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Pamphlet advertising the Chateau Frontenac Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Canadian Pacific Hotels. Le Chateau Frontenac 1931

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Canadian Pacific
The Expression of a Nation's Character
WORLDWIDE in scope, international in activities, the Canadian Pacific
is pre-eminently the expression of a progressive nation's character,
Canadian Pacific rails extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean,
webbing prairies and mountains, reaching out to cities, farms, forests,
ranches and mines scattered over a million square miles.
Stupendous record in steel of the daring and genius of a young people who
fifty years ago dreamed of transforming a virgin wilderness into a nation—
and made their dream come true.
Canadian Pacific Steamships, on all the seven seas—Canadian Pacific
Telegraphs, carrying messages to world's end and back—Canadian Pacific
Express, trusted bearer of goods to the farthest places, with money-orders
of worldwide currency—Canadian Pacific Hotels, with guests from all the
continents.
Gigantic symbol of the vision, enterprise and spirit of the people of Canada.
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1. St. Lawrence River;  2. The Citadel;   3. Dufferin Terrace;   4. Wolfe and Montcalm Monuments;   5. The Chateau Frontenac;   6. Champlain Monument;
7. Post Office;     8. Place d'Armes;     9. Court House;    10. Anglican Cathedral;     11. Convent Ursuline;     12. St. Louis Gate;     13. Cross of Sacrifice;
14. Drill Hall;   15. Parliament Building;   16  Museum;   17. Wolfe's Cove.
me CITY
Founded in 1608 by Champlain, Quebec, the grey yet
vigorously modern capital of French Canada, sprawls in
old-world fashion along the heights and down the steep
slopes of a bold promontory that juts into the broad
St. Lawrence one hundred and seventy-two miles below
Montreal. Easy of access by railway, steamship lines
and motor road, it is a charming city of 133,000 inhabi
tants—most of whom are French-speaking—a bustling
sea-port and a thriving industrial centre. Historically,
it is the most interesting and romantic spot in America,
a veritable dream-city with narrow twisting streets,
ancient walls and houses and venerable churches, all
eloquent of Quebec's past glories and accomplishments.
9JTe CLIMATE
Quebec's healthy climate may well be numbered among
its foremost attractions, no matter what season is considered. Come in springtime—when the warmest of
sunshine lies in vivid splashes on oldwalh and roofs—
when mild breezes stir blossom-laden trees in convent
gardens—and you will say that this is Quebec's most
delightful season.    But come again in summertime to
enjoy warm, breeze-tempered days and cool refreshing
nights—or in autumn when the air is tonic-like and bracing—and you will think these just as delightful. Then,
if you should come again in wintertime—to have the
crisp, never-too-cold dryness of the air set your blood
atingle, put new glow into your cheeks, new vigor into
your muscles—you will have to admit all are best!
Within the city limits—The Plains of Abraham where
Montcalm's troops were defeated by the British under
Wolfe; Montcalm's reputed headquarters on St. Louis St.;
Governor's Garden and the Wolfe-Montcalm monument;
the Seminaire de Quebec founded in the 17th century by
Laval. Place d'Armes Square, Cardinal's Palace, City
Hall, Parliament Buildings; St. Louis, Kent and St. John
gates; Franciscan Sisters (White Nuns) Chapel; Wolfe's
Monument, Martello Tower; Spencerwood (Lieutenant-
Governor's residence); the Citadel and fortifications; the
Ramparts; Laval University, Ursuline Convent; Notre
Dame des Victoires Church, over 240 years old; Sous-le-
Cap—the narrowest street in North America;   Little
POINTS of INTEREST
Champlain Street and the
Break-Neck steps, etc. Outside the city limits—Montmorency Falls and Kent
House; Ste. Anne de Beaupre
and its famous shrine; Cap
Rouge and Quebec bridge;
Sillery, with its old Jesuit
mission; Indian village
of Lorette, Wolfe's Cove,
Lake Beauport, Lake St.
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■:,, >■  The Chateau jFrontenac
QUEBEC, P.Q.
Open All Year—ROOMS AND SERVICES—European Plan
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
BUILT in the manner of an eighteenth century French Chateau, fireproof construction
throughout, modern to the last degree in
equipment and service.
Number of Guest Rooms—567 with Bath,
111 without Bath.
Four large suites in the Round Tower, facing
Dufferin Terrace, comprising the Colonial,
Dutch, Habitant and Chinese, each consisting
of two double bedrooms, with bath and large
Sitting Room. There are sixteen suites in the
Central Tower section, consisting of Sitting
Room, Double Bedroom and Bath. Connecting
rooms as desired.
Dancing every evening other than Sunday
either in the Jacques Cartier Room or Ball Room.
Every Sunday evening (except during the summer months) an interesting concert program is
given by the Chateau Frontenac orchestra
assisted by high class vocal talent.
Convention Rooms—Arranged from below—
also space for Exhibits—Committee Rooms.
DIRECTORY OF SERVICES
Terrace Floor—Coffee Shop, Barber Shop,
Billiard Room, Shoe Shine, Summer Terrace
Cafe, Tea Room, Tavern, Ladies' Hairdressing
and Manicure Parlor, Bank of Montreal,
Broker's Office.
Office Floor—Main Office, Information, Frontenac Grill Room, Jacques Cartier Room,
Library, Champlain Room, St. Lawrence Room,
Carriage Agent, Check Room, Church Directory, Ladies' Dressing Room, News Stand,
Public Stenographer, Sleeping Car and Ticket
Office, Telegraph Office, Telephones, Writing
Room, Lounge and Shops.
First Floor—Main Dining Room, Drawing
Room, Salon Madeleine de Vercheres, Foyer,
Lounge, Ball Room, Private Dining Rooms,
Children's and Servants' Dining Room.
House Physician in attendance.
PUBLIC SPACES, MEETING ROOMS, DINING ROOMS and BANQUET ROOMS
Seating Capacities
Floor
Terrace
Office
First
Second
Public Rooms Area      Convention    Banquet
Terrace Tea Room  1,380 sq. ft.
Terrace Cafe  2,068
Coffee Shop. .  2,444
Jacques Cartier Room  2,272      " 250 200
Frontenac Grill Room  2,240
Ball Room and Foyer  6,545      " 900 700
Ball Room Gallery        760      '' 127
Main Dining Room  6,701      " .. 600
Salon de Vercheres  2,419
Committee Room  1,475
Dining
60
115
136
150
125
450
500
100 or number smaller rooms.
Transfer  Rates  between  Station,   Ferry,
Ocean Docks and Chateau Frontenac.
Cabs,   Motor   Bus,   Taxis   (and   Sleighs   in
Winter).
(1) Palais Union Station and Chateau Frontenac.
Distance—Y% mile.
By Motor Bus—25c. per person, including
hand baggage.
By Tax:—50c. for one or two persons, including hand baggage.
(2) Chateau Frontenac and Ocean Docks:
Distance—1 mile.
By Motor Bus—50c. per person including
hand baggage.
By Taxi—70c. for one or two persons, including hand baggage.
(3) Chateau Frontenac and Canada S.S. Lines
Dock:    Distance—J€ mile.
By Motor Bus—25c. per person, including
hand baggage.
By Taxi—50c. for one or two persons, including hand baggage.
(4) Chateau  Frontenac   and   Levis   Ferry:
-4.
Distance—Vi mile.
By Taxi—50c. for one or two persons, including hand baggage. CANADIAN
PACIFIC
CHATEAU
FRONTENAC
QUEBEC QUE.
The Chateau -Frontenac
QUEBEC, P.Q.
"Recreational Attractions and facilities
Summer Sports
Golf—Guests of the Chateau Frontenac
have the privilege of playing on two excellent
18 hole courses.
At the Kent Golf Club
(6,121 yards)
Rates per day. . . $2.00
Rates per week .  9.00
Rates per month.25.00
Season
membership.. 50.00
At the Quebec Golf Club
(6,456yards)
Rates per day. .. $2.50
Rates per week.. 12.00
Rates per month.40.00
Season
membership.. 80.00
Both of these courses are set amid beautiful
natural surroundings high above and commanding inspiring views of the St. Lawrence River.
The Kent Golf Club is located at Montmorency
Falls (7 miles from the Chateau Frontenac) and
the Quebec Golf Club at Boischatel, a mile
farther away. They can be conveniently reached
either by electric line or motor car over a good
road.
Tennis
Playing privileges available on privately
owned and well maintained courts.
Badminton
Playing privileges available on privately
owned and completely equipped courts.
Riding
Well trained saddle horses can be hired for
a reasonable charge per hour.
Motoring
High grade touring cars for private service can
be hired at moderate rates through Carriage
Agent in the hotel lobby. The countryside
around Quebec with its romantic charm and
wealth of historic associations presents opportunities for many delightful motor trips.
Fishing and Hunting
Quebec is a convenient base from which to
reach a vast extent of wild forested country
offering exceptional fishing and hunting attractions. Capital trout fishing is furnished in
countless lakes and streams, in addition to which
the gamy ouananiche or land locked salmon
yields remarkably fine sport in some of the waters
of the Lake St. John district. In the line of big
game,mooseand deer are generally plentiful with
good chances for black bear in certain localities.
Comfortable cabin camps equipped to meet
usual requirements of the sportsman have been
established at various points throughout this
territory. Competent guides can be arranged for
and canoes and outfits supplied.
Winter Sports
With its unique natural advantages and unrivalled sport facilities, Quebec is deservedly
renowned as a winter sport centre and each year
it attracts an increasing throng of visitors from
the United States and various parts of Canada.
Among the sports which may be enjoyed under
highly favourable conditions are skiing, skijoring, skating, snowshoeing, tobogganing,
curling, sleighing, driving by husky dog team,
Indian Golf, etc. (This last-named sport, played
on skis, with bow and arrow instead of the
conventional clubs and ball, is proving very
popular among both residents and visitors.)
A varied and elaborate program of organized
activities is carried on throughout the entire
winter embracing competitions and games in
every branch of sport as well as other special
features of entertainment. A capable Sports
Director and staff of expert instructors are at the
service of Chateau Frontenac guests. Chateau Frontenac
QUEBEC
TERRACE FLOOR
on the Dufferin Terrace level
THIS SIDE FACES  THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER
Ce. coid fazi face au. fleuye 6i.£ac&en£
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
CHATEAU
FRONTENAC
QUEBEC QUE.
\.:i-.4 »-..i—■•—*————--—- - Chateau .Frontenac
QUEBEC
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
OFFICE FLOOR
First floor above
Dufferin Terrace
THIS  SIDE FACES THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER
Ce cote fail face au fleuve <St.Lauren£
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D\ DAMES
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F ESCALIER
G  LE GRAND ESCALIER
H AGENT DES VOITURES
I    PORTIER
J  BUREAU DE L'HOTEL
K BUREAU DES BILLETS
L TELEPHONES
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O JOURNAUX
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PUBLIC   STENOGRAPHER
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PARCEL ROOM
STAIRWAY
MAIN STAIRWAY
CARRIAGE AGENT
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HOTEL OFFICE
TICKET OFFICE
TELEPHONES
MEN'S WRITING!
ROOM j
MANAGER'S OFFICE
NEWS STAND
TELEGRAPHS
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QUEBEC
THIS SIDE FACES THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER
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FIRST FLOOR
CANADIAN
PACIFIC Chateau Frontenac
QUEBEC
TYPICAL BEDROOM FLOOR
THIS SIDE FACES THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER
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CANADIAN
PACIFIC
CHATEAU
FRONTENAC
QUEBEC QUE.  Founded 1880
Then As Now
A Canadian
Institution
Canadian pacific
Canada's National Enterprise
THE WORLD'S GREATEST TRAVEL SYSTEM
Serving Canada
B ridging   Two
Oceans—Linking
Four Continents—
Spans the World
STEAMSHIPS
Canadian Pacific Steamships — two
fleets which unite America east and
west with other continents. Across the
Atlantic to Europe with approximately
3 sailings a week (Empresses, Duchesses
and other Cabin Class Steamships).
Across the Pacific to Japan, China and
Philippines (Empress Steamships,
regular sailings). Connections to
Australia and New Zealand.
RAILWAY
The Canadian Pacific Railway (comprising 20,409
miles of operated and controlled lines) reaches
from Atlantic Ocean to Pacific Ocean, across
Canada and into the United States. Main line from
Montreal to Vancouver, 2,886 miles. Fast, frequent
and luxurious transcontinental long distance and
local passenger services, linking up all the important cities, industrial sections, agricultural
regions and vacation resorts. Efficient and
dependable freight service.
HOTELS
The Canadian Pacific operates the
largest chain of hotels in Canada,
numbering fourteen (including the
Royal York Hotel at Toronto, largest
hotel in the British Empire, opened
June, 1929). Situated in large cities
or at holiday resorts—others to be
built. Also—nine Bungalow Camps in
the Canadian Rockies and Ontario.
TELEGRAPHS
Canadian Pacific Telegraphs
extend the entire length of
the railway and also reach
every point of importance in
Canada away from it. 140,000
miles of wire. Also cable
connections across both
oceans and working radio
arrangements.
EXPRESS
Canadian Pacific Express—
travellers' cheques to suit
all travelling arrangements,
and good all over the world.
Also a forwarding service for
package merchandise, with
world-wide connections —
including an air express
service.
CRUISES
Seven Famous Winter
Cruise s—
Round the World
South America South Africa
Mediterranean (2)
West Indies      (3)
FARM  LANDS
Several million acres of
choice farm lands in Western
Canada for sale at low prices
and on long terms, including
irrigated land in Alberta.
Generous colonization policies that are helping to develop and settle the West.
ALL    UNDER    ONE    MANAGEMENT
Canadian Pacific Agencies Throughout the World
Canada and United States
Atlanta, Ga E. G. Chesbrough, 1017 Healey Bldg.
Banff, Alta J. A. McDonald, C.P.R. Station.
Boston, Mass L. R. Hart, 405 Boylston St.
Buffalo, N.Y W. P. Wass, 160 Pearl St.
Calgary, Alta G. D. Brophy, C.P.R. Station.
Chicago, 111 T. J. Wall, 71 East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati, Ohio M. E. Malone, 201 Dixie Term'l Bldg.
Cleveland, Ohio G. H. Griffin, 1010 Chester Ave.
Detroit, Mich G. G. McKay, 1231 Washington Blvd.
Edmonton, Alta C. S. Fyfe, C.P.R. Building.
Fort William, Ont H. J. Skynner, 108 South May St.
Guelph, Ont  W. C. Tully, 30 Wyndham St.
Halifax, N.S A. C. MacDonald, 117 Hollis St.
Hamilton, Ont  A. Craig, Cor. King and James Sts.
Honolulu, T.H Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Indianapolis, Ind J. A. McKinney, Merchants Bank Buildng.
Juneau, Alaska W. L. Coates.
Kansas City, Mo R. G. Norris, 723 Walnut St.
Ketchikan, Alaska Edgar Anderson.
Kingston, Ont J. H. Welch, 180 Wellington St.
London, Ont H. J. McCallum, 417 Richmond St.
Los Angeles, Cal W. Mcllroy, 621 South Grand Ave.
Milwaukee, Wis  F. T. Sansom, 68 East Wisconsin Ave.
Minneapolis, Minn H. M. Tait, 611 2nd Ave. South.
Montreal, Que F. C. Lydon, 201 St. James Street.
Moosejaw, Sask T. J. Colton, Canadian Pacific Station.
Nelson, B.C J. S. Carter, Baker & Ward Sts.
New York, N.Y F. R. Perry, Madison Ave., at 44th St.
North Bay, Ont C. H. White, 87 Main Street, West.
Omaha, Neb H. J. Clark, 727 W.O.W. Building.
Ottawa, Ont J. A. McGill, 83 Sparks St.
Peterboro, Ont J. Skinner, George St.
Philadelphia, Pa J. C. Patteson, 1500 Locust St.
Pittsburgh, Pa C. L. Williams, 338 Sixth Ave.
Port Arthur, Ont F. C. Gibbs, Canadian Pacific Station.
Portland, Ore W. H. Deacon, 55 Third St.
Prince Rupert, B.C *... .W. C. Orchard.
Quebec, Que C. A. Langevin, Palais Station.
Regina, Sask J. W. Dawson, Canadian Pacific Station.
Saint John, N.B G. E. Carter, 40 King St.
St. Louis, Mo Geo. P. Carbrey, 412 Locust St.
St. Paul, Minn W. H. Lennon, Soo Line, Robert & Fourth Sts.
San Francisco, Cal  .F. L. Nason, 675 Market St.
Saskatoon, Sask G. B. Hill, 115 Second Ave.
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont J. O. Johnston, 529 Queen St.
Seattle, Wash E. L. Sheehan, 1320 Fourth Ave.
Sherbrooke, Que J. A. Metivier, 91 Wellington St. North.
Skagway, Alaska L. H. Johnston.
Spokane, Wash E. L. Cardie, Spokane International Ry.
Tacoma, Wash  .D. C. O'Keefe, 1113 Pacific Ave.
Toronto, Ont Wm. Fulton, Canadian Pacific Bldg.
Vancouver, B.C..
Victoria, B.C....
Washington, D.C,
Windsor, Ont....
Winnipeg, Man. .
, F. H. Daly, 434 Hastings St. West.
.L. D. Chetham, 1102 Government St.
.C. E. Phelps, 905 Fifteenth St., N.W.
.W. C. Elmer, 34 Sandwich St. West.
. C. B. Andrews, Main and Portage.
Europe
Antwerp, Belgium E. A. Schmitz, 25 Quai Jordaens.
Belfast, Ireland Wm. McCalla, 41-43 Victoria St.
Birmingham, Eng. W. T. Treadaway, 4 Victoria Square.
Bristol, Eng A. S. Ray, 18 St. Augustine's Parade.
Brussels, Belgium G. L. M. Servais, 98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max.
Cobh, Ireland J. Hogan, 10 Westbourne Place.
Glasgow, Scotland W. Stewart, 25 Bothwell St.
Hamburg, Germany T. H. Gardner, Gansemarkt 3.
Liverpool, Eng H. T. Penny, Pier Head.
I oNmoNr Fnff /C E. Jenkins, 62-65 Charing Cross, S.W. 1.
'      s \G. Saxon Jones, 103 Leadenhall St., E.C. 3.
Manchester, Eng J. W. Maine, 31 Mosley Street.
Paris, France A. V. Clarke, 24 Boulevard des Capucines.
Rotterdam, Holland J. Springett, Coolsingel No. 91.
Southampton, Eng H. Taylor, 7 Canute Road.
Hong Kong, China G.
Kobe, Japan B.
Manila, P.I J.
Shanghai, China A.
Yokohama, Japan E.
Asia
E. Costello, Opposite Blake Pier.
G. Ryan, 7 Harima Machi.
R. Shaw, 14-16 Calle David, Roxas
M. Parker, 4 Bund.
Hospes, No. 21 Yamashita-cho
Bldg.
Australia, New Zealand, etc.
J. Sclater, Traffic Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for Australia and New Zealand.
Union House, Sydney, N.S.W.
A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for New Zealand,
Auckland, N.Z.
Adelaide, S.A Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Auckland, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Brisbane, Qd  Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Christchurch, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Dunedin, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Fremantle, W.A Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Hobart, Tas Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Launceston, Tas Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Melbourne, Vic Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.),
Thos. Cook & Son.
Perth, W.A ..,.. Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Suva, Fiji Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Sydney, N.S.W Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Wellington, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Any of the agents listed above will be glad to make reservations at Canadian Pacific Hotels for intending guests.
Canadian Pacific  Hotel Department
C B. FOSTER,
Convention and Tourist Traffic Manager,
Montreal.
D. J. GOWANS,
Asst. General Manager,
Eastern Hotels,
Montreal.
A. ALLERTON,
General Manager,
Eastern Hotelst
Montreal.
M. P. DELAHANTY,
Asst. General Manager,
Western Hotels,
Winnipeg.
H. F. MATTHEWS,
General Manager,
Western Hotels,
Winnipeg.  r. V :: N a A a H '.. n a
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FRONTENAC
QUEBEC
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1 he Jmxpression oi a Nations  Character
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WORLDWIDE in scope, international in activities, the Canadian
Pacific is pre-eminently the expression
of a progressive nation's character.
Canadian Pacific rails extend from the
Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, webbing
prairies and mountains, reaching out
to cities, farms, forests, ranches and
mines scattered over a million square
miles.
Stupendous record in steel of the daring
and genius of a young people who fifty
years ago dreamed of transforming a
virgin wilderness into a nation—and
made their dream come truq.
Canadian Pacific Steamships, on all
seven seas—Canadian Pacific Telegraphs, carrying messages to world's
end and back — Canadian Pacific
Express, trusted bearer of goods to
the farthest places, with money-orders
of worldwide currency —■ Canadian
Pacific Hotels, with guests from all
the continents.
Kjrigantic symbol oi the visionf enterprise and spirit
oi tne people oi Canada.
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1. St. Lawrence River;  2. The Citadel;   3. Dufferin Terrace;   4. Wolfe and Montcalm Monuments;   5. The Chateau Frontenac;   6. Champlain Monument;
7. Post Office;     8.  Place d'Armes;     9. Court House;    10. Anglican Cathedral;     11. Convent Ursuline;     12. St. Louis Gate;     13. Cross of Sacrifice-
14. Drill Hall;   15. Parliament Building;   16. Museum;   17. Wolfe's Cove.
me CITY
Founded in 1608 by Champlain, Quebec, the grey yet
vigorously modern capital of French Canada, sprawls in
old-world fashion along the heights and down the steep
slopes of a bold promontory that juts into the broad
St. Lawrence one hundred and seventy-two miles below
Montreal. Easy of access by railway, steamship lines
and motor road, it is a charming city of 133,000 inhabi
tants—most of whom are French-speaking—a bustling
sea-port and a thriving industrial centre. Historically,
it is the most interesting and romantic spot in America,
a veritable dream-city with narrow twisting streets,
ancient walls and houses and venerable churches, all
eloquent of Quebec's past glories and accomplishments.
Woe CLIMATE
Quebec's healthy climate may well be numbered among
its foremost attractions, no matter -what season is considered. Come in springtime—when the warmest of
sunshine lies in vivid splashes on old walls and roofs—
when mild breezes stir blossom-laden trees in convent
gardens—and you will say that this is Quebec's most
delightful season.    But come again in summertime to
enjoy warm, breeze-tempered days and cool refreshing
nights—or in autumn when the air is tonic-like and bracing—and you will think these just as delightful. Then,
if you should come again in wintertime—to have the
crisp, never-too-cold dryness of the air set your blood
atingle, put new glow into your cheeks, new vigor into
your muscles—you will have to admit all are best!
Within the city limits—The Plains of Abraham where
Montcalm's troops were defeated by the British under
Wolfe; Montcalm's reputed headquarters on St. Louis St.;
Governor's Garden and the Wolfe-Montcalm monument;
the Seminaire de Quebec founded in the 17th century by
Laval. Place d'Armes Square, Cardinal's Palace, City
Hall, Parliament Buildings; St. Louis, Kent and St. John
gates; Franciscan Sisters (White Nuns) Chapel; Wolfe's
Monument, Martello Tower; Spencerwood (Lieutenant-
Governor's residence); the Citadel and fortifications; the
Ramparts; Laval University, Ursuline Convent; Notre
Dame des Victoires Church, over 240 years old; Sous-le-
Cap—the narrowest street in North America;   Little
POINTS of INTEREST
Champlain Street and the
Break-Neck steps, etc. Outside the city limits—Montmorency Falls and Kent
House; Ste. Anne de Beaupre
and its famous shrine; Cap
Rouge and Quebec bridge;
Sillery, with its old Jesuit
mission; Indian village
of Lorette, Wolfe's Cove,
Lake Beauport, Lake St.
Charles, Isle of Orleans, etc.
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I The Chateau Frontenac
QUEBEC, P.Q.
Opbn All Year—ROOMS AND SERVICES—European Plan
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
CHATEAU
FRONTENAC
QUEBEC que.
BUILT in the manner of an eighteenth century French Chateau, fireproof construction
throughout, modern to the last degree in
equipment and service.
Number of Guest Rooms—567 with Bath,
111 without Bath.
Four large suites in the Round Tower, facing
Dufferin Terrace, comprising the Colonial,
Dutch, Habitant and Chinese, each consisting
of two double bedrooms, with bath and large
Sitting Room. There are sixteen suites in the
Central Tower section, consisting of Sitting
Room, Double Bedroom and Bath. Connecting
rooms as desired.
Dancing every evening other than Sunday
either in the Jacques Cartier Room or Ball Room.
Every Sunday evening (except during the summer months) an interesting concert program is
given by the Chateau Frontenac orchestra
assisted by high class vocal talent.
Convention Rooms—Arranged from below—
also space for Exhibits—Committee Rooms.
DIRECTORY OF SERVICES
Terrace Floor—Coffee Shop, Barber Shop,
Billiard Room, Shoe Shine, Summer Terrace
Cafe, Tea Room, Tavern, Ladies' Hairdressing
and Manicure Parlor, Bank of Montreal,
Broker's Office.
Office Floor—Main Office, Information, Frontenac Grill Room, Jacques Cartier Room,
Library, Champlain Room, St. Lawrence Room,
Carriage Agent, Check Room, Church Directory, Ladies' Dressing Room, News Stand,
Public Stenographer, Sleeping Car and Ticket
Office, Telegraph Office, Telephones, Writing
Room, Lounge and Shops.
First Floor—Main Dining Room, Drawing
Room, Salon Madeleine de Vercheres, Foyer,
Lounge, Ball Room, Private Dining Rooms,
Children's and Servants' Dining Room.
House Physician in attendance.
PUBLIC SPACES, MEETING ROOMS, DINING ROOMS and BANQUET ROOMS
Seating Capacities
Floor
Terrace
Office
First
Second
Public Rooms Area      Convention    Banquet
Terrace Tea Room  1,380 sq. ft.
Terrace Cafe  2,068
Coffee Shop  2,444
Jacques Cartier Room  2,272      " 250 200
Frontenac Grill Room  2,240
Ball Room and Foyer  6,545      " 900 700
Ball Room Gallery        760      '' 127
Main Dining Room  6,701      " .. 600
Salon de Vercheres  2,419
Committee Room  1,475
Dining
60
115
136
150
125
450
500
100 or number smaller rooms.
Transfer Rates  between  Station,   Ferry,
Ocean Docks and Chateau Frontenac.
Cabs,   Motor   Bus,   Taxis   (and   Sleighs   in
Winter).
(1) Palais Union Station and Chateau Frontenac.
Distance—3^ mile.
By Motor Bus—25c. per person, including
hand baggage.
By Taxi—50c. for one or two persons, including hand baggage.
(2) Chateau Frontenac and Ocean Docks:
Distance—1 mile.
By Motor Bus—50c. per person including
hand baggage.
By Taxi—70c. for one or two persons, including hand baggage.
(3) Chateau Frontenac and Canada S.S. Lines
Dock:   Distance—34 mile.
By Motor Bus—25c. per person, including
hand baggage.
By Taxi—50c. for one or two persons, including hand baggage.
(4) Chateau  Frontenac   and   Levis   Ferry:
Distance—34 mile.
By Taxi—50c. for one or two persons, including hand baggage. CANADIAN
PACIFIC
CHATEAU
FRONTENAC
QUEBEC QUE.
The Chateau Frontenac
QUEBEC, P.Q.
Recreational Attractions and Facilities
Summer Sports
Golf—Guests of the Chateau Frontenac
have the privilege of playing on two excellent
18 hole courses.
At the Kent Golf Club
(6,121 yards)
Rates per day. . . $2.00
Rates per week .  9.00
Rates per month.25.00
Season
membership.. 50.00
At the Quebec Golf Club
(6,456 yards)
Rates per day. . . $2.50
Rates per week.. 12.00
Rates per month.40.00
Season
membership.. 80.00
Both of these courses are set amid beautiful
natural surroundings high above and commanding inspiring views of the St. Lawrence River.
The Kent Golf Club is located at Montmorency
Falls (7 miles from the Chateau Frontenac) and
the Quebec Golf Club at Boischatel, a mile
farther away. They can be conveniently reached
either by electric line or motor car over a good
road.
Tennis
Playing privileges available on privately
owned and well maintained courts.
Badminton
Playing privileges available on privately
owned and completely equipped courts.
Riding
Well trained saddle horses can be hired for
a reasonable charge per hour.
Motoring
High grade touring cars for private service can
be hired at moderate rates through Carriage
Agent in the hotel lobby. The countryside
around Quebec with its romantic charm and
wealth of historic associations presents opportunities for many delightful motor trips.
Fishing and Hunting
Quebec is a convenient base from which to
reach a vast extent of wild forested country
offering exceptional fishing and hunting attractions. Capital trout fishing is furnished in
countless lakes and streams, in addition to which
the gamy ouananiche or land locked salmon
yields remarkably fine sport in some of the waters
of the Lake St. John district. In the line of big
game,mooseand deer are generally plentiful with
good chances for black bear in certain localities.
Comfortable cabin camps equipped to meet
usual requirements of the sportsman have been
established at various points throughout this
territory. Competent guides can be arranged for
and canoes and outfits supplied.
Winter Sports
With its unique natural advantages and unrivalled sport facilities, Quebec is deservedly
renowned as a winter sport centre and each year
it attracts an increasing throng of visitors from
the United States and various parts of Canada.
Among the sports which may be enjoyed under
highly favourable conditions are skiing, skijoring, skating, snowshoeing, tobogganing,
curling, sleighing, driving by husky dog team,
Indian Golf, etc. (This last-named sport, played
on skis, with bow and arrow instead of the
conventional clubs and ball, is proving very
popular among both residents and visitors.)
A varied and elaborate program of organized
activities is carried on throughout the entire
winter embracing competitions and games in
every branch of sport as well as other special
features of entertainment. A capable Sports
Director and staff of expert instructors are at the
service of Chateau Frontenac guests. Chateau Frontenac
QUEBEC
THIS SIDE FACE6 THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER
Ce cote /aii face au. fleuve SiZaureni
FIRST FLOOR
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
CHATEAU
FRONTENAC
QUEBEC QUE. Chateau Frontenac
QUEBEC
TYPICAL BEDROOM FLOOR
THIS SIDE FACES  THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER
Ce cofe faii face au,fZeiuxeSf.£aunerii. •
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
CHATEAU
FRONTENAC
QUEBEC QUE. y
Chateau Frontenac
QUEBEC
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on the Dufferin Terrace level
THIS SIDE FACES THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER
Ce cols fait face ait. fleuve Sifettoenj
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QUEBEC
THIS  SIDE FACES THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER
Cd go&£ fazi face au fteuve SiJjaureni
OFFICE FLOOR
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
First tloor above
Dufferin Terrace
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FRONTENAC
QUEBEC QUE.
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cS fO Founded 1880
Then As Now
A Canadian
Institution
Canadian pacific
Canada's National Enterprise
THE WORLD'S GREATEST TRAVEL SYSTEM
Serving Canada
B ridging Tw o
Oceans—Linking
Four Continents—
Spans the World
STEAMSHIPS
Canadian Pacific Steamships — two
fleets which unite America east and
west with other continents. Across the
Atlantic to Europe with approximately
3 sailings a week (Empresses, Duchesses
and other Cabin Class Steamships).
Across the Pacific to Japan, China and
Philippines (Empress Steamships,
regular sailings). Connections to
Australia and New Zealand.
TELEGRAPHS
Canadian Pacific Telegraphs
extend the entire length of
the railway and also reach
every point of importance in
Canada away from it. 140,000
miles of wire. Also cable
connections across both
oceans and working radio
arrangements.
RAILWAY
The Canadian Pacific Railway (comprising 20,409
miles of operated and controlled lines) reaches
from Atlantic Ocean to Pacific Ocean, across
Canada and into the United States. Main line from
Montreal to Vancouver, 2,886 miles. Fast, frequent
and luxurious transcontinental long distance and
local passenger services, linking up all the important cities, industrial sections, agricultural
regions and vacation resorts. Efficient and
dependable freight service.
HOTELS
The Canadian Pacific operates the
largest chain of hotels in Canada,
numbering fourteen (including the
Royal York Hotel at Toronto, largest
hotel in the British Empire, opened
June, 1929). Situated in large cities
or at holiday resorts—others to be
built. Also—nine Bungalow Camps in
the Canadian Rockies and Ontario.
EXPRESS
Canadian Pacific Express—
travellers' cheques to suit
all travelling arrangements,
and good all over the world.
Also a forwarding service for
package merchandise, with
world-wide connections —
including an air express
service.
CRUISES
Six Famous  Winter
Cruises
Round the World
Mediterranean (2)
West Indies     (3)
FARM  LANDS
Several million acres of
choice farm lands in Western
Canada for sale at low prices
and on long terms, including
irrigated land in Alberta.
Generous colonization policies that are helping to develop and settle the West.
ALL    UNDER    ONE    MANAGEMENT
Canadian Pacific Agencies Throughout the World
Canada and United States
Atlanta, Ga	
Banff, Alta	
Boston, Mass	
Buffalo, N.Y	
Calgary, Alta	
Chicago, 111	
Cincinnati, Ohio.....
Cleveland, Ohio	
Detroit, Mich	
Edmonton, Alta	
Fort William, Ont..
Guelph, Ont	
Halifax, N.S	
Hamilton, Ont	
Honolulu, T.H	
Indianapolis, Ind...
Juneau, Alaska	
Kansas City, Mo	
Ketchikan, Alaska. .
Kingston, Ont	
London, Ont	
Los Angeles, Cal...
Milwaukee, Wis....
Minneapolis, Minn..
Montreal, Que.....
Moosejaw, Sask	
Nelson, B.C	
New York, N.Y	
North Bay, Ont	
Omaha, Neb	
Ottawa, Ont	
Peterboro, Ont	
Philadelphia, Pa. . .
Pittsburgh, Pa	
Port Arthur, Ont...
Portland, Ore. .....
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Quebec, Que	
Regina, Sask	
Saint John, N.B. . ..
St. Louis, Mo	
St. Paul, Minn	
San Francisco, Cal..
Saskatoon, Sask....
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont
Seattle, Wash	
Sherbrooke, Que	
Skagway, Alaska....
Spokane, Wash	
Tacoma, Wash	
Toronto, Ont	
,. E. G. Chesbrough, 1017 Healey Bldg.
,. J. A. McDonald, C.P.R. Station.
, .L. R. Hart, 405 Boylston St.
. W. P. Wass, 160 Pearl St.
.G. D. Brophy, C.P.R. Station.
.T. J. Wall, 71 East Jackson Blvd.
. M. E. Malone, 201 Dixie Term'l Bldg.
.G. H. Griffin, 1010 Chester Ave.
.G. G. McKay, 1231 Washington Blvd.
. .C. S. Fyfe, C.P.R. Building.
.H. J. Skynner, 108 South May St.
. W. C. Tully, 30 Wyndham St.
. A. C. MacDonald, 117 Hollis St.
. A. Craig, Cor. King and James Sts.
.Theo. H. Davies & Co.
. J. A. McKinney, Merchants Bank Buildng.
.W. L. Coates.
. R. G. Norris, 723 Walnut St.
. Edgar Anderson.
J. H. Welch, 180 Wellington St.
.H. J. McCallum, 417 Richmond St.
,W. Mcllroy, 621 South Grand Ave.
. F. T. Sansom, 68 East Wisconsin Ave.
.H. M. Tait, 611 2nd Ave. South.
. F. C. Lydon, 201 St. James Street.
.T. J. Colton, Canadian Pacific Station.
J. S. Carter, Baker & Ward Sts.
.F. R. Perry, Madison Ave., at 44th St.
. C. H. White, 87 Main Street, West.
.H. J. Clark, 727 W.O.W. Building.
.J. A. McGill, 83 Sparks St.
. J. Skinner, George St.
. J. C. Patteson, 1500 Locust St.
. C. L. Williams, 338 Sixth Ave.
. F. C. Gibbs, Canadian Pacific Station.
. W. H. Deacon, 55 Third St.
.W. C. Orchard.
. C. A. Langevin, Palais Station.
. J. W. Dawson, Canadian Pacific Station.
.G. E. Carter, 40 King St.
, . Geo. P. Carbrey, 412 Locust St.
. W. H. Lennon, Soo Line, Robert & Fourth Sts.
. F. L. Nason, 675 Market St.
.G. B. Hill, 115 Second Ave.
. J. O. Johnston, 529 Queen St.
. .E. L. Sheehan, 1320 Fourth Ave.
J. A. Metivier, 91 Wellington St. North.
.L. H. Johnston.
. E. L. Cardie, Spokane International Ry.
.D. C. O'Keefe, 1113 Pacific Ave.
.Wm. Fulton, Canadian Pacific Bldg.
Vancouver, B.C..
Victoria, B.C	
Washington, D.C.
Windsor, Ont	
Winnipeg* Man..
.F. H. Daly, 434 Hastings St. West.
.L. D. Chetham, 1102 Government St.
.C. E. Phelps, 905 Fifteenth St., N.W.
. W. C. Elmer, 34 Sandwich St. West.
. C B. Andrews, Main and Portage.
Europe
l.
3.
Antwerp, Belgium  E. A. Schmitz, 25 Quai Jordaens.
Belfast, Ireland Wm. McCalla, 41-43 Victoria St.
Birmingham, Eng W. T. Treadaway, 4 Victoria Square.
Bristol, Eng A. S. Ray, 18 St. Augustine's Parade.
Brussels, Belgium G. L. M. Servais, 98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max.
Cobh, Ireland J. Hogan, 10 Westbourne Place.
Glasgow, Scotland W. Stewart, 25 Bothwell St.
Hamburg, Germany T. H. Gardner, Gansemarkt 3.
Liverpool, Eng H. T. Penny, Pier Head.
T oNmoN Frit? /C. E. Jenkins, 62-65 Charing Cross, S.W.
'      g \G. Saxon Jones, 103 Leadenhall St., E.C.
Manchester, Eng J. W. Maine, 31 Mosley Street.
Paris, France A. V. Clarke, 24 Boulevard des Capucines.
Rotterdam, Holland J. Springett, Coolsingel No. 91.
Southampton, Eng H. Taylor, 7 Canute Road.
Asia
Hong Kong. China G. E. Costello, Opposite Blake Pier.
Kobe, Japan B. G. Ryan, 7 Harima Machi.
Manila, P.I J. R. Shaw, 14-16 Calle David, Roxas Bldg.
Shanghai, China. . A. M. Parker, 4 Bund.
Yokohama, Japan E. Hospes, No. 21 Yamashita-cho
Australia, New Zealand, etc.
J. Sclater, Traffic Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for Australia and New Zealand.
Union House, Sydney, N.S.W.
A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for New Zealand,
Auckland, N.Z.
Adelaide, S.A Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Auckland, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Brisbane, Qd Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Christchurch, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Dunedin, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Fremantle, W.A. Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Hobart, Tas Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Launceston, Tas Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Melbourne, Vic Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.),
Thos. Cook & Son.
Perth, W.A Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Suva, Fiji Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Sydney, N.S.W Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Wellington, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Any of the agents listed above will be glad to make reservations at Canadian Pacific Hotels for intending guests.
Canadian Pacific ............ Hotel Department
C. B. FOSTER,
Convention and Touris-t Traffic Manager,
Montreal.
D. J. GOWANS,
Asst. General Manager,
Eastern Hotels,
Montreal.
A. ALLERTON,
General Manager,
Eastern Hotels,
Montreal.
m. P. DELAHANTY,
Asst. General Manager,
Western Hotels,
Winnipeg.
H. F. MATTHEWS,
General Manager,
Western Hotels,
Winnipeg. iii
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