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Banff Highland Gathering and Scottish Music Festival, Aug. 20 - Sept. 2, 1929, Banff Springs Hotel Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Canadian Pacific Hotels. Banff Springs Hotel 1929

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HIGHLAND
GATHERING
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SCOTTISH
MUSIC
FESTIVAL
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Aug. 30 - Sept. 2, 1929
BANFF SPRINGS HOTEL
I BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
THE CALL TO BANFF
To Banff, to Banff, how clear the call
To Banff, to Banff the Beautiful!
What   means   this   wild   resounding  cheer?
The Scottish Highlanders are here.
From Highland Glen, from Hebrides,
MacDougals,  Maclntyres',  MacKays.
From rocky crag unto the  skies
The clear tones of the bag-pipes rise,
In haunting, tender melodies
Of Highland Scots and Hebrides;
Sweet lilting tunes, old love songs too,
While friend greets friend and vows renew.
 J. E. HARRIS
THE HIGHLAND GATHERING
Now for the third time the clans will gather in the highlands of the Canadian Rockies at Banff—the tourist capital of
that marvelous playground of giant forests and snowclad peaks.
Initiated in 1927, this Highland Gathering at once stirred up in
the army of Canadian Scots memories of other such Games in
the Old Country, with the result that it attracted a record crowd
to Banff. That record was surpassed in 1928, and this year
the prospects of a large attendance are even greater, as the
programme will include the chief athletic meeting of the year
in the Dominion Amateur Track and Field Championships.
Canadians who proved their speed and prowess to the rest of
the world at the Olympic Games will challenge records on the
fast new track at Banff.
In order to still further encourage the purely Highland
Athletic Events at this Gathering, the Honorable Randolph
Bruce, Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia, has offered a
handsome silver trophy for the best all-round Highland Athlete.
Another' new trophy is the "Ardchoille" Challenge Cup, a solid
silver copy of the famous Ardagh Chalice, offered to the piper
winning the highest number of points over all in the open
piping events. This is presented by Paul Huston Gregory, an
ardent Scot of New York.
Delegate pipers from the Highland Regiments in Canada
will once more  compete  for the E.  W.  Beatty Trophy,  and  a
Page Two BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
' w    /■*,><,*,   ,*
Massed dancers and massed pipe band at the
Banff  Highland  Gathering",   1928.
new set of contestants will compete for the piping championships of the Canadian Militia, with Neil Sutherland, of Regina,
acting this year as  judge  instead of winner.
In view of the importance of this year's Highland Gathering,
extensive improvements have been made to the Athletic Grounds
of the Banff Springs Hotel, where the Gathering is held and
the Grand Stand is being enlarged. His Royal Highness the
Prince of Wales has once more graciously extended his patronage to the Gathering, and the Lieutenant-Governors of Alberta
and British Columbia have intimated their intention of attending.
The Scottish Music Festival, which provides the evening
programmes of this Gathering, will also be of great musical
interest. Marjory Kennedy Fraser, famous through her volumes
of Hebridean music, has promised to come and will assist in
the concerts. The Lewis Society of Vancouver will repeat the
Gaelic folk operetta which made  such a hit at the Vancouver
Page Three BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
Sea Music Festival. Dr. Healey
Willan, of the Toronto Conservatory of Music, has written
the music for a ballad operetta
dealing with Prince Charlie
and Flora Macdonald. The
singers      engaged      for      the
m^m>m^yyW»s^^^Mi^M^i
Pipe Major Featherstone
Argyle & Sutherland Highlander,   Hamilton,   Ont.    Winner   of
the E. W. Beatty Inter-
Regimental  Trophy,   1928.
Page Four
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->.■.■.- .■.•-■.■_•:■:•■.■.■.■.-.-• ■.■_.■■■■■■: .■■.■.:■■■:■:•:■:■:-.■.-.
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■■.•:■:■:■:
Neil   Sutherland,   of  Regina
Champion  pipe   player  of  the
Canadian   Militia    (1927-28).
Music Festival include Brownie
Peebles, of the American Opera
Company, who is a Vancouver
girl, Katherine Wright of
Winnipeg, Finlay Campbell of
Ottawa, Herbert Hewetson and
Stanley Maxted, of Montreal. BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
PIOBAIREACHD MUSIC OF THE HIGHLANDERS
By Alexander Fraser, LL.D.
Piobaireachd is known as the classical national music of
the Scottish Highlands. The best of the oldest compositions
now available show the influence of the harp which preceded
the bagpipe in the north of Scotland; the haunting croon of
the lullaby so characteristic of folk-song; as well as the elegiac
strain and the caithream were well-known to the MacCrimmons,
the MacArthurs and other great pipers of the olden time—shall
a
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lll-lliiiliit;
Looking down on  the Dancing Platform and Athletic Grounds
from   the   Banff   Springs   Hotel.
I say, the golden age of piobaireachd. These masters found
in piobaireachd a medium for the expression of human feelings
of the most complex and intense character. The realm of
piobaireachd is as vast as human nature and is therefore of
almost limitless scope and opportunity. This being the case,
what manner of man ought he to be who ventures on this
alluring field? It goes without saying that he must possess
powers and abilities of no ordinary standard. First of all he
must be deft  of  finger and have  a  good ear  for music and  a
Page Five FF   HI
LAND   GATHERING
OTWCTWWPI
retentive memory. These are necessary even for a mastery of
the mechanical or technical part of his work. But much more
than these are requisite in order to exemplify real piobaireachd.
This calls for the possession of artistic feeling of a high order,
mental and intellectual culture and refinement of mind. Artistic
truth is universal in its appeal, and if piobaireachd is what we
assert it to be, then it has a rightful place with the best forms
of musical composition, whether opera, oratorio, cantata or
sonata. When this is realized we can clearly see what the equipment of a great piper should be. It must be such that he will
measure up to the standard set by great pianists, organists and
violinists. His role is more difficult than theirs owing to the
restricted range of the instrument, and the credit is correspondingly greater when the performance
touches the highest reaches of genius
and skill combined. Pipers ought to
be a well-educated class with minds
moulded and refined by the love of,
and training in, the musical art so
as to become instinctively sensitive
to the inherent beauties of first-class
piobaireached. It, of course, follows,
that with such accomplishments the
attributes of personal qualities will
have been developed considerably, so
that a fine piper and a fine gentleman would naturally be synonymous
terms. It may be taken for granted
that personal character is elevated,
purified and refined by a real love
for, and an ardent pursuit of the
musical art.
The day has come when a critical
and discriminating public demands
the very best that can be supplied.
Therefore the exponent of the classical music of the Scottish Gael must
measure up to and stand a fair comparison with the best exponents of violin, piano or organ, in
the open arena of the musical world. Technique is necessary
in all art but the dominating interest in piobaireached is the
soul of the composition. To grasp the author's conception and
to express its true spirit, with artistic finish and correct style,
should be the earnest aim and attainment of every piper who
asks for public recognition.
L.   R.   Wilson
A Champion Dancer
from Vancouver.
Page Six BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
MWWWWWWM
James   Macbeth
A young dancer from Kamloops.
THE MUSIC OF THE SCOTTISH BAGPIPE
"In halls of joy, and
in scenes of mourning,"
says MacDonald in his
Preface to "Ancient
Martial Music," "it has
prevailed; it has animated her warriors in
battle, and welcomed
them back after their
toils, to the homes of
their love and the hills
of their nativity. Its
strains were the first
sounded on the ears of
infancy, and they are the
last to be forgotten in
the wanderings of age.
Even Highlanders will
allow that it is not the
gentlest of instruments;
but when far from their
mountain homes, what
sounds, however melodious, could thrill round
their heart like one burst
of their own wild native
pipe ? The feelings which
other instruments awaken, are general and undefined. There is not a
battle that is honorable
to Britian in which its
war blast has not
sounded. When every
other instrument has
been hushed by the confusion and carnage of
the scene, it has been
borne into the thick of
battle, and, far in the advance, its bleeding but
devoted bearer, sinking
on the earth, has sounded
at   once   encouragement
to   his   countrymen   and Lieut-Governor Egbert of Alberta
his own coronach." awards   a   medal.
Page Seven BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
Pipers from Highland Regiments in Canada leaving the Courtyard
of   the   Banff   Springs   Hotel.
SCOTTISH MUSIC
The following paragraphs from "The Scottish Gael," by
James Logan, published close on a hundred years ago, make
interesting  reading  at  the  present  time.
Poems of Ossian—
What has been a very great means to preserve the Ossianic
poems is this, that the greatest number of them have particular
tunes to which they are sung, the music of which is soft and
simple. Duan Dearmot, an elegy on the death of a celebrated
warrior so called, is held in much esteem among the Campbells,
who trace their descent from that hero. In Lord Rea's country
is a tribe of this name, and the following anecdote of an old
member is here appropriate. The Rev. Alexander Pope having
got this veteran to sing the poem, he commenced his performance
by reverently taking off his bonnet; but, says the writer, "I
caused him to stop, and would put on his bonnet; he made
some excuses; however, as soon as he began, he again took off
his bonnet. I rose and put it on—he took it off—I put it on; at
last, as he was like to swear most horribly, he would sing no
more unless I allowed him to be uncovered. I gave him his
freedom, and so he  sung with  great  spirit.    I  then asked  him
Page Eight BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
the reason; he told me it was out of regard to the memory of
that hero. I asked him if he thought that the spirit of that
hero was present; he said not, but thought it well became them
who were descended from him to honour his memory."
Stories of-Pipers—
At the battle of Quebec, in 1760, the troops were retreating
in disorder, and the general complained to a field officer in
Fraser's regiment of the bad conduct of his corps, "Sir," said
the officer, with a degree of warmth, "you did very wrong in
forbidding the pipers to play; nothing inspirits the Highlanders
so much, even now they would be of some use." "Let them
blow in God's name, then," said the general; and the order
being given, the pipers with alacrity sounded the Cruinneachadh,
on which the Gael formed in the rear,, and bravely returned to
the charge.    George Clark, now piper, etc.,
The piper, who was hereditary, held an important place
in the establishment of a chief. He had lands for his support,
and was of superior rank to the other members of the  "tail,"
Ralph Connor  (Rev. Dr. C. W. Gordon)  conducting an open air
Sunday  Service  at  Banff.
Page Nine BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
had a gilli, or servant, who carried his pipes, and was esteemed,
as his profession entitled him, to the appellation of a gentleman. He accompanied the chief wherever he went, and with
the harper had a right to appear in all public meetings. He
promenaded in front of the castle while the laird was dressing,
at an early hour in the morning, and enlivened the meals either
in the same way, or at the end of the hall.
A striking proof of the respect paid to this class, resembling
the veneration in which the bards were held, occurred on the
defeat of the MacLeods at Inverury, in Aberdeenshire, by the
rebels in 1745. MacRimmon, the chief's piper, and master of
the celebrated college, was, after a stout resistance, made
prisoner. Next morning none of the pipers in the victorious
army played through the town, as usual, and being asked the
reason of this extraordinary conduct, they answered, that while
MacRimmon was in captivity their instruments would not sound;
and it was only upon the release of the respected prisoner that
the musicians returned to their duty.
CRAIGELLACHIE—the point on the Canadian Pacific Railway at which the last spike was driven on November 7th, 1885,
linking the Eastern and Western lines of construction of the
transcontinental system, is named from the slogan of the Grants,
which in turn comes from Craig Elachaidh—Dr. James Logan
has this to  say of  Scottish  Slogans:
"Among the Scots' cries are those of Buchannan 'Clareinnis,'
an Island in Lochlomond—Campbell, 'Ben Cruachan,' a noted
mountain, in Argyle—Farquharson 'Cairn na cuimhne,' the cairn
of remembrance, in Strathdee — Fraser, anciently 'Morfhaich,'
afterwards 'Castle Downie,' the family seat—Grant, 'Craig
Elachaidh,' the rock of alarm, of which there are two in Strathspey. The division of this tribe, called Clan Chirin, have
properly 'Craig Ravoch,' to which they add 'stand sure,' the
others saying 'stand fast'—MacDonald, 'Fraoch eilan,' the Heathy
Isle—MacFarlane, 'Loch Sloidh,' the Lake of the Host—MacGregor, 'Ard choille,' the highwood—Macintosh, 'Loch-moy,' a
Lake near the seat of the chief, in Inverness-shire—Mackenzie,
'Tulach ard,' a mountain near castle Donnan, the ancient
stronghold of the clan -— MacPherson, 'Craig dhubh chloinn
Chatain'—Munro, 'Casteal Fulis na theinn,' Foulis castle in
danger—Forbes, anciently, 'Loanach,' a hill in Strathdon—Clan
Rannald, 'A dh'aindeoin cotheireadh e!' in spite of all opposition.
1 .
Page Ten BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
Members   of   the   Lewis   Gaelic   Society,   Vancouver,
In  a   fisher  folk play.
SONGS OF THE HEBRIDES
Twenty years ago there were many who thought that
Scottish song was limited to Robert Burns, James Hogg and
Lady Nairne, but a new light has been thrown on the living
folkmusic of the Western Highlands and Islands by musicians
such as Marjory Kennedy Fraser, whose three volumes of "The
Songs of the Hebrides," have revealed the hitherto almost unnoticed wealth of exquisite melody and poetic spirit to be found
among the simple fisher folk of this  seagrit fairyland.
At the Highland Gathering of 1928, Marie Thomson, a
pupil of Mrs. Kennedy Fraser, held her audiences spellbound
with some of these magic Gaelic songs. This year we have been
promised the presence of Mrs. Kennedy Fraser herself, who
wishes to make what may be her last visit to Canadian shores,
and above all to Banff. Here she may be interested with others
to listen to a little Gaelic folkplay performed by Hebrideans
from Vancouver, who have brought with them to Canada the
unforgettable songs of their childhood. This so delighted the
audience at the Sea Music Festival in Vancouver last January,
that the players and singers have been invited to produce it
again at Banff. Gaelic is still a living language in some parts
of Canada, and Finlay Campbell will sing some songs in that
language written by a Gaelic bard of Cape Breton, Nova Scotia.
Page Eleven Stanley Maxted
Tenor
Finlay Campbell
Baritone
Marjory
Kennedy-Fraser
Scottish   composer
and   singer
1.
Wrig^1
C^&ano
Herbert Hewetson
Tenor
Mary Frances James
Soprano
SOME OF THE ARTISTS AT THE  SCOTTISH   MUSIC  FESTIVAL
* BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
120 yard Hurdle Race.
PROGRAMME OF ATHLETIC EVENTS
Under the auspices of the Banff Amateur Athletic Association
Saturday, August 31st, 1929.
, Commencing  at   I   p.m.
ist Prize in each event value $20.00 2nd Prize value $15.00
3rd Prize value $10.00.
LIST OF EVENTS
(Open to aee Canada)
11.    Throwing the Discus.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
v.
100 yards run.
220 yards run.
440 yards run.
880 yards run.
Three mile run.
Pole Vault.
Standing High Jump.
Standing Broad Jump.
Hop, Step and Jump.
120 yards Hurdles.
12. Throwing 16 lb. Hammer.
13. Putting  16 lb.  Shot.
14. Throwing   56   lb.   Weight
for Distance.
15. Throwing   56   lb.,   Weight
for height.
16. Throwing   28   lb.   Weight
for Distance.
17. Tossing the  Caber.
(10 flights 3' 6" high.)
Entry Fee 25 cents each event.
A.A.U. of Canada Rules to govern.
Page Thirteen BANFF   HIGHLAND
X H JL JfC 1 N G,
A Special Trophy, offered by the Hon. R. R. Bruce, Lieut-
Governor of British Columbia, for the best aggregate in Highland/ Events, will be awarded to the competitor gaining highest
number of points in events, Nos. 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 and 17.
Trophy to be won two years in succession before becoming the
property of the  winner.
Points will be awarded as follows: ist 5 points; 2nd 3
points; 3rd 1 point.
DOMINION TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS
A.A.U.  OF CANADA
Under the auspices of the Banff Amateur Athletic Association
Monday,  September 2nd,  1929.
Commencing  at   1   p.m.
A Gold Medal, emblematic of the Championship of Canada,
will be awarded to the winner in each event; a Silver Medal
to the second; and a Bronze Medal to the third.
EVENTS
I.
100 yards run.
9-
2.
220 yards run.
10.
3-
440 yards run.
11.
4-
880 yards run.
12.
5-
One mile run.
6.
Pole Vault.
13-
7-
Running High Jump.
14-
8.
Running Broad Jump.
15-
Throwing 16 lb. Hammer.
Putting  16 lb.  Shot.
Throwing the Discus.
120 yards Hurdles.
(10 flights 3' 6" high.)
Tavelin Throw.
One Mile Relay Race.
Five  Mile Run.
A Trophy will be awarded to the competitor gaining the
highest number of points in the Championship Events. One
Mile Relay Race not included. Points will be awarded as follows:    ist 5 points;  2nd  3 points;  3rd   1  point.
Rules of A.A.U. of Canada to govern.
INTERNATIONAL PERMIT—Any Foreign athletes who
are visiting our country Must Secure an International Permit
vouching for their amateur status, before their entry will be
accepted by the  Championship  Committee.
Entry Fee 50  cents each  event.
Relay Teams $1.00 per team.
Entries accompanied by the entry fee in all cases, must be
in the hands of the Secretary, Dominion Track and Field
Championships, Banff Springs Hotel, Banff, Alta., not later than
Friday,  August 23rd,   1929.
Page Fourteen BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
RULES GOVERNING ATHLETIC EVENTS
Entries must be ^accompanied with the entry fee in all cases.
Entries positively close Friday, August 23rd,  1929.
Competitors must have the amateur cards for the current
year before  being allowed to compete.
All competitors in events under A.A.U. of Canada Rules,
must represent some club.
Competitors must wear complete clothing from the shoulder
to within five inches of the knees, e.g., Jerseys and loose drawers.
There must be two competitors in all events or no first prize
shall be allowed; three competitors or no second prize shall be
allowed; and four or more competitors, or no third prize shall
be allowed. There can be no award by default. Therefore, to
win any prize or trophy on the programme an actual contest shall
be necessarv.
The Management reserves the right to refuse to accept the
entry of any single competitor, that may be tendered by letter
in advance of the day on which the sports will be held, or in
person on the grounds on the day of the sports without assigning any reason for so doing, and any such refusal shall be final.
The Director may change the order of the events in the
course of the day, should he deem it advantageous to do so.
The Director shall have control of the grounds, and shall
have full charge and management of the events of the day.
Prizes will be presented at the close of each day.
The management will not be responsible for any unclaimed
prizes.
Entry forms for all events can be obtained on application
from the Secretary, Banff Highland Gathering, Banff Springs
Hotel, Banff, Alberta.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Saturday, August 31st, 1929.
Commencing at 9 a.m.
Quoiting Handicap  (Open Singles)   18 yards.
Calgary Quoiting Association Rules to govern.
ist Prize—Trophy and prize value $30.00
2nd Prize—Value $20.00 3rd Prize—Value $15.00
4th Prize—Value $10.00
Entry Fee 50 cents each individual.
All entries accompanied by the entry fee must be sent to
the Secretary, Banff Highland Gathering, Banff Springs Hotel,
Banff,  Alberta,  not  later  than  Friday,  August  23rd,   1929.
Page Fifteen 01
ova
an
nnce
Charlie
Flora Macdonald's escape with Prince Charlie from the pursuing redcoats
at Rossinish, in the Hebrides, has been recast as a ballad-opera for the
Scottish Music Festival at the Banff Highland Gathering of 1929. In this
are incorporated Highland airs and Jacobite songs of the period, harmonized
and arranged by Dr. Healey Willan, distinguished Canadian composer.
Great care has been taken to maintain historical accuracy in this reconstruction of one of the most romantic incidents in Scottish history. Scenery
and  sketches  here   reproduced   are  by  Charles   W.   Simpson,   R.C.A. BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
Monday, September 2nd,  1929.
Commencing at 9 a.m
Quoiting Singles   (Scratch)   18 yards  (Open).
The Silver Quoit, emblematic of the Championship of
Western Canada, will become the property of the winner for
one year.
ist Prize—Value $30.00 3rd Prize—Value $15.00
2nd Prize—Value $20.00 4th Prize—Value $10.00
Rules of the Alberta Quoiting Association to govern.
Entry Fee 50 cents each individual.
AFTERNOON
Tug of War (Without Cleats)  Open.
Seven  Men  and Captain,   12  foot pull.
ist Prize—Trophy with miniatures to members  of winning
team and prizes to the total value of $100.00
divided among the members of the team.
2nd Prize—Prizes to the total value of $75.00 divided among
the members  of the  team.
Entry  Fee $1.00  per  team.
A.A.U. of Canada Rules to govern.
Names of members of the team with addresses, must be
sent along with the entry form to the Secretary, Banff Highland
Gathering, Banff Springs Hotel, Banff, Alberta, not later than
Friday, -August 23rd,   1929.
c
Page Eighteen
Tossing  the  Caber. <*
BANFF   HIGHLAN
THERING
:•>_!
y
;;.^*ui6
Judging the Highland Events at the Banff Highland Gathering
>»
RULES GOVERNING THE HIGHLAND EVENTS
Under the auspices of the
Calgary   St.   Andrew-Caledonian   Society.
The Highland Events include competitions for the Highland
Dress, Bagpipe Music and Highland Dancing. The competitions
shall be governed by the Rules adapted and formulated by the
Gaelic Society of Canada, and the Field Events by the Rules
of the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada. Judges are requested
to be guided by these Rules in arriving at their decisions.
i. It is assumed that no one will enter as a competitor in any
of the events set forth in this programme who has not
attained considerable proficiency and skill in his or her art.
Therefore, should this requirement be disregarded the judges
shall ask any competitor whom they deem, on fair trial, incapable of rendering a fairly good performance, to withdraw
from the contest. In any such case the entry fee shall not
be   returned  to  the   competitor.
2. There must be two competitors in all events or no first prize
shall be allowed; three competitors or no second prize shall
Page Nineteen BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
5-
6.
7.
8.
9.
be allowed; and four or more competitors, or no third prize
shall be allowed. There can be no award by default. Therefore, to win any prize or trophy on the programme an actual
contest shall be necessary.
Pipers taking part in Bagpipe Music Competitions shall be
expected to play for competitors in the Dancing Events if
requested to do so by the Director of the Games.
The classification of a£~es in the Piping and Dancing Events
shall be strictly adhered to and enforced. Should any age be
seriously challenged, written proof of birth may be required.
Any breach of this rule may disqualify a competitor in future
competitions. Any dispute which may arise shall be investigated by the Standing Committee on Sports at a later
date and its findings shall be final.
The Management reserves the right to refuse to accept
the entry of any single competitor, band, team or performers
whatsoever that may be tendered by letter in advance of the
day on which the sports will be held, or in person on the
grounds on the day of the sports, without assigning any
reason for so doing, and any such refusal shall be final.
Competitors shall be called upon to compete in the inverse
order of entry. Any competitor not responding, when called
upon shall forfeit her or his right to compete.
The Director may change the order of the events in the
course of the day, should he deem it advantageous to do so.
The Director shall have control of the grounds, and shall
have full charge and management of the events of the day.
The decision of the Judges shall be final in all competitions.
In the Piping and Dancing Events the Judges shall not call
back any competitor for a second trial, except in the event
of a tie for first place, in which case the judges may require
the competitors who on the first trial are marked equal for
first place, to play or dance again for final decision.
Judges shall not be debarred from competing in any class of
events in which they are not judging.
Page T'wenty BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
BAGPIPE  COMPETITIONS
Open
1. Piobaireachd
ist. Gold Medal and $75.00.
2nd. Silver Medal and $50.00.
3rd.    Bronze  Medal and $25.00.
Competitors in Piobaireachd shall play: Cumha Mhic-an-
Toisich—Mackintosh's Lament. (David Glen's Collection
or Piobaireachd Society's setting).
2. Marches
ist. Gold Medal and $50.00.
2nd. Silver Medal and $30.00.
3rd. Bronze Medal and $20.00.
Competitors in Marches shall play their choice of any one
of  the  following pieces:—
Leaving Glenurquhart.
The Duchess of Edinburgh's March.
The Athole Highlanders' March to Loch Katrine.
Donald Cameron.
The Marchioness of Tullibardine's March.
The  Lochaber Gathering
and shall send to the Secretary at least one week in advance,
the name of the piece he intends to play.
3. Strathspeys and Reels
ist.    Gold  Medal  and $50.00.
2nd.   Silver Medal and $30.00.
3rd.    Bronze Medal and $20.00.
Competitors shall play their choice of the following pieces:
Strathspeys :
Blair   Drummond.
Lochloskin.
Atholl Cummers.
Aberlour  House.
Take Your Gun to the Hills.
Arniston  Castle.
Reels :
The Sheep Wife.
John MacEachern's Reel.
Jackie Latin.
Miss Pride.
Over the Isles to America.
The Rejected Lover,
and shall send to the Secretary, at least one week in advance,
names of the pieces he intends to play.
Page Twenty-one BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
The "Ardchoille" Perpetual Challenge Cup donated by
Paul Huston Gregory — a solid silver copy of the famous
"Ardagh" Chalice, measuring 12 inches in diameter and proportionately high, is offered for the piper winning the highest number of points over all in the open piping events. This will be
held by each year's winner until the following year's Gathering,
the winner to receive a replica of the Cup for permanent possession. Mr. Gregory also offers additional cash prizes in this
competition: $100.00 for first, $50.00 for second and $25.00 for
third. Points or marks shall be given by the judges in strict
accordance with the rules governing bagpipe competitions.
4. Novice Bagpipe Competition
Open to those who have never won a prize for such an
event in any previous contest. A written and signed statement by the competitor to this effect, endorsed by some
responsible person will be required.
Marches :
ist     $10.00
2nd       7.50
3rd  .       5.00
Strathspeys and Reels:    Prizes  same as  for Marches.
5. Youths' Bagpipe Competition
Open to those between the ages of 16 and 21 years. A
certificate of age must be produced endorsed by some
responsible person.
Marches :
ist—$10.00 and Gold Medal.
2nd— 7.50 and Silver Medal.
3rd—   5.00 and Bronze Medal.
Strathspeys and Reels:    Prizes  same as  for Marches.
6. Boys' Bagpipe Competition
Open to those between 12 and 16 years of age. A certificate of age must be produced, endorsed by some responsible person.
Marches :
ist—Prize value $7.50 and Gold Medal.
2nd—Prize value $5.00 and Silver Medal.
3rd—Prize value $3.00 and Bronze Medal.
Strathspeys  and REELS:    Prizes  same as  for Marches.
Page Twenty-two BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
7.    Special Inter-Regimental Competition (Marches)
The Inter-Regimental Competition is limited to official
delegate pipers on the active strength of Highland Regiments of the Non-Permanent Active Militia of Canada, the
regimental uniforms of such regiments being the Highland
garb, conforming in every respect to the authorized Canadian   Militia  regulations.
ist—Silver Cup presented by E. W. Beatty, Esq., Chairman and President of the Canadian Pacific Railway
and  $100.00.
2nd       $50.00
3rd       $25.00
Each competitor will play his choice of the following:—
The Athole Highlanders or the 74th Farewell to Edinburgh.
8.    Special Trophy
Open to all regimental pipers in good standing in the Active
(Non-Permanent)  Militia of Canada, i.e., to pipers who are
regular members of a pipe-band officially connected with any
regiment or unit of the Canadian Militia.    This trophy was
won two years in succession by Piper Sutherland, Regina, and
a similar trophy is offered this year.   Piper Sutherland will not
be a competitor.    Additional cash prizes $100, $50 and $25 for
ist. 2nd and 3rd respectively.    This  is intended  as  a competition for the best pipe-player in the Canadian Militia, and
\   must be won two years in succession in order to become the
property of the winner.
Entries   for   bagpipe   competitions   close,   Friday,   August
23rd,  1929.
Entry FEES—Competitors in Open Piobaireachd, Marches,
Strathspeys and Reels and Special Trophy for best pipe
player in the Canadian Militia, 50 cents each event.
Competitors in Novice Events, 25 cents each event.
Inter-Regimental Event, Youths' and Boys' events, no entry
fee.
Page Twenty-three BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
FURTHER  RULES   GOVERNING   BAGPIPE
COMPETITIONS
i. Piobaireachd will be regarded as an exhibition of good playing rather than a general competition merely for place. The
maximum number of marks will be ioo. To obtain a first
prize a minimum of 75 marks must be obtained; to obtain
a second prize, 60 marks; and to obtain a third prize, 50
marks. In fixing the standard on which the credit value
of 100 marks, maximum, shall be estimated, the Judges will
be understood to give due consideration to the conditions
under which piping is pursued on this side of the Atlantic,
i.e., the high standard possible in Scotland will not be
expected.
2. The number of beats per minute for Marching shall be
from 85 to 90. A four-part March shall be played twice;
a three-part   March twice;   and  two-part  March  twice.
3. The Strathspey and Reel, if four-part, shall be played once
over each;  if three or two, twice over.
4. In all the Piping Events the maximum number of marks
shall  be   100,   distributed  as  follows:
(1) Condition of  the
pipes—8.
(2) Tuning—10.
(3) Tone—8.
(4) Accuracy—10.
(5) Harmony—10.
(6) Phrasing—8.
(7) Time—10.
(8) Interpretation—15.
(9) Expression and Feeling
—J5.
(10)    Smart Appearance—6/
(a) In the Piping Competitions the Judges shall take into
consideration the character of the tune played — whether
difficult or easy to render. In assessing values marks shall be
given for comportment and smart appearance, correct tuning,
tone of pipes, time, fingering, rhythm, technique, interpretation of the tune (the piper must have caught its spirit and
message)  and the general musical effect.
(b) Points to be considered in marking: Tone—the chanter shall be in perfect pitch and in complete unision with
the bass and tenor drones. Quality, modulation, etc., including a full mellow tenor tone; clear, fairly loud, not thin
and lifeless. Phrasing—the proper metre and balance in
every bar; a melodious swing and sway to the music and
the  rhythmic   succession  of   accents    or   tone   impulses   in
Page Twenty-four BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
Best  Dressed  Highlanders,   1928.
regular order. Character and Style—as to whether the
time is easy or difficult to render; whether the version is
pleasing to the ear or otherwise. The melody ought never
to be scrificed for mere display of deft fingering. Technique
—briefly: true fingering, the requisite number of grace notes
(and no more) correct doublings in every movement.
Marching and Posture—upright carriage and natural swing
in walking, and holding the instrument as if it were part
of the performer. Penalties—chokes or stops, squeals and
scratches, if incidental are minor demerits, for which marks
are to be deducted, adequate to the nature of the mishap.
Best Dressed Highlander  (Men only).
ist Prize, value $30—2nd Prize, value $20—3rd Prize, value $15.
Entry Fee—50 cents.
Page Twenty-five BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
RULES GOVERNING THE HIGHLAND
COMPETITION
(for Men only)
DRESS
Note .—Prizes shall be awarded only for the plain Highland
costume such as is generally worn on ordinary, everyday
occasions, excluding all other forms of Highland dress. The
following requirements shall be observed by competitors,
viz:
The bonnet shall be of a Highland pattern—Balmoral or
Kilmarnock—flat or Glengarry  (peaked).
The jacket shall be of tweed material, with or without cuffs,
pocket-flaps or shoulder straps. It shall be well fitted at
the waist, short, smart in appearance, of different pattern
to that of an ordinary sack coat.
The waistcoat shall be of the same material as the jacket
and of moderate length.
i.
2.
3-
4-
5-
The necktie shall match the colour either of the jacket or
of the kilt.
The kilt shall be of clan or family tartan, and each competitor ought to wear the tartan to which he is by clan or
family entitled.
The kilt shall be worn plain—without bows or ribbons. A
silver  safety pin,  claw  or talon  pin  shall  be  used.
j
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A Foursome Reel.
Page Twenty-six B A N F F   HIGHL A N D   GA i HL K i N u
8.
9-
10.
11.
The sporran shall be in the form of a mottled leather, or
a fur purse. When the latter is worn the head of the
animal should be mounted on the fur. The animal should
be indigenous to the Scottish Highlands, such as the otter,
wildcat, badger, pole-cat or fox.
Ribbed worsted hose shall be worn of a colour to match
that of the jacket or of the ground colour of the kilt, with
the turn to match, generally, the high colour of the kilt.
The sgian dubh to be worn in the right-side stocking.
Low-cut shoes or brogues shall be worn, strong and serviceable  for  walking,  without  buckles.
No ornaments except the distinguishing clan or personal
crest, or the clan badge, shall be worn.
The harmony of the costume as a whole and the manner of
wearing it shall be taken into account by the Judges.
In all cases the complete dress must be the personal property
of the competitor.
HIGHLAND   DANCING
1.   Highland Fling.
(a) Boys under  10 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(b) Girls under 10 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
The J. H. Woods Silver Cup is offered for the competitor gaining the highest number of points in these
classes, cup to be retained if won two years in succession. Won in 1928 by Donella Thomson, Vancouver,  B.C.
(c) Boys 10 to under 13 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(d) Girls  10 to under  13 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(e) Boys  13 to under  16 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals,
(f) Girls 13 to under 16 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
\Page Twenty-seven BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
(g)    Open to competitors 16 years and over.
ist, Gold Medal and $15—2nd, Silver Medal and $10-
3rd, Bronze Medal and $8.
2.    Seann Triubhas.
Open to competitors 16 years and over.
ist, Gold Medal and $15—2nd, Silver Medal and $10-
3rd, Bronze Medal and $8.
(a)    Boys under 10 years.      (b)    Girls under 10 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
3. Sword Dance.
(a) Boys  10 to under  13 years.
Gold, vSilver and Bronze Medals.
(b) Girls 10 to under 13 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
Boys  or Girls—
(c) 13 to under  16 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(d) 16 years and over.
% ist, Gold Medal and $15—2nd, Silver Medal and $10-
3rd, Bronze Medal and $8.
4. Scotch Reel.
Open to competitors 16 years and over.
ist, Gold Medal and $15—2nd, Silver Medal and $10-
3rd, Bronze Medal and $8.
Sailor's Hornpipe.
Open to competitors 16 years and over.
ist, Gold Medal and $15—2nd, Silver Medal and $10-
3rd, Bronze Medal and $8.
6.    Irish Jig.
(a) Boys or girls under 10 years of age.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(b) Boys or girls 10 to under 13 years of age.
Gold,   Silver and  Bronze  Medals.
(c) Boys or girls 13 to under 16 years of age.
Gold,   Silver and  Bronze  Medals.
Page Twenty-eight BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
(d)    Open to competitors  16 years and over,
ist.    Gold  Medal  and $15.00.
2nd.    Silver Medal and $10.00.
3rd.    Bronze Medal and $8.00.
Note—Competitors, in all dancing events, under 16 years
of age, must bring certificate as to their age, endorsed
by some  responsible person.
ENTRY FEES FOR DANCING COMPETITIONS
16 years and over 50 cents each event except special events.
Under 16 years of age, no entry fee.
Entries positively close Friday, August 23rd, 1929.
HIGHLAND   DANCING
Special Events
Eightsome Reel.
Open to teams of competitors  16 years and over,
ist  team  prize—$60.00
2nd team prize—$40.00
Irish Jig.
Open to teams of competitors  16 years and over, teams to
consist  of  three  couples.
ist team prize—$48.00
2nd  team  prize—$30.00
Irish Jig.
Open to teams of competitors  10 years to under  16 years,
teams to consist of three couples.
ist team prizes value $5.00 each
2nd   team prizes value $3.00 each
RULES
These events shall be judged for team work only.
Unless otherwise decided, at least two male competitors must
be members  of the team.
No  competitor  shall  be allowed to  compete  in  more  than
one team in any one class.    No entry fee.
HIGHLAND   DANCING
Highland Fling.
I.    Correct  position,   time,   number   of   steps,   i.e.,   six   steps   in
consecutive  order,  executed accurately with  ease and  good
Page Twenty-nine BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
..
taste,  as  to  graceful,  restrained  movement,   will  determine
the values on which marks shall be given.
Seann Triubhas.
2. The very essence of this dance is grace and beauty of movement, the gentle, graceful sway of the body as a whole must
be in perfect harmony with the dance steps. The dance
shall be presented in correct position, time and step. The
introduction of steps foreign to the dance, such as hornpipes or jigs, shall count heavily against the competitor.
Sword Dance.
3. Shall be danced over a cross formed by placing a naked
sword across its sheath at right angles, the point of intersection being equally distant from the point and hilt of the
sword, and from both ends of the sheath. Correct position,
time, steps and spirited execution shall be the main requirements. Correct position shall apply to the position of the
body as a whole as well as to that of the legs and feet in
executing the steps. The body should not bend unduly forward, nor should it be stiffly erect. Ease and accuracy of
execution are basic.
Mutual   Admiration.
The  Mountie  and  the  Pipe   Major.
Page Thirty BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
Should a competitor touch or displace the sword or sheath
one-third of his credit marks shall be deduced. To touch
three  times   shall  disqualify  him  altogether.
Nothing in this Rule (except the disqualification) shall be
construed so as to preclude a competitor from taking first,
or a higher place, over others who by dancing wide of the
sword and sheath have reduced the risk of touching the
same to a minimum. Undue importance shall not attach to
the first touch of a competitor who may dance closer in
and around the cross.
Scotch Reel.    (Foursome.)
4. The outline of the figure eight shall be observed. Two steps
Highland fling and four reel steps shall be danced.
Sailor's Hornpipe.
5. Correct Sailor's Costume (boys), dancing slippers with flat
soles (heelless) shall be worn. Hornpipe steps only (traditional Jack o' Tar steps) are admissible. Jig steps shall
be counted as serious errors, but need not altogether disqualify an otherwise good performer. Hauling, heaving and
pulling movements ought to be natural as in actual work
and expressive of real action. The opening and closing
steps should not be marred by excessive action, neither
ought they to be  spiritless.
Competitors in all Highland events shall appear in
appropriate Highland costume.
Communications   and   Entries   in   connection   with
the Athletic and Highland Events should be sent to—
J. W. JENKINSON,
Secretary, Banff Highland Gathering,
Banff Springs Hotel,
Banff,   Alberta.
Page Thirty-one BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
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