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Banff-Lake Louise and the Canadian Rockies Canadian Pacific Railway Company 1929

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The   Bow   River   Valley,    Banff,   from a painting by Adam Sherriff Scott
LOOKING from Sulphur Mountain, a most wonderful
picture of the Bow River Valley can be viewed.    In the
centre is the great grey bulk of Banff Springs Hotel, bear'
ing a striking resemblance to an ancient Scottish castle.
Through the cleft of the mountains is seen the junction of the
Bow River with the smaller and darker Spray River, with the
new Banff golf course at the right; and closing in the picture
is the distant snow-clad barrier of the Fairholme Range.
ANADA'S   NATIONAL   PARKS
The line of the Canadian Pacific traverses or adjoins
six of the magnificent National Parks of Canada. These
are:
Rocky Mountains Park* 2.^751 square miles in area, the
chier centres or wnich are Banff and Lake Louise.
Kootenay Par\, extending for five miles on each side
of the Banff-Winder mere automobile road.
Yoho Par\, in which are situated Emerald Lake,
Wapta Lake, Lake O'Hara and the beautiful Yoho
Valley.
Glacier Par\, a remarkably fine climbing centre.  .
Mount Revelsto\e Par\.
Waterton La\es Par\, in southern Alberta.
EUROPEAN EDITION
PRINTED IN CANADA   1929
( THE Canadian Pacific
Route is the most picturesque across the continent of
Js[orth America. The Dominion
of Canada stretches from sea to
sea; and besides its great size, it
is a country of extraordinary
variety. Mountains, prairies,
forests, cities, mighty lakes—
these provide a journey of such
attractive quality that the
Canadian Pacific route is the
unquestioned favorite of the
traveller who wishes to see the
best.
B
T THE   Canadian
Pacific route, you
cross the backbone
ranges of America. There
awaits you, therefore, all the
magnificent scenery that is to
be found nowhere else but in
the high Rockies. The Canadian Roc\ies comprise the
most wonderful mountain
region in the world. Nearly
seven hundred peaks, over
6,000 feet in height—lovely
mountain lakes, swift rivers,
still primeval forests, glisten
ing glaciers, extensive nation'
al parks, hundreds of miles of roads and good trails—these are
some of the features.
THE CACADIAN PACIFIC route through these mighty
mountain ranges is in itself a visualization of human triumph
over nature. From Calgary, to which it has been steadily
climbing since it left Lake Superior, the railway rises another
three-eighths of a mile to the Great Divide. Thence, following the narrow Kicking Horse Pass, it dips down to meet the
majestic Columbia River; then it re-ascends another quarter of
a mile to the summit of the Selkirk Range before beginning its
three'quarter mile descent, through the rugged and impressive
Canyons of the Thompson and Fraser Rivers, to the Pacific
Coast.
THIS GREAT mountain region offers a remarkable wel"
come to those who tarry for a while. Banff, that famous
resort, with its glorious panorama of Bow and Spray Rivers,
is the headquarters of Rocky Mountains Park. La\e Louise,
an enchanting lake with a no less enchanting hotel, is the gate'
way to a region of magnificent scenery. Field brings you to
winsome Emerald Lake and the wonderful Yoho Valley, or
Wapta Camp to Lake O'Hara.
BEAUTIFUL HOTELS are there to give you welcome and
hospitality, and bungalow camps. Motoring along perfect
roads, trail-riding, fishing, hunting, climbing, exploring, swim'
ming in hot sulphur pools, Alpine flower gathering, wonder-
photo taking, golfing at Banff on the most scenic course in the
world—these are some of the "frill" doings in the Rockies.
The biggest and most solid pleasure is just living—living
where the air has never been contaminated with soot, where
you can go from summer to snow at any time you want, where
you need no alarm clock to get you up, no cordial to put you
to sleep, no dinner bell to tell you when it's time to eat.
Travelling through the Canadian Rockies during the summer
is particularly delightful, because of the comparatively cool summer temperature in the mountains north of the international
boundary line.
Train Service
Train Service through the Canadian Rockies consists in
summer of five transcontinental trains a day—each way.
The Trans-Canada Limited from Montreal and
Toronto to Winnipeg and Vancouver. This is an exclusively
all-sleeping-car train, carrying standard and compartment
sleepers, solarium lounge cars and dining car.
The Mountaineer from Chicago, St. Paul and Minnc
apolis to Calgary and Vancouver. An all-sleeping-car train,
carrying standard and compartment sleepers, solarium lounge
car and dining car.
The Soo-Pacific Express from Chicago, St. Paul
and Minneapolis to Calgary and Vancouver.
The Imperial from Montreal to Winnipeg and Vancouver.
The Toronto-Vancouver Express from Toronto to
Winnipeg and Vancouver.
The winter service consists of the Imperial, the Van-
couver'Toronto Express, and a through connection from the
Imperial to and from the Twin Cities and Chicago.
Alternative Routes
On the reverse side of this booklet you will find a com'
plete list of alternative routes and free optional routes to and
from the Pacific Coast. Two of these can be specially mentioned :
The Great Lakes Trip. This is a very agreeable
summer variation. Canadian Pacific Great Lakes Steamships
—large modern vessels with every convenience—provide a
magnificent two-day trip across Lake Superior and Lake Huron,
sailing from Port McNicoll and Owen Sound to Port Arthur
and Fort William.  (See current Time Table for sailings).
Southern British Columbia Route. This is an
alternative route of great beauty, through the picturesque
mining, agricultural and lake districts of the "Boundary11
country. At the eastern end, it leaves the main line at Medicine
Hat and follows the Crow's Nest Pass; at the western end it
rejoins the main line at Hope. This route is furthermore
linked to the main line by three cross-routes—through either
the Windermere Valley, Arrow Lakes or Okanagan Lake.
United Stated Connections
Excellent connections from the United States to the Canadian Rockies:
To Montreal and Toronto there are many services from
New York, Boston, Buffalo, Detroit and other points.
At Sault Ste. Marie—Soo Line connection to Twin
Cities, or D.S.S. 6? A. to Duluth.
At Winnipeg—Soo Line service to Twin Cities and
Chicago.
At Moose Jaw—Soo Line service to Twin Cities and
Chicago. This is the route of "The Mountaineer.'
At Calgary there is through Canadian Pacific service to
Spokane, Wash.
From Vancouver there is both rail and steamer connec'
tion to Seattle.
From Victoria and Seattle there are steamer connections
to California.
Behind Banff Springs Hotel towers Sulphur Mountain
CANADIAN PACIFIC HOTELS
In the Canadian Rockies and on the Pacific Coast are six
beautiful Canadian Pacific hotels which provide ideal accommodation for the visitor. (Open all year unless otherwise
mentioned).
Banff Springs Hotel, Banff, Alberta
A magnificent hotel in tt ; heart of Rocky Mountains
National Park, backed by three splendid mountain ranges.
Open May 15th to October ist.
Chateau Lake Louise, Lake Louise, Alberta
A wonderful hotel facing an exquisite Alpine Lake in
Rocky Mountains National Park. Open June ist to October ist.
Emerald Lake Chalet, near Field, B.C.
A charming Chalet hotel situated amidst the picturesque
Alpine scenery of the Yoho National Park. Open June 1 5th
to September 15th.
Hotel Sicamous, Sicamous, B.C.
Junction for the Okanagan Valley, and stop-over point for
daylight trip through the canyons.
Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver, B.C.
The largest hotel on the North Pacific Coast, overlooking
the Strait of Georgia.
Empress Hotel, Victoria, B.C.
A luxurious hotel in this Garden City of the Pacific Coast.
Other Canadian Pacific Hotels
Hotel Palliser, Calgary, Alberta.
Hotel Saskatchewan, Regina, Sask.
The Royal Alexandra, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
The Royal York, Toronto.     Opens June, 7929.
The Place Viger, Montreal.
The Chateau Frontenac, Quebec.
The Algonquin, St. Andrews, N.B.
McAdam Hotel, McAdam, N.B.
Bungalow Camps
Hotel accommodation in the Canadian Rockies is supplemented by Bungalow Camps at convenient points. These
Bungalow Camps appeal particularly to the climber, the
hiker or the trail rider; they consist of sleeping bungalows,
of log or other wooden construction, with a central
community building in which is an attractive dining and
lounging room.
Moraine Lake Camp
Castle Mountain Camp
Radium Hot Springs Camp
Mount Assiniboine Camp
Tea Houses and Rest Houses are located at many other
points reached from the Bungalow Camps on excursions.
Wapta Camp
La\e O^Hara Camp
Toho Valley Camp I
LAKE   LOUISE
LAKE LOUISE — probably
4 the most perfect gem of scenery in the known world—bears
the liquid music, the soft color
notes of its name, into the realm
of the visible. Nestling 600 feet
above the railway on the far side
of a mountain palisade, amidst an
amphitheatre of peaks, it is a dra'
matic palette upon which the
Great Artist has splashed his
most gorgeous hues.
Deepest and most exquisitely
colored is the lake itself, sweeping
from rosy dawn to sunset through
green, blue, amethyst and violet,
undershot by gold. Darling
white is the sun'glorified Victoria Glacier at the farther end;
sombre are the enclosing pine'
clad peaks that dip almost per'
pendicularly into the lake; and
magnificent are the stark immens'
ities of the snow'crowned peaks
that enclose the entire picture.
On the margin of this most perfect lake, in one of the wonderful
flower-gardens in which the
Rockies abound, where poppies,
violets and anemones slope
through terraced lawns to the
water's edge—the Canadian
Pacific has placed its great
Chateau Lake Louise.
.-, y^y:m:':~^mm\'-\'--:~v^'y~-m~-''^y'y'/ .-. ;.-'■-:• ,■ --■■'V''^'^'^
Lake  Louise
from a pastel by
A. C. Leighton, A.R.B.A.
24-HOUR MOTOR
DETOUR
THIS IS one of the finest or-
ganisedautomobileexcursions
of this continent, specially timed
to give through passengers an
opportunity of seeing the chief
sights in Banff, Lake Louise and
Yoho National Park. It is made
in special busses, making close
connection with through trains at
either end of the motor detour.
Leaving Banff Springs Hotel
after lunch (westbound trains arrive at 8.15, 8.55, 10.55 and n.50
a.m.) the cars, after a general
sight-seeing drive round Banff,
make a 42-mile run to Lake Louise,
where the night is spent at the
Chateau Lake Louise. In the
morning, the journey continues
to the Great Divide, Wapta Lake,
Kicking Horse Pass, Yoho Valley,
Emerald Lake, Kicking Horse
Canyon and Golden, arriving at
Golden in time to resume the
westbound train journey. Similar
schedules are established in the
reverse direction.
The length of the 24-Hour
Motor Detour, including the
sight-seeing ride round Banff, is
142 miles. Special arrangements
are made for handling baggage
and sleeping-car reservations. A
detailed circular about this very
attractive excursion can be procured from Canadian Pacific agencies.
ACROSS   CANADA
MONTREAL—Canada's largest city, with its mile-broad St. Lawrence
River (waterway of European shipping services) and its lovely Mount Royal—■
its teeming commerce and large French-Canadian population—and, if time
permits, a side-trip to old-world Quebec or the charming down-east Maritime
Provinces.
OTTAWA—Canada's capital, residence of the Governor-General, meeting-
place of the Senate and the House of Commons, and itself a beautiful city.
TOROJyTO—chief city of the prosperous province of Ontario— noted
equally for its famous fall "Fair" as for its progressiveness, vast industrial
business, beautiful residential districts, and celebrated educational institutions.
AROUND   LAKE   SUPERIOR
THE pageant flies swiftly by as you speed westward—farming, lumbering,
mining, the unrivalled fishing and hunting country of the Algoma region.
Leaving Sudbury, you enter the vast hinterland that fringes Lake Superior,
travelling for a considerable distance in full view of that magnificent inland
ocean.
Then come the twin cities of Port Arthur and Fort William, whose many
giant elevators bear vivid testimony to the enormous wheat crop of Western
Canada that finds its eastbound outlet here.
Or YOU CAN TAKE THE GREAT LAKES STEAMSHIP TRIP INSTEAD (SEE "ALTERNATIVE Routes," overleaf). Bungalow Camps at French River, Nipigon
and Kenora—see booklets obtainable at Canadian Pacific Agencies.
WINNIPEG
WESTWARD from the Twin Cities the same characteristic country continues for some three hundred miles, passing Kenora, well-known summer
resort on Lake of the Woods. Then the forest thins and widens out, to be
succeeded by the beginnings of the prairies.
WINNIPEG, at the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers, is the
capital of Manitoba—a beautiful and prosperous city that is the metropolis
ol the prairie provinces, one of the greatest primary wheat markets of the
world, and an important industrial and railway centre.
ACROSS   THE   PRAIRIES
FOR a day after leaving Winnipeg, you are still crossing the prairies. On
either side, stretching for hundreds of miles north and south, are seen the
herds of live stock and enormous grain fields that are the source of the great
agricultural production of the West. Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta
produce the best milling wheat in the world.
Important cities you pass, on the main line, are Brandon, Regina (capital cf
Saskatchewan), Moose Jaw, Medicine Hat and Calgary. Branch railway lines
criss-cross all this territory.
CALGARY, headquarters of a large irrigation system developed by the
Canadian Pacific, is also the scene each July of the famous "Stampede"—a
week's carnival of cowboy sports and contests.
NEARING   THE   ROCKIES
YOU can see the Rockies from Calgary, eighty miles distant; and as the
train pulls out, along the ancient glacier-grooved Bow Valley, the full glory
of that far-flung line of peaks, hung among the clouds and quivering in the
warm summer air, bursts upon the view. First come the grassy foothills, with
prosperous ranches and farms—then the dark evergreen forests and the great
grey bulk of the first ranges, and so, by narrow passes eroded by turbulent
mountain rivers, you reach Banff.
Six principal ranges comprise the Roc\ies—of remarkably different geological
age and configuration of outline. They stretch continuously between the
prairies and the Pacific Coast, for nearly six hundred miles. Many of the
principal mountains which you see, either from the train or at the popular
mountain centres, average a height of almost a mile above the valley.
BANFF
BANFF is the capital of Rocky Mountains Park. Situated in a pocket of a
wide circle of pearly-grey limestone peaks, embowered in pine forests and lawns,
with the glacial-green Bow River flowing through it, it has for many years been
one of the most popular mountain resorts of the entire continent.
This appeal is due not only by Banff's own environment, but also to the
world-famous Banff Springs Hotel. This magnificent structure, entirely re-built
during the past three years, dominates Banff like a huge grey baronial castle.
Its interior is characterized by a spaciousness, comfort and beauty which have
made its name a criterion amongst travellers.
WHAT   TO   DO   AT   BANFF
Golf-—a new 18-hole course created by the Canadian Pacific, providing
championship golf on one of the most beautifully-located courses of the world.
Tennis, too, at Banff Springs Hotel.
Motoring on first-class roads built by the National Parks Department.
Scores of short runs—and, for longer ones, the "Kicking Horse Trail" (traversed by the 24-Hour Motor Detour, mentioned above), and also the celebrated Banff-Windermere Road into Kootenay National Park. Many daily
organised trips.
Scenery—and no part of the Rockies yet to come exhibits a greater or more
romantic variety!
Hot Springs—from which sulphur water gushes at the rate of a million gallons
a day. Government bath-houses and handsome swimming pools at two of
them—and at Banff Springs Hotel the warm water is piped into a luxurious
swimming bath.
Beautiful hikes all around, easy mountain climbs for the beginner, and
really hard ones for the seasoned. In the town—-a 200, museum and recreation
grounds—a little way beyond, the Buffalo Park.
Boating and launch trips along the Bow River. Fishing at Lake Minnewanka. Trail-riding on mountain ponies—trips varying from two hours to
several days, with or without guides.
Two special attractions each year are INDIAN DAYS (end of July)—a
colorful pow-wow of Stoney Indians and other tribes, with gorgeous cavalcades, Indian music, dancing and sport, and the HIGHLAND GATHERING
(end of August)—a wonderful Scottish festival of bagpipers, music, sports,
tartans and dancing.
LAKE   LOUISE
LAKE LOUISE is 35 miles from Banff by train, or a little longer by road.
Here the mountains are very close around one; to reach the lake it is necessary
to climb 630 feet from the station, which is done by a light gasoline train.
Turning a corner of a great peak, the full beauty of this far-famed lake, which
has inspired so many artists and poets, bursts suddenly upon one.
The Chateau La\e Louise, a modern and luxurious hotel, stands upon the
nearer shore.
WHAT TO DO AT LAKE LOUISE
Scenery—and such a set-up! Surrounding the lake is a magnificent circle
of peaks; and many there are who count the day no better spent than to sit
at one of the huge plate-glass windows of the Chateau, watching the play of
light and color upon the mountains, glaciers and wrater.
Motoring—to practically all the same places as from Banff. One very
popular trip is to Moraine Lake (9 miles), where, in the Valley of the Ten
Peaks, an attractive Bungalow Camp can give you meals or sleeping accommodation.
Swimming in the warmed glacial water of the Chateau's 100-feet swimming
pool.
Pony Rides are very popular at Lake Louise. Amongst the favorites which
you can make between breakfast and supper, or even lunch, are to Lakes in
the Clouds, Saddleback, or Plain of Six Glaciers (each with a tea-house or
rest-house), or Paradise Valley.
Mountain climbing and hiking-—easy and difficult, with Swiss guides for
the latter. One fine trip (for the experienced) is over Abbot Pass to Lake
O'Hara.
YOHO   NATIONAL   PARK
SIX miles west of Lake Louise is the Great Divide—highest elevation of the
Canadian Pacific, interprovincial boundary, and backbone of the continent,
where waters divide either west or east. From here into Field (14 miles) the
railway descends nearly a quarter-mile down the narrow Kicking Horse Pass
and here you see the great "Spiral Tunnels" that were constructed in S shape
through two mountains to cut the difficult grade in half.
Here, too, you enter Yoho National Park, a little wilder, a little more
densely forested, than Rocky Mountains Park, and offering some very attractive motoring, climbing and pony trips. It has four favourite centres with
hotel or bungalow camp accommodation.
One of these centres is the celebrated Yoho Valley, reached by motor.
Yoho Valley Bungalow Camp, facing Takakkaw Falls, is about half way up
the valley. Another is Wapta Camp on the railway and Kicking Horse
motor-road; and south of the latter, reached only by trail through an almost
primeval forest (8 miles) is La\e O'Hara Camp.
Each of these Bungalow Camps ties up with other points in Yoho
National Park by an excellent system of roads or trails which thus form very
attractive circle trips. From Yoho Valley Bungalow Camp, for example, a
trail goes over Yoho Pass to Emerald Lake.
EMERALD   LAKE
SEVEN miles from Field station, through the hush of a pine-forest, bring*
you to Emerald Lake. This beautiful sheet of water, of most exquisite coloring
and sublimity of surrounding, lies placidly under the protection of Mount
Wapta, Mount Burgess and Mount President.
On its wooded shore is Emerald La\e Chalet, a picturesque cosy Canadian
Pacific hotel. At Emerald Lake there are a wide variety of fine hikes, rides
and climbs, and also some trout fishing.
THE   CANYONS
FROM Field the line descends into the valley of the Columbia River, and
then climbs again into the great and spectacular Selkirk Range, with the five-
mile Connaught Tunnel bringing it to Glacier. This magnificent mountain
area contains numerous glaciers and giant peaks, many of which are visible
from the track.
Following the Illecillewaet River, along the brink of deep chasms, one next
reaches Revelstoke, on the Columbia River.
From here to sea-level the route is through some lesser ranges, continually
descending, and following, most of the time, the gigantic canyons of the
Thompson and Fraser Rivers—second only in scenic grandeur to the Rockies
themselves.
Sicamous, junction point for Okanagan Valley and with a charming hotel,
is on Shuswap Lake. Kamloops is the beginning of the canyon country. The
railway follows the canyons at often a considerable height above the river
bank; the track, hewn from solid rock, not only crosses from side to side in the
gorge but also tunnels through great rock spans. Presently the river widens
out, and we reach a meadow-like country through which we roll to Vancouver.
Canadian Pacific Passenger Agencies in Europe
Aalesund, Norway Nils Musaeus, Kongcns Gade 21.
Antwerp, Belgium E. A. Schmitz, 25 Quai Jordaens.
Basle, Switzerland Dr. A. Im. Obersteg, 9 Place de la Gare Centrale.
Belfast, Ireland Wm. McCalla, 41-43 Victoria Street.
Bergen, Norway L. D. Kirkwold, Guldskogaarden 2.
Berlin, Germany A. W. Treadaway, Unter den Linden 39, N.W. 7.
Birmingham, England W. T. Treadaway, 4 Victoria Square.
Bristol, England A. S. Ray, 18 St. Augustine's Parade.
Brussels, Belgium G. L. M. Servais, 98 Boulevard Adolphe-Max.
Bucharest, Roumania D. Kapeller, Calea Grivitei 157.
Budapest, Hungary G. von Braun Belatin, Baross Ter 12.
Cherbourg, France Canadian Pacific Railway Co., 46 Quai Alexandre
III.
Christianssand, Norway A. Normann.
Cobh, Irish Free State T. Hogan, 10 Westbourne Place.
Copenhagen, Denmark N. B. Sorensen. Vesterbrogadc, 5.
Dundee, Scotland H. H. Borthwick, 88 Commercial Street
Glasgow, Scotland Wm. Stewart, 25 Bothwell Street, C2.
Gothenburg, Sweden J. Hagglund, S. Hamngatan 43.
Hamburg, Germany T. H. Gardner, Gansemarkt3.
Havre, France J. M. Currie & Co., 2 Rue Pleuvry.
Helsingborg, Sweden Nils A. Nilsson, Sundstorget 5.
Helsingfors, Finland Hj. Ekroth, Finska Angfartygs Aktiebolaget.
Kovno, Lithuania Canadian Pacific, Laisves Aleja 15.
Lemberg, Poland C. Cramb, Grodecka 93.
Liverpool, England H. T. Penny, Royal Liver Building, Pier Head.
t ~r,^~~  -i?r.~i~*A JC. E.Jenkins, 62-65 Charing Cross, S.W. 1.
London, iingland ^ gaxon JoneSj 103 Leadenhall Street, E.C. 3.
Malmo, Sweden A. Persson, Norra Vallgatan 94.
Manchester, England J. W. Maine, 31 Moslev Street.
Moscow, U.S.S.R H. Gard, Care RUSCAPA, 20 Kuzretsky Most.
Naples, Italy Wilmink Borriello, Ltd., 62 Via Depretis.
Oslo, Norway E. Bordewick, Jernbanetorvet 4.
Paris, France A. V. Clark, 24 Boulevard des Capucines.
Plymouth, England Weekes, Phillips & Co., 10 Millbay Road.
Prague, Czecho-Slovakia W. D. Alder, Poric 22, Legio Bank Palace.
Riga, Latvia L.Callaghan, AspasiaBoulevard3 (P.O. Box 478).
Rome, Italy A. Ross Owen, 130 Via del Tritone.
Rotterdam, Holland J. Springett, Coolsingel91.
Southampton, England H. Taylor, Passenger Agent. Canute Road.
Stavanger, Norway H. N. Pedersen, Skandsegaten 1 (P.O. Box 18).
Stockholm, Sweden J. Kullander, Vasagatan 8.
Tarnopol, Poland A. Mauer, ul Pilsudskiego No. 19.
Trondhjem, Norway Oluf Ruud, Fjordgaden 17.
Vienna, Austria F. King, Opernring 6.
Warsaw, Poland G. Hyna, 117 Marszalkowska.
Zagreb, Jugo-Slavia A. W. Bradshaw, 59 Gajeve Ulice.
Sir George McLaren Brown
European General Manager
London
H. G. Dring
European PaLssenger Manager
London
R. E. Swain
General Passenger Agent
London
Canadian Pacific Agencies throughout the world
VANCOUVER
VANCOUVER, beautifully situated en Burrard Inlet, and facing a magnificent mountain range, is the largest city of British Columbia. With its
imposing business section, its busy docks, its fine shopping streets, and its
flower-garbed residential suburbs, it is one of the great metropolitan centres
of the Pacific Coast. The Canadian Pacific Hotel Vancouver, very conveniently
situated in the downtown section, is the finest hotel of the North Pacific Coast.
Vancouver is a favorite summer city, for its mild climate, floral luxuriance
and abundance of water make life there very pleasant. There are. many
bathing beaches, parks, boulevards, automobile roads, golf courses, and short
and long steamer trips. Stanley Park, a remarkable forest of almost primeval
characteristics, is inside the city limits.
TO   MOUNT   BAKER
MOL/7s[T BAKER is one of the most prominent objects of the landscape
as we approach Vancouver. In height 10,827 feet, and always snow-crowned,
the "Great White Watcher" of Indian lore lies about 100 miles south in a new
National Forest in the State of Washington, and can be easily reached by
automobile. Mount Baker Lodge, in the heart of this forest and alpine vacation
land, is the centre from which to visit the magnificent region.
Touring cars and motor busses make the trip from Vancouver to Mount
Baker Lodge (4,200 feet above sea-level and on the shore of Sunrise Lake)
by arrangement during the season, returning the same night. Time, about
3 l/z hours each way.
VICTORIA
CHARMINGLY situated at the southern end of Vancouver Island,
Victoria—capital city of British Columbia—is essentially a home city, with
beautiful houses, bungalows, gardens, lawns, boulevards, and parks; and it has
furthermore a distant charm of its own that makes it different from all other
cities of North America, and that has made it a favorite residential and vacation city for both summer and winter alike.
The Empress Hotel is a beautiful structure matching the city, overlooking
the Inner Harbor, and facing the Parliament Buildings. Adjoining the Empress
Hotel, an amusement casino, the Crystal Garden, contains one of the world's
largest glass-enclosed salt-water swimming pools, with dance floors, picture
galleries, etc.
From Victoria many delightful excursions can be made by train or automobile into the interior of Vancouver Island. The immense Douglas fir forests
make this trip very attractive. Fine salmon and trout fishing can be enjoyed
at many spots.
TO    ALAoKA
FROM Vancouver or Victoria the palatial Canadian Pacific Princess
steamers provide a frequent service to Alaska. This exceedingly popular
side-trip can be made, including return, in nine days. It is a thousand-mile
journey through the beautiful "Inside Passage" and introduces you to scenery
of a type unknown elsewhere in North America—long fjord-like channels,
with glacier-clad mountains, gaily painted totem poles, Indians, gold mines,
and always the purple glories of the Alaska sunset.
Leaving Vancouver, stops are made at Alert Bay, Prince Rupert, Ketchikan, Wrangell, Juneau and Skagway. From Skagway the White Pass and
Yukon Railway takes you still further into "The Land of the Midnight Sun'1
—over the White Pass to Whitehorse, Yukon Territory.
TO    CALIFORNIA
ALL round-trip tickets to and from the Pacific Coast through the Canadian
Rockies can be routed, at a small extra charge, one way via Seattle, Portland
and California points. This is either via rail from Seattle or via steamship
from Victoria or Seattle.
Seattle—splendidly located on Puget Sound, mountain-girt and fringed
wTith lakes, Seattle holds out countless attractions—not only in its skyscrapers
and downtown business section but also in Lake Washington and its beautiful
residential districts, parks and beaches. A large number of enjoyable trips
can be made to such points as Bellingham, Everett and Tacoma.
Mount Ranier (14,408 feet high)—easily accessible from either Seattle or
Tacoma. An automobile ride takes one to Paradise Inn; while the National
Park has many trails for riding or hiking.
Portland—city of Roses, with its famous Columbia River Highway drive
and its trips to Mount Hood and Mount Adams.
San Francisco—fascinating, cosmopolitan, with its Golden Gate, its hills,
its Chinatown, its shipping, its nearby valleys, golf-courses and beaches. An
entry point, too, for Yosemite and Lake Tahoe.
Santa Barbara—famous for its mission, its hotels, its mountain background, and its gardens.
Los Angeles—city of lovely homes, bungalows, orange groves, vineyards,
moving pictures, missions, and beaches.
San Diego—-birthplace of California, close to Mexico, with Coronado
Beach, a famous flying centre, and an exotic atmosphere. T
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and Connecting Lines
There are the following main routes to and from the Pacific Coast.
1.—Montreal Service:
Regina Golden
Moose Jaw Revelstoke
Medicine Hat Sicamous
Calgary Vancouver
Banff Victoria
Lake Louise Seattle
Field
tiorfeit
jloski -
Owen
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on
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Montreal
Ottawa
North Bay
Sudbury
Port Arthur
Fort William
Winnipeg
2.—Toronto Service
Toronto
Sudbury
-yX'
sb
e*CW
^s0^V^©
teP°f
°/«
4eV>i
'•6,
O/v,
-^65
MacTier
Thence same as Route 1.
3.—To and From Chicago, St. Paul and Minneapolis
Via Twin Cities, Emerson, and Winnipeg.
4.—To and From Chicago, St. Paul and Minneapolis
Via Twin Cities, Portal, and Moose Jaw.
There are the following diversions, alternatives and optional
routes which can be combined with above routes.
5.—The Great Lakes Route.
M
N
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ipulash
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Canadian 'Pacific Steamship service between
(a) Port McNicoll and Port Arthur—-Fort William.
(h) Owen Sound and Port Arthur—Fort William.
Continuing by rail from these points.
6.—The Southern British Columbia Route
(a) Leave. Main Line at Medicine Hat (going west)
and join it again at either
(b) Golden—using branch from Cranbrook,
(c) Revelstoke—using Arrow Lake Steamer Route
from Robson West.
(d) Sicamous—Using C.P., Kettle Valley Ry. and
Okanagan Lake Steamer Service from Penticton.
(e) Hope-—using C.P. and Kettle Valley Ry.
Similar service on Eastboard Route.
7.—Via Spokane.
Leave Main Line at Medicine Hat, and
use
Canadian Pacific
(to Kingsgate via Yahk)
Spokane International
(Kingsgate to Spokane)
U.P. or S.P. & S.
(Spokane to Portland).
8.—Routes between Vancouver and
Seattle.
(a) Canadian   Pacific   Princess   steamships   from
Vancouver to Victoria to Seattle.
(b) Canadian   Pacific   Princess   steamships   Vancouver to Seattle direct.
(c) All-rail route from Vancouver to Seattle, via
G. N. Ry.
9.—Routes South of Seattle.
(a) Seattle to Portland, G. N., N. P. or U. P.
(b) Portland to San Francisco, S, P,
(c) Seattle, Victoria to San Francisco, Pacific S. S.
Co.
Allowed on First-Class One-Way and Round-Trip Tickets to and from
the Pacific Coast.
' RY
}Ot*e)
<,v
»cV
M
ia«ai     A0
^FTroupe
jstine
Joe"obabi
0     il    ZZ   35  4+ 55
Scale      of      Miles
IIP 165
-JT"^
W 7-
1octe.
2"**
7°si//a
Copyright.    I937,   by  Can Pac Rly
lithographed in Canada, by Rolph Clark Stone ltd /Toronto.
zurna
o
m/o
Menardo
Sonoro
IIMT-
^.c,.
&>**
^CKSON
Ipoekhaven
jMcCorr^
\r7entvOo6
ioou«E(  i/
iomrnonV /y'
■ifto>'
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X*C\
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»sta
3B«*°n
MOl
F,omatan,^..-^s^
%^
yCV<3
0\&"
l2§*
Star*
t\fe
A.—Between Montreal and Sudbury
These tickets will be honored either direct or via
Toronto. From Montreal to Toronto there is the
choice of four routes—
(a) Lake Ontario Shore Line
(Smiths Falls-Belleville)
(b) Peterboro Line
(Smiths Falls-Peterboro)
(e) Via Ottawa—Main Line
(Vaudreuil-Rigaud)
(d) Via Ottawa—North Shore
(Lachute)
From Ottawa there are direct trains to Toronto via
both (a) and (b).
B—On the Prairies
(a) Between Emerson or Winnipeg and Calgary,
tickets may be routed via direct line or via Portage
la Prairie, Kirkella, or Regina, Saskatoon, and
Wetaskiwin or Edmonton. Or via Moose Jaw,
Macklin and Wetaskiwin, or Edmonton. Or via
Moose  Jaw   and   Lacombe.
(b) Between Portal and Calgary, tickets may be
routed via direct line, or via Moose Jaw, Macklin
and Wetaskiwin, or Edmonton. Or via Moose Jaw
and Lacombe.
(c) Between Swift Current and Bassano, via either
Medicine Hat or Empress.
(d) Between Weyburn and Lethbridge, via either
Moose Jaw and Medicine Hat, or via Assiniboia and
Stirling.
0/Sn
^Onc
-i^pngfel/ow
AUS1
?Pr.
esidio
m!^^p^r^^y
Del
^lE
Hock Springs...	
tford \^
Kerrville0 I    '^A^enhart^jS^^
San MorcoSyP^lvrO-    „t 0c<i/v.        iNfe-^i-bf-.
Tejy
* P0'
so"
,0Moj
vPortArthun
118
SOUTHER!!
^AN ANTONIO
_j^»GALVESTON
New Iberia
if   r   .1
PortSi^A
y^!
Cleans
Ced°
■ Keys
cOe
0c
l^flprnond h
oc
\NH«
Co*
102
98
94
St. Petersburg^^
^4
icherr"
.lo*e s
stia"
No expensive side trips necessary.
The Canadian Pacific Railway is built directly through four Dominion of Canada National Parks
and the famous Canadian Rockies. Over 500 continuous miles of the most magnificent scenery in
the world may be viewed from the train.
See that your ticket between Eastern Canada or United States, or St. Paul, Minneapolis, Duluth or
Winnipeg, and Seattle, Tacoma, Portland or California includes coupons for the delightful 165-mile
Puget Sound Steamship trip between Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle.    No Extra Charge.
\
-28
78
Chocked for C.P.R. Lin.es Nov.1929
70 ¥&mi&
f
W *? / ^# *•*

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