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Canada : water trips, motor tours Canadian Pacific Railway Company 1927

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 WATER. TBJPS'
MOTORTOXJRS
Ll/ictoria
n.  vancower _
VancouverJslatuL Suggested Trips to Canada Interest Points
Motor and Water Trips that will appeal to Tourists and
Vacationists seeking the unusual in beauty and comfort
Seattle-Victoria and Return:
A one-day trip on the Princess Kathleen and Princess
Marguerite, sailing from Seattle in the morning, spending more than three and one-half hours in the afternoon
in Victoria, and returning to Seattle the same evening.
Plenty of time in Victoria for sightseeing, a swim in the
Crystal Gardens and a visit about town.
Victoria:
A lengthier visit, affording ample time to drive about
the city and see many of the interesting points within
easy automobile distance over excellent roads.
Sooke:
A one-day trip, 22 miles from Victoria. Excellent salmon
and trout fishing; hiking up Mt. Shepherd. Good hotel
accommodations.
Shawnigan Lake:
A one-day trip, 27 miles from Victoria, affording fine
trout fishing.
Cowichan Bay:
36 miles from Victoria, affording excellent salmon fishing.
Cowichan Lake:
62 miles from Victoria. Good trout fishing in river and
lake.    Good hotel accommodations.
Parksville and Qualicum Beach:
A two-day trip from Victoria, 102 miles. Trout fishing,
sea bathing, golf.    Good hotel accommodations.
Cameron Lake:
108 miles from Victoria—a two-day trip. Good fly
fishing in May and June, with deeper fishing as the
season advances.
Sproat and Great Central Lakes:
104 miles from Victoria, in the heart of the Vancouver
Island mountain district. Fine scenery and good trout
fishing, both trolling and fly. Good hotel accommodations.
Comox:
A three-day trip, 150 miles from Victoria. Good salmon
and trout fishing; a beautiful farming valley. Good
hotel accommodations.
Campbell River and Forbes Landing:
A three-day trip, 176 miles from Victoria. Salmon fishing at Campbell River; trout fishing at Forbes Landing.
Strathcona National Park 15 miles from Forbes Landing.
Seattle-Victoria-Vancouver:
The Triangle Route, beginning at Seattle and sailing to
Victoria with your car, to be followed by a tour of
Vancouver Island. Over the famous Malahat Drive,
and then to Vancouver by Canadian Pacific ferry from
Nanaimo. Return from Vancouver by boat or via the
paved Pacific Highway — a delightful six-hour drive
across the international border at Blaine, and through
Bellingham and Everett to Seattle.
Grouse Mountain:
Sixteen miles from Vancouver, a marvelous trip over
Grouse Mountain Highway into a scenic mountain playground. The ultimate in scenic motoring and panorama
of the Northwest. Fine accommodations and outing
sports.
Capilano Canyon:
Almost within the city of Vancouver—a beautiful scenic
canyon with a suspension bridge famous over the entire
Pacific Coast.
than   1,000  acres, right in  the
A wealth of foliage and giant
Stanley Park:
A natural park of more
heart of Vancouver city.
trees; excellent view.
Marine Drive:
A famous drive around the entire shore line of Vancouver, visiting the well-known English Bay bathing
beach and many other points of interest. '•«>*• *-i
mm^*mt
Empress Hotel, Victoria
Canada Offers Uncpt-        %!harm and Interest to Every Tourist
W/HETHER the guest in  Canada prefers the life of  the  city, with  its many
ried  types of recreation,  or the country life with  its sports of field  and
stream, he can find in Canada just the diversion and entertainment he seeks.
In Victoria, for example, one finds the Parliament Buildings, Provincial
Museum and Library, Mineral Museum, Dominion Astrophysical Observatory,
Butchart Sunken Gardens and Brentwood, all having distinct appeal to the
sightseer. For the golfer, there are numerous fine courses, including the Colwood
Golf and Country Club, which is open to all guests at the Empress Hotel upon
payment of the regular green fees.
A distinct feature in Victoria is the Canadian Pacific Company's Crystal
Gardens, one of the largest indoor swimming pools on the American continent,
and a gymnasium, dancing palace and peacock promenade as well.
From Victoria the motorist follows the Island Highway over Malahat Drive
through  Duncan  and  Ladysmith  to  Nanaimo,   80  miles  distant.     Nanaimo,  the
second oldest city in British Columbia, is the center of the British Columbia coal
mining industry, and is tributary to numerous regions of scenic beauty and fishing
a city of distinct historical appeal.
At Nanaimo one boards a Canadian Pacific ferry for a magnificent
short sail to Vancouver, crossing the far-famed Gulf of Georgia. Vancouver, a city of 175,000 residents, is a commanding metropolis that
bristles with commercial life and tourist appeal.
In Vancouver there are many points of scenic interest, including
Stanley Park, the Marine Drive, Grouse Mountain Highway, Capilano Canyon, Lynn Canyon and English Bay. Here again golf plays an important
part, five courses offering distinct playing advantages to the tourist. One
of the newest and most attractive of the courses is Langara, recently built
by the Canadian Pacific Company. The Hotel Vancouver is the social and
business center of the city.
Vancouver is of great natural interest through its close proximity to
immense lumber and shingle industries, mining and farming interests. It is
the Pacific Coast terminal for the great Canadian Pacific Empress liners
that sail regularly to Japan, China and the Philippines, and the terminals
are always open for public inspection.
Both Victoria and Vancouver are cities well worth visiting, and the
tourist will find many interesting types of recreation, freedom and pleasure
in the British Columbia territory.
Crystal Gardens,
Victoria
Parliament Building,
Victoria
Grouse Mountain
Chalet, Vancouver
Copyright, J. Ward law
Hanaimo River
Canyon
Trout Fishing
'Hear Victoria
Stanley Park, Vancouver ONE of the most interesting and enjoyable features of a trip to Canada is
the voyage aboard the luxurious liners Princess Kathleen and Princess
Marguerite. These ships were built at Clydebank, Scotland, especially for the
Canadian Pacific Triangular Service, at a cost of $1,500,000 each, and are
capable of making an average speed of 21 knots an hour. In design, accommodations and service they are replicas of the largest trans-ocean Empress
liners.
The Observation Room, for example, is exceptionally spacious and is
arranged with large square windows to enable the passengers to obtain an
excellent view. Comfortable chairs and settees are furnished, where one may
relax and enjoy to the fullest extent the ever-interesting views.
The Library is entered by a stairway from the Observation Room as
well as from the Boat Deck, and is decorated with fine detail in Louis XVI
style. Bookcases where you'll find a wealth of good books, comfortable
lounge seats and charmingly designed oval tables upon which you'll find the
latest issue of your favorite magazine, form a part of the equipment. A feature of the Library is the Sperry Master Gyro Compass, which has been fitted
with a special case, enabling the passengers to view the working of the
internal mechanism.
The Dining Saloons of the ships are finely proportioned rooms, extending
across the full width of the ship and decorated in true Louis XVI
style. Large oval windows afford the passengers a beautiful
marine view while dining. Accommodations are provided for
dining 159 passengers, tables being arranged for parties of six,
eight and fourteen. The famous Canadian Pacific cuisine is
enhanced by the delightful surroundings. An additional feature
of the dining service is the luncheon counter, where one may
receive a quick lunch.
The  Smoking  Room  is  uniquely  decorated  in  an  Alaskan
motif.    Six totem poles—the curious, highly-carved "family trees"
on which the Indian records his tribal history, support the
elaborate carved and colored cornice of the raised part of the
room. There arc two large skylights in addition to the windows,
which are fitted with brilliantly colored leaded glass. Seats covered with brown hide arc arranged around the room, and in the
center are easy chairs and settees, also in brown hide. Tables
colored to harmonize with the general scheme are conveniently
placed.
The Social Halls arc a feature of the vessels, and have space
for dancing. Other parts arc arranged as Lounge Rooms, and
arc luxuriously furnished. Each of these two new ships has
sleeping accommodation for over 400 passengers, in two and
three berth cabins. There arc, distributed over the hoat, promenade and shelter decks, 86 rooms each containing lower and
upper berths and settee; on the promenade and shelter decks, 12
rooms with lower and upper berths and cot beds; and 11 rooms
with lower, upper and sofa berths. Bathroom and lavatory
accommodation is handily adjacent.
On the boat deck there are 21 "bachelor" rooms, each containing lower and upper berths and settee, with private shower
bath and lavatory adjoining.
One very notable feature of these new steamships is the
provision of 17 special rooms—4 on the promenade deck and 13
on the shelter deck. These special rooms are most luxuriously
furnished, with bright hangings and carpets, with beds instead
of berths, and each with private toilet and basin, with bathroom
ctwecn adjoining rooms. Eight rooms are one-bed rooms.
Four arc one-bed-plus-sofa rooms. Five are two-bed rooms, each
with sofa berth additional. During day runs these special rooms
arc exceedingly convenient for family parties.
Of  particular  interest  to  motorists  is  the  ample  space  for
the transportation of motor cars.    Fifty cars are very conveniently )5
carried.    These ships can handle any size passenger automobil
1—Observation
Room
2—The Verandah Cafe
-A Special   Stateroom
5—Smoking   Room
-A Special Stateroom
6—The Dining Saloon
Coast Service Time Schedules
SEATTLE-VICTORIA-VANCOUVER
"Princess Kathleen" and "Princess Marguerite"
Double Daily Service Effective May 15,  1927
Lv. Seattle   9:00 a.m.
Ar.  Victoria   12:45 noon
Lv.   Victoria       1:45 p.m.
Ar. Vancouver    5:45 p.m.
Lv. Vancouver  10:30 a. m.
Ar.   Victoria      2:30p.m.
Lv. Victoria    4:30 p.m.
Ar. Seattle   8:30p.m.
Seattle-Vancouver Direct
Lv. Seattle  11:30 p. m.
Ar. Vancouver  8:00 a.m.
Lv.  Vancouver   11:00 p. m.
Ar. Seattle   7:30 a.m.
Handling Passenger Automobiles of any size.
VANCOUVER-NANAIMO SERVICE
"M. S. Motor Princess"
Double Daily Service May 1 to September 15
Single Daily Service After September 15
Lv.  Vancouver    7:00 a.m.
Ar. Nanaimo  10:00 a. m.
Lv. Nanaimo  10:30 a. m.
Ar.  Vancouver      1:30 p.m.
Lv. Vancouver    2:15 p.m.
Ar. Nanaimo    5:15p.m.
Lv. Nanaimo    5:45 p.m.
Ar.  Vancouver   .....'   8:45 p.m.
Handling Passenger Automobiles of any size
S. S. "Charmer"
Double Daily Service Effective May 1, 1927
Lv. Nanaimo      5:15 a.m.
Ar. Vancouver    8:15 a.m.
Lv. Vancouver  9:15 a.m.
Ar.  Nanaimo  12:15  noon
Lv.  Nanaimo     2:00  p.m.
Ar.  Vancouver       5:00 p.m.
Lv. Vancouver    5:45 p.m.
Ar. Nanaimo   8:45 p.m.
Clearance for Automobiles 7 ft. 2 in.
VANCOUVER-VICTORIA
Daily Service
Lv. Vancouver 11:45 p.m. Lv. Victoria ....11:45 p.m.
Ar. Victoria ....  7:00 a.m.   Ar. Vancouver    7:00 a.m.
The times of arrival and departure will be followed as
closely as possible, but are subject to weather conditions
and to change without notice.
Canadian Pacific Ferry Service
VANCOUVER-NANAIMO
CANADIAN AND UNITED STATES CUSTOMS REQUIREMENTS
Automobiles will not be permitted to cross the international boundary if passenger cannot show registration number of
car and maker's name.
If the automobile is to remain in Canada less than thirty days (90 days in United Slates) a touring permit is obtainable
from the customs officer at the port of entry, allowing the car to be run for one month (90 days in United States) without
securing a  customs bond  or  depositing duty.
If more than a thirty-day stay is planned in Canada an extension for a further period, not exceeding thirty days, may be
obtained, without bond or deposit, upon presentation to Customs, (a) the original permit granted at the port of arrival into
Canada and (b) a certificate from an authorized representative of a recognized Canadian Automobile Club or Association.
A second extension for thirty days, without bond or-deposit, may be secured by following the  same procedure as above.
In order to bring the car back into the United States or Canada duty free on the return journey, it must be registered
with the customs officer at the international border when leaving the United States or Canada, and a certificate of export
obtained. Owners of Canadian cars entering the United States may obtain permit from Canadian customs at Vancouver or
Victoria, and similar permit for United States cars entering Canada may be obtained from United States customs at
Seattle.
Canadian Pacific M. S. "Motor Princess"
The Canadian Pacific Company offers regular automobile ferry service between Nanaimo and Vancouver
throughout the year. The modern, spacious ships on this
run have ample capacity for automobiles, and are fully
fitted with observation rooms, smoking rooms, delightful
meal service and roomy deck accommodations. The scenic
element of this trip is one of the features of a tour in
British Columbia.
An Interior view aj the "Motor Princess," showing ample space
for motor cars  on the delightful  voyage  between  Vancouver and
T^anaimo
AUTOMOBILE RATES
Seattle to Victoria $5.00    $6.00    $6.50    $7.00
Victoria to Vancouver   5.00      6.00      6.50      7.00
Nanaimo to Vancouver  4.00       5.00       5.50      6.00
(Reduction for Round Trip Tickets)
Rates made  are  wheel-base  measurement,  as  follows:
Up to  105 in., from  105 to 115 in., from  115 to  125
in., over 125 in.   (Exclusive  of  Passenger Fares)
H. W. SCHOFIELD
District Passenger Agent, B. C. Coast S. S. Service
Vancouver, B. C.
C. H. BOWES N. R. DESBRISAY
Asst. Gen'l Pass'r Agent General Passenger Agent
Vancouver, B. C. Vancouver, B. C.
C.  E. McPHERSON J. W. TROUP
Asst. Pass'r Traffic Manager Manager B. C. Coast Service
Winnipeg, Man. Victoria,   B.   C.
BSk
BUS
■UMMM1 WATEICTBJPS
MOTORTOUPsS
^ancouver-Viptoria
^Vancouver
Island

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