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Summer tours via the Canadian Pacific Railway across the continent to Banff, Glacier, Kootenay and the… Canadian Pacific Railway Company 1901

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Full Text

 No. 4
SUMMERTOURS^p-j^jjjp
Canadian
Acmssthe Conflnenf
to Banff,QlacieK
Kootenay &the Pacific Coast
It. ^:5Tmi£i::-: "■■ ] f
1901 ™< Qanadian pacific
Railway
Is the most Substantial and Perfectly Built Railway on the
Continent oC America, and superbly equipped with tho finest rolling
stock modern skill can produce. The Coaches, Dining and Sleep-
ins Curs are triumphs of luxurious elegance, and excel in stability and
beauty of finish any other in the world.
TOURISTS wiU fmd Ule RolllG through Canada from the
 ■ Atlantic to the Pacific unapproached for magnificence and variety of scenery by any other line of travel. The
rugged wildnessof the North Shore of Lake Superior, the picturesque
Lake of the Woods gold region, the billowy Prairies of the Canadian
North-West, the stately grandeur of the Rockies, the marvels of the
Selkirks and Gold Range, and the wondrous Beauty of the Pacific
Coast are traversed by The Great Dustless Route. Being entirely
controlled and managed by one Company, the CANADIAN PACIFIC
RAILWAY offers special advantages to transcontinental travellers
that cannot be given by any other line. It is the Best, the Safest
and Fastest Route from Ocean to Ocean. The Company has spared
no expense in providing for the wants and comfort of its patrons,
as its line of Dining Cars and Mountain Hotels will at all times
testify, being supplied with all that the most fastidious can desire.
Through the Mountains Observation Cars are run in the Tourist Season.
THE ROYAL MAIL STEAMSHIPS
"EMPRESS OF INDIA" "EMPRESS OF JAPAN"
"EMPRESS OF CHINA"
Placed on tho Pacific by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, bring
thar, Wonderland, Japan, within the reach of all. Sixty days from
New York will admit of one month's holiday in Japan.
THE CANADIAN-AUSTRALIAN ROYAL MAIL LINE
R. M. SS. "MIOWERA" "WARRIMOO"
and "AORANGI"
Between Vancouver and Victoria, B.C., and Sydney, New South "Wales,
via Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, and Brisbane, Queensland, is the
shortest and most attractive route to the Tropics and Antipodes.
Through Tickets from Halifax, St. John, N.B., Quebec,
Montreal, Ottawa, Prescott, Brockville, Toronto, Hamilton,
London, and all points in Canada ; also from New York, Boston,
and all points in the East, to Vancouver, Victoria, Skagway,
and other points in British Columbia and Alaska, and to
Portland, Ore., Puget Sound Ports, San Francisco, Japan,
China, Philippines, Corea, Straits Settlements, India, Hawaiian
Islands, New Zealand, Australia, and Around the World.
INSIST ON GETTING YOUR TICKETS VIA
THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RY.
-RATES ARE THE LOWEST. ■ ^ *y<9
I
Canadian Pacific
Railway
SUMMER
TOURS
Volume IV.-Western Tours
Across the Continent.
Lake of the Woods.
Winnipeg; and the Prairies.
The Crow's Nest Pass.
The Kootenays.
The Rockies —Banff, Lakes in the Clouds, Field and
Yoho Valley.
The Selkirks—The Great Glacier.
Okanagan Lake.
The Pacific Coast—
Vancouver and Victoria.
Alaska and the Klondike.
Puget Sound. California.
Trans-Pacific—
Honolulu. Australia.
New Zealand.        China and Japan.
Around the World.
For particulars of other tours,
VOL.    I.   EASTERN TOURS      ]
VOL.   II.   CENTRAL TOURS       I See page 3.
VOL. III.   UPPER LAKE TOURsJ
ISSUED  BY THE
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.
1901
\/-4.*-s£s     c     p^/wo   \L**+»-*JtJ
■&A   ?, fp%".
y CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
Head Offices: Montreal, Canada
S'R K.CM:G.™. .H°.RNE:   } Chairman of the Board Montreal.
T. G. Shauohnessy  President Montreal.
D. McNicoll /Second Vice-President and \ Montre ,
^        General Manager J •
Charles Drinkwater.. /s<*£p%9uednA6sistant to    } Montreal.
Wm. Whyte Assistant to the President,.. Winnipeg-.
I. G. Ogden Comptroller  Montreal.
W. Sutherland Taylor .. Treasurer Montreal.
P, A. Peterson Chief Engineer Montreal.
G. M. Bosworth Freight Traffic Manager Montreal.
Robt. Kerr Passenger Traffic Manager.. Montreal.
Thos. Tait Manager of Transportation .Montreal,
J— OBO«. { ^AtnS^nt:... } ^. John, N.B.
C W. Spencer {G-glSjj-togl^   . | Montreal.
H. P. TIMMERMAN {G-^S?S3S?^ .. . }T°™*»•
T •w™ {QT£i!MSwSu.}North B*y ■
J-w-L™ {^S^:,}^™.
R- MARPO- { Genepaaclc Bi^ion^"':... } Vancouver, B.C.
E. A. Williams Supt. of Rolling Stock Montreal.
James Kent Manager of Telegraphs Montreal.
J. A. Sheeeielo {""ffi&S^MJS} Montreal-
Arthur Piers Supt. of Steamship Lines Montreal.
A, C, Henry   General Purchasing Agent .. Montreal.
A. D. MacTier General Fuel Agent    Montreal.
G. S. Cantlie Superintendent Car Service.. Montreal.
F. T. Griffin Land Commissioner    Winnipeg.
G. McL. Brown Executive Agent Vancouver, B.C.
W. R. Baker Executive Agent Winnipeg.
C E. E. Ussher { G-£StaS EST.AffCnt'. } MontnaU.
C. E. McPherson {^wt^S^:.jWinnipes.'
A. H. Notman { AsStA°ennter.aI. P.aSSe"Se.r.   . } Toronto.
WM. Stixt {ASigente,Wes,PereDi?Son} *"""««■
E- J- Covle {XSTSdfcS£3&.. } Vancouver, B.C.
R, H. Morris General Baggage Agent Montreal.
J. N. Sotherlani,   {G-S5lSSSfe.... }St' J°h«. N- B-
w. b. BULL,™ {**££?&*£?.....}Montreal-
W- R. MACINNES {Genwae1stFerr„i8UneAgent:... }Winnipeg.
S. P.Howard Asst. Gen.  Freight Agent. .Montreal.
W. B. Lanigan Asst. Gen. Freight Agent.. .Toronto.
O- H- SH- {*"*;*£ g^^ }Winnipeg.
E- W Peters {^nlTb^n'.^:}^^"' B.C.
H. E. Macdonnell \ Acting Asst.Gen.Fgt Agt. I N j B c
t Kootenay Lines, etc... )
H. L. Penny General Auditor Montreal.
J, H.Shearing Auditor of Pass. Receipts... .Montreal.
E. Emery.. Asst. Aud. of Pass. Receipts. Montreal.
CJ- Flanagan {^T^STg^....}""*"1-
J*»» B™ { ASSta„AlVde!e0gr0afphR Sipts } M°<^'
John Leslie Auditor of Disbursements Montreal.
A. A. GoodchilD Auditor of Statistics Montreal.
J. R. Steele ..Freight Claims Auditor Montreal.
C. J. Black Auditor of Agencies Montreal. Summer Tours
by the      Canadian
Pacific Railway
VOLUME  I.—EASTERN  TOURS.
Montreal and Vicinity.
The Laurentians.
Quebec and Lower St. Lawrence.
Maritime Provinces.
Newfoundland.
The Atlantic Coast.
Maine Summer Resorts.
White Mountains.
Boston and New England.
The Adirondack^.
VOLUME  II.—CENTRAL  TOURS.
Niagara Falls.
Buffalo.
Toronto and Western Ontario.
The St. Lawrence and iooo Islands.
Ottawa, the Capital of Canada.
The Upper Ottawa Valley.
Lakes Kippewa, Temiskaming and Temagaming.
VOLUME  III.—UPPER  LAKE  TOURS.
The Great Upper Lakes—
Lake Huron.
Georgian Bay.
The Islands of the North Shore.
Mackinac Island.
The Desbarats Islands and Land of Hiawatha.
Sault Ste. Marie River—
The Famous Soo Canals.
Lake Superior—
Thunder Bay.
VOLUME IV.—WESTERN TOURS.
Across the Continent.
Lake of the Woods.
Winnipeg and The Prairies.
The Crow's Nest Pass.
The Kootenays.
The Rockies—Banff, Lakes in the Clouds, Field
and Yoho Valley.
The Selkirks—The Great Glacier.
Okanagan Lake.
The Pacific Coast—
Vancouver and Victoria.
Alaska and the Klondike.
Puget Sound.
California.
Trans-Pacific—
Honolulu.
Australia.
New Zealand.
China and Japan.
Around the World.
Copies of these publications, or of any other of the numerous books and
pamphlets issued by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, can be had free on
application to any agent of the Company, or to the Passenger Traffic Department, Montreal.  INDEX
Agassiz (for Harrison Hot Springs).. ..B.C.
Ainsworth    "   .
Alaska (Sitka, Glacier Bay, etc..)	
Around the World	
Australia	
Banff Hot Springs   Alba.
Brisbane, Queensland    	
Calgary Alba .
China	
Page
ol
51
51,62
67
65
51,52
51, 52, 58
65,66
Desbarats Ont..
Duluth Minn .
Field (for Lake Emerald)  B.C..
Fort    Francis    (for    Rainy  Lake   Gold
Fields) Ont   .
Glacier B.C..
Glacier Bay (see Alaska)	
Grand Forks B.C..
Greenwood ....       "
Halcyon Hot Springs B.C...
Harrison Hot Springs    "   ...
Hawaii	
Hong Kong	
Honolulu H. I ..
62
62
62
52
51
62
62
52,62
62
66
65,66
65
66
53,62
62
Japan	
Kaslo B.C	
Kippewa   Que	
Laergan (for Lakes in the Clouds) Alba     51, 52, 54
Lakes in the Clouds (see Laggan)    "    	
Lake Emerald (see Field) B.C	
Lake Kippewa (see Kippewa, Que.)	
Lake Temagaming (see Temiskaming) . Ont	
Lake Temiskaming (see Temiskaming)	
Mackinac Island Mich .
MacLeod Alba.
Manila, Philippines	
Midway	
Nakusp B.C.
Nelson    "   ■•
Nepigon Ont .
Ckanagan(see Pentiction) B.C
Penticton    B.C..
Philippines	
Portland Ore .
Rainy River (see Rat Portage and Fort
Francis)	
Rat Portage Ont..
Revelstoke B.C.
Rossland    ''    .
Round the World	
64
52
62
63
63
62
51.52,53
65,66
62,63
62
54, 62
63
54,63
54,63
Sandon B.C	
San Francisco Cal	
Seattle Wash ..
Shanghai China ..
Sitka   Alaska.
Slocan City B.C. ...
Spokane Wash.
Sydney N.« V
.S.W .
Tacoma Wash .
Temiskaming Que ...
Trail B.C...
Vancouver B.C.
Victoria	
Winnipeg Man. ..
Yokohama Japan .
55
62
55
5fi
66, 62,
63
68
62
63
57
58
Bo
51
62
63
ns
65,66
58
63
63
58
19
59
60
60
61
66 General Information
I HE   TOURIST   ROUTES  shown herein cover only a small
I   portion of the attractive places that can be reached by the
I   Canadian Pacific Railway and Steamship Lines.    Additional
routes will be  made and  prices given on application to any
city ticket office of the Company in Canada.
Tourist tickets entitle the purchaser to all the privileges of
regular first class tickets.
Unless otherwise specified tourist tickets are on sale from June Ist
to September 30th, and are available for travel until November Ist of
the year in which issued. They are good for stop-over on application
to Conductor or Purser at any intermediate point on the Canadian
Pacific Railway or Steamship Lines, within their time limit. Portions
issued over the lines of other railways or transportation companies
are subject to the local stop-over regulations of the lines over which
they read.     See pages S and 9.
Transfers between stations are not included in Tourist Tickets,
unless specially noted, as they are necessary at very few points, and
most of these points being places of interest, tourists would naturally
desire to see them.
Round Trip Tours going one way and returning another, that
are designated "R.W.," may be reversed, at the time of ticket
purchase, for the convenience of tourist.
Many of the steamer lines do not begin their service until
about June ist, and cease running, or make irregular trips, prior
to November Ist, and tourists should consult each company's advertisements, and arrange their movements accordingly, as all Tourist
Tickets are sold on condition that they are used while the service
is in effect.
The tickets for side trips should be purchased at the starting
point, as in many instances the benefit of the Side-Trip rates cannot
be obtained at the junction point where the side trip diverges from
the main tour.
The time jof railway and steamship connections given herein
cannot be guaranteed, as it is subject to change as the season
advances. For details and latest changes a perusal of the current
time-table  "folder" of the Company is recommended.
Where steamship routes are designated thus ||, it indicates that
no extra charge will be made for meals and berths on steamships.
If not so marked, meals and berths are not included and will be
charged for extra.
Children between the ages of J and 12 years will be chirged
half fare on railways and inland steamer lines on North American
Continent; over 12 years, full fare.
The Railway Company maintains a staff of Travelling Passenger
Agents to accompany large parties of tourists, sportsmen or pleasure-
seekers, and will, when such parties are being formed, send a
representative to render assistance and give all information.
Special and First Class Sleeping Cars will be reserved for parties
of eighteen or more first class passengers ;  and when destined to a GENERAL   INFORMATION
point west of Fort William or Sault Ste. Marie will lie reserved for
parties of fifteen or more first class passengers, on payment of the
required number of first class fares. The rate will be about $45.00
per car per day for the use of such cars in addition to the price of
passage tickets.
Tourists are warned that in no instances are their tickets
transferable, and if they are unable to use a whole or a part of the
ticket, the portion unused should be returned not later than November
30th, 1901, to the General Passenger Agent of the Canadian Pacific
Railway, at Montreal or Winnipeg, who will refund the difference
between the fare for the distance travelled and amount paid.
When Tourist rates are. quoted herein from points not located
on the line of the Canadian Pacific Railway, the routes by which the
Canadian Pacific Railway will be reached, unless otherwise stated,
are as follows:
From Buffalo or Niagara Falls to Hamilton by Michigan
Central Rd. to Welland, thence Toronto Hamilton & Buffalo
Ry.
From Buffalo to Toronto by Michigan Central Rd. to Welland,
Toronto Hamilton & Buffalo Uy. to Hamilton, thence Canadian Pacific Ry. ; or by New York Central & Hudson
River Rd. to Lewiston Wharf, thence Niagara River Line ; or
by Michigan Central Rd. to Niagara-on-the-Lake, thence
Niagara River Line; or by Buffalo Ry. to City Line, Buffalo &
Niagara Falls Electric Ry. to Niagara Falls, Niagara Gorge
Rd. to Lewiston, thence Niagara River Line ; or by International Nav. Co. to Slater's Point, NiagaraFalls Park & River
Ry. to Queenston, thence Niagara River Line.
From Niagara Falls to Toronto by Michigan Central Rd. to
Welland, Toronto Hamilton & Buffalo Ry. to Hamilton,
thence Canadian Pacific Ry.; or by Niagara Falls Park &
River Railway to Queenston, thence Niagara River Line; or by
New York Central & Hudson River Rd. to Lewiston Wharf,
thence Niagara River Line; or by Michigan Central Rd.
to Niagara-on-the-Lake, thence Niagara River Line; or by
Niagara Gorge Rd. to Lewiston, thence Niagara River Line.
From Boston, Mass., to Newport, Vt., by Montreal & Boston
Air Line (Boston & Maine Rd.)
From Portland Me., to Newport, Vt, by the Maine Central Rd.
to Lunenburg via Fabyans, thence Boston & Maine Rd.
Tickets or coupons between Owen Sound and Sault Ste. Marie
in either direction, reading over the Canadian Pacific Steamship Line
will be available by the Local Steamers of the Northern Navigation
Co. running north of Manitoulin Island and calling at intermediate
ports when exchanged by the C.P.R. Agent at Sault Ste. Marie or
Owen Sound. An extra payment of $2.00 in each direction is, however, required on one-way or round trip tickets if exchanged for use
by the local steamers between June 20th and September 13th
{i.e., $2.00 if coupon in one direction is exchanged, $4.00 if coupons
in  both directions are exchanged).
Berths in Steamships of the Canadian Pacific S.S. Line can be
procured through Ticket Agent when purchasing ticket, or through
city ticket office at Toronto.
All the Tourist Tickets by routes specified herein are on sale
in the city ticket offices of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company,
from which rates are shown ; but tickets for many of the tours may be
obtained at numerous other offices'. Full information and descriptive
matter can be obtained on application to any ticket agent of the
Railway Company, or to any officer of tlie Passenger Traffic Department mentioned on inside front and back pages. Correspondence is
respectfully invited, see addresses on inside of back cover. STOP-OVER PRIVILEGES
ALLOWED ON OTHER LINES
Anchor Line (Erie & Western Transportation Co.)
Stop-over allowed on application to purser on unlimited and summer
tourist tickets.
Bangor & Aroostook Rd.
Stop-over allowed at any station on notice to conductor, except on excursion tickets which are limited to continuous passage in each direction.
Bay of Quinte Ry.
Stop-over allowed on notice to conductor.
Boston & Albany Rd.
Stop-over allowed for ten days on notice to conductor.
Boston & Maine Rd.
Stop-over for ten days allowed at any station—except at stations between
Ware,   Concord  (Mass.),   Wilmington,   Stoneham,  Salem   (Mass.),
Marblehead or Reading and Boston, or on tickets limited to continuous
passage—on notice to conductor.
Boston & Maine Rd. (Fitchburg Div.)
Stop-over allowed on notice to conductor.
Bras d'Or Steam Navigation Co.
Stop-over allowed on application to purser.
Central Vermont Ry.
Stop-over allowed at any station on notice to conductor.
Champlain Transportation Co. (Str. on Lake Champlain).
Stop-over allowed on notice to purser.
Cleveland & Buffalo Transit Co.
No intermediate stops.
Day Line Steamers (on Hudson River).
Stop-over allowed on notice to purser.
Delaware & Hudson Rd.
Stop-over allowed at any station on notice to conductor.
Delaware Lackawanna & Western Rd.
Stop-over allowed on notice to Conductor.
Detroit & Cleveland Navigation Co.
Stop-over allowed at St. Clair and Alpena on up trip only.
Dominion Atlantic Ry.
Stop-tfver allowed on notice to conductor.
Duluth South Shore & Atlantic Ry.
Stop-over for ten days allowed on application to conductor.
Erie Rd.
Stop-over allowed on notice to conductor.
Fall River Line(N.Y., N.H. & H. Rd—Marine District).
Stop-over of five days on unlimited tickets allowed at Newport. R.I., in
either direction on notice to purser, when steamer touches at Newport.
Fitchburg Rd. (see Boston & Maine Rd.)
Grand Trunk Railway System.
Stop-over allowed at any station on notice to conductor.
Hudson River Day Line.
Stop-over allowed on notice to purser.
Intercolonial Railway.
Stop-over allowed at any station on notice to conductor.
International Steamship Line.
Stop-over allowed at any landing.
Kingston & Pembroke Railway.
Stop-over allowed on notice to conductor.
Lake George Steamboat Co.
Stop-over allowed on notice to purser.
Lake Michigan & Lake Superior Transportation Co.
Stop-over allowed at all ports except Milwaukee.
Lake Ontario Nav. Co.
Stop-over allowed on notice to purser.
Lehigh Valley Rd.
Stop-over allowed on notice to conductor.
Maine Central Rd.
Stop-over allowed at any station on notice to conductor, except on
excursion tickets which are limited to continuous passage in each
direction. STOP-OVER PRIVILEGES
Manitou S. S. Co.
Stop-over allowed on application to purser.
Michigan Central Rd.
Stop-over  of fifteen days allowed on sumlner tourist tickets to eastern
resorts.
Minneapolis St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Ry.
Stop-over allowed on application to conductor.
Mount Washington Railway.
No intermediate stops.
New Bedford Martha's Vineyard & Nantucket S.B. Line.
Stop-over of ten days allowed on notice to purser.
Newfoundland Ry.
Stop-over allowed on application to conductor on tickets designated
" Good for stop-off" (for which an extra charge is required). On
coupons not bearing the words " Good to stop-off" continuous passage
only will be allowed.
New York Central & Hudson River Rd.
Stop-over allowed at any station on notice to conductor, on summer
tourist tickets bearing final limit Oct. 31st, unless coupons call for
continuous passage.
New York New Haven & Hartford Rd.   (Eastern District.)
One stop-over allowed on each division on notice to conductor.
New York New Haven & Hartford Rd.    (Western District.)
One stop-over allowed on each division on notice to conductor.
New York Ontario & Western Ry.
Stop-over allowed on notice to conductor.
Niagara River Line (Niagara Navigation Co.)
Stop-over allowed on notice to purser.
Northern Michigan Transportation Co.
Stop-over allowed.
Northern Navigation Co. of Ontario (Ltd.)
Stop-over allowed on notice to purser.
Northern S.S. Co.
Stop-over allowed on notice to purser on unlimited local or through tourist
tickets.
Ottawa River Navigation Co.
Stop-over allowed at Car-lion, Grenville and L'Orignal for Caledonia
Springs—at other points on notice to purser.
People's (Night) Line Steamers (Hudson River).
No intermediate stops.
Portland Mt. Desert & Machias S.B. Line.
Stop-over allowed at any landing on notice to purser, except on excursion tickets which are limited to continuous passage in each direction.
Profile & Franconia Notch Rd. (see Boston & Maine Rd.)
Quebec Railway (formerly Que- Mont. & Charlev. Ry.)
Stop-over allowed on notice to conductor.
Quebec Central Ry.
Stop-over allowed on notice to conductor.
Quebec & Lake St. John Railway.
Stop-over allowed on notice to conductor.
Quebec Steamship Co.
Stop-over allowed.
Richelieu & Ontario Navigation Co.
Stop-over allowed on notice to purser.
Rideau Lakes Nav. Co. (Ltd.)
Stop-over allowed on application to purser.
St. Johnsbury & Lake Champlain Rd.
Stop-over of ten days allowed at any station on notice to conductor.
St. Lawrence River S.B. Co. & Thousand Island S.B. Co.
No stop-over allowed.
Toronto Hamilton & Buffalo Ry.
Stop-over allowed on notice to conductor.
Wabash Rd.
Stop-over of fifteen days allowed on summer tourist tickets to eastern
resorts.
West Shore Rd.
Stop-over allowed at any station on notice to conductor only on summer
tourist tickets bearing final limit of Oct. 31st.
Windsor Detroit & Soo Line.
Stop-over allowed on notice to purser. Advantages Offered
By the     Canadian
Pacific
Railway
To Promote Travel
Round Trip First Class Tickets, good for one month, are sold
between local stations at a reduction of one-sixth from double the
one-way rates.
One Thousand Mile Tickets, good for one year and available
over all portions of the line east of Port Arthur, are sold at principal stations, for $25.00.
Saturday Excursion Tickets, good for return until the following Monday, are sold during summer months from Eastern cities to
the country points within a radius of about sixty miles, at ten cents
more than the one-way first class rate. For particulars apply to city
ticket offices.
Sportsmen, travelling together in Canada, in parties of five or
more, will be issued return tickets, good for one month, to shooting
and fishing resorts on the Canadian Pacific Railway, at greatly reduced rates. 200 lbs. of baggage and camp equipment, consisting of
tents, canoes or skiffs under 20 feet in length, camp utensils, etc.,
including a fish or game catch of 50 lbs. weight, will be carried free
in certain specified territory for each sportsman. Full particulars as
to rates, localities, etc., can be obtained from any ticket agent of the
Company. Perusal of the pamphlets, " Fishing and Shooting on
the Canadian Pacific Railway," "Fishing and Shooting hi
Quebec" and "Sportsman's Map of Canada," is recommended.
Copies can be procured on application to any of the Company's
agents.
Baby Carriages (estimated weight 75 lbs. each) will be checked
at owner's risk to stations on Canadian Pacific Railway east of Port
Arthur, as personal baggage, but no more than one baby carriage
will be checked on each ticket.
Dogs. Dogs will be carried only at owner's risk if provided
with suitable collars and chains to secure them. The charge for each
dog will be the same as for one hundred (ioo) pounds excess baggage.
Special Round Trip Excursion Parties. Reduced rates for
such parties are made when ten or more passengers are travelling
together.
Compirtment Sleeping Cars furnished in the most luxurious
style and fitted with every convenience, will be available for special
parties on reasonable notice to the Company's Agents whenever
not less than four staterooms are taken. Particulars as to charges,
etc., on application. Summer Tours
BY THE
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
RAILWAY
"HE lines of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, stretching from the
Atlantic to the Pacific, with a network of branches, offer peculiar facilities to the intending holiday-maker,
whether he decides upon going to the Atlantic
sea-side, the great inland lakes, the northern
forests, the Western prairies, the mountains, or
the Pacific coast. Whatever his destination, he
is assured of an incomparable service in the
perfectly equipped road, whose distinguishing
features have gained an enviable reputation for the Canadian Pacific
the world over; and if he is in search of sport with gun or rod,
he will find within easy distance regions that are filled with large and
small game, and through which flow waters teeming with fish.
Tourists by the Canadian Pacific are not limited to land travel or
even to the American Continent. The Company's magnificent steamers traverse the Great Lakes, the magnificent water stretches of British
Columbia and the Pacific Ocean. One who has sixty days to spare
can travel from the Atlantic coast across the continent and over the
Pacific to Japan, spend a month in the land of the Mikado and return
to the Atlantic cities within two months of his departure, or even in
less time he can visit the charming Hawaiian Islands or "do " Alaska
and the Klondike. Nor does this reach the limit of the arrangements
made by the Canadian Pacific. Railway Company for tourists. A
tourist can purchase a ticket at a very moderate price which will
take him around the world, with stop-over privileges enabling him to
wander about Japan, inspect the chief cities of China, the Straits
Settlements and Australasia, and visit the historical places of India,
Egypt and Europe. For the information of those who contemplate
making one or other of these tours, the Canadian Pacific Railway
Company has published, in addition to this series of " Summer
Tours," a number of short guides and maps compiled from trustworthy
sources. They are called "Westward to the Far East " and " East
to the West " (guides to the principal cities in Japan and China,
travelling either by the eastern or western routes), " New Highway
to the Orient," "Across Canada to Australia," "Hawaii," and
"Around the World," which, with "Fishing and Shooting" (a
pamphlet of special interest to anglers and hunters), can be obtained
free of charge on application to any agent of the Railway Company,
or to the Passenger Traffic Department of the Railway at Montreal.
11 WESTERN   TOURS
Across the
Continent
THROUGH THE CANADIAN LAKE, PRAIRIE AND
MOUNTAIN REGION TO THE PACIFIC.
THROUGHOUT the Canadian West there are many delightful
resorts—in the Lake of the Woods district, on the broad prairies of
Manitoba and the adjoining Territories, in the mountains of British
Columbia and along the Pacific Coast—and beyond that great
western ocean—and the Canadian Pacific system affords numerous
routes by which they can be reached. The tourist has the choice
of the transcontinental line from Montreal north of Lake Superior
to the Pacific Coast at Vancouver; the Lake Route from Owen Sound
across Lakes Huron and Superior to Fort William and thence by rail;
by the "Soo "Route to Sault Ste. Marie, and through Northern
Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota to St. Paul and Minneapolis,
and Moose Jaw on the plains of Assiniboia, where the transcontinental
line is again reached, or by variations of all these routes, and by all
there is an alternate route between Medicine Hat and Revelstoke
through the mountains of Southern British Columbia by the newly-
opened Crow's Nest  Pass  Railway.
Commencing the westward journey by the first mentioned all-
rail transcontinental route, upon leaving Montreal westward-bound
on the Imperial Limited, which crosses the continent in ioo hours,
the quaint French suburbs, dating back to the earliest settlement of
the country, are first seen. Fifty miles brings one to the banks of
the Ottawa River, which is closely followed until Hull, opposite
Ottawa, is reached, when it is crossed by the railway upon a bridge
which permits the passengers to see the Chaudiere Falls, a point of
great interest in the early history of Canada, and the extensive
booms, rafts and lumber mills that indicate the principal industry of
the locality. Ottawa is the capital of the Dominion, and is most
picturesquely situated between the Chaudiere Falls and a point
where the Rideau River falls in a fine cataract into the larger stream.
The many imposing structures of the city, including the Parliament
buildings, the Library, Museum of Natural History, and Rideau Hall
(where the Governor-General resides) and the public parks and
gardens are a constant attraction to visitors.
Leaving Ottawa the train moves on up the Ontario bank of the
river, through an agricultural and then a lumbering region. At
Arnprior, 52 miles from Ottawa, there are medicinal springs. At
short intervals streams and small lakes promise splendid sport to the
angler. The country becomes more broken and rocky towards Lake
Nipissing. There is less agriculture, more woodland and greater
attractions for artists and sportsmen.      From Mattawa there is rail WESTERN  TOURS
and steamer communication with the Temiskaming country, where
there is unsurpassed fishing and shooting and canoeing in the Temiskaming, Temagaming and Kippewa lakes, and in the multitude
of streams which network the region. The scenery of this new
district is inviting, and with the placing of fine steamers on the lakes
and the erection of good hotels, tourists are afforded excellent accommodation and every facility for enjoying the beauties of this hitherto
almost unknown region with ease and comfort.
Resuming the transcontinental journey, Lake Nipissing, reached
at North Bay, is noted for its fishing and shooting; good hotels exist
upon its borders, and it is a favorite summer resort. Here passengers
from Toronto join the train. Glimpses of rolling hills, lakes, dashing
trout streams, cataracts, rocky crags, meadows and marshes, are
caught through the almost universal forest as the train speeds along
its northern shore. Many hundreds of beautiful islets at the western
end of Lake Nipissing, near the mouth of French River, may be
reached from Sturgeon Falls or Cache Bay, and are eligible sites for
3    ~~ ~—r^Tfifo
O.P.R.   CO. S   UPPER   LAKE   STEAMSHIP
summer residences. Ample details about these and other islands can
be had from the Colonization Agent of the C. P. R. Company at
Montreal. The railway winds among forested hills for some distance
westward of Nipissing, then crosses to another stream, which leads
it down to Lake Superior, first seen at Heron Bay station, a little
over 24 hours after leaving Montreal.
Lake Superior remains in view, with only occasional intermissions, until Fort Wiliiam is reached, towards which the train makes
its way amid rocky hills and tremendous cliffs, forming pictures
delightful to the eye, but in construction testing the utmost skill of
the engineer. In this district the line crosses a number of the finest
trout rivers in Canada, chief amongst which is the Nepigon River,
which flows into Nepigon Bay, and is the best trout fishing stream on the
continent. There are comfortable hotels at Nepigon station, but those
in quest of sport usually go a few miles up the river and camp there.
There are several good camping grounds, and Indian guides may be
hired and camp supplies and outfit purchased at reasonable figures.
13 WESTERN   TOURS
To Fort William and Port Arthur come the steamers of the
Canadian Pacific line from Owen Sound and Sault Ste. Marie,
while most of the other Lake Superior boats call in passing. This
furnishes alternate routes between the east and these ports during
the season of navigation, that are justly popular. Connection is also
made with steamers which leave Port Arthur for Duluth frequently.
Fort William is the western terminus of the Eastern Division of
the Canadian Pacific Railway, and of its Lake Steamship line. It is
at present only the mere beginning of what is destined to be a great
city. It has several monster grain elevators, docks, etc., and a fine
large hotel—the Kaministiquia—on the bank of the Kaministiquia river,
which falls into Thunder Bay and forms the frontage of the town,
affords a very pleasant stopping place for the traveller or tourist.
Port Arthur, five miles from Fort William—the two towns being connected by electric railway—has several very good hotels, and in the
bay and the streams of the neighborhood there is good fishing.
Kakabeka Falls, which have a drop of 120 feet, and in this
respect nearly equal Niagara, are also within 21 miles of Fort
William, affording a pleasant side-trip.
The locality is very favorable for the cure of hay fever, and
many afflicted with that ailment find relief in spending ,a month or
longer on Thunder Bay.
Lake of the Woods
THE THOUSAND ISLAND REGION OF
THE WEST
OF ALL the lovely lakes that diversify and ornament the country
lying between Lake Superior and the great western prairies, Lake
of the Woods is the most beautiful and most accessible. It is a
summer resort par excellence, and is largely visited by the people
of Western Canada and from middle Western States, who find here
ideal conditions for the thorough enjoyment of the summer holidays.
To reach these pleasant waters from Fort William one travels
through a region of rapid-flowing streams and picturesque lakelets
bordered and surrounded by rugged rocks, and a dense tangle of
woodland that charms by its wild beauty.
Rat Portage, a well-built town of about 7,000 people, is on the
northern outlet of the lake, which contains many thousands of islands
varying in size from the one containing a dozen or so square miles
to the little tree-crowned islet of one or two acres in area. Each
has its own peculiarity of beauty in form, and each channel that
penetrates this archipelagic maze its characteristics. Starting from
Rat Portage one can in an hour's time sail or row in a seemingly
land-locked sheet of pellucid water, surrounded by high-rising lands,
beyond the sight of civilization or human life. The channels and
bays are as varied in scenic beauty as they are bewildering in their
windings.      On  many  of the  islands  nearer the town  are erected
li WESTERN   TOURS
handsome summer residences, and many camping parties find temporary abodes on others, for this is the favorite summering resort of
the Canadian West. Excursions can be made by small steamers
to the different mines, which are operated within twenty miles of the
town, for this is a rich mineral country, whose wealth is widely
scattered from the international boundary to north of the lake.
There are a number of well-equipped steamers on the lake, amongst
others the new Keenora of the Rainy River Navigation Co., which
make regular trips to Fort Frances, at the head of Rainy River, 180
miles south, where close connection is made with steamers of the same
company to Mine Centre, in the Lower Seine mining region. The route
lies through the islands of the northern end, passing through the famed
Devil's Gap, across the Traverse, and up Rainy River, a magnificent
stream separating Ontario and Minnesota. Near the Sault and
Manitou rapids of the river are mounds left by that departed race, the
Mound-builders, of whom so little is known, but who once occupied
the country from these northern waters to the Gulf of Mexico ; and
at Fort Frances are the pretty falls of Koochiching, and the famous
Government locks, commenced over a quarter of a century ago and
never completed. Rainy Lake is a reproduction of the Lake of the
Woods in many ways, and on it excursions may be taken in many
directions—to Kettle Falls, 50 miles southeast ; Devil's Cascade, 30
miles north ; up the Seine river to the Foley mine and Mine Centre,
where there is an excellent hotel, and 18 miles beyond which are
Sturgeon Falls, a great dashing cascade in a wildly picturesque region.
Around Mine Centre cluster groups of mines now being developed,
and which are easily reached. From Rainy Lake, the main line
of the C. P. R. can be reached by steamer and stage, or by canoe
and portage by those not wishing to follow beaten lines of travel, on
over a dozen different routes through a region prolific in fish and both
big and small game. One favorite route is to the Devil's Cascade,
and by steamer through the Manitou Lakes to Wabigoon, 95 miles
east of Rat Portage.
The waters of Lake of the Woods flow in a magnificent stream
into the Winnipeg river, which, within a few hundred yards of the
town, tumbles through a rocky gorge and forms the beautiful Ka-ka-be-
Kitchewart Falls. This river also gives a picturesque canoeing route
to Fort Alexander on Lake Winnipeg, from which the city of Winnipeg is reached, and is frequently used by excursionists who find
supplies and guides easily procurable at Rat Portage.
Norman is a part of Rat Portage which possesses many desirable
camping sites, and west again is Keewatin, where are located the
great mills of the Lake of the Woods Milling Co., and the works of
the Keewatin Power Co., which are intended not only to supply
power to factories and industries which it is expected will be erected
in the locality, but to transmit power to Winnipeg and other western
cities.
Besides mining, lumbering and fishing are carried on extensively
on the Lakes of the Woods, and a visit to the scene of operations of
these industries will be interesting to the visitor. WESTERN   TOURS
The Western Prairies
WINNIPEG AND THE GREAT WHEAT FIELDS-
TOURS THROUGH THE WEST
FROM the Lake of the Woods it is an interesting six hours' ride
on the Canadian Pacific through a picturesque region to Winnipeg, the
capital of Manitoba, and the gateway of the great western prairie-
land of Canada.
Winnipeg is a Chicago so far as 50,000 ambitious people are able
to make it. Before the advent of a railway it was merely a small
village round the Hudson's Bay Company's post of Fort Garry,
hundreds of miles from anywhere. To-day it is the focus of nearly a
dozen radiating railways, and is progressing rapidly. It has many
fine public buildings, several beautiful public parks, and the magnificent residences of its wealthier citizens display taste and refinement.
Across the Red River is the town of St. Boniface, whose cathedral
bells were immortalized by Whittier, and a mile north of the centre
of the city is St. John's (Episcopalian) Cathedral, one of the oldest
landmarks of this new country. With Winnipeg as headquarters,
tours can be made—through the great grain fields of the west
and southwest, which in the late summer and early autumn present
scenes which delight the eye. In 1885, when the Canadian
Pacific Ry. was completed, this western country was importing food
products. To-day, Manitoba's 30,000 farmers alone raise millions of
bushels of wheat, oats, barley and flax, while, with the Territories,
they export to the Eastern Provinces, and to the old country, hundreds
of thousands of head of cattle, horses, sheep and hogs. With each
succeeding year the yield of grain is largely increasing, so that now
every autumn 10,000 laborers go up from the east to work in the
harvest fields.
To the southwest of Winnipeg, reached by a daily train service
over the Pembina Branch, is the attractive resort Lake Killarney,
situated about half a mile from the town of that name. Farther on
the student of the past will find something of interest in the two
mounds—Pilot and Star—which are supposed to have been the work
of the Mound-builders in remote ages. Pilot Mound is near the
town of that name, and Star Mound about 15 miles distant and
near the international boundary.
Winnipeg is connected by twenty miles of railway with Lake
Winnipeg, one of the great inland lakes of the continent, whose combination of bays, sheltered nooks, of forests and lawn-like openings,
of long, green shores winding in curves of symmetrical beauty, of
projecting promontories and gleaming beaches, of pretty islands,
shrub and vine adorned, and of charms wrought by the hand of nature,
will compare favorably with resorts more widely known and will be
better appreciated. Days and weeks may be spent steaming, rowing
and sailing over its surface, camping and resting on its shores, fishing
or bathing in its clear waters or hunting in its surrounding woods and
prairies. Steamers run regularly on Lake Winnipeg between
Selkirk near the mouth of the Red River of the North and Grand WESTERN   TOURS
Rapids at the mouth of the Saskatchewan River. The rapids are
worthy of their name, and to run them is a novel and delightful
experience, and visits to the fishing grounds are interesting features
of the trip. Within easy reach of Winnipeg City is Winnipeg Beach,
a delightful new resort, opened this year for the first time to the
public, and which promises to become a most popular summering-place.
Another pretty place is Lac du Bonnet, reached by rail from
Molson, a station on the C.P.R., 45 miles east of Winnipeg. The
scenery is very picturesque.
Shoal Lake, on the line of the Manitoba & Northwestern Railway from Portage la Prairie, is a pleasant resort, and beyond
are pleasant villages near which shooting parties can find excellent
sport. Lake Winnipegosis, where there is not only excellent fishing,
but most delightful scenery, is also reached from Portage la Prairie
by the Canadian Northern Rd.
Westward from Winnipeg spreads a thousand miles of open and
productive plains—the wheat prairies of Manitoba, the green uplands
of Assiniboia, and Alberta's broad pastures, which are gradually and
steadily being taken up by the settler. During the first day's travel
thriving towns and villages and comfortable farm houses are passed.
Later the villages diminish and the farms become fewer, at least near
the railway, which has now ascended to a higher region. This is the
old buffalo range, and their trails mark the prairie in long lines. The
buffalo have disappeared, but domestic cattle have taken their places,
wild fowl throng the many lakes, and in the season grouse are plentiful, and antelope occasionally are seen quietly watching the train as
it hurries on. From Regina, the North Saskatchewan River is
reached by railway to Prince Albert, in the centre of a thriving
agricultural and stock-raising district where there is good shooting and
fishing.
At Moose Jaw, the " Soo " Line from Sault Ste. Marie, St. Paul
and Minneapolis, by which tourists from Chicago and other cities of
the central Western States travel, connects with the main line of the
Canadian Pacific, and from here the route continues through the
great plains.
From Medicine Hat a choice of routes is offered through the
mountains of British Columbia.
Through the Crow's Nest Pass
THE NEW SHORT LINE TO  THE
KOOTENAYS
THE Crow's Nest Pass Railway which branches off from the main
line of the Canadian Pacific at Medicine Hat, 660 miles west of
Winnipeg, furnishes a new and the shortest route to the vast
mining regions of East and West Kootenay and the Boundary
Country, and an alternate route through the Rocky Mountain and
Selkirk ranges. This road extends by way of the Lethbridge coal
fields and the town of Macleod, across the great ranching district of
Southern Alberta, through the Crow's Nest Pass to its present
terminus on Kootenay Lake. It is proving a potent factor in the
opening up  of the rich  and as  yet  undeveloped   resources   of the WESTERN  TOURS
new region of East Kootenay. Countless herds of sleek cattle are
seen on the plains and in the foothills, and in the mountains
there is a wonderful wealth of scenic grandeur, although in
sublimity and ruggedness it scarcely equals that which is to be
seen along the main line further north.
A great line of huge boulders lying due north and south a few
miles west of Macleod, about which the Indians relate a legend of
the revenge wreaked by the Evil Spirit on fleeing tribes, are mute
but interesting witnesses of the presence in the long ago of large
glaciers by which these stones were brought from the farther north.
EAST KOOTENAY
The pass is a narrow gateway sentinelled by towering peaks, and
ten miles westward is Crow's Nest Lake, which is credited with being
the birthplace of the winds which sometimes blow across the plains.
A river flowing out of a hole in the side of the mountain into the lake is
no less interesting a sight than the Crow's Nest Mountain itself, which,
with its seven pillars, stands distinct and alone against the sky line. Beyond Island Lake the summit of the Rockies is reached—the dividing
line between Alberta and British Columbia—at an elevation of 4427
feet. The line descends into the valley of Michel Creek, along the
side of a lofty mountain, and by a loop which makes some amazing
turns and twists that double it back to within a stone's throw of itself
it easily overcomes one of those engineering difficulties which frequently
confront the railway builder in mountainous regions. Mountains
appear to bar the way on all sides, jagged and naked, but they are
circled, and the valley of the Elk is gained. Near Fernie, a new town
built in the heart of the mountains and surrounded by densely forested
flat-topped hills, are the coal mines whose rapid development is having
such a marked effect upon the prosperity of British Columbia. Here
and hereabouts are the greatest coal-bearing areas of the world, layer
after layer cropping out on mountains' sides that aggregate in one
place 132 feet. It has been demonstrated that a coke superior to
any manufactured in the United States, and not inferior to the best
Welsh coke, is obtained from this coal, and the three hundred
coke-ovens, shortly to be increased, are kept busy supplying the
smelters of West Kootenay and Montana with fuel.
The new town of Elko is located at the crossing of the Elk river.
The valley of the Elk, down which the railway is carried forty miles,
here merges into the greater valley of the Kootenay. The flat bottom
lands show their fertility in the great growth of trees which are rapidly
being thinned to supply the saw mills along the river. The country,
especially around Elko, is extremely beautiful. Over the forests can
be seen the sharp angular peaks of the Rockies, while up the valley
glimpses of the sparkling waters of the river winding its way through
grass-covered flats that suggest eligible sites for the homes of the coming
settlers. To the tourist this district possesses many attractions, for
besides its picturesqueness it is the region of big game, while the Elk
river is one of the best fishing waters in British Columbia. The
Kootenay river is crossed at Wardner, and its course is followed
through a series of natural parks with Sand Creek Range, The
"Steeples," Mount Fisher and Saunder's Peak in the distance.
18 19 WESTERN   TOURS
The mining region impenetrated beyond Cranbrook, an important
typical western railway town, which is charmingly situated in a
hill-girt valley„surrounded by a dense forest growth and overshadowed
by the lofty peaks of Baker Mountain. Cranbrook is the centre of
trade for the large mining interests in this locality, as well as for the
rapidly growing ranching industries, and from it the Kimberley
Branch extends to the North Star mines.
Crossing streams and brooks at brief intervals, and passing mining
camps, the train emerges into the open at Swansea, and commences
its winding course along the beautiful Moyie Lake—a delightful sheet
of water which occupies the whole valley between two mountain
ridges and forces the railway into the hill side. Around Moyie Lake
are extensive galena mines which are being actively developed, and
Moyie is situated at its southern end, in a great game country.
Further on splendid views of the Yahk Mountains are obtainable,and at
Yahk station the valley of the Moyie is left, and the ascent made of the
Purcell range of the Selkirks, amidst lofty rugged peaks and broken
and serrated mountain ranges on every side. From Goatfell the
descent of the Purcells is commenced, and at Kitchener, the Goat
River canon, through which the compressed waters of that stream
tumble and roar and rush furiously, presenting an awe-inspiring
spectacle, is entered. Passing Creston and following the slope of
Goat Mountain into the flats of the Kootenay, famous for feathered
game, the train rolls into Kootenay Landing, on Kootenay Lake,
the present terminus of the road, where transfer slips of gigantic
dimensions are built for the convenient transfer of freight cars to
barges which are conveyed by water to Nelson. The view of
Kootenay Lake, into which the Kootenay river after debouching into
Montana and Idaho pours its flood, is a magnificent one, and there is
a world of mountain and lake whose splendours delight the eye.
WEST KOOTENAY
From Kootenay Landing, the trip is continued 55 miles down
the lake by Canadian Pacific steamer to Nelson, a rising city whose
present prosperity and bright prospects are best indicated by its rapid
growth and increase of population, and by its busy streets. Nelson
is a delightful residential place, in which are already many handsome
residences and public buildings and well-stocked stores and fine
hotels, churches and schools and a great smelter. It is the judicial
centre of the southern West Kootenay country, and one of the most
important and thriving, as well as attractive and healthful towns in
British Columbia. It is picturesquely built on sloping ground, its site
being on an arm of Lake Kootenay, just where its outflow commences
to pour through the Lower Kootenay river to join the Columbia near
Robson, 28 miles away, and is a convenient centre from which all
parts of the country can be reached. The magnificent steamers of
the Canadian Pacific Railway Co. afford a daily service to all points
on Kootenay Lake—to Ainsworth, Pilot Bay, Kaslo, and other mining
towns, and to Kootenay Landing. A novel feature for tourists who
have time and leisure at their disposal is the houseboat placed at
Nelson, in which  every   provision   is  made   for  their  comfort   and
_ WESTERN TOURS
convenience. The houseboat is practically a floating home, the inmates
of which can view the marvelous scenery of this picturesque region or
indulge in excellent fishing and shooting in season, under the most
enjoyable circumstances. The houseboat can be chartered at
moderate rates, and is towed by the Company's tugs to different points
on the lake, as the tourists may desire. This service was inaugurated
last summer, and those who chartered the houseboat were more than
delighted over their outings.
The Lower Kootenay river has many pretty and attractive falls
and rapids which give additional charm to the picturesque surroundings. Bonnington Falls is a magnificent cataract whose lack of
height is more than compensated for by the vast volume of water
which madly rushes over its broad brink, and from it power is generated that is utilized in the Rossland mines. The river is one of the
most noted fishing waters in the world, at different points being
literally alive with rainbow and silver trout, the best spot being below
the Lower Falls, 13 miles from Nelson. The Columbia & Kootenay
Railway, operated by the Canadian Pacific, parallels the north bank
CANADIAN PACIFIC SLOCAN LAKE STEAMSHIP
its full length to Robson, and fishing parties are consequently always
within reach of communication. From Robson, the transcontinental
line can be reached by a pleasant sail up the Columbia river and
Arrow Lakes past Nakusp to Arrowhead, where a branch railway
runs to Revelstoke. But the traveller will doubtless first want to
visit the Rossland and Slocan mines. To reach the first-named,
the Columbia & Western Railway, also operated by the C.P.R. Co.,
is taken opposite Robson, near the confluence of the Kootenay
and Columbia, to Trail, and on to Rossland through the famous Trail
Creek and Red Mountain mining districts. Extensive smelting works
for the treatment of ore are established at the town of Trail. The ride
from Trail is exceedingly picturesque, ascending the mountain side to
Rossland, the rise being 2,300 feet in 13 miles. Rossland is one
of  the  most   interesting  and  prosperous   mining  camps in British
21 WESTERN   TOURS
Columbia, and at the present day in America. It is a well-built city of
8,000 population, and within its limits are some of the most extensive
and best paying gold-mining properties in the country, of which Le
Roi is perhaps the most widely known. This railway has also been
extended from opposite Robson into the Boundary country, a newly-
opened mining region, to such thriving towns as Cascade, Grand
Forks, Columbia, Greenwood and Midway. The route lies through
a land of great picturesque beauty with an immensity of wealth of
mineral now being rapidly developed.
The Slocan country—the greatest silver-lead mining region on the
continent—is reached from Robson by steamer to Nakusp, on Upper
Arrow Lake, thence by railway to Sandon, a bustling mining camp, the
route lying through scenes of mountain splendor, the canon of the
Three Forks being a remarkable gorge worth seeing. The Slocan is
also reached from Nelson by a branch of the Columbia & Kootenay
Railway from Slocan Junction to Slocan City at the foot of
Slocan Lake, a mountain-girt waterstretch on which are located
several mining towns. On this lake another Canadian Pacific steamer
plies between Slocan City, Silverton, New Denver and Rosebery, at
the head of the lake through which the railway runs from Nakusp to
Sandon.
ROSSLAND, B.C.
A complete system of steamer and rail communication is
established throughout the entire region by the Canadian Pacific,
by which every important point is easily reached. The Canadian
Pacific fleet of passenger steamers on these waters are the
"Rossland," "Kootenay" and "Minto," plying on the Columbia
River and Arrow Lakes between Arrowhead and Robson, the
" Slocan "on Slocan Lake, the " Kokanee," " Moyie "and "Nelson"
on Kootenay Lake, and numerous freight steamers and tugs. The
passenger boats are fast, scrupulously clean, lighted with electricity,
modern, and to the joy of the traveller the cuisine is excellent.
Everything   is   done  to make the trip a comfortable one ;  in truth,
_ WESTERN   TOURS
the passenger will have cause long to remember the impressions of an
evening's sail, watching the setting sun slipping over the western
hills trailed by her shadow of warmth which is reflected in glorious
coloring from the snow-covered mountain tops in Kootenay. Such is
ever to be seen in summer, and the glory of it does not detract from
the quiet beauty of the moonlight ride which follows, with the
towering hills on either side standing out as sentinels and reflecting
deep in the waters below.
The excellence of the hotel accommodation throughout this
region is noted and appreciated by travellers, every town of
importance and even smaller places having first-class hostelries, the
Hotel Revelstoke, at Revelstoke, a new and handsome structure
erected by the Canadian Pacific Railway Co. on a high bench above
the station, being especially a pleasant resort for travellers.
CANADIAN  PACIFIC  DINING CAR
23 WESTERN   TOURS
The Mountains of
British Columbia
BANFF, LAKES IN THE CLOUDS, FIELD,
GREAT GLACIER AND OKANAGAN
THE traveller who has chosen the main line for his trip through
the mountains continues on through the vast plains of Central Alberta
to Calgary, a well-built city, from which a railway runs south to
Macleod where it connects with the Crow's Nest Pass road, and north
to Edmonton on the North Saskatchewan river, in the midst of an
excellent agricultural country, and where gold mining is carried on in
the bars and benches of the river. From here the mystic polar
regions can be reached. A good wagon road leads to Athabasca
river, 90 miles north of Edmonton, from which the steamers of the
Hudson's Bay Company can be taken to the mouth of the Mackenzie
river, which flows into the Arctic Ocean, a distance of 2,000 miles,
but as their sailings are irregular it is advisable for intending tourists
to make inquiries at the Company's head offices in Winnipeg before
undertaking the journey. In this far northern country, there is big
game and plenty of it—in the Barren Lands the musk-ox being
found. There is capital fishing, and the whole Mackenzie basin
offers more than ordinary attractions to the venturesome explorer,
the Mackenzie being the great waterway to the Arctic Ocean.
Continuing the journey westward, the mountains rise up in
majestic grandeur. In startling and wonderful contrast to the prairies
are these great ranges of British Columbia—the wildest and most
magnificent scenery in the world. Before the traveller is aware the
train has passed from rolling plain to rising plateau, and from plateau
wound through the foothills up the valley of the Bow ; the prairies
are shut off behind ; and a tortuous way is followed into the folds of
the mighty Rockies.
And now all that has gone before dwindles into insignificance.
Several ranges of huge mountains are to be crossed before the Pacific
Ocean is reached, and for over five hundred miles there is a
succession of views unequalled for grandeur on the American
continent. "As we passed through the Selkirks and Rockies so
marvelous are the works of nature in this region for grandeur and
beauty," writes Surgeon-General Hamilton, of the Royal Army Medical
Corps, " that we agreed that nothing we had seen in Switzerland could
for one moment compare with what awaits the traveller between
Vancouver and Calgary on the Canadian Pacific Line."
" Do not try to take in all of this in one unbroken trip " is the
timely advice given to the tourist by one who has been across the
Rockies many times, and knows the giants well. "The eye loses
power of discrimination, so fast do grandeur of form and beauty in
details crowd upon the view and demand attention as the train speeds
24 WESTERN   TOURS
through gorge and past mountain, giving here a vast outlook, and
there an interior glimpse, then exchanging it for a new one too rapidly
for appreciation. Here gush the headwaters of rivers that run for a
thousand miles east and west. You enter by and escape by the gates
they have cut, your track is laid along the ravine pathways they
have hewn, and you behold the very source of their currents in some
crystal lake, or in some vast body of ice borne upon the shoulders of
mountains mantled with eternal frost. Sometimes you are in the
bottom of these ravines beside the bounding stream, and strain your
eyes to toppling crags that swim among the fleeciest of summer
clouds a mile and a quarter higher than your place. Again, the
railway surmounts a portion of this distance; and you can look down
to where tall forest trees appear like shrubs. Upwards, apparently
close at hand, are the naked edges lifted above the last fringe of
vegetation,  wide  spaces of never-wasting   snow,  and the wrinkled WESTERN TOURS
backs of glaciers whence cataracts come leaping into the concealment
of the forest.    Here you can look out upon a wilderness of icy peaks,
glaciers and aiguilles of black rock, there you cautiously descend into
the depths of profound gorges, and find yourself enshrouded in the
shadow of a forest.    The massiveness and breadth of the mountains
26 WESTERN   TOURS
in one part will astonish you ; their splendid and fantastic forms in
another excite your curiosity ; while now and then a single stately
peak, like Cathedral Peak, Mount Stephen or Sir Donald, will print
itself upon your memory." True, a general idea of the illimitable
grandeur of the scene may be formed without disembarking from a
train, but while the result of a trip in this hurried fashion across the
Rockies is an experience never to be forgotten, a leisurely exploration of this region reveals wonders undreamed of and grandeurs that
surpass conception.
It would be well, then, for the tourist to stop off at two or three
points at least, and take time to understand the mountains. Pleasant
hotels, revelations to those who have elsewhere sojourned in the
Rocky Mountains, have been built by the railway company at suitable
points, where one may dwell in perfect comfort within the very heart
of the mountains, and whence the glaciers may be explored, or
sport   with rifle   and rod enjoyed.     At   four of these—Banff,  the
SOME OF THE SWISS GUIDES.
Lakes in the Clouds, Field and the Great Glacier—experienced Swiss
guides are stationed during the tourist season at the Company's hotels,
who accompany visitors on pleasant expeditions to points of more than
usual interest. These will be carefully and systematically planned,
so that in a comparatively short stay the visitor can thoroughly and
satisfactorily exploit the immediate region in which he is stopping.
This will also enable those who are not accustomed to mountaineering
to gain points of vantage which were hitherto practically inaccessible
to them, and materially add to the pleasure of a sojourn in these
delightful spots, while to the ardent mountain climber it offers
opportunities of making those difficult ascents which are so attractive
to him.
27 WESTERN   TOURS
BANFF
The first and most prominent of the stopping places is Banff,
the station for the Canadian National Park, in the Bow River
Valley, among the eastern foothills of the Rocky Mountains.
The hot mineral springs there have peculiar curative properties,
and   a   fine hotel, owned   and operated   by  the   railway  company,
klffl
•■'.
7.
a a
m,
which affords luxurious accommodation, attracts pleasure and health-
seekers from the world's capitals in yearly increasing numbers.
This park is a tract of many square miles embracing every variety
of scenery, charming and wonderful, which the Government has
made easily accessible by carriage-roads and bridle-paths. In the
rivers and lakes trout are plentiful, and in the hills and forests roam
deer, mountain sheep and goats, while in a large corral just east of
the railway station are a band of elk and a herd of buffalo, which are
28 WESTERN   TOURS
amongst the remaining few of the almost extinct monarchs which twenty
years ago roamed over the adjoining plains in countless thousands.
The general altitude of the valley is about 4,500 feet. Nine miles
north is Devil's Lake, an extremely deep sheet of water, walled in by
tremendous cliffs, and overlooked by that remarkable peak, the Devil's
Head, which forms a well-known landmark, visible far out upon the
plains. The fishing here is very good and the scenery grand. In a
capacious launch the tour of the lake can be pleasantly made.
Another launch plies upon the Bow river and Vermillion lakes,
giving access to the best points and a fine view of the surroundings.
Excellent canoes and skiffs are also kept for hire and will be found very
useful to sportsmen who prefer the tamer sport of duck shooting to
the pursuit of sheep, goat and bear. Rare good mountain trout-fishing
can be had.on the Bow and Cascade rivers within a short walk of the
hotel, the fish taking the fly greedily. A large number of driving and
saddle horses are kept for tourists' use, and there is perhaps no more
enjoyable way of spending a morning than in a breezy gallop over the
lower levels, rolling along the well-kept roads in a carriage, or climbing
the steeps and studying the marvelous beauty of the park on the
back of a sturdy, sure-footed cayuse, as the native ponies are called.
There are many points of interest to visit: The cave and basin,
a remarkable formation, from which gush natural sulphur springs;
the Bow Falls in the valley beneath the hotel; the hot springs on
Sulphur Mountain ; the Loop, a drive around Bow Valley, skirting
the base of Mount Rundle ; the Sun Dance canon, a curious cleft in
the mountain ; up the side of Tunnel Mountain to a height of 5,000
feet ; Anthracite, where the coal mines are operated, etc. There is
also a museum, near the hotel, where the Government has made a very
interesting collection of specimens of the flora, fauna, mineralogy,
etc., of the mountain region.
Banff's summer climate is a glorious one, salubrious and enjoyable, with no great extremes of heat and cold during the daytime and
even in winter is seldom unpleasant.
Although Banff is chiefly a tourist resort, the curative properties
of its waters attract invalids, in numbers, who find relief from their
ailments here. At the hotel, a new large bath house,has.been erected.
An analysis of the Banff water supplies by an official of the Dominion
Government is as follows: "The water is very free from organic
impurities and gives no albumenoid nitrogen. *****
Each gallon contains dissolved sulphuretted hydrogen to the amount
of o. 3 grains (equivalent to o. 8 cubic inch).
" The dissolved solids are as follows :
Chlorine (in Chlorides)  0.42 grains.
Sulphuric Acid (S 0„)  38.50       "
Silica (Si 02)  2.31
. Lime (Ca O)  24.85
Magnesia (Mg°)  4.87        "
Alkalies (as Soda, Na.,°)  0.62       "
Lithium A decided trace."
The quantity of lithium present is at least one hundred times as
much in the Banff water as in some of the so-called lithia waters
placed on the market. The temperature of this spring is 114.3
degrees Fahrenheit.
_ . WESTERN   TOURS
Guests of the C. P. R. hotel find amusement in lawn tennis, golf,
billiards, bowling, etc., in addition to driving, fishing, boating, bathing
and mountain climbing. In the hotel, a dark room has been
furnished for the use of photographers who desire to finish their pictures
before returning home. Alpenstocks for mountain climbers can also
be procured. The hotel opens on May 15th, and closes October Ist,
and the rates are from $3.00 per day upwards, with reduction upon
this rate for a stay of one week or longer.
Complete outfits, including guides, servants, provisions, saddle
and pack horses, tents, etc., are supplied from Banff for parties of
Alpine explorers, goat and sheep hunters in the Selkirks, and caribou
and elk hunters in the foothills of the northern Rockies, at moderate
rates, not exceeding $4.00 each per day for parties of four or more.
30 WESTERN TOURS
THE LAKES IN THE CLOUDS
It is only an hour's ride by train through the wooded Bow Valley,
with high mountains on every hand, to Laggan, the station for the
famed Lakes in the Clouds. Hidden high above the valley, shut in
by towering heights, this trinity of pellucid waters is a revelation to
those unaccustomed to Alpine environments. From the station,
where conveyances await the trains, a carriage road has been made
rising along the mountain side and following the turbulent mountain
torrent called Louise Creek for two and a half miles to Lake Louise—
the first of the three. This lake lies between two peaks of the
Rockies and is fed by a glacier which covers the side of a third eminence at the farther end. A chalet has been built by the Company
on the near shore at which parties can find excellent accommodation
31 WESTERN   TOURS
even if remaining longer than a day or two, the place being under the
same management as the Banff Springs Hotel, with which there is
telephonic communication. Swiss guides are located here who plan and
accompany excursions. The ascent to the upper lakes—Mirror and
Agnes—is easily made, ponies being procurable for those not wishing to
climb, and good trails lead to Saddleback Mountain and to Paradise
Valley, from which superb views are to be gained. At Lake Agnes and
Saddleback shelter houses are erected for the use of tourists.
To describe these lakes would be a task from which the most facile
word-painter might well shrink. Their beauty is beyond description,
and language fails to impart even a fair conception of their supreme
loveliness and splendour. There is nothing like them on the face of
the earth elsewhere than here in the regal Rockies, where they lie like
a string of jewels in the clefts. Sheer from the water's edge the
mountain walls rise toward the sky. The spruce and pine that
clothe the steeps are reflected with perfect fidelity in the motionless
waters of Lake Louise. Every gleam of color on the everchanging
bare acclivity on the other side is reproduced there in the mirror-like
surface. The varied tintings and the colorings of the water, from
the changing effects of the atmosphere and the coursing of the sun,
are gloriously superb, and evoke the admiration of the astonished
beholder.
The Valley of the Ten Peaks, a most delightful spot where
camping facilities are offered visitors, is reached by trail, which
branches off the road between Laggan and Lake Louise. The
scenery in this valley has the same magnificence and grandeur that
characterizes the Lakes in the Clouds region, and to those wishing to
revel in the pleasures of camping, it is an ideal spot.
F1ELD—YOHO VALLEY
From the Lakes in the Clouds to the great giant of the Rockies is
only seventeen miles, but between the two is the summit of the
Rocky Mountains. This long-reaching range is climbed amid scenes
that bid defiance to realistic description, so stupendous are the great
heights and so immense and overwhelming their individual features.
At the " Great Divide " the backbone of the continent is crossed,
the elevation being marked by a rustic frame beneath which flows a
mountain stream, here separating its waters to flow one way to
Hudson's Bay and in another to the Pacific Ocean. Ten miles below
the "Divide," at the base of Mount Stephen, a huge pyramid rising
sheer 8,000 feet from the railway track, is Field, where the railway
company's chalet hotel affords a delightful resting place to those
wishing to remain over and explore the glacier-laden monarchs
which are here in a glorious group, or visit the other points of interest. A
few miles away is a curious natural bridge, under whicli the angry
waters of the Kicking Horse, compressed in a narrow space, rush
madly. Beyond this is Emerald Lake, one of the most charming of
mountain waters and a fitting rival to the Lakes in the Clouds—and
a favorite spot for anglers as well as artists—which, like the natural
bridge, is reached by a foot-bridge across the Kicking Horse river.
From Emerald Lake trails lead through the wonderful Yoho Valley,
which this year is made accessible to visitors for the first time.    It is
32 WESTERN   TOURS
a region of immense glaciers, stupendous waterfalls, and marvelous
canons, the counterpart of which nature has seldom fashioned. These
trails skirt the mountains' shoulders at high altitudes and follow the
canons' brink, so that exquisite views are obtainable from every conceivable point of vantage of this newly-discovered wonderland. The
Takakkaw Falls (Takakkaw being the Cree for " It is magnificent ")
leap from the forefront of a glacier and dropping several hundred feet
to a ledge, shoot out an hundred  feet like a  huge watery bow and
TAKAKKAW   FALLS,   YOHO  VALLEY.
make the final plunge of I,ooo feet without again touching the
precipice. The Twin Falls is another remarkable cataract whose
divided waters unite in one great stream before reaching the depths
below. There are many other smaller waterfalls, and the great
glacier, pushing its way between two mountains is a worthy rival of
the famed Illicilliwaet of the Selkirks. The canon of the Yoho is a
great cleft in the rock, which rises from 200 to 500 feet on either side,
and one place its width is compressed  to 20 feet.    There are capital
33 WESTERN   TOURS
opportunities for mountain climbing, pretty little parks which form
excellent camping grounds, where the sportsman can find wild goats
in plenty and the botanist discover a wealth of wild flowers and
plants. Camps are erected at different points throughout the valley,
for the shelter and comfort of visitors. From Field, a stroll to
the western Ottertail bridge, six miles, affording a most beautiful
view of  the Ottertail   range and the   mountains  north  of  Emerald
Lake,   and  a  walk  to  an eastern  point   opposite  the   North Fork
Canon or to   Hector,   are  excursions   which  may  be  easily   made
and which will give great delight to the visitor.    The silver  mines,
1,500  feet up  the  side of   old   Mount   Stephen,   are   reached  by
a  good  trail   and  are  very  interesting, while nearer   at  hand   are
the immense fossil  beds—near  the base  of  the  mountain,   but an
hour's walk by a good trail—in which rare specimens of those things
_ WESTERN   TOURS
which existed when the world was young are obtainable, and the
crystal cave, about an hour's walk from the hotel, in whose depths
are to be seen fine stalactites. The chalet hotel is open throughout
the whole year, and has been enlarged twice to meet the requirements
of a constantly increasing number of guests who appreciate Field's
many charms.    Ponies and guides are obtainable at the hotel.
THE GREAT GLACIER
From Field, the route onward lies down the Kicking Horse
Pass. New scenes of sublimity appear in endless succession, and
high up against the sky a serrated line of snow-mantled peaks of
new forms and colors loom up beyond the intervening deep forest-
covered valley holding the broad and rapid-running Columbia,
crossing which, the ascent of the second range—the Selkirks—is commenced.    Seen in the full glory of the morning sun, these mountains
33 WESTERN   TOURS
are   the   most   beautiful   and wonderfully   colored of all the great
ranges between the Plains and the Pacific.     Further on, the Rockies
and the Selkirks come close together,  forcing the river into a deep
narrow gorge,  through which its turbulent  waters roar and fume in
maddening, ferocious torrent, far above which the track winds along
the mountain side to which it clings and finds a passage through narrow defiles to the vast amphitheatre of mountains beyond.    Climbing
higher and higher, near the summit of the range, is seen a wonderful
group of strangely-shaped glacier-bearing peaks,  and  further away
the largest of all the world's ice-fields—the  Great   Glacier   of  the
Selkirks.    Here is another of the Company's chalet hotels, which has
become a favorite resting place, for there are attractions aside from
the immense glacier, whose forefoot extends to within a short distance
of the track, rivalling those at Banff..    There are vast forests clothing
the lower slopes and filling valleys in which game abounds, cascades
tumbling  thousands   of   feet  and  glaciers   covering  miles  of   area
with gleaming  ice,  and  lofty  peaks  that  pre-eminently  appeal  to
the true   Alpine climber.    Facing the hotel, the   Hermit  range, on
which  the  old  cowled hermit and   his   dog have  kept   watch  and
ward for untold ages, stand in stately line, snow-capped and grim ;
to the  right,   Sir  Donald rears  his hoary  head near Eagle   Peak,
from whose summit over a hundred glaciers  are  visible,  whilst to
the left lie Ross Peak, Cheops, Abbott, and a score of other equally
daring  ascents.      Branching  off   up  Fish   Creek Valley  is a trail
leading to the Asulkan Glacier, crossing which a magnificent view is
obtained of the ice-bound valley on the further side with the three commanding peaks—Fox, Donkin and Dawson—and the serpentine Donkin
and Geikie glaciers.    This region is peculiarly attractive to mountaineers, who assemble here from all parts of the globe, to make the
ascent of the higher peaks.      It has one great advantage over other
mountainous countries in that the ascents can be made directly from
the hotel without having to travel great distances before commencing
the climb.    The Swiss Guides stationed here, like those at Banff, Field
and Lakes in the Clouds, are expert mountaineers,  and accompany
parties in their expeditions.    For those who cannot attempt the greater
climbs, there are numerous shorter and easier ascents, such as Marion
Lake, the Cascades, or the ridge of Glacier Crest, from Rogers' Pass
to the foot of the Swiss Peaks, for all these and many other similar
points may  be  gained without difficulty.    Excellent trails have been
built in all directions,  with   resting-places along  the   roads,   and at
some points shelters erected where sleeping and cooking outfits can
be utilized by picnickers who wish to spend a day or longer in the
higher  altitudes.     The Great Glacier itself,  being only about half-
an-hour's walk from the hotel, and reached by a good trail,  everyone
can visit its  foot and even explore its wrinkled surface.
At the Glacier House, which, has accommodation for ioo guests,
are a bowling alley, billiard hall, swings and other sources of amusement, and there are an observatory and a telescope. The hotel remains
open throughout the year. The best time for visiting this place,
however, is during the latter part of June, July, August and
September.
36 WESTERN   TOURS
Leaving the Glacier, the descent of the western slope of the
Selkirks is made by the Loops, a bewildering turning and twisting and
doubling, to the valley of the Illicilliwaet, whose picturesque features
are accentuated by startling gorges, to the very brink of the deepest
of which—Albert Canon—the railway runs, and stops to give passengers the opportunity of peering into its depths.
From Revelstoke another route lies to the gold fields and silver-lead
mines of West Kootenay.    The trip is by branch railway, twenty-eight
miles to Arrowhead, at the head of Upper Arrow Lake, and thence
by the Canadian Pacific steamers and their connections, as mentioned
in the description of the Crow's Nest Pass Railway, to Nakusp and
the Slocan, Robson, Nelson, and the Lower Kootenay river, to Trail
and Rossland and to the newly-opened Boundary country to the
west. Twelve miles below Arrowhead are the Halcyon Hot Springs,
at which the traveller finds an up-to-date Sanitarium and  hotel, in
37 W E S T E It N   T OURS
connection with which are a number of comfortably furnished villas
for guests who prefer privacy. The climate is very mild—even in
winter—and the waters of the springs possess exceptionally high
virtues, being held in high opinion by medical men for the cure of
rheumatic and gouty and other affections. The quantity of lithium
contained in these waters is larger than that shown to exist in some
much-advertised foreign waters. The grounds are beautifully laid
out in terraced walks ; there is good boating and fishing, and the
surroundings are charming.
THE OKANAGAN
Beyond the Columbia is the Gold range, which is crossed by the
Kagle l'ass. The grandeur of the mountain scenery is not wanting
until the lake region of British Columbia is reached. The Great
Shuswap Lake is a remarkable body of water, an arm of which is
crossed to Sicamous Junction, from which a branch railway penetrates the famed Okanagan country, a region of great beauty and
which affords unending delight to the holiday seeker and the sportsman. This is a great fruit, agricultural and game country, and was
the scene of the hunting expedition several years ago of the Archduke
of Austria on his tour around the world. Caribou, black, cinnamon,
and other bear, deer, mountain goat, mountain sheep, wild cat,
cougar, eagles, swans, etc., are here in abundance, and the waters
are filled with fish. The railway runs past Armstrong and Enderby,.
two thriving villages, and Vernon, a delightfully situated town, five
miles beyond which is Okanagan Landing, on Okanagan Lake,
where the commodious Canadian Pacific steamer " Aberdeen " runs
to Kelowna and Penticton at the foot of the
lake, affording a delightful sail. Low—
comparatively low —
rolling hills border
either shore of the long
narrow waterstretch.
The water is remarkably pure and clear,
and the climate approaches perfection.
Kelowna is a pleasant
little stopping place,
near which Lord Aberdeen, formerly Governor-General of Canada, has one of his extensive ranches (another being near Vernon), and
at Peachland, another port of call of the steamer, connection is made
for Glen Robinson, a community who conduct their business on the
co-operative principle. They have engaged in farming, mining and
manufacturing. There is much to interest the tourist on this lake,
and the two days occupied in making the round trip from Sicamous
Junction can be most enjoyably spent.
There is an excellent hotel at Sicamous, located on the  shore of WESTERN   TOURS
Shuswap Lake. The fishing and shooting are excellent, and a houseboat, built on similar lines to that on Kootenay Lake, is to be placed
on the Shuswap during the present summer. Rowboats are procurable at the hotel.
From Penticton, where there is an excellent hotel, stages also
run to Okanagan Falls, Camp McKinney, Fairview, an established
mining camp, Osoyoos, Oro, Loomiston, and other points in the rich
and rapidly developing country of the Okanagan.
ON TO THE COAST
There are many points of interest along the railway line between
Sicamous and the Coast. A delightful health and pleasure resort is
the pretty little city of Kamloops, in the great basin between the Gold
and Coast ranges, where the absolute requirements of salubrious
climate and pleasant   surroundings,   essential   to  the   cure   of lung
FRASER  RIVER AT  YALE,   BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
troubles, are happily combined in the highest degree. High medical
authorities agree that the conditions existing here are the most
favorable known for consumptives.
Savonas, where valuable quicksilver deposits have been discovered, is at the further end of Kamloops Lake, near where the
wonderful canons of the Thompson begin. The lake offers opportunities for pleasant sails, steam launches being procurable at
Kamloops.
The famous gold-fields of Cariboo are reached from Ashcroft,
on the main line of the C.P.R., by stage which leaves for Clinton
tri-weekly, beyond which point there is semi-weekly communication; but special stages can be secured by pre-arrangement, and a
steamboat service during the season of navigation on the Upper Fraser
from Soda Creek to Quesnelle reduces the time to the gold-fields
materially.      The   district   only   awaits  the   railway   facilities,  the
: 39 WESTERN   TOURS
preliminaries of which have been inaugurated, and which, when
completed, will aid in the development of a gold region confidently
anticipated to rival the findings of the Klondike. This district comprises the Cariboo, Cassiar and Omenica districts, from which, forty
years ago, from surface washings alone, there was taken more gold
than the Yukon has yet produced.    There are now  many financially
strong companies working energetically with
the extraction of the gold.
modern  appliances   for
Beyond Ashcroft, the Black Canon of the Thompson, whose
angry waters rush in a perfect maelstrom, is entered, and after the
junction at Lytton with the Fraser, the great watercourse of the
Province, which comes down from the north, the scenery becomes
wilder than ever. At North Bend, in the midst of the awe-inspiring
surroundings of the ferocious Fraser canons, is another hotel similar
to those at Field and the Glacier, which is a desirable headquarters
for  those who intend  to explore the wonderful canons.    Here the
40 WESTERN   TOURS
flowers of British Columbia are to be found in great profusion ; there
is excellent fishing in the locality and places of interest to tourists.
Harrison Springs, on Harrison Lake, a little beyond North Bend,
is sought for its hot sulphur springs. It is reached by stage (6 miles)
from Agassiz station. The lake is studded with islands, and on it
plies a steam launch for pleasure and fishing parties.
Forty-three miles east of Vancouver is Mission Junction, from
which a branch of the Canadian Pacific Railway runs south connecting at the international boundary, at Sumas, with rail lines for
Seattle, Tacoma, Whatcom, Portland, San Francisco and all other
points on the Pacific Coast.
Twelve miles east of Vancouver a branch line runs to New
Westminster, a flourishing city on the Fraser river, and the
headquarters of the salmon canning industry.
The western terminus of the road is reached at Vancouver on
Burrard Inlet, a few miles north of the mouth of the Fraser, on the
fourth day after leaving Montreal. This new seaport is only fourteen
years old, yet it has over 25,000 inhabitants and a flourishing commerce. Its situation is unrivalled, as regards picturesque surroundings,
natural drainage, harbor facilities and commercial advantages, and a
variety of sport is obtainable in the neighborhood. Upon a hill commanding the best and widest view the Company has erected a large
hotel, the Vancouver, second to none on the Pacific Coast, which for
comfort and luxury compares favorably with the best hotels on the
Atlantic seaboard. From its broad balconies a magnificent prospect is
revealed. Far to the southeast rises the snow-capped cone of Mount
Baker ; to the north and north-west, rising directly from the sea, are
the imposing giants of the Cascade range ; westward, beyond English
Bay and the Straits of Georgia, huge purple masses mark the mountains of Vancouver Island ; and to the south-west, across the broad
fertile delta of the Fraser river, tower the serrated peaks of the
Olympian range, the whole forming a panorama of scenic loveliness
unsurpassed in the world. There are many charming drives around
Vancouver—that through Stanley Park being particularly interesting—
and a visit to Capilano Canon, across the inlet, is a delightful outing—
the canon being several hundred feet deep, with perpendicular sides.
From Vancouver daily steamers enable the traveller' to cross
through the archipelagoes of the Straits of Georgia and Fuca to Victoria, on Vancouver Island, the capital of the Province of British
Columbia. The sail, which usually occupies about six hours, is a delightful one. Victoria is charmingly situated at the extremity of a
miniature rocky harbor, near the entrance of which stands the
government house within its beautiful park. The new government buildings across James' Bay, erected at a cost of $1,000,000,
are a most striking piece of architectural skill and design, and
within their walls the visitor will find many things pertaining
to the province that will interest him—the museum and library
especially being worthy of more than a hurried visit. The
business part of the town has overspread an elevated peninsula at the
head of the harbor. At a little distance from the centre of the city
Beacon Hill overlooks the Straits of Fuca, and gives a view of the
Olympian range on the southern shore of the strait and of the great
Cascade range in Oregon.    This is the city's park, in which the races, WESTERN   TOURS
cricket matches, etc., take place. Victoria is one of the most important ports north of San Francisco, and does a large business with the
interior of the island and with the mainland. Since the opening of
the Canadian Pacific Railway, Victoria has increased largely in
population and importance. It is connected by railway with the
Nanaimo coal region, northward, and with Saanich. Esquimalt, three
miles distant, the rendezvous of the British navy in the North Pacific,
where there are immense dry docks and marine railway and huge
fortifications, is reached by electric tram car, or by a pleasant carriage
drive. There are several summering resorts within short distances of
the city. Lines of steamers give regular communication between
Victoria and every port on the Pacific Coast from San Francisco to
Alaska, and it is a port of call of the China, Japan and Australian
On the Pacific Coast
TO YUKON, ALASKAN, PUGET SOUND
AND OTHER COAST POINTS
NO PART of the world offers greater attractions to tourists than
the North Pacific Coast, the whole of which is a vast aggregation of
scenic marvels that find culminating grandeur in the mountains and
ice-fields of the Far North. There are the same geographical characteristics as Norway and the west coast of New Zealand—deep inlets
penetrating into the mountains, with a fringe of islands forming a
breakwater outside of the long line of reaches, passages, sounds and
canals. Alaskan scenery, too, is of superlative grandeur, and the
voyager is amid it from the very start. Archipelagoes, peninsulas,
bays, inlets, forest-clad mountains, alternating with bare-peaked and
snow-capped giants, quaint native villages with their distinctive
totem poles, busy mining towns, and fishing villages in which are yet
seen evidences of Russian occupancy, and huge glaciers are amongst
the prominent features of this trip—the land of nightless days. At
Taku Inlet and Glacier Bay, great walls of ice tower hundreds of feet
above the sea-level. The great Muir Glacier is a spectacle that is
strangely beautiful in the variety of forms and depth of color, and
awful in its grandeur and immensity.
Added interest is given to this region by the great rush to the
northern gold-fields of Canada, which has caused a remarkable increase in shipping facilities, and frequent sailings to Skagway and other
ports from Vancouver and Victoria. It is now only a pleasant jaunt to
Dawson during the season of navigation. From Skagway, a railway
is constructed over the White Pass to White Horse Rapids. Below the
rapids large and comfortable boats carry the traveller to Dawson. The
scenery along the whole route is very grand, and in summer under the
bright blue sky, with a sunshine which lasts about twenty hours out of
the twenty-four, there is a mild, genial atmosphere. The rivers are lined
along the whole route with high, well-wooded hills, garbed in green,
and if it were not for the mid-night day-light it would be hard for the
traveller to believe that he was within a few degrees of the Arctic
circle.    Every here and there the camps of prospectors will be passed,
_ WESTERN   TOURS
some consisting of only a tent or two, others of a score or more of
tents, and at one or two places, where, perhaps, a recent "strike"
has been made, as many as a hundred or more tents will be clustered
together at the mouth of a creek or river. Indeed, the route is now
never lonely, and besides the attraction of the scenery, there is plenty
of human interest. On the fourth or fifth day Dawson will be
reached, and there the traveller has the opportunity of seeing the life
of one of the greatest mining-camps of the generation whose placer diggings are amongst the richest in the world. When the traveller has seen
all he wants to see at Dawson, and is ready to start for home, he has the
choice of either continuing his journey down the Yukon by one of the
many fine, large steamboats engaged in this trade, to St. Michael's, and
thence by ocean steamer to Victoria, Vancouver or Seattle, or by returning by the same route as he came. The difference in time between
Dawson and Vancouver or Victoria would be about ten or twelve
days in favor of the Bennett and Skagway route.
It will thus be seen that if the traveller goes and returns by the
Skagway route, he can make the round trip from Montreal in about
a month. This would be divided up as follows : Four days from
Montreal to Vancouver by Canadian Pacific Railway ; three days from
Vancouver to Skagway by ocean steamboat; seven hours from Skagway
to White Horse by the railway ; and say two days from White Horse
to Dawson by river steamboats, making less than ten days in all
from Montreal to Dawson. The return trip would take a couple
of days longer, because of the difference in going up stream to White
Horse instead of down stream to Dawson.
From Vancouver, there is direct rail communication, via Mission
Junction, to Seattle, Tacoma, Whatcom, Portland, San Francisco,
etc., and those passengers who have taken steamer at Vancouver,
but desire to visit Victoria, can do so and continue their journey
from that point to Port Townsend, Seattle and Tacoma on the
steamships that ply on that route. The route from Vancouver,
whether by all rail via Mission, or via Victoria and Puget
Sound steamers to Tacoma, is a most attractive one. Varied and
interesting views of a lofty coast range are everywhere obtained.
Mount Baker is distinctly seen for hours, and Mount Tacoma rising
over 14,000 feet and seen from the sea level is most impressive.
Seattle, situated on the eastern shore of Puget Sound, is the largest
city in the State of Washington. This city is fortunate in the possession of a fresh water lake easy of access by means of several electric
and cable tram lines. On the shores of the lake, the city has created
three beautiful parks to which a visit should be made. Tacoma, at
the head of Puget Sound, about thirty miles to the south of Seattle,
is another flourishing city of rapid growth. Like Seattle, this city
boasts of a magnificent park, and there are several delightful drives in
the vicinity. From these two ports steamers ply to the new towns
springing up all along the many-armed shores of Puget Sound.
From Tacoma to Portland the route is comparatively speaking
uninteresting, although Mounts Hood and St. Helen's are in view for
a considerable time. Portland is a handsome city, the largest in
Oregon, and has more of an eastern appearance than any other on
the Pacific coast. Its business is large, and it is surrounded by an
extensive   agricultural country.     It is the real western terminus of
_ WESTERN   TOURS
both the Northern and Union Pacific railways, and has several local
roads and lines of steamers. Astoria, at the mouth of the Columbia,
the American headquarters of the salmon-canning industry, is of
considerable interest, and is reached from Portland by steamer.
The overland or " Shasta "route from Portland to San Francisco,
730 miles, is by the Southern Pacific system. The most picturesque
part of this journey is seen on reaching Mt. Shasta. The main peak
stands 14,442 feet above the sea and the railway passes close to its
base.    South of Shasta the route lies through Sacramento Valley.
San Francisco is also reached by sea, from Vancouver to Victoria,
and thence by the steamers of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company
southward on the Pacific direct to San Francisco. Fifty-five hours
are required for the passage from Victoria. The coast is in sight for
part of the way ; but the lofty broken rocks of Cape Flattery, on
the southern side of the entrance to the Straits of Fuca, and the
Golden Gate are the only features likely to be seen with any
distinctness.
Western Tours shown herein can, when desired at time of
purchase, be made to return via other overland routes on payment of
a slight additional charge, particulars of which can be obtained from
any ticket agent.
Across the Pacific
TO THE ORIENT, THE TROPICS, THE ANTIPODES
AND AROUND THE WORLD
Those who desire a trip to Japan and China, or the Hawaiian
Islands, Australasia, or around the world, are enabled to visit those
distant countries or even to circle the globe at moderate expense,
and, so complete are the arrangements, with the same ease and comfort experienced on an ordinary holiday outing.
A trip to Japan and China is now one of the easiest and it is the
most delightful tour, and a month, or better still, two months, can
be most enjoyably spent in the Celestial Kingdom and the Land of the
Mikado. One of the great White Empresses of the Canadian Pacific
—which for speed, comfort and luxurious appointments are unrivalled
on the Pacific—leaves Vancouver every three weeks, and by taking
the shortest route, Yokohama is reached in about eleven days. Here the
tourist finds himself amidst the refinements of European civilization,
and in the chief city of the most attractive eastern country. From
Yokohama he can reach, by rail or steamboat, all the principal cities
of Japan. Tokio, Nikko, Kioto and Nagasaki can be visited with
comfort ; the sacred mountain Fujiyama can be ascended, under the
care of experienced guides. Steamers ply on the Inland Sea, and
the country round . about each of the cities can be traversed in the
ubiquitous jinrikisha at moderate expense. From Nagasaki the
tourist may proceed to Woosung, and up the Yang-tse-Kiang River
to Shanghai, the great commercial centre of North China, and to
Hankow, the chief tea mart of the Empire, passing Nankin en route ;
— WESTERN   TOURS
and from Shanghai connecting steamers run to Tien-Tsin, the port of
Pekin, and other northern Chinese ports ; and southerly to the
British island of Hong Kong, from which steamers ply regularly to
Macao, an old and picturesque Portuguese settlement, now the
watering place and health resort of the residents of Hong Kong, and
Canton, perhaps the most interesting of all Chinese cities, and also
to Manila in the Philippines.    There are  so many delightful experi
ences afforded by a trip to China and Japan as to preclude more than
passing mention in these pages, but so much has been written of these
countries that the traveller cannot be at a loss for guidance.
" Westward to the Far East," and "East to the West," guides to
the principal cities of Japan and China, issued gratuitously by the
C. P. R. Co., which describe the journey in both directions—either
by the east or by the west—and "Murray's Guide to Japan," will be
found valuable pocket companions.
il WESTERN  TOURS
Another charming trip is to the Hawaiian Islands, and
Australia, which may be reached direct from Vancouver and
Victoria by the magnificent steamships of the Canadian-Australian
line. The passage of the southern seas is a proverbially delightful
voyage, and in the romantic history of the Pacific Ocean the
Hawaiian Islands furnish an interesting chapter. For variety of
pleasure and adventure within a small area this strange volcanic
archipelago appeals strongly to the tourist, who finds there the greatest
of the world's living and extinct volcanoes, a magnificent climate
in a land of perpetual bloom, and every form of recreation. A
tourist may spend an agreeable month in Honolulu and in the
interior, visiting the remarkable volcano " Kilauea" in its fiery
brilliancy, the canons of the main island, and through the cultivated
portions of the country, amongst a race of natives always interesting
and in many respects superior to those of more southern groups.
Steamers run regularly from Honolulu to the Volcano and all other
principal points of interest in the neighboring islands, the round trip
occupying ten days. There is a choice of two routes, on each of
which tri-monthly trips are made—one being by Maui and around
the northern coast of Hawaii to Hilo, and the other along Maui and
southern coast of Hawaii to Punaluu, and these may be extended at
very little increase of expense or time. A tourist who is continuing
his journey, and whose stay is necessarily limited, can find time and
opportunity for several short tours of absorbing interest about
Honolulu ; but, if one intends returning by the next steamer, he has
usually plenty of time to explore the wonders of these sub-tropical
isles.
Beyond Hawaii, the l8o° or anteprime meridian is crossed. On
the voyage to Vancouver, the mariner, in order to keep his time correct,
finds it necessary to double up the day he crosses this meridian—
which is precisely opposite Greenwich—and this he does by having
two Mondays or two Tuesdays, or two some other days in the same
week. If he is going towards Australia, he drops a day completely. If this point, for example, be reached on Monday, the
next day will be Wednesday—Tuesday, and the day it represents,
being absorbed into Monday.
It is a fortnight's sail from Honolulu to Brisbane, Queensland, the
youngest of the five Australian capitals, from which the steamer
coasts down to Sydney, New South Wales, in many respects the
principal city in the Southern Hemisphere, and not only distinguished for the beauty of its location—its harbor being considered one of the finest in the world—but as the chief commercial
metropolis, being a great steamship and railway centre. From
here all parts of Australasia can be readily reached : Tasmania,
across Bass Straits, New Zealand, the most interesting of the
Australasian group, and the cities of the island continent. At
Sydney the tourist sees the first evidences of the marvelous growth of
trade and civilization that has distinguished the Antipodean Colonies
of Great Britain. John Bull in the tropics ; living and bustling, under
the Southern Cross, with a steady determination to keep as much of
England about him as he can. The voyage from Vancouver to
Sydney occupies about 28 days- -there being sailings in each direction
every four weeks.     There is a choice of routes to return—by Vancouver
46 WESTERN   TOURS
direct, or by China and Japan and Vancouver, or the voyage may
lie continued via India and Egypt, or Brazil, as mentioned in the
" Round the World Trip." " New Route to Australia " and "A Trip
to Hawaii," issued by the Canadian Pacific Railway Co., for free
distribution, contain useful information for the traveller.
A still more pretentious trip—and one that is popularizing itself
wonderfully—is "Around the World," for which a whole year is
allowed ; and the tourist may, by nearly all the routes, start to travel
either east or west, and can begin and end his journey at any one
point on the route. Starting from Liverpool or Southampton (assuming
that he purposes travelling westward) he can choose from a number
of the first-class steamship lines and can land at Halifax, St. John,
N. B., Montreal or Quebec, New York or Boston, according to the
destination of the vessel he selects. By coming direct to Montreal or
Quebec, he will find the passage of the St. Lawrence not the least
attractive part of his tour by this route. During the last two days of
his Atlantic voyage he will pass by scenes of historical interest, and
witness a panorama of great scenic beauty. Both Quebec and
Montreal will well repay a day or two inspection, the one full of
mementoes of the early wars in Canada ; the latter, as an evidence
of the business and growing importance of the commerce of the
Dominion. In crossing the American continent either by the all-rail
route, or sailing up the great lakes in the magnificent steamships of
the Company, the broad prairies of the Canadian Northwest are
traversed, and the mighty Rockies and succeeding ranges are crossed
through the grandest of picturesque surroundings. At Vancouver the
around-the-world tourist embarks on one of the Canadian Pacific's
unrivalled steamships—the only twin-screws on the Pacific—and
crosses the ocean to Yokohama. After leisurely visiting the many
curious and interesting spots in Japan—the temples of Nikko, the
antiquities of Kioto, the bazaars of Osaka, and the sacred mount
of Fujiyama—from Nagasaki he sails across the great Inland Sea,
and explores the quaint and strange cities of China—Shanghai,
Hankow, Pekin, Canton, Nankin, etc., etc.—and then proceeds to
I long Kong, where either a steamer of the Peninsular & Oriental Co.
is taken to Singapore, Penang and Colombo, each of which has its
own marked peculiarities, and should be visited, or a North German
Lloyd steamer to Singapore and Colombo, and thence direct to Aden,
Suez, Port Said, Naples, Genoa and Southampton. At Colombo the
choice is offered the round-the-world tourist, by the P. & O. Line, of
continuing by the same steamer to Bombay, of taking another steamer
home by the Red Sea, or, if he desires to visit India, he can change
to the steamer for Calcutta, and proceed thence by rail via Cawnpore,
Lucknow, Agra, Delhi, and other celebrated places of the great
British Empire in the east, till Bombay is reached by rail. Guide
books, containing all information and useful directions, as well as
native servants, can be procured at Calcutta.
From Bombay or Colombo the route lies across the Indian Ocean
to Aden, thence up the Red Sea to Ismalia, where tourists desiring to
visit Cairo, Alexandria and the Nile disembark. From October till
May is the season for touring in Egypt, after which the weather
becomes warmer, than is agreeable to the majority of Europeans.
From Ismalia the tourist has a choice of several routes through the WESTERN   TOURS
Mediterranean by the Straits of Gibraltar, or he can go via Brindisi
or Marseilles, taking in such of the cities of Europe as he may desire
to see.
At Hong Kong, the tourist desiring to include Australia in his
journey can take the China Navigation or the Eastern & Australian
Steamship Company's steamers via Torres Straits to Sydney, the
capital of New South Wales, and from that port, Melbourne, or
Adelaide, continue his journey by the P. & O. Company's steamer to
Colombo, from which the route is continued as before described.
Australia can also be reached direct via Vancouver and Honolulu,
Hawaii, and the journey either continued by way of Ceylon and
Suez, or by Cape Horn, Rio Janeiro and Teneriffe to London ; or
the outward voyage can be made from London via Teneriffe and
Cape of Good Hope, touching at Cape Town, a place of more
than ordinary interest owing to recent stirring events in South
Africa, and on to Hobart, Tasmania, and thence to Sydney, and
continued by the Canadian-Australian route to Vancouver direct, or
via China and Japan and Canadian Pacific Steamship Line, thence
C. P. R. across the American continent and Atlantic lines from
Montreal, Quebec, Boston and New York, to Europe.
The globe can easily be circled in ten weeks, but the tourist is
only limited to one year to complete his journey, giving ample time
to explore the many countries visited, to see everything that is worth
seeing, and to familiarize himself with the customs and manners and
modes of life of the different nations of the world. He will be able
to procure interesting guide books to every land, and "Around the
World," issued free by the Canadian Pacific Railway Co., will furnish
valuable information regarding its various around-the-world trips.
48 WESTERN   TOURS
SPECIAL INFORMATION
IN
CONNECTION
WITH
Western
Tours
TOURISTS ticketed from points not on the line of the Canadian
Pacific Railway must begin their journey on that line at either of
the following junction points, viz. : Quebec, Montreal, Newport, Vt.,
St. John's, Que., St. John, N.B., Prescott, Brockville, Toronto,
Hamilton, St. Thomas, Detroit, Sault Ste. Marie, Port Arthur,
Fort William, Gretna or Portal.
The Time Limit on Tourist Tickets to Vancouver, B.C., Victoria, B.C., Seattle, Wash., Tacoma, Wash., Portland, Ore., and
San Francisco, Cal., is nine months from the date of purchase, the
going journey as far as Vancouver, Whatcom, Everett or Seattle,
to be made within 60 days from date of purchase. Tourist Return
Tickets to Banff Hot Springs, Calgary, Laggan, Field or Glacier
(except where otherwise stated), are good for six months from date
of issue. Tourist Return Tickets to Kaslo, Nelson, Rossland, Trail
or Spokane (except where otherwise stated), are good for 90 days from
date of purchase, the going journey to be made within 40 days from
date of purchase, and return journey to be completed within 40 days
from its commencement. To other points, unless otherwise stated,
the final limit will be November ist.
The route of Western Tours going or coming by rail between
Port Arthur, Fort William or Sault Ste. Marie and eastern points in
Western Ontario west of Sharbot Lake and Kingston will be via
the Ontario Route, i.e., via the Grand Trunk Railway System
between Toronto and North Bay, thence Canadian Pacific Railway.
From east of Sharbot Lake and Kingston passengers have the option
of travelling by All Rail, Canadian Pacific Railway via Carleton
Junction or via the Ontario Route, or of going one way and returning
the other on application to Ticket Agent at time of purchasing ticket.
The route of Western Tours from Boston will be by the
Montreal and Boston Air Line to Montreal, thence Canadian Pacific
Railway ; from St. John, N.B., by the Canadian Pacific Railway
Short Line through Maine.
Tours returning from Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle, Tacoma
and Portland, Ore., through Portal, St. Paul and Chicago (Soo-
Pacific Route), can, when desired at time of purchase, be made to
return via other overland routes (in some cases on payment of a
slight additional charge, particulars of which can be obtained from
any Ticket Agent).
Tours reading between St. Paul and the east via Chicago
will, when requested at time of purchase, be made applicable by
the Minneapolis St.   Paul &. Sault  Ste. Marie  Railway  (Soo Line)
_ WESTERN   TOURS
to Sault Ste. Marie, thence Canadian Pacific Railway, or thence
via Canadian Pacific Steamship Line to Owen Sound, and Canadian
Pacific Railway.
Rates quoted herein for Western Tours from Sault Ste. Marie,
unless otherwise stated, will be via Canadian Pacific Steamship Line
to Fort William, thence as shown in details of route.
Except when sold at rates which are shown herein as applying
only by the Lake Routes, Round Trip Tourist Tickets to points west
of Fort William via Fort William, will, if desired, be made good to
go either via Canadian Rail Routes or via the Canadian Pacific Lake
Steamship Line between Owen Sound and P'ort William or Sault Ste.
Marie and Fort William, and should tourist desire to alter his route on
return from rail to the lake route he can do so without extra charge
on application to Agent of the Canadian Pacific Railway at Winnipeg,
Fort William or Sault Ste. Marie. Round Trip Tourist Tickets to
Pacific Coast points will be made good either via Canadian Pacific Ry.
Main Line west of Fort William, or via Lethbridge, Crow's Nest
Branch, Kootenay Landing, Nelson and Revelstoke, or to go one
way and return the other on application to Ticket Agent at time of
purchase.
When purchasing Pacific Coast Round Trip Tickets reading one
way via the Crow's Nest Route, passengers from points east of Port
Arthur, or east of and including St. Paul and Minneapolis, may
purchase for $6.00 additional a ticket covering side trips from
Robson to Rossland and Midway, and from Nakusp to Sandon and
back, and may also, if desired, have their tickets made to read
between Robson and Revelstoke via Slocan Junction, Slocan City,
Rosebery and Nakusp (with side trip Rosebery to Sandon and
back).
Tickets or coupons between Owen Sound and Sault Ste. Marie
in either direction, reading over the Canadian Pacific Steamship
Line, will be available by the local steamers of the Northern
Navigation Co., running north of Manitoulin Island and calling
at intermediate ports, when exchanged by the C. P. R. agent at
Sault Ste Marie or Owen Sound. An extra payment of $2.00 in
each direction is, however, required on one way or round trip tickets
if exchanged for use by the local steamers between June 20th and
September 13th (i.e., $2.00 if coupon in one direction is exchanged ;
$4.00 if coupons in both directions are exchanged).
Berths in Steamships of the Canadian Pacific S.S. Line can be
procured through Ticket Agent when purchasing ticket, or through
city ticket offices at Toronto, Fort William or Winnipeg.
Berths in Alaska steamships can be procured through Ticket
Agent, from General Passenger Agent, Montreal, from Assistant
General Passenger Agent, Toronto, or from District Passenger
Agents.
50 Western
Tours
To THE LAKE OF THE WOODS
THE PRAIRIES, BANFF
LOUISE AND THE GLACIER
KOOTENAY AND OKANAGAN
THE PACIFIC COAST
Agassiz, B.C., and Return, for Harrison Hot Springs.
From
Route
Rate
From
Route
Rate
R200
R200
R200
R200
R200
I $2.50
3.25
5.00
II 2.50
1   2.50
R200
R201
R 202
R202
$5.00
8.00
do	
If   4.00
do	
do.            	
5.00
Time Limit, 30 days.
Tl Good going Friday to return until Monday, or going Saturday or Sunday
to return until Tuesday.
Route R 200 Rates as above.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Agassiz  14
Return same route. R
Route R 201                                                                         Rates as above.
Canadian Pacific Navigation Co. (Ltd.) ... to Vancouver  17
Canadian Pacific Ry " Agassiz  14
Return same route. R
Route R 202                                                                         Rates as above.
Bellingham Bay & British Columbia Rd.. .to Sumas  226
Canadian Pacific Ry " Agassiz  14
Return same route.
R
AlNSWORTH, B.C., AND RETURN.
Same rates and routes as to Kaslo.    See Routes R 210, 211, 212 and 213
Alaska (Sitka, Glacier Bay, etc.) and Return.
Route R 203       Rates $60.00 higher than Victoria, B.C.—Routes R 245 to 249,
inclusive.
Choice of Routes R 215 to 249, inclusive, to Victoria (according to rate paid).
Pacific Coast Steamship Co to Sitka     68
Return same route to Victoria.
Banff Hot Springs, or
Calgary, or *Macleod, or
Laggan (For Lakes in the Clouds)
and Return.     R W
Route R 201
From   Boston   $101.50
St. John, N.B  106.00
"        Quebec & Sherbrooke   90.00
"        Montreal     90.00
Ottawa      90.00
"        Prescott     90.00
"       Brockville     90.00
Rates as follows :
From Toronto & Hamilton t$80.00S85.00
"    London t 80.00 85.00
"    St. Thomas t 80.00 85.00
"    NiagaraFalls t 82.25 87.25
"    Buffalo t 83.20 88.20
"    Detroit t 80.00 85.00
S.S. Marie via Lakes t65.00 70.00
From S.S. Marie and Mackinaw City via Soo-Pacific Route §$70.00
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound   265
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Fort William     18
Canadian Pacific Ry " Destination    266
Return same route. R
* Tickets to Macleod at rates shown must be routed via Lethbridge both ways.
Tickets may be made good via Calgary in  one direction on payment of
$4.30; or in both directions on payment of $8.60.
§ Limited to 40 days in each direction, final limit 90 days.
II Meals and berth included.
t On sale May 15th to Sept. 30th, limited for return until Nov. 1st.
51 WESTERN TOURS
and Return.
Banff Hot Springs, or
Calgary, or *Macleod, or
Laggan (tor Lakes in the Clouds)
Route R 205                                                        Rates same as for Route R 204.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound 265
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Fort William     18
Canadian Pacific Ry " Destination    268
Canadian Pacific R y " Fort William      266
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point  266
Banff Hot Springs, or]
Calgary, or [ and Return .
*Macleod
Route R 206
From Boston
St. John
N.B.
Quebec & Sherbrooke
Montreal......
Ottawa	
Prescott	
Brockville	
Rates as follows
|101.50    From Toronto ti
106.00        "      Hamilton t
London t
St. Thomas t
Niagara Falls.
Buffalo	
Detroit	
90.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
From Winnipeg to Banff.t§40.00    From Fort William to Banff
"      Winnipeg to Calgary§50.00        "      Port Arthur to Banff.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Fort William	
Canadian Pacific Ry " Destination   	
Return same route.
580.00
80.00
80.00
80.00
82.25
83.20
80.00
50.00
50.00
$85.00
85.00
85.00
85.00
87.25
88.20
85.00
60.00
60.00
... 266
... 266
R
Route R 207
From Westminster, B.C....$30.00
Vancouver, B.C   30.00
Victoria, B.C.
An cortes ....
Whatcom	
'.oo
30.00
30.00
Banff Hot Springs and Return.
Rates as follows :
From Tacoma $30.00
Seattle     30.00
Portland,   Ore (lim. 30 days) 35.00
Centralia  35.00
Olympia    30.00
From Port Townsend $30.00
Canadian Pacific Ry to Banff Hot Springs     11
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point     14
The route from Victoria is via the Canadian Pacific Navigation Company to
Vancouver (17), thence as above. From* Portland, Tacorn i, Centralia and
Olympia, via the Northern Pacific Ry. to Sumas (262), thence as above; returning same route.
Calgary, Alberta, and Return.
See Routes R 201, 205 and 206.
To Field, B.C. (For Yoho Valley and       \
Lake Emerald), or Glacier, B.C./
and Return.
Route R 208
From Boston $106.50
St John,N.Bt$110.00
Quebec   and
Sherbrooke tlOO.OO
Montreal....t 95.00
Ottawa    t 95.00
Prescott t 95.00
Fron
Rates as follows :
Brockville t$95.00 $96.85
121.00        "     Toronto & Hamil'n t  85.00    90.00
"     London   t  85.00    90.00
107.10      "    St.Thomas t 85.00   90.00
102.10        "     NiagaraFalls t   87.25    92.25
96.60      "    Buffalo t 88.20   93.20
97.50        "     Detroit t  85.00    90.00
From S.S. Marie via Lakes   $75.00
From S.S. Marie and Mackinaw City via Soo-Pacific Route t$75.00
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound  265
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Fort William     18
Canadian Pacific Ry " Field or Glacier  266
Return same route. R
Halcyon Hot Springs, B.C., and Return.
Route R 209
From Revelstoke $2.25
"     Sandon  3.85
"     Robson     5.75
"     Nelson  7.50
"     Slocan City  4.35
(Time limit, one month.)
Rates as follows :
From Trail $7.20
"     Rossland  7.75
"     Kaslo  9.75
"     Ainsworth  9.15
New Denver  3.35
Canadian Pacific Ry. and Steamer Line going and returning.
+ On sale May 15th to Sept. 30th, limited for return until Nov. 1st.
§ On sale all year.    Time limit, 60 days.
{ Time limit 40 days each way, final limit 90 days.
II  Meals and berth included.
* Tickets to Macleod at rates shown must be routed via Lethbridge both ways.
Tickets may be made good via  Calgary in one direction on payment of
$4.30, or in both directions on payment of $8.60.
62 WESTERN TOURS
Route R 210
Kaslo, B.C., and Return.
Rates as follows :
From Boston t$121.50
"     St. John, NB     t 136.00
"     Quebec and Sherbrooke.t 122.10
"     Montreal t 117.10
"     Ottawa t 111.60
"     Prescott  t 112.50
"      Brockville t 111 .85
"     Toronto and Hamilton.! 100.40
"      London J 100.40
"     St. Thomas t 100.40
From Winnipeg	
From Niagara Falls +$102.65
"     Detroit t 100.40
"     Buffalo. ...t 103.60
"      Ft. William, Winnipeg,
St. Paul orMinneapolis,
via Soo-Pacific Route . t
'*     S.S. Marie or Mackinaw
City,   via    Soo-Pacific
Route t
"     S.S.Marie via Lakes ..
 t $70.00
70.00
90.00
85.00
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound   265
HCanadiin Pacific Steamship Line " Fort William      18
Canadian Pacific Ry  " Kootenay Landing  266
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line " Nelson  349
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line " Kaslo  349
Return same route.
Kaslo, B.C., and Return.
RW
Route R 211 Rates same as for Route R 210.
Same as Route R 210 to Kaslo.
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line  " Nelson  349
Canadian Pacific Ry " Robson  216
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line " Arrowhead  322
Canadian Pacific Ry " Fort William  266
llCanadian Pacific Steamer Line " Owen Sound  18
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point  265
Kaslo, B.C., and Return.
Route R 212 Rates same as for Route R 210.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Fort William  266
Canadian Pacific Ry " Kootenay Landing  266
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line "Nelson  349
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line " Kaslo  349
Return same route. R
Or return same as Route R 213.
Kaslo, B.C., and Return.
RW
Route R 213 Rates same as for Route R 210.
Same as Route R 210 or Route R 212 to Kaslo.
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line " Nelson  349
Canadian Pacific Ry " Robson     216
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line " Arrowhead  322
Canadian Pacific Ry  " Portal  14
j Canadian Pacific Steamer Line " Kootenay Landing  349
or ( Canadian Pacific Ry " Portal     14
Minneapolis St. Paul & S.S. Marie Ry. .. " S.S.Marie via Minneapolis  175
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point  14
Macleod, Alba., and Return.
Rates as follows :
From Whatcom, Wash   $45.00
Port Townsend, Wash  45.00
Seattle, Wash   45.00
Tacoma, Wash   45.00
Canadian Pacific Ry to Arrowhead     14
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line " Robson  322
Route R 214
From Westminster. B.C $45.00
"     Vancouver, B.C  45.00
Victoria, B.C  45.00
Anacortes, Wash   15.00
Canadian Pacific Rv " Nelson _	
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line " Kootenay Landing..
Canadian Pacific Ry  " Macleod	
Return same route.
216
349
11
R
The route from Victoria is via the Canadian Pacific Navigation Co. to Vancouver (17), thence as above. From Tacoma via the Northern Pacific Ry. to
Sumas  (262),   thence as above; returning same route.
Macleod and Calgary, Alba., and Return.    RW
Route R 215 Rates same as for Route R 214.
Same as Route R 214 to Macleod.
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting   Point, via   Calgary,
Banff, etc     14
t Tickets good 40 days going, 10 days returning, final limit 90 days,
|| Meals and berth included.
53 WE STERN TOURS
To Laggan, Alba., and Return.
(For Lakes in the Clouds.)
See Routes R 204 and R 205.
Nelson, B.C., and Return.
Route R 216 Rates as follows :
From Boston +$121.50    From NiagaraFalls   +$102.65
"     St. John, N.B t 136.00        "     Buffalo   f 103.60
"     Quebec and Sherbr'ket 122.10        "     Detroit   +100.40
"     Montreal t 117.10 "     Fort William,Winnipeg,
"     Ottawa + 111.60 St. Paul or Min'apolis,
"     Prescott    + 112.50 via Soo-Pac. Route...  +    70.00
"     Brockville t 111.85 "     S.S. Marie or Mackinaw
"     Toronto andHamilton t 100.40 City,   via    Soo-Pacific
"     London + 100.40 Route   +    90.00
"     St.Thomas + 100.40 "     S.S. Marie, via Lakes..         85.00
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound  265
[| Canadian Pacific Steamship Line ** Fort William      18
Canadian Pacific Ry " Kootenay Landing  266
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line " Nelson      349
Return same route. R
Nelson, B.C., and Return. RW
Route R 217 Rates same as for Route R 216.
Same as Route R 216 to Nelson.
Canadian Pacific Ry " Robson  216
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line " Arrowhead  322
Canadian Pacific Ry _ " Fort William    266
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Owen Sound     18
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point   265
Nelson, B.C., and Return.
Route R 218 Rates same as for Route R 216.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Fort William   266
Canadian Pacific Ry " Kootenay Landing   266
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line " Nelson 349
Return same route. R
Or return same as Route R 217.
Nelson, B.C., and Return. RW
Route R 219 Rates same as for Route R 216.
Same as Route R 216 or Route R 218 to Nelson.
Canadian Pacific Ry " Robson     216
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line " Arrowhead   322
Canadian Pacific Ry " Portal     14
j Canadian Pacific Steamer Line " Kootenay Landing  349
( Canadian Pacific Ry " Portal     14
Minneapolis St.P.ml & Sault Ste.Marie Ry. " S.S. Marie via Minneapolis ..,. 175
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point    ,...    14
Penticton, B.C., and Return.
Route R 220 Rates as follows :
From   Westminster, B.C... .$30.00    From Tacoma $30.00
11       Vancouver, B.C  30.00       "     Seattle  30.00
"       Victoria, B.C 30.00        "     Portland, Ore  35.00
"        Anacortes   30.00        "      Centralia   35.00
"        Whatcom       30.00        "     Olympia   30.00
From Port Townsend $30.00
Canadian Pacific Ry. .^ to Okanagan Landing     14
Canadian Pacific Ky. Steamer "Aberdeen" " Penticton   285
Return same route. R
The route from Victoria is via the Canadian Pacific Navigation Company to
Vancouver (17), thence as above. From Portland, Tacoma, Centralia and
Olympia via the Northern Pacific Ry. to Sumas (262), thence as above ; returning
same route.
t Tickets will be good for 40 days going, 40 days returning, final limit, 90 days.
|| Meals and berth included.
_ WESTERN   TOURS
Portland, Ore., and Return.
* Route R 221
From Boston      $141.50
•'     St. John, N.B  156.00
" Quebec and Sherbrooke 142.10
"     Montreal   137.10
"     Ottawa  131.GO
"     Prescott   132.50
"     Brockville   131.85
" Toronto and Hamilton 120.40
"       London    120.40
•'     St. Thomas  120.40
Rates as follows:
From Niagara Falls $122.65
"      Buffalo    123.00
"     Detroit.......	
"      S.S. Marie via Lakes
"      Ft. William and Winnipeg
St. Paul and Min'apolis,
via Soo-Pac. Route. .
"      S.S. Marie or Mackinaw
City     v i a    Soo-Pacific
Route   110.00
120.40
105.00
90.00
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound...
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line  " Fort William ..
Canadian Pacific Ry " Sumas	
Northern Pacific Ry  " Portland	
Northern Pacific Ry " Sumas	
Canadian Pacific Ry  " Fort William.. ,
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point.
.265
18
266
262
262
266
266
Portland, Ore., and Return.
♦Route R 222
Rates same as for Route R 221.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Fort William.
Canadian Pacific Ry  " Sumas	
Northern Pacific Ry " Portland	
266
297
Return same route.
Rat Portage and Return.
(For Rainy Lake District.)
Route R 223
From Boston $66.20
" St. John, N.B  80.70
" QuebecandSherbrooke 66.45
" Montreal     61.45
" Ottawa  58.f 5
" Prescott  57.15
" Brockville  56.55
Rates as follows :
From Toronto $44.95
"     Hamilton  44.95
"     London and St. Thomas  44.95
"     Niagara Falls  47.20
"     Buffalo  48.15
"     Detroit  44.95
"     Sault Ste. Marie via Lake.. 29.75
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound.
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line   " Fort William.
Canadian Pacific Ry  " Rat Portage.
Return same route.
Rat Portage and Return.
16
265
RW
Route R 224
From Boston $71.90
•'     St. John,N.B  86.40
" Quebec and Sherbrooke..  72.35
"     Montreal  67.35
"    Ottawa  63.75
"     Prescott  62.85
"     Brockville  62.25
Rates as follows:
From Toronto .    'l
"      Hamilton	
"      London   f$50.65
"      St.Thomas	
Detroit 1
"     Niag. Falls     52.90
"      Buffalo  53.85
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound . .
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Fort William..
Canadian Pacific Ry  " Rat Portage ..
Canadian Pacific Ry    ...   . " Fort William .
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point.
265
18
266
266
266
* This route may be varied to read via Canadian Pacific Ry. (Crow's Nest
Branch) to Kootenay Landing (14), Canadian Pacific Steamer Line to
Nelson (3401, Canadian Pacific Ry. to Robson (216, Canadian Pacific
Steamer Line to Arrowhead (322), and Canadian Pacific Ry. beyond (11), in
either or in both directions, on application to ticket agent at time of
purchase.
|| Meals and berth included. WESTERN   TOURS
To Revelstoke, B.C., and Return.
Route R 225
F'm Westminst'r,B.C*$21.75 $30.00
"    Vancouver, B.C.* 25.35   30.00
"    Victoria, B.C.  ..« 29.35   30.00
"    Anacortes   30.00
"    Whatcom  30.00
From Port Townsend, ,
Rates as follows :
From Tacoma $30.00
•■     Seattle  30.00
"     Portland, Ore   35.00
"     Centralia   35.00
"     Olympia  30.00
 $30.00
14
14
Canadian Pacific Ry to Revelstoke	
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point	
The route from Victoria is via the Canadian Pacific Navigation Company
to Vancouver (17), thence as above. From Portland, Tacoma, Centralia and
Olympia via the Northern Pacific Ry. to Sumas (262), thence as above ; returning same route.
Rossland, B.C., and Return.
Route R 226
From Boston   t$121.50
"      St. John, N.B   t  136.00
" Quebec & Sherbr'ke t  122.10
"      Montreal   t 117.10
"      Ottawa   t  111.60
"      Prescott   t  112.50
"      Brockville    t  111.85
" Toronto &IIamilton t  100.40
"      London   t  100.40
"     St. Thomas t 100.40
Rates as follows:
i NiagaraFalls   +$102.65
Buffalo    t  103.00
Detroit   t 100.10
Ft. William and Winnipeg.
St. Paul or Min'apolis,
via Soo-Pac. Route.   .    t    70.00
S.S. Marie or Mackinr.w
City,   via   Soo-Pacific
Route     +    90.00
S.S. Marie, via Lakes .. 85.00
Canadian Pacific Ry  to Owen Sound  265
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line   " Fort William    18
Canadian Pacific Ry    " Kootenay Landing  266
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line    " Nelson  349
Canadian Pacific Ry   " Rossland  ]4
Return same route. R
Rossland, B.C., and Return.
R W
Route R 227
Rates same as for Route R 226.
Same as Route R 226 to Rossland.
Canadian Pacific Ry
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line .
Canadian Pacific Ry	
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line .
Canadian Pacific Ry      " Starting Point .
West Robson  14
Arrowhead  322
Fort William  266
Owen Sound  18
265
Route R 228
Rossland, B.C., and Return.
Rates same as for Route R 226.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Fort William  266
Canadian Pacific Ry   " Kootenay Landing  266
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line    " Nelson  349
Canadian Pacific Ry    " Rossland  14
Return same route, or return same as Route R 227. R
Rossland, B.C., and Return.
R W
Route R 229
Rates same as for Route R 226.
Same as Route R 226 or R 228 to Rossland
Canadian Pacific Ry  " West Robson
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line	
Canadian Pacific Ry	
{Canadian Pacific Ry 
Canadian Pacific Steamer Line .. .
Canadian Pacific Ry	
Minn. St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Ry.
Canadian Pacific Ry	
     14
Arrowhead       322
Portal     14
Nelson     14
Kootenay Landing  349
Portal  ...     14
S. S. Marie via Minneapolis... 175
Starting Point     14
*  Time Limit, one month.     Not good to stop over.
t Tickets will be good for 40 days going, 40 days returning
|| Meals and berth included.
final limit 90 days
56 WESTERN TOURS
San Francisco, Cal., and Return.
* Route R 230
From Boston  $155.00
"      St.John.N.B  169.50
"      Quebec ^Sherbrooke 155.60
"      Montreal  150.60
"     Ottawa  145.10
"      Brockville  145.35
"      Prescott  116.00
Rates as follows:
From Toronto and Hamilton ...$133.90
London  133.90
"      St.Thomas  133.90
"      Niagara Falls  136.15
"      Buffalo  137.10
"     Detroit  133.90
S.S.MarieviaLakes  118.50
From Fort William and Winnipeg   $103.50.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound      266
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Fort William     17
Canadian Pacific Ry " Vancouver   268
Canadian Pacific Navigation Co. (Ltd.).. " Victoria     18
UPacific Coast Steamship Co " San Francisco     67
JlPacific Coast Steamship Co " Victoria     66
Canadian Pacific Navigation Co. (Ltd.). .. " Vancouver     18
Canadian Pacific Ry " Fort William   268
yCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Owen Sound     15
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point   265
San Francisco, Cal., and Return.
R W
* Route R 231 Rates same as for Route R 230.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Fort William   264
Canadian Pacific Ry " Sumas  266
Northern Pacific Ry " Portland   262
Southern Pacific Co "San Francisco   188
Southern Pacific Co  " Portland   189
Northern Pacific Ry " Sumas   262
Canadian Pacific Ry " Fort William   266
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Owen Sound     18
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point 265
San Francisco, Cal., and Return.
R W
* Route R 232 Rates same as for Route R 230.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Fort William  266
Canadian Pacific Ry " Vancouver  266
Canadian Pacific Navigation Co. (Ltd.). .. " Victoria  17
UPacific Coast Steamship Co " San Francisco  68
Return same route. R
San Francisco, Cal., and Return.
R W
* Route R 233 Rates same as for Route R 230.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Fort William  266
Canadian Pacific Ry " Sumas   266
Northern Pacific Ry " Portland  262
Southern Pacific Co     " San Francisco   188
UPacific Coast Steamship Co " Victoria     68
Canadian Pacific Nav. Co. (Ltd.) " Vancouver     17
Canadian Pacific Ry " Fort William   266
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point   266
San Francisco, Cal., and Return.
R W
t * Route R 234                                               Rates same as for Route R 230.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound   265
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line .
' Fort William     18
Canadian Pacific Ry '■  " Sumas.  266
Northern Pacific Ry " Portland  262
Southern Pacific Co     " San Francisco  188
Southern Pacific Co  " Portland   189
Northern Pacific Ry  " Sumas   262
Canadian Pacific Ry " Portal     14
Minneapolis St. Paul & S. S. Marie Ry... " S. S. Mane via Minneapolis..  175
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point     14
t Rates quoted for this route will apply, if application is made at time of purchase, by the direct United States routes on return journey from San Francisco
through St. Paul, Kansas City, St. Louis or St. Paul and Chicago (except that
from Ottawa the rate for such route will be $147.95).
* This route may be varied to read via Canadian Pacific Ry. (Crow's Nest Branch)
to Kootenay Landing (11), Canadian Pacific Steamer Line to Nelson (349),
Canadian Pacific Ry, to Robson (216). Canadian Pacific Steamship Line to
Arrowhead (322), and Canadian Pacific Ry. beyond (14), in either or both
directions on application to ticket agent at time of purchase.
II Meals and berth included.
57 WESTERN   TOURS
Seattle, Wash., and Return.
* Route R 235 Rates as follows :
From Boston   $141.50    FromNiagara Falls   $122.65
"     -t. John,N.B     156.00       "    Buffalo     123.80
"     Quebec & Sherbrooke    142.10        "    Detroit     120.40
"     Montreal     137.10        "    S.S.Marie via Lakes     105.00
"     Ottawa     131.60       "    Ft. William andWinnipeg.
"     Prescott     132.50 St.Paul or Minneapolis,
"     Brockville     131.85 via Soo-Pacific Route ...      90.00
"    TorontoandHamilton    120.40        "    S.S.   Marie  or Mackinaw
"     London      120.40 City, via Soo-Pacific
"    St  Thomas      120.40 Route       110.00
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound   265
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Fort William     18
Canadian Pacific Ry         " Sumas  266
Northern Pacific Ry " Seattle  262
Return same route. R
Seattle, Wash., and Return. R W
* Route R 236 Rates same as for Route R 235.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Fort William   266
Canadian Pacific Ry "Sumas  266
Northern Pacific Ry " Seattle  262
Return same route. R
Spokane, Wash., and Return.
Route R 237    Rates $5.00 higher than to Nelson. Routes R216, 217, 218 and 219.
Choice of Routes R216, 217, 218 and 219 to Nelson (according to rate).
Nelson & Fort Sheppard Ry to Boundary   301
Spokane Falls & Northern Ry " Spokane  302
Return same route to Spokane.
Choice of Routes  R  216, 217, 218   and   219   (according   to   rate)   back to
starting point.
Tacoma, Wash., and Return.
* Route R 238                                                  Rates same as for Route R 235.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound  265
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Fort William     18
Canadian Pacific Ry "Sumas   266
Northern Pacific Ry " Tacoma   262
Return same route. R
Tacoma, Wash., and Return. R W
* Route R 239 Rates same as for Route R 235.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Fort William   266
Canadian Pacific Ry  " Sumas   266
Northern Pacific Ry " Tacoma  262
Return same route. R
Vancouver, B.C., and Return.
* Route R 240 Rates as follows :
From Boston $141.50    From Niagara Falls $122.65
"      St.John.N.B     156.00        "      Buffalo     123.60
"      Quebec& Sherbrooke    142.10        "      Detroit     120.40
"      Montreal     137.10        "      Sault   Ste.   Marie via
"      Ottawa     131.60 Lakes      105.00
"      Prescott     132.50        "      Ft. William andWinnipeg,
"      Brockville     131.85 St. Paul or Minneapolis,
"      Toronto & Hamilton    120.40 via Soo-Pacific Route...      90.00
"      London       120.40        "       S.S. Marie or Mackinaw
"     St.Thomas     120.40 City, via Soo-Pac. Route   110.00
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound   265
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Fort William     18
Canadian Pacific Ry " Vancouver  266
Return same route. R
Vancouver, B.C., and Return.
* Route R 241 Rates same as for Route R 240.
Canadian Pacific Ry     to Fort William  266
Canadian Pacific Ry  " Vancouver   266
Return same route. R
* This route may be varied to read via Canadian Pacific Ry. (Crow's Nest Branch)
to Kootenay Landing [14], Canadian Pacific Steamer Line to Nelson [310],
Canadian Pacific Ry. to Robson  [216], Canadian   Pacific Steamer Line to
Arrowhead [322], and Canadian Pacific Ry, beyond  [14], in  either or both
directions on application to ticket agent at time of purchase.
X Meals and berth included.
58 WESTERN  TOURS
Vancouver, B.C., and Return. R W
* Route R 242 Rates same as tor Route R 210
Canadian Pacific Ry to Fort William   266
Canadian Pacific Ry " Vancouver   266
Canadian Pacific Ry " Fort William   266
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Owen Sound     18
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point  265
Vancouver, B.C., and Return. R W
* Route R 243                                                            Rates same as for Route R 240
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound   265
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Fort William      18
Canadian Pacific Ry   " Vancouver  266
Canadian Pacific Ry " Portal     14
Minneapolis St. Paul & S. S. Marie Ry... "S.S. Marie via Minneapolis...  175
Canadian Pacific Ry  " Starting Point     14
Vancouver, B.C., and Return. R W
* Route R 244 Rates same as for Route R 240
Canadian Pacific Ry to Fort William 265
Canadian Pacific Ry " Vancouver  266
Canadian Pacific Ry " Portal     14
Minneapolis St. Paul & S. S. Marie Ry... " S. S. Marie via Minneapolis.. 175
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point     14
Victoria, B.C., and Return.
* Route R 245 Rates same as for Route R 210.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound  265
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Fort William  18
Canadian Pacific Ry , " Vancouver  266
Canadian Pacific Nav. Co. (Ltd.) " Victoria  17
Return same route. R
Victoria, B.C., and Return. R W
* Route R 246 Rates same as for Route R 240.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Fort William  266
Canadian Pacific Ry  " Vancouver  266
Canadian Pacific Nav. Co. (Ltd.) " Victoria     17
Canadian Pacific Nav. Co. (Ltd.) " Vancouver     17
Canadian Pacific Ry " Fort William   266
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Owen Sound     18
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point  265
Victoria, B.C., and Return.
* Route R 247 Rates same as for Route R 240.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Fort William  266
Canadian Pacific Ry *' Vancouver  266
Canadian Pacific Nav. Co. (Ltd.) " Victoria  17
Return same route. R
Victoria, B.C., and Return.
• Route R 248                                                        Rates same as for Route R 240.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound   265
^Canadian Pacific Steamship Line " Fort William     18
Canadian Pacific Ry " Vancouver   266
Canadian Pacific Nav. Co. (Ltd.) " Victoria     17
Canadian Pacific Nav. Co. (Ltd.) " Vancouver     17
Canadian Pacific Ry " Portal     14
Minneapolis St. Paul & S. S. Marie Ry... " S. S. Marie via Minneapolis..  175
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point     14
* This route may be varied to read via Canadian Pacific Ry. (Crow's Nest Branch)
to Kootenay Landing (14), Canadian Pacific Steamer Line to Nelson (349),
Canadian Pacific Ry. to Robson (216). Canadian Pacific Steamer Line to
Arrowhead(322), and Canadian Pacific Ry. beyond (14), in either or both
directions on application to ticket agent at time of purchase.
|| Meals and berth included.
. _ WESTERN  TOURS
Victoria, B.C., and Return.
* Route R 249 Rates same as for Route R 240.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Fort William  266
Canadian Pacific Ry " Vancouver  266
Canadian Pacific Nav. Co. (Ltd.) " Victoria  17
Canadian Pacific Nav. Co. (Ltd.) " Vancouver  17
Canadian Pacific Ry  " Fortal      14
Minneapolis St. Paul&S. S. Marie Ry. .. " S. S. Marie via Minneapolis.. 175
Canadian Pacific Ry  " Starting Point  14
Winnipeg, Man., and Return.
Route R 250
From    Boston    $72.80     From
St.John.N.B  87.30 $t86.00   "
"        Quebec    and "
Sherbrooke  73.05 t70.00    "
"        Montreal    68.05 165.00    "
"       Ottawa  64.65         "
"       Prescott   63.75
.$51.55
Brockville    63.15
Rates as follows :
Toronto....
Hamilton ..
London	
St.Thomas.
Niag. Falls. 53.80
Buffalo  54.75
Detroit  51.55
S.S. Marie via Lake  36.35
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound.
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Fort William.
Canadian Pacific Ry " Winnipeg ....
Return same route.
265
18
266
R
Winnipeg, Man., and Return.
R W
Route R 251
From    Boston $78.50 $t76.25 From
St.John.N.B 93.00   t8(i.OO    "
"       Quebec    and
Sherbrooke ....  78.95   +70 00      "
Montreal     73.95   t05.00     "
Ottawa     70.35   t65.00     "
Prescott 69.45   tOS.OO     "
From   Buffalo : 5
Rates as follows :
Brockville $68.85 $t65.00
Toronto.... \
Hamilton .. I
London.... V .... 57.25   t55.00
St.Thomas. I
Detroit )
NiagaraFalls....  59.50   t57.25
30.45    $t58.20
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound  265
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Fort William     18
Canadian Pacific Ry  " Winnipeg  266
Canadian Pacific Ry  " Fort William  266
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point  266
Winnipeg, Man., and Return.
Route R 252
Canadian Pacific Ry to Fort William
Canadian Pacific Ry " Winnipeg....
Return same route.
Rates same as for Route R 251.
266
R
Winnipeg, Man., and Return.
Route R 253
From    Boston $79.50.
St. John, NB 94.00 $+86.00
Quebec   and
Sherbrooke 80.50   +70.00
Montreal 75.50   +65.00
Rates as follows:
From    Ottawa   $73.50 $t65.00
Prescott  73.20   +65.00
Brockville  72.50   t65.00
Toronto and
Hamilton 61.50   t55.00
From London $57.65     $+55.00
Canadian Pacific Ry to Detroit	
Wabash Rd " Chicago	
Choice of six railways  " St. Paul or Minneapolis.
Great Northern Ry " Gretna	
Canadian Pacific Ry " Winnipeg	
Return same route.
© 1 or 22 or 23 or 24, 25, 26 or 107 or 112.
264
199
0
95
186
R
* This route may be varied to read via Canadian Pacific Ry. (Crow's Nest
Branch) to Kootenay Landing (14), Canadian Pacific Steamer Line toNelson
(349), Canadian Pacific Ry. to Robson (216), Canadian Pacific Steamer Line
to Arrowhead (322l, and Canadian Pacific Ry. beyond (14), in either or both
directions on application to ticket agent at time of purchase.
+ Time Limit, 60 days.      Not good to stop over.
|| Meals and berth included.
60 WESTERN  TOURS
Winnipeg, Man., and Return.
Rates as follows
From
R W
Route R 254
From    Boston $81.50
St. John, N.B 96.75
"        Quebec & Sherbrooke 80.75
"        Montreal  75.75
Ottawa  73.35
From Detroit  .$60.25
Canadian Pacific Ry to Owen Sound ..
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Fort William  ...
Canadian Pacific Ry " Winnipeg	
Canadian Pacific Ry " Gretna	
Great Northern Ry "St. Paul or Minneapolis     95
Choice of six railways " Chicago     0
Wabash Rd " Detroit   199
Canadian Pacific Ry " Starting Point   264
0 1 or 22 or 23 or 24, 25, 26 or 107 or 112.
Prescott $72.45
Brockville  71.85
Toronto and Hamilton   60.25
London  60.25
St. Thomas 60.25
265
18
266
186
Winnipeg, Man., and Return. R W
Route R 255                                             Rates same as for Route R 254.
Canadian Pacific  Ry to Owen Sound   265
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line " Fort William     18
Canadian Pacific Ry " Winnipeg  266
Canadian Pacific Ry " Gretna   186
Great Northern Ry  "St. Paul         95
Minneapolis St. Paul & S.S. Marie Ry.. - " Sault Ste. Marie   175
[|Canadian Pacific Steamship Line " Owen Sound     18
Canadian Pacific Ry    .. " Starting Point   265
Winnipeg, Man., and Return. R W
Route R 256 Rates same as for Route R 254.
Same as Route R 254 to Winnipeg.
Canadian Pacific Ry    " Gretna   186
Great Northern Ry    " Duluth   261
Duluth South Shore & Atlantic Ry   " Sault Ste. Marie   115
llCanadian Pacific Steamship Line    " Owen Sound     18
Canadian Pacific Ry   " Starting Point     265
II Meals and berth included. SIDE TRIPS
TO BE USED IN CONNECTION
WITH
Western  Tours
SHOWN ON PRECEDING PAGES
When it is desired to make one or more of the Side Trips shown herein,
tickets covering transportation (to such points as through tickets may be sold)
should be purchased at starting point, as in some cases the cost of the trip will be
higher when ticket is purchased at junction point. Unless otherwise stated the
route on the return journey is the same as on the going trip shown below :—
TO
FROM
ROUTE
Round
Trip
Rate
Alaska, Sitka ..
Desbarats, Ont.
Duluth, Minn ..
Victoria, B.C..
Ft. Francis, Ont.
(Rainy Lake
Gold Fields
Ont. "\
;e V
>)■■■.)
§S. S. Marie...
/ §Ft.William
\or Pt. Arthur.
Rat Portage.
|Pacific Coast S.S. Co.
Can. Pac. Ry	
Steamer	
I Stean
..(68)
..(14)
. (203)
•(257)
Grand Forks,   B.C
Greenwood,  B.C..
Ha'cyon Hot )
Springs, B.C.. j
Harrison Hot )
Springs, B.C... )
Kaslo, B.C	
Kippewa, Que.       "1
(Lake Kippewa)/
tWest Robson. Can. Pac. Ry..
tWest Robson. Can. Pac. Ry .
-(14)
•(14)
tRevelstoke. ..
tAgassiz, B.C.
fNelson. ..
tMattawa.
fC. P. Ry. to Arrowhead..(14)1
j\Can. Pac. Steamer Line.(322)J
'Stage.
.[Can. Pac. Str. Line.
. Can.  Pac. Ry	
. (213)
.(349)
•-(14)
§S. S. Marie.
Robson 	
Mackinaclsl'd, Mich
f Midway and   \
£ J     Rossland... j
'         a"d /'Nakusp or
Sandon  11    Rosebery
Nakusp, B.C ItRevelstoke.
Nelson, B.C j*Revelstoke .
do.
do.
*    do.
do.
. Steamer (253)
(Can. Pac. Ry. to Rossland(14) 1
•\ Can. Pac. Ry. to Midway (14)
{■Can. Pac. Ry. to Sandon.(14)J
i.Pac.Ry. to Arrowhead(14)
l. Pac. Str.   Line (322)
i.Pac Ry. to Arrowhead(U)
'.Str. Line to Robson.   (322)
i.Pac.Ry. to Nelson.. (14)
i.Pac.Ry. to Arrowhead(14)
'.Str. Line to Nakusp (322)
i.Pac.Ry. toRoseberv. (14)
'.Str, Line to SlocanCy. (133)
i.Pac.Ry. to Nelson..(14)
i.Pac.Ry. to Arrowh'd(l4)"
'.Str.Line to Robson(322)
i.Pac.Ry. to Nelson(14)
>.Ry. to Slocan City.(14)
'.Str. Line to Roseb'y(133)
i.Pac.Ry. toNakusp(H)
'.Str.Line to Ar'wh'd(322)
'.Ry. to Revelstoke .(14)
:60.t0
1.25
8.00
10.00
4.70
6.10
2.25
1.00
3.00
2.35
4.00
$6.00
4.25
*10 00
*10.00
*10.00
* This rate is applicable only in connection with tickets from Winnipeg and
points east thereof, and from Pacific Coast points.
II Meals arid berth included.
§ Tickets on sale at point named.
+ Tickets on sale at point named—time limit, one month.
t This rate is applicable only in connection with round trip tickets to the
Pacific Coast from points east of Port Arthur, from St. Paul or Minneapolis, or
east thereof, and must be paid at time of purchasing Pacific Coast t:cket.
62 WESTERN   TOURS
TO
FROM
ROUTE
Round
Trip
Rate
I Ft. William or
"t    Pt. Arthur.
Penticton, B.C +SicamousJu
Can. Pac. Ry .
(14)
Rossland, B.C.
do.
Revelstoke.
do.
do.
do.
do.
t Robson.
Robso
t Rossland and "|
^ J     Midway
I     Saanddon.... jNakl,sP°r
v (.      Rosebery
Sandon, B.C !tNakusp. ..
jtRevelstoke
tRosebery .
. ;tNakusp. ..
do.
do.
Slocan City, B.C.
do.
do.
I
Temiskaming, Que. tMattawa.
Trail. B.C Revelstoke.
t Revelstoke.
tsi
ocan June
C. P. Ry. to Okanagan Ldg(14) \
C.P.Str. "Aberdeen" to >
Penticton (285) J
/C.P.Ry- to Arrowhead...(14))
! C.P.Str.Line to Robson.(322) >
( Can.Pac.Rv. to Rossland (11) )
C.P.Ry. to Arrowhead.(14)
C.P.Str.LinetoWRobs'n(322)
C.P.Ry. to Rossland...(14)
C.P.Ry. to Nelson (14)
C.P.Ry. to Slocan City (14)
C.P.Str. Line toRoseb'y(322)
C.P.Ry. to Nakusp ....(14)
C.P.Str.Line toArr'wh'd(322)
VC.P.Ry. to Revelstoke.(14)
f Same as the above to Nelson."\ 5
C.P.Str. Line to Kaslo (133) S
Kas.&Slo.Ry. toSandon(351) I   £
C.P.R. to Nakusp (14) f.o
C.P.Str.Line to Ar'wh'd(322)     £
C.P.Ry. to Revelstoke. (14)J  o
Can. Pac. Ry. to Rossland (14)
| Can. Pac. Ry. to Rossland(li)
"( Can. Pac. Ry. to. Midway.(14)
l Can. Pac. Ry. to Sandon. .(14)
Can. Pac. Ry. to Sandon (14)
C.P.Rv. to Arrowhead ... (14)
C.P Str.Line to Nakusp. .(322)
C.P.Ry. to Sandon (14)
C.P.Ry.  to Sandon (14)
C.P.Rv. to Rosebery (14)\
C.P.Str.Line toSlocanCy(133)/
C.P.Ry. to Arrowhead ...(14))
C.P.Str. to Nakusp (322) (
C.P.Ry to Rosebery  (14) (
C. P. Str. Line to SlocanCy(133) )
C.P.Ry. to Slocan City (14)
$3.25
9.25
*10.00
*12.05
*14.05
2.45
$6.00
2.75
7.00
0.95
3.70
7.95
2.20
1.95
C. P. Ry. to Temiskaming- ... (14)
C.P.Ry. to Arrowhead. ..(14)) I
C. P. Str. Line toW.Robs'n(322) H *10.00
C.P.Ry. to Trail (14) )
* This rate is applicable only in connection with tickets from Winnipeg and
points east thereof, and from Pacific Coast points.
+ Tickets on sale at point named—time limit, one month.
iJ This rate is appl'cable only in connection with round trip tickets to the
Pacific Coast from points east of Port Arthur, from St. Paul or Minneapolis, or
east thereof, and must be paid at time of purchasing; Pacific Coast ticket.
63 RAILWAY AND STEAMSHIP
CONNECTIONS
Western Tours
Subject to Chance—Steamship Lines, weather permitting.
For time of TRANSCONTINENTAL TRAINS to Pacific Coast and of
BOSTON AND MONTREAL TO ST. PAUL AND MINNEAPOLIS
EXPRESS, see Time Table Folder.
"Alberta,"
, Thur., Sat.
, Thur., Sat.
Fri.,
, Sat.,
, Sat.,
Sun.,
Sun.
Su
Mon.
Mon.
Tues.
Tues.
Sun., Tues.
Mon., Wed.
Tues., Thur.
Tues., Thur.
Canadian Pacific Upper Lake Express Steamships
"Athabasca" and "Manitoba."
Westbound—Lv. Toronto (by S.S. Express)  1.30 p.m. Tues.
Lv. Owen Sound about 5.30 p.m. Tues.
Lv. Sault Ste. Marie     "      2 00 p.m. Wed
Ar. Port Arthur     "    11.00 a.m. Thur.
Ar. Fort William (East. Time)    "    12.00 n'n    Thur.
EASTBOUND—Lv. Fort William I Cent. Time)    "      9.00 a.m. Fri.,
Lv. Fort William (East. Time)    "    10.00 a.m. Fri ,
Lv. Port Arthur     "    11.00 a.m. Fri.,
Lv. Sault Ste. Marie     "    12.00 n'n    Sat.,
Ar. Owen Sound     "     8 00 a.m. Sun.,
Ar. Toronto (S.S. Express)...    ''    12.45 p.m. Sun.,
FROM FORT WILLIAM AND PORT ARTHUR:
Canadian Pacific Ry   See Time Table Folder.
FROM GOLDEN, B.C.:
Upper Columbia Nav. Co.'s Steamers.. .dep. 4.00 a.m. Tuesday and Friday,
arriving at Windermere 8.30 p.m returning, dep. from Windermere
5.00 a.m. Wednesday and Saturday, arriving Golden 4.00 p.m.
FROM AGASSIZ,  B.C.:
Stage for Harrison, Hot Springs dep. daily.
FROM OKANAGAN LANDING :
Can. Pac. Steamer   " Aberdeen "  for Penticton, etc dep. 10.30 a.m.
Mondays,   Wednesdays and Fridays.    Returning:, leave Penticton  6.00
a.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
FROM REVELSTOKE, NELSON AND KOOTENAY
LANDING,  B.C.:
Canadian Pacific Ky. and Steamer Lines to
Kootenay District points :—
Rossland, Trail, Nelson. Kaslo,
Sandon, Slocan City, etc.
See Can. Pac. Ry. Time Table Folder.
FROM VANCOUVER,  B.C.:
Canadian Pacific Nav. Co. (Ltd.) Steamers
For Victoria, see Can. Pac, Ry. Time Table Folder.
E. & N. Ry. Co.'s Steamer   " Joan"
For Nanaimo dep. daily except Sunday on arriva
of C.P.Ry, Imperial Limited Express.
FROM VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Canadian Pacific Navigation Co. (Ltd.)
For Vancouver, see Can. Pac. Ry. Time Table Folder.
Steamers for Puget Sound Ports.
See Time Table Folder.
Pacific Coast Steamship Co.
For San Francisco dep,  8.00 p.m., June 3rd,   and every  five days
thereafter.
For  Glacier  Bav and Sitka,   Alaska—June  9 and  24, July  9  and  24,
Aug. 8 and 23.
For additional details and any change which may he made
during* season, see Current Time Table Folders. TOURS TO THE ORIENT AND THE ANTIPODES
Hong Kong or Shanghai and Return.
Route R 500
From   New York  $181.20
Boston  178.00
St. John, N B  493.50
"        Montreal  474.60
Quebec & Sherbrooke 479.60
Toronto & Hamilton 457.90
Detroit     457.90
Chicago   117.50
Rates as follows :
From St. Paul and Minneapolis. .$127.50
"     Duluth  427.50
"      Winnipeg  427.50
•'       Fort William 427.50
''      San Francisco  337.50
"      Seattle, Tacoma and Portland, Ore  337.50
Vancouver & Victoria. B.C. 337.50
From S. S. Marie and Mackinaw City via Soo-Pac. Route $447.50
Canadian Pacific Ry to Vancouver
Canadian Pacific Royal Mai] Steamships to Shanghai or Hong Kong
Return same route.
Time limit of transpacific portion, four months from date steamship is due
to arrive at Shanghai or Hong Kong till date of embarkation at Hong Kong or
intermediate port, on C. P. Steamships for return continuous passage to Vancouver, B.C.: time limit of rail portion nine months. For twelve months' time
limit, $56.25 extra.    Stop-overs allowed at ports of call within time limit.
Hong Kong, Manila and Sydney and Return.      R W
Circular Tour via Japan, China, Philippine Islands and Australia.
Route R 501 Rat   . as follows :
From   New York $662.20    From St. Paul and Minneapolis..$005.00
Duluth  605.00
Winnipeg    605.00
Fort William  605.00
Seattle, Tacoma and Portland, Ore  515.00
Vancouver & Victoria, B.C. 515.00
San Francisco ..., 515.00
Boston 656.50
St. John. N.B 671.00
Montreal  652.10
Quebec&Sherbrooke 657.10
Toronto & Hamilton 635.40
Detroit 635.40
Chicago  625.00
From S.S. Marie and Mackinaw City via Soo-Pac. Route 8600.00
Canadian Pacific Ry     to Vancouver
Canadian Pacific Royal Mail Steamships to Hong Kong
China Navigation Co. or Eastern & Australian
SS. Co., via Manila and Torres Straits to Sydney
Canadian-Australian Royal Mail SS. Line to Vancouver
Time limit nine months.    Stop-over within time limit allowed at intermediate
ports of call of Canadian Pacific and Canadian-Australian Steamships.
Hong Kong and Sydney and Return.
Circular Tour via Japan, China, Straits Settlements, Java and Australia.
Route R 502 Rates $25.00 more than for Route R 501.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Vancouver
Canadian Pacific Royal Mail Steamships   to Hong Kong
Peninsular & Oriental Steam Nav. Co to Singapore, Straits Settlements
Connecting Steamer , to Batavia, Java
British India Steam Nav. Co to Brisbane, via Torres Straits
Rail or Steamer to Sydney
Canadian- Australian Royal Mail Steamship Line Io Vancouver
Canadian Pacific Ry to Starting Point
Honolulu, H.I., and Return.
Rates as follows :
From St. Paul and Minneapolis. .$215.00
"     Duluth  215.00
"     Winnipeg  215.00
"      Fort William   215.00
"     San Francisco  125.00
"      Seattle. Tacoma and Portland, Ore   125.00
"      Vancouver & Victoria, B.C. 125.00
City via Soo-Pac. Route $235.00
Route R 503
From   New York $268.70
Boston  266.50
St. John   N.B  281.00
"        Montreal  262.10
Quebec* Sherbrooke 267.10
Toronto & Hamilton 245.40
Detroit...  245.40
Chicago  235.00
From S. S.Marie and Mackina
Canadian Pacific Ry to Vancouver
Canadian-Australian Royal Mail SS. Line to Honolulu
Return same route.
Time limit of transpacific portion, four months from date steamship is due
to arrive at Honolulu to date of re-embarkation at Honolulu ; time limit of rail
portion, nine months.
Honolulu, H.I., and Return.
Rates as follows :
From Quebec $271.50
l-i i i._ o«Q nn
Route R 501
From   New York $268.70
Boston  206.50
St. John, N.B  281.00
" _    Montreal  286.50
Canadian Pacific Ry	
Canadian Pacific Royal Mail SS. Line
Oceanic SS.  Co
Sherbrooke   268.90
Toronto   255.85
Chicago 235.00
 to Vancouver
 to Honolulu
to San Francisco
Choice of direct routes to Starting Point
Time limit of transpacific portion four months from date steamship is due
to arrive at Honolulu to date of re-embarkation at Honolulu ; time limit of rail
portion nine months.
65 TOURS TO THE ORIENT AND THE ANTIPODES
Manila, Philippines, and Return.
Route R 505 Rates $60.00 more than for Route R 500.
Canadian Pacific Ry to Vancouver
Canadian Pacific Royal Mail Steamships to Hong Kong
Choice of Steamship Lines to Manila
Return same route.
Time limits same as for Route R 500. See also Route R 501.
Sydney
Route R 506
From   New York $117.20
Boston  441.50
St. John, N.B  456 00
Montreal  437.10
Quebec& Sherbrooke 112.10
Toronto & Hamilton 420.10        "
Detroit and London. 420.40
Chicago      410.00        "
From S. S. Marie and Mackinaw City
N.S.W., and Return.
Rates as follows :
From St. Paul and Minneapolis. .$393.00
"     Duluth     390.00
"      Winnipeg   390.00
"      Fort William  390.00
"      San Francisco  300.00
"      Seattle, Tacoma and Portland, Ore   300.00
Vancouver & Victoria, B.C. 300.00
via Soo-Pac. Route $110.00
Canadian Pacific Ry to Vancouver
Canadian-Australian Royal Mail Steamship Line via Hawaii and Brisbane to
Sydney,
Return same route.
Time limit of transpacific portion, four months from date steamship is due
to arrive at Sydney till date of re-embarkation at Sydney for a return continuous
passage.   time   limit of  rail   portion, nine months.    For twelve months' time
limit, $60 extra.
Sydney, Manila and Hong Kong, and Return.
See Routes R 501 and R 502.
Yokohama, Japan, and Return.
Rates same as for Route R 505.
From St. Paul and Minneapolis. .$390.00
"     Duluth  390.00
"      Winnipeg  390.00
"      Fort William  390.00
"      San Francisco   300.00
"      Seattle, Tacoma and  Portland, Ore  300.00
Vancouver & Victoria. B.C. 300.00
l-ia Soo-Pac. Route $410.00
Route R 507
From  New York $417.20
"       Boston  441.50       "
St. John, N.B  456.00
Montreal  437.10
Quebec&Sherbrooke 442.10        "
Toronto & Hamilton 420.40        "
"        Detroit and London 420.40
"        Chicago   .  410.00        "
From S. S. Marie and Mackinaw City
Canadian Pacific Ry to Vancouver
Canadian Pacific Royal Mail Steamships from Vancouver.. to Yokohama, Japan
Return same route.
Time limit of transpacific portion four months from date steamship is due to
arrive at Yokohama till date of re-embarkation for return at Yokohama ; time
limit of rail portion nine months.    For twelve months  time limit, $50 extra.
66 Around
the
World
BY THE
(Canadian
Pacific
(SUBJECT TO CHANGE.)
Via VANCOUVER, JAPAN, CHINA, CEYLON,
SUEZ and LONDON
£J3I.J0 or $642 Gold
Via VANCOUVER, HAWAII, AUSTRALIA,
CEYLON, SUEZ and LONDON
£ J 37 or $670 Gold
For full particulars of the above and other Around the World
Tours offered by the Canadian Pacific Ry., see "Around the World
Folder," to be had from any agent of the Company.
67 WESTERN   TOURS
CANADIAN PACIFIC RY.
 THE	
SLEEPING AND PARLOR CARS
Unless otherwise noted, are owned and operated by the Canadian
Pacific Railway Company.      They surpass any in the world.
Through Sleeping Car Service
(Subjbct to Change).
Montreal and Quebec.
^Montreal and Boston via Montreal & Boston Air Line,
j Montreal & Old Orchard Beach via White Mountains & Portland.
Montreal and Halifax, N.S., via C.P.R. Short Line and St. John, N.B.
fMontreal and New York via N.Y.C,
Montreal and St. Andrews, N.B.
Montreal and Toronto.
Montreal and Vancouver via Fort William, Winnipeg; and Moose Jaw.
{Boston and St. Paul via Montreal and Sault Ste. Marie.
Boston and St. John, N.B.
Levis (Quebec) and St. John, N.B., via Megant:c,
Ottawa and Toronto via Smiths ^11 s.
St. Paul, Minneapolis, Moose Jaw and Medicine Hat.
Medicine Hat and Kootenay Landing.
^Montreal and Chicago via Toronto, Detroit and Wabash Railroad.
^Toronto and Chicago via Detroit.
Toronto and Detroit.
Toronto and Winnipeg, via North Bay.
Toronto and New York.
Toronto and North Bay.
tSt. Paul and Winnipeg via Great Northern Railway and Gretna.
Fort William and Winnipeg.
Parlor Car Service
Boston and St John, N.B.
Montreal and Quebec.
Montreal and Ottawa.
Montreal and Boston.
Montreal and Portland and Old Orchard Beach via White Mountains.
Montreal and Toronto.
tMontreal and New York via N.Y.C.
Toronto and Owen Sound on S.S. Express.
Toronto and Hamilton and Buffalo.
Vancouver and Seattle via Whatcom.
(service in both directions)
t Cars owned by Sleeping Car Companies, not C. P.R.
t Some of the cars in these lines are owned by other companies.
For  time of trains  on which these cars are run see  current Time  Table
Folder of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Rates for one Lower or one Upper Berth in
Sleeping Car between
Bangor and St. John,  N.B $2 00
Bangorand Boston  2 00
Boston and Montreal  2 00
Boston and Sault Ste. Marie .... 5 00
Boston and St. Paul, Minn 7 00
Boston and Chicago  5 50
Boston and Duluth 7 00
Boston and Vancouver, Seattle,
Tacoma and Portland 19 00
Chicago and St. Paul, Minn 2 00
Fort William and Banff  9 00
Fort William and Vancouver, Seattle,Tacoma and Portland..15 00
Montreal and Boston  2 00
Montreal and Portland  S 00
Montreal and Old Orchard  2 00
Montreal and St. Andrews N.B. 2 60
Montreal and St. John, N.B 2 M
Montreal and Painsec Junc 2 50
Montreal and Halifax, N.S 4 00
Montreal and Toronto  2 00
Montreal and Detroit 3 50
Montreal and Chicago  6 00
Montreal and Sault Ste. Marie.. 4 00
Montreal and St. Paul, Minn. .. 6 00
Montreal and Duluth 6 00
Montreal and Port Arthur 6 00
Montreal and Fort William 6 00
Montreal and Rat Portage 7 50
Montreal and Winnipeg   8 00
Montreal and Banff HotSprings  14 00
Montreal and Vancouver,Seattle,
Tacoma and Portland...... $18 00
New York and Montreal.. 2 00
New York and Vancouver,Seattle,
Tacoma and Portland 19 00
Ottawa and Toronto  2 00
Ottawa and Vancouver, Seattle,
Tacoma and Portland 17 50
Port Arthur and Banff 9 00
Port Arthur and Vancouver, Seattle, Tacoma and Portland ..15 00
?uebec and Montreal  l 60
oronto and Portland, Me  8 00
Toronto and Old Orchard  8 00
Toronto and Chicago  S 00
Toronto and Detroit  2 00
Toronto and Port Arthur  6 00
Toronto and Fort William  6 00
Toronto and Rat Portage  7 60
Toronto and St. Andrews, N.B.. 4 50
Toronto and St. John, N.B  4 50
Toronto and Halifax, N.S 8 00
Toronto and Winnipeg 8 00
Toronto and Vancouver, Seattle,
Tacoma and Portland .17 00
St. Paul and Winnipeg 8 00
St.Paul  and Vancouver, Seattle,
Tacoma and  Portland  12 00
Winnipeg  and Vancouver,  Seattle, Tacoma and  Portland ..13 00 WESTERN   TOURS
FOR ONE SEAT IN PARLOR CAR
BETWEEN
Toronto and Detroit *1 00
Montreal and Boston     1 50
Montreal and Portland. Me.,
or Old Orchard Beach..    1 50
Quebec and Montreal *   75
Montreal and Ottawa       50
Montreal and Toronto    1 00
Toronto and Owen Sound ..      50
Toronto and London       50
Between other Stations In Proportion.
Accommodation in First Class Sleeping Cars and in Parlor Cars will be sold
only to holders ot First Class transportation.
Sleeping Car Sections, in Canadian Pacific Cars, double the berth rate ;
Drawing Rooms, between three and tour times the berth rate.
Two persons in same party, when travelling- tog-ether and boarding car at
same station, will be allowed to occupy a berth on one berth ticket, four a section
on one section ticket, and six a drawing- room on one drawing room ticket; if
each presents first class railway transportation.
Agents of the Canadian Pacific Railway at the starting points of Sleeping or
Parlor Cars will hold diagrams of Canadian Pacific Railway Cars for location of
passengers ; other ticket agents will secure accommodation on application to
them.
Toronto A. H. Notman, Asst. Gen.  Pass. Agent, 1 King St, E.
« Montreal W. F. Egg, 129 St. James Street.
n Ottawa Geo. Duncan, 42 Sparks Street.
n Quebec E. H. Crban, opposite Post Office.
Boston F. R. Perry, 197 Washington Street.
»St. John, N. B W. H. C. Mackay, 49 King Street.
Halifax, N.S J. D. Chipman, 107 Hollis Street.
°'d °Beachd Me      } Ticket Agent, Boston & Maine Station.
Portland, Me Ticket Agent, Maine Central Station.
Detroit,  Mich  A. E. Edmonds, City Ticket Agent, 7 Fort St. West.
Chicago, III Ticket Agent of the Wabash Railroad.
St. Paul, Minn (Ticket Agent of the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste.
Minneapolis,Minn, j Marie Ry.
Winnipeg A. C. Smith, cor. Mail Street and McDermott Ave.
Vancouver James Sclathr, Ticket Agent.
n Telegrams for accommodation required same night should be addressed to
Station Agents, if sent after 6-00 p.m. All city offices are closed on Sundays and
legal holidays, and close at 6.00 p.m. week days.
Diagrams of Sleeping Cars on following through trains, will be held at
stations noted several hours before arrival of Sleeping Cars, and accommodation
may be secured by telegram or letter.
IMPERIAL LIMITED (Westbound).—At North Bay, Fort William,
Winnipeg, Banff, Glacier, Revelstoke.
IMPERIAL LIMITED (Eastbound).—At Glacier, Banff, Winnipeg, Fort
William, North Bay.
ST. PAUL EXPRESS.—At Montreal, Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.
BOSTON EXPRESS.—At Montreal, Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.
Letters or telegrams from passengers direct to above agents will receive
prompt attention. When ordering be particular to state number of berths or
sections, etc., required, the train, from and to what points, date of starting,
and route.
Holders of Sleeping Car Tickets, reading in either direction, through both
Winnipeg (or St. Paul) and Mission June, will be furnished on application to
Porter of Sleeping Car with check on which they may stop-over (not exceeding 60 days) at Winnipeg, Banff Hot Springs, Laggan, Field, Glacier,
Revelstoke, Sicamous June, or North Bend as desired.
Dining Cars are run on the through Transcontinental and Montreal and
Halifax, Montreal and St, Paul and Montreal and Chicago trains. Meals—
breakfast or dinner 75 cents, luncheon a-la-carte (except on Montreal-Halifax
run where charge is 75 cents each meal).
Buffet Cars will be run on Montreal and Boston day express trains, etc.
For details see current Time Table Folder. List of Agencies
Adelaide Aus..B. W. Macdonald.
Auioy China. .Jardlne, Matheson & Co.
Auckland N.Z..Ncw Zealand Shipping Co.   Thos. Cook & Son.
Baltimore Md..J. H.Thompson, Frt. and Pass'r Agt 129 E. Baltimore St
Batavia Java..MacLalne, "Watson & Co.
Bombay India..Ewart, Lathom & Co.   Thomas Cook & Son, 13 Esplanade Road
„„h4.  >*„„„  S ET. J- Colvln, District Passenger Agent 197 "Washington St
Boston Ma88-}F. R. Perry, City Passenger Agent  	
Brisbane Qd..Burns, Philp & Co., Limited.
Brockville Ont..Geo. E. McGlade, Ticket Agent \ courfHOTS^Ave!
Buffalo N.Y..A. J. Shulman, City Passenger and Frt. Agent 233 Main St.
r..i..,,f t„ t^^io ! Gilanders, Arbuthnot & Co.
Calcutta lntlIa) Thomas Cook & Son  9 Old Court House St.
Canton China..Jardlne, Matheson & Co.
( A.C.Shaw, Gen'l Agt., Passr. Dept 228South Clark St
Chicago 111. ^ C. L. "Williams, City Passenger Agent        " "
( W.A. Klttermaster, Genl. Agt., Freight Dept..234 La Salle St
Geo. A. Clifford. Trav. Pass'r Agent... ( 1r, drew BiitlrHnir
B. K. White, Freight Agent } II, Caiew Building.
A. E. Edmonds. City Passenger Agent 7 Fort St. "W.
M. H. Brown, District Freight Agent        "        "
Duluth Minn. .M. Adson, District Agent 426 Spalding House Block
Everett "Wash. A. B. winter, Ticket Agent 1515 Hewitt Ave
Glasgow ..Scotland. Archer Baker, European Traffic Manager 67 St. Vincent St
G'd Rapids... Mich.. E. C. Oviatt, Trav. Pass. Agent 76 Ottawa St.
Halifax N.S.. J. D. Chlpman, City Passenger and Freight Agent, 107 Hollls St
Hamilton Ont..W. J. Grant, Commercial Agent Cor. King and James Sts
Hankow China. .Jardlne, Matheson & Co.
Hobart... Tasmania. .Huddart, Parker & Co., Limited.   Thomas Cook & Son.
Hong Kong: D. E. Brown, General Agent, China and Japan, etc.
Honolulu H.L.Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Kingston..Jamaica..Gerald A. Morals Cor. Port Royal and Orange Sts
Cincinnati.
Detroit .
.Ohio]
.Mich.
Kobe Japan.. G. Mill ward.
.14A, Mayc-machi
Liverpool Eng.. Archer Baker, European Traffic Manager  9 James St
London Eng.
Archer Baker, European Traffic j 67 & 68 King William St. E.C
Manager    (    and 30 Cockspur St. S.W.
London Ont. .W. Fulton, City Passenger Agent 161 DundaB St
Melbourne Aus.-Aus. United Steam Nav. Co.   Thomas Cook & Son.
Milwaukee Wis..Edward Olson, Freight Agent 84 Michigan St
Minneapolis.Minn..W. B. Chandler, Agent Soo Line 119 South Third St
Montreal One! w- r- ESK, City Passenger Agent 129 St. James St
mom real yuej j   corbett, Foreign Freight Agent 6 St. Sacrament St
Nagasaki —Japan..Holme, Ringer & Co.
Nelson B.C..J. S. Carter, District Passenger Agent.
m^,.- Vni.ii-        xt v 5 E. V. Skinner, General Eastern Agent 353 Broadway
new ion jn.i j Lima nnd llnmigrati0ri Office 1 Broadway
Niagara Falls. N.Y..D. Isaacs, Prospect House.
Ottawa Ont.. Geo. Duncan, City Passenger Agent  42 Sparks St
i>-..-iu Ti-v„,w.,> 5 Hernu, Peron & Co., Ticket Agents..61 Boulevard Haussmann
ra '" * rance 1 International Sleeping Car Co 3 Place de l'Opera
Philadelphia .. Pa. .H. McMurtrie, Freight and Passenger Agt .629-631 Chestnut St
Pittsburg Pa..F. W. Salsbury, Commercial Agent....     409 Smith Bldg
Portland Me. .G. H. Thompson, Ticket Agent, Maine Central Rd. .Union Depot
Portland Ore..H. H. Abbott, Passenger and Freight Agent 142ThirdSt
Quebec Que..K. H. Crean, City Passenger Agent Opposite Post Office
Sanitate M»rin  Mteh 5 W. C. Sutherland, Depot Ticket Agent.
sault ste. M.arie, Mich, j T E  Harvey, city pa8Senger Agent.
at   Tnhn w-niA. J. Heath, District Passenger Agent 10 King St.
si. uonn ^-"Mw.H.C.Mackay, City Ticket Agent 49 King St.
W. M. Porteous, Freight Agent 315 Chestnut St.
C. E. Benjamin, Trav. PaBs. Agent       " "
St. Paul Minn ,W. S. Thorn, A.G.P.A., Soo Line  379 Robert St.
v-infrini-iarn Col  i M.M .Stern,Dist.Frt. and Passenger Agent, Palace Hotel Bldg.
san*rancisco,oai.|GoodalljPerkln8&Co _ Agentsp c s g Co 10 Market St.
Seattle Wash..W. R. Thomson Mutual Life Building, 609 First Ave
Shanghai China..Jardlne, Matheson & Co.
Sherbrooke...Que.. W. H. Bottum, City Passenger Agent 6 Commercial St.
Sydney Aus. .Burns, Philp & Co., Limited.   Thomas Cook & Son.
Tacoma Wash..F. R. Johnson, Freight and Passenger Agent.1028 Pacine Ave
Toronto Ont...C. E. Bunting, City Ticket Agent 1 KlngSt. E
Vancouver... B.C...James Sclater, Ticket Agent.
Victoria B.C..B. W. Greer, Freight and Passenger Agent...Government St
Washington ..D C..W. W. Merkle, Freight ajid Pass'r Agt. 1229 Pennsylvania Ave
Whatcom—Wash..W. H. Gordon. Passenger Agent 1225 Dock St
Winnipeg Man..A. C. Smith, City Tkt.Agt„Cor.MalnSt. and McDermott Ave.
Yokohama.. Japan.. Wm. T. Payne, General Traffic Agent for Japan  14 Bund
70
St. Louis Mo.  MEMORANDA u '
TF^
' w®^
\
Longitude      lft°\ West    ^^from ^|  1£0U Greenwich
^»o.
■>
' ,4
CAP*
m~
mm
MAP    OF   THE „B^_^__	
CANADIAN  PACIFIC  RAILWAY,
THE   MINNEAPOLIS, ST PAUL  AND   SAULT   SHIM AR IE   RAILWAY,
THE   DULUTH, SOUTH SHORE  AND  ATLANTIC   RAILWAY^
AND    CONNECTIONS. ^~
Black Lake\
>eZ.A
\yBate7iet oX,
* s
ii
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tf\
7
rfc.»K jg^
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Big Horn>
%^mbe\ ryP^f) CBo8.«b«fl
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■■ ■
P'. ofBocib"
^Crawford,
N\E     B     R
=^!!!^^^^^JfertK till
 ~^*       VStockvilh?o
Sterling^
__   Chamber-
CJteL'T
gChtey^T BaaP^fS
rtr
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wW"s£S^4f"  ~T-^
1
P
ublications
Issued by the
Canadian Pacific
Railway Cc.
"THE  NEW  HIGHWAY TO THE  ORIENT"
'SUMMER TOURS"      "FISHING AND SHOOTING"
"SPORTSMAN'S   MAP   OF   CANADA"
"WESTWARD TO  THE  FAR   EAST"
"EAST TO  THE  WEST"
GUIDES TO  THE   PRINCIPAL CITIITS   OF   JAPAN  AND   CHINA, TRAVELLING
BY   EITHER   THE   EASTERN   OR   THE   WESTERN   ROUTE.
"TIME-TABLE WITH   NOTES"
"AROUND THE  WORLD"
"CLIMATES OF CANADA"
"QUEBEC   SUMMER  AND WINTER"
" MONTREAL"
"ST. ANDREWS-BY-THE-SEA"
"TEMAGAMING   A GLIMPSE OFTHE
ALGONQUIN PARADISE"
"ACROSS CANADA TO AUSTRALASIA"
"BANFF" "HAWAII"
ALSO   NUMEROUS   PAMPHLETS   DESCRIPTIVE   OF   MANITOBA,   THE  CANADIAN
NORTH-WEST   TERRITORIES   AND   BRITISH   COLUMBIA  :
"WESTERN  CANADA" "BRITISH  COLUMBIA"
"GOLD  FIELDS  OF B.C."
"NEW  ONTARIO  GOLD  FIELDS, ETC."
Most of these publications are handsomely illustrated, and contain
much useful Information in interesting shape. Time-Tables with Notes
will be found a valuable companion for all Transcontinental travellers.
Copies may be obtained FREE from Agents of the Company, or will
be mailed to any address on application to undersigned.
The Company has also published a new Map, on the polar projection,
showing the whole of the northern hemisphere, and the Canadian Pacific
Railway's Around the World Route in a novel and interesting way, and
another of Canada and the northern half of the United States, showing
the entire system of the Comnany in detail. A sporting map of Canada,
showing the best regions for fish and game, is also issued. These maps
will be given away for public and prominent display.
The Company now has on saie in its hotels, principal ticket offices,
and on the trains, several series of handsomely finished views of scenes
along their lines of railway. Size—12 x 10 inches, in portfolios suitable
for the table (12 views in each series), price 51.00.
A.  H.  NOTMAN
Asst. General Passenger Agent
1 King Street East, TORONTO
H.  J.  COLVIN
District Passenger Agent
197 Washington Street, BOSTON
W.  R   CALLAWAY
General Passenger Agent
Soo Line, MINNEAPOLIS
GEO. W.  HIBBARD
General Passenger Agent
Duluth, Smith Shore ,t Atlantic, llv.
Marquette, Mich.
A. C. SHAW
General Agent, Passenger Dept.
2JS South Clark St., CHICAGO, 111.
E. J. COYLE
Asst. General Passenger Agent
Vancouver, B.C.
A
J.  HEATH
District Passenger Agent
ST. John, N.I'..
E.
V. SKINNER
General Eastern Agent
3">3 Broadway, New York
A
E.  EDMONDS
7 Fort Street West, DETROIT, Mich.
M
.  M. STERN
District PjiKKi'tifrer Airent
Pahice Hotel J'.uildiiig, Ran Francisco
D.  E. BROWN
General Agont China and Japan, etc
Hung Kong
ARCHER  BAKER, European Traffic Manager
and 68 King WlUlinn Street, K.C.\T_„__V  Vv.,
1 ockspm-SI reel,     -    -    -    - S.W. I
67a.l
30 Cock spur £
67 St. Vincent Street. GLASGOW
!> .lames Street, LIVERPOOL
C. E. McPHERSON,C!enl.Pass. Agt., Western Lines, WINNIPEG
C. E. E. USSHER, Oi-nl. Pass, Agt., Eastern Lines, MONTREAL.
ROBT. KERR, Passenger Traffic Manager, Mon-ireal. No. 4
SumerTours^
Across the Continent
to Banff.QlacieK
Kootenay &the Pacific Coast.
Pacific
RAILWAY
SSBSffe-
1901
 , ; „	

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