The Chung Collection

Chung Logo

The Chung Collection

Tax assessments and related records Yip Sang Company 1920

Item Metadata

Download

Media
chungtext-1.0225759.pdf
Metadata
JSON: chungtext-1.0225759.json
JSON-LD: chungtext-1.0225759-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): chungtext-1.0225759-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: chungtext-1.0225759-rdf.json
Turtle: chungtext-1.0225759-turtle.txt
N-Triples: chungtext-1.0225759-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: chungtext-1.0225759-source.json
Full Text
chungtext-1.0225759-fulltext.txt
Citation
chungtext-1.0225759.ris

Full Text

 ACTIVE MEMBERSHIP CARD       j_\, 9 \ £ 4
THE   ASSOCIATED   PROPERTY OWNERS   OF  VANCOUVER
RECEIVED OF
4a____a___i_?
The Sum  of Twenty ^vjf Dollars.    Membership  Fee for
Year Ending 3G3T Af^ril./ 19.iL/t
.19..
TREASURER Telephone Seymour 4835
».■'.»-
THE ASSOCIATED PROPERTY OWNERS OF VANCOUVER
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
350.  Pender Street west,
March 20th (1920. M „ ^
«««.«,**    M \J.,_\y. VANCOUVER,    B.C.
Yip Sang Esq,
51.   Pender Street East
Vancouver,  B.C..
Dear Sir;-
I "beg to  acknowledge  receipt  of vour application for Membership
in  the above Association & taufee pleasure in notifying you +hat  tne
Executive Coramitt** have passed tne application & your Membership      Card
is  enclosed herewith*
Fotices of all Meetings will he mailed you from tia* to time & we trust timt
you will recoamead to your friends the xaxistOLiXi^jcx advisability of joining
this Society,
Yours very truly. s ^~
Telephone Seymour 48a
THE ASSOCIATED PROPERTY OWNERS Of VANCOUVER
Office of The Secretary
350 Pender St. West,
Vancouver, B. C,
June 12th, 1920.
A Meeting of the City Council will be held at
City Hall on Monday afternoon next   (14th. inst) at 2.30
o'clock, to consider a recommendation from the Engineer's
Department whereby the annual rental of Sidewalk areas
(underneath) will be Increased 100^.
ZHI§^HECTS YOU.  ATTEND WITHOUT SAIL AND 1AEE
YOUR PROTEST EMPHATIC.
Just another reason why Property Owners should
work and vote against all Money By-laws until the Taxation
System is "broadened.
.., . Yours truly,
ASHWORTH ANDERSON,
Secretary. ££EHl5il°E_££_l!l£££HI£!l_.19£3» II4>2£0: IE  1919> 12^,050. Increase It
INCREASE IN COST OF CIV^ DEPARTMENTS« YEAR 1915 0_Q^ARED_WITH 1919.
Department 1913 1919        Increase
Parks
Police
Eire
Health
Juvenile Court
66,564
397,923
413,516
59,236
11,205
Schools (Operating only) 640,915
66,950
408,560
429,930
62,665
14,811
1,024,813
Half of 1 %
2.6 per cent
3.9 per cent
5.7 per cent
32 per cent
59 per cent
1 RELIES1 DEPARTMENT
i         	
31,203
74,045
137 per cent j
[details of increases
IN
RELIEF depart_en
r YEAR 1913
COMPARED WITH |
|1919
[Salaries
1
3,959
18,866
110 per cent|
1
[Departmental Expenses
5,055
13,794
172 per cent|
jGeneral Relief
i
jl~l * Ofji
37,284
215 per cent|
1
[Old People's Home
6,134
14,275
132 per cent|
'Creche
4,368
5,009
15 per cent!
INCREASES IS  GHAUTS FOR CIVIC WELFARE WORE OUTSIDE RELIEF DEPARTMENT
General Hospital 80,834        157,181       94 per cent
Charitable Grants        23,528 33,304       41 per cent
Excluding far Charities
The Canadian Patriotic Fund distributed in the City of Vancouver in
the year 1919  | 232,369.55
COST OF RELIEb1 DEPARTMENT AS COMPARED WITH COST OF HEALTH DEPARTMENT
In 1908
In 1913
In 1919
Relief, with a population of 66,500
cost in relation to the cost of the
Etealth Department       27 per  cent
As a Separate Department, with a
population of 114,220, the cost of the
Relief Department In relation to the
cost of tbe Health Department was     52.6 per cent
The cost of the Relief Department with
a population of .123,050 (an increase
of 7 per cent from 1913) cost in
relation to the cost of Health Dept.   110.5 per cent £^Hll'ii2!l_°i„Z2:£££HI!:!I„l.91I'__i14 i gj^': in 1919, _I23,050. Increase 1%
7 i—
IE251ASB„Il!_^T^OF_CI-*^.j DEPARTMENTS. YEAR 1913 C Q£?ARED WITH 1919.
Department 1913 1919        Increase
Parks
Police
Eire
Health
|   66,564
397,928
413,516
59,236
Juvenile Court 11,205
Schools (Operating only) 840,915
% 66,950
408,560
429,930
62,665
14,811
1,024,813
Half of 1 $
2.6 per cent
3.9 per cent
5.7 per cent
32 per cent
59 per cent
[RELIEF DEPARTMENT
31,203
74,045
137 per cent, j
!DETAILS OF INCREASES IN RELIEF DEPARTMENT YEAR 1913 COMPARED WITH |
11919 ,        I
(Salaries
D e p a r t m e n tai Exp e :n s e s
General Re 11ef
J Old Pe opl e ' s Home
I
j Creche
8,959
5 a 55
.L -L - ^7 33 L
6,134
4,368
18,866
13,794
37,284
14,275
5,009
110 per cent|
I
172 ner cent)
I
215 per cent!
I
132 per cent)
I
15 per cent]
INCREASES IU  GRANTS FOR CIVIC WELFARE WORK OUTSIDE RELIEF DEPARTMENT
General Hospital 80,834        157,181       94 per cent
Charitable Grants        23,523 33,,304       41 per cent
.Excluding War Charities
The Canadian Patriotic Fund distributed In the City of Vancouver in
the year 1919   f 232,369.55
COST OF RELIEF DEPARTMENT A3 COMPARED WITH COST OF HEALTH DEPARTMENT
In 1908
In 1913
In 1919
Relief, with a population of 66,500
cost in relation to the cost of the
Health Department  27 per cent
As a Separate Department, with a
population of 114,220, the cost of the
Relief Department In relation to the
cost of the Health Department was     52.6 per cent
The cost of the Relief Department with
a population of 123,050 (an increase
of 7 per cent from 1913) cost in
relation to the cost of Health Dspt.   110.5 per cent Population of Vancouver 1913, J31-3^220: _in_1919L_125,05Q. Increase 7j
INCREASE IN COST OF CIVlC~DEPARTMENTS. YEAR 1915 GC^-ARED WITH 1919.
Department                1913 1919 Increase
Parks              $   66,564'   $ 66,950 Half of 1 i
Police                 397,928 403,560 2.6 per cent
Eire                   413,516 429,930 3.9 per cent
Health                  59,236 62,665 5.7 per cent
Juvenile Court          11,205 14,811 32 per cent
Schools (Operating only) 640,915 1,024,813 59 per cent
[RELIEF DEPARTMENT       31,203 74,045      137 par cent
|DETAILS OF INCREASES IN RELIEF DEPARTMENT YEAR 1913 COMPARED WITH
11919
[Salaries 8,959 18,866      110 per cent
I
|Departmental Expenses    5,055 13,794      172 per cent
t
|General Relief 11,821 37,284      215 ner cent
I
jOld. People's Home        6,134 1.4,275      132 per cent
I
|Creche 4,368 5,009       15 per cent
INCREASES IN-GRANTS FOR CIVIC WELFARE WORK OUTSIDE RELIEF DEPARTMENT
General Hospital 80,334        157,181       94 per cent
Charitable Grants        23,528 33,304       41 per cent
Excluding War Charities
The Canadian Patriotic Fund distributed, in the City of Vancouver in
the year 1919  $ 232,369.55
COST OF RELIEF DEPARTMENT AS COMPARED IITH COST OF HEALTH DEPARTMENT
In 1908       Relief, with a population of 66,500
cost In relation to the cost of the
Health Department  27 per cent
In 191.3       As a Separate Department, with a
population of .114,220, the cost of the
Relief Department in relation to the
cost of the Health Department was     52.6 per cent
In 1919       The cost of the Relief Department with
a population of 123,050 (an increase
of 7 per cent from 1913) cost in
relation to the cost of Health Dspt.   110.5 per cent a
7*M
9
INCORPORATED   1869
i^T
XEbe IRo^ai Bank of Canaba
j/
.Required a   ...Dr/ift otyt
l)%Jav{
O*'       \Jy~)
ai^ .4.Forj$i7eJum,A)f.
Ji
&/mfi
19}S&
No. Par $
Exchange, per c. $
Checked by	
f933*e>
$ 7/£-;9
 -___a_7l^
*j£lU/3uJ
mm TLhe 1Ro?al Bank oi Canaba
>J 19lX&
No Par $ d$C
Exchange, ...per c. $      yy.rV
 .-_*••->" -.
Form No. 20.
$
QJi?F legal Sank of Canada.
INCORPORATED  1869.
EAST END BRANGH |9|
Vancouver; b: c
To..^Ct^-%-yo^   t:7'7' <* » a       '-9
f }   (TTSi-^'Ctt^ ty£
Sir,
Please take notice that
a promissory Note oi yS.S39Sy%yA f^^^ST
9        339/3 777
for $ cr3$t3iT..33. endorsed by you, which
matured on the    h3^^.^^^S^7y.y..SyP..	
lies   at   this   Bank   dishonored,   where   payment   is
immediateka^qpiped.
ANAGER *
BOWSER. REID,WALLBRIDGE, DOUGLAS a GIBSON.
BARRISTERS. SOLICITORS, S.^^2^
W.  J.    BOWSER.   K. C.
P.   L.    REID.   K. C.
S.  W    „i_Q(R1DGE.
H.   DOUGLAS.
J. C.GIBSON.
YORKSHIRE BUILDING   ,£
525 SEYMOUR STREET
TfcLEFHONE  SEYMOUR 6800
Cable, address, "BOWfridge
CODES     A*  B* C*
^-uuts      WESTERN UNION
VANCOUVER, B.C.
March  3rd,   1920.
KINDLY ADDRESS-ALL  LETTERS TO  THE  FIRM
Mr. Murray.
ATTENTION   OF
Mr. Yip Sang,
c/o Wing Sang & Co.
51 Pender St, East,
Vancouver,  B.C.
Dear Sir:-
KB  &INFGHD V  Yjp  SANG:
The  trial of  the action is fixed for Tuesday the
23rd   inst.,   at 10:30 a.a.   before His Honour Judge Ruggles,
You might let us know if you will have Subooena served on W. W.
York,   or if  you prefer  that we send it out to Steveston for
service.      We would like  to  se, Hagawara some time before the
trial and see   if he  can add anything to the evidence.
WA
Yours  truly,
BOWSER REID  WALkBRUffi DOUGLAS & GIBSON.
Per. 4*93? '^~"~3S>S^ fiEAD  OFFICE!
,.s ■
SSB? Hastings St. West
VANCOUVER, B. C.
*>S.
y.-
a
72.1... .-.-.,-,... ,,.,aEAa^*^^-Efc:E^r-E:10i..af
L/,     ^S^-.33yS7'y72-^3=3^"....
IN   ACCOUNT   WITH
GOSSE-MILLERD PACKING CO., LTD.
->&--i
rt
>'^
3%
fVyyyj
|**\     :JUr-77    nrx.A!     *^t43Srt^7<^9€%       pJT
o — ivj- -*' Nfc*
Pk    Q
.3 vV--*"*"'  j-J*. •      Hjvfc
A
• a~-  i   a-m/i x yy*yK,
mm*   Y
J   ES t>   -     ~
P-7o* -
HHpi __H IB—-WWpBBBbBBI Van convey, B.C*
lOtember 22nd, 1918,
SEDOIDA CASIIIG 80  GOLD S2GB.     *  f a. :..D
II ACOOUHE i:i2H
MESSRS. ESUJiaGEO & HIGASHIDE.
1918.
Oct. 29.
Hot*. 2.
• 5*
m  10.
* IS.,
?' 16,
11 18.
" 16.
" 19.
' * 21.
28 tons, at |20. per ton
W Jf   ?!   •   n  .    M     I?
10. "  *   n
8. " H   !t
10. n  "  *
n   n
6S.S tons, at $30.00 per ton
6.7 tons at $ 25.00. per ton
20. "       " ,f       "
10. "       * " "       "
!J tt tl tt H 1?
41.7    tfes at £25.00 per ton
less, allowance
Xs@se -
3:3^  .;..t
00.00
200.00
$1899.00
.fl!042.5g_
..a
2200.00
741,    I
rS'ESS .y%.
¥anscnwerf 3.0,- 2e<*« 10th. 1918.
Ro&onda Canning & Cold Storage- Go. Limited
ii ago on*::   tm
Messrs* 2siijim©t*o & EigaeMde.'
•v »sist»   Sy Bft.ia.ne© t-s a-*''-.
■Sot.  22nd. Billed. XdOOO^    a.'ortage
Hov.' 28th. Billed 20000#)
|74!*50.
rr PS o A
,.','
)
or!
floy. i   f ii . aa.    *
Sot.  50th. I aa...a   ■
■^80*        3tli. o'a.Ei'        'a:;EA-.
33'3.3.3 ' I o 1®4    '   :; .-:   -'}:      3
-    aa 1 ;■;■:>■■■■ ■3.XT y   to  dat
)  Shortage 5800 #
1/5 2
OB       (
at        i .00 psr 2on
' 3^3,00
. Bjaajrteal of Bait -   -
■ -           .
 -—--•-*-—->......-— .—....- -
•3W^m-y
.3    V96.50
Iot.  Mf*  Eo cash
aoo.oo .
.';      *'.-,
" '  25.     "       «
aaoo
>          ,
*    215.    5I   '   .  2 .,, ■    n note
*                                              s .'...■  ' ■ . ' .'• »E0         j."
1918  ta Rog.   :..-
G   AlCHtaD    a;b    2 ,
tux
- ■
j,     ...    XO
i
J^MtM--   *
I i        .  -
-    f'954.50 t^L   ^ X-^y      ^"^fy?    IL?71^
Lo 0 /Lt-yC** £Y'(S3/W72*^21,      3 > 9,a ..
s^
.33 y
AGENT FOR
ARTHUR  JAMES
FISH   HOOKS
JOS.GUNDRY&CO.
SALMON  NETS 6. TWINE
SAWYER
EXCELSIOR  OILED   CLOTHING
,     TAYLOR
FISHING   BOOTS
BALL   BAND
RUBBER BOOTS
MANUFACTURER OF
Your Order No.
Our   Folio No.
-DAYS    NET
C.K1  IO|   j^Q        %  D[SCOUNT |F pAID BY
fy?
10 dye.
Wing Sang Oo.,
Steveston,  B.   C.
68^VavraiRST.
IMPORTER OF
COTTON DUCKS AND DRILLS
COTTON AND MANILA ROPE
COTTON TWiNE AND NETTING
ANCHORS OARS BLOCKS AND
BOAT FITTINGS OF ALL KINDS
vi
TELEPHONES^  603 1.
SEYMOUR      I 6032.
Cable Address "LIPSETT"
A.B.C.Code 4*™ sS^Ed'ticns
LIPSETT-CUNNINGHAM & CO: IIP
REPRESENTATIVES'AT
PRINCE   RUPERT,  B.C.
■a. sept. i8th, 1918,
2 Pr. #6 VAC-Hip Ext. Sole Boosts
3 Pr. #7      ditto
2 Prs #8      ditto
2 Pr. #9 Vac Hip Boots
S  f
7 pr
$10.50
9.50
/
/ c.R'Bf,i-E:E;o:i^e
AGENT FOR
ARTHUR  JAMES
FISH   HOOKS
JOS. GUNDRY & CO.
SALMON  NETS 6. TWINE
SAWYER
EXCELSIOR  OILED   CLOTHING
TAYLOR
FISHING   BOOTS
:      'BALL   BAND
RUBBER   BOOTS
Your Order No Q.Higashide
Our   Folio No 495®	
FISH1WG   SUPPLIES
MANUFACTURER OF
68WaterSt.
-DAYS    NET
ICn (    10       V"  DISCO<JNT IF PAID BY      3_0      3SE   •
&oldfo   Wing Sang Co.,
51 Pender St.   E.
f/emww&fy
S^
IMPORTER OF
COTTON DUCKS AND DRILLS
COTTON AND MANILA ROPE
COTTON TWINE AND NETTING
ANCHORS OARS BLOCKS AND
BOAT FITTINGS OF ALL KINDS
TELEPHONES!  603 1.
SEYMOUR      J 6032.
 : Q	
Cable Address 'LIPSETT'
A.B.C.Code 4™ & 5T.f Editions
LIPSETT-CUNNINGHAM a CO.UP_
REPRESENTATIVES AT,
PRINCE   RUPERT,  B.C.
Sept. 12th, 1918
15
5
10
9i
1
1
28
1
lbs.
lbs.
lbs.
lbs.
coil
coil
lbs.
doz.
#6 Med Laid Twine a
^28 Soft ditto
#96 Hard ditto 'yi
#120       ditto
3/16" Cotton Bope S,
llj>2"        ditto
Cutch
5W Vule. Met Needles
39
1
S
^a
21;
22
/
lra.
lbs.
■hi
(I
T\
12
SE? 3 0191*
.91
.76
.i7i
,15 ea.
H3.65
3.85
7.80
7.41
lb.34
16.72
4.90
1.80
172.47 W. A. WOOD
PRESIDENT
W. G. MACKENZIE
VI="-J=RESIDENT   AND   MANAGING   DIRECTOR
3*.
M
SECRE"
K
BOUGHT OF
INVOICE No
ORDER No.
TERMS:
VANCOUVER. B. C,   0C1   10/18 \
WOOD, VALLANCE & LEGGAT, limited
1010083
HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE, AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES
AND SHIP CHANDLERY
WING SANG ,
a i 6^(^93,
CITY
"..,«'     '•"* V"
INTEREST  AT  8%  CHARGED  ON   OVERDUE  ACCOUNTS
This^Bill ma}) at  Vendors', option run60 days, but  Vendor* reserve the right to demand payment at any time without notice.
■
COIL   U»   DIA   PURE   MANILLA   ROPE   BEST
50       LBS  WHITE   CALKING   COTTON
SHIPPED     TO  0.    HIGASHIDE
NANAIMO     B   0
394# 4Ct      159 57
42g
j
i
CTGE
_9X   PACKING
21.   25
40
25
18
47
IMPORTANT—Do  not  RETURN  GOODS without first  receiving our permission.    Phone or write CLAIMS DEPT., giving
number and date of Invoice. W. A. WOOD
PRESIDENT
vW. G. MACKENZIE
RESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR
M
M. H.  LEGGAT
SECRETARY-TREASURER
! - ,
BOUGHT OF
VANCOUVER, B. C,   SEPT   12/18
WOOD, VALLANCE & LEGGAT, limited
912082
INVOICE No.
ORDER No.
TERMS:
A ING  SANG   CO
HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE, AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES
AND SHIP CHANDLERY
CITY   51 97e^^y^37y7S^y^
t
OB MP* .I^UOHW
INTEREST AT B% CHARGED ON OVERDUE ACCOUNTS
This Bill may at Vendors' option run 60 days, but Vendors reserve the right to demand payment at any time without notice.
4
Pr
1
Keg
1
Coif
2
Pr
1
c<a
h
D02-
IALL.
#1        RIBBED   R0.H0CKS
6"   COM.   „'l RE   NA»l 3  '
#«•   PURE  MAN.   ROPE^-A ^2#
36
'?k    6 95
41
7i-FT  OARS   COPPER  T»PPED-30«#    "?/20
f33l   X o#   HAMwERS
3b«   SLEDGE   HANDLES   G. S.:
b#
20
A a? |5 10
1
6
37
6
1
Onl^     d#   SPLI TTI HG  AEDGE S 0RE GON ?ff fefo
16# 15
Bov        7"   MU..1.   SAA   FILES   AM ER    3  90        i.92
LESS 30%
S99%99'y^Si^if3 ~S
CAUED   FOR
44
95
72
00
bO
42
12
37
ttoZfflVd 77:
993...
K^/er
Hn JVxxmmi iwify
*
ffyffl Set ty\ %<&&&<*& %
I9^y
f80611
&/3/1JJI
7
136V&
J^ A^
'Mii '"?* KS*
.«•   • ^SL
99/....
3tt JkttQxmt txritl|
y*r
% 9& f-  I
A
ar
E
a
I
9%
3
"£La
IK
L\7
*^     JTyy^ypyy^^y /i cxS U^-^ At4*W
*4   #
29(7° <^
/777y7>o
3l7$o(>o
2/)cy™
29]<r^
3l9)3rt^
29itr^
2A<s^
f?£\"0
2/3s#-*
/7)C /><>
3SS^
/&29?0
fy?y^*
LfX
Of
/3y °^
f<f& 9"
/?& ?c
fOS
1111 >°
7? O 99/	
&r
Jfrt JVxxmmt twtlj
7//yg^
rt
&	
0~0
tptya
*9 »
/37? 3y>
9$y*
3Lvf 69
/%f%Sf7
IJzsTT
LfCfkl?
J &
<\* <P.
x*~ *£_
77 &
Kfy-U"
h ft
tt
#,5>
e-n
C7-Z7
St/7—
j 9 7y/>
V$ 7>
S%Tp9r#
S?7>
2y?7r
ffti^
/a If 3s o>
/  <)/7SfC7
<iy7<T~-~
(\* + ~_
so**
//—
33
t^w
U Stiff
iflCf x f
C~z>
^7   361*?" .
s/...
■07337   „*-#*.
3ht .Attfluttt teritlj
^;,
./,<?/..
\±4>
7
70
<)S>
fo     %
zo7k
Ttf
-\
f/'ffc
y
^ '"3 x?~ ~j i"
a/3
/43*\
«\
y%
L//lt\
&-1
^3<*7k
n
r} 4 '-^9 )tl 7"v*.
7 A- ^'i^y
-
i
->7
39
3
/3b 3 <3h'%
7* ^    Vi* K
Z3
339
3<S"-fc*®-%-    Atfc^fc   3-^^ife   7--3^y<&
7 r~Q y^oo 7 7-0 l7tK?
<r<?<
73££.
*? r V
—    ""    \y
3
/ '3
77   ft 7f_{
7/3 v
337395-*°
_.fW
2/f_ %*f
399
/ q &a -—
/^ "
/7 "
?/' I
/ / 67S3L
3  Co
/ /J3
L/V30
/ 6^
/ p <? *
S*L7 'S
•39^7-9 ffiu fft ., fffc, gpStyLfa
' &4L%jLg^Ji_
2jy
3^7> p -
_&'
"■ . a...
,,.A..O
rv
0
ixj^
S*y
)
, *;. -i
W3-m *      .*
fc ,'.■'    *-**
€** ^ **'>   ?a ;, J
.0 **'*
mL ' -S    iP*1* 2» * fc-' *****
/      f       i   / 5
y 14 \    <        U y.
9 '      ■
:  n 11 -'
k
o     , '<
k -    * _
rv e» « o
?a     I
1
\7
h  \3•
3 &0f Ct o
<0* 7  * - *    )
/
, --P- t L3~l
■      7:     19
/   \
/ dO .
a &
&»*■ I
/   p O
(J   c
o     /
o
^r      '
(/
* conveyor, a substantial  covered way with sides  shall be
provided.
40. Ladders.—AH movable ladders (except substantial
step-ladders) shall be provided with either sharp points at
the foot or wide rough surface feet or other effective means
to prevent slipping. Ladders for use in oiling overhead
shafting, where necessary to rest same on the shafting,
shall be arranged to hook over the shafting. Ladders shall
extend at least two feet (2') above top of landing.
41. Stairways and Handrails.—All stairways shall be
equipped with handrails, and the rails shall be kept smooth
and free from.nails and splinters.
42. Where the Stairway is not built next to a wall or
partition, rails shall be provided for both sides.
43. Floor Openings shall not be allowed without guardrails and toe-boards without written permission from
the Board.
44. Floor Platforms and Wharves, etc., shall be kept
in good repair and free from nails and other debris.
45. Where timber, lumber, slabs, rock, or refuse is
dropped from mill floor to lower floor or ground, the space
where it is dropped to shall have a railing so as to prevent
any person from walking under said opening.
46. Emery-wheels, Hoods, and Guards.—Emery-wheels
used for grinding purposes shall be equipped with a hood
connected with an exhaust-fan or water system. A guard
shall be provided as a part of the hood-construction or in
addition to the hood, which shall be strong enough to
withstand the shock of a bursting wheel. This guard shall
be adjusted close to the wheel and extend over the top of
the wheel at a point thirty degrees beyond a vertical line
drawn through the centre of the wheel. The exhaust or
water system is not required on emery-wheels which are
ih general use by all employees in common to touch up
castings or tools.
47. Arbor Ends shall be guarded.
48. Speed of Wheel shall not exceed the speed guaranteed by the manufacturer or determined by the Inspector.
49. Goggles shall be supplied for workmen while working at emery-wheels, or the guard shall be equipped with
an extension guard with steel frame and heavy glass to
prevent sparks striking workmen in the eyes. Celluloid-
frame goggles shall not be used.
50. Passage-ways and Platforms.—Whenever it is
possible, thoroughfares through basements shall be avoided.
If not possible to avoid this altogether, any passage-way
that may have to be used as a thoroughfare shall be
properly protected and lighted.
51. Tanks.—The supports of all elevated tanks shall
be accessible for the purpose of inspection. Every tank
over seven feet (7') deep containing liquids shall have a
fixed ladder both inside and out. Rungs shall have a clearance of at least six inches (6").
52. Hogs and Grinders shall be properly guarded, so
that it is impossible for knots, chips, etc., to fly out and
injure workmen.
53. When it is necessary for workmen to pass under
bearings, said bearings shall be equipped with drip cups
or pans securely fastened in position, so as to prevent oil
from falling on floor.
54. Where iron or steel scrap is broken up with drop-
weight, the said area shall be completely enclosed on sides
eight feet (8') high, to prevent injury to workmen from
flying pieces.
SCAFFOLDS.
1. Scaffolds in particular shall receive .the most careful attention as to strength and rigidity.
2. All Scaffolds shall be kept in the best of repair and
all broken or rotten timbers or boards removed.
3. The Piling of excessive weights or concentrated
loads which might cause collapse of the scaffold shall at
all times be avoided. Where scaffolds are over ten feet
(10') above the ground or floor, they shall, where practicable, be equipped with ' a railing and toe-boards or
skirting-boards to prevent falling material. On suspended
scaffolds, where practicable, it shall'be necessary to use
wire rope for slings and stirrups.
4. Floor Openings shall not be allowed without guardrails and toe-boards, unless by permission of Inspector.
CRANES.
Safety Standards for Cranes.
Factor of Safety for all Parts other than Gears, and
complete hoist mechanism, 5.
Factor of Safety for brakes, 1.5.
Floorman to warn people out of the way.
Floorman or Hoistman to be provided with megaphone
or gong.
SAWMILLS.
1. Log-hauls.— (a.) For chain-hauls the return strand
of the chain in the basement shall be so supported over
passage-ways that in the event of its breaking it cannot
fall on any one beneath.
(b.) Unless clearly impracticable, every log-haul shall
have at least one runway of sufficient width to enable a
person to stand clear of logs in the chute.
(c.)    Runway shall be equipped with handrail.
2. Log-deck.—Provision shall be made at the mill end
of the log-deck to afford substantial protection from rolling
logs to the sawyer and other employees who may be engaged around the band or circular mill.
3. Carriage.— (a.) When a log-deck is equipped with
a steam-operated nigger, carriage knees shall be equipped
with goose-necks or straight bar extending eighteen inches
(18") or more above top of knee.
7
-Jfc_ (b.) The seat or stand of the setter shall be fitted
with an adequate protection to prevent his coming in contact with the wall timbers or rafters where the clearance
between the back of the setter's seat and the wall timbers
of the mill structure is less than eighteen inches (18").
(c.) There shall be placed at each end of the carriage-
travel a substantial buffer-stop, preferably equipped with
spring or pneumatic buffers.
(d.) Means shall be provided for securely locking the
sawyer's log-turning and carriage-control levers.
4. Band-mills.— (a.) All band-mills and band re-saws
shall be adequately protected when running.
(b.) Every band-mill wheel shall be carefully inspected at least once a month, and all hubs, spokes, rims, bolts,
and rivets subjected to hammer tests and examined thoroughly.
(c.) Every band-mill shall be equipped with a saw-
catcher or rest of substantial construction.
(d.) Opening above band-mill into filing-room shall be
boxed and covered, with a cross-bar to lock same.
5. Band Resaws.— (a.) These shall have gears covered on feed-rolls and shall have a sufficiently heavy board
up in front to catch the blow in case saw should break.
(b.) Guards shall be installed to cover both upper and
lower wheels of all band resaws.
(c.) The up-travel shall be completely guarded, and
the down-travel shall be guarded with a shield extending
down to the guide.
6. Circular Saws.— (a.) A screen of wire cloth or other
suitable device shall be so placed on circular-saw mills as
to protect the sawyer from flying particles.
(b.) Circular-saw mills shall be equipped with safety
guides, which will admit of adjustment without the use of
a wrench or other hand-tool.
7. Edgers.—(a.) There shall be a screen of wire cloth
or wood both back and front of the edger to prevent flying
knots, chips, etc., or the top of the edger must be completely covered over.
(b.) Bench or single-saw edgers shall be equipped with
splitter and saw-guard.
8. Live Rolls.—(a.) All live-roll gears shall be guarded
on the top, bottom, and sides.
(b.) Driving-shafts of live rolls shall be guarded on
top and sides.
9. Jump-saws.—Jump-saws shall be guarded below the
top of the roll and a stop shall be provided which will prevent any timber from being thrown off the live-roll case
and on to the carriage-track.
10. Swing-saws.—All swing-saws shall have guard
over front and safety stop to keep them from swinging out
too far.
11. Slashers.—Slasher-saws., shall be guarded front
and back.
12. Trimmers.—A guard shall be provided in front of
all trimmer-saws unless the method of control is such that
the point where the belt, rope, or chain runs on to the
pulley sheave or sprocket, if within six feet six inches
(6' 6") of the floor or platform, shall be guarded.
Exception.—Belts which are so small that they are
not in any way a source of danger. '
32. All Horizontal Belts, Ropes, or Chains driving
machinery or shafting six feet six inches (6' 6") or less
above the floor or platform, where exposed to contact,
must be guarded. All overhead belts six inches (6") or
more in width and over six feet six inches 06' 6") from
the floor or platform, shall be guarded underneath and on
sides, unless so guarded that persons cannot pass under
them. All chains or rope-drives over six feet six inches
(6' 6") from the floor or platform shall be guarded in like
manner to belts over six inches (6") in width. In all cases
the guard should cover the outer faces of the two pulleys
or sheaves and extend upward to such a point and be
attached in such a way that, in case the belt, chain, or
rope breaks, the guard will withstand the whipping force.
33. Vertical and Inclined Belts shall be substantially
guarded as follows: If the guard be less than fifteen
inches (15") from the belt, there shall be a complete enclosure of wood or metal to a height of six feet (6'), unless
it is a small belt, then with the permission of the Board
a small belt-guard need only be three feet six inches (3'
6") high. If the guard is placed at least fifteen inches
(15") clearance from the belt, a two-rail railing at least
three and one-half feet (3y2')  shall be required.
34. Belt-tighteners which control the operation of
machines shall be equipped with a safety -lock or stop
which will prevent the application of the tightener to its
belt until the lock or stop is released.
35. Transmission Gearing.—In this term is included
all forms of spur-gears, pinions, bevel-gears, mortise-
wheels, and sprockets for chain-drives, etc. Such gearing, wherever located shall be strongly and completely
encased, or when this is impracticable shall have a band
guard provided with side flanges extending inward beyond
the root of the teeth. Where there is a spoke hazard the
gears always shall be enclosed on exposed side.
36. The Operation cf Driven Pulleys on line or
counter-shafts which have no bearing between the pulley
and the end of the shaft shall not be used unless guides be
provided which will prevent the belt running off the pulley.
37. Runways.—If possible, overhead runways shall not
be less than twenty inches (20") in width and equipped
with a handrail. If runway is less than twenty inches
(20") in width, then same shall have two handrails. Access
to these runways shall be in all cases by means of fixed
ladders or railed stairways.
38. If a Passage or Runway pass between the strands
of a belt, a substantially covered way with railed sides or
other adequate guard shall be provided.
39. If a  Passage or  Runway passes over a shaft or
5 20. Friction-clutch Couplings shall have their operating mechanisms, where exposed, completely guarded.
21. Keys exposed to contact shall be made flush or
guarded.
22. Key-seats, where exposed to contact, shall be
guarded.
23. Set-screws or revolving parts shall be countersunk, or covered by a guard, or a headless set-screw shall
he used. No part of the set-screw shall project above the
surface.
24. The Above Guards shall be so designed, where
practicable, as not to 'revolve with the part guarded.
25. Friction-drives.—The contact faces of all friction-
drives, when exposed  to contact, shall be enclosed.
26. All Frictions with projecting bolts shall be
guarded.
27. Bearings.—Accurate alignment of bearings is an
important factor in safety and in economy of operation.
Frequent inspections of bearings and hangers are desirable. They should be so equipped with oiling apparatus
that there will be no occasion for the oiler to come into
dangerous proximity with shafting when it is in motion.
28. Pulleys Pulleys   shall   be   placed   at   a   slightly
greater distance from bearings or hangers or other pulleys
(except tight and loose pulleys) than the width of the
belt, so that in case the belt ships off the pulley it will
not become wedged between the hanger and the pulley or
between the two pulleys, thus pulling down the line-shafting., If it is impracticable to space pulleys farther from a
hanger or another pulley than the width of the belt, the
intervening space shall be guarded in such a way that it
will be impossible for the belting to become wedged should
it slip the pulley. This may be done by placing a spool
four inches (4") larger in diameter than the pulley on the
side of the pulley adjacent to a hanger or another pulley,
or by use of a belt-hanger. Pulleys shall be frequently
inspected for cracks which are likely to develop in the
arms or rims. When a crack occurs a piece of the rim
may be thrown out by centrifugal force and cause a serious accident. Testing by hammer will usually disclose
any defects.
29. Idler Pulleys or Tighteners used to tighten belts
on pulleys, if provided with counter-weights, shall have
counter-weights guarded or enclosed.
30. Belt-shifters.— (a.) A permanent belt-shifter shall
be provided for all loose pulleys, and shall be located
within easy reach of the operator. The construction of
belt-shifters shall be such as to make it impossible for
the belt to creep back on to the tight pulley. All belt-
shifters shall be equipped with a lock or some other device to prevent accidental shifting.
31. Belts.—All belts, ropes, or chain-driving machinery
or shafting, and all secondary belts, ropes, or chains,
where exposed to contact, shall be guarded.    In all cases
no employee is required to stand in direct line with any
saw while it is cutting, and in the case of overhead trimmers, where the duties of employees require them to stand
in the rear of the trimmer-table, a guard shall be provided
in the rear of the saws.
13. Conveyors.— (a.) When the return strands of conveyors operate within seven feet (7') of the floor, there
shall be a shallow trough provided of sufficient strength
to carry the weight resulting from a broken chain.
(b.) If the strands are over seven feet (7') from the
floor, a means shall be provided to catch and support the
ends of the chain in the event of a break over passageways or runways.
LATH-MILL.
Lath-bolters.—The gears and sprockets of lath-bolters
shall be fully guarded and the feed-chains shall be guarded
to as low a point as the maximum height of the stock will
permit.
Lath-machines.—The feed-rolls, saws, gears, sprockets,
and chains of lath-machines shall be guarded.
SHINGLE-MILLS.
1. Vertical Shingle-saws.—With the exception of that
portion against which the stock is fed, the shingle-saws
shall be guarded. To make provision for the clearing of
waste from the saw, it is permissible to leave the periphery
of the saw open, provided that the guards shall extend not
less than six inches (6") beyond the point of the sawteeth.
2. Clipper-saw.— (a.) A guard over saw shall be maintained at all times.
(b.) Clipper-boards shall be equipped with finger-
guards.
3. Shingle-jointers.—The front or cutting face of knife-
type shingle-jointers shall be fully guarded, with the exception of a narrow slot through which the shingles may
he fed against the knives.
4. Power-bolters.—These shall have spreader behind
saw and railing of standard size around carriage-track from
front of saw.
5. Pinion-gears. — These shall be covered on all
shingle-machines.
6. Drag-saws.—All gears and frictions on drag-saws
shall be guarded.
7. Fly-trips.—Fly-trips shall not be used on shingle-
machines.
WOOD-WORKING.
1. Machines with Knife-heads.—All knife-heads of
wood-shapers and similar heads of other machines not
automatically fed shall be guarded, or forms shall be used
in which the part operated on is securely fastened. All
knife-heads of wood-working machines which are automatically fed, such as stickers, planers, etc., when exposed
to contact, shall be guarded.
9 2. Wood-jointers.—All wood-jointers shall be equipped
with cylindrical cutter-heads of safety type. A suitable
automatically adjusted guard shall be placed over the
whole cutting-space in the table.
3. Sanding-machines.—Disk sanders shall have the
circumference and back of the revolving head thoroughly
guarded.    Belt-sanders  shall  have  both  pulleys  enclosed.
4. Jump-saws.—To prevent any one from approaching
too near saw from back, jump-saws shall have railing.
5. Swing-saws.—All swing-saws shall have guard over
front and safety stop to keep them from swinging out too
far.
6. Cut-off Saws.—These shall rest in hood when idle.
7. Table Rip-saws.—These shall have spreader behind
them and hood over top.
8. Revolving Cut-off Saws.—These shall be boxed beneath table so they cannot be reached without removing
cover.
9. Band-saws.— (a.) These shall have gears covered
on feed-rolls and shall have heavy board up in front to
catch the blow in case saw should break.
(b.) Guards shall be installed to cover both upper and
lower wheels of all band-saws.
(c.) The up-travel of all band-saws shall be completely guarded, and the down-travel shall be guarded with a
shield extending down to the guide-rolls.
LAUNDRIES.
1. Flat-work Ironers.—A feed-roll guard shall be provided for all flat-work ironers and kept in good working
order.
2. Collar and Cuff Ironers.—All collar and cuff ironers
shall be equipped with guards in front of the first rolls to
prevent the hands of the operator from being drawn into
the rolls.
3. Body-ironers.—Asbestos shield over heated roll
shall be provided for all body-ironers, same to act as a
guard for upper portion of roll. All body-ironers installed
hereafter shall have finger-guards.
4. Handkerchief-mangle shall have guard for feed-roll.
5. Extractors.—All extractors shall be provided with
cover, same to be kept closed when machine is in operation.
6. Washing-machines. — All washing-machines and
tumblers shall be equipped with brakes and lock or other
device to prevent the inner cylinders from moving during
the loading and unloading process.
7. Belting.—Whenever women are liable to come in
contact with belting, it shall be guarded so as to prevent
it from attracting their dresses or hair.
8. Pulleys.—All pulleys and gears shall be guarded in
such a manner as to prevent women's aprons or dresses
from being caught.
10
those whose duty it is to oil up and repair machines, shall
be buttoned and close fitting.
8. Gloves and Mittens.—Gloves or mittens shall not
be worn when handling belts when in motion, or working
on machinery where they are liable to be caught in moving machinery.
9. Handling Belts.—No belt larger than three inches
(3") wide (except with the consent of the Board) shall be
connected by hand unless it be slow-running. Slow-running
belts shall be defined as those running less than one hundred and twenty feet  (120')  per minute.
10. When a Belt is not in Use it shall be hung up in
a place where it cannot be caught by pulleys or shafts.
11. Horizontal Shafting.—Any portion of a horizontal
shaft which is six feet six inches (6' 6") or less from the
floor or working-platform, or which may be approached
while in motion, shall be guarded on the sides and bottom
or protected by a standard railing ensuring at least fifteen
inches (15") and not more than twenty inches (20") horizontal clearance from the nearest moving part.
12. Vertical Shafting.—(Except with the consent of
the Board.) Vertical or inclining transmission shafting
shall be encased to a height of six feet (6') from the floor.
13. When a Shaft, pulley, or belt passes through the
floor (or any guard is placed around floor opening) a six-
inch (6") solid section or toe-board shall be placed at the
bottom of the guard, and a heavy top rail not less than
three and a half feet (3%')  high.
14. Projecting Shaft Ends or Keys.—All projecting
shaft ends or keys shall be cut off or properly protected
with stationary casing.
15. Fly-wheels.—All sections of fly-wheels with spokes
which are six feet six inches (6' 6") or less from the floor
and which are exposed to contact shall be guarded. Flywheels which run.in pits shall be provided with handrail
and toe-board around the pit.
Exception.—Where an engine is isolated in a room
used exclusively as an engine-room, the fly-wheel of such
engine may be guarded with a railing. This railing shall
be constructed with two rails, the bottom of which shall
not be less than eighteen inches (18") from the floor.
Whenever main or auxiliary engines are located in a basement, they shall be completely railed or fenced off so
that no unauthorized person can gain access thereto.
16. Couplings and Collars, Keys and Set-screws.—
Shaft-couplings and set-collars shall be of a safety type,
without projecting bolts, set-screws, or other dangerous
projections, or be completely guarded.
17. Clamp-couplings shall be guarded by a cylindrical
sleeve the full length of the coupling.
18. Jaw-clutch Couplings shall be provided with cylindrical sleeve which at least covers the jaws.
19. Universal and Flexible Couplings shall be so guarded or encased as to remove all hazards. V  7
understanding of the necessity for safety measures
as well as requiring, if he deems so advisable, the adding of additional safety devices and the fixing of
the time for their completion. The Board hopes
that with the active co-operation of the employers
and the employees, there will early become evident success in accident prevention.
Accident prevention is one of the primary purposes of Workmen's Compensation Legislation.
PURSUANT to section 51 of the "Workmen's
Compensation Act," the Workmen's Compensation Board has adopted the following Safety
Rules and Regulations, the same to take effect from
the 16th of June, 1918:
GENERAL.
Transmission     Machinery,    Shafting,    Couplings,    Pulleys,
Gearing,   Belting,  and  Conveyors.
1. Emergency Stopping Device.— (Except with the
consent of the Board.) Wherever there is power-driven
machinery, a device shall be provided at a convenient
point or points, in each department or work-room, whereby
either the entire power-supply in that department or room
may be cut off as a whole or the one or more lines of
shafting used in driving* counter-shafting or directly driving machines may be cut off independently.
2. A Safety Placard shall be prominently displayed,
calling attention to the stopping device and method of
operating same.
3. All Safeguards shall be well constructed and of
the best material for the purpose and maintained in place.
4. All Manufacturing Plants shall have signal-cords
connected with the bell or whistle, and located in convenient places on each floor.
5. All Workmen in a plant shall be taught how to
make use of the system of signals by which all the machines can be stopped in case of accident.
6. Ofling, Cleaning, and Repairs.—Workmen shall not
undertake to oil, inspect, clean, or repair machines in motion or moving parts of machinery unless previously authorized to do so by the foreman or overseer.
7. Clothing.—The clothing of employees having to
work around moving parts of machinery, and particularly
2
ELEVATORS.
1. Elevator Catching Device.—All elevators, except
direct-lift plunger elevators, shall be equipped with an
automatic device to catch the car in case it drops.
2. On catching devices to which speed-governors are
attached, the dogs or clamps of such catching device shall
be attached to the under-side of the car platform.
3. All power-driven elevators shall be provided with
automatic stops which shall stop them at the lowest and
at the highest landings, independent of the operating cable
or other device.
4. Safety devices shall be tested for efficiency at least
once a month, and a record thereof kept for inspection by
the Board or its Inspectors.
5. Freight-elevator Gates.—(Except with the consent
of the Board.) At each landing gates shall be self-closing
and not less than five and one-half feet (5%') in height,
except at top landing, where such gates shall not be less
than three and one-half feet (3%') in height. The bottom
rail- on all gates shall be not more than twelve inches
(12")  from the floor.
6. In case local conditions do not permit of a gate
five and one-half feet (5%') in height, a gate not less than
three and one-half feet (3%') in height may be used, provided such gate is placed not less than twelve inches (12")
from the platform of the car, and provided that tell-tale
chains not less than four feet (4') long and not over five
inches (5") apart are suspended from the edge of the platform in front of opening.
7. Elevator-shafts—Projecting Floors, etc.—All projections in shaft, such as floors, beams, sills, unless guarded against by the car enclosure, shall be provided with
smooth bevelled guards, fitted directly under such projection so as to push any projecting portion of the body back
into the car instead of crushing it. This bevelled guard
shall be set at an angle of not less than sixty (60) degrees
with the floor-level.
8. Freight-elevators—Enclosure of Car.—(Exceptwith
the consent of the Board.) All freight-elevator cars shall
be enclosed solidly on all sides except on entrance side to
a height of not less than six feet (6'). On side of the
operating cable sufficient space shall be allowed to operate
the cable. ' '*, /
9. All elevator-cars except sidewalk elevators shall be
t equipped with a covering over the top;   this to be made
solid or of wire screen, and shall be not less»tlj^n No, ten
. (10) wire and with mesh net over one inch. 'On freight-
elevators the part of such covering which faces the opening to the shaft shalKbe constructed with,,# section of not
less than eighteen' inches (18")' in width and extending
the width of the opening to the shaft. Such* section shall
be attached with hinges to the screen, so that it will rise
i'-when it meets with an obstruction as the car flesjcenfl-S
10. Shipper-rope Locks.—All g power-driverr* freight-
elevators controlled by shipper-ropes shall be provided with
11 lock, so arranged that the car can be locked at each landing.
11. Machine Slack-cable Safety Device.—Slack-cable
devices, which will stop the elevator machines if the
hoisting cables slacken or break, shall be provided on all
winding-drum power elevators having a travel of over
fifteen feet (15').
12. Signals.—There shall be a bell located in every
power-driven freight-elevator or in the shaftway where it
may be heard on all floors, and so arranged as to be operated from each landing.
13. Mechanical Devices shall be kept clean and free
from excessive grease and dirt.
14. Cables shall be renewed when, through broken
wires, wear, undue strain, or other conditions indicating
deterioration, they are considered unsafe.
15. Overhead Sheaves.—Where the overhead machinery consists only of sheaves, a metal grating or screen
shall be placed under such sheaves and extend over the
entire shaftway and give safe access to the sheaves from
the floor or roof of the building. The grating or screen
shall be sufficient strength to sustain a load at centre of
span of not less than five hundred pounds, with a factor of
safety of four. The openings in such gratings or screen
shall not be wider than one inch (1").
PENALTY.
Every person who contravenes any of the aforesaid
regulations shall be liable to a penalty of fifty dollars.
Dated at Vancouver, B. C, this 6th day of May,
1918.
£3,    ^,o&JK.
ACCIDENT PREVENTION
Accident prevention is desirable from an economic as well as from a humanitarian viewpoint. The
prevention of accident depends mainly upon the
care exercised by the employees as a whole. Therefore every industry having any kind of mechanical
equipment should have its Safety Committee. In
plants employing six to a dozen men, one person
to look after the safety conditions is sufficient; in
plants employing from twelve to thirty men, a committee of two will get good, results; while a Committee of three or more should be appointed for
larger establishments. Their work in this regard
need not interfere with their regular duties, but
having been given authority to look after the safety of the plant there are but few men so appointed
who will fail to keep a watchful eye on the movements of the other men and make such recommendation to the management as will be to the interest of the employees as well as to the employer. It
will not take long before such a Committee will get
every workman interested in precautionary measures and thereby avoid many of the common and
easily preventable accidents. Wherever it has been
tried it has resulted in a general study and application of safety devices and safety reforms that have
saved many accidents and thereby suffering and
expense.
It should be the duty of this Safety Committee
to exercise surveillance over the workmen and machinery in the plant and carefully consider and devise means whereby safety conditions may be improved from time to time. This Committee should
at stated periods report its findings and recommendations to the management.
When an inspector under the jurisdiction of the
Board, visits the plant he will confer with the Safety Committee as well as with the management, with
a view to  closer  cooperation  and  a more  general
l Workmen'*
(Uttmpmmtmn
Art
Srtttatj ffinlutnbta
Safety Regulations
1910
Progress   Publishing   Co.,   Ltd.
Workmen's   Compensation   Board,   Board   of  Trade   Bldg
Vancouver,  B. C. Western Fuel ^ompany
-rem
Jhuumo, W. CfT/^^^S /'
%
J9S^
ceiveb/
3 7-37
'oUaffl&
100
,,   , * - ia^^^^-^ ^**-f^^^'o2^-^^ l *fj ^~S/xy?^a /<y yy/y^^y 19 ^hyryS/y
^^3^'933973Sfy3-3yf993'9SS337333, "■"' """" '•'■'— ■■ *■•
Western Fpe_. Compa
73&H'
Pet ■?/--
#
S&'
332°
&
i*»w *«** or^
£
*<
OFFICE OF
GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT
74l
NANAIMO. B.C.   NOV. 6,     I9 I9
Mr.   Yip Sang,
5l Pender  Street,
Vancouver,   73.   G.
Sear Sir:-
. 7
■3
Please  reply  to   our  letter of Oct,   11,
1919,   re Lease   of Lot 7,   Newcastle  Island.
——- This  Lease  expired  on October 31>
and we wish to  know if you desire  to   renew it.
The amount  of rental- for 1920  will  he §350.00.
S:H
Sincerely yours,
CMADIM  WESTS
OeneJ^.1  Supt.
Perl
h^rU-f^
flx3 >•>
FIRE    INSURANCE:
LIVERPOOL   &  LONDON   &  GLOBE
. INSURANCE   CO..   LTD.
PHOENIX   FIRE   ASSURANCE   CO.,   LTD.
OF   LONDON.    ENGLAND
BRITISH   AMERICA   EIRE   ASSURANCE
CO.,   LTD.
AUTOMOBILE   INSURANCE
Telephone Fraser 108
W.   E.   AND   A.    D.   BRENDON.   DIRECTORS
ESTATE   AND   FINANCIAL   AGENTS
6181    FRASER   STREET
SOUTH    VANCOUVER,
YipaSang Esq..,
51 Pender Street. E.
City.
COLLECTIONS
RENTALS
CONVEYANCING
LOANS
3.c14.:«]1jl JfflXA 19-10.
Dear  Sir,
We regret to  inform you that the roof of our  feaildlng is
leaking "badly.     Water  is corning through the  bathroom in DrlRobertson's
Suite & falling through  to Mr.  Evans'   Store.     It  is also  coming
down the  side of the wall  in our Office against Mr.   Cole's Store,
but  this  part  is  not so \Tery bad.
practical
lies aroun
which  spot
a tin or b
roof to  th
falls   on t
naturally
very   soon,
down.
I have been up on the  roof with Mr.  Sherlock,  who  is a
roof man & who fixed Mr.   Cole's roof.     She trouble  chiefly
d the sky-lights,  more  particularly the centre   one,   to
the roof slopes  from each side.     There  is no  doubt that
ox drain should  be   put  to  carry the water from the higher
e down pipe.     At present all the water  from this  roof
h the lower  one & as  the flashing  is  in bad shape ,   it
comes through,  with a result that  if it  is not  attended  to
we  shall have   the   ceiling  in Dr.  Robertson's  Suite  falling
Shall we instruct Mr.   Sherlock to make the  necessary rex>airs
at these different  points?    He  estimates the work at  about   $30  or
thereabouts. The  roof as   a whole  is  in good shape.
y.oura faithful^
&   AND_. 7   LIMIT! The:   Vancouver   General   Hospital
Vancouver,  B. O.
,  'a
H.  T.   DEV1NE,   ESQ.,  Chairman
R.   S.    SOMERVILLE,    ESQ.,  VICE-CHAIRMAN
W.   C.   OITMARS.   ESS,  Treasurer
MALCOLM   T.   MACEACHERN,   M.D., C,M.
General  Superintendent,
Geo. Haddon,
Man's Secretary
January 6th.1920,
Messrs:   Wing  Sang  Co..,
51   Pender  St.  3ast,
City.
Dear Sire:-
I have been instructed by the Directors
of the hospital to request you to submit the name of
one party as a Life Governor of this Institution.
This is in accordance with your kind
contribution to the fund raised to wipe out the indebtedness of the hospital, end also in accordance with the"
Bylaws which provide that all those who subscribe the sum
of $100*00 or over shall become Life Governors*
I shall be extremely obliged if you will let
me have this name before the fifteenth of this month, in
order that a complete list of the Life Governors may be
prepared for the Annual Meetang to be held in February.
Yours^ery truly,
s- Man'g Secretary* ■ ■ y-
C
¥lr* Hirgal ^attlurf (Hanata
NCORPORATED    1869
-9fo& 333s/3e2%e4<a9y/3(gmy&am^
SL-y&y tosust *•ms
a
i
Dear Sir (or Madam)s
CAPITAL STOCK
London Gounty Westminster & Parr's Bank, Ltd,
We beg to advise that the right to accept allotments of the issue of new stock made on April 16, 1919, will expire on November 5,
1919.
In our Circular Letter dated April 16th, we asked you to renounce
any rights you might have, in respect to this issue by signing and returning the Power of Attorney which was enclosed for that purpose. Up
to the present this document has not reached us, and in order that the
very desirable arrangement which we have entered into with the London
County Westminster 8:  Parr's Bank, Ltd., may be given full effect, we
enclose a new form of Power of Attorney, whion please sign and return
as soon as possible.
Yours truly,
General Manager
REGISTERED ^V, [ TELEPHONE   SEYMOUR 6BOO
BOWSER, REID,WALLBRIDGE, DOUGLA. A GIBSON. cable address, -bowfridge;
BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS. &c. Codes    ,A* B* c
  WESTERN UNION \
W.J.    BOWSER.   K.C. D.   S.  WALLBRIDGE. YORKSHIRE  BUILDING \
B. l. re,p. k.c. a. h.douglas. 525 SEYMOUR STREET     ' \J
J.  G. GIBSON, \
VANCOUVER. B.C. ITOV.     5th.  ,1919
KINDLY ADDRESS ALL  LETTERS TO THE  FIRM
Mr.   Wallbridfae
ATTENTION   OF «—*  • I* «%*•*.■»*   J. VA i-J-'
Mr. Yip   Sang.
C/o  Wing  Sang & Go.
51 Pender   Street  Sast,
City.
Dear   Sir:
We beg to advise you that we have to-day received
your Herring Purse seine License for the years 1919-1920, the
License   expiring  on  the  31st.   of March,   1920.
Yours   truly,
B0WS2B  K3ID VMJ&mDO!  DOWLAS &   GIBSON
BSW/P ptf^^V    / FIRE    INSURANCE:
LIVERPOOL  &   LONDON   &   GLOBE
INSURANCE   CO..   LTD.
PHOENIX   FIRE   ASSURANCE   CO.,   LTD.
OF   LONDON.    ENGLAND
BRITISH   AMERICA   EIRE   ASSURANCE
CO.,   LTD.
AUTOMOBILE   INSURANCE
^
Telephone Fraser  108
71
WilTtofi  W  S/fncfevTym,  T/lTmiifecf
W.   E.   AND   A.   D.   BRENDON.   DIRECTORS
ESTATE   AND   FINANCIAL   AGENTS
COLLECTIONS
RENTALS
CONVEYANCING
LOANS
6181    FRASER   STREET
SOUTH    VANCOUVER,    B.C....S8 _"fcjl. _..]___.*-
.19
.19.
Yip Sang Esq.,
51 Pender Street Bast
City.
Dear Sir,
We hare had an offer to rent the Fraser Hall to  a
Returned Soldiers Organization,   for use as  a Club room,   on
a lease for £ years at a rental of $18.00 per month.
We  can,   of course,  get more money by making it   into
Suites, but   then of course there will be  some  expense to do
that.
Please let us know as soon as possible whether you
are willing to lease the Hall at this figure.
Yours faithfully,
WILSON 8c ANDE D
_Q
No.
1919
GOVERNMENT OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF  LABOUR
■ *       o
STATISTICS   OF   WAGE-EARNERS  EMPLOYED   IN  TRADES,
INDUSTRIES,   ETC.,   1919
l»~To be returned to the Department as early as possible, but not later than 30th September, 1919.
Name of employer	
Trade-name 	
Business address	
Location of plant*	
Kind of industryf	
* Note all points where operations are conducted.
t Make description definite as to kind of manufacture, trade, or business.
Where the employer carries on two or more separate classes of industry he should make a separate report for each,
specifying the particular branch of industry in the space provided at right-hand top corner of page 3.
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Victoria, ist August, 1919.
The Department is directed by the " Department of
Labour Act" to collect such statistical and other information respecting trades and industries in British
Columbia as may be deemed expedient from time to
time. In compliance with this provision it is desired
that all to whom this Schedule is sent should understand that the facts supplied are not to be used as the
basis for any .system of taxation or other liability. The
information secured will be presented in statistical
form only, and the business of employers individually
will not be divulged.
The Schedule must be certified to (see form below)
and the postal address of the general office given, so
that we may communicate with you readily in case of
error or omission in the Schedule.
The Department is bound by law to consider your
answers in this Schedule as strictly confidential. This
front leaf will therefore be detached before tabulation, that the identity of the firm may be effectively
concealed.
In order that statistics of trades and industries
may be of the greatest value both to the commercial
community and the general public, they should be
published at the earliest possible moment after the
collection of the data. The courtesy of your co-operation in sending in complete and correct return
as promptly as possible will be appreciated by the
Department.
J. D. McNIVEN,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
CERTIFICATE
This is to Certify that the Answers to the* Inquiries in the within Schedule are complete and correct to the
best of my knowledge and belief.
(Signed) —	
(Post-office address of General Office). f_
Please read carefully the following Instructions before writing in the
Answers on the annexed Schedule
• af:*L
THE INQUIRIES
Inquiry No. 1. Total wages paid to wage-earners. The object here is to ascertain the
amount of wages paid during the seven months under review to all those who worked in the
production of the factory or output of the trade or industry, whether by the piece, day,
week, etc. Salaries of agents, managers, book-keepers, clerks, salesmen, and others of this
class should be omitted. The return should include only wages paid to those employed in
your own mill, factory, shop, camp, etc. The amount paid out for contract work or home
work, if any, should be reported here as a separate item.
Inquiry No. 2. Wage-earners employed 31st July, 1919. Here it is sought to
ascertain the condition of employment on a given day—viz., 31st July, 1919. The answer
should therefore be the number appearing on your pay-roll on that particular day only.
Inquiry No. 3. Average No. of wage-earners. The object here is to ascertain the
average number of wage-earners employed during each month of the period under review.
Should the number of persons vary during the month, the average may be obtained as follows:
For example, if during the week ending January 6th you employed 16 males and 20 females;
the week ending January 13th, 15 males and 21 females; the week ending January 20th, 14
males and 19 females; the week ending January 27th, 15 males and 21 females, then the
total for the four weeks would be 60 males and 82 females, or an average of 15 males and
20% females. They should be reported as 15 males and 21 females, fractions of one-half or
more being considered an extra person; less than one-half to be disregarded. For shutdowns, stoppages for repairs, etc., the average for the month should be proportionately
reduced; for example, if in the month of January the plant was shut down during the week
ending January 13th while the other three weeks remained as outlined above, the total of
persons employed for the month would be 45 males and 60 females, and this figure should
be divided by the whole number of weeks (4), in which case the average for the month of
January would be 11.2 males and 15 females and should be reported as 11 males and 15
females. In case of great irregularity in number or in running-time, the average should
be computed on the basis of days instead of weeks, as above. Omit all persons paid a yearly
salary, such as agents, managers, clerks, book-keepers, salesmen, and supervisory foremen.
Inquiry No. -4. Nationality. The object of this inquiry is to ascertain the trades or
industries absorbing the greatest number of Canadian and immigrant workers respectively.
Inquiry No. 5. Classified weekly wages. The object of this question is to ascertain
the general rates of wages, whether paid by day, the week, month, or piece. State the
number of persons paid less than $6 for a full week's work, the number paid $6 to $6.99
per week, etc., giving males under 18 and over 18 years of age, and females under 18
and over 18 years of age, separately as indicated by the column headings. These figures
should be given preferably for the week of employment of the greatest number. In reporting for piece-workers, consider a full-time week only and do not include overtime. Short
time should be brought up to a full-time basis and bonuses or premiums, if given, should be
included.    Salaried persons should be omitted.
, Inquiry No. 6. The object of this question is to ascertain the grouping of the wage-
earners of the various industries in the matter of hours normally worked per week, for
example:   How many work 44 hours; how many work 48 or 54 hours, and so forth.
Inquiry No. 7. Weeks in operation. The object of this inquiry is to ascertain the
number of weeks the establishment, factory, camp, etc., was in operation during the period
under review. FOR YOUR  OFFICE  FILE.
No.
ANSWERS  FOR THE TWELVE  MONTHS  ENDING 31st JULY 1919
                      §se~Nature of Trade or Industry 	
1.    Total wages paid to wage-earners during twelve months
ending 31st July, 1919.
NOTE.—Do not include salaries.
2.   Wage-earners, number, 31st July, 1919, as per pay-roll.
Males.     Females.
3.     Average No. of wage-earners (do not include salaried
officials, etc.).
Average Number of Wage-earners
during the Month of
1918 August	
September.
October ....
November .
December .
1919 January ....
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
Males.
Females.
4.     Nationality of employees on pay-roll, 31st July, 1919.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia 	
Belgium 	
France  	
Italy	
G erm an y 	
Austria 	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark ,
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan 	
Japan   	
All other countries 	
Males.
Females.
5.    No. of Wage-earners (only) classified as to weekly wages.
Specified Full-week
Wages (Rates) paid
for the Week of
Employment of the
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$ 6.00 to $ 6.99..
7.00 to 7.99..
8.00 to 8.99..
9.00 to 9.99..
10.00 to 10.99..
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99..
13.00 to 13.99..
14.00 to 14.99.-
15.00 to 15.99..
16.00 to 16.99..
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 30.99..
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 and over..
Totals.
No. of Males.
No.
18 Years
of Age
and over.
No.
Under
18 Years
of Age.
No. of Females.
No.
18 Years
of Age
and over
No.
Under
18 Years
of Age.
No. of
Apprentices (not
to be
included
in other
columns).
6.    Number of hours per week normally
worked by wage-earners..
7.    During how many weeks in the twelve months ending 31st
July, 1919, was your plant in operation?	
;j«i
Your attention is drawn to the obligation created by section 8 of the Act to supply the information asked for.""*! -
y"*v
Remarks :  Have you any special suggestion to make regarding laws affecting labour or employment that should
be enacted or amended?	
SPECIAL  NOTICE
If you have sold your establishment to others, or have retired from business, please
return this Schedule with the name and address of your successor, if any, and the date of
such sale or retirement. This information is needed in order that Schedules, in future, may
be sent to the existing firm or corporation rather than to you. If, however, a change has
taken place in the name of the firm only, please fill the Schedule and write the new firm-
name on the first page. No.
 L	
ANSWERS  FOR THE TWELVE MONTHS ENDING 31st JULY
  gas-Nature of Trade or Industry	
1919
1.    Total wages paid to wage-earners during twelve months
ending 31st July, 1919.
$..
NOTE.—Do not include salaries.
2.   Wage-earners, number, 31st July, 1919, as per pay-roll.
Males.     Females.
3.     Average No. of wage-earners (do not include salaried
officials, etc.).
Average Number of Wage-earners
during the Month of
1918 August	
September..
October ....
November .
December .
1919 January	
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
Males.
Females.
4.     Nationality of employees on pay-roll, 31st July, 1919.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia 	
Belgium 	
France 	
Italy	
Germany 	
Austria 	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan 	
japan   	
All other countries
Males.     Females.
5.   No. of Wage-earners (only) classified as to weekly wages.
Specified Full-week
Wages (Rates) paid
for the Week of
Employment of the
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.oo
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35-oo
40.00
45.00
50.00
jSb.oo	
to $ 6.99..
to 7.99..
to 8.99..
to 9.99..
to 10.99..
to 11.99..
to 12.99..
to 13.99..
to 14.99..
to 15.99..
to 16.gg..
to 17.99..
to 18.99..
to 19.gg..
to 20. gg..
to 21.gg..
to 22.99..
to 23.99..
to 24.99..
to 25.99..
to 26.99..
to 27.99..
to 28.99..
to 29.99..
to 34.99..
to 39.99..
to 44.99..
to 49.99..
and over..
Totals.
No. of Males.
No.
18 Years
of Age
and over.
No.
Under
18 Years
of Age.
No. of Females.
No.
18 Years
of Age
and over.
No.
Under
18 Years
of Age.
No. of
Apprentices (not
to be
included
in other
columns).
6.    Number of hours per week normally
worked by wage-earners..
7.    During how many weeks in the twelve months ending 31st
July, 1919, was your plant in operation?	
i*~Your attention is drawn to the obligation created by section 8 of the Act to supply the information asked for.~"3Ki m
9
3
Remarks:  Have you any special suggestion to make regarding laws affecting labour or employment that should
be enacted or amended?:. :..........	
SPECIAL  NOTICE
If you have sold your establishment to others, or have retired from business, please
return this Schedule with the name and address of your successor, if any, and the date of
such sale or retirement. This information is needed in order that Schedules, in future, may
be sent to the existing firm or corporation rather than to you. If, however, a change has
taken place in the name of the firm only, please fill the Schedule and write the new firm-
name on the first page. *s
BOWSER. REID,WALLBRIDGE, DOUGLAS & GIBSON.
BARRISTERS. SOLICITORS, 6c.
c
TELEPHONE   SEVMOOR
Cable address, kBow-Pi
CODES      A' P: *?'        ^^_
WESTERN WN«|
W. J.    BOWSER,   K, C* D.   S. WALLBRIDGE,
P.   L.    RE IP,   K. C- A.   H.   POUGLAS.
J. G. GIBSON-
YORKSHIRE BUILDING
525 SEYMOUR STREET
Vancouver, b.c.   May 9tii.,1919
KINDLY  ADDRESS  ALL  LETTERS TO THE  FIRM
attention of Mr.   ¥allbri dge
-■■
Mr.   Yip   Sang.
C/o Messrs Wing  Sang 3  Co.
52 Pender  street Bast,   .
City.
Dear  sir:
r^e Herring Parse  seine License No.   41
,5fe  beg  to enclose herevn th. copy  of letter  received
to-day  from  the inspector of Pisheii.es at  Nanaimo,   B.   C.   and   shall
be   glad   to have you give   the matter your   attention.
Yours  truly,
BOWSER BMS W-ALLBMDOffi DOUGLASS  GIBSON
enc
per
m
^ A
W.  2
(copy:
Office of  the
INSPECTOR OF FISHERIES
NAVAL  SERVICE
Canada
JEPARTMSNT OP THE  NAVAL   SERVICE
CANADA
Hanaimo  B.   C.        MaySth     1919
Yip   Sang  Esq;
C/o  Bowser  Reid  and Wallbri dge ,
York shi re Bldg.,   Vancouver,   B.C.
Bear  sir:
Attached to Herring Purse  seine  license
No.   41   issued to  you  during  the past Herring
season,   there were  So   forms  to  be   filled in
and returned  at   the close  of   the  fishing.
These  forms have  not yet  been  received  and I
would  request   that  you  forward them  immediately.
If  license was   not  operated,   simply   state  so
on  the forms.
. Y-QUIA3- f ai tii f u 1 iy, * i	
Edward  G.   Taylor  .,
Inspector of Fisheries.
iisa^ .-v:;-.-.. ',   ■ r
THE 60UERNMENT OF
TIE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUHBifl.
Provincial Fisheries Department
Victoria -	
>--ne»    1 %i-'n       "!-c"l ?
Geritleraen;
I have to call your attention to Section 5 ox the
"Caruieries License* Act",
Sec. Z.   "It shall be unlawful for any person to operate
n6 cHMQherj* or to operate a tish-pf chin;:
"establishment in this .?rsvince unless and until
"such person shall have been duly licensed under
"this Act, and sh&lZ h&ve-p-alil the license fee
."and obtained the license hereinafter provided."
EEndly remit fees covering the cannery or canneries
you wish to operate this ye;-,Ta     Draw chequec payable to the
Commissioner of .Fisheries.
Cannery and I* ish-packing Sfctftblishaent fees i)lOO„
The licenses should be sent direct to each cannery
Superintendent.. Our Officers* are directed to see the licenses,
Au-iat&nt to the Co.ciisbioner.
Yip Sang,  Esq.,
e/o Bowser,   Re id & V/allbridge,
Vancouver,   B.  C. *If-*you look at your Tax Notice,you will see where I have
narked, it in blue pencil,that only marked cheques payable at par,
'■. are accepted at this*office,you owe me 15 cents for exchange,
another time I shall have to return your cheque,unless you
cqi-Sj. j  with this rule.
JOSEPH page;
Collector. Form fro. -Id 500 bks. 4-18 ^^_BS_o_r_!_3E[^::m^ y6u CALLTO mi
3
TAXATION ACT.
cent, per annum on Notice of
assessment.
Due dates.
Liability and
recovery of
delinquent taxes.
Rectification  of
errors.
Right of appeal.
Form of appeal.
paid
INFORMATION  FOR THE GUfO^I
No further notice will be giy,
I  °F TAXPAYERS.
en, taxpayers are ^^ ^ gee ^ ^ ^
All assessed Taxes
yearly, a dlsoount Qf 10 ^ ^jjf ™ January 2ll<i
delinquent irn„t „„., ,    Z3       nt Wl11 be allowed froi-
_  d by December 31st yen
are promptly
 «i uecome
Ie5?^'-j Jlrcent. interest will be added.
nd tbe amount due may be recovered by distress
There is aTJBF§5nn7 7!
proceedings or by action.
Land upon which taxes are delinquent will be advertised for sale between July 15th and1
October 15th following the date of delinquency, and the'date of the Tax Sale will be advertised
iu tho Gazette and local newspapers for four weeks previous to the day of sale. Lands sold at
Tax Sale may be redeemed within two years from the date of sale l«r tendering to the Collector
the amount for which the land was sold, with interest at 12 per cent., together with the taxes
due since date of sale. Lands unsold at. Tax Sale are forfeited to the Crown at the expiration
of twelve months from date of Tax Sale, unless the amount due with interest is sooner paid.
Lands forfeited to the Crown may be repurchased on written application to the Minister of Lands.
Personal-property or Income taxes may be collected by the Assessor by distress proceedings
directly thev become delinouent. ~.:..3. ■... ........... „„,_.„.,. 0 „t iVny.w»mi wioj.
term not exceeding six months or both fine and imprisonment.    For refusal, neglect, ^or withholding information a fine not eEtceeding five hundred dollars.
If the taxpayer discovers any error in his notice, which the Assessor is able to correct before
the Court of Revision, be is requested to write to the Assessor giving particulars of the error.
If you deem yourself overassessed, or otherwise incorrectly assessed, you or your agent are
requested to notify me in writing, stating in detail your grounds of complaint, within fourteen
days after the date on which this notice is mailed or delivered to you. If such complaint is not
lodged with me within said limited time, then this assessment shall stand, and you will have no
further right to appeal. If notice of complaint is sent to me as provided, you will have an
opportunity to appeal to the Court of Revision and Appeal for the Assessment District. Due
notice of the date of holding tbe Court of Revision and Appeal will be published in the British
Columbia Gazette and in a newspaper published in the District, In terms of law/
No appeal against the assessment of School Taxes is allowed where the assessed value is
the same as in the last revised Assessment Roll of the Assessment District.
mMHNH
If you intend to appeal to the Court of Revision you may fill up the followin
W^-and
return this notice to the Assessor within the fourteen days allowed by law.
To the Assessor :    Take notice that I intend to appeal to the Court of Revision and Appeal
against the above assessment for the following reasons, namely:—
/
(Signature).
 , this day of..
1ST.
Where there is insufficient space on the first page hereof for the description  oFfr-iuls"'
Assessors may continue the descriptions here, giving the assessed value and tax agaiilst each
parcel.
«•» Form a.     10000-1-ie,     s-m  issaa.
Vancouver, B. C,
f S
No. / >...5.0.5....-.  firmn^T.Q*;.
January .19.th 19 19,
Medical Aid Assessment
TAKE NOTKWthat in pursuance  of Section  30 of the  "Workmen's  Compensation  Act" the  following
amount of Medical Aid deductions is due and payable at par at the Board's Offices, in Vancouver, B. C.
On your payroll, from
On your    	
To
payroll, from
THE WQ
to 1.91.7.    $ 36.00^
to 1.918,    $  16.EO
**T3e»%3«
-I.i.P-.aang., l-QJ^y    JJ-»iy*9 ^orkmen's Compensatioti Borfrd |   .-
 ZLJLenlef... St...aL..t, j H^ '' "' 4°2 Pe"der Street
Vancouver,   B.JJ    LT^IQ  I
 NiT  '" COMFEMSATICN BOARD
Vancouver, B. C. I-orm 2a.—10,000-10-18.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
January 10th    1919,
^S
^     2129
.
FIRM   1&7-J
NOTICE  OF ASSESSMENT.
cuss      «   % ,
first & Second Instalments for 1917.      U .  ^^^^^^^
TAKE NOTICE that in pursuance of Section 29 of the "Workmen's Compensation Act" the assessment for 19.... l.^/iasy,
made.   The amount therefore is payable at par one month from the dat^Jiereof at the Board's Offices, in Vancouver j. ^
t_______m
On your..
 L.J!isllin£ 7. ...Industry, in Class	
half audited Qnn       _
a levy based on oiS§3p|£&r of your eKtksated annual pay-roll of $..39v9f.y.9.
being $ 45QQ.jt.QQ , which at....3.,_.QQ._..per cent, amounts to  $     135.00
On your 93^M.S...79M Industry, in Class	
half               audited <xAnn nn
a levy based on ori§3pa£*er of your eS&KatSd annual pay-roll of $ ?.?.¥}* ♦!?*'..
being $ lSO.Q.^.O.Q , which at ..SQ....per cent, amountsr-tag-^^^g^.^- $       14.40
penaity - fr':^""S fi^n
TO ...Xip...San&*.
irfflli $.... 149 .40
..51.a.andox.-..3.t......£as.t.,
 Vane ojive :&*...,
^  RETURN  THIS  NOTICE WITH REMITTAN
r:   ^i-'^Wfe  WORKMEN'S  COMPENSATION
402 PENDER STREET,
VANC0TJV**?~
V
^\ 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.chungtext.1-0225759/manifest

Comment

Related Items