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Pamphlet advertising the Banff Springs Hotel Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Canadian Pacific Hotels. Banff Springs Hotel 1930

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BANFF SPRINGS HOTEL., BANFF SPRINGS, ALTA.
Canadian Pacific
mm
The Expression of a Nation's Character
WORLDWIDE in scope, international in activities, the Canadian Pacific
is pre-eminently the expression of a progressive nation's character.
Canadian Pacific rails extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean,
webbing prairies and mountains, reaching out to cities, farms, forests,
ranches and mines scattered over a million square miles.
Stupendous record in steel of the daring and genius of a young people who
fifty years ago dreamed of transforming a virgin wilderness into a nation—
and made their dream come true.
Canadian Pacific Steamships, on all the seven seas—Canadian Pacific
Telegraphs, carrying messages to world's end and back—Canadian Pacific
Express, trusted bearer of goods to the farthest places, with money-orders
of worldwide currency—Canadian Pacific Hotels, with guests from all the
continents.
Gigantic symbol of the vision, enterprise and spirit of the people of Canada,
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Banff
Station .
Upper
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BANFF
Banff, administrative centre of Rocky Mountains
National Park, is just a wee town tucked away in the
high-up valley of the Bow River where it winds like a
thread of silver between the towering peaks of the
Canadian Rockies, 82 miles west of Calgary.
Banff has no great population to boast of, no feverish
commercial activities.    But... as compensation. . . bluest
of blue skies.. . Indians in the glory of tribal panoply. . -
the white tumult of plunging waters. . the scurrying
flight of deer . alpine meadows, majestic peaks. . .
swaggering cowboys. . . sunshine. . fairy-green slopes.. .
staccato of galloping hoofs. . . springs of magic warmth
. . .calm. No resort anywhere offers a more varied and
alluring appeal.
Vfie CLIMATE
Banff enjoys an unusually mild and agreeable climate,
due to the encircling wall of mountains which surround
it on all sides. Summertime is marked by days of sparkling sunshine and nights of a comfortable coolness ideal
for sleeping, and rains seldom come to interfere with the
outdoor activities which play so prominent a part in
Banff's attractiveness. Wintertime, while cold enough
to keep snow and ice satisfactorily firm, is rarely so cold
as to be uncomfortable. Banff's rapidly growing reputation as a winter resort is built in large measure upon the
favorable nature of its climate. Each February a carnival of spectacular interest is held there.
POINTS of INTEREST
Banff is a veritable treasure-house of the unusual, the
beautiful, the inspiring. Close by are the Bow River*
Falls; the meeting of the Spray and Bow Rivers; the
natural Cave and Basin; the Museum, the Zoo with its
grizzlies, cougars, lynx and other wild animals native to
the surrounding country; the immense fenced-in animal
corral where herds of buffaloes, mountain sheep, mountain goats, moose and elk roam in natural freedom; the
Government Recreation Grounds; the narrow cleft in
the mountains that is Sundance Canyon; Upper and
Middle Hot Springs; the Observatory atop Sulphur
Mountain;  the steel-blue waters of Lake Minnewanka,
and Johnson Canyon. Lake
Louise, iridescent gem of
the Canadian Rockies, the
Great Divide, Marble Canyon, Stoney, Sawback and
Mystic Lakes, Mount
Assiniboine, and a thousand
other scenic marvels are
within reasonable distance
by motor car or pony trail- Banff Springs Hotc
BANFF, ALTA
SON MAt 15 TO O
;: h I      :. SID SERVICES European
iAtiidMWkWtlti!
UAKPi'.sramuii
notrmt.,
■fli
BANFF SPRINGS HOTEL eoj oys ©ne of the
loveliest ihuiadons in the world., set as
it is I.h. the exquisite valley of the Bow
River, 4,625 feet above sea-levi       Every wio-
.. !»w  of this castle-like hotel  affords  superb
iewfl of magnificent peaks and wooded slopes.
Construction, is fire-proof throughoi       Tine
giant frame- work of the hotel i$ of steel, and the
massive exterior walls, which rise 14 storeys in
height, are .of native rock trimmed with cut
Tyndall  stone, whose soft color  effects  lend
striking beauty to the imposing structure.
Number   of   Guest   Room i dl   with
Baths.
Public Rooms
:»nvei:i don pur-
Special Si .rious  Special  Suites
e avaiiab, ese are alike m
arrangeme meal:.    On the
end outlook, is the
ed  unit of 14
rooms with ig Roan       I service
room.    TJ uite.
Th.       "ian Suites., in furakur.; ition
the south-east end of Mount Stephen Hall. The
River view Lounge is the favorite rendezvous
of guests at: tea hour,.
Convention Rooms.
listed below are available !
poses.    In   si:?:e,   arrangement   and   equipment
they provide--ideal facilities for meetings and
banquets, both small and h
ililfllll
DIRIiiCTORY OF SERVICES
Office Wjjoovl
Re«::3E!i>ttok'   Hall Hotel   Office,   Manager's
Office, Motor-car and Saddle Horse Agent., Head
Porter., Public Stenographer. Telephones, Chun:
Directory;
Garden Lounge .Rail,   Sleeping   Ca        id
Steamship Ticket Office, 'Telegraphs and Gables.,
3m.k of Montreal, Assistant Manager's Office
Garden Lounge Lobbt -Cheek .Room.
Mount   S        en   Hall   Billiard .Root
o o
replicas  of an   apartment of the B nee
tuated on the 200 and %%) floors.
Suites, done-in modern style, are located
e 300, 400, 300 and 600 floors.
Tudor, Georgian, Louis XV,
and Art Moderne Suites
on floors from  200 to 600
DM AND  I DoRfUtDC
ye fearures of the I
re vn:- Ci ridor an
or is siti
Stephen H
•• for th
k Ro
6,213
KTxvi
Ncnn
le dl   i
My, Ladies' Rest Ro< i
Centre Section—Cttirio Rn
Sun Parlor.
South W:ing< Alhambra Dining Room (a la
Carte Service),  Strathcona and  Angus »•
dinionr rooms, Writing Room
»OK
hiro-
vfen's
ah
Physic ian ha <atmdi
it Stephen fri
Gai&jbry Sun Ii
Corridors;
Jl
/—»
ROOMS AND BANQUET ROOMS
elegr aph „   i! j€ kbxb,   b am,   etc.
Oak, Room/Cloister Corridor.
1,718 m
5,634 sq
Sea's i       Capacit
Convention Banquet
Bail Room •
Floor    Rivervnrw I, m.   . ..     6 21.5 B*q.
.1.06 sq. ft.
Alhambra D ■   ! 5,824 sq. ft.
Private 640 sq,
408 sq. ft
^Jjfefefefctttess
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
< i
D Re
JOO sq. ft.
Baoff
.,50 c son
.. Free.,
. 1IHIIII
!9IHIIH!m1
iff,    administrative   centre   of   Rocky    Mountain:;
National K3 is just        ee town tucked away in. the
high-up valley of the » River where it winds like a
thread of silver between the towering peaks of the
Canadian Rockies, 82 miles west of Calgary.
inff has no great population to boast of, no feverish
commercial .iicti       5S,    But      as compensation... him
of blue skies. . ..Indians in. the gloty of tribal :        ply
the white tumult of plunging waters. .
flight of deer  .   alpine meadows,    majestic
swaggering cowboys. . .suns; .  fail
staccato of galloping hoofs
. . .calm.    No resort an
alluring al.
We CLIMATE
Banff enjoys an unusually mild and agree climate.,
due to the encircling wall of mountains which s
it on all sides.    Sum
ling sunshine and nights
for sleeping, and rain
oi
\ mmmM
PC
BAirT is a ve iusual, l
be|uti.M, .^W^*f^|i|i       ( are th
Falls;  fWiifteltn^W'thep. d Bow Ri
natural Cave and BasmL^|Le Museum, the .Zoo with its
1 other wild animals native t
the immense fenced-in anim
loes, mountain sheep,,  xm
roam in natural freedom;   i
n Grounds:,   the narrow
dance Canyon;   Upper and
Middle Hot "Springs;    the Observatory atop Snip!
Mountain;  the steel-blue waters of Lake Mir*new.
Banff 3 ;s.    Wim
ice sati;
:>r table.
er resort:
mire
spectaeul.
INTEREST
grizzlies, c/mgars.*
tha s urroMg^g ^fiftu^
corm janere^enats
tain i
Govei:
the moun
Johnson (
Louise,   iri i
.
the
i
i i c L a k e.
injboine, ai
other scenic n
a rea
cance
motor cai
trail- Banff springs ifotel
BANFF, ALTA.
SEASON MAY 15 TO OCT. 1
ROOMS AND SERVICES—European Plan
BANFF SPRINGS HOTEL enjoys one of the
loveliest situations in the world, set as
it is in the exquisite valley of the Bow
River, 4,625 feet above sea-level. Every window of this castle-like hotel affords superb
views of magnificent peaks and wooded slopes.
Construction is fire-proof throughout. The
giant frame-work of the hotel is of steel, and the
massive exterior walls, which rise 14 storeys in
height, are of native rock trimmed with cut
Tyndall stone, whose soft color effects lend
striking beauty to the imposing structure.
Number of Guest Rooms—600, all with
Baths.
Special Suites—38 luxurious Special Suites
are available. No two of these are alike in
arrangement and decorative treatment. On the
600 floor, with an enchanting outlook, is the
Vice-Regal Suite, a self-contained unit of 14
rooms with its own Dining Room and service
room. This floor also contains the Swiss Suite.
The Italian Suites, in furniture and decoration
replicas of an apartment of the Renaissance
period, are situated on the 200 and 300 floors.
Angle Suites, done in modern style, are located
in the wings of .the 300, 400, 500 and 600 floors.
The Jacobean, Tudor, Georgian, Louis XV,
Louis XVI, Empire and Art Moderne Suites are
variously situated on floors from 200 to 600
inclusive.
Oak Room and Cloister Corridor—Two of
the most distinctive features of the hotel's interior are the Cloister Corridor and the Oak
Room. The Cloister Corridor is situated to the
south of beautiful Mount Stephen Hall, and provides a delightful retreat for those who wish
quiet and seclusion. The Oak Room opens from
the south-east end of Mount Stephen Hall. The
River view Lounge is the favorite rendezvous
of guests at tea hour.
Convention Rooms. — The Public Rooms
listed below are available for convention purposes. In size, arrangement and equipment
they provide ideal facilities for meetings and
banquets, both small and large.
DIRECTORY OF SERVICES
Office Floor
Reception Hall—Hotel Office, Manager's
Office, Motor-car and Saddle Horse Agent, Head
Porter, Public Stenographer, Telephones, Church
Directory.
Garden Lounge—Rail, Sleeping Car and
Steamship Ticket Office, Telegraphs and Cables,
Bank of Montreal, Assistant Manager's Office.
Garden Lounge Lobby—Check Room.
Mount Stephen Hall — Billiard Room,
Ladies' Retiring Room, Men's Retiring Room.
First Floor
North Wing—Fairholme Dining Room
(Table d'Hote Service), Ball Room, Conservatory, Ladies' Rest Room, Library.
Centre Section—Curio Room, News Stand,
Sun Parlor.
South Wing—Alhambra Dining Room (a la
Carte Service), Strathcona and Angus private
dining rooms, Writing Room.
Terrace Floor
Barber Shop, Manicure, Hair Dresser, Chiropodist, Shoe Shine,Tavern, Soda Fountain, Men's
Retiring Room, Swimming Pool Office, Turkish
Baths.
House Physician in attendance.
PUBLIC SPACES—DINING ROOMS—MEETING ROOMS AND BANQUET ROOMS
ft.    Information,   Telegraph,   Tickets,   Bank,   Etc.
Office
Floor
Garden Lounge    6,215 sq.
Mount Stephen Hall. . . .   2,600 sq.
Gallery Sun Room    1,718 sq.
Corridors    1,718 sq.
First     Ball Room  5,634 sq.
Floor    River view Lounge  6,215 sq.
Fairholme Dining Room. 10,106 sq.
Alhambra Dining Room. 5,824 sq.
Private Dining Room. . . 640 sq.
... 408 sq.
Billiard Room  800 sq.
ft.
General Lounge,
Oak Room, Cl<
ft.
ft.
•
Seating Capacities
Convention
Banquet
ft.
750
450
ft.
•  •  •
•  •   •
ft.
1,000
750
ft.
750
450
ft.
75
45
ft.
40
20
ft.
Dining
650
350
30
16
Transfer Rates between Station and Banff
Springs Hotel.
By auto-bus 50 cents a person.
Hand baggage Free.
Trunks 50 cents.
Tavern—In Banff Springs Hotel, Ale and Beer
only may be obtained. All kinds of Liquor may
be purchased from the Alberta Government
store in Banff. CANADIAN
PACIFIC
[BANFF SPRINGS
HOT ■ I.
BANtr ALTA.
Banff iprings Hotel
BANFF, ALTA
Recreational Attractions and Facilities
Golf
Guests have the privilege of playing over the
famous Banff course, one of the finest and most
beautiful courses in the world. Starting close
to the hotel, it has a length of 6,695 yards and a
par of 73. The fairways are exceptionally wide
with two tees for each hole.    Rates are:
Per day or per round $3-00
Per week  15-00
Per month 50.00
Per season 75-00
Tennis
Guests may play without charge on admirably
constructed courts maintained by the Hotel.
Swimming
Banff Springs Hotel has two large swimming
pools, the Outer Pool measuring 105 feet by 58
feet, the Inner Pool measuring 100 feet by 40
feet.
The Inner Pool is entirely enclosed within an
artistic structure that adjoins the hotel proper.
This pool is filled with spring water, the temperature ranging between 70 and 80 degrees.
The Outer Pool lies entirely in the open air
just beyond the Inner Pool. It is filled with
sulphur water, the temperature ranging between
80 and 90 degrees.
Well-equipped dressing rooms adjoin the Inner
Pool. The fee for use of the pools is 50 cents
per person. This fee includes use of dressing
room, locker, bathing suit and- towel.
Pony Trips
Trips by saddle pony over the mountain trails
are among the most popular diversions at this
celebrated resort. Well-trained and sure-footed
ponies can be hired by the hour, half-day or day
at moderate rates. Reliable and experienced
guides may be engaged for special trips of any
distance.
Motoring
Banff is situated along the main motor route
through the heart of the Canadian Rockies and
is a starting point for an almost endless variety
of delightful sight-seeing trips. By covering the
Banff-Windermere Road and the Banff-Lake
Louise-Kicking Horse Road to Golden with a
detour to the Yoho Valley and Emerald Lake the
motorist is enabled to view some of the most
magnificent and inspiring scenery to be found in
this land of scenic marvels. Sightseeing auto-
busses operated on regular schedules and private
motor cars are available for both long and short
trips.
Hiking and Mountain Climbing
Any number of trails radiating in all directions
from Banff offer inviting possibilities for the
hiker, while for those who enjoy mountain
climbing, some fine ascents can be made in the
vicinity, most of which are not of a difficult
character.
Music and Dancing
There is dancing to the music of an excellent
orchestra each weekday evening in the ball room
at Banff Springs Hotel. Concerts every evening
and Nature Study talks frequently.
Boating
The Bow River, Echo River, Vermilion Lakes
and Lake Minnewanka afford excellent opportunities for canoeing, rowing and motor boating.
Canoes, skiffs and motor boats can be rented at
reasonable rates from the local boat livery.
Sightseeing trips by launch daily on the Bow
River and Vermilion Lakes and on Lake
Minnewanka.
Fishing
The lakes and streams in the neighborhood
of Banff are well worth the attention of angling
enthusiasts. Lake trout of large size are found
in Lake Minnewanka while other waters contain principally Cut Throat and Dolly Varden
trout. The Spray River, Spray Lakes, Forty
Mile Creek, Mystic Lake, the Sawback Lakes,
Vista Lake and Boom Lake, might be mentioned
as offering special fishing inducements. Most
of these places are reached by pony trail from
Banff where guides and equipment can be secured.
Reliable information and advice can be obtained
from local Government Fishing Inspector.
Hunting
Banff is an excellent outfitting centre and
starting point for big game hunting trips.
Although it is situated in Rocky Mountains
Park in which hunting is strictly prohibite 1,
outside the Park boundaries grizzly, cinnamon
and black bear, mountain sheep and goat,
moose, caribou and cougar afford splendid
sporting possibilities. In certain sections elk
(or wapiti) may also be hunted with good
prospects of success. Local guides and outfitters
can look after all requirements of hunting
parties.
Wild Flowers
The beautiful Alpine Wild Flowers which
grow in wonderful variety and profusion on the
mountain slopes and in the valleys around Banff
are a never failing source of interest and delight
to the nature lover and botanist. "Banff springs Hotel
BANFF, ALBERTA
TERRACE FLOOR AND
SWIMMING POOLS
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BANFF. ALBERTA
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
BANFF SPRINGS
HOTIL
BANtT ALTA.
FIRST FLOOR
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BANFF, ALBERTA
TYPICAL BEDROOM FLOOR
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
| BANFF SPRINGS
HOTEL.
BANrr ALTA.
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TRAILS
CANAD/AN   RAC/F/C   RAILWAY
• % % 1* o
Scale of Miles
i z 3 Founded 1880
Then As Now
a canadian
Institution
CANADIAN PACIFIC
Canada's National Enterprise
THE WORLD'S GREATEST TRAVEL SYSTEM
Serving Canada
b ridgi ng two
Oceans—Linking
Four Continents—
Spans the World
STEAMSHIPS
Canadian Pacific Steamships — two
fleets which unite America east and
west with other continents. Across the
Atlantic to Europe with approximately
3 sailings a week (Empresses, Duchesses
and other Cabin Class Steamships).
Across the Pacific to Japan, China and
Philippines (Empress Steamships,
regular sailings). Connections to
Australia and New Zealand.
RAILWAY
The Canadian Pacific Railway (comprising 20,409
miles of operated and controlled lines) reaches
from Atlantic Ocean to Pacific Ocean, across
Canada and into the United States. Main line from
Montreal to Vancouver, 2,886 miles. Fast, frequent
and luxurious transcontinental long distance and
local passenger services, linking up all the important cities, industrial sections, agricultural
regions and vacation resorts. Efficient and
dependable freight service.
HOTELS
The Canadian Pacific operates the
largest chain of hotels in Canada,
numbering fourteen (including the
Royal York Hotel at Toronto, largest
hotel in the British Empire, opened
June, 1929). Situated in large cities
or at holiday resorts—others to be
built. Also—nine Bungalow Camps in
the Canadian Rockies and Ontario.
TELEGRAPHS
Canadian Pacific Telegraphs
extend the entire length of
the railway and also reach
every point of importance in
Canada away from it. 140,000
miles of wire. Also cable
connections across both
oceans and working radio
arrangements.
EXPRESS
Canadian Pacific Express—
travellers' cheques to suit
all travelling arrangements,
and good all over the world.
Also a forwarding service for
package merchandise, with
world-wide connections —
including an air express
service.
CRUISES
Seven Famous Winter
Cruises—■
Round the World
South America  South Africa
Mediterranean (2)
West Indies      (3)
FARM  LANDS
Several million acres of
choice farm lands in Western
Canada for sale at low prices
and on long terms, including
irrigated land in Alberta.
Generous colonization policies that are helping to develop and settle the West.
ALL    UNDER    ONE    MANAGEMENT
Canadian Pacific Agencies Throughout the World
Canada and United States
Atlanta, Ga	
Banff, Alta	
Boston, Mass	
Buffalo, N.Y	
Calgary, Alta	
Chicago, 111	
Cincinnati, Ohio....
Cleveland, Ohio....
Detroit, Mich	
Edmonton, Alta	
Fort William, Ont..
Guelph, Ont	
Halifax, N.S	
Hamilton, Ont	
Honolulu, T.H	
Indianapolis, Ind. ..
Juneau, Alaska	
Kansas City, Mo	
Ketchikan, Alaska. .
Kingston, Ont	
London, Ont	
Los Angeles, Cal. . .
Milwaukee, Wis... .
Minneapolis, Minn..
Montreal, Que	
Moosejaw, Sask	
Nelson, B.C	
New York, N.Y	
North Bay, Ont	
Omaha, Neb	
Ottawa, Ont	
Peterboro, Ont	
Philadelphia, Pa. . .
Pittsburgh, Pa	
Port Arthur, Ont...
Portland, Ore	
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Quebec, Que	
Regina, Sask	
Saint John, N.B. . . .
St. Louis, Mo	
St. Paul, Minn	
San Francisco, Cal..
Saskatoon, Sask. . . .
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont
Seattle, Wash	
Sherbrooke, Que	
Skagway, Alaska....
Spokane, Wash	
Tacoma, Wash	
Toronto, Ont	
.G.
.G.
.C.
.H.
.W,
.A.
H.
G.
S.
J.
c.
c.
.E. G. Chesbrough, 1017 Healey Bldg.
J. A. McDonald, C.P.R. Station.
. L. R. Hart, 405 Boylston St.
. W. P. Wass, 160 Pearl St.
.G. D. Brophy, C.P.R. Station.
.T. J. Wall, 71 East Jackson Blvd.
,M. E. Malone, 201 Dixie Term'l Bldg.
Griffin, 1010 Chester Ave.
McKav, 1231 Washington Blvd.
Fyfe, C.P.R. Building.
Skynner, 108 South May St.
Tully, 30 Wvndham St.
MacDonald, 117 Hollis St.
. A. Craig, Cor. King and James Sts.
. Theo. H. Davies & Co.
.J. A. McKinney, Merchants Bank Buildng.
.W. L. Coates.
. R. G. Norris, 723 Walnut St.
. Edgar Anderson.
J. H. Welch, 180 Wellington St.
. H. J. McCallum, 417 Richmond St.
.W. Mcllroy, 621 South Grand Ave.
.F. T. Sansom, 68 East Wisconsin Ave.
.H. M. Tait, 611 2nd Ave. South.
. F. C. Lydon, 201 St. James Street.
.T. J. Colton, Canadian Pacific Station.
J. S. Carter, Baker & Ward Sts.
.F. R. Perry, Madison Ave., at 44th St.
. C. H. White, 87 Main Street, West.
. H. J. Clark, 727 W.OW. Building.
J. A. McGill, 83 Sparks St.
.J. Skinner, George St.
J. C. Patteson, 1500 Locust St.
. C. L. Williams, 338 Sixth Ave.
Gibbs, Canadian Pacific Station.
Deacon, 55 Third St.
Orchard.
Langevin, Palais Station.
Dawson, Canadian Pacific Station.
. G. E. Carter, 40 King St.
. Geo. P. Carbrey, 412 Locust St.
. W. H. Lennon, Soo Line, Robert & Fourth Sts.
. F. L. Nason, 675 Market St.
Hill, 115 Second Ave.
Johnston, 529 Queen St.
Sheehan, 1320 Fourth Ave.
Metivier, 91 Wellington St. North.
Johnston.
Cardie, Spokane International Ry.
O'Keefe, 1113 Pacific Ave.
Fulton, Canadian Pacific Bldg.
.F.
.W
.W
.c.
J
c.
H.
. c.
A.
W.
.G. B.
J. O.
.E. L.
J. A.
.L. H.
.E. L.
.D. C.
.Wm.
Vancouver, B.C. .
Victoria, B.C... .
Washington, D.C.
Windsor, Ont.. ..
Winnipeg, Man. .
. F. H. Daly, 434 Hastings St. West.
.L. D. Chetham, 1102 Government St.
,C. E. Phelps, 905 Fifteenth St., N.W.
.W. C. Elmer, 34 Sandwich St. West.
. C. B. Andrews, Main and Portage.
Europe
Antwerp, Belgium E. A. Schmitz, 25 Quai Jordaens.
Belfast, Ireland Wm. McCalla, 41-43 Victoria St.
Birmingham, Eng W. T. Treadaway, 4 Victoria Square.
Bristol, Eng A. S. Ray, 18 St. Augustine's Parade.
Brussels, Belgium G. L. M. Servais, 98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max.
Cobh, Ireland J. Hogan, 10 Westbourne Place.
Glasgow, Scotland W. Stewart, 25 Bothwell St.
Hamburg, Germany T. H. Gardner, Gansemarkt 3.
Liverpool, Eng H. T. Penny, Pier Head.
T ondom  Fnp /C E. Jenkins, 62-65 Charing Cross, S.W.
'      B \G. Saxon Jones, 103 Leadenhall St., E.C.
Manchester, Eng J. W. Maine, 31 Mosley Street.
Paris, France A. V. Clarke, 24 Boulevard des Capucines.
Rotterdam, Holland J. Springett, Coolsingel No. 91.
Southampton, Eng H. Taylor, 7 Canute Road.
Hong Kong, China G.
Kobe, Japan B.
Manila, P.I J.
Shanghai, China A.
Yokohama, Japan E.
Asia
E. Costello, Opposite Blake Pier.
G. Ryan, 7 Harima Machi.
R. Shaw, 14-16 Calle David, Roxas
M. Parker, 4 Bund.
Hospes, No. 21 Yamashita-cho
Bldg.
Australia, New Zealand, etc.
J. Sclater, Traffic Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for Australia and New Zealand.
Union House, Sydney, N.S.W.
A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for New Zealand,
Auckland, N.Z.
Adelaide, S.A Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Auckland, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Brisbane, Qd Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Christchurch, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Dunedin, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Fremantle, W.A  Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Hobart, Tas Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Launceston, Tas.. . Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Melbourne, Vic Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.),
Thos. Cook & Son.
Perth, W.A Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Suva, Fiji Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Sydney, N.S.W Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Wellington, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Any of the agents listed above will be glad to make reservations at Canadian Pacific Hotels for intending guests.
Canadian Pacific Motel Department
C. B. FOSTER,
Convention and. Tourist Traffic Manager,
Montreal.
D. J. GOWANS,
Asst. General Manager,
Eastern Hotels,
Montreal.
A. ALLERTON,
General Manager,
Eastern Hotels,
Montreal.
H. F. MATTHEWS,
General Manager,
Western Hotels,
Winnipeg.  Founded 1880
Then As Now
A   C A N A D 31 A N
I N S T I T U TION
ANADIAN FACII
Canada js NATioNATri5r«nrfiiu_:;lbisE
X-J
TJJE WORM)'S GREATEST TRAVEL-SYSTEM
OCFt A W8 L 1 NKING
Four   Continents -
Spans  iihb  World
-y
'•irmn Atlantic   0<:
way (comprising
STEAMSHIPS
Canadian    Pacilic   ^Jtealm phips — 'hip ^    ,,, 'T*fe
fleets which mrke/f A.'iiierica  east •    mil«s /ijf uper
west with. QtpKFKmAntnn. Acrosfcjpkj/ '    '"frap Atlantic  0 to
:mticjrt:^Europ^ wijfh n/p^cro^dnM^Iil^^'Xalv^ia at:,;!, i.m .
3 sailings li weekwEmprreftsRS, D ^M    N. Moopeal to Vac
and  ocfier   Cal^jt?.%.s   Steamsliipi)X\.     &(kI |i:k^ri.otggt^
Acros3m?j^
P.biUplinH
re#ti
HOTELS
Jkicific   operates   the
Muhpteilfi  in  Canada,
numbering   'iouWp \ (mtfttdjipg   the
%qva\ York fe^Ktfanr^feranifl^LurgeRt
in tlw il        hphe,  oper
929). / 5i:tjuJ|^d m \(arge cities
thVs   to  be
Tl
Ga.a
the raflwf|^SllS
every point a
■va '
miles of able
connections js;-
,   and   working radio
arxangemv
af»atJOn"*p
A L L    U N D E R    O N E    M" A N A G E M E N T
kTLANXA, G» . .
Banff, Alta. ,.
BOS'ION
Buffalo,
Calgary, Alta
Crane ago, .I'll..
Co< i, 0
CLEVELAND*, C
X>E •     Tic
IOMTOJH',
Fort William, Out
Guelph, Ont.	
I IF AX, N.S
THE EMPRESS OF BRITAIN
Canadian . eocies Ihroughoiit .the World
Canada and United States
H ami [.ion, Ont A, Cvd
,E. G, h, 1017 1
.j, . :"'.R. ■
L. R. Slav iatoa
.W, P. ,p*ss, I
.G. D„ flfcokv. C
.T. J. WaJ, 'WE
.M. K.JM^lone,
. G. H. Griffon, 1010 Chester A
. G, G... McKay, 1281 WaBhtafGott B
,C. S. Fyf'e, CP.R. Building;
H. J. Skynner, 108 South Mav St.
. W. C. lully, 30 Wyndham. St.
.A. C. MafiT)cmal.4.U7jHolli^LSt
. F. H. Daly, 43* HaaUmga St. W
.JL D. Chet.ham, H02 Government Sit
. C. E. P 05 Fifteenth. St., N,W
W. C, l£lmer, M Sandwich St. We?t
, C. B-Andrev?':;, .Main and Portage-
tk
Honolulu, T..FI.
Indianapolis.. In--:.
SAU, Alaska..
Kansas Ci:
Ketchixa.
Kingston, Chat
London, Ont.
Los Angeles, Ca
UKEE, Vv'F
Ml.'.
Mowtbueal, Que.
osejaw, Sask,
-.son, B.C	
ORK, I .
Bay, Gait	
eb	
.
Fori Artb
Portland, ....
Prince Rupert, B.C.
:, Que	
ask.
ST.
Si. i
Sault !
SEATTLE.   :
SKKkJIKOOlCK.
Skagway, /via
Spokane, Was
Tacoma,, Wa.sh.   .
H.ONTO, Ont.. , ,
ai
K
v.y, Merchants B;
Belfast,. Ireland
Brussels, Bel
Cobb., Ireland	
■ma mmm:fo
inn, r Tv
W. L. Coatea; " fC   \7"1 r^np '-*>
R. G. Noma, 723 WaltiJt^U   V IJ\   5 1 .Mi
lid gar .*
J.H.'«; iWellinj
j. I>rtll.-if;ii,»vi-Ms^L3JAkhmr.,iriit ,S^    jf) J Vr^f)^iM!iPrWW  Iv"
• iciir'oV,"'DSTsrnraT"ra,ftg",!ry# JLS-S*- •* k>- *i/3r,x2iT't t1
68 Easrl /e.
.1 2nd Ave. f.Hi»utJ
Cha:
[p. Saxon Tone-.. 10-i Lead
l|4 W. Maine, 31 M<
 A., V. Clarke, 24
.   . .   J". IS [»riirij|;ett,
rrrrt';:. Ih' aCn.rJuu£ iiaaag'-
Lvdon, 203. SL. James •' __. ,.,.        ..... _- . ^   ...  .,., .^.
-&«BfiA9^JNtific ipliM'Ja3S-':Sev#fl!    #
St. 	
^tt^i'a^Xon    Duchess AS«i*ifc«1i4t
Canadian Paci
: >eacoti, 55 Third Si:.
..]. W. '^.Vii>B|iii'!       ■    n, Paqil
'^ yi
i tin
V.Z
e. <isjiMiiipjpk3kdjes, "fliave tfte qmi«:ifi^c cume. across xmzMmtm
i. P. Garbiref> *12 Locudl St.                                                                        ..,,... U ■
ti. I.eni3.on,. So Rol>ert f>: Fowt I 	
g X^yglSaafgtcific Cruisc*,JKC*[*dl the'Worl:^-
J. O. ;U neetuS,
J. A. Metiv
, L. H. JohiTiafeon.
. If). L. Cardie. Spokarx
.D. C. O'Keofe, H13 Pa<
ii. Canadian i
Canadian Pacific
tQ
Unj.
r'E. R„ lliihrrfffz,^.";
Wm.,>CcCalla, 41-
W. T, Treacla.way, 4 \
A. S. Ray, IS St Aug
G. L. ISA.
H
i|r<uilifiitoiiseniarkt 8.
■erm^'Pw Head.
f■*-.■'£■ v.ii|i-;i^ m| "1
4      r     «      #      •
.)«':> I..
and 2'owittt Traffic Manager,
MOKTRXAL,
D, j, GOWANS,
meral Manager
Eastern Hotels,
Mi
S^'E'A'MiSH IPS
Depart;
R.TON,
i
Winnipeg. 11
IWfmM:
SWIMMING   POOL PRINTED  IN  CANADA

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