The Chung Collection

Chung Logo

The Chung Collection

Empress Hotel, Victoria, Vancouver Island, B.C. Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Canadian Pacific Hotels. The Empress Hotel 1929

Item Metadata

Download

Media
chungtext-1.0228971.pdf
Metadata
JSON: chungtext-1.0228971.json
JSON-LD: chungtext-1.0228971-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): chungtext-1.0228971-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: chungtext-1.0228971-rdf.json
Turtle: chungtext-1.0228971-turtle.txt
N-Triples: chungtext-1.0228971-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: chungtext-1.0228971-source.json
Full Text
chungtext-1.0228971-fulltext.txt
Citation
chungtext-1.0228971.ris

Full Text

 ftJMft ftftSft.;.,
www
r
I
m
Si
mi
iXt/'-Ol-$* -w '** ■»!$£ '»*■*#* a* & & sn» *
^-^^.' •/.-'.---.'.ft'.-■.'-ft.'-..'.-v--~.v■ ;>-:--^;j
•M*.*'*
CANADiK.
PAC I PI f
EMPRESS
*
ui
"PUP* f# **
*lia«t*H'£?-••
,«,.-.ft,. i ■ •
ri
".Ti
ftft
IMI
'-w&zi        * ligft'ftftftSftftft^
__*«:I^i       i_!V*J
i—4,
..LI..-.-- «
"I
t&myyy
mm's
|_S^_^^KS^i2^i_SSl^SSI^»5 '^3»SBSi3gSi^^K^g
Canadian Pacific
The Expression of a Nation's Character
WORLDWIDE in scope, international in activities, the Canadian Pacific
is pre-eminently the expression of a progressive nation's character.
Canadian Pacific rails extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean,
webbing prairies and mountains', reaching out to cities, farms, forests,
ranches and mines scattered over a million square miles.
Stupendous record in steel of the daring and genius of a young people who
fifty years ago dreamed of transforming a virgin wilderness into a nation—
and made their dream come true.
Canadian Pacific Steamships, on all the seven seas—Canadian Pacific
Telegraphs, carrying messages to world's end and back—Canadian Pacific
Express, trusted bearer of goods to the farthest places, with money-orders
of worldwide currency—Canadian Pacific Hotels, with guests from all the
continents.
Gigantic symbol of the vision, enterprise and spirit of the people of Canada.
4k, m 1
Jl
HMSM
____■ ■.'"'**j
*?m:m.m;m:' -=-v m-r-yymy^--
1 *- «■   , ...    St Of-      „
tftft**-ft<ftft
V.     ::  '^^^£JUtilBf!!j_)F;4
ft: ■' ft.;$^3_g!*&
rSm^H^i^'^m^^^'-'::^-x ■ my;'mm^
h i
■H
mmmi
am "Follow the birds" to Victoria, B.C., gateway to 1000 miles of wonderland.
S35ZCITY
Victoria, the largest city on Vancouver Island and
capital of British Columbia, was founded in 1843 by
the Hudson's Bay Company as its farthest-west trading
post. Today, with a population of approximately
40,000, it is the evergreen city of Canada, a beauty spot
of parks and flowers, whose marvelous lawns fringe a
flourishing industrial and shipping community. Victoria
is situated at the southern end of the Island, set below
Little Saanich Mountain, amid the blue-tinted Sooke Hills
and across the water from the majestic snow-capped
Olympics of the mainland.
The surrounding countryside possesses a rare beauty
reminiscent of Old England, and imparts an aura of quiet
dignity to the capital city which does not lessen its
industrial and commercial importance. Victoria has the
second largest drydock in the world. The city and
Island are made accessible by the splendid service provided by the fleet of the British Columbia Coast Steamships of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and Victoria
itself is a port of call for the great Empresses and other
liners sailing to and from the Orient, New Zealand
and Australia.
me CLIMATE
Tempered by mild ocean breezes and the warm Japanese
Current, the climate of Victoria is subject neither to
extremes of heat nor cold, and it is no uncommon thing
to pick roses in the celebrated gardens of the Empress
Hotel at Christmas. The sweeping lawns of the city
and district are always green, no matter what the time of
year, while bright sunshine in every month with a
minimum of rain or mist, makes possible the pursuit of
every kind of outdoor recreation right through the calendar. New spring growth is usually a week or two ahead
of the mainland, and blossoms of various kinds are to be
seen while it is still winter in many other climes. The
average summer temperature is 61 degrees and winter
42 degrees.
POINTS of INTEREST
Victoria and Vancouver Island are rich in scenic attractions. Victoria is the seat of Government and as such is
fittingly dominated by the stately Parliament Buildings.
Government House, with its marvelous gardens, numerous imposing public buildings and a host of handsome
private residences contribute further to the distinction
of the city. Just beyond its limits are the famous Gorge
with its reversible falls, the beginning of the spectacular
Malahat Drive, combining mountain and coastal scenery,
magnificent Beacon Hill and other parks, numerous fine
golf courses, the renowned
Bu tchar t Sun ken Gardens, observatories, the naval base at
Esquimalt,docks wheregreat
liners call, and scores of other
interesting features. Within
easy reach by boat or rail is
the astounding beauty of the
WestCoast,oneofthecoming
tourist meccas of the world.
PRINTED   IN  CANADA /1.1.JL
11"\
W   V.J «!
J
o
ICT0R1A, VANCOUVER  ISLAND, B.C.;
Open: Ail Veaii—ROOMS AMI) SERVICES- Emlomah R>U»i
fHE EMPRESS HOTEL, one of tltffi woi
mo:;!: charming hotels, is sitwa . a beautiful
rroa'l garden that fronts ci .  ters
s Inner Harbcr.   It is of : on-
etraction  throughout,  and its  large pub       nd
vate rooms are due ta$t word in laixui -
comfort
Nuw»wnii w I        rooms 589---482< with bath
.1.06 without bath (when new       g now m course
of eons traction is completed in October, 1929)..
Special Suites—In addition to the magnific
Vice-Regal Suite- 'which has its own dining room
as Well a;? parlor1 and bedroom;; there are so: other
special suites each consisting o| | parV       d two
Tutor Gi?;:tLL Room With its beamed ceiling
and panelled walla* the Tudor Grill Rodib provides
a delightful environment for meals, Opening from
the Tudor Grill. Room is the beai.iti.ful Georgian
Lounge with its huge fireplaons..
Tea Room Aim Lounge (Office Floor)—-T
:d every  afternoon in  the Tea  Room a:
Lounge, where a profusion of flowers and a great:
firepkoK add to the attractiveness of the settir
CowfOBRVATORit1—A distinctive and much appre-
ciftited 6       _ of the Ofhce Floor is the Gonftei
tory with untain and e:     c blooms,
ticw Room;;- -Thai Public Rocwna listed
law piwicte ample, well-arranged space for convention and banquet purp; irith ci
nmtt facilities for                         fccnjjfB, driapilay
of exhibits., etc,
directory of services
_oweir   Fli or   G       Room,   Private
; Rooms, Georgian
dies' Dressing
,oom, Men's Dressing Room., Barber Shop, L
Hairdressing Parlor., Manicure, Check Roc      Ihoe
Shine.
Office Floor.—Lobby, the Lounge, Tea Room,
Crystal Ball Room, Crystal Ball Room Foyer, Maki
Dining Room, Elizabethan Room., Library and
Writing Room., News Stand, Verandah, Conservatory, Telephones, Telegraphs, Public og'
raphes:, Motor Car Agent, Postal Boa, Qheci
Room.. ChurchDirectory.
Bum Floor Children's atad Servants'1 Dining
Room,.
House Physician
Tnvzzn—Bsa: a
Empress Hotel, but
parlors outside the cu
»enc.r,        .! from
I fhnm.n't
> iiuiikiwhuii -n Kid I imimi
PUBLIC SPA.'
! ROOMS,
'.LOOR
howsx
Pumuc Rooms
Tudor Grill Roc
»BLOIA!KT LOUW
Dmejb of Kwr i
f'mncess charlotte
Princess Louihis
Prince Albert
Private Dining Tim
Main DtNTKG KC'Om
Crystal Bali., Room
Crystal Ball Room Foyir
'Writing Room
Tub Lou woe
Tea Room
Elizabethan Room
IHMHMltlMtNttllt»ttHMil>IMIIII
N8_»JE_. HATxts, Etc.—Between        ress Hate
Esqmrxialt &P Nanaimo Puuiiway Station
....... . }/'i mile.
By Tax_cab 50        ■. for one or more persons
mks  ,50 cents each.,
en. Empress Hotel and Canadian F'acifi
p Doeko—
l_fc'l |   j   » _/'._•    AJ.l.UC^a
aca'ln 50 cents for one or more
#. 50 cents each,
CA:NA©IAN
PACTPIG
Between  Bnnpresfi  Hotel
1:: teaiaahip Docks-—
Distance.. ....,., .1)4 miles,
By Taxkab. ._ JL00 for ii"1
$1.50 for
Trunks .50 cents eac!
h'fiuuBT Gars- 'Victoria has
car system which affords an econ<
venient means  of travel   between
el and all points- in the tity.   The fare Sr^l pcftta
ling transfer (6 ti     ts for chirty'fivc cen: "Follow the bi:
■ {
0 rail
■m
?,
me c n
c
Victo        the lar-       city on
capital of British Columbia, 1
the Had son's Bay Company afl
post.    Today,   v
40,003, il: is
of parks and fl
flourish i nil:
island   an
m 1843 h
•tli est-west tl
appro
a beaut'
s lawn
1 i
dX.1
IS .
:tk
and
Olymt
Temper*. mild ocean breez<
Current, the climate of
extremes of heat nor cold, a    '
commu
he!
surrot
iniscent
dignity to
mistrial i
second
Island
.vided b|
itryside possesses
land., ana imparts
city which doffl
ial import an i
lir
ck .in
■   i e I ■
the Br i
i   :  .     .
hi
y  and
nricfl pro-
ast Ste?
id Victoria
i iin< ot
INfew Ze;
n or
Outd
to
He
ye;
»»>-». >*_, »_«_»«,
til
If If K^'
m, m
he
iWMimuiiim
mmm—iMMinw
Viitoria and Vancouver
fit
G<
erou
privs
of the
with its re
poj   rs
. Build in
.lens,  .
t of h an
the distinct!
I its li the famous Go i
s, the be i g of the spectacu
Mala hat Drivte, cottibining i i nd coastal scene
magnificent Beacr        11 and o <:ks, numerous t
■llllii '
\y
RES'
rtSun
i,l l   L j ■» '.'
•
. scall, ai
ring:!
reach 1
thin
isto unci i
: the
tCoast,<
iurist max
'..    ■:
PRINTTt__5   BN   CANADA Empress Hotel
VICTORIA, VANCOUVER ISLAND, B.C.
Open All Year—ROOMS AND SERVICES—European Plan
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
THE EMPRESS HOTEL, one of the world's
most charming hotels, is situated in a beautiful
formal garden that fronts on the placid waters
of Victoria's Inner Harbor. It is of fireproof construction throughout, and its large public and
private rooms are the last word in luxury and
comfort.
Number of Guest rooms—589—483 with bath,
106 without bath (when new wing now in course
of construction is completed in October, 1929).
Special Suites—In addition to the magnificent
Vice'Regal Suite—which has its own dining room
as well as parlor and bedrooms—there are six other
special suites, each consisting of a parlor and two
bedrooms.
Tudor Grill Room—With its beamed ceiling
and panelled walls, the Tudor Grill Room provides
a delightful environment for meals. Opening from
the Tudor Grill Room is the beautiful Georgian
Lounge with its huge fireplaces.
Tea Room and Lounge (Office Floor)—Tea is
served every afternoon in the Tea Room and
Lounge, where a profusion of flowers and a great
fireplace add to the attractiveness of the setting.
Conservatory—A distinctive and much appre'
ciated feature of the Office Floor is the Conserva-
tory with its fountain and masses of exotic blooms.
Convention Rooms—The Public Rooms listed
below provide ample, welharranged space for con'
vention and banquet purposes, together with con-
venient facilities for committee meetings, display
of exhibits, etc.
DIRECTORY OF SERVICES
Lower Floor—Tudor Grill Room, Private
Dining Rooms, Georgian Lounge, Ladies' Dressing
Room, Men's Dressing Room, Barber Shop, Ladies'
Hairdressing Parlor, Manicure, Check Room, Shoe
Shine.
Office Floor—Lobby, the Lounge, Tea Room,
Crystal Ball Room, Crystal Ball Room Foyer, Main
Dining Room, Elizabethan Room, Library and
Writing Room, News Stand, Verandah, Com
servatory, Telephones, Telegraphs, Public Stenog'
rapher, Motor Car Agent, Postal Box, Check
Room, Church Directory.
First Floor—Children's and Servants' Dining
Room.
House Physician in Attendance
Tavern—Beer and Ale are not sold in the
Empress Hotel, but may be obtained in licensed
parlors outside the city limits. Wines and liquors
maybe purchased from Government Liquor Vendors.
PUBLIC SPACES, MEETING ROOMS
•
, DINING ROOMS AND BANQUET ROOMS
Seating Capacities
Floor
Public Rooms
Area
Convention
Banquet
Dining
Lower
Tudor Grill Room
3,670 sq. ft.
450
300
175
Georgian Lounge
3,800  "
th
450
300
175
Duke of Kent Private Dining Room
1,388  "   '
■t
170
110
65
Princess Charlotte "        "
(<
650  "   '
•c
85
50
35
Princess Louise         "        "
cc
550  "
u
70
45
30
Prince Albert          "        "
cc
550  "   '
fc
70
45
30
Private Dining Room, No. 1
270  "   '
t
35
20
15
Office
Main Dining Room
4,440  "   '
it
550
425
225
Crystal Ball Room
4,550  "   '
tt
600
450
250
Crystal Ball Room Foyer
1,230  "   '
•t
125
75
50
Writing Room
2,780  "   '
.1
400
• • •
•  •  •
The Lounge
4,100  "   '
.1
•  • •
• • •
•  • •
Tea Room
2,950  "   '
■c
400
275
150
Elizabethan Room
860  "   "
90
• • •
*
• • •
Transfer Rates, Etc.—Between Empress Hotel
and Esquimalt &? Nanaimo Railway Station—
Distance 34 mile.
By Taxicab.... 50 cents for one or more persons.
Trunks  50 cents each.
Between Empress Hotel and Canadian Pacific
Steamship Docks—
Distance 34 mile.
By Taxicab.... 50 cents for one or more persons.
Trunks 50 cents each.
Between Empress Hotel and Outer Harbor
Steamship Docks—
Distance 1^ miles.
By Taxicab. .. .$1.00 for five persons or less;
$1.50 for seven persons.
Trunks 50 cents each.
Street Cars—Victoria has an efficient street
car system which affords an economical and com
venient means of travel between the Empress
Hotel and all points in the city. The fare is six cents
including transfer (6 tickets for thirty'five cents). jEmpress Hotel
VICTORIA, VANCOUVER ISLAND, B.C.
Recreational Attractions and Facilities
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
Golf
Golf is played the year round in Victoria and
guests of the Empress Hotel may enjoy privileges
on the following beautiful and well-maintained
courses:
Colwood Golf and Country Club (9 miles from
Empress Hotel), 6,291 yards, 18 holes.
Green Fee, per day—$2.00.
Green Fee, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays—
$2.50.
Green Fee, per month—$25.00.
Victoria Golf and Country Club  (4H miles
from Empress Hotel), 5,395 yards, 18 holes.
Green Fee, per day—$2.00.
Green Fee, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays—
$2.50.
Green fee per month for men—$30.00.
Green fee per month for ladies—$20.00.
Uplands Golf Club (5 miles from Empress Hotel),
5,800 yards, 18 holes.
Green fee, per day—$1.00.
Green fee, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays—
$1.50.
Green fee per month for men—$15.00.
Green fee per month for ladies—$10.00.
Macaulay  Point  Golf Club   (2^  miles  from
Empress Hotel), 2,750 yards, 9 holes.
Green fee, per day—50 cents.
Green fee, Saturdays—75 cents.
Green fee, Sundays and holidays—$1.00.
Green fee, per month—$5.00.
Cedar Hill Golf Course (33^ miles from Empress
Hotel), 3,480 yards, 9 holes.
Green fee, per day—50 cents.
Green fee, per month—$5.00.
Tennis
Guests have the privilege of playing on the well-
maintained courts of the Empress Hotel, also on
board, clay and grass courts of private clubs.
Putting Green
Putting practice and clock-golf may be enjoyed
by guests in the grounds of the Empress Hotel.
Motoring
Private cars of all makes may be hired, with or
without chauffeur, on application to Motor Car
Agent at the Empress Hotel. Practically all of
Victoria's boulevards and streets are paved, and
there are one thousand miles of scenic motor drives
radiating from the city. A feature of special interest is the Astrophysical Observatory with the
second largest telescope in the world, situated only
six miles by road from Victoria.
Riding
Well-broken saddle horses may be engaged from
riding  establishments  in  Victoria  itself and  at
Sooke Harbor and other up-island points. On the
outskirts of Victoria are many miles of beautiful
bridle paths and trails.
Hiking
No other part of the continent offers greater
inducements for the hiker than Victoria and Vancouver Island. Miles of forest trails, paths that
border the sea and quiet country roads are all
within a short distance of the Empress Hotel.
Swimming
Outdoor swimming may be enjoyed in many of
the bays and coves near the Empress Hotel, and
also in the rivers and lakes of the interior of Vancouver Island. Indoor swimming is a feature of the
Crystal Garden, described below.
MOTORBOATING, ROWING  AND  CANOEING
The sheltered ocean waters around Victoria,
the many good-sized lakes in the interior of Vancouver Island, and the various river-estuaries offer
ideal conditions for boating of all kinds.
Mountain Climbing
Within a few miles of the Empress Hotel easy
climbs are available, while farther afield are many
fine peaks to test the skill of the experienced
mountaineer.
Scenic Trips
Hour, half-day, day and longer* trips by motor
stage or excursion steamers take guests to the many
beauty spots, recreation centres and places of
unusual interest on Vancouver Island.
Fishing and Hunting
Vancouver Island is a paradise for the angler
and hunter. In the river-estuaries there is splendid
fishing for Tyee and Cohoe salmon, while the inland
streams, rivers and lakes abound in cut-throat,
rainbow and lake trout. Steelhead, the peer of the
Scotch salmon, can be caught in the rivers both in
summer and winter.
The hunter has his choice, within a reasonably
short distance of the Empress Hotel, of grouse,
pheasant and duck shooting, in season. Comparatively easy of access also are the haunts of deer,
bear, cougar and wolf.
Crystal Garden
Close by the Empress Hotel is the Crystal
Garden, a glass-roofed amusement casino, with
spacious dancing floors, concert hall, carpet bowling and badminton courts, and a swimming pool
that, measuring 150 feet by 40 feet, varies in depth
from 3 feet to 9 feet, and is filled with warmed,
sterlised sea-water. Commodious dressing rooms
adjoin the pool, and exceptional seating capacity is
afforded for spectators among the palms and other
tropical plants which bloom on the promenades.
Dancing is held nightly except Sunday, and tea is
served every afternoon. jEmpress Hotel
VICTORIA, B.C.
lower floor
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
*__.•§ -S
rt J3 > rt
to   rt   ^ CO
P   <U -Q
>
_
3*2
>   3
O   .S
4)   C   Jh
.. "** o
CO
co rfl ._-  rt
o
o
<_•
+J TS  -ft
o__5
<_>
a a
»^2
a   ...
CO
CO
<U
t-l
O
-a is
CO   V-'  HlH
CO   rt
C . .t-J
>
CO ___
a
o
o
./•P4
•.-l     CO     ■"*
S-§J_L»
<_
o
H
ai    _    ,
ft   W)
a 2
rt   o   O   u
CO
O   H   G
ci impress Hotel
VICTORIA, B.C.
OFFICE  FLOOR
CANADIAN
PACIFIC impress Hotel
VICTORIA B.C.
TYPICAL BEDROOM
FLOOR
)
rf
o
o
S
8
rf
Q
w
CO
<
O
»—»
cu
H
I 1 | I
co   &1 ^—j
-O o a 3 <_
u a B PQ -m
tt  rt u  _.« tt
Q o o tt in
rt ni   U rt
a-a
_-9W
\ 3 Ef-c
a ? tt'l^
"J_ no 13  P  W)
I i § or
GO
G
&§.__•_-
CO
••a
■I   CO
t_~  C? **  ?0
G   <"   K
•J=! _G   tt
4) <**
£ o o
t0'O « 5 ■
G   rt  5^-£j
I .$> %* &
o o ** e*_:
Tl -G    M    H    _>
0**"* tt  p  H
to   OP   >   d
a^H « a
8       ©tt
G-g.S3o Crystal   Garden
VICTORIA, B.C.
SWIMMING POOL, Etc
BATHERS" f ]
EMTRANCL Jjjjll
SWIMMING POOL
The most striking feature of the Crystal Garden is the huge swimming pool situated beneath a high glass'roofed dome in the centre of
the building. Filled with warmed and sterilized sea'water, it measures 150 feet in length, 40 feet in width, and varies in depth from
3 feet at the shallow end to 9 feet at the deep end. Resilient diving boards and platforms are located at the deep end. The Ladies'
Dressing Rooms, Salt Water Baths, etc., are located to the right of the Bathers'* Entrance, with the Men's quarters at the left.
DANCE
FLOOR
AND
BADMINTON
COURTS
PROMENADE OVERLOOKING  POOL
ORCHESTRA
pfl-ATFlePR M
SALT WATER SWIMMING POOL
150*    *   -AO*
PLATFOTTTST
i tk: ■
JBfc
' DANCE
FLOOR
m   - >      ■
PROMENADE  OVERLOOKING   POOL
UPPER FLOOR (PROMENADE)
Palms and other exotic tropical plants bloom on the wide promenades at both sides of the pool and afford a delightful setting for afternoon tea and enjoyment of the scene in the pool below. Large dancing floors are situated above the dressing rooms and gymnasium
at the ends of the pool, and dances are held here nightly except Sunday.    Badminton courts are also provided as indicated. C O /? D O 1/ A      B/f Y
[r/cfor/3
GMCM
0 r^C3    J/*?//
MAP OF VICTORIA, B.C., AND ENVIRONS Founded 1880
Then As Now
A Canadian
Instituti on
CANADIAN PACIFIC
Canada's National Enterprise
THE WORLD'S GREATEST TRAVEL SYSTEM
Serving Canada
Bridging Two
Oceans—Linking
Four Continents—
Spans the  World
STEAMSHIPS
Canadian Pacific Steamships — two
fleets which unite America east and
west with other continents. Across the
Atlantic to Europe with approximately
3 sailings a week (Empresses, Duchesses
and other Cabin Class Steamships).
Across the Pacific to Japan, China and
Philippines (Empress Steamships,
regular sailings). Connections to
Australia and New Zealand.
TELEGRAPHS
Canadian Pacific Telegraphs
extend the entire length of
the railway and also reach
every point of importance in
Canadaawayfromit. 140,000
miles of wire. Also cable
connections across both
oceans and working radio
arrangements.
RAILWAY
The Canadian Pacific Railway (comprising 20,409
miles of operated and controlled lines) reaches
from Atlantic Ocean to Pacific Ocean, across
Canada and into the United States. Main line from
Montreal to Vancouver, 2,886 miles. Fast, frequent
and luxurious transcontinental long distance and
local passenger services, linking up all the important cities, industrial sections, agricultural
regions and vacation resorts. Efficient and
dependable freight service.
HOTELS
The Canadian Pacific operates the
largest chain of hotels in Canada,
numbering fourteen (including the
Royal York Hotel at Toronto, largest
hotel in the British Empire, opened
June, 1929). Situated in large cities
or at holiday resorts—others to be
built. Also—nine Bungalow Camps in
the Canadian Rockies and Ontario.
EXPRESS
Canadian Pacific Express—
travellers' cheques to suit
all travelling arrangements,
and good all over the world.
Also a forwarding service for
package merchandise, with
world-wide connections —
including an air express
service.
CRUISES
Seven Famous Winter
Cruise s—
Round the World
South America South Africa
Mediterranean (2)
West Indies      (3)
FARM  LANDS
Several million acres of
choice farm lands in Western
Canada for sale at low prices
and on long terms, including
irrigated land in Alberta.
Generous colonization policies that are helping to develop and settle the West.
ALL    UNDER    ONE    MANAGEMENT
Canadian Pacific Agencies Throughout the World
Canada and United States
Atlanta, Ga . .
Banff, Alta...
Boston, Mass.
Buffalo, N.Y.
Calgary, Alta.
. .K. A. Cook, 1017 Healey Bldg.
J. A. McDonald, C.P.R. Station.
.L. R. Hart, 405 Boylston St.
.W. P. Wass, 160 Pearl St.
.G. D. Brophy, C.P.R. Station.
Chicago, 111. T. J. Walh 7 i East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati, Ohio.
Cleveland, Ohio. . .
Detroit, Mich	
Edmonton, Alta
Fort William, Ont.
Guelph, Ont	
Halifax, N.S	
,M. E. Malone, 201 Dixie Term'l Bldg.
.G. H. Griffin, 1010 Chester Ave.
.G. G. McKay, 1231 Washington Blvd.
.C. S. Fyfe, C.P.R. Building.
.H. J. Skynner, 108 South May St.
.W. C. Tully, 30 Wyndham St.
.A. C. MacDonald, 117 Hollis St.
Hamilton, Ont A. Craig, Cor. King and James Sts.
Honolulu, T.H Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Indianapolis, Ind J. A. McKinney, Merchants Bank Building.
Juneau, Alaska W. L. Coates.
Kansas City, Mo R. G. N orris, 723 Walnut St.
Ketchikan, Alaska Edgar Anderson.
Kingston, Ont J. H. Welch, 180 Wellington St.
London, Ont H. J. McCallum, 417 Richmond St.
Los Angeles, Cal W. Mcllroy, 621 South Grand Ave.
Memphis, Tenn E. A. Humler, Porter Bldg.
Milwaukee, Wis F. T. Sansom, 68 East Wisconsin Ave.
Minneapolis, Minn H. M. Tait, 611 2nd Ave. South.
Montreal, Que F. C. Lydon, 201 St. James Street.
Moosejaw, Sask T. J. Colton, Canadian Pacific Station.
Nelson, B.C J. S. Carter, Baker & Ward Sts.
New York, N.Y F. R. Perry, Madison Ave., at 44th St.
North Bay, Ont C. H. White, 87 Main Street, West.
Omaha, Neb H. J. Clark, 727 W.O.W. Building.
Ottawa, Ont J. A. McGill, 83 Sparks St.
Peterboro, Ont J. Skinner, George St.
Philadelphia, Pa J. C. Patteson, 1500 Locust St.
Pittsburgh, Pa C. L. Williams, 338 Sixth Ave.
Port Arthur, Ont F. C. Gibbs, Canadian Pacific Station.
Portland, Ore W. H. Deacon, 55 Third St.
Prince Rupert, B.C W. C. Orchard.
Quebec, Que C. A. Langevin, Palais Station.
Regina, Sask J. W. Dawson, Canadian Pacific Station.
Saint John, N.B G. E. Carter, 40 King St.
St. Louis, Mo Geo. P. Carbrey, 412 Locust St.
St. Paul, Minn W. H. Lennon, Soo Line, Robert & Fourth Sts.
San Francisco, Cal F. L. Nason, 675 Market St.
Saskatoon, Sask R. T. Wilson, 115 Second Ave.
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont R. S. Merifield, 529 Queen St.
Seattle, Wash E. L. Sheehan, 1320 Fourth Ave.
Sherbrooke, Que J. A. Metivier, 91 Wellington St. North.
Skagway, Alaska L. H. Johnston.
Spokane, Wash E. L. Cardie, Spokane International Ry.
Tacoma, Wash D. C. O'Keefe, 1113 Pacific Ave.
Toronto, Ont Wm. Fulton, Canadian Pacific Bldg.
Vancouver, B.C..
Victoria, B.C
Washington, D.C
Windsor, Ont
Winnipeg, Man...
.F. H. Daly, 434 Hastings St. West.
.L. D. Chetham, 1102 Government St.
.C. E. Phelps, 905 Fifteenth St., N.W.
.W. C. Elmer, 34 Sandwich St. West.
.C. B. Andrews, Main and Portage.
Europe
Antwerp, Belgium E. A. Schmitz, 25 Quai Jordaens.
Belfast, Ireland Wm. McCalla, 41-43 Victoria St.
Birmingham, Eng W. T. Treadaway, 4 Victoria Square.
Bristol, Eng A. S. Ray, 18 St. Augustine's Parade.
Brussels, Belgium G. L. M. Servais, 98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max.
Cobh, Ireland J. Hogan, 10 Westbourne Place.
Glasgow, Scotland W. Stewart, 25 Bothwell St.
Hamburg, Germany.
Liverpool, Eng	
• T. H. Gardner, Gansemarkt 3.
• H. T. Penny, Pier Head.        I	
S.W. 1.
^^^^^^^^^^^          3.
Manchester, Eng J. W. Maine, 31 Mosley Street.
Paris, France A. V. Clarke, 24 Boulevard des Capucines.
Rotterdam, Holland J. Springett, Coolsingel No. 91.
Southampton, Eng H. Taylor, 7 Canute Road.
T n\mnN  Fna JC- E- Jenkins, 62-65 Charing Cross, S.W.
londun, .nmg ^G_ gaxon jonegi 1Q3 Leadenhall st ( EC
Asia
Hong Kong, China G.
Kobe, Japan B.
Manila, P.I J.
Shanghai, China A.
Yokohama, Japan E.
E. Costello, Opposite Blake Pier.
G. Ryan, 7 Harima Machi.
R. Shaw, 14-16 Calle David, Roxas Bldg.
M. Parker, 4 Bund.
Hospes, No. 21 Yamashita-cho.
Australia, New Zealand, etc.
J. Sclater, Traffic Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for Australia and New Zealand,
Union House, Sydney, N.S.W.
A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for New Zealand,
Auckland, N.Z.
Adelaide, S.A Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Auckland, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Brisbane, Qd Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Christchurch, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Dunedin, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Fremantle, W.A Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Hobart, Tas Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Launceston, Tas Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
I     . Thos. Cook & Son.
........ <jjarry Boyer> Passenger Representative, Can.
(      Pac. Ry.
Perth, W.A Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Suva, Fiji Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Sydney, N.S.W Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Wellington, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Melbourne, Vic.
Any of the agents listed above will be glad to make reservations at Canadian Pacific Hotels for intending guests.
Canadian Pacific  Hotel Department
C. B. FOSTER,
Convention and Tourist Trajjic Manager,
Montreal
D. J. GOWANS,
Asst. General Manager,
Eastern Hotels,
Montreal
A. ALLERTON.
General Manager,
Eastern Hotels,
Montreal.
M. P. DELAHANTY,
Asst. General Manager,
Western Hotelst
Winnipeg.
H. F. MATTHEWS,
General Manager,
Western Hotels,
Winnipeg.  Founded 1880
Then' As Now
a. c a n a d i a n
Ins t i '".r u t 1: o M
Cyi >a's NaT!        UuJ_l_N__3tISE
THE WORLD'S GREATEST TRAV SI, SYSTEM
VY*i
Sm RV1NO CAN ADA
B jr. t d g i aw ci   T w o
0C E A W Si — LINKI N 0>
FOOB.    CfllWTIIfllBNTIfl—
Spams  '.i drid
m
L,,-n
IBS,
STEAMSHIPS
Canadian    P. Steams hi pa y two
fleets which   tlmW ' America   _aif--<pxi_fc:
west with .rinents.  Act
Adnn,tac to Europe with approximately
3sa.i' : v/eek (impresses, lj)^h|ssex
and other   Cab*n\ Class  Ste^1^'
Jksnm& tl'
■!;!.!'
■•' and New 2-.;
ire lKn/?tn o*
il'.V V.VT Vfttt■
CanaisU*
HttUes oi wife.   '^Sfr TUSs^
connections across both
ocean?. Mid working radio
iii'Kaagements.
RAILWAY
Canadians Pacific Railway (compiiiiij# 20,409
a
irprn   Atlantic   Ocean  to   Pacific  Ocean, 'a_ro-__
(palladia and into the Uni ted. States. M a
..'«!:: ■ t'ir.r, 2,886 mi] c fre<
pus transcontine.tiU-j;-l€»n;' n,<:e a^id
pa«s^'i^:r  R_frvias.fi,  link
mt , :ir;t:^   industrial •   i
acatiofi    ; ;_oi't;i
est
.  OTEI'8
in   Calls
«    ^m  ng    the
riHtrre-1'>(!•: Toronto, largest
ie  B Empire,   opened
:ituatedk,in' iarife cities
-pllM'Ji
Hxhers   to be
Camps in
■   r
Crave
service..
" g_ the w6n<
uaijQ_&e-5  witfR
res_
*n«iigiQt>3gfe
J&yKrA "y-y m 'tscrt.a,
^JSrraei'iHis.;c_tf anifcatiun poll-
' cies'"t.h*f:^aig*"i|__eiping to de
velop and Mettle ;'*<;; West.
■
A L L    IJ N D E 1    O N E    M A 2 E M E NT 1
ItlllMUUHIUMIU
Ganada and United States      / ~ ~.._-. _X*w«ww«.lf^
Atlanta, Ga.
Baniw, A'ita.
Boston, L
Buffalo, N.v
states    AQOOW^B
.... K. A. Cook, 101
.. J. A. McDonald, C.P.R. St.
, . . L. R. Hart, 403 Bov'laton St.
.. ,W. P. Wass, 160 Pearl St..
Calgary, Alta. , ,G. D^Mi-i:-phy,"W7P%. Station.
Chicago, Hi T. J.fflall, 71 Kurt. Jk:1j^#. Alfd
Cincinnati, Ohio M„ E7fi:aii__io,K01jPi/r^;e:t|tiri Bid
Cleveland. Ohio G, H^rnfan,Jhijrt'.m4m: _»e.
D?f!ir»;OlT, Mich G. <T MclCav, 1 ?.:■ hiiv/on Blvd.
honton, Alta C. S. Fyfe, C.P --Z       mit..,.     ,. ^^
Fort Wii. I Hal. H. J. Skynner, 108 i
Gvmum, Otirt . . W. C. Tully, 30 Wy St.
Hau.ax, N.S A. C. MacDonald, 111* Mollis
Ont, .
W [NNXPEGh, Man—
,.F„ H. Daly, 4-.. '•. West.
Chetham, 1102 ki.i, S
-C   !•;.   ?    ,:![)<!,  JKlS
.W. C, Lch SI
.C. HI. vs, Main nrad. Portage.
muimzKHwati, IBEgi.
Bristol, E.tibi	
_5CK_IKn'
Gl,v -
TrLo_
Hamilton, Or      A. CpijL Cor. King a;:nLJaj:[|«? _ Sts. iiSi- riij
rNDlANAPOUS,' lad..' ','..'.'..'.' J, A.ul^iS.n.eSl3iLJtI^        ]:i^fc,^.    .|^0-|ii#: /t.. f Q. , Jf»]
25 On:
jMjMJpitJfi, 41-43
jr. Treadawav.
.Artf, Ray, 1.8 St.
. G. L. M. Seivais,
..I. Hojran, 10 W
.W. Stewart, 2.  ;■
.T. h. <:
:#T_;|i
u are
•.'eau, .Alaska.
Kansas City  Mo
Ketctiikak
London. Oat.	
l.O'.- iVlS'GELF.f,,
Memphis, Tenn .. ,
MjlLWAIJ'KEE, HVia. .
'CNEAPCHMS,  Mien
iWTRll hL, Que. . . .
Moo«ejaw, Sajilr.. ..
. . .
Mkw Yon
Vn.,
Ottawa
Put :'Ta
Ptttsburg
Portland,
Pft'rwcK Re
Oute:'ec, Q
Regina, S<,
Saint Joht
St. Loots, .vdT«ri.
St. Paul, tl
Saw Fi;
:aivu>
..r Sth. Mai
:tle, '/'
SHERirROCUl
:>-lHD__H
ojPOI!
P.*.COMA, W
Dnt,
L. Coah«B.
,R„ G. Morris, 723 W at|U£ti S* ;
■ <_}_..rt_«_».fc»i. "]      i|    V'
-«.ii'«(i»pyy|)yiM»MMiM    mil        jLJ? Jt,  X   -ft
ad
rTonaiKH .
I   roN, Eiig   ..
V SEA
Chi
he, Japai!
j. A. MctS
!M'feT   to
VoKOHAMAi J.
and   f
Villiam-i, .rJ3.fi Sixth Ave.
ibbn, Canadian. Pacific StattiMi
'   ' '.on, 55 Thrird St..
t r"_f"*^'\ 1 * III Lrrl 11 II lllllf * *
(^^i_la::fSl_^y?^S
\nadian Pfu:ilic St.
; ! acl:
Aii|l4-lfi  Cail<: Is.
'yi- SaoWel'l: B»;nd.
,_.. fl.ojipesi, K'c>. :ii. V'anr?i!il
[{Crqaa, R.W. I.
ipudnea.
>xas JB!t(ft„.
Rift'la
, i;- ■ ^ '■' •;'   i^af^&^i^Ml.'-i
r, Can. Pac, Ry., for New Zes-ila,nd,
J1!!
piLl
Wm,
Mfjwp»3ti_e«., nave
Locust !flt„
j Lime, Robert &
'i3.no .rtit.cri".h
1113 Paci;
.anadia.ti. Pa::'"
d, N.Z.
?aCl:^l'Sl!
fami!ton & Co.
land (Ltd.)
ft Of
tkmd
..v., W..A
<3?*o-_*'Ss»Ml
, Ma,::tl<:inald,
T.hnion S.S.
■ in'
ft'lhM.'rJil.l
Canadian Pacific
C. Hi. FOSTER,
:;:i;ii^wiroii a«<f Tourt'tt Trajjk Manager,
•
J. CO!
!. Gtimval Ma
Eau tern
.•NTREAL
w'raiwa!hy!_ifkd  w-estia^
Pac. Ry
PttRTH, W.X.  . Macdor
I'A, Fiji.   .   .  . Union f
Sydney, N.S.W	
N.Z.._^. - ■ - -. Unjoru__-.S
ft'r
nrfl (Ltd.l
and (Ltd.)
n & ;
rialaml (Ltd
I  nd (Ltd..)
I (Ltd )
ative, f-
and (I'ld.'l
of New Zea
Nw Zealand
ilarid
^Irfijir.:'
dian CiP::il_L HJLul-'JJl'nlaitt«i~UMi
.. Hotel Department
,ERTON,
I Manager,
Eastern Holds,
OIMI-UBAL,
M. P. TJELAPIAK'.
.'itiTw HoklSo
WtMWlfi'ECn.
H. F. MAfTHBWS,
Cene.nrX Manager,
' ■vU'.rn Holds,
ftTPEG, ft!;
: m
ft
1
HI
t ft*'
XXXXy
;,„. ......
lis
f...........
i ftft
ftft' ft
ft ft--.:
ft:? ;
.
1:1
1:1: ft
III
-
11111
|||:i|
, .....
ftftft
;;::::::::!:
:::i::t
.111
my
■::11
:-: ; : :
111
ft 1
ftll
READING AND WRITING ROOM
ft ;
BED  ROOM
MAIN DINING ROOM
ft-,..:.;.-.
W^MJjyjfXiiyi.Mm..
' ,:.   ■■       '■>■■■ '"
Iftf-i'S   i ft ft-1 '"•'      ft   ft**'       ft! '';.. ,.     . ...sift
■ft      *■'        ft**   - ft mm.„
SWIMMING POOL, CRYSTAL GARDEN
CRYSTAL BALL ROOM
^mmmm^
PROMENADE CRYSTAL GARDEN / ft. ■'
X
'to1
w r
IL
wJ_^_<__J_-k-
:.ft.:,^l
if
. W> .ft       v ."--.■       ■    -;.,
Ill   Emerald Lake Chalet
Near   F i e I d
:
Olil'7'"":  ' ft:
i^fiw.mM.^s^m • .-.^*^v-.^^^
.^jSSsSjSSf^^.:
.
s_a___i____x)____3__^
ssssss
igg^iliiilJi^il^Mii
mi .«■ ■)■■■■ ■■■■li ni ■
'ftft.ft
^il_\      "- Wn
>J_£^d____ff>_l^
^'Iftfc  t ' i-'-'*«iI ;
v^.      J
Ha
IS m
Hff
*  :
ft?«8!s«ses»^

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.chungtext.1-0228971/manifest

Comment

Related Items