lewaet through Albert Canyon, a marvelous gorge of
great depth and startling fascination^
Revelstoke is an
important center,
from which there
is water communication with the
rich Kootenay and
Boundary districts.
At Sicamous Junction an excellent
hotel is operated
by the Canadian
Pacific Railway.
A branch line
here makes connection with Lake
Okanagan, a
beautiful sheet of
water on which
plies the Cana-
dian Pacific
steamer "Aberdeen." The round
trip from Sicamous Junction to
the foot of the lake
occupies two days,
which will be
most enjoyably
spent.
The Canyon
of the Thompson
is entered beyond
Ashcroft. Its
angry waters rush
along in a perfect maelstrom
and after the
junction with the
Fraser at Lytton,
the scenery assumes an even wilder aspect. North Bend is situated
in the heart of the Fraser Canyon, amid awe-inspiring
surroundings.
At Agassiz there is a fine Government experimental
fruit farm,while five miles north is Harrison Lake, a beautiful sheet of water noted for its hot sulphur springs.
BIG  TREES
From Mission Junction a branch line runs to the
International Boundary, connecting at Sumas with the
Northern Pacific Railway. The St. Paul-Seattle
through trains are operated over this route and connections are made at Seattle for Tacoma, Portland, San
Francisco, Los Angeles and other Pacific Coast points.
Forty-two miles
beyond Mission
Junction is Vancouver, the western
terminus of the
Canadian Pacific
Railway.
Vancouver
(pop. 130,000) is
beautifully situated on the shores
of Burrard Inlet.
It is a progressive, ambitious
city, the largest
in British Columbia, with numerous attractions to
offer the visitor,
including Stanley
Park, one of the
most beautiful
parks in America,
noted for its luxuriant vegetation
and "big trees."
Hotel Vancouver, of the Canadian Pacific Hotel
System, is conveniently located
and has a high
reputation for the
excellency of its
service.
From Vancouver the Company's    famous
(   (   T% ' 9   9
rrmcess
steamers offer a
splendid service to Victoria, Seattle, Northern British
Columbia and Alaska; the White Empresses cross
the Pacific to Japan and China, and the Canadian-
Australian Line runs regularly to Honolulu, Suva
(Fiji), Australia and New Zealand, giving unequalled
opportunities for varied and delightful water trips.
PARK,VANCOUVER
10 VIA THE KOOTENAY
Diverging from the main line of the Canadian
Pacific at Dunmore, an attractive alternative route is
offered to the Pacific Coast via the Crow's Nest Branch,
through the great ranching districts of Southern Alberta
and the vast mining regions of the Kootenay; thence by
way of Nelson, the Columbia River, and Arrow Lakes
to Revelstoke, where the main line is joined for continuance of trip, as already described. This rail and
water route, combining the fascinating beauty of valley,
lake and mountain, appeals strongly to tourists because
of its varied general attractiveness.
Traveling one way via the Canadian Rockies, the
trip through the Kootenay in the reverse direction
makes a particularly attractive and enjoyable tour.
ST.  PAUL-SPOKANE-PORTLAND
THROUGH SERVICE
Another route is by the Crow's Nest Line via Kings-
gate and Spokane to Portland. At Kingsgate the
International Boundary is crossed and the line then
runs through a country remarkable for its scenic attractiveness and wonderfully rich both in mining and
agriculture.
Spokane, Wash., is the commercial metropolis of
the "Inland Empire," and a good example of the progressive western city. It has many fine buildings,
parks and pleasant driveways.
Continuing from Spokane the route lies through a
highly productive wheat and grain country. Crossing
from Washington into Oregon, the valley of the Columbia is followed, and that majestic stream is seldom out
of sight of the railway for the remainder of the journey.
Portland, appropriately designated as the "Rose
City," is beautifully situated near the confluence of the
Willamette and Columbia rivers, in the midst of a rich
agricultural country. It is a thoroughly modern city
with well-kept streets, handsome business buildings
and dwellings.    The climate is pleasant and healthful.
TO CALIFORNIA
Passengers en route to California have the choice of
either an overland trip or sea voyage from North Coast
points.
From Portland to San Francisco the picturesque
Shasta route of the Southern Pacific or the San Francisco
and Portland Steamship Company may be used; from
Victoria or Seattle, steamers of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company maintain a regular service to San Francisco.
11
^    W° J
CANADIAN PACIFIC R'Y
KOOTENAY DISTRICT
BRITISH COLUMBIA
-^r^x
Canadian Pacific Ry.: g
Proposed Line :■■!
Boat Routes : m«WM S. S.  PRINCESS   CHARLOTTE BRITISH   COLUMBIA   COAST   SERVICE
"PRINCESS"  STEAMERS BETWEEN
VANCOUVER, VICTORIA
AND  SEATTLE
This short but very interesting boat trip on Puget
Sound, embracing three of the most flourishing cities of
the Pacific Coast region, should not be omitted from the
itinerary of any tourist. If requested when purchasing,
it will be included in through tickets without additional
charge.      (See ticketing routes, page 29.)
The Company's famous three-funnel Princess Liners
operating on this route are the fastest, most comfortable,
and best equipped of any steamships in the Pacific
coastwise trade.
The voyage is made from Vancouver or Seattle to
Victoria in four hours, at an average speed of eighteen
knots per hour.
Victoria, which has been aptly described as a
transplanted section of Old England, is charmingly
situated on Vancouver Island, overlooking the Straits
of Fuca. It is a beautiful residential city, with many
miles of magnificent roads, fine parks, and Government
buildings which rank among the handsomest in America.
The Empress Hotel of the Canadian Pacific Hotel
System commands a fine view of the harbor and is in
high favor with all tourists.
Seattle, a city of 250,000 population, is delightfully
situated on the shores of Elliot Bay, an arm of Puget
Sound.    It has many large manufacturing industries.
The residential section is attractively laid out on
terraced hills and there is an extensive system of boulevards. The city is fortunate in the possession of a
fresh-water lake, easy of access, on the shores of which
beautiful parks have been created.
Round-Trip Tickets to the North Pacific Coast are available via either one of
the routes described, going and returning, or going one and returning another, or one
way Canadian Pacific in connection with direct United States lines in the reverse
direction.
Any of these routes may also be used via the North Pacific Coast to California, in
connection with direct routes returning from California, or vice versa.
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"FROM OCEAN TO OCEAN"
ACROSS the continent
via the
CANADIAN PACIFIC RY.
Gulf    of    M e oc i c a SIDE    TRIPS     IN     THE. CANADIAN    ROCKIES
LAKE   LOUISE
BANFF —There are a great many interesting spots
in the vicinity, all easily accessible by good carriage
roads and bridle paths. At a short
distance from Banff Springs Hotel
are the Bow Falls, a cataract of
wonderful beauty, Tunnel Mountain,
from which a splendid view of the
valley is obtained, and the Cave and
Basin, a remarkable formation from
which gush natural sulphur springs.
Within a radius of three miles are
the Hoodoos, natural concrete pillars
of various shapes and sizes, Cascade
Mountain, Stoney Squaw Mountain,
the beautiful Vermilion Lakes, the
animal paddocks, and Sun Dance
Canyon, a deep and curious cleft in
the mountain. At a distance of nine
miles is Lake Minnewanka, a pretty
sheet of water, extremely deep and
walled in by tremendous cliffs. The
lake is sixteen miles long with a
width of from one to two miles.
On it a launch is operated, which
can be chartered by visitors at a
small charge.
19
Cataract   Creek,
LAKE  LOUISE (LAGGAN)—
From Lake Louise (alt. 5645 feet)
good trails lead to principal features
of interest in the vicinity. It is an
easy ascent to Mirror Lake (alt. 6550
feet) and Lake Agnes (alt. 6820 feet),
which literally nestle amid the clouds,
encircled by majestic peaks. It is a
three-mile trip to Saddleback Mountain,which commands an inspiringview
of the famous Paradise Valley. At a
distance of about ten miles is Moraine
Lake, situated at the head of the Valley of the Ten Peaks, and reached over
a good carriage road, recently constructed. Good camping facilities are
afforded on the shore of the lake in
the midst of scenic surroundings of
surpassing beauty and grandeur. The
Victoria Glacier, a great palisade of
hanging snow, Abbot Pass, a deep
canyon between Mounts Victoria and
Lefroy, O'Hara Lake, set amid surroundings of wild Alpine grandeur,
Paradise   Valley  and   the   Ptarmigan
Lakes are among the notable spots well worthy of a visit.
2   *
MORAINE   LAKE, VALLEY   OF  THE   TEN   PEAKS.   NEAR   LAGGAN
20 FIELD—From the Company's hotel a variety of
pleasant excursions may be made to the wonder spots
so plentiful in this region. Emerald Lake, a delightful resort, seven miles distant, is reached by a good
carriage road down the
bank of the Kicking
Horse River and thence
around the base of Mount
Burgess. On the wooded
shore of this beautiful
Lake, the Company has
built a picturesque Swiss
Chalet, which affords good
accommodations. It is an
extremely beautiful fourteen-mile drive to the celebrated Takakkaw Falls,
of the Yoho Valley, a remarkable cataract making
a descent of 1,200 feet.
A trail continues up the
valley, past Laughing
Falls and the great Wapta
Glacier, to the curious
Twin Falls, whose divided
waters unite in one stream
before reaching the depths
below. Other pleasant
excursions may be made
to points of interest within
a short distance of Field—
such as the Fossil Beds,
Aerial Silver Mines, Natural Bridge,Monarch Mine
Cabins and the Grade
Reduction Loops, one of the greatest engineering
triumphs of the century.
GLACIER— Leading from the station a good
trail follows the turbulent course of the Illecillewaet River to the Great Illecillewaet Glacier and
valley; other trails branch off in all directions,
inviting and leading the mountain climber, explorer
and lover of Nature to scenes of marvelous grandeur
and enchanting beauty. Glacier Crest, Lake Marion
and Observation Point are among the shorter and
easier ascents. Mount Abbot is a day's climb, but
not a difficult one. From its summit an exceptionally fine view is obtained of the Asulkan Valley.
Easy trails also lead up to the summits of Eagle
Peak and Mount Avalanche. The ascent of Mount
Sir Donald is more difficult, but with the assistance
of experienced   guides   may   readily  be   accomplished.
21
An excellent trail leads to the Asulkan Glacier, through
scenes of Alpine splendor, and the recently discovered
Caves of Nakimu are only distant about seven miles
from  Glacier  House,   by  a   good   bridle   path.    These
wonderful caverns have
been formed by the action
of water for ages upon
the solid rock and form a
series of chambers with
large entrances, polished
rock ceilings, and walls
which sparkle with quartz
crystals and reflect myriads
of miniature lights from
the darkness.
The Brewster Transfer Company will furnish
carriage teams, saddle
ponies, pack horses, and
guides at reasonable rates
for side trips mentioned
from Banff, Laggan, and
Field. At Glacier, ponies
may be secured from Mr.
S. H. Baker, outfitter.
(For details, see publication " Resorts in the Canadian Rockies,1' issued
by the Canadian Pacific R'y.)
SWISS GUIDES
The Company's own
Swiss Guides are also stationed    at    Lake    Louise,
THE   ROAD   FROM   FIELD   TO   EMERALD   LAKE
VIEW   FROM   EMERALD   LAKE   CHALET   NEAR   FIELD
22 Field, and Glacier, whose services may
be engaged by those who wish to indulge
either in short or extended mountain climbs.
To keep within the bounds of this
booklet only brief mention has been made
of the principal features of interest at
mountain resorts. There is such a multitude of varied attractions that it is impossible to enumerate them all, but it is hoped
that sufficient has been said to impress
upon the traveller the strikingly unique
characteristics of this matchless region,
and the unequalled facilities offered by
the Canadian Pacific for reaching it and
for looking after the comfort  and  enjoy-
TAKAKKAW   FALLS, YOHO   VALLEY
ment of passengers en route and during their
stay at the celebrated resorts — Banff, Lake
Louise, Field, Glacier, etc.
OUR HOTELS
The Canadian Pacific Railway has erected
and operates under its Hotel System a chain
of palatial modern hotels which have a distinctive charm of their own and enjoy a
universal reputation for excellence of service.
Located at points where features of especial
interest invite the tourist to stop over and
enjoy more than a passing view of the locality,
these hotels provide a comfortable means for
doing so.
MOUNT   SIR   DONALD   NEAR   GLACIER, B. C.
23
ON PAGES 27 AND 28 WILL BE
FOUND A COMPLETE LIST OF
THE COMPANY'S HOTELS, AND
TABLE SHOWING THEIR CAPACITY,
RATES, DISTANCE FROM THE STATION
AND  TRANSFER   CHARGE,   IF   ANY.
24 THE ALASKA TRIP
THIS trip is unquestionably unsurpassed for
beauty of scenery and novelty of experience,
together with the general charm and interest
which is always attached to a cruise to the land
of "the midnight sun," as sunset is anywhere
from ten to twelve at night and sunrise from two to three
in the morning. It embraces a visit to the home of the
totem pole, in the primitive Indian villages, to great ice
fields and glaciers, magnificent mountains and picturesque fiords, and has also innumerable other attractions
at the various ports of call.
Canadian Pacific steamers, "Princess May" and
"Princess Royal," maintain weekly service from Victoria
and Vancouver to Alaska. They are designed especially
for this service with a view to the comfort and safety of
passengers, and no expense has been spared to make them
models in appointments and construction. They have
large and comfortable observation rooms on the forward
© ...
promenade deck, fine commodious smoking rooms, wireless telegraphy, and all modern appliances for safety.
The first port of call is Alert Bay, with its mission
settlements, cedar lodges, and grotesque Indian carvings.
Opposite is the Nimpkish River, with its logging camps.
At Swanson Bay is an extensive pulp mill. Port Essing-
ton is famous for its fisheries.
Prince Rupert is the Pacific terminus of the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railway.
Port Simpson is  a  romantic spot, of which  many
?"-•#
TOTEM   POLES,
stories are related of barbaric practices, raids, and massacres by fighting factions of the natives.
Ketchikan is the port of entry for Alaska. This
busy, picturesque town is the headquarters of an extensive copper-mining district.
Wrangell is an enterprising business city. The passage through Wrangell Narrows is one of the most interesting of the entire trip.
Juneau is also an industrious town, noted as a gold-
mining  center.    The  largest  stamp-mill  in the world
is   situated   at  the  Treadwell
mines.
Skagway, famous in the
days of the great Klondike rush
for gold, is now a most interesting spot to visit.
The steamer will remain a
sufficient time at Skagway
to give passengers the opportunity of making the
round trip to the summit
of the White Pass or through
to Lake Bennett and White
Horse.
This inland cruise through
water that is never rough, gives
passengers all the benefits of an
ocean voyage without any of its
distressing inconveniences.
It is a trip to plan for early,
and reservations should be
made well in advance to secure
accommodations.
WRANGELL
25
26 CANADIAN PACIFIC
HOTEL SYSTEM
Season
Plan
Number
Rooms
Rate per
Day
Single
Meals
Distance from
Station
Transfer
Charge
St. Andrews, N. B.
The Algonquin,	
The Inn	
June 20th-Sept. 15th
July lst-Sept. 30th.
Am.
211
$3.50 up
2.50 up
$1.00
1 mile,	
SO. 25
Am.
19
.50
100 yards,	
McAdam Junction, N. B.
McAdam Station Hotel,      ....
All year
Am.
.    17
2.50 up
.75
At Station	
"i- ■ '
Quebec, Que.
Chateau Frontenac,	
All year
Am.
386
4.00 up
B.  1.00)
L.  1.00 \
D.  1.50)
1 mile,	
.50
Montreal, Que.
Place Viger Hotel,	
All year
Am.
110
3.50 up
B.  1.00)
L.  1.00V
D.  1.50)
At Place Viger Station,   .   .
14 miles from Windsor Sta'n,
.50
Caledonia Springs, Ont.
B.     .75)
L.     .75 V
D.  1.00}
Caledonia Springs Hotel, .....
All year
Am.
150
2.50 up
200 yards,	
Winnipeg, Man.
The Royal Alexandra	
All year
Eu.
287
2.00 up
a la carte
At Station,    .
Banff, Alta.
Banff Springs Hotel,	
May 15th-Sept. 30th
Am.
217
3.50 up
1.00
Ih miles,	
.25
Laggan (Lake Louise), Alta.
Chateau Lake Louise,	
June lOth-Sept. 30th
All year
Am.
Am.
165
80
3.50 up
3.50 up
1.00
B.     .75)
L.  1.00y
D.  1.00)
2J miles,	
.50
Field, B. C.
Mt. Stephen House,	
At Station,	
Emerald Lake (near Field), B. C.
Emerald Lake Chalet,	
June 15th-Sept. 30th
Am.
16
3.50
1.00
7 miles,	
1.00
Glacier, B. C.
Glacier House,      	
May lst-Oct. 31st
Am.
90
3.50 up
B.     .75)
L.  1.00 [
D.  1.00 \
At Station,	
Revelstoke, B. C.
;
Hotel Revelstoke	
All year
All year
(New hotel—initial opening about July 1, 1911)
All year
Am.
Am.
Am.
57
50
70
3.50 up
3.50
3.50 up
.75
B.     .75)
L.     .75}'
D.  1.00 )
B.     .75)
L.     .75 V
D.  1.00)
At Station,	
1 mile,     .........
Balfour, B. C.
Kootenay Lake Hotel,	
Sicamous, B. C.
Hotel Sicamous^	
At Station,     .    .    .    M .    .    .
Vancouver, B. C.
Hotel Vancouver,	
All year-
Am.
310 )
4.00 up
B.   1.00)
L.   1.00>
D.  1.50)
% mile,	
.25
Victoria, B. C.
Empress Hotel,	
All year
Eu.
220 j
2.00 up
a la carte
100 yards,  .    ...    ....    .    .
27
28 TICKETING ROUTES
ST. PAUL TO PORTLAND VIA VANCOUVER AND STEAMER
(1) St. Paul to Portal, Soo Line
Portal to Vancouver,   . Can. Pac.
Vancouver to Victoria C. P. SS. Line
Victoria to Seattle C. P. SS. Line
Seattle to Portland,      O.-W. R. & N. or Nor. Pac/
ST. PAUL TO PORTLAND  (ALL RAIL)
(2) St. Paul to Portal, Soo Line
Portal to Sumas Can. Pac.
Sumas to Portland, Nor. Pac.
or
Sumas to Seattle,       Nor. Pac.
Seattle to Portland O.-W. R. & N.
VIA SPOKANE
(3) St. Paul to Portal, Soo Line
Portal to Kingsgate, Can. Pac.
Kingsgate to Spokane, Spokane Intl.
Spokane to Portland,   .   .   .   ...   .   .   .   ....   '.   O.-W. R. & N.
VIA KOOTENAY
(4) St. Paul to Portal, Soo Line
Portal to Kootenay Landing, Can. Pac.
Kootenay Landing to Nelson,      C. P. SS. Line
Nelson to Robson, Can. Pac-
Robson to Arrowhead C. P. SS. Line
Arrowhead to Vancouver or Sumas,       Can. Pac.
Thence as via Routes 1 or 2.
VIA WINNIPEG
(5)    St. Paul to Emerson,	
f Vancouver,
Emerson to | Ungate.
L Kootenay Landing,
Thence a3 via Routes 1, 2, 3 or 4.
Soo Line
Can. Pac.
(6)
FROM MONTREAL, TORONTO OR WINNIPEG
Montreal  ]        f J™Ver'
Toronto     f to \ |^||ate>
Winnipeg j        [kootenay Landing,
Thence as via Routes 1, 2, 3 or 4.
Can. PaC.
FROM MONTREAL OR TORONTO, VIA GREAT LAKES
(7)     Montreal or Toronto to Owen Sound, Can. Pac.
Owen Sound to Fort William,    .   ...   .   ...   .   .   .     C P. SS. Line
Fort William to Junction point,     .   .   .   .   . Can. Pac
Thence as via Routes 1, 2, 3 or 4.
(a)
<b)
:(c)
(d)
'(e)
(0
OPTIONAL ROUTES
The following optional routes are available in connection with Pacific
Coast round-trip tickets.
Tickets from or through St. Paul are good either via Portal or via
Emerson and   Winnipeg.    They must read  over  the   route   used,
however,  and  may  be  exchanged at  the   SoO. Line  office  in  St.
Paul or Minneapolis,  westbound,  and eastbound at our offices in
Vancouver or Moose Jaw.
Between Dunmore, Alta., and Revelstoke, B. C, tickets are good:
Via Main Line through Calgary and Banff, Alta.
Via Crowsnest Branch, Nelson, West Robson and Arrowhead, B.'C.
Via   Crowsnest   Branch,   Nelson,    Slocan   Junction,    Rosebery   and
Arrowhead, B. C.
Tickets   reading  via   Sumas,   Wash., "are  honored   Mission Junction
to Vancouver, B. C, and return, on application to conductor, without additional charge.
Between Montreal and Toronto,  tickets   are honored via direct line
or via Ottawa.
Between Montreal and  Sudbury tickets are honored via  Main Line
through Ottawa and North Bay or via Toronto and Muskoka Route.
Tickets reading via Soo Line from Chicago or Sault Ste. Marie through
Portal, or Emerson and Winnipeg, will be honored either via St.
Paul or Duluth.
BAGGAGE
Baggage may be checked from a point in the United States to another
point in the United States, through Canada, without the necessity of
Canadian Customs' examination, or inconvenience to passengers.
Baggage from the United States to points in Canada should be examined
at the International Boundary.    If this cannot conveniently be arranged
it may be bonded through to interior Canadian points as follows:
Banff, Alta. (June-Sept.), Ottawa, Ont.,
Calgary, Alta., Owen Sound, Ont.,
Fort William, Ont., Quebec,
Hamilton, Ont., Revelstoke, B. C,
Macleod, Alta., Regina, Sask.,
Medicine Hat, Alta., Toronto, Ont.,
Montreal, Que., Vancouver, B. C,
Moose Jaw, Sask., Victoria, B. C,
Nelson, B. C, Winnipeg, Man.
U. S. Customs officers are located at Banff, Alta. (June-Sept.), Quebec,
Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver, B. C, for the
purpose of inspecting baggage destined to United States points.
EQUIPMENT
All Canadian Pacific passenger equipment is built at the Company's
own shops and no expense is spared in embodying in its construction the
very latest improvements that ingenuity and experience can suggest.
The Standard sleeping cars are beautifully finished and furnished to
please the most exacting taste, with wider and more spacious berths than
in the ordinary sleeping car.
The Compartment-Observation cars are elegantly furnished and fitted
with every known modern device to assure comfort and convenience.
There are two patterns, known as the "Glen" and "Mount" car. The
"Glen" series contains besides one drawing-room (similar to the drawing-
room in a standard sleeper), one compartment (containing one lower and
one upper berth and toilet facilities), a buffet capable of serving light
refreshments, a well-selected library, a writing desk, a large smoking room,
a large observation room fitted with easy chairs and an observation platform at the rear end; they are lighted by electricity. The "Mount" series
differ from the "Glen" in that they each have a drawing-room and three
compartments but no smoking room.
The Tourist sleeping cars are of superior design and construction,
affording a splendid service for those wishing comfortable accommodation,
without the lavish accessories of the standard sleeper.
The Dining-car service of the Canadian Pacific is famed for its excellence.
The cars are of the most modern design, and their equipment is complete in
every particular. Meals are served on the "a la carte" plan. The Company employs only the best che'fs and experienced white waiters, whose
uniform courtesy is invariably remarked upon by the traveller.
OUR AGENCIES
Baltimore, Md.,  . .
Boston, Mass., .   . .
Buffalo, N. Y.,   . .
Chicago, 111.,     .   . .
Cincinnati, Ohio,. .
Cleveland, Ohio,. .
Detroit, Mich.,    . .
Kansas Cm, Mo., .
Los Angeles,   .   . .
Minneapolis, Minn.,
Montreal, Que., . .
New York, N. Y., .
Ottawa, Ont.,   .   . .
Philadelphia, .   . .
Pittsburg, Pa.,    . .
Portland, Ore.,    . .
Quebec, Que.,   .   . .
St. John, N. B.,    . .
St. Louis, Mo.,     . .
St. Paul, Minn.,   . .
San Francisco,    . .
Seattle, Wash.,   . .
Spokane, Wash., . .
Tacoma', Wash.,    . .
Toronto, Ont.,     . .
Vancouver, B. C, .
Victoria, B. O,    . .
Washington, D. C,.
Winnipeg, Man., . .
Arthur W. Robson, P. and T. A., 127 E. Baltimore St.
F. R. Perry, D. P. A., 362 Washington St.
G. H. Griffin, C. P. A., 233 Main St.
A. B. Calder, G. A. P. D., 224 South Clark St,
A. J. Blaisdell, G. A. P. D., 436 Walnut St,
Geo. A. Clifford, C. P. A., 245 Superior Ave., N. W.
A. E. Edmonds, D. P. A., 7 Fort St., W.
Edward Merchant, T. P. A., 441 Sheidley Building.
A. A. Polhamus, G. A. P. D., 609 S. Spring St,
R. S. Elworthy, C. T. A., Soo Line, 410 Nicollet Ave.
A. E. Lalande, C. P. A., 218 St. James St.
W. H. Snell, E. P. A., 458 Broadway.
George Duncan, C. P. A., 42 Sparks St.
F. W. Huntington, G. A. P. D., 629 Chestnut St.
C. L. Williams, G. A. P. D., 340 Sixth Ave.
F. R. Johnson, G. A. P. D., 142 Third St.
G. J. P. Moore, C. P. A., 30 St. John St.
W. B. Howard, D. P. A., 8 King St.
T. J. Barnes, C. P. A., 725 Olive St.
L. M. Harmsen, C. T. A., Soo Line, 379 Robert St,
G. M. Jackson, G. A. P. D., 645 Market St,
E. E. Penn, G. A. P. D., 713 Second Ave.
Geo. A. Walton, G. A. P. D., 14 Wall St.
C. H. Reade, C. P. A., 1113 Pacific Ave.
R. L. Thompson, D. P. A., 16 King St., East.
J. Moe, C. T. A., 428 Hastings St.
L. D. Chetham, C. P. A., 1102 Government St.
A. L. Powell, C. P. A., Bond Building.
A. G. Richardson, C. P. A., cor. Main St. and Portage Ave.
G. E. BENJAMIN, General Tourist Agent, Montreal.
C. E. McPHERSON, C.  E.  E. USSHER,
Ass't Pass'r Traffic Manager, Passenger Traffic Manager,
WINNIPEG, MAN. MONTREAL.
29
THE    MATTHEWS-NORTHRUP    WORKS
30
3UFHALO, CLEVELAND, AND NEW YORK
Second Issue, April, 1911 MFICGO)
TOURS
FTR
THROUGH THE
CANADIAN ROCKIES
/^i
I
\
"THE   EMPRESS" VICTORIA
&:
• VANCOUVER VICTORIA -
BELLINGHAM NEW WESTMINSTER
SEATTLE TACOMA-
• PORTLAND LOS ANGELES -
• SAN FRANCISCO -
CANADIAN PACIFIC RY
1911

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