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The Empress Hotel, Victoria, B.C. Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Canadian Pacific Hotels. The Empress Hotel 1929

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Array Victoria, B.C.
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A CANADIAN PACIFICllI OTEL Bathing, Crystal Gardens, Victoria
IMPRESSIONS of VICTORIA
^7 ^HEN Rudyard Kipling visited Victoria
I 1/ J some years ago, its superb setting so
w ^ enchanted this much-travelled poet that
he limned his impressions in the following words-
quoted from "Sea to Sea": "To realize Victoria
vou must take all that the eve admires most in
Bournemouth, Torquay, the Isle of Wight, the
Happy Valley at Hong Kong, the Doon, Sorrento,
and Camps Bay; add reminscences of the Thousand
Islands, and arrange the whole round the Bay of
Naples, with some Himalayas for the background.''
His nomenclature of Canada as "Our Lady of
the Snows" has been challenged but none have
cavilled at his word-picture of this garden city of
the Pacific—the most westerly point in the British
Empire.
Lesser luminaries than Kipling have visited this
scenic gem of the West and have added their modest
paean of praise of its beauty, its unique atmosphere
combining much of the charm of the Old World
with the up-to-dateness of the New; its enviable
climate; its moderate temperatures finding their
reflection in gardens that are a riot of bloom the
year round; its beautiful homes that are homes, not
merely residences; its hinterland of forest-clad
mountain, lush valleys, limpid lakes in fairy-like
settings; its magnificent roads—verily a Paradise
for the holiday-maker and the sportsman.
Victoria! The very name conjures up its Old
World atmosphere and hints of pioneer families who
hewed out of the virgin forest on the edge of the
Pacific the city they named in honor of the great
Queen. On this palimpsest has been imposed a
tradition and culture, expressed in the stately homes
which have been built up in the passing of the
years, containing treasures brought from the Old
World and emanating an atmosphere which distinguishes the capital city of British Columbia from
any other city on the American continent. Age
cannot wither nor custom stale the infinite variety
of Victoria's charm.
From its commanding position at the southern
end of Vancouver Island it dominates the gateway
to the Orient. In its land-locked magnificent
harbour ocean liners from all corners of the globe,
freighters bringing silks and spices from old Cathay
and the Indies, ride at anchor side by side with
smart, palatial yachts bent on a pleasure cruise of
this picturesque coast.
Printed in Canada—1929 Dolly-Vardens are not lacking. Large fish are caught in the
lakes by trolling, but there are no trout waters where fish
will not take the fly. The best months for trout fishing are
May, June and early part of July, latter part of September
and October. While salmon is caught throughout the year,
the big runs occur in July, August and September.
Non-residents should consult regulations with respect to
license and open seasons.
All-the-Year Golf
Golf is played practically every day of the year in Victoria,
for the mean temperature in Winter is 42 degrees Fahrenheit
and in Summer 61 degrees, with an average yearly rainfall of
27 inches.    No more striking commentary on the all-the-year
round geniality of Victoria's climate could be given than to
state that in February, 1929, the Empress Hotel inaugurated
its first Winter golf tournament, for which was offered the
magnificent E.   W.  Beatty  trophy  and   other   valuable
prizes.    A large field entered   both   the   men's   and
women's cham pionships.
This tournament was   played   at   the   Victoria
Golf and Country   Club   on   the   shores   of
Oak   Bay.     The   emerald   fairways   of this
course    fringe    the    coast-line,   with     the
dancing  waves   waiting   to    penalize   the
unwary   golfer   who   slices   or  hooks   at
some of the rocky tees; with;a superb
panorama  of cobalt  sea  and  snow-clad
Olympics to tempt the eye from the ball.
This course is but   one   of six   in,   or
very close to, Victoria.
But a scant eight-mile drive inland from
the Empress Hotel is the Colwood Golf
and Country Club, pronounced by Walter
Hagen and other   prominent   golfers   as
one    of   the    finest   in   the   world.    Its
eighteen  holes   of lawn-like   fairway   are
Vancouver Island Attractions
To the traveller seeking something different, to the
holiday-maker on pleasure bent, to the sportsman seeking
"fresh fields and pastures new" in which to enjoy the lure of
rod and gun, Victoria and the adjacent hinterland offers
unparalleled opportunities, a veritable treasure-house of
joys. Followers of Izaak Walton need go but a few hundred
yards from the Empress Hotel to find grilse and salmon
fishing in the Straits of Juan de Fuca, or a few miles to
Brentwood Bay on beautiful Saanich Arm where many a
twenty-pounder has been caught—and many a fifty-pounder
lost after an exciting tussle, fated to be the principal ingredient
in the old but ever new fish story!
For those who prefer the rival attractions of fly-fishing,
or of shooting, Vancouver Island can offer a multiplicity of
opportunities, for Nature has generously endowed this happy
hunting ground, within easy reach of Victoria, with rippling
streams where fish leap at the dancing falls or lie hidden in
the deep pools, and pine-girt lakes teem with silvery-scaled
denizens; wooded hills and valleys where the "drum" of the
grouse makes sweet music in the ear of the sportsman.
Practically all the streams and lakes contain trout of
some  kind  or  other,   chiefly  rainbow  or  cut-throat,  while
Oak Bay Golf and
Country Club.
Picturesque
Malahat Drive.
3. A Princess Liner on
Vancouver, Victoria,
Seattle Service.
4. The Elizabethan
Room.
magnificently situated among tall trees and dotted with
miniature lakes, making it sporty enough to test the champion
while at the same time providing keen pleasure for the more
modest "shooter around the hundred mark."
Practically within the city limits is the Uplands Golf
Club, on an eminence which affords an unforgettable view of
the city against the background of sea and mountain;
Macaulay Point Club at Esquimalt, the oldest British naval
station on the Pacific, has a charm all its own. The Cedar
Hill course is a smaller and newer links, while the Gorge
Vale Club, in course of construction, promises to be one of
the most beautiful of the many around Victoria.
Swimming in the sun-warmed waters of the Gorge, a
natural arm of the sea which runs right through the city to
the wooded countryside beyond, or in the more invigorating
waters of the Pacific, may be varied by a plunge in the pool
at the Crystal Gardens, adjacent to the Empress Hotel.
Picturesque Cruises
Victoria is also the embarkation point for many delightful
cruises, principal among which are the West Coast and Gulf
Island. The West coast is a five-day cruise on a palatial
"Princess" liner to Port Alice in
Quatsino Sound. It takes the traveller
along the beautiful inlets and soundsr
with calls at many interesting and
picturesque ports. The primitive state
of the West Coast provides a charm all
its own, devoted as it is to fishing and
lumbering, Indian villages, totem poles
and curious Indian folklore. The
Gulf Island tour while much shorter,
provides those with limited time at
their disposal, an opportunity of
enjoying a most delightful cruise on
the placid waters of the Pacific
Coast.
Victoria
K/ke Cilj ofRgjses
Visitors to the Empress Hotel invariably comment upon
the charm of its gardens, which are among the finest of their
kind in Canada. Lawns of velvety smoothness and verdant
freshness flank the rose garden, a delightful retreat where
rare specimens lift their showy heads and the more prolific
climbers wend their fragrant way over pergolas and arbours,
while beautiful old shade trees offer sequestered nooks wherein
to enjoy the solace of a book or watch the performers on the
nine-hole putting green or in the tennis courts. ^ On the other
side of the hotel is a rock garden where Alpine and other
creeping plants nestle in the shade of a lily pond which reflects
the graceful fronds the of willows in its mirrored surface.
Adjacent to the hotel and reached by a rose-bordered
path is the Crystal Garden, a huge glass structure which
nouses a swimming pool 150 feet long by 40 feet, and ranging
in depth from 3 feet to 9 feet.
Exotic vines have been trained all over the inside walls
and roof with graceful effect, providing, even on the hottest
day, an oasis of cool greenery wherein the visitor may partake
of tea on the tiled promenade, while the more energetic swim
and dive in the lucent, warm sea-water
pumped in daily from the Straits of Juan
de Fuca. At either end of the promenade
is a perfect dancing floor, and a first-
class orchestra plays nightly.
Delightful Motor Trips
Motorists will delight in the
thousand miles of perfect auto roads
on Vancouver Island which converge
on Victoria, each with its own distinctive appeal.
The famous Pacific Highway wends
its way through the leafy shades of
the beautiful Goldstream Valley, up
over the Malahat Drive where it climbs
Writing Room and
Library.
The Crystal Gardens.
®%g) THE EMP
A pivotal centre of all the varied attractions of
Victoria and vicinity is the Empress Hotel, the
palatial hostelry of the Canadian Pacific Railway
Company, standing in a dominating position overlooking the harbour. With the completion of its
new wing, just built at a cost of $2,500,000, the
Empress is one of the finest and most up-to-date
hotels on the American continent. Its total accommodation is 578 rooms and with numerous suites.
In addition to the elegant suites in the main
building, notably that used on several occasions by
His Roj^al Highness the Prince of Wales, the new
wing contains a vice-regal suite, including a sitting
room, dining room, two bedrooms, with pantry, in
addition to other private suites for the convenience
of those who prefer such accommodation. Entrance
to the hotel is made through a spacious rotunda
opening into a lounge, which has recently been
re-decorated in dull cream and gold, and entirely
re-furnished with period furniture, with blue the
dominating note. Furniture whose graceful lines
speak of the Queen Anne and William and Mary
tESS HOTEL <^g>
period, luxurious divans and armchairs upholstered
in blue brocades and tapestries, spell dignity and
beauty combined with the maximum of comfort.
Opening off the charming oak tea room is the magnificent ballroom, with its glass roof, and deep windows
on three sides—an ideal setting for a dance—the leaf-
green and gold hangings against the cream walls
completing the picture. The main dining room
continues the color motif of blue, the tapestried
walls and deep pile carpet throwing into bold relief
the handsome carvings of the oak ceiling. An
Elizabethan drawing room off the rotunda suggests
an English baronial hall with its fine carved period
furniture of old oak. Handsome Italian pottery
lamps with parchment shades and a profusion of
flowers everywhere add to the general effect of a
palatial country house with its atmosphere of
inviting hospitality. Downstairs there is an attractive Tudor grill room and a spacious lounge and
card room.
On application, the manager will quote you
special rates which prevail for the fall, winter and
early spring months.
to nearly 1300 feet along the side of the pine-clad
mountains verging on Saanich Arm, affording a wonderful
view over the island-dotted Gulf of Georgia to the distant
mainland.
Another drive of entrancing interest is through the
Saanich Peninsula to the famous Butchart gardens at Tod
Inlet, where a former limestone quarry has been converted
from a hideous gash in the earth to a garden, famed for its
beauty the world over. Millions of roses throw their sweetness
to the air along their colorful way over pergola, terrace and wall
in this garden in the Summer; a waterfall tinkles into a stream
bordered with iris and kissed with water lilies; flowers of
lush growth in every hue lift their heads in a riot of color
throughout the successive seasons in every corner of this
lovely pleasance the Mecca of visitors from all parts of the
globe.
A favorite drive is that around the undulating coast
line from the hotel, through   the  natural  beauty  of
Beacon Hill Park, famous for   its  glorious,   golden
broom and carpet of wild flowers in the Spring
along the Marine Drive with its   superb view
of the distant Olympics,  past  the Oak  Bay
and Uplands golf courses  to  the  Uplands
with  its   gnarled  oaks,   through the pastoral lanes of Cadboro Bay and Saanich,
and back to   the   city,   over  mile   after
mile of perfect road surface.
To   the   equestrian,    Victoria   offers
unusual attraction.    A   number of
excellent stables are  available,   and   in
the city and in its adjacent countryside
are many bridle-paths and   lanes whose
hedges of sweet-smelling   wild   roses  are
reminiscent   of    rural    England  in   their
pristine   beauty.
If
_
The Observatory.
The Provincial Parliament Buildings.
The Museum
The student of natural history as well as the casual
observer will find the provincial museum worthy of a visit
also, for in it is assembled a collection depicting much of the
traditional history of the Province. Wonderfully carved
totem poles and other Indian handicrafts, fur-bearing animals,
birds, fish and other marine life such as shells, sponges,
corals, etc. In brief, a visitor will learn the wealth of natural
history material contained in the Province of British
Columbia.
Music Festivals
Nowhere in Canada could one find a more admirable
setting for a Christmas Festival than the ivy-clad Empress
Hotel, which is annually centered there over the Christmas
and New Year period. Other attractions of no less import
are the sea-music Festival about the middle of January and
the Empress Hotel Mid-Winter Golf Tournament around the
middle of February.
The Festivals are reminiscent of by-gone days, reviving
many of the ancient songs and old-time melodies, providing
a real treat for the lover of music and an inspiration to all
who hear them. To the tourist entering Canada by way of
Victoria, the Empress Hotel presents a notable
introduction to the chain of palatial  hotels directed by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company
at each of the points of interest across Canada.
Travellers who have circled the globe have testified again and again to the fact that nowhere in
the   world   is   there  a   finer   hotel   system.    No
expense has been  spared  to  give   the   travelling
public the very best obtainable in  accommodation,
equipment and service.    The buildings  themselves
are all on a magnificent  scale,  notable engineering
and architectural achievements; the equipment and
furnishings are commensurate,   while   the   human
factor—that of the service—has been  developed to
the   highest   point   of   efficiency.
In Vancouver, eighty miles
by water   from Victoria,   is
the Hotel Vancouver, the     ^
largest   hotel   on   the
Pacific    Coast,     over -
looking the Strait of
Georgia and serving
equally     business
man and the tourist.   Further East,
the    Hotel   Sicamous, at Sicamous,
B.C.,    suggests
a delightful stopover
from which to view
the  orchards   of   the
Okanagan.
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1. The Royal York, Toronto, Ont.
2. Chateau Frontenac, Quebec, Que.
3. Banff Springs Hotel, Banff, Alta.
4. Hotel Vancouver,   Vancouver, B.C.
5. The Algonquin,  St. Andrews, N.B,
6. Chateau Lake Louise,
Lake Louise, Alta.
7. The Royal Alexandra, Winnipeg,
Man.
8. Empress Hotel, Victoria, B.C.
9. Hotel Palliser, Calgary, Alta.
10. Emerald Lake Chalet, Field, B.C.
11. Hotel Saskatchewan,
Regina, Sask.
'Pacific TJoIels
>
D.J. GOWANS
Asst.-General Manager
Eastern Hotels
MONTREAL
A. ALLERTON
General Manager
Eastern Hotels
MONTREAL
M. P. DELAHANTY
Asst.-General Manager
Western Hotels
WINNIPEG
H. F. MATHEWS
General Manager
Western Hotels
WINNIPEG
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Emerald Lake Chalet,   near Field, B.C.,  is a
charming chalet hotel at  the   foot   of   Mount
Burgess, in   the  exquisite setting  of the  Yoho
National Park. Situated at  an altitude of 4,262
feet, it is open from June 15th to September 15th.
On   the   prairies  the Hotel Palliser at   Calgary,
Alberta, the Hotel Saskatchewan at Regina, Saskatchewan,    opened    in     1927,   and    the    Roval
Alexandra    Hotel    at   Winnipeg,   Manitoba,   are
handsome hotels of metropolitan standards  which
will appeal  to  the  tourist   seeking   to   break   the
transcontinental journey.
At Toronto the Canadian Pacific Railway Company
has just erected the Royal York Hotel, the largest
hotel in the British Empire.    This Titian-like palace
contains   over   1,000   rooms,   and
its exterior design, like many of
the other hotels owned and
operated by the Company,
owes its  inspiration   to
medieval Lombardy.
Nearer   the   Atlantic
seaboard is the Chateau    Frontenac,   at
Quebec,   an imposing hostelry   overlooking one of the
oldest   and   most
historic     cities     in
North America, and
the Place Viger Hotel
at   Montreal,   an   attractive     centre     in
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in the heart of the Rocky Mountains,
unrivalled for the grandeur of their scenery,
is the magnificent Banff Springs Hotel, at Banff,
Alberta, open from May 15th to October 1st, a centre
for Alpine climbing, motoring, trail-riding, bathing in hot
sulphur springs, fishing and other outdoor sports.
Chateau Lake Louise is another palatial resort overlooking the limpid blue, glacier-fed waters of Lake Louise
in Alberta, 5,670 feet above sea-level, and open from June
1st to October 1st.
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Canada's largest city.   The most easterly hotel of the Canadian  Pacific system
is   the  Algonquin at   St. Andrews  by-the-sea,
New   Brunswick,    the   popular    resort    centre    for
residents  of   Eastern   Canada   and   the   Eastern   States,
open from June  22nd  to September 10th.
Any Agent will be glad ^ to make reservations at
Canadian Pacific Hotels for intending guests or write
the Manager. 

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