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Lake Windermere Bungalow Camp Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Canadian Pacific Hotels. Lake Windermere Camp 1924

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«i«i« Between the main line of the Rockies and the subsidiary
but equally spectacular Selkirk Range lies a long and
beautiful valley traversed by two rivers, the Columbia and
the Kootenay, which eventually, after curious turns and
twists, unite their streams far to the south. In this valley,
half way between Golden on the main line of the Canadian
Pacific Railway and Cranbrook on the Crow's Nest Branch,
lies Lake Windermere, a warm-water lake over ten miles in
length and from one to three miles in breadth. The lake is
surrounded by bench land, much of which has recently been
transformed by irrigation into good farm land; behind the
benches are the foothills, and then the towering, jagged
mountains typical of this region.
Lake Windermere is one of the newer tourist regions of
the Canadian Pacific Rockies. Not that it is without fame,
for it is the source of the mighty Columbia River, the most
important waterway that flows into the North Pacific. Nor
is it without history, for the explorer David Thompson discovered it as long ago as 1 807, and established a trading
post at Kootenai House. But although its charm has always
been known to the "old-timers" who have pioneered in this
lovely valley, it is only since the construction of a railway a
few years ago that the outside world has taken any real
notice of it.
This railway is a branch that connects Golden on the
main line of the Canadian Pacific with Cranbrook on the
Crow's Nest Line. To this can now be added a fine highway, the Banff-Windermere road, completed in 1922 by the
Canadian Government. The road is a magnificent one taking
the traveller over 1 00 miles of the most spectacular.mountain
scenery of the continent. It can be travelled either by horse
or by automobile, for it is in first class condition for motor
traffic.
To afford increased facilities for the accommodation of
the increasing number of tourists at Lake Windermere, an
attractive Bungalow Camp has been constructed on the
shores of the lake, and has proved exceedingly popular. It
will be open for the season of 1924 from July 1 st to
September 15th, inclusive.
Lake Windermere Camp has accommodation for about
fifty guests. It consists of a large main building, with a wide
verandah, and containing a combination dining, recreation
and lounging room, with an open fireplace; and of separate
small living and sleeping bungalows. Each of the latter has
single beds, store, clothes closet, wash basin, running water,
mirror, table and chairs. A double bath-house, with hot and
cold running water, contains separate bath room and toilets.
All the buildings are electrically lighted.
Printed in Canada—1924 T"
LAKE WINDERMERE
CAMP AND THE
COUNTRY IT
SERVES
1. Miriam   Lake,   at   the   summit   of
Sinclair Pass.
2. On   the   Verandah   of   the   Club
House, Lake Windermere Camp.
3. Looking   over   Athalmer   to   Lake
Windermere Camp.
4. Red Gates, Sinclair Canyon, Banff-
Windermere Road.
5. Lake of the Hanging Glaciers.
6. Hot Springs, Sinclair Canyon.
I
7. Lake Windermere Camp.
8. A mile of Ice Cliffs at the Lake of
the Hanging Glaciers.
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David Thompson Memorial Fort
±\.(2tCS—Rates at Lake Windermere Camp are $5.50
per day or $35.00 per week, American plan. Mail or
telegrams should be addressed to Lake Windermere Camp,
Lake Windermere, B.C.
SpOrt—The privileges of the Golf Club at Lake
Windermere are available to guests of the Camp on payment
of a small fee. Mountain ponies of local breed are available
for riding the trails, and the neighboring village of Invermere
has automobiles for the excellent roads of the valley. In
several of the creeks and smaller lakes within easy reach,
good trout fishing in season may be had. The water of Lake
Windermere itself is too warm for trout, though it contains
countless squaw fish, many of large size. There are also
landlocked salmon to be caught by trolling in spring.
For bathing and boating the wonders of Lake Windermere are ideal. The summer temperature averages about
68 degrees, and the water is crystal-clear. There are
several islands on the lake, each tempting the explorer.
Lake Windermere is an outfitting centre for hunting goat,
bear, and deer on the slopes of the Selkirks, and goat, mountain sheep, moose, bear and deer in the famous hunting
grounds of the Kootenay Valley.
The David Thompson Memorial Fort, built of huge logs
with palisades and bastions, is only a short walk from the
Camp; it is used as a recreation hall and Indian Museum.
Toby Creek—Among the many expeditions to be
recommended are those up Toby Creek, Sinclair Canyon and
Horse Thief Creek. Nine miles up Toby Canyon, Toby
Creek is spanned by a spectacular bridge three hundred feet
above the bed of the stream, uniting roads on either side, so
that a highly interesting round trip automobile ride of eighteen
miles can be made from Lake Windermere Camp. Beyond
the bridge the road leads in the direction of Earl Grey Pass
or Wells Pass to Kootenay Lake.
Horse Thief Creek—Horse Thief Creek is an
easy gateway to very spectacular glacier country.    One can
A
Horse Thief Creek
drive by auto for eighteen miles, after which there is.a pony
trail leading direct up towards Horse Thief Creek, with a
new trail to the wonderful Lake of the Hanging Glaciers.
Or one can branch up Mackenzie Creek to Iron Cap, where
on a ridge at an elevation of 1 0,000 feet one has a magnificent panorama of 1 00 miles of snow-clad peaks.
Banff - Windermere   Road — The  new
Banff-Windermere Road is the last link in the "Grand
Circle Tour" to California. From Banff the route is at first
the road to Lake Louise, but at Castle (about 20 miles before reaching Lake Louise) it leaves this road and takes a
more southerly course, crossing the Bow and rising to the
Vermilion Pass (altitude 5,264 feet). Here it enters
Kootenay Park. From Marble Canyon, a remarkable fissure
three hundred feet deep, there is a trail to the curious Ochre
beds. The road then follows the Vermilion River to its
junction with Kootenay River.
Crossing the Kootenay River, the road follows through
a beautiful avenue through virgin forest, then ascends the
Sinclair Pass between the Briscoe and Stanford Ranges.
Turning westerly again, it reaches Radium Hot Springs, long
famous for their radium qualities. Emerging through the gap
at Sinclair Canyon, the road meets the Columbia River about
9 miles north of Lake Windermere.
Touring automobiles can be hired in either Banff, Lake
Louise, or Windermere.
Other CampS—Three smaller Bungalow Camps
have been established along the Banff-Windermere road,
and afford convenient stops for meals or lodging. These are:
Storm Mountain Bungalow Camp—
26 miles from Banff—78 miles from Lake Windermere.
Vermilion River Bungalow Camp—
50 miles from Banff—54 miles from Lake Windermere.
Radium Hot Springs Bungalow Camp—
91 miles from Banff—1 3 miles from Lake Windermere.  y&
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