Open Collections

The Chung Collection

Chung Logo

The Chung Collection

Banff Highland Gathering and Scottish Music Festival, Aug. 20 - Sept. 1, 1930, Banff Springs Hotel Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Canadian Pacific Hotels. Banff Springs Hotel 1930

Item Metadata

Download

Media
chungtext-1.0226232.pdf
Metadata
JSON: chungtext-1.0226232.json
JSON-LD: chungtext-1.0226232-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): chungtext-1.0226232-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: chungtext-1.0226232-rdf.json
Turtle: chungtext-1.0226232-turtle.txt
N-Triples: chungtext-1.0226232-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: chungtext-1.0226232-source.json
Full Text
chungtext-1.0226232-fulltext.txt
Citation
chungtext-1.0226232.ris

Full Text

 %lS \$S \LS \JL* \2S \J^r \L  Gr
0/t
)
■
■   J
by..:--
s*
**
GATh
AND
NG
an
j
MUSIC
Jl* SSm 231 JL JL V/Uj
Aug. 29 - Sept. 1, 1930
BANFF SPRINGS HOTEL
Printed in Canada 1930
_J BANFF   HIGHL
ATHERiN
Chieftains Twa
Lieutenant-Governor Dr. W. Egbert of Alberta and Lieutenant-Governor R. R. Bruce
of Brtiish Columbia at the Banff Highland Gathering of 1929
Page »T wo A
M
L
BANFF HIGHLAND GATHERING
It is a far cry from the hills and glens of Scotland to Banff in
the heart of the Canadian Rockies; a far cry, too, from the primitive
meets of an earlier day to the great annual Highland Gathering
in the Valley of the Bow. A far cry indeed—but the spirit is the
same.
For if the Rockies surpass in majestic grandeur the Highlands
of Scotland, there is yet a strange similarity between them. The
skirl of the pipes re-echoes with the same authentic note through
Rocky Mountain fastnesses; the tartan glints as brightly on this
Canadian soil.
And if the Scot in this land of his adoption has won for himself
a greater store of this world's goods than his forbears in the Old
country—a greater mess of potage—he has zealously guarded his
birthright and fostered that spirit of healthy competition in outdoor
sports—the essential spirit of the Games.
Now for the fourth time the call has gone throughout the length
and breadth of the continent, rallying the clansmen to Banff.
From Halifax to Victoria—the Land's End and John o' Groats
of Canada—they are coming, but not from Canada only. Pride of
ancestry is as strong below the forty-ninth parallel, and hard-
headed Scots-Americans will renounce the pleasures of business—
did not their ancestors on occasion forsake the lure of cattle lifting?—
for the gathering of the clans.
It is to Banff they are coming—Banff, the Braemar of America—
Banff, set amidst an amphitheatre of everlasting mountains whose
serrated ridges are capped with eternal snow—Banff by the glacial
green waters of the Bow—Banff with its great grey baronial castle,
Banff Springs Hotel.
The Prince of Wales has graciously extended his patronage to
the Gathering, w7hile the Honourable Randolph Bruce, Lieutenant-
Governor of British Columbia, and the Honourable W. Egbert,
Lieutenant-Governor of Alberta, have intimated their intention of
being present. Colonel the Hon. J. L. Ralston, Minister of National
Defence, is also a patron.
And the Games? There will be piping—pibrochs, marches,
reels and strathspeys—piping for the trophies which generous
donors have given, piping by the greatest exponents of the art in
the North American continent and beyond.
And dancing—by demure little people whose effortless mastery
of terpsichorean intricacies is rather bewildering, and dancing by
their elders whose experience has given them a flawless if less
unconscious technique. Dancing? Highland Flings and Seann
Triubhas, Sword Dances and Reels, Hornpipes and Jigs.
Page Three Jpp*
ANFF   HIGHL
Parade of Pipers from the Courtyard of the Banff Springs Hotel,
Banff Highland Gathering
There is Tug-of-War, too, without cleats—seven men to a side
and a captain, straining over the twelve-foot pull. And there is
Quoiting for the Silver Quoit.
Tossing the Caber? It takes brawn to balance a sapling like a
telegraph pole in the hands and send it careening tip over end
into space.
Never an idle moment on the Athletic Grounds and always a
diversity of competitions to see.
And colorful as the gathering has been in the past, two new
costume competitions will this year add lustre to the throngs. On
Monday afternoon, characters from Scottish history and heroes and
heroines of Scottish song will mingle with the crowds. There are
also Scottish song competitions this year.
In the evenings the Scottish Music Festival provides the
entertainment—the entertainment, that is, of a less physical kind.
For before the concerts the tables in the great dining room are set,
and what if the menu cards are printed in Gaelic? Gaelic is after
all a spoken language, and even to the uninitiated Ashainn
mhairteil roiste, le maragan an Eilein-Fhada must convey
something.
Page Four AND   SCOTTISH   MUSIC   FESTIVAL
But when more material needs have been satisfied the guests
repair to the spacious concert hall and listen to consummate artists
interpreting the melodies and songs of Scotland.
Sunday—and with the pipers swinging gaily ahead all Banff
fares forth to an open-air service, worshipping on the mountain
side by choice, even as their Covenanting ancestors worshipped
perforce. With an inspiring zest the age-old Scottish psalms are
sung, and a piper plays the minister to his improvised pulpit.
It is a memorable pageant—this Highland Gathering at Banff,
and it is then that the Scot comes into his own. The French
Canadians have their own great festival of folksong and iolkdance
at Quebec. Victoria, Vancouver and Toronto have already shown
the English contribution to Canadian culture. But when the Scot
comes forward to make his bow, he chooses the most picturesque
spot in the Canadian Rockies—a majestic highland glen with a
baronial castle—and there, for a few brief days, he lives in the
glamour of other days and other scenes, preserving and promoting
customs and traditions not unworthy of preservation, and giving
generously of his priceless heritage of Scottish music.
The Open Air Service at the Devil's Cauldron with a Congregation
of 3,000 listening to "Ralph Connor"
Page Five BANFF   HIGHL
ATHERING
k
THE HIGHLAND DRESS
By Colonel Alexander Fraser, LL.D.
"Abroad, at home, where'er we roam,
All honour and hail
To bonnet, plaid and feile-beag,
The garb of the Gael."
—C. T. H.
Much has been written on the subject of the Highland Dress,—
The Garb of Old Gaul—most of it of a controversial, some of it of
an instructive nature. The antiquity or modernity of the dress
need not, however, occupy us in this brief reference, but a word
on one phase of its present-day use may be timely.
At least six forms are recognized, the Levee, Evening, Full
Dress, Undress for morning or afternoon ceremonial, Walking or
Working Dress, and Military or Regimental Uniforms. The last
mentioned conform to the Dress Regulations of the Service. Levee,
Evening, and Full Dress adhere to standard patterns with but minor
variations. On rare occasions, such as a Clan Muster, the Studded
Shield and the Lochaber Axe may be carried by the men, in addition
to the other accoutrements belonging to the Full Dress. The
Undress adapts itself freely to the requirements of the moment,
but is never intended to be elaborate with respect either to trimmings or ornaments. The Walking or Vocational Dress is minutely
described in this Programme for the purposes of the Competition
Judges at Work
Colonel Alexander Fraser in  Centre with Pipe-Major Ferguson of North Bay
and Pipe-Major Macleod of Bermuda
Page Six ND
TISH   MUSIC  FESTIVAL
in the Highland Dress. Naturally, because
it is the form of dress for every-day wear
it is the most popular of all the forms, and
for the last ten years or so has had a steady
vogue.
These remarks apply to the Highland
Dress as worn by men: picturesque, comfortable, designed for freedom and ease of
movement.
"He that wears the kilt should be
Erect and free as deer on heather,
Agus ho, Mhorag!"
It is j ealously r
guarded against
superfluous innovations by a people
sensitive to the perpetuation of their
national costume in
its proper forms.
As far back as
we can trace the
records of our past,
m^^^^^^^^M^^
Cathie Kemp
(Calgary)
L. R. Wilson
(Vancouver)
Pipe-Major Gillies
(Vancouver)
Scottish women —
Highland and Lowland — gave much
attention to their
garments. In the
higher walks of
Clan life the ladies
were noted for the
style and elegance
of their wearing
apparel. The tartan skirt, sometimes
flounced; the well-
fitted bodice or
firmly flanged middy, the colours of which
varied from the crotul-brown to the deep-
hued saffron; the pliant cuaran; the tilted
cap and feather, make up an attire beautiful
and becoming. The ladies of the Clan were
the peers of their sisters in France in the
matter of dress design, and were but slightly
affected by foreign modes. As a rule they
had an instinctive feeling for the fitness of
things. A native garb was to them a garb
which adapted itself to native conditions,
such as climate, and the seasonal changes
Page Seven BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
consequent on different avocations, pastimes, social functions or
domestic usages. Queen Victoria, to whom Highland customs owe
much, delighted to speak and write about the costumes of the
Highland women, and did much to encourage the wearing of the
distinctive Highland Dress by them on suitable occasions. Her own
daughters, and granddaughters, too, with her warm approval, set a
fine example.
•
Many years ago a popular wave of indiscriminate vaudeville
play swept in its train all sorts of fantastic costumes, and the
Highland Dress did not escape the onrush. Girl dancers dressed
as boys, bedizened in the tawdry splendour of tinselled tunics,
low-cut hose, wavy muslins,—wearing even the masculine sporran
itself,—appeared on the theatre boards, and the fad appealing to
the undiscerning crowds soon became a familiar spectacle on the
platforms at Highland Gatherings! It was a daring adventure;
but a Highland Gathering is not a vaudeville show, and by and by
the incongruity of the thing elicited such decided protests that
responsible committees are moving for a gradual return to correct
girls' dresses at their annual competitions. Already such outstanding
places as Balmoral and Braemar have ruled out the incorrect dress
altogether; Cow^al is more or less in line; so are Toronto and other
centres of Caledonian games.
•MBgW1
Winners in the Best Dressed Highlander Competition, 1929
Page Eight AND  SCOTTISH  MUSIC  FESTIVAL
Probably it may not be necessary to take drastic action all at
once; but no doubt the good sense of the girls themselves, who in
most cases are innocent victims of a misunderstood movement
which has already well nigh spent its force, will lead to a rectification
in this matter.
Mary Ferguson
Helen Perrv
Betty Watkin
Jean Mundre
Kathleen Anderson
Thelma Collins
Bob Butler
Muriel Rollo        Gladys^Arbuckle        Kathleen Anderson       Thelma Collins
Page Nine BANFF    H
w   *
THERING
•:WSrww?^*';*
THE ROYAL SCOTS
AT BANFF
The oldest regiment in the British
Army, the 1st Royal Scots, will be
represented this Summer at the
Banff Highland Gathering by two
members of the pipe band which
that regiment is proud to possess.
Historians have traced the origin
of this redoubtable body as far
back as the year 882, when Charles
III of France formed a bodyguard
of twenty-four armed Scots. This
royal bodyguard of the French
kings grew in numbers and prestige
till, in the fifteenth century, Charles
VII selected a special corps of two
hundred archers and men-at-arms
under the title of Les Gendarmes
FW-'S'ffi-
Pipa-Sergeant Donald MacLeod
(Winnipeg)
Champion Piper, Canadian
Highland Regiments
Ecossais. The Earl of Buchan was
created Constable of France and
the Provinces, according to Sis-
mondi, "were governed and defended by Scotchmen whom a
love of war, of pillage, of the
wines and fruits of France, drew
hither in considerable numbers.''
Sir Walter Scott in "Quentin
Durward" gives a vivid picture of
the Scottish Archers who guarded
the person of Louis XL
In 1625 a troop of Scots under
the command of Colonel Sir John
Hepburn joined Gustavus Adol-
phus, the celebrated Swedish King,
in his invasion of Poland. On the
death of Gustavus in 1632, Hep-
Page Ten
Hector Macdonald
Winner of the Grand Aggregate
for Piping AN
Ti
I
TiVAL
burn's Scots Brigade fought under
various flags till in 1635 it was
merged with another Scottish regiment fighting for the French in
Germany. Lord James Douglas
took command in 1636, when Le
Regiment du Douglas numbered
over 8,000 men.
When Charles II was restored
to the English throne, the Douglas
regiment was brought to England
to support his sovereignty, arriving
in 1661 and obtaining rank in the
British Army from that date. In
1684 it was definitely transferred
from any connection with France
and was named "The Royal
Regiment of Foot." The numerical
rank of the 1st or Royal Regiment
of Foot was conferred in 1751 and
in 1758 the 2nd Battalion arrived
in  Nova Scotia for the siege of
■■:
Norman MacPherson (Hamilton)
Winner of the Piobaireachd
Competition
Pipe-Sergeant J. K. Cairns
(Hamilton)
Champion Piper, Canadian
Militia
Louisburg. In the following year,
they took part in the movement
against Ticonderoga, and were
engaged in Indian warfare for
several years. In 1760 they shared
in the capture of Montreal from
the French, and thus have a peculiar place in the early history of
Canada.
The Honourable R. Randolph
Bruce, Lieutenant-Governor of
British Columbia, is an honorary
Colonel of the Royal Scots, and
as patron and chief of the Banff
Highland Gathering, he was active
in enlisting the interest of the
regiment in this premier Scottish
celebration in Canada.
Page Eleven BANFF   HIGHLA
GATHERING
AT THE DEVIL'S CAULDRON
Marjory Kennedy Fraser, distinguished collector and singer of
Hebrician folk music, describes in "An Gaidheal" her impressions
of the Banff Highland Gathering of 1929. The following is an
extract from her reference to the Open Air Service at the Devil's
Cauldron:—-
"The Highland Festival extends over four days, including a
Sunday. The forenoon of the day of rest is devoted to a revival of
the old-time out-of-door religious services such as I have myself
seen in my childhood in the Scottish Highlands. A beautiful spot
within easy walking distance of the Hotel, encloses by a semi-circle
of steepish hills, a small lake.
"The preacher ("Ralph Connor," the well-known novelist), speaks
from a small island in the middle of the lake, his resonant voice
reaching easily the vast congregation seated or standing 'mong the
scrub on the steep hillside. Then, rising up to the branches of the
spruce, the poplar, and the birch, that clothe the lower slopes of
the 10,000 ft. higher peaks, float the familiar tones of the old Scots
psalms:—'I to the hills wall lift mine eyes,' and 'All people that on
earth do dwell.' Strange sounds these to issue from the 'Devil's
Cauldron,' for such is the name by which the retreat is known.
The service over, all disperse,
and if you are among the last,
and the road is fairly empty, you
may have the luck to be greeted
by a big beautiful, brown bear
and her two cubs coming straight
out of the woods to beg for
sweets. But beware of her seeming friendliness and drive on!
"Altogether it was a rare
sensation, this of the meeting of
Scots from 'a' the airts' at a v
central point in those barren
rocks, rocks that in a sense seem
to repel humanity, repel it as a
thing apart. Rupert Brooke, who
was deeply impressed by these
strange 'Rockies,' wrote of 'their
homeless grandeur.' Man there
seems a stranger, 'neither Nature's enemy nor her child.' And
yet, 'on either side go up the
dark processional pines, mounting to the sacred peaks, devout,
kneeling, motionless in an ecstasy
of homely adoration, like the
donors and their families in a      I
Flemish Picture'." Pipe-Major Gillies of Vancouver
Page Twelve AND
TTISH  MUSIC  FESTIVAL
"Ralph Connor" (Rev. Dr. C. W. Gordon) Preaching at the Open Air Service
at the Devil's Cauldron
The photographs taken at Banff used to illustrate this booklet were made by the
Associated Screen News, Montreal.
Thu cover design is a reproduction of the painting made at the Banff Highland
Gathering last year by Richard Jack, R.A.
Page Thirteen FF
L
220 Yards Run
880 Yards Run
One Mile Walk
3 Mile Run
One Mile Fiery Torch
Relay Race
Tossing the Caber
Hop, Step and Jump
PROGRAMME OF ATHLETIC EVENTS
{Under the auspices of the Banff Amateur Athletic Association)
1st Prize in each event value $20.00, 2nd Prize value $15.00,
3rd Prize value $10.00.
List of Events
(Open to all Canada)
A.A.U. of Canada Rules to govern.
Saturday, August 30, 1930
Commencing at 1.30 p.m.
Standing High Jump
Standing Broad Jump
Throwing 56 lb. Weight for
Height
Throwing 16 (Lb. Hammer
(Scottish Style)
Throwing 28 lb Weight For
Distance
Monday, September 1, 1930
Commencing at 1.30 p.m.
100 Yards Run Running Broad Jump
440 Yards Run Throwing 16 lb. Hammer
One Mile Run Putting 16 lb. Shot
120 Yards Hurdles (10 Throwing the Discus
flights 3' 6" high) Throwing 56 lb. Weight for
Pole Vault Distance
Running High Jump Javelin Throw
Novelty Events
100 Yards Sack Race 100 Yards (Run in Highland
costume)
Entry fee—25c each event.
RULES GOVERNING ATHLETIC EVENTS
Entries must be accompanied with the entry fee in all cases.
Entries positively close Friday, August 22, 1930.
Competitors must have the amateur cards for the current year
before being allowed to compete.
All competitors in events under A.A.U. of Canada Rules, must
represent some club.
Competitors must wear complete clothing from the shoulder
to within five inches of the knees, e.g., jerseys and loose drawers.
There must be two* competitors in all events or no first prize
shall be allowed; three competitors or no second prize shall be
allowed; and four or more competitors, or no third prize shall be
allowed. There can be no award by default. Therefore, to win
any prize or trophy on the programme an actual contest shall be
necessary.
The Management reserves the right to refuse to accept the
entry of any single competitor, that may be tendered by letter
Page Fourteen H   M
Tl
.
1                  ^*
•    ^^^p^^^^^^^^
jllgi&S;
S§&is5§555g«&«?
!
1    i i
:P             H             pJ;                  p
^-   ••            1               \       '                    P
I                                iI  Xi                    1                    .fc 1                           IP
P   p:               ;P[::           1         «?> >%               Pi:
:   ",           '•&•       I      :1M.        Jl   :
p
1
V. Pickard of Hamilton Pole Vaulting at the Banff Highland! Gathering, l^f 9
in advance of the day on which the sports will be held, or in person
on the grounds on the day of the sports without assigning any
reason for so doing, and any such refusal shall be final.
The Director may change the order of the events in the' course
of the day, should he deem it advantageous to do so.
The Director shall have control of the grounds, and shall have
full charge and management of the events of the day.
Prizes wall be presented at the close of each day.
The Management will not be responsible for any unclaimed
prizes.
Entry forms for all events can be obtained on application from
the Secretary, Banff Highland Gathering, Banff Springs Hotel,
Banff, Alberta.
PAGB  FlFTEBN BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING   AND   SCOTTISH   MUSIC   FESTIVAL
.
Massed BandB and Massed Dancers at the Banff Highland Gathering
with the Background of the Banff Springs Hotel and Mount Rundle
Page Sixteen
Page Seventeen FF    H
Saturday, August 30, 1930
Commencing at 8.30 a.m.
Quoiting Handicap (Open Singles), 18 Yards
1st  Prize—Trophy, and prize value $30.00.
2nd Prize—Value of $20.00.
3rd Prize—Value $15.00.
4th Prize—Value $10.00.
Entry fee—50c each individual.
Calgary Quoiting Association Rules to govern.
Monday September 1, 1930
Commencing at 8.30 a.m.
Quoiting Singles (Scratch), 18 Yards (Open)
The Silver Quoit, emblematic of the Championship of Western
Canada, will become the property of the winner for one year.
1st  Prize—Value $30.00. 3rd Prize—Value $15.00.
2nd Prize—Value $20.00. 4th Prize—Value $10.00.
Entry fee—50c each individual.
Rules of the Alberta Quoiting Association to govern.
All entries accompanied by the entry fee must be sent to the
Secretary, Banff Highland Gathering, Banff Springs Hotel, Banff,
Alberta, not later than Friday, August 22, 1930.
LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR R. R. BRUCE'S TROPHY
For the best aggregate in the following events:
Throwing 16 lb. Hammer
Putting 16 lb. Shot
Throwing 56 lb. Weight for Distance
Throwing 56 lb. Weight for Height
Throwing 28 lb. Weight for Distance
Tossing the Caber
Trophy to be won two years in succession before becoming the
property of the winner.
Points will be awarded as follows: 1st 5 points, 2nd 3 points, 3rd
1 point.
Special Events
Monday, September 1, 1930
Tug-of-War (Without Cleats) Open
Seven Men and Captain, 12 foot Pull.
1st Prize—Trophy, with miniatures to members of winning team
and prizes to the total value of $100.00 divided among the members
of the team.
2nd Prize—Prizes to the total value of $75.00 divided among
the members of the team.
Entry fee—$1.00 per team.
A.A.U. of Canada Rules to govern.
Names of members of the team, with addresses, must be sent
along with the entry form to the Secretary, Banff Highland
Gathering, Banff Springs Hotel, Banff, Alberta, not later than
Friday, August 22, 1930.
Page Eighteen AND
TISH
IC  FESTIVAL
RULES GOVERNING THE HIGHLAND EVENTS
(Under the auspices of the Calgary St. Andrew-Caledonian Society)
The Highland Events include competitions for the Highland
Dress, Bagpipe Music and Highland Dancing. The competitions
shall be governed by the Rules adapted and formulated by the
Gaelic Society of Canada, and the Field Events by the Rules of
the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada. Judges are requested to
be guided by these Rules in arriving at their decisions.
1. It is assumed that no one will enter as a competitor in any of the events set
forth in this programme who has not attained considerable proficiency and
skill in his or her art. Therefore, should this requirement be disregarded the
judges shall ask any competitor whom they deem, on fair trial, incapable of
rendering a fairly good performance, to withdraw from the contest. In any
such case the entry fee shall not be returned to the competitor.
2. There must be two competitors in all events or no first prize shall be allowed;
three competitors or no second prize shall be allowed; and four or more
competitors, or no third prize shall be allowed. There can be no award by
default. Therefore, to win any prize or trophy on the programme an actual
contest shall be necessary.
3. Pipers taking part in Bagpipe Music Competitions shall be expected to play
for competitors in the Dancing Events if requested to do so by the Director
of the Games.
4. The classification of ages in the Piping and Dancing Events shall be strictly
adhered to and enforced. Should any age be seriously challenged, written
proof of birth may be required. Any breach of this rule may disqualify a
competitor in future competitions. Any dispute which may arise shall be
investigated by the Standing Committee on Sports at a later date, and its
findings shall be final.
The Management reserves the right to refuse to accept the entry of any
single competitor, band* team or performers whatsoever that may be tendered
by letter in advance of the day on which the sports will be held, or in person
on the grounds on the day of the sports, without assigning any reason for so
doing, and any such refusal shall be final.
Competitors shall be called upon to compete in the inverse order of entry
Any competitor not responding, when called upon shall forfeit her or his
right to compete.
6. The Director may change the order of the events in the course of the day,
should he deem it advantageous to do so.
7. The Director shall have control of the grounds, and shall have full charge
and management of the events of the day.
8. The decision of the Judges shall be final in all competitions. In the Piping
and Dancing Events the Judges shall not call back any competitor for a second
trial, except in the event of a tie for first place, in which case the judges may
require the competitors who on the first trial are marked equal for first place,
to play or dance again for final decision.
9. Judges shall not be debarred from competing in any class of events in which
they are not judging.
Page Nineteen
5.
•a
d BANFF   HIGHLAND   GATHERING
BAGPIPE COMPETITIONS
(Open)
1. Piobaireachd:
1st —Gold Medal and $75.00.
2nd—$50.00.
3rd—$25.00.
Competitor in Piobaireachd shall play their choice of any one
of the following: Macintosh's Lament, MacKenzie of Applecross*
Salute, Craigellachie.
2. Marches:
1st —Gold Medal and $50.00.
2nd—$30.00.
3rd—$20.00.
Competitors in Marches shall send to the Secretary, at least one
week in advance, the name of the piece they intend to play.
3. Strathspeys and Reels:
1st —Gold Medal and $50.00.
2nd—$30.00.
3rd—$20.00.
Competitor in Strathspeys and Reels shall send to the Secretary,
at least one week in advance, the names of the pieces they intend
to play.
4. Inter-Regimental Competition (Marches) :
1st
2nd-
3rd-
-Silver Cup presented by E. W. Beatty, Esq., Chairman
and President of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and
$100.00.
-$50.00.
$25.00.
Each competitor will play his choice of the following: Leaving
Glen Urquhart, Duchess of Edinburgh, 74th Farewell to Edinburgh.
The Inter-Regimental Competition is confined to official delegate
pipers on the active strength of Highland Regiments of the Non-
Permanent Active Militia of Canada, the regimental uniforms of
such regiments being the Highland garb, conforming in every
respect to the authorized Canadian Militia regulations.
5.    Special Canadian Militia Competition (Marches):
1st —Silver Trophy and $100.00.
2nd—$50.00.
3rd—$25.00.
Open to all regimental pipers in good standing in the Active
(Non-Permanent) Militia of Canada, i.e., to pipers who are regular
members of a pipe band officially connected with any regiment or
unit of the Canadian Militia.   This is intended as competition for
the best pipe-player in the Canadian Militia, and must be won two
years in succession in order to become the property of the winner.
Entry fee 50c.
Winner in 1929—Pipe Sergeant J. K. Cairns of Hamilton, who
has to defend his title.
Page Twenty AND   SCOTTISH   MUSIC   FESTIVAL
SPECIAL ALBERTAN COMPETITION
6. Marches Strathspeys and Reels
Confined to bona fide residents of Alberta, for Challenge Cup
and  1st  Prize of  $50.00,  2nd Prize $30.00,  3rd Prize $20.00.
The Challenge Cup must be won three years in succession before
becoming the property of the winner.
Competitors must produce evidence, if necessary, of having
resided at least six months continuously in the Province of Alberta
immediately prior to the date of the competition.
Highest total number of marks given for the twro events will
decide the first, second and third places.
No entry fee.
7. Special British Empire Competition (Strathspeys
and Reels) :
1st —Silver Trophy and $100.00.
2nd—$75.00. 3rd—$50.00.
Open to Pipers resident in any part of the British Empire.
No entry fee.
8. Novice Competition:
Marches:
1st—$15.00. 2nd—$10.00. 3rd—$7.50.
Strathspeys and Reels:
Prizes same as for Marches.
Open to those who have never won a prize for such an event
in any previous contest.    A wrritten and signed statement to this
effect by the competitor,  endorsed by some responsible person,
will be required.
9. Youths' Competition:
Marches:
1st —Gold Medal and $10.00.
2nd—Silver Medal and $7.50.
3rd—Bronze Medal and $5.00.
Strathspeys and Reels:
Prizes same as for Marches.
Open to those between the ages of 16 and 21 years.   A certificate
of age must be produced endorsed by some responsible person.
10. Boys' Competition:
Marches:
1st —Gold Medal, and prize value $7.50.
2nd—Silver Medal, and prize value $5.00.
3rd—Bronze Medal, and prize value $3.00.
Strathspeys and Reels:    Prizes same as for Marches.
Open to those between 12 and 16 years of age.   A certificate of
age must be produced, endorsed by some responsible person.
Entries for Bagpipe Competition close Friday, August 22, 1930.
Entry   fees:      Competitors   in   Open   Piobaireachd,   Marches,
Strathspeys and Reels—50c each event.    Competitors in Novice
Events—25c each event.   Youths' and Boys' Events—no entry fee.
Page Twenty-one m
ER
FURTHER RULES GOVERNING BAGPIPE
COMPETITIONS
1. Piobaireachd will be regarded as an exhibition of good playing
rather than a general competition merely for place. The
maximum number of marks will be 100. To obtain a first
prize a minimum of 75 marks must be obtained; to obtain
a second prize, 60 marks; and to obtain a third prize, 50 marks.
In fixing the standard on which the credit value of 100 marks,
maximum, shall be estimated, the Judges will be understood
to give due consideration to the conditions under which piping
is pursued on this side of the Atlantic, i.e., the high standard
possible in Scotland will not be expected.
2. The number of beats per minute for Marching shall be from
85 to 90. A four-part March shall be played twice; a three-part
March twice; and two-part March twice.
3. The Strathspey and Reel, if four-part, shall be played once
over each; if three or two, twice over.
4. In all the Piping Events the maximum number of marks shall
be 100, distributed as follows:
(1) Condition of the (6) Phrasing—8.
pipes—8. (7) Time—10.
(2) Tuning—10. (8) Interpretation—15.
(3) Tone—8. (9) Expression and Feeling
(4) Accuracy—10. —15.
(5) Harmony—10. (10) Smart Appearance—6.
5. (a) In the Piping Competitions the Judges shall take into
consideration the character of the tune played—whether difficult
or easy to render. In assessing values marks shall be given
for comportment and smart appearance, correct tuning, tone
of pipes, time, fingering, rhythm, technique, interpretation of
the tune (the piper must have caught its spirit and message)
and the general musical effect.
(b) Points to be considered in marking: Tone—the chanter
shall be in perfect pitch and in complete unison with the bass
and tenor drones. Quality, modulation, etc., including a full
mellow tenor tone; clear, fairly loud, not thin and lifeless.
Phrasing—the proper metre and balance in every bar; a
melodious swing and sway to the music and the rhythmic succession of accents or tone impulses in regular order. Character
and Style—as to whether the time is easy or difficult to render;
whether the version is pleasing to the ear or otherwise. The
melody ought never to be sacrificed for mere display of deft
fingering. Technique—briefly: true fingering, the requisite
number of grace notes (and no more) correct doublings in
every movement. Marching and Posture—upright carriage
and natural swing in walking, and holding the instrument as
Page Twenty-two AND  SCOTTI
I
MUSIC  FESTIVAL
if it were part of the performer. Penalties—chokes or stops,
squeals and scratches, if incidental are minor demerits, for
which marks are to be deducted, adequate to the nature of the
mishap.
COMPETITION FOR THE BEST DRESSED
HIGHLANDER (Men only)
1st Prize, value $30; 2nd Prize, value $20; 3rd Prize, value $15.
Entry fee—50c.
Rules Governing Competition for Best Dressed Highlander
(For Men only)
Note:—Prizes   shall  be  awarded  only  for  the  plain  Highland
costume  such  as is generally worn  on  ordinary,  everyday
occasions, excluding all other forms of Highland dress.    The
following requirements shall be observed by competitors, viz.:
1. The bonnet shall be of a Highland pattern—Balmoral or
Kilmarnock—flat or Glengarry (peaked).
2. The jacket shall be of tweed material, with or without cuffs,
pocket-flaps or shoulder straps. It shall be well fitted at
the waist, short, smart in appearance, of different pattern
to that of an ordinary sack coat.
3. The waistcoat shall be of the same material as the jacket
and of moderate length.
4. The necktie shall match the colour either of the jacket or
of the kilt.
5. The kilt shall be of clan or family tartan, and each competitor
ought to wear the tartan to which he is by clan or family
entitled.
The kilt shall be worn plain—without bows or ribbons.
A silver safety pin, claw or talon pin shall be used.
6. The sporran shall be in the form of a mottled leather, or a
fur purse. When the latter is worn the head of the animal
should be mounted on the fur. The animal should be indigenous to the Scottish Highlands, such as the otter, wildcat,
badger, pole-cat or fox.
7. Ribbed worsted hose shall be worn of a colour to match that
of the jacket or of the ground colour of the kilt, with the turn
to match, generally, the high colour of the kilt. The sgian
dubh to be worn in the right-side stocking.
8. Low-cut shoes or brogues shall be worn, strong and serviceable
for walking, without buckles.
9. No ornaments except the distinguishing clan or personal
crest or the clan badge, shall be worn.
10. The harmony of the costume as a whole and the manner of
wearing it shall be taken into account by the Judges.
11. In all cases the complete dress must be the personal property
of the competitor.
Page. Twenty-three FF
GATHERING
»:-Ww::w^
Scene from "Prince Charlie and Flora"
Ballad Opera Produced at the Banff Highland Gathering, 1929
COSTUME COMPETITIONS OTHER THAN
FOR BEST DRESSED HIGHLANDER
(a)    Characters in Scottish History:
Ladies
1st Prize Value $30.00
2nd Prize Value $20.00
3rd Prize Value $15.00
Entrance fee-
Gentlemen
1st Prize Value $30.00
2nd Prize Value $20.00
3rd Prize Value $15.00
50c.
(b)    Heroes and Heroines of Scottish Song:
Ladies Gentlemen
1st  Prize Value $30.00 1st  Prize Value $30.00
2nd Prize Value $20.00 2nd Prize Value $20.00
3rd Prize Value $15.00 3rd Prize Value $15.00
Entrance fee—50c.
Judging of costumes in these competitions will be made on the
Grounds during the afternoon of September 1st.
It is planned to have a Costume Ball at the Banff Springs
Hotel on the evening of September 1st. Winners in these competitions
will receive complimentary invitation tickets to this ball.
page Twenty-four AND
TT
IC  FESTIVAL
HIGHLAND DANCING
1. Highland Fling:
(a) Competitors under 10 years of age.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
The J. H. Woods Silver Cup is offered for the
competitor gaining the highest number of points in this
class, cup to be won two years in succession before
becoming the property of the winner.
(b) Competitors 10 to under 13 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(c) Boys 13 to under 16 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(d) Girls 13 to under 16 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(e) Competitors 16 years and over.
1st —Gold Medal and $15.00.
2nd—Silver Medal and $10.00.
3rd—Bronze Medal and $8.00.
2. Seann Triubhas :
(a) Competitors under 10 years of age.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(b) Competitors 16 years and over.
1st —Gold Medal and $15.00.
2nd—Silver Medal and $10.00.
3rd—Bronze Medal and $8.00.
3. Sword Dance:
(a) Competitors 10 to under
13 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(b) Competitors 13 to under
16 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(c) Competitors   16   years
and over.
1st —Gold Medal and $15.00.
2nd—Silver Medal and $10.00.
3rd—Bronze Medal and $8.00.
4. Sailor's Hornpipe:
Competitors   16   years
and over.
1st —Gold Medal and $15.00.
2nd—Silver Medal and$10.00.
3rd—Bronze Medal and $8.00.
5. Scotch Reel:
Competitors   16    years
and over.
1st—Gold Medal and $15.00.
2nd—Silver Medal and$10.00. Jean Gauid
3rd—Bronze Medal and$8.00. of Regina
Page Twenty-five
■:^ymmm.yyyy^yy- BANFF
H L
6.    Irish Jig:
(a) Competitors under 10 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(b) Competitors 10 to under 13 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(c) Competitors 13 to under 16 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(d) Competitors 16 years and over.
1st —Gold Medal and $15.00.
2nd—Silver Medal and $10.00.
3rd—Bronze Medal and $8.00.
Note:—Competitors in all dancing events under 16 years of
age must bring certificate as to their age, endorsed by some
responsible person.
RUTHVEN-STUART CHALLENGE CUP FOR
ADULT HIGHLAND DANCING
This cup must be won by the same person three years in succession to be wron outright. A replica of the cup will be presented to
the winner each year.
Offered for the best all-round dancer in the open events, 16 years
old and over (special event competitions excluded). Total number
of marks to count.
Special Events
Eightsome Reel:
(a) Open to teams of competitors 10 to under 16 years.
1st  Team Prizes—Value $5.00 each.
2nd Team Prizes—Value $3.00 each.
(b) Open to teams of competitors 16 years and over.
1st  Team Prize—$60.00.
2nd Team Prize—$40.00.
Irish Jig :
(a)
(b)
Open to teams of competitors 10 to under 16 years.
(Team to consist of three couples.)
1st  Team Prizes—Value $5.00 each.
2nd Team Prizes—Value $3.00 each.
Open to teams of competitors 16 years and over.
(Team to consist of three couples.)
1st  Team Prize—$48.00.
2nd Team Prize—$30.00.
Rules:—These events shall be judged for team work only.
Unless otherwise decided at the time of the competition, at least
two male competitors must be members of the team. No competitor shall be allowed to compete in more than one team in any
one class.
Page Twenty-six TTISH   M
9 1 I V #\ lv
J. D. McARA CHALLENGE CUP FOR ALBERTA DANCERS
Highland Fling, 16 years and over
Sword Dance, 16 years and over
Seann Triubhas, 16 years and over
Confined to bona fide residents of Alberta, for the J. D. McAra
Challenge Cup and 1st Prize of $15.00, 2nd Prize $10.00, 3rd
Prize $8.00.
The Challenge Cup must be won three years in succession before
becoming the property of the winner.
Competitors must produce evidence, if necessary, of having
resided at least six months continuously in the Province of Alberta
immediately prior to the date of the competition.
Highest total number of marks given for the three events will
decide the first, second and third places.
Entry fees: 16 years and over—50c each event; under 16 years
of age, and special events—no entry fee.
Entries positively close Friday, August 22, 1930.
Lieut.-Governor Hon. R. R. Bruce with Col. Alexander Fraser at the Prize Table
Page Twenty-seven BANFF    HIGHLAND
ATHERING
HIGHLAND DANCING
Highland Fling.
1. Correct position, time, number of steps, i.e., six steps in
consecutive order, executed accurately with ease and good
taste, as to graceful, restrained movement, will determine the
values on which marks shall be given.
Seann Triubhas.
2. The very essence of this dance is grace and beauty of movement, the gentle, graceful sway of the body as a whole must
be in perfect harmony with the dance steps. The dance shall
be presented in correct position, time and step. The
introduction of steps foreign to the dance, such as hornpipes
or jigs, shall count heavily against the competitor.
Sword Dance.
3. Shall be danced over a cross formed by placing a naked sword
across its sheath at right angles, the point of intersection being
equally distant from the point and hilt of the sword, and from
both ends of the sheath. Correct position, time, steps and
spirited execution shall be the main requirements. Correct
position shall apply to the position of the body as a whole
as well as to that of the legs and feet in executing the steps.
The body should not bend unduly forward, nor should it be
stiffly erect.   Ease and accuracy of execution are basic.
Should a competitor touch or displace the sword or sheath
one-third of his credit marks shall be deduced. To touch
three times shall disqualify him altogether.
Nothing in this Rule (except the disqualification) shall be
construed so as to preclude a competitor from taking first,
or a higher place, over others who by dancing wide of the
sword and sheath have reduced the risk of touching the same
to a minimum. Undue importance shall not attach to the
first touch of a competitor who may dance closer in and around
the cross.
Scotch Reel.   (Foursome.)
4. The outline of the figure eight shall be observed. Two steps,
Highland fling and four reel steps shall be danced.
Sailor's Hornpipe.
5. Correct Sailor's Costume (boys), dancing slippers with flat
soles (heelless) shall be worn. Hornpipe steps only (traditional
Jack o' Tar steps) are admissible. Jig steps shall be counted
as seridus errors, but need not altogether disqualify an otherwise
good performer. Hauling, heaving and pulling movements
ought to be natural as in actual work and expressive of real
action. The opening and closing steps should not be marred
by excessive action, neither ought they to be spiritless.
Note:
1.    In the Highland Fling, Seann Triubhas, Reels, etc., the raised
foot (vertical position) shall not in any of the step movements
touch the front or back of the supporting leg.
Page Twenty-eight H  M
2
4.
5.
6.
Marking values shall be: Accuracy, 20 marks; Execution, 15
marks; Style, 15 marks; Gracefulness, 12 marks; Position, 15
marks; Time, 15 marks; General Appearance, 8 marks. Total,
100 marks.
Correct Costume: Competitors in all Highland events shall
appear in correct Highland costume.
Boys' dress would be decidedly incorrect for girls. As some
girls, however, may be unprepared to wear proper dresses in
this respect, such will be permitted this year to appear as
formerly, but after this year it is hoped girl competitors will
be prepared to come in correct costume. A kilted tartan skirt
and a middy of light material with tartan favours would be
appropriate. ,.    .;■■„.,,    -,
No medals shall be worn by any competitor m the Highland
events—dancing, piping or dress—while performing or exhibiting, on the platform.
In the Seann Triubhas, Sword Dance, there shall be danced
six slow and two quick steps; in the Sailor's Hornpipe, six
steps shall be danced.
Marks shall be awarded in the Scots' Reel and Eightsome Reel:
Accuracy, 50 marks; Gracefulness, 20 marks; Appearance, 10
marks; Time, 20 marks. The same steps in the same sequence
shall be danced by all the competitors in Reels.
Where Burns and His Cronies Foregathered
Page Twenty-nine 0 \   I   I  I C* l\ 1
^ i
 3i&*£ul <
"4
' \
ft
F
Robert Burns
Whose songs will be featured in the Scottish Music Festival which forms part of this
Banff Highland Gathering. The Concerts will include a ballad opera, "The Ayrshire
Ploughman," libretto by J. S. Middleton, harmonization by Healey Willan — also Burns'
Cantata "The Jolly Beggars," newly revised with the original melodies, newly scored
for solo voices, chorus and orchestra by M. Wood Hill.
Portrait from a Lithograph Reproduced by courtesy of the Montreal Burns' Memorial
Statue Committee.
Page Thirty SCOTTI
SCOTTISH SONG COMPETITIONS
Saturday, August 29, 1930
(J. Campbell Mclnnes—Adjudicator)
(a) Open to Girls and Boys, 12 Years of Age and Under:'
1st  Prize—Gold Medal and $7.50.
2nd Prize—$5.00.
Girls to sing- "A Wee Bird cam' to our Ha' Door," or (for lower
pitched voices) "Will ye no Come Back Again."
Boys to sing "The Blue Bells of Scotland."
A certificate of age must be produced, endorsed by some
responsible person.
(b) Adult Competition:
1st  Prize (in Six Classes)—Each Gold Medal and $10.00.
2nd Prize (in Six Classes)—Each $7.50.
Ladies:    Soprano—"My Heart is Sair for Somebody;" Mezzo-
Soprano—"Caller   Herrin';"    Contralto—"The   Banks   of   Allan
Water."
Gentlemen: Tenor—"Macgregor's Gathering;" Baritone—
"Scots Wha Hae;" Bass—"The Flowers o' the Forest."
(c) Duet—Juvenile Equal Voices:
(Two boys or two girls or boy and girl.)
1st  Prize—Medal and $7.50 each.
2nd Prize—$5.00 each.
Test Piece—"O Wert Thou in the Cauld Blast." (Mendelssohn.)
(d) Duet—Unequal Voices:
(Soprano and tenor or contralto and baritone.)
1st  Prize—Medal and $10.00 each.
2nd Prize—$7.50 each.
Test Piece—"Huntingtower."
(e) Special Gaelic Song Competition:
1st  Prize—Medal and $10.00.
2nd Prize—$7.50.
Test Piece—to be sung in Gaelic—"Fear a' Bhata"  (O My
Boatman).
(f) Character Song:
Ladies Gentlemen
1st  Prize—Medal and $10.00.      1st  Prize—Medal and $10.00.
2nd Prize—$7.50. 2nd Prize—$7.50.
Ladies to sing "Comin' thro the Rye."
Men to sing "The Laird o' Cockpen."
WALTER SCOTT CHALLENGE TROPHY
Presented by Walter Scott, Esq., of New jYork City. To be
held for one year by the singer considered most worthy by the
Adjudicator. Must be won three years in succession to be retained
permanently.
Entrance fee for adults, 25 cents; for juveniles under 12, free.
For entry forms apply J. W. Jenkinson, Secretary.
Page Thirty-one F
LAND
T
Brownie Peebles
Canadian mezzo-soprano, formerly
of the American Opera Company,
prima donna in the Chautauqua
Opera Association, 1930, and soloist
with the Chautauqua Symphony
Orchestra and New York Oratorio
Society. Will sing in the comedy
of Scottish Music at the Banff
Highland Gathering.
J. Campbell Mclnnes
Brownie Peebles
J. Campbell Mclnnes
Scottish-Canadian baritone of international celebrity. Will supervise
the Scottish diction and take part
in the two ballad operas planned
for this Highland Gathering. Will
also adjudicate in the Scottish
Song Competition.
Communications and Entries in connection with the
Athletic and Highland Events should be sent to—
J. W. JENKINSON,
Secretary, Banff Highland Gathering,
Banff Springs Hotel,
Banff, Alberta.
Page Thirty-two BANFF
on the 18 th hole at Banff
in the Canadian Ifycfces
A month will do
wonders for your golf!
Champions gather here for a new mm. \\\
thriiL Three sets of tees to choose --^''"
from. The novice has as much fun
as the expert! A few minutes
walk... and you are back at Banff
Springs Hotel. Plunge into its sun'
splashed, warm sulphur pool...
try out the splendid tennis
courts ... dance to the gayest of
music. A Light Opera Company 0.. in
July and August, with delightful concert
talent. And, oh, those rides up winding
trails . . . right to a sunset on a snow*
capped peak! Stay the season. Attractive
rates by the month. You go there on a
fast Canadian Pacific train I
Prince of Wales Trophy . . . Golf
Tournament, August 18-23, eligible
to guests of the hotel. Other competitions from week to week.
CanadianEidflc
world's    greatest    travel   system
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
Indian Days
July 22, 24
Official Trail Rides
4 Days
July 31—Aug. J
10 Days
Aug. 7—Aug. 16
Highland Gathering
Aug. 29—Sept. 1 J^vl^
«uttp
£y;7S!;*££'^
?.-;^^-.r,.>^v..,^?:^.^-i,^;.^;^•,•.■ (i^^^M^M^^^f^^^M
..„.-;-:;.';•/>;0;,
. ■..:■■>:::■■.':---:•
:-:;r:':;-:0>:>;:v'>:':J.-:0:-:
■:..:.        . ■:   .   .    .
''■'.      "   ■'■   ■;-."';■'■'. :■
■
......     ■.. ■    .
'.-.. . ". ';■-..■:. .
■::.-■-:■:;: :-::.;-:.;;,:.■:.;:■:-:
:::■•■:::■■-3: ;■-;;-:;:■:-:;;■■:-:::■-;.■:
mp-m
.:-■:   ■.   ..   . ■ ■..    . ■
:.:::.:.     .    :.■-■.
■■.:■■■    .      .■-.■ :-■: ■:-
■■    .    ..   ■
■
i:;.:;.-;;;;-:;::--:;;.vi;.-/i.';;
■
.    :   . .-:..: ::■:
::ymm^ymm^
■■..-.    . ■    ■:    .■-.■■■
I
I
1
S3':
:;-.;:V;
Bra
'::■:-:• ■;■;.:■;■•.; V.\ •.'';0.';.V.-".-;.-'..';'-';. V:;.';;.'/;;,-;;-
.   .   .
mm.        $m
rHtiiiriiittifiSfilfttifn-.
;:-..;:■;; --.-v.-v. ,■,,■■,-...■.;,;,■.. v.; .-,,■...■ ■.-.■;-•;-_ ■-■.'_■■■,-;_-..■.-.-■-.:_•■.■■., -.;■•■•-:,■-.;;•;■;• <v ■.,■>,_■■.:_-v.
-•■:.•■
:■'•:■■: .::
mm:y:m:y
yyyyy ■■■■■■■■
y- ■
f
;yyyyy
ISIS
■ 'y-;y-;y--yy::yyy..
.    ■
mm
Hi
^s
Hi
s
.JtPL-t-
• c        '   i
-.■...    :       v .:.. ■.  '   ■.■■  .   .-.■'.   .    ■' .  .    : .■■■.■..■.■'■■■'.
ymmy
■
sr   '    _^,
HH
ililf
m
OT"TO-raatSK'. ■ '■"■TSWattHtSn
■■;■  . .■.:,.■ ■.    ■   ■■... '/
lill
:'rti.V.-.'-';::.:r.«V-
3S1
gSr'Asp
Hs^^^fe
.-rfe;.
t; ••/':■•/■ ■■■^
:"•:';:■; \:'.-:;:-:>;:':;-:'>. :•■:;■;■'■:

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.chungtext.1-0226232/manifest

Comment

Related Items