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Home from California via the Canadian Pacific Railway Canadian Pacific Railway Company 1910

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©BN.   AGT.   PAS8ENGEK   DBP^«
«09 So. Spring1 St., Los Angeles, C«JU
MM Home from California
BY THE
Canadian Pacific Route
HOSE who visit California in summer or spend
their winters in that sunny land, should carefully note when purchasing their tickets that
one portion reads via Canadian Pacific or Soo-
Pacific lines through the Canadian Rocky Mountains. The trip costs no more than by any other
of the northern routes, and from start to finish
is full of interest. It is a wonderful change from
the land of palm to the land of pine, coupled
with the grandest mountain scenery in the world.
The connection between San Francisco and
Vancouver or Victoria, B. C, is easily made via
the picturesque Shasta Route. From San Francisco, the valley of the Sacramento, with its fine
fruit farms, is followed as far as Reading, and the line then
climbs the spurs of the Siskiyou Mountains. Above them
towers Mount Shasta, which lifts its triple peak far above
the clouds. Splendid views HHHHHTf
of this mighty monarch
are obtained from the train,
and contrast well with the
lovely scenery of the valley of
the Rogue River, which is
crossed soon after the State of
Oregon has been reached.
Salem^ the capital, is built
on the Williamette River,
and is most picturesquely
situated, shut in on the west
by a semicircle of. fir-covered hills, while it commands a fine, view of the
Cascade Mountains on the
east. At Portland a view of
that beautiful "rose city" and
the valley of the Columbia may be enjoyed. From Portland
to Seattle passengers are in sight of mountain ranges on both sides
of the track. Standing out prominently are Mount St. Helen,
Mount Rainier and Mount Baker.
STREET SCENE IN SEATTLE.
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From Seattle passengers may go by rail to Mission Junction to
join the Canadian Pacific Railway main line; many, however, will
prefer the sail through Puget Sound by the justly celebrated
Canadian Pacific Railway steamships to Victoria, B. C., and to
Vancouver across the Gulf of Georgia, one of the most lovely
stretches of sheltered water in the world.
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"PRINCESS   CHARLOTTE/
SEATTLE, VICTORIA, VANCOUVER SERVICE.
From Vancouver by the Canadian Pacific Railway transcontinental line travellers for Eastern Canada or the Eastern United
States can, if they so please, go straight through to Montreal, Toronto
or Niagara Falls, and from there proceed to their destinations.
Passengers for the Middle West or for parts of the United States
west of Detroit, will leave the Canadian Pacific Railway main line
at Moose Jaw and travel via the Soo-Pacific to Minneapolis or St.
Paul. This line crosses the International boundary at Portal, in
North Dakota, and is most convenient for its quick connections
between any of the great centres of the Western United States.
From Moose Jaw the journey to Minneapolis or St. Paul takes
about twenty-four hours, and to Chicago forty hours.
Besides these main routes there are many possible variations, each
with its own attractions and advantages. At Sicamous a side-trip to
the Okanagan district may be enjoyed. At Revelstoke a divergence
by Canadian Pacific Railway steamboat down Arrow Lakes to the
Kootenay region, and thence by the Crowsnest Pass to,t the main
line at Medicine Hat, would take the traveller through some of
the richest mining centres of the world, the names of which—Trail,
Rossland, Fernie, Lethbridge, have become household words. At
Pincher Creek the ranching country is reached, and here is also
much to observe in the immense system of irrigation which has
been constructed.
As the train runs through Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba,
the traveller sees, without leaving his car, undoubted proofs of the
marvellous fertility of the great Canadian West.
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The Pacific Coast
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After leaving Winnipeg, the Chicago of Canada, and its splendid
hotel, the Royal Alexandria, there is a further choice between an all-
rail and a trip through the Great Lakes. At Fort William, at the
head of Lake Superior, connection is made with the splendid
steamships of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and the tourist, if he
EMPRESS   HOTEL. AN 13   DOClvS   AI    VIClvJ-ttlA, -t$ • v...
CANADIAN   PACIFIC  RAILWAY   HOTEL  SYSTEM.
has already seen the wild, rugged scenery of the north shore of the lake,
may spend two pleasant days on the water sailing to Owen Sound,
from which Montreal, Toronto, Detroit and Buffalo are reached easily.
Varied as are these routes, equally varied are their points of interest.
Victoria is the city of beautiful homes, and possesses a magnificent
hotel, the Empress, which is one of the Canadian Pacific Railway's
Hotel System. Vancouver, on the other hand, is a commercial city
and the Pacific port of the Dominion, and the Canadian Pacific Hotel
Vancouver will be found most
comfortable. From here sail
the Canadian Pacific Railway's
Empress fleet for the Orient
and the ships of the Canadian-Australian line for Australia and New Zealand, while
this Company has also a line of
British Columbia coast steamers running regularly to Skagway. Vancouver is one of the
principal centres of the lumber
and salmon-curing industries,
for which British Columbia
is famous the world over.
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CROWSNEST LAKE—ON LINE OP
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
-' For over 500 miles after leaving the Coast the Canadian Pacific
Railway runs through the mountains, and the scenery in its sublimity surpasses all description. Above the track rise ranges 11,000
feet high, and the achievements of man are dwarfed into insignificance by the mighty works of Nature. In the valleys are deep rivers,
and on the slopes are forests with trees in girth and height far greater
than any that grow in eas tern parts. Above, again, the crags stand forth
gaunt and bare, until they reach the snow line and receive a covering that year in, year out, clothes them with a glistening mantle.
MOUNT  STEPHEN   HOUSE,   FIELD,   B.   C     THE   GATEWAY   TO   Ti
FAR-FAMED   YOHO   VALLEY.
At Emerald Lake, seven miles from Field, the Canadian Pacific
Railway has erected yet another chalet where visitors usually tarry
on their way to the Yoho Valley. It is a convenient resting place
and the lake has attractions of its own. As its name implies, its
waters are deep green, and they are veined here and there with red
from the earth carried down by the torrents that pour into it. It is
closed in at one end by a great wall of rock, sheer and regular.   Above
GLACIER HOUSE, B. C, NEAR THE GREAT GLACIER OF THE SELKIRKS
CANADIAN   PACIFIC  RAILWAY  HOTEL   SYSTEM.
Perhaps the grandest views, in a land where all is magnificent,
inav be obtained at Glacier, Field, Lake Louise and Banff, where
the Canadian Pacific Railway has made every arrangement for the
convenience of passengers and stop-over privileges are granted.
At Qlacier the Company has built an excellent hotel right under
the shadow of Mount Sir Donald, as it towers for nearly 11,000 feet
above sea level. Within forty-five minutes' easy walk of the hotel
is one of the famous glaciers of the world, and the traveller can
examine this wonderful phenomenon with the utmost comfort and
safety. For this and other excursions Swiss guides are provided
by the Canadian Pacific Railway here, at Field, and at Lake Louise
reached from Laggan.
At Field, too, there is another hotel owned by the Canadian
Pacific Railway and named after Mount Stephen, that rises 10,450
feet close by. It is the portal to the Yoho Valley, one of the most
beautiful mountain valleys in the world.
ET,  AMI!
BEAUTIFUL   SURROUNDINGS.
MOUNT  BURGESS.
- appear the peaks, clad everlastingly in snow, and in the cleft between
two of them a magnificent glacier thrusts its tongue. At other parts
thick woods rise from the very edge of the water, and the angler can
build his camp, secure from all intruders, amid splendid straight-
stemmed spruce. Emerald Lake is full of fine, gamey trout, and
many a creel has been filled to the brim on its waters.
LAKE  LOUISE,   NATURE S  LOVELIEST   HANDIWORK.
A few miles east the Great Divide of the Canadian Rockies is
crossed and a curious phenomenon is seen. A brook at the parting
of the slope divides its stream to east and west. The eastern rivulet
finds its way into the Bow River, and is carried on until it finally
adds its quota to the icy tide of Hudson's Bay, while the western
BANFF  SPRINGS   HOTEL,   IN   THE   CANADIAN   NATIONAL   PARK
CANADIAN   PACIFIC  RAILWAY   HOTEL   SYSTEM.
Wonderful Works of
Nature
branch runs into the Columbia River, and is by it taken with many
wanderings, through the State of Washington, until it flows into
the Pacific Ocean and meets waters heated by all the warmth of
the equatorial sun.
Laggan is next reached, near which are the Lakes in the Clouds,
three tarns of peerless beauty, that preserve in all the wildness of
the scene the most perfect peace and grace. At the largest of them,
Lake Louise, the Canadian Pacific Railway has another hotel,
beautifully situated in the midst of the spruce woods that grow to
the water's edge.
From its windows there is a splendid view of the lake and the
great glaciers of Mount Victoria, framed, as it were, in the mountains all around it. From it, too, easy trails lead to Lake Agnes,
Mirror Lake, the other two Lakes in the Clouds that lie like lovely
jewels on the bosom of the
crags. Within reach of
pleasant excursions are also
the Valley of the Ten Peaks
and Paradise Valley, where
some of the most characteristic beauties of the mountains
are displayed by the imposing
line of heights that dominate
the former, and the deep cleft
of the latter, over which
Mount Temple broods.
Days may be spent at Banff
in the enjoyment of the marvellous views afforded by the valleys of the Bow and the Spray, and the
Canadian Rocky Mountains National Park, for it includes scenery
of the most varied character, in which every kind of mountain,
deep-set lake, and foaming river combine to delight the eye and
bring rest to the mind. A large hotel awaits visitors and excellent
driving roads and bridle-paths give glimpses of the scenery from
varied but always charming points of view. Moreover, there are
ample facilities for boating on the Bow River and beautiful lakes
within easy distance of the hotel. The temperature is delightful
for outdoor life, for the cool, pure air of the mountains invigorates
everybody, and when the inhabitants of Chicago, New York and
Boston are suffering with the thermometer at ninety-five degrees,
it is rarely more than seventy-five degrees at Banff.
Beyond the mountains come the plains, and the Canadian Pacific
Railway runs rapidly through the finest ranching district in the
world and the great prairie grain-growing district, to which immigrants by the thousand are attracted, not only from Europe, but
also from the United States. The greatness of the resources of
Canada will be comprehended by a journey through Alberta, Sas-
ROYAL  ALEXANDRIA,   WINNIPEG
CANADIAN   PACIFIC   RY.   HOTEL   SYSTEM
■
katchewan and Manitoba, and it will be still more clearly brought
home to the traveller by the sight of the Canadian "Pacific Railway
elevators at Fort William and Port Arthur on Lake Superior.
The great attractions of this route and the comfort with which
the transcontinental journey may be made has led to a large increase
in the numbers carried by the Canadian Pacific Railway. To
meet this augmented demand the Company has enlarged
its transcontinental train service considerably. There are
two trains each day between Montreal and Vancouver. The
train leaving Montreal at 10.10 a. m. is the Pacific Express, while
the train leaving at 10.30 p. m. is the Imperial Limited, connections
being made at Winnipeg by passengers from Toronto. Eastbound
from Vancouver there are two trains daily the Imperial Limited
and the Atlantic Express.
For further information as to rates, etc., apply to the nearest
Canadian Pacific Railway agent.
Boston,  Mass. . -. .F. R. Perry, District Passenger Agent, 362 Washington Street
Brandon,  Man. . . . J.   E.  Proctor,   District  Passenger Agent
Buffalo,    N. Y .. . G. H. Griffin, City Passenger Agent, 233 Main Street
Calgary, Alta . . . . . R. G. McNeillie, District Passenger Agent
Chicago, III A. B. Calder, General Agent, Passenger Department,
224 So. Clark Street
Cincinnati,  Ohio.: ... .A. J. Blaisdell, General Agent, Passenger Department,
Sinton Hotel Block, 15 E. 4th Street
Cleveland,  Ohio. ."..'' Geo. A. Clifford, City Passenger Agent,
Cor. Superior and West 3rd Streets
Detroit,  Mich ........A. E. Edmonds, District Passenger Agent, 7 Fort St., West
Duluth, Minn. . ...... M. Adson, General Passenger Agent, D. S. S. & A. Ry.,
Manhattan Building
Edmonton,  Alta. . . .Chas.   F.   Fyfe,   City  Ticket   Agent,   145  Jasper  Avenue
Hamilton, Ont., W. J. Grant, Commercial Agent, Cor. King and James Streets
Kansas City,  Mo Ed.  Merchant, Travelling Passenger Agent,
441 Sheidley Building
Los Angeles, Cal A. A. Polhamus, General Agent, Passenger Department,
609 South Spring Street
Minneapolis,   Minn,-. .W.   R.   Callaway,   General  Passenger  Agent,   Soo   Line
Montreal, Que A. E. Lalande, City Passenger Agent, 218 St. James Street
Nelson,  B.  C  W. J. Wells, District Passenger Agent
New York, N. Y.■. .' W. H. Snell, Eastern Passenger Agent, 458 Broadway
Ottawa, Ont Geo. Duncan, City Passenger Agent, 42 Sparks Street
Philadelphia, Pa. . . . F. W. Huntington, General Agent, Passenger Department,
629-631 Chestnut Street
Pittsburg, Pa., C. L. Williams, General Agent, Passenger Dep't, 340 Sixth Ave.
Portland, Ore, F. R. Johnson, General Agent, Passenger Department,
142 Third Street
Quebec,  Que. .  .Jules Hone, Jr., City Passenger Agent,
30 St. John Street, Cor. Palace Hill
St. John, N. B W. B. Howard, District Passenger Agent, 8 King Street
St. Louis,  Mo T. J. Barnes, City Passenger Agent, 725 Olive Street
St. Paul, Minn., L. M. Harmsen, City Ticket Agent, Soo Line, 379 Robert Street
San Francisco, Cal. . . . G. M. Jackson, General Agent, Passenger Department,
645 Market Street (Palace Hotel)
Seattle,  Wash E. E. Penn, General Agent, Passenger Department,
609 First Avenue
Spokane,  Wash. .... .Geo. A. Walton, General Agent, Passenger Department,
/ 14 Wall Street
Tacoma,  Wash  . . C.  H.  Reade, City Passenger Agent,
1113  Pacific  Avenue,   Arcade   Building
Toronto,  Ont. . . . R. L. Thompson, District Passenger Agent, 16 King St., East
Vancouver,   B.   C  H.   W.   Brodie,   General   Passenger  Agent
Victoria, B. C. . L. D. Chetham,. City Passenger Agent, 1102 Government Street
Washington,  D.  C .-...- • .A. L. Powell, City Passenger Agent,
Bond Building, 14th Street, New York Avenue
Winnipeg, Man., A.  G.  Richardson, City Passenger Agent, Cor.  Main St. and
Portage Avenue
C. B. FOSTER, H. W. BRODIE, WM. STITT,
General Passenger Agent,  General Passenger Agent,  General Passenger Agent,
Winnipeg, Man. Vancouver,  B.  C. Montreal,  Que.
C. E. McPHERSON, C E. E. USSHER,
Asst: Pass'r. Traffic Manager, Passenger Traffic Manager,
Winnipeg, Man. Montreal, Que.
— I.
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AMERICAN    BANK   NOTE   COMPANY,    N.    Y.

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