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Montreal : the Canadian metropolis and its picturesque environments Canadian Pacific Railway Company 1907

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Array FROttTHE MOUNTAIN
MOH
X&^£- Canadian Pacific Railway Co.
ATLANTIC SERVICE
Between LIVERPOOL   and  QUEBEC
R. M. S. Empress of Ireland and R. M. S. Empress
of  Britain
2   Days   on   the   sheltered   waters   of the  St.
Lawrence  River.     Less than   4 days   at  sea
Speaking of these ships at the time of their completion in the summer
of \ 906 a Marine Journal stated "From stem to stern and from keel to
truck, these ships are the last word in shipbuilding/*
For lull particulars apply to any Agent of the Company in the United
States or Canada, or to
GEO.  Mch.   BROWN,
General  Passenger   J&gent,
Canadian  Pacific Ry.  Atlantic S.S. Lines,  Montreal. 'S
The    Canadian     Metropolis
and its Many Attractions
issued   by   the
Canadian   Pacific   Rai lwa.y Com pan y
E'07
ft*
ff*r^
;: ;   :W»-mm
'■■■Ml:, The
Attractive
Canadian
Metropolis
Itiontreal
Unique
City
MONGST all the cities on the North American Continent, there
are none fairer or more attractive to the tourist than Montreal, the largest city in Canada and the commercial capital of
the Dominion. The City is beautifully situated on an island
in the St. Lawrence River, just below its confluence with
the Ottawa, and stretches along the north bank of that magnificent waterway for seven miles. It is built on a series of terraces, the former levels
of the river, or of an ancient lake, which terminate
in Mount Royal, whose summit and wooded slopes
form one of the grandest public pleasure grounds
on the continent.
It is a city of marked contrasts—where the picturesque quaintness of a vanished age, is mingled
with the luxury, culture, and enterprise of modern
times; where the customs and usages of Old France
and Young Canada, characteristic of the old city
and new eras of civilization, harmoniously co-exist;
where massive business blocks, costly public buildings, and private residences, rise side by side with
grey old churches, sombre convents and nunneries,
and grand cathedrals,whose magnificence and splendour rival those of the Old World.    It is a modern,
metropolitan city—an important seaport, although
600 miles from the Atlantic by the
St.Lawrence, with huge ocean liners
at its busy docks—a bustling, thriving     commercial    and    industrial
centre.     Here converge the  principal railways of Canada, chief of .
which   is    the   Canadian   Pacific-
Stretching   across    the    continent
from the Atlantic to the Pacific it
is the  longest  continuous railway maisonnetjve monument
line in the world. on place d'armes square MONTREAL
Its History.
Montreal is among the half-dozen historic cities of North America where
lingers that subtle charm which only the glamour of an eventful past can
bestow. When Jacques Cartier first visited the island in 1535, he found the
palisaded Indian Village of Hochelaga, whose very existence disappeared
from all record, and whose site was utterly unknown until a few years ago,
when some remains of the aboriginal inhabitants were accidently discovered
in the heart of the upper part of the city.    The illustrious Champlain, the first
PLACE  D'ARMES  SQUARE,   MONTREAL
A  HISTORICAL   SPOT
Governor of Canada, came in 1611, and established a trading post, which he
named Place Roy ale, on the site of the present Custom House; but it was not
until May 18th, 1642, that the city was founded by a band of gallant adventurers, composed of the flower of France, who planned a town to be known as
Ville-Marie de Montreal.    The leader of the expedition and the Governor of MONTREAL
the   colony was the soldier Maisonneuve, whose memory is perpetuated in
bronze, in one of the historic spots of the city—where he gallantly met, and
m i
BONSECOURS   CHURCH,   MONTREAL
ONE  OF   THE   OLDEST   CHURCHES   IN   AMERICA
vanquished, his Indian foe. The old streets of Montreal are redolent with
legends of a turbulent past—of wars with the fierce and wily aborigines, of
French adventure and enterprise—for here dwelt the intrepid La Salle (the MONTREAL
Mississippi explorer), Du, L'Hut (the founder of Duluth), Cadillac (the founder
of Detroit), Bienville (the founder of New Orleans), and other adventurous
spirits, whose names are still revered by posterity. Ville-Marie was, too, the
headquarters of the great French fur trading and exploring companies, whose
operations throughout the great West, extended to the foot-hills of the Rocky
Mountains and the far-off shores of Hudson Bay. It remained under the rule
of France until 1760, when Vaudreuil capitulated to General Amherst and
the ancient regime came to an end.    Three years later, by the treaty of Paris,
THE   CHATEAU  DE   RAMEZAY A   HISTORICAL   LANDMARK
France ceded Canada, to Great Britain, and the French Canadians became
British subjects. The town was occupied for a time, in 1775, by the Americans, under General Montgomery, who afterwards was slain in a gallant but
unsuccessful assault upon Quebec, and here in the old Chateau de Ramezay,
the home of the old Governors, lived Benjamin Franklin, Samuel Chase and
Rev. Charles Carroll, the American commissioners who came to negotiate the
cession of the country to the United States. During the war of 1812-15,
Montreal was thrice threatened by the invading United States forces, but fortunately its walls were not entered by the enemy. MONTREAL
Since that time the development and progress of the city have been continuous and rapid, until it now possesses, with its suburbs, a population of
about 400,000, two-thirds of whom are French Canadians, and boasts a wealth
equalled by no other city of its size in the world.
Parks and Drives.
The Mount Royal Park is about 464 acres in extent. It has an elevation
of about 900 feet above sea level, and is 740 feet above the river.
The park on St. Helen Island is reached by a ferry steamer.    It was named
VICTORIA  SQUARE,   MONTREAL
by Champlain after his wife Helene de Bouilli, and bought by him with her
dowry. It was upon this island that Chevalier de Levis, commanding the
last French army in Canada, burned his flags on Sept. 8th, 1760, rather than
surrender them to General Amherst, who took the City.
Lafontaine Park, containing over eighty-four acres, lies at the east end of
Sherbrooke Street.
There are a considerable number of beautiful public squares scattered
throughout the City.    The principal of these is Dominion Square, which from MONTREAL
its situation and the fine buildings surrounding it, always commands the
admiration of visitors; Victoria Square, Champ de Mars, St. Louis Square,
Place Viger Square, Place d'Armes Square are all rich in history. Pleasant
drives wind around the mountain, from which the city derives its name, and
lead to the summit, from which there is a glorious panorama of a finely placed
city: the broad valley of the St. Lawrence; the gleaming river flowing to the
sea.
":-pp....'-:::.:■■:^«V- ■ '     ■•/■■'/   '/
PLACE   VIGER   HOTEL   AND  STATION—CANADIAN   PACIFIC   RAILWAY  SYSTEM
The Place Viger Hotel.
Facing the picturesque Place Viger square, is the new Place Viger Hotel,
erected by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company—one of the chain of
magnificent hotels, now extending from Quebec to Victoria, B.C., including,
amongst others, those charming resorts in the mountains of British Columbia—
Banff, Lake Louise, Field, Emerald Lake, and Glacier.    This imposing struc- MONTREAL
9
ture occupies an historic site and was named to honor the memory of Com-
mander Viger, the first Mayor of Montreal. The authoress of "Famous Firesides of French Canada," in her description of this memorable place says:
"Few visitors to this city, as the palace cars of the Canadian Pacific
Railway carry them into the mammoth station on Viger Square, realize the
historic associations which cling around this spot.
"Two hundred and fifty years ago the sound of hammer and saw here
awoke the echoes of the forest,    Workmen who had learned their craft in old
French  towns,     when    Col-
bert, the great statesman
and financier, was developing the architecture and industries, revenues and resources of the kingdom,
here reared a windmill, the
first industrial building in
Montreal. The winds of
those autumns long ago
turned the fans and ground
the seeds of harvests toilsomely gathered from cornfields among whose furrows
many a time the arrow and
tomahawk spilt the blood of
the reaper and sower. The
old mill with its pastoral
associations of peaceful toil
in time passed away, and
was succeeded by a structure dedicated to the art of war, for on the same spot stood 'la Citadel.'
This stronghold though primitive in its appointments was important during the French occupation and evacuation of New France, being the last
fortification held by French troops on Canadian soil.
"This old earthen citadel, a relic of mediaeval defence, was about
seventy years ago removed, its material being used in the levelling and enlargement of the Parade Ground, or as it is called, the ' Champ de Mars.'
Its demolition might be regretted were it not that in an age of progress, even
sentiment must give way before advance. The Place Viger Hotel, although
built to promote the comfort of the people of the Dominion, has not destroyed
the pathetic interest of the early struggles and heroism which still clothes its
CORRIDOR PLACE VIGER HOTEL 10
MONTREAL
site, and which heightens the present appreciation of a civilization of
which the old mill and fort were the pioneers." The Place Viger Hotel is
built in the quaint style of the French Renaissance, partaking of the type
of the old chateaux found on the banks of the Loire. The general outline
and effect of the five story building is one of great solidity, combined with
gracefulness.    It is constructed of grey^limestone and Scotch buff   firebrick,
crowned by a massive tower
rising from a graceful sweep
into a great circle, and with
its many turrets and gables,
forms a striking picture. The
total length of the building
is 300 feet with a depth of 66
feet. The main facade has a
magnificent arcade of twenty-
one arches, which abuts the
two projecting gables, with
broad granolithic steps leading up to it from the street,
and facing Place Viger; the
balcony affords a delightful
resort for guests. The main
staircase of Carrara marble is
beautifully finished, and the
general effect of the artistic
decorations symbolizes the
national character of the
structure. The dining room
is spacious, bright, cheerful and handsome, with luxurious appointments; the
cuisine, of that high standard maintained by the Canadian Pacific in its painstaking service. The magnificent drawing room and parlours from which the
balcony, a grand summer promenade, stretching almost the entire length
of the building, is reached, are elaborately and richly furnished, and the sleeping apartments, from whose windows unobstructed views of the surroundings
can be obtained, are large, well-ventilated and solidly appointed—the rooms
being single, or en suite, as may be desired. There is accommodation for 350
guests. In the heating, lighting, and sanitary arrangements (which were specially designed for this hotel) the acme of perfection has been secured, and the
entire building, which is modern in every respect, is as absolutely fire-proof
as human ingenuity can devise.
MAIN   STAIRCASE   PLACE   VIGER   HOTEL MONTREAL
11
mm^Mmm^&im
The place Viger hotel is advantageously situated for those reaching the
city by train or boat, being a short distance from the principal steamer docks,
and combined in its erection is the Place Viger passenger station of the Canadian Pacific Railway (from
which all trains leave for
and arrive from Quebec
and resorts in the Lauren-
tians, and certain trains
for and from Ottawa), and
although located amidst
quiet and restful surroundings, is only a few minutes'
walk from the business portion of the city, and convenient to the city's street
car system.
The Place Viger Hotel
is operated on the American plan. Special arrangements can be made for
large parties or those making prolonged visits.
BALCONY PLACE VIGER  HOTEL
Other places of Interest.
Among the many places of attraction to the tourist are the Cathedral
of St. James, an almost exact reproduction on a reduced scale of St. Peter's
at Rome; the old parish church of Notre Dame, one of the largest edifices in
America, which seats 15,000 people, with its bell, "le gros Bourdon," the
largest in America, weighing 24,780 lbs., and its magnificent chapel in rear of
the main altar, which is adorned with valuable paintings; the Jesuit's Church
and Notre Dame de Lourdes, famous for their magnificent frescoes; the curious
old church of Our Lady of Bonsecours dating from 1657, with its "Little
Heaven," in the upper portion; the Chateau de Ramezay, once the home of the
Governors of Canada (which contains a splendid collection of historical relics)
the "Elgin Gallery," with rare historical portraits; the "Court Room,' hung
with battle scenes of the British Empire, the "Council Chamber," where
Montcalm and other great rulers sat in state, the "Salon," in which Montgomery met the citizens of Montreal at the time of the American invasion of 12
MONTREAL
1775; the old vaults in one of which Franklin's press was set up, on which was
printed the Gazette which still continues as a daily paper. At Bonsecours
Market, facing the harbor, a glimpse is given of the primitive life of the
habitants;   especially interesting in the forenoon of  market  days—Tuesdays
(
NOTRE    DAME    CHURCH,   MONTREAL
THIS   CITY   IS   FAMOUS   FOR  ITS   CHURCHES
and Fridays. The visitor will also be interested in a visit to McGill University, founded in 1828, one of the foremost educational institutions of the
world—and attended by over 1000 students yearly. The handsome buildings,   beautifully  located, comprise   arts,  medical,   engineering,   chemistry, MONTREAL 13
mining and physics buildings; the Redpath museum and university library,
and the observatory—Laval University, the chief French seat of learning,
occupying amongst that nationality the same position as McGill amongst the
English; the Seminary of Philosophy on the slope of Mount Royal; the little
Sisters of the Poor; the Monastery of the Franciscan Fathers, and Little and
Grand Seminaries on Sherbrooke street, with the two historical towers, where
Marguerite Bourgeois, founder of the Order of the Congregation of Notre
Dame, taught the young Indians over 250 years ago; Monklands, the mother
. ,     :                     i
 tjpji  J
CANADIAN   PACIFIC   RAILWAY    GENERAL   OFFICES
AND WINDSOR STREET PASSENGER STATION
house of the congregation of Notre Dame, and at one time the official residence of the Governors of Canada; the Monastery of the Precious Blood,
Notre Dame de Grace; the Royal Victoria, Montreal General, Hotel Dieu,
Notre Dame and Grey Nuns' Hospitals; Deaf and Dumb Institute, directed
by the Sisters of Providence, and Institute for the Blind; the Art Association Building, wth its rare collection of paintings; the Natural History Association's museum containing amongst others a small but interesting collection
of Egyptian antiquities; Christ Church Cathedral, a perfect specimen of Gothic 14
MONTREAL
architecture; the numerous edifices of other denominations; the immense
Angus Works of the Canadian Pacific Railway, at the east end of the city,
Armory and drill halls, and a score or more of convents and other educational institutions—while a drive along Sherbrooke, Dorchester and other
fashionable streets, or through Westmount, Montreal's fashionable West End*
will reveal the artistic homes of wealthy citizens.
BANK    OF    MONTREAL    AND    POST    OFFICE
ST. JAMES STREET,  MONTREAL
The building of the Bank of Montreal deserves a special visit. Its great
banking hall is a marvel of modern architecture. The rich decoration of
marble columns, and gilded capitals, has been designed with exquisite taste,
and an effect of dignity and spaciousness has been produced, worthy of one
of the strongest financial institutions in the world. MONTREAL
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MONTREAL
Montreal's Magnificent Environments.
There is no other large city in America, where a quarter or a half-hour's
journey will traverse so many scenes of varied natural beauty or places of
historic interest, or a few hours' railway trip will take one to more picturesque
solitudes of mountain, lake and stream.
The famous Lachine Rapids
are at the city's doors, and
to run them is a pleasant experience which few visitors
to the city miss; Caughna-
waga, an Indian village where
dwell the remnant of a once
powerful tribe, is worth a
visit; and near by are Lake
St. Louis, on which have
taken place some of America's greatest aquatic contests, and the Lake of Two
Mountains, where the opportunities for yachting and
boating are unsurpassed. At
the foot of this lake is Ste.
Anne de Bellevue, where
Tom Moore was inspired by
the wealth of its beauty to
write the immortal "Canadian Boat Song." The Laurentian mountains to
the north are penetrated by the Canadian Pacific in a virgin region of
countless lakes and streams which are claimed to be the best trout fishing
waters in Canada. Both banks of the Ottawa River are paralleled by the
Canadian Pacific to the City of Ottawa, the capital of the Dominion—the
line on the western or Ontario bank leading past Caledonia Springs Hotel
of the Canadian Pacific Hotel System, a health resort the fame of whose
waters attracts visitors from all parts of America, and that on the eastern
or Quebec side past towns near which large and small game is abundant and
fishing waters plentiful. Another branch runs through the Eastern Townships with their rich farms and pleasant lakes and rugged tree-clad hills—ideal
resting places during the heated term; and from Montreal one has means of
communication with all parts of America.
C.P.R.   BRIDGE   ACROSS  ST.   LAWRENCE   RIVER $
Quaint Quebec
A BIT OF MEDIAEVAL EUROPE
IN AMERICAN SETTING
FEW, if any, places in America rival the ancient city of
Quebec in its attractiveness.  The quaint old-walled place is
the most interesting spot historically on this western continent, and combined  with  this  feature is a picturesque
location, perhaps unequalled in the world.    Quebec is like
a transplanted city—a French town of   olden   times   set
down in American surroundings, in which the chief characteristics of mediaeval Europe and modern America are
deftly and delightfully interwoven—and around it are clustered a host of legendary memories.      Perched on a high
promontory at the confluence of the St. Lawrence and St. Charles Rivers, its situation is
unique and magnificent.    On the highest point is the famed citadel, which has given to this city the name of the "American
Gibraltar," and everywhere  around are battlements, fortresses,
castles, monasteries,  convents, and  feudal gates and towering
walls.     As one puts foot on the historic soil of this matchless Mecca of tourists, the ancient and foreign  aspect of the
city, so wholly at variance with the rest  of the continent,   is
impressive.    "The quaint, picturesque figures  of the  inhabitants," says   one writer,   "their   alien speech,   their
primitive   vehicles of locomotion, their  antique French
houses, huddled together and poised up high on the edge
of the cliff, the unrivalled citadel and menacing fortifications,  the narrow,  crooked   streets,  and winding,
steep   ascent   to   the   Upper  Town, recall some old-
world capital—a survival of mediaeval times."
All about this   ancient   stronghold—first   of   the
French, then of the English—every spot has been the
WOLFE AND MONTCALM
MONUMENT, QUEBEC o
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scene of stirring events. Here it was that the early discoverers of the northern
part of America first landed, and here European civilization was first planted.
Here lived those illustrious and chivalrous adventurers, whose exploits
shed lustre on Old France, and from here, at one time, the whole country, from the great lakes to the Gulf of Mexico, was governed. Here the
French made their last fight for dominion in this western world—on the plains
of Abraham, where Wolfe and Montcalm heroically fell. But, for nearly a
century and a half, peace has prevailed between the two great nations, and
while still redolent of the martial and religious flavour, with which it was
characterized from its very birth, Quebec has gradually evolved itself from a
military stronghold into a bustling, commercial centre, and an ideal resort for
pleasure and health seekers. During the winter months, residents and
visitors alike revel in the delights of those most interesting sports—
curling, skiing, skating, hockey, snowshoeing and tobogganing—and
the opportunities for sleigh-driving, in comfortable vehicles, are unexcelled.
But interesting and beautiful as Quebec may be, with its quaint buildings
and historical treasures, the drives and excursions about the city are no less
attractive. Amongst them are those to the falls of Montmorenci, 100 feet
higher than those of Niagara, and the Chaudiere Falls, second only to the
Great Cataract; Ste. Anne de Beaupre, for two centuries and a half the Mecca
of thousands of devout pilgrims seeking restoration of health at the sacred
shrine, where a magnificent edifice, raised to the dignity of a Basilica by Pope
Pius IX., has been erected, and which is reached by a short electric railway
trip; Beauport, bombarded by Wolfe in 1759; Lorette, an Indian village
where the remnant of the once powerful tribe of Hurons is located: Levis,
across the St. Lawrence, where there are large military forts and engineers'
camps; and many picturesque villages which dot the landscape and where
the curious primitive customs of the early French settlers still prevail.
To meet the requirements of tourist travel, there is at the base of the
citadel a magnificent fire-proof hotel, the Chateau Frontenac, a stately seven-
storey structure, built after the style of the French chateaux of the sixteenth
century, but embracing twentieth century ideas of spaciousness, convenience
and elegance. Over one million dollars have given the world this marvel of
architecture. Crowning the cliff, on which the famed Dufferin Terrace stretches
its great length—the longest promenade known, for it now extends past the
citadel to the Cove Fields—hundreds of feet above the St. Lawrence and the
Lower Town, the perspective of the city, stream and landscape, seen from the
windows of this unique hotel is magnificent—a scene of both historic and majestic grandeur—a view of mountain, valley, river and island, from an eleva- 20
QUEBEC
tion such as no other city boasts. The Chateau itself, harmonizing as it does
with its picturesque surroundings, impresses the beholder, as having always
been part and parcel of the granite cliff on which it stands. In its interior, the
predominating design, being mediaeval, is carried out in an elaborate detail,
and its fluted columns and dainty panels, are specimens of exquisite delineation and artistic workmanship. The apartments throughout are luxurious.
Special arrangements can be made for large parties, or for those making prolonged visits.
Quebec is best reached via Montreal. Tourists from New York, reach
Montreal by the New York Central and Rutland Roads, and those from the
New England States by the Boston and Maine & C.P.R. It is four and a half
hours' run from Montreal to Quebec, by the Canadian Pacific Railway, through
the old French settlements, along the north bank of the St. Lawrence, or during navigation, steamer can be taken down the St. Lawrence, and the return
trip made by rail.
A   QUEBEC   CALECHE TO£ CAPITAL CITY OF CANADA.
mmm
the capital of Canada, is so easily reached from
Montreal that few visiting that commercial
centre fail to see the seat of Government
of Canada, often described as the Washington
of the North, to view its beauties and magnificent scenery. The city's site for grandeur
is second only to that of Quebec being located
on the Ottawa river the third greatest stream
in volume in all Canada, where the Rideau and Gatineau join.
Ottawa, it is claimed, is the most picturesque capital in the world.
The waters of the Ottawa, which here flow between the provinces of Ontario
and Quebec, pour over the Chaudiere Falls—resembling in shape the rim of a
huge cauldron or kettle; and the Rideau Falls, half a mile distant, where the
Rideau's flood leaps into the Ottawa, are so called from their likeness to a
curtain—"rideau." This waterfall also gives name to the vice-regal residence
of the Governor General of Canada, from which it is only a stone's throw
distant. Across the Ottawa, opposite Rideau Hall, is the mouth of the
Gatineau, along which, before its confluence with the larger stream, are
numerous picturesque rapids. Ottawa's great water-power has long since
made it the chief lumber and milling centre of the Dominion, and in its immense
saw-mills and other industries are attractions to the tourist, while to ride
down the timber slides by which the square timber of the upper Ottawa passes
uninjured down to the navigable waters below, is an exciting experience which
many visitors enjoy. By an artificial channel, 300 yards above the falls, rafts
can pass over the incline, straight reaches at intervals reducing the speed.
Some of these terminate with a drop of four feet, over which the raft jumps.
The immense speed, the rush of waters,the succession of chutes stretching out
like sloping stairs, timbers  rocking  like a bundle  of  reeds,   and  getting  a 22
momentary rush with each incline, offer a novelty to visitors, which can be
enjoyed in perfect safety.
It is the national buildings, however, which are the chief glory of Ottawa,
and the principal object of interest to strangers. They stand out boldly on
Parliament Hill, a steep promontory, rising 100 feet or more from the Ottawa
River, in all the beauty of seemingly varied architecture. The octagonal
library in the rear of the Houses of Parliament—much like the chapter house
of a cathedral—is one of the most complete in the world, and contains about
200,000 volumes, some of which are exceedingly rare. These buildings, with
the Eastern and Western Departmental Blocks, which flank the square
fronting the main structure, were erected at a cost of about $5,000,000.
Their construction was commenced in 1859, and a year later, the corner
stone was laid by his Majesty King Edward VII., who was then Prince of
Wales.
Other objects of interest are the Rideau Canal, built in 1827 for military*
purposes; Rockliffe and Major Hill Parks; the city buildings; the great Roman
Catholic Cathedral; the Geological Museum; the Fisheries exhibit; the Lovers'
Walk; the National Art Gallery, in the Supreme Court Building, and the
Central Experimental Farm in the suburbs. There are a number of delightful
summer resorts near Ottawa, amongst which are Aylmer and Queen's Park,
Chelsea, Kingsmere, the Cascades, etc.,
and reached by rail is the Gatineau
Valley, a magnificent summer domain, in
which are pleasant, restful places—near
pretty lakes and streams, which are
attractive to the angler—and in the
woods, the hunter finds plenty of game.
Opposite Ottawa is the French city
of Hull, and combined they have a
population of about 85,000.
Ottawa is reached from
Montreal by the Canadian
Pacific Railway, whose lines
parallel both banks of the
Ottawa River, and by steamer in summer, the railway
run being made in three
hours by the Short Line
Express.
LIBRARY PARLIAMENT  BUILDINGS THE CITY OF MONTREAL
TARIFF FOR HACKNEY CARRIAGES
ONE HORSE VEHICLES.
By the Drive.
Time allowed, Fifteen Minutes.
For one or two persons  $0.25
For three or four persons         50
Time allowed, Thirty Minutes.
For one or two persons :   $0.50
For three or four persons 75
Time allowed, Three quarters of an hour.
For one or two persons   $0.75
For three or four persons      1.00
By Time.
For the first hour.
For one or two persons  $1.00
For three or four persons  1.25
For every subsequent hour.
For one or two persons   $0.75
For three or four persons      1.00
Three hours to the summit of Mount Royal, to the Churches, past the
finest residences, McGill University Grounds and Sherbrooke Street. $3 pays
the Hack, seating comfortably 4 persons.
Any portion or extension of this drive, and all drives extending beyond
the city limits, will be charged for at the rate of one dollar per hour.
BAGGAGE
For each trunk carried in any such vehicle, 25c, No charge shall be
made for travelling bags, valises, boxes or parcels which passengers can carry
by the hand.
a. Fractions of hours for any drive exceeding one hour shall be charged
at pro rata rates as above established for drives by the hour.
b. For drives between midnight and four o'clock in the morning fifty per
cent, shall be added to the tariff rates above established.
c. The tariff by time shall apply to all drives extending beyond the city
limits provided the engagement be made within the said limits.
d. Children under five years of age and sitting on their parent's or
guardian's lap will be admitted free of charge, and shall not be held as being
included in the word "persons" in the said tariff.
e. The word "drive" wherever it occurs in the said tariff, shall be held to
admit stoppages within the time fixed for said drives. Publications
Issued  by the
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
RAILWAY
COMPANY
" THE HIGHWAY TO THE ORIENT "
" SUMMER TOURS "
" QUEBEC »
" FISHING AND SHOOTING »
" OPEN SEASONS, FOR FISH AND GAME »
" MONTREAL "
" ST. ANDREWS-BY-THE-SEA "
"CLIMATES OF CANADA"
'* WESTWARD TO THE FAR EAST "
" ANNOTATED TIME TABLES "
" THE CHALLENGE OF THE MOUNTAINS '
" THE GLACIERS "
" AROUND THE WORLD "
*' HAND-BOOK AND TIME-TABLE "
"MUSKOKA " and " TOURIST CAR "
C. B. FOSTER,
District Passenger Agent;
71 Yonge St., Toronto.
F. R. PERRY,
District Passenger Agent,
362 Washington Street, Boston.
W. B. HOWARD,
District Passenger Agent,
St. John, N.B
A. C. SHAW,
General Agent, Passenger Dept.,
232 South Clark St.  Chicago, 111.
E. J. COYLE,
Assistant General Passenger Agent,
Vancouver, B.C.
E. V. SKINNER,
Assistant Traffic Manager,
458 Broadway, N.Y.
W. R. CALLAWAY,
General Passenger Agent Soo Line
Minneapolis.
L. M. HARMSEN,
City Ticket Agent,
Soo Line, St. Paul, Minn.
WM. STITT,
Genl. Pass. Agent, Eastern Lines,
Montreal.
C. B. B USSHER,
Assistant Passenger Traffic Manager,
Western Lines,
Winnipeg.
ALLAN CAMERON,
General Traffic Agent,
62-65 Charing Cross, S.W., and 67-68
King William St., E. C, London, Eng. :
24 James St., Liverpool; 67 St. Vincent St., Glasgow.
F. W. HUNTINGTON,
General Agent, Passenger Dept.,
629-631 Chestnut St., Philadelphia
A. W. ROBSON,
Passenger & Ticket Agent,
127 E. Baltimore St., Baltimore.
Wm. LINSON,
City Passenger Agent,
Bond Bldg., 14th St. & New York Ave.
Washington, D.C.
E. E. PENN,
General Agent, Passenger Dept.
77 EllesSt., Jas. Flood Building,
San Francisco.
M. ADSON,
General Passenger Agent,
D., S. S. & A. Ry.,
Duluth, Minn.
D. W. CRADDOCK,
General Agent, China, Japan, etc.,
Hong Kong.
C. E. McPHERSON,
Genl. Passr. Agent, Western Lines, #
Winnipeg
ROBERT KERR,
Passenger  Traffic  Manager,
Montreal
Canada's  Famous  Seaside Resort
"St. Andrews By The Sea,"   N.B.
Excellent Sea Bathing, Magnificent Drives, Splendid Boating.
Write, Manager, The Algonquin Hotel, Canadian Pacific Railway Hotel System, St. Andrews, N.B. Caledonia Springs
NATURE'S HEALING FOUNTAINS
CALEDONIA SPRINGS HOTKIy
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY HOTEL SYSTEM
Endorsed by the most prominent Physicians. The
efficacy of the Waters have been proven for over
a hundred years. Situated midway between Montreal
and Ottawa. A charming location. For rates and information write Manager, Caledonia Springs Hotel,
Caledonia Springs, Ont. 

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