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Highland Gathering and Scottish Music Festival Canadian Pacific Railway Company; Leader-Post, Regina; Devon, James; Fraser, James Alexander 1931

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 .     v, v- , JWH. u , A ,■*-    r   ■* Vx1
-... aug. 2y
Printed in Canada, 193t BANFF      HIGHLAND      GATHERING
The serrated peaks of the Canadian  Rockies form a  glorious  background for the
Banff  Highland   Gathering.
ONCE  AGAIN  AT BANFF
Ready as the Scot may be to emigrate to other lands, there is
no one who clings so firmly to the traditions of his race, and among
those traditions there is none more vigorously upheld than that of
athletic prowess — so necessary in olden days to clansmen whose
livelihood came from fighting and hunting. The games which are
peculiarly Scottish are games of leaping and of vaulting, putting the
shot, throwing the hammer, tossing the caber and quoiting. The Scot
has also traditions of music—the music of song and of the pipes.
With the pipes go two traditions, those of war and of peace—of
marches and of dancing—the reels, flings and seann triubhas. Add
to these the tradition of costume—the tartan coloured fabrics, the
kilts and the bonnets. Set these in an amphitheatre of mountains and
you have the makings of a Scottish Highland Gathering.
It is just four years ago that the first Highland Gathering was
staged at Banff, in the Canadian Rockies, but already it is firmly
established as a national festival. For the Scot is everywhere to be
found in Western Canada. He is the original old-timer, for it was
a Scot, Sir Alexander Mackenzie, who made the first expedition across
the Canadian Rockies to the Pacific Coast and the fur-trade which
blazed the trails through the West was mainly in Scottish hands.
The Scot was the pioneering settler and took a great hand in the
creation and upbuilding of the Canadian Pacific Railway. He is still
a dynamic factor in the trade,**industry and commerce of the West.
The  struggle  to  overcome the wilderness left  little time at first  for
Page two AND     SCOTTISH     MUSIC     FESTIVAL
games on any large scale, but when the Highland Gathering did come
to Banff, the Scots of Western Canada rolled up in their thousands
to attend and take part, the pipes skirled, the dancers danced, the
kilts swung and there was a brave array of tartans in the forest
clearing under the serrated peaks of these grim, gray Rockies. In
the ballroom of the towering Banff Springs Hotel, the ballads of the
old Scottish harpers, the songs of the Jacobites, the songs of Burns
and Lady Nairn, the folksongs of the Hebrides and of the Highlands
were rendered by the finest singers in Canada—Marjory Kennedy-
Fraser herself came two years ago from Edinburgh with her sister
to interpret her work to Canadian Scots. Most impressive of all,
at each of the four Gatherings there has been an open-air service,
conducted by Ralph Connor, the well known Canadian preacher-
novelist.
The Fifth Highland Gathering at Banff will be held this Summer
of 1931, from August 27-30—once again under the distinguished patronage of His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales. It will be formally
opened  by   H.R.H.   Prince   Sukhodaya  of   Siam.      With  the  consent
Birdseye  view  of   the  Highland  Gathering  from   the   Banff   Springs  Hotel,   1930.
The photographs of Banff and the Highland Gathering in this booklet are by the
Associated Screen News Co., Montreal.
Page three BANFF      HIGHLAND      GATHERING
of the Hon. Donald M. Sutherland, Minister of National Defence,
delegate pipers from the seventeen Highland Regiments in Canada
will compete for the Challenge Cup offered by E. W. Beatty, Chairman and President of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and other valuable
trophies and prizes are offered in open competition to these and other
pipers. In Highland dancing the medal of the Banff Gathering is
coming to be recognized as hallmark of supremacy and draws its
competitors from all over Canada. The Provincial Track and Field
Championships of Alberta will be decided on Saturday, August 29th.
There will be a Competition in Scottish Song for a trophy presented
by Walter Scott, of New York. During the evenings there will be
wonderful concerts of Scottish music interpreted by outstanding singers,
Best   Dressed   Highlanders   at   Banff,   1930.
such as Robert Burnett, Scotland's foremost baritone; Madame Jeanne
Dusseau, Canadian soprano; Theodore Webb, a Canadian baritone
who has made a great name for himself in radio; Mary Stewart,
another brilliant  Canadian  soprano  and  many  others.
Two ballad operas dealing with Prince Charlie will be presented—
one entitled "Prince Charming" with songs specially arranged by Dr.
Ernest MacMillan, Principal of the Toronto Conservatory of Music
at Toronto, and the other "Prince Charlie and Flora" with very
beautiful settings of  Highland melodies,  by Dr.  Healey Willan.
It will indeed be a wonderful Gathering.    Don't miss it!
Page four AND     SCOTTISH     MUSIC     FESTIVAL
Pipe-Major   Gillies   has  a   new   pupil.
Page five BANFF      HIGHLAND      GATHERING
ON A SCOTTISH GATHERING
(Regina  Leader-Post—September  2,   1930)
Out at Banff these days there is quite a convention going on, involving oatmeal porridge, piping,
Scottish dancing, and a campaign to get certain
people to admit that the Scots are reasonably competent in looking out for themselves. The Canadian
Pacific Railway, which is sponsoring what has come
to be a great Annual Highland Gathering, fits into
the picture without trouble, for the Canadian Pacific
Railway owes  something to  the  Scot,  provided,  of
course, it has not already
been collected. Donald
Smith and George Mount
Stephen, brother Scots,
helped the C.P.R. to get
on its feet and naturally
enough managed to help
themselves to a little in
the process. This is an
entirely logical and business-like    arrangement—
A.  W. Durham
Hector   Macdonald
helping the other fellow
and helping yourself at
the same time.
We imagine that
when the Banff Festival,
held in the lee of the
hills where night falls
with a sombre gloom
that puts hill people
in community with the
great mystic forces of
the   universe,   has   come
to its end, the thing to be remembered by the visitors
will be the pipers. We are not sure how many there
will be, probably a hundred. They will be wearing
the proud Highland dress, with the cocked feather
in the bonnet, and a bit of "braggart in the step," as
the Highland song has it. Other races have their
games, other races have their national dances. These
are thing of the passing day, but a hundred pipers
together, stepping jauntily on a level parade ground
or piping up a valley, make a sight that is not forgotten.    It is  something for the eternal memory.
Page six
Pipe-Major   Clarke
of the Royal  Scots. AND     SCOTTISH     MUSIC     FESTIVAL
The  Hon.   R.   R.   Bruce,   Lt.-Gov.   of   British   Columbia,   accompanied  by  Hon.   Dr.
W.   Egbert,   Lt.-Gov.   of  Alberta,   makes   a   tour  of   inspection.
One hundred pipers playing together give the test whether there
is Scottish blood in your veins or whether you are a complete outsider.
To the one it is music, story, fire, sorrow, history, dead men pitched
headlong on far battlefields, moss-grown burying grounds in odd
corners of the earth. To the one who isn't of the race it is just a
lot of noise,  and not too pleasant a noise at that.
The playing of the bagpipes is a serious business. To attempt
to be jocular with a man blowing the pipes is to be looking for an
early grave. One of the finest and most vivid bits of fictional writing
about pipe playing is found in Stevenson, where the gay, gallant
Allan Breck, and the young MacGregor, the son of Rob Roy, agree
to settle who is the best man by piping instead of with their swords.
The proud Allan was a skilled piper but the piping of MacGregor,
who was able to interpolate the most entrancing grace notes, broke
Allan Breck's heart, especially wThen MacGregor played a piece that
was a favourite of Allan's clan. "You have more music in your
sporran than I have in my head," Allan remarks to his opponent.
It would be a shame to use the sword on such a player, he adds.
And so the quarrel is forgotten, and late into the night they sit,
with piping, and; perhaps, with more piping.
Which we suspect is what is happening at Banff this very minute.
Page seven BANFF      HIGHLAND      GATHERING
ON SCOTTISH SONG
By  James  Devon
President Scottish Burns Club, Glasgow and Edinburgh.
An old song survives because, in some way, its appeal continues
through the years. If it depends for its preservation merely on
associations connected with it, time will destroy it with the death of
those who were attached to it; but if it charms the ear, moves the
heart, and stills the soul of succeeding generations, it will renew
its youth in spite of changes of fashion. A song is not good because
it is old.    It is old because it is good.
The Scots are a small nation, but they have a great store of
excellent songs. Many of the tunes to which the songs are sung are
known by people who are ignorant of the words. The tunes are the
best of some of them; but there are hundreds which, in words and
music, are worth the fame they have. Burns wrote words to scores
of tunes that had been in existence long before his day, and lesser
poets have done likewise. These tunes were played, and the songs
were sung by the people in town and country. Some were greater
favourites in one part of the country than in another. Others were
little known outside special districts. Those that are the peculiar
possession of the Highlands and Islands have lately been collected,
and have obtained an extended circulation. The songs were not written
for the modern Concert Room. The like of it did not exist. They
were written for people generally, and were sung by all ranks at
social and friendly gatherings. No doubt they would often be badly
sung, and many of the singers would be without the rudiments of
musical instruction; but in those ruder days the limitations of singers
were as keenly appreciated as they are in our time, and they were
brought home to them in a straightforward, and even a brutal way,
which is not common nowadays. Everybody might know a number
of songs, but few were permitted to sing them in public. John might
sing this one, and Sandy that, and Andra this other; but it was
because he had proved he could do it better than the others. He was
not puffed up writh the notion that he was therefore the best singer
in the company. Each had his pre-eminence granted in one direction.
One result was that men and women did often shew a skill in rendering one or two songs which surprised anybody who heard them try to
sing others.    The range and variety of the songs partly explains this.
In broadcasts (as on St. Andrew's Night or a Burns' Celebration)
I always look to Robert Burnett as my mainstay. It is not because
he has a well-established and well-earned reputation on the Concert
platform, and is acknowledged to interpret music as only an artist
can, whether it be Oratorio or Lyrics. It is because he enters into
the spirit of Scottish song and does not mar the beauty of its simplicity, or tarnish its appeal, by attempting to elaborate.    He shows the
Page eight AND     SCOTTISH     MUSIC     FESTIVAL
lily. He does not paint it. He
gives refined gold and does not
gilt it. There is no danger of
him drowning sweet sentiment in
sticky glucose, or trailing a lament
through a decoction of bitter aloes.
"The song's the thing," and he sings
it; believing that its own beauty will
carry it off, without any artificial
graces. I have never had to fear
that the simple pathos of "Ae Fond
Kiss" would, in his rendering, become a lachrymose wail, or the
tender and fervid appeal of "The
Lea Rig" be lost in a display of
vocal gymnastics; or "Mary Mori-
son" become dropsical with suppressed tears; or "The Wee, Wee
German Lairdie" lose in bitter con^
tempt; "Duncan Gray" fail in pawky
and humorous observation. The very
living   spirit   of   "Scots   Wha   Hae" Robert Burnett
and  "A  Man's  A  Man  For A'  that," celebrated      Scottish      baritone,
he   can   evoke   with   a   birr   that   is        ™ho is *om™s ^omfl?Sc^1d toA
*       j   •      ,i       i r   1 •     1 sing    at    the     Banff     Highland
echoed m the  breast oi his hearers. Gathering,  1931.
Indeed    I    have    never   listened    to
him and been disappointed, and I have tried him through all the
range and variety of Scottish song. He is not only a first rate artist
but he is master of a larger field than any other I know. I have
never had the reputation of being an easy taskmaster, either to myself
or others, and I have been as much surprised as pleased to find that
in anything he undertook, large or small, he took endless pains to
master it thoroughly. If he did not succeed in doing so to his own
satisfaction, he would put it aside even though I were satisfied, until
he got it to please him. In my opinion he is the best living exponent
of Scottish song. That is why, when I broadcast on the subject,
I always have made it a condition that I should have him sing, and
have put all the difficult work on him.
Robert Burnett has appeared as Soloist at the Queen's Hall
Symphony Concerts, London Symphony Orchestra, Albert Hall Concerts, London Ballad Concerts, Brighton Musical Festival, Halle
Concerts, Manchester, Liverpool Philharmonic Concerts, Scottish
Orchestra Concerts, Sheffield Musical Society Concerts and many other
Festivals. He is recognized as the leading interpreter of Scottish Song
in Scotland, and his presence at the Banff Highland Gathering is
anticipated with the keenest interest by lovers of Scottish Song
throughout North America.
Page nine BANFF      HIGHLAND      GATHERING
The    Covenanter   Service,    Banff   Highland   Gathering,    1930,   conducted   by   the
Rev.  Charles  W.  Gordon   (Ralph  Connor)   at the Devil's  Cauldron.
AT THE DEVIL'S CAULDRON
♦k* V£^, imPr.es5ve *s the °Pen"air service held at an old pot-hole under
ThP  *2J°Tw iMOlw    ^Un,dle  formerly known  as  the  Devil's  Cauldron
^ i??u   9J1^rles  W*   Gordon   (Ralph  Connor)   conducts  this  service  at
which the Calgary Scottish Choir leads in the singing of the psalms  of
the Covenanters.    Writing of these psalms in the Scots Year Book   J   A
Anderson  says:    -As  he  heard  the  strains  of  Kilmarnock—that  old'air
i 4 11    mt of the wmd and the sea—Martyrdom—Our Lady of Sorrows
and Ballerma—soothing as a mother singing to her bairn at the darkening-—the writer felt how good it was to sing the old songs.    By a simple
mental process it  carried his  mind back to  the  days when  the  psalms
were   the   inspiration   of   a   movement   that   found   a   nation's   soul     No
&wM^ea? <^e men.of ,the Covenant lightly spoken of. 'Hill
Men. Wild Whigs, Cameronians' or whatever contemptuous name th^v
were known by, these names have long been held in honour and rever-
"The psalms were their inspiration and their hope, their consolation
and encouragement.    The singing of these Covenanting psalms sets the
Page ten AND     SCOTTISH     MUSIC     FESTIVAL
blood on fire, and conjures up a whole army of rugged men. One can
see them—strapping hillmen with their plaids flying in the wind—marching under the blue banner of conscience, crossing the wine-red moor
where the whaups are crying, with set faces and the light of eternity
in their eyes. In their psalms we can hear the exultant cry of battle—
the clash and clang of arms—the song of men who are willing to die
for their faith, but not to die cravenly. For two generations the men of
the Covenant were hunted and persecuted like the wild beasts of the
field. They left home and comfort, left kindred and possessions, all that
made life sweet and gladsome, in order that their Kirk might be free
and their bairns left to worship God as their conscience dictated. In
the end and at long last they won, and the royal race that had sought
to impose an alien worship on them and rob them of their souls was
driven   out  utterly."
Long before the Reformation, in order to encourage singing, Seminaries were established in all the principal towns throughout Scotland
for the practice of music. Undej the name of Sang Schules vocal music
was taught on scientific principles, and for many years the influence of
these "Schules" was felt. The importance of good singing was so deeply
impressed on the people that in 1579 the subject was deemed fit for
special legislation, the Scots Parliament decreeing that every parish
should  have   a   "Sang   Schule."
The schoolmaster was usually the singing teacher and he also acted
as precentor or lettergae in the Sunday services. The lettergae had been
an important functionary in the pre-reformation church and was a
celebrated personage indeed.    Allan Ramsay sings of him as:
The lettergae  of haly rhyme
Sat up at the board hedd
An' a* he said was thocht a crime
To ^contradict indeed.
The name lettergae simply means letting goi the tune. He occupied
lectern or lettern and was the precentor or leader of psalmody. Unaccompanied singing, until within recent years, was the rule in the
Scottish Kirk. "A Kist o' Whussels," as the organ was contemptuously
termed, was a thing abhorrent in the young days of many people still
living. Earlier still not even a pitchfork was used. "They sang by the
licht o* nature," as one old precentor had it. The best precentor was
he who could strike the reading so that its final tone was the key on
which he raised the psalm. There were no choirs as we know them, but
there were usually one or two good singers who helped the precentor with
the   psalmody.
Dancing   Competition   at   the   Banff   Highland   Gathering,   1930.
Page eleven BANFF      HIGHLAND      GATHERING
HIGHLAND DRESS FOR LADIES
By Col. James Alexander Fraser, LL.D.
women
As far back as we can trace the records of our past, Scottish
Highland and Lowland — gave much attention to their
garments. In the higher walks of Clan life the ladies were noted
for the style and elegance of their wearing apparel. The tartan skirt,
sometimes flounced; the well-fitted bodice or firmly flanged middy,
the colours of which varied from the crotul-brown to the deep-hued
saffron ; the pliant cuaran ;
the tilted cap and feather,
make up an attire beautiful
and becoming. The ladies
of the Clan were the peers
of their sisters in France
in the matter of dress
design, and were but slightly
affected by foreign modes.
As a rule they had an instinctive feeling for the fitness of things. A native
garb was to them a garb
which adapted itself to
native conditions, such as
climate, and the seasonal
changes consequent on different avocations, pastimes,
social functions or domestic
usages. Queen Victoria, to
whom Highland customs
owe much, delighted to
speak and write about the
costumes of the Highland
women, and did much to
encourage the wearing of
the distinctive Highland
Dress by them on suitable occasions. Her own
daughters and granddaugh-
fine example.
The    two    Lieut.-Governors    of    Alberta
and    B.C.    join   hands.
ters, too, with her warm approval, set a
A Highland Gathering is not a vaudeville show, and responsible
committees are moving for a gradual return to correct girls' dresses
at their annual competitions. Already such outstanding places as
Balmoral and Braemar have ruled out the incorrect dress altogether;
Cowal is more or less in line; so are Toronto and other centres of
Caledonian Games.
Page twelve *
AND     SCOTTISH     MUSIC     FESTIVAL
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Page thirteen BANFF      HIGHLAND      GATHERING
PROGRAMME OF ATHLETIC EVENTS
.   .. ]
(Under  the auspices  of the  Banff  Amateur Athletic Association) „
Friday, August 28th, 1931
Commencing at  1.30 p.m.
OPEN TO ALL CANADA
A.A.U. of Canada Rules to govern.
1st Prize in each event value $20.00, 2nd Prize value $15.00,  and
3rd Prize value $10.00.
100 Yards Run Throwing 56 lb. Weight for
440 Yards Run Height
880 Yards Run Throwing 28 13. Weight'for
Hop, Step and Jump Distance
Throwing 16 lb. Hammer Putting 16 lb. Shot
Throwing 56 lb. Weight for Tossing the Caber
Distance Pole Vault
Entry   fee—25  cents   each   event
ALBERTA SENIOR TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS
(Alberta Branch of A.A.U. of C.)
Saturday, August 29th, 1931
Commencing at  1.30 p.m.
ist Prize Gold Medal, 2nd Prize Silver Medal, 3rd Prize Bronze
Medal.    (Emblematic  of  Championship  of Alberta.)
100 Yards Run Running High Jump
220 Yards Run Running Broad Jump
440 Yards Run Throwing 16 lb. Hammer
880 Yards Run Putting 16 lb. Shot
One Mile Run Throwing Discus
Three AIilE Run Javelin Throw
Six Mile Run One Mile Relay Race
120 Yards  Hurdles (4 x 440 yards)
10 flights 3 ft. 6 in.) 440 Yards Relay Race
Pole  Vault (4 x iio yards)
Entry   fee—50  cents  each   event. I|
SPECIAL  EVENTS
Saturday, August 29th, 1931
Tug of War  (Without Cleats)  Open
Seven  Men  and  Captain,   12  foot  Pull.
ist Prize—Trophy, with miniatures to members of winning team
and prizes to the total value of $100.00 divided among the members
of the team.
Page f out teen rv AND     SCOTTISH     MUSIC     FESTIVAL
■>■■.■■.■:•:•:•:•:■
Throwing   the   16-lb.   Hammer.
Tossing  the   Caber.
2nd Prize—Prizes to the total value of $75.00 divided among the
members of the team. ►-."■■
Entry fee—$1.00 per team.
A.A.U.  of  Canada Rules to govern.
Names of members of the team, with addresses, must be filled in
on the entry form and sent to the Secretary, Banff Highland Gathering,
Banff Springs Hotel, Banff, Alberta, not later than Thursday, August
20th,  1931.
NOVELTY EVENTS
100 Yards Sack Race     Entry fee—25 cents.
100 Y'ard Walking Race
Confined to competing Pipers in costume.    Competitors must
play the Bagpipes while in the race.    Entries taken on the Grounds.
Entry free.
LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR R. R. BRUCE'S TROPHY
For the best Aggregate in the following Open Events:
Throwing 16 lb. Hammer Throwing 56 lb. Weight for
Putting 16 lb. Shot Height
Throwing 56 lb. Weight for     Throwing 28 lb. Weight for
Distance Distance
Tossing the Caber
Trophy to be won two years in succession before becoming the
property of the winner.
Points will be awarded as follows: ist, 5 points; 2nd, 3 points;
3rd,  1 point.
Page fifteen BANFF      HIGHLAND      GATHERINGfAND     SCOTTISH     MUSIC     FESTIVAL
m
L.   R.   Wilson
(Vancouver)
■:•:■:•:•:•:•:•:•: yvsyyyyyyyyyyyyy
. ..
yyysyy.yyyyyyyy
■ .    ,:.
yyyyyyy.wi^yyyyy.-
yyWiiim
yy-yy-y
.S..S.'..S ...
Rose   McCool
(Calgary)
The  Irish  Jig.
Phyllis   Moorhead
(Medicine Hat)
Cathie  Kemp
(Calgary)
Tina  Thomson
(Fernie,   B.C.)
The Highland Fling.
Page sixteen
The   Sailors'    Hornpipe.
HIGHLAND DANCES AT BANFF GATHERING.
Page seventeen BANFF      HIGHLAND      GATHERING
RULES GOVERNING ATHLETIC EVENTS
Entries must be accompanied with the entry fee in all cases.
Entries positively close Thursday, August 20th,   1931.
Entry forms for all events can be obtained from the Secretary,
Banff Highland Gathering, Banff Springs Hotel, Banff, Alberta.
Competitors must have their amateur cards for the current year
before being allowed to compete. All competitors in events under
A.A.U.  of  Canada Rules must represent  some club.
Competitors must wear complete clothing from the shoulder to
within five inches of the knees,  e.g., jerseys and loose drawers.
There must be two competitors in all events or no first
prize shall be allowed; three
competitors or no second prize
shall be allowed; and four or
more   competitors  or  no  third |
prize shall be allowed.    There |
can be no award by default.
Therefore, to win any prize or
trophy on the programme an
actual contest shall be necessary. *
The Management reserves
the right to refuse to accept
the entry of any single competitor that may be tendered
by letter in advance of the day
on which the sports will be
held, or in person on the
grounds on the day of the
sports, without assigning any
reason for so doing, and any
such refusal shall be final.
The Director may change
the order of the events in the
course of the day, should he
deem it advantageous to do so.
The Director shall have
control of the grounds, and
shall have full charge and
management of the events of
the day.
Prizes will be presented at
the close of each day.
The Management will not
be responsible for any unclaimed prizes. Pole  Vault.
Page eighteen AND     SCOTTISH     MUSIC     FESTIVAL
British Columbia High School Team at Banff, with Lt.-Gov. R. R. Bruce in centre.
QUOITING
Saturday, August 29th, 1931
Commencing at 8.30 a.m.
Quoiting Handicap  (Open Singles)   18 Yards
ist Prize—Trophy, and Prize value $30.00
2nd Prize—Value $20.00
3rd Prize—Value $15.00
4th Prize—Value $10.00
Entry fee—50 cents each individual.
Calgary Quoiting Association Rules to govern.
Monday, September 7, 1931, at Calgary
Quoiting Singles  (Scratch)   18 Yards  (Open)
The  Silver Quoit   emblematic of  the  Championship  of  Western
Canada, will become the property ot the winner for one year.
ist Prize—Value $30.00
2nd Prize—Value $20.00
3rd Prize—Value $15.00
4th Prize—Value $10.00
*      ■
Entry fee—50 cents each individual.
Rules of the Alberta Quoiting Association to govern.
All entries accompanied by the entry fee, must be sent to the
Secretary, Banff Highland Gathering, Banff Springs Hotel, Banff,
Alberta, not later than Thursday, August 20th, 1931.
Page nineteen BANFF      HIGHLAND      GATHERING
RULES GOVERNING THE HIGHLAND  EVENTS
(Under the auspices of the Calgary St. Andrew-Caledonian Society)
The Highland Events includes competitions for the Highland
Dress, Bagpipe Music and Highland Dancing. The competitions shall
be governed by the Rules adapted and formulated by the Gaelic Society
of Canada, and the Field Events by the Rules of the Amateur Athletic
Union of Canada. Judges are requested to be guided by these Rules
in arriving at their decisions.
1. It is assumed that no one will enter as a competitor in any of
the events set forth in this programme who has not attained considerable
proficiency and skill in his or her art. Therefore, should this requirement be disregarded the judges shall ask any competitor whom they
deem, on fair trial, incapable of rendering a fairly good performance, to
withdraw from the contest. In any such case the entry fee shall not
be returned to the competitor.
2. There must be two competitors in all events or no first prize
shall be allowed; three competitors or no second prize shall be allowed;
and four or more competitors, or no third prize shall be allowed. There
can be no award by default. Therefore, to win any prize or trophy on
the programme an actual contest shall be necessary.
3. Pipers taking part in Bagpipe Music Competition shall be expected to play for competitors in the Dancing Events if requested to
do so by the Director of the Games.
4. The classification of ages in the Piping and Dancing Events shall
be strictly adhered to and enforced. Should any age be seriously
challenged, written proof of birth may be required. Any breach of this
rule may disqualify a competitor in future competitions. Any dispute
which may arise shall be investigated by the Standing Committee on
Sports  at  a  later  date,   and  its  findings  shall  be  final.
The Management reserves the right to refuse to accept the entry
of any single competitor, band, team or performers whatsoever that
may be tendered by letter in advance of the day on which the sports
will be held, or in person on the grounds on the day of the sports,
without assigning any reason for so doing, and such refusal shall be
final.
5. Competitors shall be called upon to compete in the inverse order
of entry. Any competitors not responding, when called upon, shall forfeit
her  or  his  right  to  compete.
6. The Director may change the order of the events in the course
of the  day,  should he deem it advantageous to do  so.
7. The Director shall have control of the grounds, and shall have
full charge and management of the events of the day.
8. The decision of the Judges shall be final in all competitions. In
the Piping and Dancing Events the Judges shall not call back any
competitor for a second trial, except in the event of a tie for first place,
in which case the Judges may require the competitors who on the first
trial are marked equal for first place, to play or dance again for final
decision.
9. Judges shall not be debarred from competing in any class of
events in which they are not judging.
10. Prizes not claimed within forty-eight hours from date of event,
shall   be   declared   forfeited.
Page twenty AND     SCOTTISH     MUSIC     FESTIVAL
BAGPIPE COMPETITIONS
i.   Piobaireachd:
ist—Gold  Medal  and $75.00.    2nd—$50.00.    3rd—$25.00.
Competitors in Piobaireachd shall play their choice of any one
of the following: "MacKenzie of Applecross' Salute"; "Lament of
the Children"; "The Bells of Perth."    (Entry Fee, 50 cents.)
2. Marches :
ist—Gold  Medal and $50.00.    2nd—$30.00.    3rd—$20.00.
Competitors in Marches shall play their choice of any one of the
following:
"Captain Campbell's March," "Balmoral Highlanders March"
(Angus   McKay) ;   "The   Rosshire   Volunteers'   Farewell    to
Edinburgh" (John Connon) ; "March of the 92nd Highlanders"
(James Mauchline) ;  Donald Cameron; The Hon.  Miss Els-
peth Campbell (Lady)   (William Douglas).
(Entry  Fee,   50. cents.)
3. Strathspeys and Reels :
ist—Gold Medal and $50.00.    2nd—$30.00.   3rd—$20.00.
Competitors in Strathspeys and Reels shall play their choice of
any one of the following:
Strathspeys: "Delvinside" (Four Parts); "Orniston Castle"
(Four Parts) ;  "Blair Drummond"   (Six Parts).
REELS: "Lord Macdonald's Reel"; "Pretty Marion"; "Caber-
feidth."
(Entry Fee, 50 cents).
A Silver Challenge Cup will be presented to the Piper gaining the
highest total marks in the Open Piping Events; the Cup to become the
property of the winner for one year.
4. Inter-Regimental Competition  (Marches):
1st—Silver Cup presented by E. W. Beatty, Esq., Chairman and
President of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and $100.00. 2nd—$50.00.
3rd—$25.00.
Each Competitor will play his choice of the following:
"74th's  Farewell  to  Edinburgh";   "Glengarry's  Gathering."
The Inter-Regimental Competition is confined to official delegate
pipers on the active strength of Highland Regiments of the Non-
Permanent Active Militia of Canada, the regimental uniforms of such
regiments being the Highland garb, conforming in every respect to the
authorized Canadian Militia regulations.    (Entry Free.)
Page twenty-one BANFF      HIGHLAND      GATHERING
5. Special Canadian Militia Competition  (Marches) :
ist—Silver  Trophy  and  $100.00.    2nd—$50.00.    3rd—$25.00.
Open to all regimental pipers in good standing in the Active
(Non-Permanent) Militia of Canada, i.e., to pipers who are regular
members of a pipe band officially connected with any regiment or unit
of the Canadian Militia. This is intended as a competition for the
best pipe-player in the Canadian Militia, and must be won two years
in succession in order to become the property of the winner. Competitors shall play their own choice of tune.    Entry fee 50 cents.
Winner in 1930—Piper Hector MacDonald, 2nd Battalion, Royal
Highlanders of  Canada, Montreal,  Quebec.
Each competitor shall send to the Secretary at least one week in
advance the name of the tune he intends to play, in the various competitions.
6. Special   Alberta   Competition      (Marches — Strathspeys   and
Reels) :
Confined to bona fide residents of Alberta, for Challenge Cup and
ist Prize of $50.00; 2nd Prize, $30.00; 3rd Prize, $20.00.
The Challenge Cup must be won three years in succession before
becoming the property of the winner. Winner in 1930—Donald Mac-
Innes, Calgary.
Competitors must produce evidence, if necessary, of having resided at least six months continuously in the Province of Alberta
immediately prior to the date of the competition.
Highest total number of marks given for the two events will
decide the first,  second and third places.    Entry Free.
7. Youths''Competition:
Marches: ist—Gold Medal and $10.00. 2nd—Silver Medal and
$7-50.    3rd—Bronze Medal and $5.00.
Strathspeys and Reels:    Prizes same as for Marches.
Open to those between the ages of 16 and 21 years. A certificate
of age must be produced endorsed by some responsible person.
8. Boys' Competition:
Marches: 1st—Gold Medal, and prize value $7.50. 2nd—Silver
Medal, and prize value $5.00.    3rd—Bronze Medal, and prize value $3.00.
Strathspeys and Reels:    Prizes same as for Marches.
Open to those between 12 and 16 years of age. Entry free. A
certificate of age must be produced, endorsed by some responsible
person.
Entries for Bagpipe Competitions close Thursday,, August 20th,
1931.
Page twenty-two AND     SCOTTISH     MUSIC     FESTIVAL
FURTHER RULES GOVERNING BAGPIPE
COMPETITIONS
i. Piobaireachd will be regarded as an exhibition of good playing
rather than a general competition merely for place. The maximum
number of marks will be ioo. To obtain a first prize, a minimum of
75 marks must be obtained; to obtain a second prize, 60 marks; and
to obtain a third prize, 50 marks. In fixing the standard on which
the credit value of 100 marks, maximum, shall be estimated, the Judges
will be understood to give due consideration to the conditions under
which piping is pursued on this side of the Atlantic, i.e., the high
standard possible in Scotland will not be expected.
2. The number of beats per minute for Marching shall be from
85 to 90. A four-part March shall be played twice; a three-part
March twice; and two-part March twice.
3. The Strathspey and Reel, if four-part, shall be played once
over each; if three or two, twice over.
4. In all the Piping Events the maximum number of marks shall
be 100, distributed as follows:
(1) Condition of the pipes—8. (6)
(2) Tuning—10. (7)
(3) Tone—8 (8)
Phrasing—8.
Time—10.
(4) Accuracy—10.
(5) Harmony—10.
Interpretation—15.
(9)  Expression and Feeling—15,
(10)  Smart Appearance—6.
5. (a) In the Piping Competitions the Judges shall take into
consideration the character of the tune played—whether difficult or
easy to render. In assessing values marks shall be given for comportment and smart appearance, correct tuning, tone of pipes, time,
fingering, rhythm, technique, interpretation of the tune (the piper must
have caught its spirit and message)   and the general musical  effect.
(b) Points to be considered in marking: Tone—the chanter
shall be in perfect pitch and in complete unison with the bass and
tenor drones. Quality, modulation, etc., including a full mellow tenor
tone; clear, fairly loud, not thin and lifeless. Phrasing—the proper
metre and balance in every bar; a melodious swing and sway to the
music and the rhythmic succession of accents or tone impulses in
regular order. Character and Style—as to whether the time is easy
or difficult to render; whether the version is pleasing to the ear or
otherwise. The melody ought never to be sacrificed for mere display
of deft fingering. Technique—briefly: True fingering, the requisite
number of grace notes (and no more), correct doublings in every
movement. Marching and Posture—upright cairiage and natural
swing in walking, and holding the instrument as if it were part of the
performer. Penalties—chokes or stops, squeals and scratches, if
incidental are minor demerits, for which marks are to be deducted,
adequate to the nature of the mishap.
Page twenty-three BANFF      HIGHLAND      GATHERING
COMPETITION FOR THE BEST DRESSED HIGHLANDER
ist  Prize, value $30;     2nd Prize, value $20;     3rd  Prize,  value $15.
Entr}'  fee—50 cents.
Rules Governing Competition for Best Dressed Highlander
(For Men only)
Note : Prizes shall be awarded only for the plain Highland
costume, such as is generally worn on ordinary, everyday occasions,
excluding all other forms of Highland dress. The following requirements shall be observed by competitors, viz.:
1. The bonnet shall be a Highland pattern—Barmoral or Kilmarnock—flat or Glengarry   (peaked).
2. The jacket shall be of tweed material, with or without cuffs,
pocket-flaps or shoulder straps. It shall be well fitted at the waist,
short, smart in appearance, of different pattern to that of an ordinary
sack coat.
3. The waist coat shall be of the same material as the jacket
and of moderate length.
4. The necktie shall match the colour either of the jacket or
of  the  kilt.
5. The kilt shall be of clan or family tartan, and each competitor
ought to wear the tartan to which he is by clan or family entitled.
The kilt shall be worn plain—without bows or ribbons. A silver
safety pin, claw or talon pin shall be used.
6. The sporran shall be in the form of a mottled leather, or a
fur purse. When the latter is worn the head of the animal should
be mounted on the fur. The animal should be indigenous to the
Scottish Highlands, such as the otter, wildcat, badger, pole-cat or fox.
7. Ribbed worsted hose shall be worn of a color to match that of
the jacket or of the ground colour of the kilt, with the turn to match,
generally, the high colour of the kilt. The sgian dubh to be worn
in  the  right-side  stocking.
8. Low-cut shoes or brogues shall be worn, strong and serviceable
for walking, without buckles.
9. No ornaments except the distinguishing clan or personal crest
or the clan badge, shall be worn.
10. The harmony of the costume as a whole and the manner of
wearing it shall be taken into account by the Judges.
11. In all cases the complete dress must be the personal property
of the  competitor.
Page twenty-four AND     SCOTTISH     MUSIC     FESTIVAL
3.   Sword Dance :
(a) Competitors 10 to under 13 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(b) Competitors  13 to under 16 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(c) Competitors  16 years and over.
ist—Gold Medal and $15.00
2nd—Silver Medal and $10.00
3rd—Bronze Medal and $8.00
5;Spt?*5
HIGHLAND  DANCING
1. Highland  Fling:
(a)    Competitors under 10 years of age.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
The J. H. Woods Silver Cup is offered for the
competitor gaining the highest number of marks in this
class, cup to be won two years in succession before becoming the property of the winner. Winner 1930—
Phyllis  Mikkelson,  Vancouver,  B.C.
(b) Competitors   10 to  under  13 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(c) Competitors 13 to under 16 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(d) Competitors   16 years  and  over.
ist—Gold Medal and $15.00
2nd—Silver Medal and $10.00
3rd—Bronze Medal and $8.00
2. Seann Triubhas:
(a) Competitors under  10 years of age.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(b) Competitors  16 years and over.
ist—Gold Medal and $15.00
2nd—Silver Medal and $10.00
3rd—Bronze Medal and $8.00
Pipe-Major    W.    Roy
with   the   youngest
competitor.
4.   Sailor's Hornpipe   also   5.   Scotch Reel:
Competitors  16 years  and  over.
ist—Gold Medal and $15.00      2nd—Silver Medal and $10.00
3rd—Bronze Medal and $8.00
Page twenty-five AND     SCOTTISH     MUSIC     FESTIVAL
6.   Irish Jig :
(a) Competitors under  io years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(b) Competitors 10 to under 13 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(c) Competitors 13 to under 16 years.
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
(d) Competitors   16  years  and   over.
ist—Gold Medal and $15.00
2nd—Silver Medal and $10.00
3rd—Bronze Medal and $8.00
NoTE:—Competitors in all Dancing Events under 16 years of age
must bring certificate as to their age, endorsed by some responsible
person.
RUTHVEN-STUART CHALLENGE CUP FOR ADULT
HIGHLAND DANCING
This Cup must be won by the same person three years in succession to be won outright. A replica of the cup will be presented to
the winner each year.
Offered for the best all-round dancer in the open events, 16 years
old and over (special event competitions excluded). Total number
of marks to count.    Winner 1930—L. R. Wilson. Vancouver, B.C.
SPECIAL  EVENTS
Eightsome Reel:
(a) Open to teams of competitors 10 to under 16 years.
ist   Team Prizes—Value $5.00 each.
2nd Team Prizes—Value $3,00 each.
(b) Open to teams of competitors 16 years and over.
ist   Team Prize—$60.00
2nd Team Prize—$40.00
Irish Jig:
(a) Open to teams of competitors 10 to under 16 years.
(Team to consist of three couples.)
ist   Team Prizes—Value $5.00 each.
2nd Team Prizes—Value $3.00 each.
(b) Open to teams of competitors 16 years and over.
(Team to consist of three couples.)
ist   Team Prize—$48.00
2nd Team Prize—$30.00
Rules:—These events shall be judged for team work only. Unless
otherwise decided at the time of the competition, at least two male
competitors must be members of the team. No competitor shall be
allowed to compete in more than one team in any one class.
Page twenty-six
i
\j.
_^ AND     SCOTTISH     MUSIC     FESTIVAL
f Judges  at the  Banff   Highland   Gathering,   1930.
r.
JOHN D. McARA CHALLENGE CUP
FOR ALBERTA DANCERS
Highland Fling—16 years and over.
Sword Dance—16 vears and over.
Seann Triubhas—16 years and over. ^
Confined to bona fide residents of Alberta, for the John D. McAra
Challenge Cup and ist Prize of $15.00; 2nd Prize, $10.00; 3rd Prize,
$8.00.
The Challenge Cup must be won three years in succession before
becoming the property of the winner.
Winner 1930, Helen Shirlaw, Edmonton.
Competitors must produce evidence, if necessary, of having resided at least six months continuously in the Province of Alberta
immediately prior to the date of the competition.
Highest total number of marks given for the three events will
decide the first, second and third places.
Entry Fees—Competitors 16 years and over—50 cents each event;
under 16 years of age, and special events—No entry fee.
Entries positively close Thursday, August 20th, 1931.
Page twenty-seven BANFF      HIGHLAN D      GATHERING
HIGHLAND  DANCING
Highland Fling :
i. Correct position, time, number of steps, i.e., six steps in consecutive order, executed accurately with ease and good taste, as to
graceful, restrained movement, will determine the values on which
marks shall be given.
Seann Triubhas :
2. The very essence of this dance is grace and beauty of movement, the gentle, graceful sway of the body as a whole must be in
perfect harmony wTith the dance steps. The dance shall be presented
in correct position, time and step. The introduction of steps foreign
to the dance, such as hornpipes or jigs, shall count heavily against the
competitor.
Sword Dance:
3. Shall be danced over a cross formed by placing a naked sword
across its sheath at right angles, the point of intersection being equally
distant from the point and hilt of the sword, and from both ends of
the sheath. Correct position, time, steps, and spirited execution shall
be the main requirements. Correct position shall apply to the position of the body as a whole as well as to that of the legs and feet in
executing the steps. The body should not bend unduly forward, nor
should it be stiffly erect.    Ease and accuracy of execution are basic.
Should a competitor touch or displace the sword or sheath one-
third of his credit marks shall be deducted. To touch three times shall
disqualify him altogether.
Nothing in this Rule (except the disqualification) shall be construed so as to preclude a competitor from taking first, or a higher
place, over others who by dancing wide of the sword and sheath have
reduced the risk of touching the same to a minimum. Undue importance shall not attach to the first touch of a competitor who may dance
closer in and around the cross.
Scotch Reel (Foursome):
4. The outline of the figure eight shall be observed: Two steps,
Highland fling and four reel steps shall be danced.
Sailor's Hornpipe:
5. Correct Sailor's Costume (Boys), dancing slippers with flat
soles (heelless) shall be worn. Hornpipe steps only (traditional Jack
o' Tar steps) are admissible. Jig steps shall be counted as serious
errors, but need not altogether disqualify an otherwise good performer. Hauling, heaving and pulling movements ought to be natural
as in actual work and expressive of real action. The opening and
closing steps should not be marred by excessive action, neither ought
they to be spiritless.
Page twenty-eight AND     SCOTTISH     MUSIC     FESTIVAL
Note :
1. In the Highland Fling, Seann Triubhas,
Reels, etc., the raised foot (vertical position)
shall not in any of the step movements touch the
front or back of the supporting leg.
2. Marking values shall be: Accuracy, 20
marks; Execution, 15 marks; Style, 15 marks;
Gracefulness, 12 marks; Position, 15 marks;
Time, 15 marks; General Appearance, 8 marks.
Total, 100 marks.
3. Correct Costume: Competitors in all
Highland events shall appear in correct Highland
costume.
Boys' dress would be decidedly incorrect for
girls. As some girls, however, may be unprepared to wear proper dresses in this respect, such
will be permitted this year to appear as formerly,
but after this year it is hoped girl competitors
will be prepared to come in correct costume.    A
kilted   tartan   skirt   and   a
I      middy    of    light    material
with tartan favours would be appropriate.
Ian   Inkster
six    years    old,    who
claims to be Canada's
youngest   piper.
4. No Medals shall be worn by any competitor in the Highland events—dancing, piping
or dress—while performing or exhibiting, on the
platform.
5. In the Seann Triubhas, Sword Dance,
there shall be danced six slow and two quick
steps; in the Sailor's Hornpipe, six steps shall
be danced.
6. Marks shall be awarded in the Scots'
Reel and Eightsome Reel: Accuracy, 50 marks;
Gracefulness, 20 marks; Appearance, 10 marks;
Time, 20 marks. The same steps in the same
sequence shall be danced by all the competitors
in Reels.
Doreen Tomlinson
winner of gold medal
for Irish Jig and
Seann Triubhas, for
competitors under 10
years   old.
Page twenty-nine BANFF      HIGHLAND      GATHERING
SCOTTISH  SONG  COMPETITIONS
Saturday,  August 29th,  1931
Adjudicator: ''Professor Collingwood, F.R.C.O., F.T.C.L," Dean of
the   Faculty   of  Music,   University  of   Saskatchewan.
Competitors in each class should come prepared to sing two songs in
their respective classes, though only one may be called for performance.
(a) Open to Girls and Boys,  12 years of age and Under:
ist Prize—Gold Medal and $7.50.     2nd   Prize—$5.00.
Girls to sing: "Afton Water," or "Kelvin Grove," or "A Highland
Lad"    (or   any   two).
Boys to sing: "Up in the Morning Early," or "Logie o' Buchan,"
(or  both).
A certificate of age must be produced, endorsed by some responsible
person.
(b) Adult Competition :
ist Prize (in Four Classes)—Each Gold Medal and $10.00.
2nd Prize (in Four Classes)—Each $7.50.
Ladies—Soprano:
"Willie's Rare and Willie's Fair"   (Ballad-Yarrow)
"There's nae luck about the Hoose"
Contralto:
"Can ye sew Cushions," "The Rowan Tree"
Men—Tenor:
"The Lea Rig,"      "Oh saw ye Bonnie Leslie;"
or "O' a' the airts the win' can blawT,"
"My Love She's but a Lassie Yet"
Baritone or Bass:
"O Gin I were a Baron's Heir,"   "Mary Morison;"
or "Bonnie Earl of Murray," "A Hundred Pipers"
(c) Duet—Unequal Voices :
(Soprano and tenor or contralto and baritone.)
ist   Prize—Medal and $10.00 each.
2nd Prize—$7.50 each.
Test Piece—"Hunting Tower."    Books 1 and 2—Scots Song Book.
Edited by Michael Diack Paterson.
(d) Special Gaeuc Song Competition:
ist Prize—Medal and $10.00.    2nd Prize—$7.50
Test Pieces—"Eriskay Love Lilt," arranged by M. Kennedy-Fraser
"Kishmul's Galley," arranged by M. Kennedy-Fraser
(Boosey & Co.)
Both to  be  sung in Gaelic.
Entry Fee for Classes B, C and D, 25c. each person. Class A entry
free. For entry forms apply Secretary, Banff Highland Gathering, Banff,
Alberta.
WALTER   SCOTT  CHALLENGE   TROPHY
Presented by Walter Scott, Esq., of New York City. To be held
for one year by the singer considered most worthy by the Adjudicator.
Must  be  won  three  years  in  succession  to be  retained  permanently.
Winner  for  1930—Peter  H.   Kirkpatrick,   Calgary.
Page thirty AND     SCOTTISH     MUSIC     FESTIVAL
IS&tts
MADAME JEANNE DUSSEAU
Canadian lyric soprano, who is
celebrated for her rendering of
Scottish song and makes her third
appearance   at   Banff.
MARY    STUART
Scottish soprano, soloist at concerts of the N.Y. Caledonian Club,
N. Y. Scottish Society, Gaelic
Musical  Society of America,  etc.
THEODORE WEBB
Baritone of Winnipeg and New
York. Guest artist with Hartford
Oratorio Society, N. Y. Mozart
Society, etc., and now one of the
outstanding singers with the
National  Broadcasting Co.,  N.Y.
TERRY   HORNE
Tenor of Calgary and New York.
Has sung leading roles with the
Little Theatre Opera Company, and
took the lead in the Schubert
Operettas "Duchess of Chicago
and "Dear Love."
f 9
Some of the Artists at Banff Highland Gathering.
Page thirty-one BANFF      HIGHLAND      GATHERING
vsl»is
yyymyyyyyyyymmm
MARY  FRANCES   JAMES
Scots-Canadian  Mezzo-Soprano
Two Favourite Singers for the Banff Highland Gathering.
AMY FLEMING
Scots-Canadian Contralto
MUSIC  AT BANFF
The programmes of music arranged for the Scottish Music
festival, which forms part of the Banff Highland Gathering, will this
year be devoted particularly to the music of the Jacobite period. Two
ballad operas will be presented, one entitled "Prince Charming" with
libretto by J. E. Middleton, and musical setting by Dr. Ernest Mac-
Millan, Principal of the Toronto Conservatory of Music. This has
been specially written for Banff and will be presented for the first
time. The second is "Prince Charlie and Flora" with music by Dr.
Healey Willan, which was produced in 1929 with such success that
it is being repeated this year by request. The singers at the concerts
will include Robert Burnett, Scottish baritone, Jeanne Dusseau, Mary
Stuart, Theodore Webb, Terry Home, Mary Frances James, Amv
Fleming and members of the operatic group known as the Musical
Crusaders, who are providing unusual musical entertainment for
guests at the Banff Springs Hotel during July and August under the
direction of Alfred Heather.
Page thirty-two WITH A REAL
Your first drive is over the torrential Spray
River . . . then a dog's leg around the corner
of a mountain . . . "Devil's Cauldron/' a
mashie lift across a mountain lake . . . "Jinx"
—the great temper testei . . . and the "19th"
with its $100,000 club house . . . riding . . .
swimming . . . mountain climbing . . . dance
orchestra . . . resident Light Opera Company.
Indian Days, July 22-24. Highland Gathering,
August 27-30.    Plan to Stay a Week or Longer!
2 Big Amateur Golf Events
Willingdon Cup—Aug. 17-22
Prince of Wales Cup—Sept. 8-12
Low   Fares   to   the   Pacific   Coast,
May 15 to Sept. 30
Ask for literature at any Canadian
_   Pacific Office
KICK . ..
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SPRINGS
A    CANADIAN     PACIFIC     HOTEL onnie
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rince hharlie
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J'rince Charlie bidding farewell to
Flora Macdonald
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PRINTED   IN  CANADA
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