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The Chung Collection

Duplicate of Scottish Immigrant Aid Society printed materials MacDonell, Father Andrew 1940

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 -3-
case, and a guiding principle will be the saving of overhead in'
each case. Supervision will be the work of the Extension in coordination with the Provincial Service mentioned above.
The money above mentioned having been obtained as a gift,
will be loaned to the settler at 2$.
No part of the money will be expended on administration.
Administration funds will be obtained:-
1. from the Federal Government and from the British Government
on a 50/50 basis.
2. from Canadian railways, possibly, and other sources as a
private collection by the S.I.A.S. and thus on a 25/75 basis with
the British Government thus providing adequate administratis, funds
for the proper carrying out of the purpose of settling British
settlers.
The British settlers will pay for their farms in the course
of 15 years - paying 2% interest on the unpaid balance. The stock
and equipment should be paid for in 10 years, the interest charges
on unpaid balances being 3%,
The collections in above will be done by the S.I.A.S. -2-
would need to follow suit, and for the first time in our modern
history the essential difference between the basic occupation of
Agriculture and Industrialism would-be rightly acknowledged and
vindicated. The resulting prosperity and human happiness would
be the best proof of the right tackling of this great problem, of
the right solving of the most pressing and genuine human need. This
was succinctly stated at a Rural Life Conference last fall in Richmond, Virginia.
"The burning concern of the Catholic Church with Agriculture
arises from the altogether unique relationship which exists universally between the agricultural occupation and the central institution
of Christian, nay of all, civilization; namely the family.  The fan-
is the native habitat of the family."  It might be well to state here
and emphatically that the above is true in the thinking minds of
all other Christian denominations and the work can only be done if
all co-operate.
2.  Coincident with the colonization of the sons of Nova Scotia
on lands within tho Provinco a scheme for tho s.ttl.ideiit of selected
British families in Nova Scotia should be initiated without delay.
This project may be begun in such fashion that not only would
the families be a valuable asset, but thoir settlement would bo a
financial gain to the Province..
The families coming from tho British Isles, i.e. Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, would bo carofully selected and would comprise
both Protostand and Catholic families.
Thoir selection would bo tho care of tho Scottish Immigrant Aid
Society. Approval of each individual family would be given by officers of the Federal Government stationed in Groat Britain.
The S.I.A.S. being an Approved Society would obtain from the
British Government funds on a 25/75 basis for tho work. The
Society must obtain by private enterprise one quarter of tho sum
required and then it is understood that tho Oversea Department of
tho British Government would provide tho other three quarters.
It is proposed that tho people of Nova Scotia through their
Government, and other institutions, i.o. Banks, Railways, etc.,
place the quarter to the credit of tho Society who would then
approach tho British Government for the balance mentionod.
In direct dealing as between the Governments, the British
will pay only on a 50/50 basis. Dealing with an approved Society
they will pay, if they approve of the seheme generally, on a
25/75 basis.
The Society appeals therefore for a sum of $200,000 which, on
above scale would bring $600,000, providing thus a sum total of
$800,000 for tho settlement of British families in Nova Scotia.
A firm promise will be obtained from the British Government
by the S.I.A.S. before anything is begun in this Province.
Tho money obtained as abovo will"be expended exclusively on
buying farms, and stock and equipment, for British settlers.
The selection of farms and the providing and purchasing of
the stock and equipment for th© settlers will be tho direct responsibility of the University Extension or of a body created ad
hoc, acting in co-ordination with the Extension Service of tho
Provincial Department of Agriculture.
The Extension will be judges of what is necessary on each
farm and there will be no question of supplying all alike. The
extent and nature of tho farm will be taken into account In every MEMO
Rev. A. Macdonell, O.S.B.
It Is proposed to get a colonization scheme under way for the
colonization and settlement of farms in Nova Scotia.
Families eligible for Farm Settlement are
1. Canadians now in Ncwa Scotia.
(a) Heads of families who have been tenants but
have not had the wherewithal to purchase a home
farm of their own.
(b) Sons of farmers who have worked at home, or
with other farmers, but have not been in a position
to purchase.
(c) Others who have for several years successfully
cultivated small holdings and are judged likely to
make a success of a larger holding.
2. Selected British settlers, with farming experience who
are anxious to settle on farm homes in Nova Scotia.
For this double purpose a survey should be made of all available lands in this Province suitable for cultivation - lands in
hands of municipalities, lands held by absentee owners and others.
As soon as a price is set, and the price should be set In view of
the little or no use made of these lands, then the Province should
buy.  These lands to be resold to selected men chosen by the Approved Society at the cut price paid for them.
1.  The settlers to be financed for stock and equipment by the
Government In accordance with the size and nature of the farm and
as adjusted by the Society.  In no case the financing to be above
$1000.  The settler will not be given contract for 18"months -
during that period he is a tenant but paying as below.  The
settler would pay 2%  on the valuation of the farm and 3%  on the
price of the unpaid balance of the stock and equipment.
As soon as he has paid for his stock and equipment the 2%  and
3%  would no longer be paid and at the end of 10 years, if he has
his taxes paid up, and 75/. of the farm producing to the satisfaction
of the supervisors, he gets a clear title.
Until he has title to the farm he will not be allowed to farm
another place.
In no case will the settlor be allowed to use the farm as a
convenience whilst working for wages at some other work.  (This
does not refer to working out at off seasons.)
The candidate for a farm under the scheme will not be the
owner of a farm at the time of application.
This undoubtedly will be a revolutionary move but it is one
that the times, particularly the immediate future, would seem to
call for most urgently.
The organization is to hand. An organization that is undenominational in its work.  The University Extension of Antigonish who
will constitute the Approved Society.  In that you have experts in
Agriculture and men of the highest Integrity - also and this is
very important - men who have studied their fellowmen and realise
to the full, the diversities of the human element that is to be
dealt with In Colonization.
In these qualifications lie success; failure is certain when
they are lacking. Were this scheme tackled on the general lines
indicated with high courage and understanding, it would be the
beginning of a new era for Canada. Every Province in the Dominion to a place or safety- The witness
stated that 'the ai.r space between
the stairway and the asb ,sto» boards
was Ailed with refuse. Questioned
how the asbestos boards did not
prevent fire, he replied: "The wall
appeared to be made of blocks of
wood 2' x 4' with asbestos boards
tucked on, which seemed to be the
whole construction of the building?."
He explained that immediately the
blocks of wood caught lire the asbestos boards would fall away.
Questioned by John Kerry, who was
present on behalf of a number of
the tenants, Mr. Wright stated that
eince, the first fire the 'insurance
companies had cancelled his policies
and that he had approached several
companies for fire insurance, none
of which would insure his furniture
at   2660   Park   avenue-.
a.. Wilson, apartment 36, stated
that on Sunday, March lOh, the
door of the garbage chute which
was in a. bedroom, flew open and
flames burst out. The pressure closed the door again, put numerous
sparks were, left on" some clothes.
On Sunday last, he said, he also
noticed  flames ia   the  chute.
Joseph Lamouche, janitor, stated
that it had been the custom to 'burn
the accumulated recuse every morning, but that by order of tlje proprietor, Z. Patenaude, he had not
done so sine© March 1st. Questioned as to the cause the 'witness
stated he was of the opinion that
the fire had been set by some person or  persons  unknown.
INSURANCE   REPORT.
Edgar Favre.au, 8 Fort street, an
insurance inspector, testified that
on behalf of an insurance company,
he inspected the building after the
first ifire. Aekeji '.by Mr. Kerry to tell
the court the substance of his report, the witness stated that he gave
it vefbally. VWhat did you say?"
asked Mr. Kerry, to which Mr.- Fav-
i-cau replied: "I told the manager
that I wouldn't write a cent on the
building." The -witness added that
when he Inspected the building h'e
noticed that the brioks Hear the
refuse chute in Mr. Wright's apartment   'were   hot.
Capt. T. Taylor, of the Salvage
Corps, testified that he was informed that the tenants of the
building were uneasy about 'the fire
and suspected some one had set fire
to the building, and- he made an
inspection. Whereupon he found
some paint Pots in the cellar and
some turpentine, which, he thought,
might <have. caused spontaneous
rum'bustion. Asked by Mr. Kerry to
..ive an opinion on his discovery,
('apt. Taylor said: "It is better to
keep turpentine out of a building
where there are paint iand -families."
5,. Patenaude, the proprietor,
staj.d that the iParkside apartments
were insured for $60,000. The damages were assessed at about $3,200.
lie stated that on the .first or second
day that the apartment, were occupied, a small fire started as a result of the, residents putting paper
and cardboard down the garbage
cliule. Questioned by the Commissioner' the witness stated that he
thought the fire had been malioious-
!>- wet. He assured the court that
the construction of the build!.',
complied with the 'by-laws and ha .
been Inspected  by the underwriters.
STEEL PLATE CONTRACT
Hon.   Mr.   Lapointc  Explains
Terms of Settlement
Ottawa, April ..—An answer waa
given by Hon. Ernest X<apolnte in the
House of Commons this afternoon to
questions by T. W. Caldwell (Pro-
tressive,.Victoria and Carleton, N.B.),
resun win u. uuTL'Lore, as one example, that there 'Will not be a bad
stretch of several miles in a maJ
because the municipality in question
has not the money for the repairs.
In addition to the two millions and
a half to be spent from revenue account for roads this year, there is a
loan power of five millions additional provided for, and the intention is to use i all this, money, if It
can be profitably done, this year. One.
benefit of this which is figured on Is
that this large expenditure will result in much relief in the unemployment situation.
~S~H0WERS~~~
Toronto, April 3.—The weather over the Dominion today ' has Ijeen
mostly  fair  and   mild.
Minimum ami maximum temperatures:
Min. Afnx.
Dawson     36 18
Prince Rupert     36 4S
Victoria      40 54
Vancouver     36 56
Calgary      26 46
Edmonton     ?2 52
Moose Jaw     33 36
Winnipeg     4 0 48
Port Arthur     i'S 35
White River     22 40
Parry  Sound     28 44
Dondon      34 54
Toronto     36 50
Kingston -34 50
Ottawa, '30 54
SltJ   John .32 46
Halifax     30 42
FORECASTS.
Ijbwer Lakes and Georgian Bay—
Fresh to strong easterly winds; becoming  showery.
Ottawa Valley and Upper St.
'.Lawrence—_laste-rly winds, fair;
showers    at night or on Friday.
Lower St. Lawrence—Fair and
mild.
Culr and North S-Ore—Moderate
winds; fair; stationary or higher
temperature.
Maritime—'Moderate winds; not
much   change     in   temperature.
Lake Superior — Easterly winds
with  showers.
Manitoba—Mostly fc^r: stationary
or   a  little  lower  temperature.
Saskatchewan and Al'berta — Fair
and mild.
iNoiti hern iNew England—Falfr
Thursday; Friday cloudy arid warmer with showers; moderate variable
winds, becoming easterly.
April  5.
Abstract    from    Meteorological    records,
McOill University.  Montreal.    Heig-t
above sea level, 1S7 feet. 	
Barometer
reduced to       —Wind—      General Weather
Hour, sea level. Ther. Dir. Yel. Conditions.
Op.ra. 30-2-3 38 SB 6
Hp,m. 30.28 37 B 7
la.m. 30.27 37 SE 5
3a.ua. 30.30 84 _ B
5a.m. 30.37 31 B 0
7a.ip. 30.39 33 _ « Clear.
9a.m. 30.40 44 NE 4
11a.m. 30.38 47 NK 3
lip.ui. 30.38 50 KB   «
3p.m. 80.33 51 _       «
Op.in. 80.34 01 S 10
7'p.m. 30.85 45 S 10
Max., 51.2: min., 31.2; hum., 72; sun,
11.4 brs—95%.
Sun rises today at 5.27 a.m. Sun sets
at B.2S  p.m.
in regard to the contract (between the
Dominion Government and the Dominion Iron & Stpel Corporation for
a supply of .steel plates. Mr. La-
pointe stated that the -contract was.
cancelied on Feibruary IS,'1921, and
•that tlhe matter of damage's was referred to the Exchequer Court. The
total claim, of the company was for
$10,969,4S2, and $3,000,000 was paid
upon it on December 14, 1921.
Company on Borcy street, two miles
away from the scene of the tragedy.
He   admitted   having known   the wo
man,   but denied      ever having  had
quarrel    with   her  or cause    to at
tack or molest her in any way.
Raoul and Avila Chalut, employees
of the City I'ce Company at the
time, swore that Sulpice had been
with them near th. C.P.R. sheds
on Berey street at 6.55 a.m., on. the
day of the crime, and this testimony
was further strengthened 'by that of
Bmrtle Bernier, who corroborated
them.
In his speech to the jury Mr. Ger
main   said that  it  would  be  irftpos
sible   to  coven"  the  two.    miles from
Contant lane to Bercy street in  less
than thirty minutes; the testimony of
the  accused      and   the three  others
estalbli-hed   a .complete      alibi,      -ho
claimed; and the fact that there had
evidently  never,been Wtternees  'be
tween   Mrs.   De   Rosa   and   the   ac
cused,   pointed   to   the   extreme   improbability of Sulpice's guilt.
J. C. Walsh, K.C., declared that
it was the clearest case of straight
proof he had ever experienced, In his
career, and Mr. Justice Monet, in re
viewing the evidence, charged against
the prisoner. After thirty minutes
of deliberation the jury returned a
verdict of not guilty.
WANTS ciTY~MANAGER
Mr.    Frank   Ritchie    Favors
Plan for Three Rivers
Three (Rivers, Que., -April 6.—With
a view of having the city of Thre?
Rivers controlled iby a city manager,
Mr. Frank Ritchie, manager of the
Wayagamack Pulp & Paper Company, of this city, gave notice at the
meeting of the Cham'ber of Commerce last night .hat he will propose
■this municipal system' and will ask
Abe support of the Chamber to insist
that the civic authorities accept this
system and put it in force without
delay.
This question is not new here. It
was revived lately in. a conference
with Mr. Henri Ortiz, city manager of
Grand'Mere, who explained the advantages of civic 'government by a
mana.ger.
BARBERS REDUCE PRICES
25 Cents for Haircut and 15
for Shave in Ottawa
Ottawa, April 5.—A reduction of
over thirty-five per cent, in the cost
of hair cuts and twentyrfive per
cent, in the cost of shaves, has -been
put into effect by several bariber
shops here, who are announcing Oheir
new prices as being 25 cents for a
hair cut, and 15 cents tfnr a shave.
Local tonsorial parlors previously
were charging fifty and forty cents
for a liai.r cut, and twenty-five cents
for a shave.
James
Strachan's
Galettp
au Beurre
Tomorrow
Order Today
•It was arranged that this committee   should   meet    at   the   Board
of T*nade tocla-y, in order to draft
t.elr resolution embodying the objections to the W'heat Board proposition, and send it forward to
Ott_wa in order to reach the
standing committee of Parliament
on Agriculture and Colonization,
who are now considering the subject, before their meeting at Ottawa on Saturday.
This resolution or memiorandum
will be. accompanied by a request
that the committee on agriculture
and colonization afford opportunity
for a delegation representing the
Montreal Oorn Exchange Association and other trade bodies to meet
the committee, and present their
views  more  fully.
In addition to this it was decided by the meeting that as this was
a question which not only concerned the. grain merchants, but all
'classes of the community, the principal trade organizations of the city
should be asked te join with the.
Corn Exchange in their protest. To
this end notifications will be sent
to the Board of Trade and its
branch .associations, the OhanAre
de Commerce, and other organizations, inviting them to.send representatives with a deputation later
to proceed to Ottawa and meet the
agriculture and colonization committee of Parliament.
CONSERVATIVES TO AID
Pledge Assistance to Starving
Russian Children
Ottawa; April 5.—Practical assistance for the Save the Children Fund
for famine-stricken Russia was
pledged by the Conservative members of the House of Commons in
caucus this morning. The urgency
of all aiding in this work was voiced
by several members, and a resolution
pledging the support of the Conservative memlbers was approved.
Pending legislation and motions on
the order paper were also discussed.
Donald Sutherland (Oxford South)
presided.
NOTED HEALTH LECTURER
ST. JAMES METHODIST
Dr. J. C. Elliot, Distinguished Lecturer, Author, Preacher, Noted Food
ind Health Specialist, lectures at St.
James' Methodist Church, St. Catherine and City Councillors Streets,
rhurnlay. 2.30, Constipation and
Sleeplessness: Thursday, 7.30, Nervous Indigestion and Self-Consciousness; .Friday, 2.30, How to
Keep Young and Well; Friday, 7,30,
Eating for Health and Prevention
of Disease; Saturday, 2.30, Worry
anil Food in Indigestion. Admission
Free,  including  exercise.—Advt.
'"JW*A. ---*       V.-aiifl«HI,l        tlK^QLUld, .,,,,..
the war this had been changed, and
Willi < strong publicity campaign the
Dominion Government had sold over
two billions of Canadian bonds to
Canadian investors, completely
changing the investing habits of our
people, which was a lesson for all time
to come.
This change in methods must continue in order that we could sell ourselves as a trading nation among the
trading nations of the world. This
was necessary firBt for our own self-
respect, to mako Canada known as
a nation with an appreciation of art
and culture and not lacking in business, commercial or industrial intelligence. To do this, it was necessary
to tell other nations what we are,
what we have, and what we aim to
■become, and he quoted from The
Gazette of that day several examples
of the kind of publicity other nations
were getting, even though some of it
was  not very  favorable.
As an example of lack of publicity,
Col. Cooper said that few Canadians
knew that the Dominion had tin:
greatest gold mine in the world, and
Was producing today more gold than
any' State in the Union, while her
mineral progress was attracting atten
ds   JU/l'l .11,1   1.   »1.        HUM IN ION   S(J.
Nautical Instruments
SASH OPERATING
DEVICES
Swivel Truck Casters
W.F.Canavan
128 Bclgravc  Ave
Wcstmount   6707
PHYSICIANS   AND   DENTISTS.
DR. ALBERIC MARIN
4  years   in   military   hospitals  in   France
and Ensiand. Specialty, skin and venereal
diseases.     Consultations,  Z  to  6;   7 to  9
East 605H — 295  ST. DENIS
DR. R. LEVESQUE
Apt.   11,  40  DRU5IMOND   ST.     |
Specialist   In
VKNEREAIa   diseases
0.30—13.30: 3—1: 6—7 P.M.    Uptown S981.
Library Bureau (Wood) Counter
Height Filing Cabinets—Just die
Thing to Save You That Valuable
Space—Prices Are Reasonable
Three and One-half Feet High — Counter
Height. Does Not Shalt Off Air or Light of
Obstruct the View with Files for Any Business.
In Sections—You Can, Therefore, Place,
Where You Wish—as a Counter—as a Partition or Against a Wall/ See Them for Yourself in Our Showrooms or Telephone Main
4825 for Our Representative to Call.
Office Equipment Co.
Of Canada
Distributors of Library Bureau Wood Filing Devices
305 Notre Dame St. W.
West of McGill
Only One Store—Note Our Address
The prices are surprisingly moderate-
$7.50, $10.00 and $15.00
—First Floor Up
VAN HEUSEN
the world's smartest
COLLAR
VAN CAMP
The VAN HEUSEN has about as much relation to the ordinary untidy soft collar as a
full dress suit has to overalls.
The rage of New York's smartest dressers,
thousands of Montreal men have waited for
its introduction here—and, _s usual, Blumen-
thal is first.
The demand will be impossible to fill. We
will supply as fast as the mills can produce
the fabric—we therefore must set a limit of
>/_ dozen to a customer until production meets
the demand.
Sizes
13%-17
50c      InsSer
Same as the New York price !
MAIL  ORDERS, PREPAID,  ACCEPTED.
PHONE PLATEAU 82.
It/        MM 1T£E» Kj
A few steps east of Bleury and St. Caiherin
'GIVE A THOUGHT TO STYL1
— LI. No.  S2
THE  GAZETTE.   MONTREAL.  THURSDAY,  APRIL  6,  1922.
aLICIOUSLY
WAS OPINION
m Was Theory of
ir and Janitor of.
de Apartments
BREAKS LATELY
of  Salvage  Corps
Suggested Spon-
Coinbustion as
iso of Blaze
m was stated by Z.
to proprietor, and Jos.
he janitor, 'to 'bo th©
iso of the fire which
tho (Par-side, apart-
2664 Park avenue, at
n Wednesday, March
ir testimony yesterday
isKioner W. _. Ritchie
stigation into the out-
ause was not definitely
□ winy to some of the
_ rather contradictory,
son, apartment 18, as-
;cr t.o th© Hudson Bay
tine.il that on the night
e was awakened by a
he. at first thought
ling on the to of. He
d and found that his
as 'filled with smoke,
e opened th© door to
it,   he   discovered   that
which  led  to the -roof
He  immediately   gave
his neighbor, Richard
they threw some water
;. Mr. Hodkisson. stated
greatly alarmed on be-
other who had sniftered
shock from the prev-
Tich occurred in the
the 20th March. He
ut with the assistance
it   as she,  was  70   and
walk. Had they been
ater, said Mr. Hod'kis-
ust have 'been surnames.
by the Commissioner,
•eplicd  th-it  the flames
have started ih the
ich     was     against the
side with asbestos on
e.   He had  no  Idea  of
the  outbreak,   but   he
some paint pota and
o stairs which might
3 way started the fire.
)n stated that in his
ere was a metal chut©
irbage was thrown and
ccumiulated in the celled. He had not suffer-
Tage from the. fire ex-
ter, but he told the
:|"The shock has alii y  mother."
ES  CANCELLED.
'right, apartment 17,
3 was awakened by his
saw tho flames. After
ly dressed ho assisted
n to bring his mother
f safety.     The   witness
he air space between
ind the asbestos boards
th refuse. Questioned
estos     boards   did   not
PATROL SYSTEM TO
MAINTAIN ALL ROADS
Hon. J. L. Perron's Plans Provide for Unified Method of
Constant Repair
MEANS MILLION  EXTRA
Municipalities Will Have Com-1
munication Ways Maintained at Less Expense to
Themselves
1 Plans ar© under way by the Provincial Roads Department whereby
there will be established in this
province this year a patrol system,
which will keep in repair all tho
improved roads of the province, 4,000
miles, and which organization will be
built on such a basis that it will extend itself to take care of further
rodd  building.
The intention of the Government
is that there will be brought into
being a complete organization by
which it will be possible for Hon.
J. L. Perron, Minister of Roads, to
know in detail and with exactitude
the state ot' each' section of r .ad,
the road mender in charge, and the
amount of .repairs being done.
Hon. Mr. Perron has been Minister of Roads for only a few months,
but already the plans have been
executed, and tho general anticipation is that before the close of this
year all roads will be in good repair,
and such provision made as to keep
them   permanently   in  that   state.
Tho fact that the Government is
taking an extra million dollars per
year out of liquor revenue to be
used for roads, in addition to the
regular roads department budget of
a million and a half, means that
while more work will be done, and
unification arrived a't, there will be
less expense to the municipalities
concerned.
WILL   SAVE   MONET,
It will be necessary, however, under the new plans for the municipalities to work In harmony with the
Government by passing the necessary by-laws to permit of the Minister taking care of their roads.
Such by-laws will provide the conditions. At present municipalities
have to pay" 50 per cent of main-
tenant© of improved roads, the Government paying the other half, but
it is provided in the measure which
Mr. Perron put through the Legislature last session that the Minister
may use his discretion as to the
ratio which each municipality will
pay. This will mean in practice that
if it is found that a municipality
with a long stretch of road can show-
that deterioration is due very largely
to outside traffic, th© Government
will agree to pay more than 50 per
cent, of the cost of maintenance. Tha
poverty of a municipality will also
be taken into consideration, and the
result will be therefore, as one example, that there will not be a bad
stretch of several miles in a road
because the municipality in question
has not the money for the repairs.
SULPICE FREED OF
ATTEMPTED MURDER
Defence Established Alibi and
Jury Returned Verdict of
Not Guilty
VICTIM   HAS   SINCE   DIED
Woman Was Attacked     and
Badly Slashed With Razor,
While    Her    Terrified
Daughter Looked on
Justine Sulpice was acquitted by a
jury In the Court of King's Bench
yesterday afternoon of havin>g attempted to murder Mrs. Maria De
Rosa, by slashing her with a razor
on the .morning of Juno 8 last. Sul-
pica swore that he was two milee
away from the place where the crime
was committed at tha time in question, and his evidence was corroborated iby two other witnesses. The
victim, who has 'Since died from other
cause*-, swore tihat It was Sulpice
who had attacked her, and during
the preliminary hearing her daughter
Maria, aged 14, bore out her etory.
The 'girl testified yesterday morning, repeating her evidence as given
in the lower courts. She told of
her mother's death in hospital of
pneumonia, and of her now being the
solo support of a three-year-old sister.
For some time, she said, she had
known Sulpice, and had, in fact, previously lived in the eame house as
tho accused. On the morning in
question she was accompanying her
mother to work at the Tuckett Tobacco Co., Limited, where they were
both employed, and they were passing along Contant street, a narrow
lane, when a man rushed up to them
and slashed her mother in the face
with a razor. When she put up her
arm to guard her face she received
a second cut, which badly injured
her wrist. They both screamed for
help and the assailant ran away.
CLAIMED ACCUSED THE MAN.
"There Is the man," she declared,
pointing at the accused in the dock.
Sulpice looked her straight in the
eye and appeared fully composed.
During the preliminary hearing the
girl's mother had made a similar declaration of complete identification.
Cross-questioned iby Alban Germain, ICC., as to the time, the girl
.sworo positively that It was five
minutes before seyen o'clock, as she
had heard the whistle from a nearby tobacco factory. She could not
ascribe any motive fo,r the crime; to
her there was no cause for the forutal
attack, as there had never to her
knowledge been any dispute 'between
her  mother and the accused.
Sulpice, a .man well over forty
years of age, stated that he was an
ice carter and jobber. On the morning of the crime, he said, he had ibeen
with some employees of the City Ice
Company on Bca-cy street, two miles
away from the scene of the tragedy.
He admitted having: known the woman,   but denied      ever having  had
NO WHEAT BOARD
FOR CORN EXCHANGE
Members  Unanimously  Protested Against Proposal
for Its Reorganization
WILL   SEND   DEPUTATION
Price   of   Wheat   Cannot   be
Fixed    in    Canada—Exchange    Asks    Trade
Bodies to Protest
Emphatic disapproval of the proposed resurrection of the Canada
Wheat Board was, voiced at a. special general meetlirfg of the Montreal
Corn Exchange Association yesterday afternoon at ^the council chamber of tho Montreal Board of Trade.
There were about thirty-five members present, the president, Mr. Howard D. Strachlan, in the chair,
and the voice of th© meeting was
unanimous in opposition ta. any
such   proposal.
In opening the. meeting tha president briefly explained tho objects
for which they had boom called, to
make a pronouncement of their
vi.ews as to tho bringing back to life
of the Canada Wheat Board, and
expressed his own disapproval of
any  such  step.
Considerable discussion followed,
whiich was taken part In by nearly
all of those present. The general
opinion .of the meeting was that
there was no rea,son why the Canadian Govenrmient should go into
the wheat business any more than
with regard to any other commodities.
It was pointed out by members
that in order that such a move by
the Goveirnimienit could have any effect as the western grain growers
seemed to think it would, the Government would through the Wheat
Board have to guarantee a minimum price for wheat, which w_8
considered an unsound proposition
econ'omicalil'y, and impossible to carry out wiithO'Ut serious Injustice to
the whole of the rest of the country,
for the benefit of on. class. The
dealers pointed out that the price
of wheat was not made in Canada,,
nor was it made by the grain dealers, against whom the grain growers seemed to have their main objection. The price bf wheat, it was
shown, was made in the ultimate
market in Great Britain, and no
Wheat Board in Canada could Influence this,
TO   DRAFT   RESOLUTION.
After the discussion it was decided to appoint a small committee, consisting of President Howard
D. Slfcrachan, of the Corn exchange,
with Messrs. P. A. Heywood, A. Geo.
Burton and Norman Wight, to draft
tho Corn Exchange's objection to
the proposals . for the re-establish-
t^ent of the Wheat  Board.
■It was arranged that this committee should meet at the Board
of Trade today, in order to draft
their   resolution emibodying   the ob-
WHftnc       in    M-i.%    "WT,Vi—c+    'R:n^iT*_    rvrn-
CANADA BEHIND ;
IN ADVERTISING
Dominion Publicity Commissioner in New York Urged
More Propaganda Work
COMMENDED   VISE    FEES
Trade    Representatives    Too
Few, Poorly Equipped and
Not Adequately Trained,
Said Col. Cooper
A strong argument was made by
Col. John A. Cooper, of Toronto, before tihe Montreal Publicity Association, yesterday, that Canada, while it
had greater potentialities than almost
any part of the Empire for foreign
trade, was the least advertised dominion of tho Empii-e, with the poorest representation in trade commissioners, both in numbers and in their
general individual capacity for making the Dominion known and getting
trade for Canada. In fact, he went
further, anil showed that even in our
own country there was little propaganda work to make known what we
ourselves had. He argued that Canada ought to have at least 500 trade
commissioners abroad, and that the
system should be adopted of using
the fee system for viseing invoices of
goods, at $2.50 fee for every invoice
over J100, as was being used by the
United States and most other countries. In this way, he claimed, the
trade commission system could not
only be made self-supporting, but
leave a balance for the Government,
which was the case with the United
States. Some members asked Col.
Cooper if the Publicity Association
could do anything to assist in getting a better trade commissionership
representation abroad, and he replied
that the first thing to do would be to
persuade the Montreal Board of
Trade, with its strong influence, lo
withdraw its opposition to the system of charging fees for the viseing
of invoices on goods coming to Canada. Their opposition, he said, had
been made on the ground that such
a system would add further taxation
to foreign trade, but his opinion was
that the benefits to be derived would
far outweigh any cost of the service.
President John Fraser occupied the'
chair, and introduced Col. Cooper,
with a few words of appreciation of
the work he had done for Canada
during his service as publicity commissioner for the Dominion at New
York, and the latter was given a
warm reception by an unusually large
attendance.
NATIONAL   PUBLICITY.
Col. Cooper said the subject he had
to discuss was Canadian publicity
abroad. His audience knew the va'je
of publicity, but unfortunately that
could not be said of Canada as a nation. Previous to the war Canada
was not even advertised to herself,
and had not sold half a million of
bonds to Canadian investors. Since
the war this had been changed, and
Hit- « strona publicity campaign the
Dominion Government had sold over
two billions of  Canadian  bonds    to
lion throughout the world. It. was
such things that called, for national
publicity abroad, especially sin™ last
year Canada's foreign trade was $1,-
600,000,000, about evenly divided between exports and imports, a far
greater per capita foreign trade than
that of either the United States or
Australia.
There were two methods of securing this publicity, official and unofficial, and in this connection Colonel
Cooper paid a warm tribute to the
foreign publicity service of the C.P.R.
abroad, which, he said, was doing
more for Canada, and incidentally the
C.P.R., than any other element of
foreign publicity, especially with their
service in the United States under
Max Enos at New York.
CANADA IN REAR.
As to the official foreign publicity,
lie said it was only beginning its
work, under II. R. Poussette, in connection with the Department of Trade
and Commerce. The way in which
this was being done was shown by
the fact that at Now York there wero
50 foreign trade commissioners, representing as many countries, each
out for their own publicity, and getting it. In this work Sweden was
easily the leader, and Canada badly
in the rear, with one trade commissioner- at N*w York, and twenty-five
throughout the whole United States.
"But the difficulty is," said Colonel
Cooper, "that our representatives are
not well equipped to sell Canadian
goods as are tho other representatives. They are not properly trained
or selected, while the importance of
their work abroad is not properly appreciated. We need better trade
commissioners abroad. When I was
in New York I was the only Canadian
representative who had power to invite a visitor to lunch and charge it
up to the Canadian Government, and
I still hold the Government's official
authority, that I might spend as much
as $25 a month in this work.
(Laughter.)
Tho United States, he said, had the
greatest publicity bureau in the
world, while its 1,200. trade commis-
SPRING
CLEANING
The time of the year dreaded by every housewife. For
a small cost we can do all
the heavy work, such as:—
Rugs, Draperies, Curtains,
Cushion Covers and Furniture Coverings. Telephone
us now. We will send a
man to give you an estimate
on the cost without any
further obligation.
Toilet Laundries
Limited «
Uptown 7640
(Established   1857)
HARBISON & Go.
5 .MKTCALFE ST.     DOMINION S ..
Nautical Instruments
/^   A   r.»
^^V^*^v«    A   n.*.,n
sioners throughout the world were
trained and equipped for their work,
;yyl adequately supported through
the system of charging fees for viseing invoices. They had 92 men in
this service in Canada alone, who
sent in regular and valuable reports
as to conaitions, as compared with
Canada's 25 *or the whole world. The
vise fee system last year brought the
United States $450,000, and their total
expense for consular and trade commissioner systems was only $270,000,
so it was clear that by adopting the
same system Canada could easily
support 500 foreign trade commissioners,, which would make the Dominion and its resources known
throughout   the   world,   and   greatly
assist in increasing our foreign trade,'
both   export  apd   import.
An excellent musical programme
was given by Mme. Eva Plouffe-
Stopes and Messrs. Ilercule Lavole
and Valade.
Jap Delegates Named
' Tokio, April 5—Tho appointment ot
Baron Hayashi, ambassador to Great
Britain; Viscount Ishii, ambassador,
to France, and Kogo Mori, financial
commissioner in London, as the Japanese delegates to the Genoa confer-*
ence has been officially confirmed.
Eferon Hayashi will head the delega-i
tion.
a group of
Easter Hats
is waiting for you
Only cleverly designed chapeaux have
been admitted to the collection, which
is characterized by a beauty of coloring
which is new in its softness of tone, a
grace of line which distinguishes unusual creations.
Toques are banked high in front with
French blossoms, straw braids have
great perky bows, and the large drooping models show the least trimming of "Kesolved that the ruinous consequences now apprehended from the
growing embarrassments of Canadian
commerce can no longer be afforded
or even delayed by the solitary exertions of individuals, or by tho occasional hasty and Inadequate deliberations of public meetings, and
that the present alarming crisis demands tho establishment of a standing Committco, of Merchants to be
authorized by their constituents • to
watch over the general interests of
the trade of the country;
"Resolved that to conciliate public
favor and confidence, and to obtain
such a combination of experience, energy and perseverance as existing
circumstances require, the said Committee shall bo established on liberal
principles, and be annually, elected
by ballot by such resident merchants
of this city as shall contribute annually to the funds of the proposed
Constitution the sum of three guineas,
the first payment to be made at the
time of subscription;
"Resolved, that this important
measure is not only demanded by the
present emergency, but is likewise
recommended by the. example of most
of the commercial cities in Europe
and in America, and more particularly by the recent establishment and
reported effects of Committees of
Trade in Halifax, N.S., St. John,
N.B., and in the Capital of this province;
"Resolved, that a committee of organization be now appointed to receive subscriptions, and to prepare
and digest rules and regulations for
the -support and management of the
proposed establishment, and for rendering annually to the subscribers a
correct account of the application and
disbursement of the funds;
"Resolved, that a report of proceedings of the committee of organization on the present reference shall
by the said committee be laid before
a meeting of the subscribers, to be
called with as little delay as possible,
for the approbation Of tho same, and
for tho purpose of electing the members of the proposed Committee of
Trade;
"Resolved, that the committee of
organization shall consist of seven
subscribers to the intended institution;
ORGANIZATION  COMMITTEE.
"Resolved, that the following gentlemen, selected from those who have
now opened the subscription sheet,
shall compose the said committee of
organization: Horatio Gates, George
Aldjo, George Moffatt, John Fleming,
Henry Mackenzie, Campbell Sweeny
and W. N. Porter.-,.(Signed) John
Richardson,  Chairman."
With the unanimous adoption of
those resolutions toy a group of men,
all of whom have long since joined
ty.e silent majority, was the organization (born which ihas continued
ever since, and ultimately developed
into tho most powerful and influential Board of Trade li» the Dominion.
Another meeting was held on April
20th, 1822, when the Organization
Committee to receive subscriptions,
and prepare rules and regulations for
the new CommJittiee of Trade, and to
■deliberate on other matters submitted to them, reported;
"That in obedience to the instructions of the public meeting, the committee proceeded in the first place
to consider the expediency of substitution to subscribers," and a number of Oitiher details as to organization.
Even then there were complaints as
to tho cost of subscription, andv requests had .been made that the .subscription rate should be reduced to
l.wo guineas. This was not favored
by the committee, which reported that
51 merchants had sufhscribed to. the
association, producing a fund c-f
£178.10 in currency.
With this report the committee
submitted tlhe original rules and regulations for the Committee of Trade,
of awards was as follows: —
Grand Prize—"Summer Breezes,"
by Gen. Henry High, ,f Chicago. This
picture also took 1st prize in C1hs_
ii. Figure Studies.
Class A—Portraiture — let prize,
"Mary Lambroix," by Jane Roeee, of
Dayton, Ohio, 1st prize, Canadian,
"The Tough," by Russ. M. Collins, of
Toronto.
Class B—Figure Studies—1st prize,
"Summer Breezes," by Gen. Jly,
High, of Chicago, 1st prize, Canadian,
"Reflections," b.y W. D. Moore, of
Winnipeg.
Class C—Landscape—1st prize,
"Autumn Sunlight," by Don Fitts, of
Northampton, Mass. 1st -Canadian,
"Meadowvale," toy Arthur S. Goss, of
Toronto.
Class D—Marine—let prize, "Harbour Reflections," by G. R. Smith, ot
Toronto.
Class E—Genre—1st prize, "Sidewalk Treasures," by, O. E. Fischer, of
Detroit, Mich. let Canadian, "The
Gypsy Washing Day," by Ernest
Hoch, of Toronto.
Class F—Architecture and Street
Scenes—1st prize, "A Maine Fishing
Village," by Eugene P. Henry, of
Brooklyn,  N.Y.
Class' G—Miscellaneous—1st prize,
"Fine Feathers Make Fine Birds," by
Thomas O. Sheckel, of Salt Lake
City, Utah. let prize, Canadian,
"Jack Frost's Mighty Jaw," by Ernest Hoch, of Toronto.
•    SOME EFFECTIVE PRINTS..
Of the M.A.A.A. Camera Club
members F. H. J. Ruol is represented
by five portraits and one genre
work called "The Autocrat of the
Breakfast Table," which depicts a
vivacious looking girl, dressed in a
middy blouse, evidently engaged in
the discussion of a subject on which
she is very sure of herself. William
_*. AVeir has a nicely composed print
in "Ruins—Furness Abbey," and
there is space and light in "The Pass
Road." James Rose in "A Club
House" has made the most ot a formal subject. William S. Parke sends
one excellent print entitled "The
Trout Stream," a typical bit of
northern scenery where a little
brook dashes its foamy way between rocks into a pool, quite promising in a piscatorial sense. In
composition and lighting the print is
good—honest camera work without
recourse to fuzzy outline j«.nd doctoring of the plate. Gordon K. Miller
shows his versatility in landscape and
portraiture as does Peter J. B. Brass.
The making of such recommendations and suggestions as will in the
opinion of tho members of th<> GttilM
redound, not only to the advantage, of
the'service, but to the individual betterment of the members of the Guild;
Guild; \
Discussing with the heads of departments and other officials such
grievances or misunderstandings as
may arise from time to time, and effect the relations of one or more
members of the Guild with the heads
of departments;
Giving such aid, pecuniary or
otherwise, as the circumstances of the
Case  may  require;
Securing for any one or more members of the Guild such redress as he
or they are entitled to, as a result of
investigation conducted by the Guild,
or any member appointed to enquire
into such grievances or injustices.
Footsteps of a house fly booming
out like thunder as it walked across
a piece of paper have been heard
by scientists visiting the Bell telephone system's research laboratories.
Walter G. D. Bbronow is represented
by two prints, the waterside view,
with its picturesque willow, called
"Far from the Hectic City," exciting
a longing to get out into the open.
Other Montrealers showing work are
L. Archamb ault, with "Sur lo Lao"—
three children in a nquaro-ended boat
on Lac Superieur. near St. Fauetln;
Herbert W. Aehby with a portrait
and a subject picture in which a
Persian cat is the centre of interest; R. Bindon, with "A Chip of
the Old Block" which shows a kiddie
in overalls smoking a pipe; Sylvio
Bordeleau with a portrait group,
Thomas Farmer with "An Old Stairway" in which the lighting has been
well managed. Marion E. Farrell
sonds "Reflections," a winter landscape with trees which are reflected
in tho pool on which the ice ie
breaking. Mrs. S. W. Jacobs sends
two portraits of merit. William Mea-
coe is represented by four prints, and
Mme. L. J. A. Peloquin has an effective work in her red-toned "Mar-
celle." I. Shlntani has made an artistic subject out of the'Victoria
Bridge, the gleam of sunlight on the
river adding to the effect. Alfred
Stephen Upton is successful with the
portrait "Miss O.It." The work from
outside the city is up to the usual
standard, and the exhibition as a
whole is an interesting one.
Ware"
"Madm by McClary'i, in London toan,
Tho big stop* Arm of much renown."
With the smooth, glassy
surface that cannot absorb
dirt, and of a wear-resisting
toughness — that's Mc-
Clary's.
At All Good Stores
Trait Mark
;.McClar/.s__
Registered
uuue-u Jtxt_n.
SOME QUALM-CATIONS.
Atolllty and experience such _s
other countries require of their representatives should be required of
persons to be- appointed Canadian
trade commissioners or- commercial
agents. In 'addition to business experience each one should have a
solid economic and -commercial
foundation of (knowledge. All should
have at least tho command of the
two 'Official- languages of the country, while those who are to (be
ed in countries where the official
language is other than English or
French should have, a sufficient
knowledge, of that language. Finally, should 'it be thought advisable
to give the novice the experienoe
of travel in several countries, when
finally named he should be required
to remain in the one country.
' It is suggested .that commissioners and agents should) 'furnish continuous and .rapid notifications 'by
cable if necessary, of supply and
demand, of possibilities of 'business,
of transport rates, of customs'
duties, and of all other urgent Information likely to place Canadian
trade on an equal tooting with
other countries in the markets of
the world. Detailed monthly reports
Commissioners and agents ahould
be in a position to answer :i" r0'
quests lor  ii -ie reJ
port, whether the. information
should relate to Canada or. the
country -where they ai*e 'stationed;
They should be advised of pieas,-
ures taken by other departments
which arc  likely to affect trade.
The report, concludes with the
suggestion, that the information
gathered in foreign countries should
be. centralized . and rapidly communicated to interested parties. One
form of centralization could toe the
establishing of a commercial
miuseurri, preferably in (Montreal, the.
commercial metropolis, where 'samples of foreign goods gathered by
commissioners and agents could be
exhibited 'in comparison with samples of similair goods of Canadian
production. An information bureau
could bo operated 'in connection
with this museum. Finally, publications could toe issued as often as
the nature of the information on
hand   would   justify.
The appointment of trade, correspondents In certain cerebrcs where
no commissioners or agents could be
stationed is also recommended in
the. report, which was adopted unanimously toy the Chambre de
Commerce.
THE IMPORTANT THING
ABOUT CLOTHES
Style in Society Brand Clothes rfieans more
than their appearance when you first put
them on, however much they may please
you then. That appearance will last as long
as the fabric looks well—and that's a long
time. Well considered design and careful
tailoring account for it.
The value is there and the price will please
you.    Drop in and look them over.
The Label in the pocket is your guarantee.
MOR_NMFRERE
( I':mhi(..(.* Building)
5 St. Catherine Street East
#0rfrtg Irani* (iUiitfpg.
Split Switcn
One per
son was instantly killed and six
others injured, two perhaps fatally,
early this evening when a Rochester
and Syracuse inter-urban car split
a switch and pinned a group of pedestrians between its rear trucks and a
lino of automobiles.    Walter Schrier,
-tttery and^^c^^Sfif^Wl
172 BLEURY STREET
Plateau 1661-1710.   W. J. LITTLE, Jr., Manager, R
1 Costs Are Amazingly Lov
jj     Economy?
The Packard Single-Six has given the won
a new meaning.
Think of owning a quality car that perform
M with the smoothness, reliability and eas<
1 that only a Packard can give, and that deliver
1 20 miles or better to the gallon of gasoline
j§     and 15,000 miles or better from tires.
That is the experience that thousands o
Single-Six owners are enjoying.
Touring -
Runabout -
Sedan - -
Coupe -    -
* -
$3785.00
$3785.00
$5285.00
$4950.00
Including Spare Tire and Bumper, F.O.B., Montreal, Sales Tax Paid.
Packard Montreal Motor Co,
Limited
=       307  University Street
Phone Uptown 648
I PACKARD
ASK   THE   MAN   WHO   OWNS   ONE THE  GAZETTE,   MONTREAL;! TlTORSBAY,  APRIL 6,  1922p
VOL.  CLI.  No.  82
IAL MINUTES
)ARD OF TRADE
Containing Century-
cords Makes Inter-
sting Reading
TTEE   OF  TRADE
to Cope With Emer-
-Started With 51
ters, Each Assess-
Guineas Yearly
if the approaching centen-
Montreal Board of Trade,
rs on, April 11th next, but
Mally celebrated by a ban-
Til 28th, Mr. George Had-
eran secretary emeritus of
yesterday dug up from
j archives the volume of
.1 minutes of the meeting
chants which decided upon
:atlon of a "Committee of
lich formed the nucleus
h. the present Board of
loped. The minutes, writ-
jry ago in a round hand,
decades before the rattle
ewriter was heard, make
sly interesting and valu-
I, not only for the inclu-
nes which have since be-
of Montreal's history, but
of the fact exhibited that
;al Board of Trade was
tury ago from the trade
conditions which resulted
inclusion of the protracted
wars, but that history is
tself in the fact that the
>f the board is being cele-
ng the critical trade con-
owing the conclusion, of
t of all world wars.
D WITH 51 MEMBERS.
ites allow the various steps
the small origins of the
ird of Trade were consum-
i a primal membership of
guineas each, since grown
membership of 2,200 with
Df associate organizations,
rreater  than   the  original
of Trade, and building
3 beyond the imagination
dy founders, whose names
ses are still borne by uni-
chools and streets in the
Jtes of the original meet-
>d in the quaint phraseol-
il 11th, 1822, set forth:
eeting of merchants and
rested in the commerce of
leld this day at the Kx-
St. Joseph street, to take
eration the propriety and
of establishing a Commlt-
de:
norable John Richardson,
n called to the chair, tho
evolutions were first read,
/ards   proposed   and   car-
1 that the ruinous conse-
>w apprehended from the
ibarrassments of Canadian
can no longer be afforded
•layed by the solitary  cx-
whlch report was (submitted and adopted, as testified <by the signatiy^
Of the Chairman, Georgo Jloffatt.
LIST OF O'RIGINAH. MEMBERS.
These rules and regulations, the
foundation for the present by-dawa
of the Board of Trade, were then
subscribed to and signed ;by the 61
founders of the Board of Trade, a.
follows: Horatio Gates, Peter Free-
land, George Auldjo, Aibner Bagg,
Henry Mackenzie, John Mackenzie,
George Moffatt, Joseph Donegany,
Campbell Sweeny, Thoa. Delvecchio,
D. Robertson, Jatoe. Dewltt, John
ForsyBh, Chas. Brooke, W. N. Porter, George Proctor, John Brown, William Frears, Peiter McGMl, C. Dal-
rympl-e, John Gray, S. Gerrard, Fran-
cols Ant. Earocque, Fred. W. Er-
matinger, John Fleming, D. David,
J. Cuthbertson, John Porteous, Jos.
Chapman, Thos. Blackwood, Aibijah
Bigelow, T. Masson, T. Bouthelller,
James Young, Wm. Spragg, Michael
Scott, John Spragg, Tunton Penn,
Jas. Duncan Glbfb, T. Leslie, Peter
Macintosh, Wm. Peddle, John Torrance, Jas. Miller, William Smith,
John T. Sims, Thos. Torrance, Adam
L. MaoNlder, Chas. L. Ogden, Wm.
T. Holt, Norman Bethune, David
Handyeide, R. Harwood and Roibert
Nesbitt.
The minutes show that a further
meeting of the subscribers was held,
with Thomas Blackwood in the chair,
when a ballot was held, resulting in
the election of the original Committee of Trade, to act until June,
1823, as follows: " Horatio Gates,
George Auldijo, George Moffatt, Henry
McKenzie, Campbell Sweeny, John
Forsyth, Peter MeGill, F. L. La-
rocque, John Fleming, Samuel Gerrard, Thos. Blackwood, Chas, L.
Ogden and James Leslie.
Oh April 23rd, 18212, this committee
again met, as shown 'by .the minutes,
and hy hallot elected John Forsyth
chairman. But as it was found that
Mr. Forsyth was absent from the
province, Mr. Thos. Blackwood was
elected first chairman in his stead,
and thuis .became t)he first presiding
officer of what Is now the Board of
Trade.
GOOD WORK SEEN
AT CAMERA SHOW
Members of  M.A.A.A.   Well
Represented—No Montreal-
ers in Prize List
An unusually good showing is
made by Montreal amateur photographers at the sixteenth annual exhibition of the M.A.A.A. Camera
Club which is at present being held
in the club house on Peel street.- To
those interested the exhibits will be
on view each day from 2.30 until 5.30
o'clock in the afternoon, and between
8 and half-past 10 o'clock in the
evening. Tho show will close on
Saturday night.
The exhibits from the United States
do not seem to be as numerous as
usual, and so many exhibits were received late that a supplemental list
had to be attached to the .tinted
catalogue. The decision of the jury
of awards was aa follows: —
Grand Prize—"Summer Breezes,"
by Gen. Henry High, >_f Chicago. This
picture also took  1st' prize in
EX-SOLDIERS. SEEK
FULL RECOGNITION
New Organization Prepares to
Meet Situation as to Government Jobs •
PRINCIPLES LAID DOWN
Loyalty and Sincerity in Per-
formance of Duties First
Idea—Consideration
for Public
With probable readjustments in
civil service conditions there has
grown up among returned men employed by the federal and provincial
governments a desire to see that the
interests of returned men are protected, and that they obtain, in some
measure, realization of the promises
of the early days of the war and of
the period following the armistice.
This was the feeling which animated a number of such employees
gathered at tho Array and Navy Veterans' headquarters last night to decide on the general principles of a
constitution for the association termed "The Veterans' Civil Service
Guild." The Guild was brought into
being last week, with a provisional
committee in charge, Capt. W. J. Gerrard being chairman, and this committee was instructed to draw up a
constitution. This was approved of,
but in the matter of electing officers
it was decided that for the present
the same provisional committee
should act until, there had been secured additional members, and this
matter was left over until next Wednesday's meeting.
A number of Speeches were made
as to the necessity of such an organization, among others one by Bernard Rose, the legal adviser, who emphasized that the returned men must
work towards the aim that they were
entitled to preferential treatment in
the matter of public positions, that
they have it recognized that when
they enlisted in the army and now
were in the civil service they were
merely continuing to serve the same
country, and were entitled to all advantages as returned men.
LOYALTY IN DUTIES.
The clauses of the constitution provide for a president, three vice-presidents, a recording secretary, a corresponding secretary, a financial sec-
rotary, a treasurer, and a directorate
of not less than twelve members.
Other clauses call for the following:
Loyalty and sincerity in the performance of our duties;
Courtesy an our relations with the
public that may have occasion to require our assistance in connection
with the performance of our duties;
Doing everything within our power
to promote the welfare of the service;
Doing everything within our power
and by all legal means to secure recognition of our just claims, bated
upon service and attention to duties;
The making of such recommendations and suggestions as will in the
opinion of tho members of the tail'!
redound, not only to the advantage of
.1--       \....
,v.~  ;...i;,-;,i.
SUGGESTION FOR
TRADE EXTENSION
Improvement   of   Canada's
Commercial Representation
to be Urged
CHAMBRE   DE  C0MMER(
Committee's    Report    Advj
cates More Agents, With J
Expeditious Advices as
to Opportunities
A detailed schedule of Itriporl tnt
suggestions for the improvement of
Canada's commercial represents ion
abroad will he forwarded te. the
Prime Minister and members of the
federal cabinet hy the Chambie de
Commerce, following a report of
that body's committee on trado extension adopted at yesterday's r.»< e>t-
Ing of the Chambre. The increase
In the. number of Canadian Trade
commissioners, the appoint!)i
commercial agents attached to British consulates in countries where no
commissioners are stationed, thu establishment of a high standard of
ability and experience in the choice
of commissioners or agents, the inauguration of a thorough syister. of
trade information, and the establishment in Montreal of a conuie.r-
clal 'museum and information 'bureau, are among the recommendations which the Cham'bre de Commerce places before, the Gov.rn-
rnent.
The preamble of the report, which
was presented hy Henry Laureys,
chairman of the. committee, states
that "considering that it is in the
interest of Canada, In view of the
extension of Canadian trade aibrt ad,
to be kept fully informed of tnde
possibilities abroad; that the competition on foreign markets toetwjen
all nations whioh are interested in
their "economic progress is greater
than ever; and' that the only solution to the present crisis is to be.
found in the increase of production
and, consequently, in the opening, of
new markets; the committee Is,
therefore, of opinion that it is advisable to further develop the .government, service of'trade comn/is-
sioners."
The increase of the number of
Canadian trade ooimmissioniTS
abroad is (first recommended, especially in countries not fully developed Industrially where Canada
could find an outlet for her manufactured goods, as well as in tae
centres, where she could sell n..w
materials or food products, or
where, she oould secure necessary
raw materials or manufactured
goods, iln countries where it would
not be thought advisable to sei.d
commissioners it is recommended
that commercial agents be. named
to look after Canadian interests' si'd
that they he. attached to British
consulates.
SOME   QUALIFICATIONS.
And     experience e=<:
other  countries require  of their re-
FROM SCOTLAND TO
FARM IN ONTARIO
Advance Party of Immigrants
Arrives From Hebrides and
Inverness
ALL  WAR   VETERANS
Will Learn Canadian Methods
Before Taking Up Land
—Brought Out by Catholic Padre
Thirteen torawny Scottish farm-
era and fishermen from the highlands of Invernesshire and tho Hebrides, title advance 'party of about
150 dthens who are coming over, to
settle In Canada, left Montreal laat
night from Windsor Station for
Chatham, Ont„ and will ieam the
intricacies of Canadian farming on
the large Ardara Farms, Kent Coun-.
ty, wihioh are owned by the Roman
Catholic Church. They were aecom-
.panied 'by Rev. Father R. A. MacDonald, M.C, chaplain attached to
the 12th Brigade, C.15.F.., during
the war, who met them at :St. John,
N.B., when they lan-iied from the
S.S. Tunisian, of the C.P.R., Tuesday afternoon.
AH are veterans of the Iinperia't
army, and iseveral havo oeen decorated for .bravery during the war. AW
are nearly six feet tail, and only
three of them can speak English'
with any Amount of fluency. The
rest speak ipure Gaelic; and alii their
names ibegin with "Mac'- or "Mc".
There are ithree McLeans and three
MaoDonalds, two MoKenztes, two
McTiaviiislhos, a Mcpherson, i a Mcintosh and a Macintyre—and all are
ibachel'on.
"We're no' married yet," said one
of *he McLeans with a _<ri_, 'tout
Hater on we'ill -write for the. lassies
to come an' join us."
The .party arrived! by the C.P.R.
boat 'train .ye_teirday afternoon, and
spent most of their tiimo seeinir the'
sights of Montreal. On ths Ardan
Farms, five mMes from Chatham,
they will toe trained into the Canadian way of farming, and some of
them will toe .placed on neighboring
farmls, after which they -i.il} h? helped in selecting their own land,
Father MacDohald, h'mseiir a
Higihlandielr, is the instigator of thu
movement for bringing in immigrants from the North and Northwest of (Scotland. He .pent some
time in those parts' recently, and ar-
rangied for iloO to come,to Canada.
Their voyage across the Atlantic is
paid (tor toy the British Govsrnmevnt.
on   the.   signs   ^qi^ecWrttflRIc   !
couri&Sies   which  they  cover,  on the
commercial  situation,  and  'especially on  the  activities  of competitors,
are  also  recommended.
Commissioners and 'agents. should
be in a position to answer all rt--
qqests for iin'orriiatiou, &u.xp aiie r»4
pert, whether the. information
should     relate     to   Canada   or. the
The Hebrides and the isolated parts
of the Soottis'l. highlands were untouched when the Reformationwavie
swept the rest of the country, and
tho Roman-Catholics of chose part-
are today following the religious
customs of many centuries.
One of the party, isix .feat tlwerf)
Inches tall,, told of conditions in his
parts, which happens to bo Loch-
atoer.' 'Tho 'ground is used up, ho
said, and living is precarious. Farming is not carried '.>ut in the up-to-
date manner which characterizes it
on the North American continent.
The fishermen from the west coast
and the Hebrides have tout rittle experience in farming. They grow a
few ipotatoes, and a goat or two
form's the average lliiveatock on
these small farms among the rockg.
Exoapt for their visit to Franco unci
Flanders 'during the war the 'newcomers have never been away from
their -native ishores. Father MacDon-
aid stated that they are passionately
fond iof their homes, and it ia d. uibt-
t'ul if aM will be able to tear themselves away from their island® and,
highlands. Judging toy appearances
the men are physically all that can.
toe desired, £»d they seem quick at
adapting thpnTselves as to the new
conditions, of things.
Rev. John Chi1, holm, director ot
Brote-tant Immigration, was at the
station last .night, and was much impressed toy the members of th.
party. He chatted with some oif them
in the Gaelic language, and afterwards .expressed the hope that similar training farms would soon be
established for the tosnofit of Protestant immigrants.
Many of those that arrive later
will .bring their wives and famlhes|
with them. They are also hound for
the same destination.
ROBERT GLASGOW DEAD
Canadian Editor Passed Away
at n°°ft in ianm v"-"1"
ecial to The .Gazette.)
New fork, April 5.—Robert Glasgow, wbfc edited "The Chronicles of
America* a fifty-volume historical
work th* gained him the honorary
degree ol M.A. from Yale in 1919, died
suddenly this afternoon.of heart disease whi ! seated in his office at No.
727 Fiftl avenue. Following a miid
attack < influenza last fall his
heart ha bothered him on several
occasions but when he arrived at the
office toi ty there was no indication
that he
While ta  ;ing with two of his asso
ciates ho
America.'
Canadian
his home
Survivin
children,
has crea
as in a critical condition.
asped and fell to the floor,
dying air  >st instantly.
Until j 16 Mr. Glasgow had carried on a publishing business at Toronto. H was born in Canada .6
years ag and was the publisher of
"The Ch: nicies of Canada," similar
in -chara^er to his "Chronicles of
He' was a member of the
and Yale clubs, and made
\t NO./21S West 91st street,
are llis  widow and  three
rTale University Press
Yale  the   Theodore
another s«i, ar
dian arm* wh
Glasgow  Bound ition   in   memory   of
aviator in the Cana
was killed over the
German Uftes iii Flanders. Mr. Glasgow had giincofporated his preaer.t
publishingiactjwties under the name
of the TT"t"fl aw'"" Publishers' As
ONE KILLED, 6 INJURED
Inter-Urban Car in Rochester
Split Switch
sr>n • was     instantly   killed     and   six
others  injured,  two  perhaps  fatally,
15. anb Theodore Brown, 19, were.1 ered, but Brown escaped with an in-
pinnediunder the rear trucks of the jured left arm and a' few fractured
ear.    Sphrler's body %yas almbBt sev-   ribs. ■	
■BE
IMiilJI
CASE
VAN EASE
one of the new
VAN.HEUSEN COLLARS
Made in Canada.
They're here in three shapes, the
tAN LOWE   VAN EASE   VAN CAMP
Ai F.     IV- B.  2V4 F.     1V_ B,   2V_ F.     1% B.
~__z5r-_ to I71/2   Sizes I31/2 to 17  Sizes 12l/2 to 17
These new collars—at the popular price of fifty
cents—are really very stylish as well as comfortable to wear. A range of collars that step
forth with the utmost refinement.
607  St.   Catherine
Street   West
CB
In   the
Drummond Bldg.
NEW
WEST END
CopjrtlgM nthtaced, 1»« J_#l!'V_rT__N Vil
FORUM BLDG.-ATWATER AVE.
Uptown 105
NOW OPEN
THE SAME WILLARD SERVICE!
&itery:::a^
'.taraaiTAi Ho. 192-/
Montreal, Ikgril 5
1922.
W. Randall,
Publicity Dept.
(Steamship Traffic).
St. John, H.B. April 4.—The Canadian Pacific "Tunisian" arrived
this afternoon from Glasgow with k  large passenger list. Prominent among the passengers were A. 5 P.agate Miller, of Glasgow;
Robert Mcintosh, George Wilson, Mt-sS E.D. Duthie, oi Glasgow; Mrs
St. Andrews: Pa., w, Huntington, M.R„S.So,
G, Stuart MacEwan, of
l.R.CP., London; Commander C.G.
St. Conans, Scotland 5 G.A. Salveson
, Montreal; Alex Robertson,
Polnont, Scotland
Among the Canadians v/ere Miss M. Anderson, Vancouver; J.
Bald, Pense, , Bask-,.; J. Barbour, Pekisko, Alta,; H. Begg, Toronto;
J. Boyd, Calgary; Mrs. Cooper, Master J.W. Cooper, Cross Creek,
H.B.; j__________a___t_e_sg J.H. Dunlop, Bathurst, H.B.; Mr. and Mrs. J.
Esselmont, Master H. Esselmont, Transcona, Man.; Master S. Essel-
mont, Miss 1. Esselmont, Master J, Esselmont, Transcona, Man.*
C. Ferguson, Moose Jaw; Miss K. Hughes, Toronto; W. Logan, Elm
Greek, Man,; Mr. and Mrs.. T. MacDonald, Toronto; H. Mac Lean,
Kindersley, Sask.; Mrs. MacMahon, Spalding, Sask.; Mrs, llawhinney,
Miss B. Mawhinney, St. John, H.B.; A. Meiklejohn, Regina; 8.
Horrie, Brandon, Man.;. Mrs, Ross, Toronto; Mrs. Simpson, Master
J.A. Simpson, Master Jas. L. Simpson, Master CM, Simpson, Mooe©
Jaw; Mrs. Smith, Miss M. Smith, Master G. Smith, Spalding, Sask,;
Mrs, Stewart, Vancouver; G.Y. Stewart, Winnipeg; Mrs. Thomson,
and Miss C. Thomson, Edmonton.
An interesting party of agriculturists, including Donald
MacPhee, Angus MacDonald, Duncan MacDonald, Donald MaeDougal,
Roderick MacHeil, Angus Maclean, Donald MacKinnon, Donald Maclean,
John MacLean, John MacHeil, John MacKinnon, Donald MaeKeehnie,
and Alexander MacDonald, arrived from Barra, West Hebrides, and
were met by Rev, Father Angus MacDonald, of Chatham, Ontario, and
they are proceeding to that city, ^en  of them had their pipes
with them and skurled merrily at Sherbrooke, en route to Montreal.
This party was met at St, John and accompanied to Montreal by „,..^£
attain Andrew MacDuff, of the CPZ, Department of Colonisation
n
Passenger
Traffic).
Ag&nt'YAtlan tic
& Immigration, and Donald J, Cable
Ports, Canadian Pacific (Steamship
Barra, from which point this party of Scotsman have come to
make their homes in Canada, is an historic island with a population
of but several thousands persons.  Castle Bay, one of the safest
harbors in the Minch, is the fishing port of Barra,
In the centre of the bay. on a rock, the ruins of Kismul
Castle represent the once impregrPole stronghold of the MacHeils.
It was a chief of Kismul, according to legend, who refused to
accept Hcah's hospitality, as "The MacHeil had a boat of his own." - 8 -
that important Information i_-   to haiid respecting some big
gushers of oil which have made their appearance on one of the
Company's properties.
Assuring you of our best attention at all times,
Yours faithfully,
for   FINANCIAL   MART   & EXCHANGE, LTD.,
Secretary, MEMO
Rev, A. Macdonell, O.S.B.
It is proposed to get a colonization scheme under way for the
colonization and settlement of farms In Nova Scotia,
Families eligible for Farm Settlement are
1, Canadians now In Ncwa Scotia,
(a) Heads of families who have been tenants but
have not had the wherewithal to purchase a home
farm of their own,
(b) Sons of farmers who have worked at home, or
with other farmers, but have not been in a position
to purchase,
(c) Others who have for several years successfully
cultivated small holdings and are judged likely to
make a success of a larger holding.
2. Selected British settlors, with farming experience who
are anxious to settle on farm homes in Nova Scotia.
For this double purpose a survey should be made of all available lands in this Province suitable for cultivation - lands in
hands of municipalities, lands held by absentee owners and others.
As soon as a price is set, and the price should be set in view of
the little or no use made of these lands, then the Province should
buy.  These lands to be resold to selected men chosen by the Approved Society at the cut price paid for them.
1.  The settlers to be financed for stock and equipment by the
Government in accordance with the size and nature of the farm and
as adjusted by the Society.  In no case the financing to be above
$1000.  The settler will not bo given contract for 18 months -
during that period he is a tenant but paying as below.  The
settler would pay 2%  on the valuation of the farm and 3$ on the
price of the unpaid balance of the stock and equipment.
As soon as he has paid for his stock and equipment the 2%  and
3%  would no longer be paid and at the end of 10 years, If he has
his taxes paid up, and 75/. of the farm producing to the satisfaction
of the supervisors, he gets a clear title.
Until he has title to the farm he will not be allowed to farm
another place.
In no case will the settlor be allowed to use the farm as a
convenience whilst working for wages at some other work.  (This
does not refer to working out at off seasons.)
The candidate for a farm under the scheme will not be the
owner of a farm at the time of application.
This undoubtedly will be a revolutionary move but it is one
that the times, particularly the immediate future, would seem to
call for most urgently.
The organization is to hand. An organization that is undenominational in its work.  The University Extension of Antigonish who
will constitute the Approved Society.  In that you have experts in
Agriculture and men of the highest integrity - also and this is
very important - men who have studied their fellowmen and realise
to the full, the diversities of the human element that is to be
dealt v/ith in Colonization.
In these qualifications lio success; failure is certain when
thoy are lacking.  Were this scheme tacklod on the general lines
indicated with high courage and understanding, it would be the
beginning of a new era for Canada.  Every Province in the Dominion -2-
would need to follow suit, and for the first time in our modern
history the essential difference between the basic occupation of
Agriculture and Industrialism would be rightly acknowledged and
vindicated.  The resulting prosperity and human happiness would
be the best proof of the right tackling of this great problem, of
tho right solving of the most pressing and genuine human need. This
was succinctly stated at a Rural Life Conference last fall In Richmond, Virginia.
"The burning concern of the Catholic Church with Agriculture
arises from the altogether unique relationship which exists universally between the agricultural occupation and the central institution
of Christian, nay of all, civilization; namoly the family.  The fan-
Is the native habitat of the family."  It might be well to state here
and emphatically that the above is true in the thinking minds of
all other Christian denominations and the work can only be done if
all co-operate.
2.  Coincident with the colonization of the sons of Nova Scotia
on lands within tho Provinco a scheme for the settlement of selected
British families in Nova Scotia should bo initiated without delay.
This project may bo begun in such fashion that not only would
the families be a valuable asset, but thoir settlement would be a
financial gain to the Province..
Tho families coming from tho British Isles, i.e. Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, would bo carefully selected and would comprise
both Probos Land and Catholic families.
Thoir selection would bo tho care of tho Scottish Immigrant Aid
Society. Approval of oach individual family would bo given by officers of the Federal Government stationod in Groat Britain.
The S.I.A.S. being an Approved Society would obtain from the
British Government funds on a 25/75 basis for the work.  The
Society must obtain by private enterprise one quarter of the sum
required and then it is understood that tho Oversea Department of
the British Government would provide the other three quarters.
It is proposed that the people of Nova Scotia through their
Government, and other institutions, i.e. Banks, Railways, etc.,
place the quarter to the credit of the Society who would then
approach tho British Government for the balance mentioned.
In direct dealing as between the Governments, the British
will pay only on a 50/50 basis. Dealing with an approved Society
they will pay, if they approve of the seheme gone-rally, on a
25/75 basis.
Tho Society appeals therefore for a sum of $200,000 which, on
above scale would bring $600,000, providing thus a sum total of
$800,000 for the settlement of 3ritish families in Nova Scotia.
A firm promise will bo obtained from the British Government
by the S.I.A.S. before anything is begun in this Province.
Tho money obtained as above will"be expended exclusively on
buying farms, and stock and equipment, for British settlers.
The selection of farms and the providing and purchasing of
the stock and equipment for the settlors will be tho direct responsibility of the University Extension or of a body created ad
hoc, acting in co-ordination with the Extension Service of the
Provincial Department of Agriculture.
The Extension will be judges of what is necessary on each
farm and there will be no question of supplying all alike.  The
extent and nature of tho farm will be taken into account in every -3-
case, and a guiding principle will be the saving of overhead in'
each case.  Supervision will be the work of the Extension in cp-
ordination with the Provincial Service mentioned above.
The money above mentioned having been obtained as a gift,
will be loaned to the settler at 2%,
No part of the money will be expended on administration.
Administration funds will be obtained:-
1. from the Federal Government and from the British Government
on a 50/50 basis,
2. from Canadian railways, possibly, and other sources as a
private collection by the S.I.A.S. and thus on a 25/75 basis with
the British Government thus providing adequate administrative funds
for the proper carrying out of the purpose of settling British
settlers.
The British settlers will pay for their farms in the course
of 15 years - paying 2% interest on the unpaid balance. The stock
and equipment should be paid for in 10 years, the interest charges
on unpaid balances being 3%»
The collections in above will be done by the S.I.A.S. MEMO
Rev. A. Macdonell, O.S.B.
It is proposed to get a colonization scheme under way for the
colonization and settlement of farms in Nova Scotia.
Families eligible for Farm Settlement are
1, Canadians now in Ncwa Scotia,
(a) Heads of families who have been tenants but
have not had the wherewithal to purchase a home
farm of their own,
(b) Sons of farmers who have worked at home, or
with other farmers, but have not been in a position
to purchase,
(c) Others who have for several years successfully
cultivated small holdings and are judged likely to
make a success of a larger holding.
2. Selected British settlers, with farming experience who
are anxious to settle on farm homes in Nova Scotia.
For this double purpose a survey should be made of all available lands in this Province suitable for cultivation - lands in
hands of municipalities, land3 held by absentee owners and others.
As soon as a price is set, and the price should be set in view of
the little or no use made of these lands, then the Province should
buy. These lands to be resold to selected men chosen by the Approved Society at the cut price paid for them.
1,  The settlers to be financed for stock and equipment by the
Government in accordance with the size and nature of the farm and
as adjusted by the Society,  In no case the financing to be above
$1000,  The settler will not be given contract for 18 months -
during that period he is a tenant but paying as below.  The
settler would pay 2%  on the valuation of the farm and 3%  on the
price of the unpaid balance of the stock and equipment.
As soon as he has paid for his stock and equipment the 2%  and
3%  would no longer be paid and at the end of 10 years, If he has
his taxes paid up, and 75/5* of the farm producing to the satisfaction
of the supervisors, he gets a clear title.
Until he has title to the farm he will not be allowed to farm
another place.
In no case will the settlor be allowed to use the farm as a
convenience whilst working for wages at some other work,  (This
does not refer to v/orking out at off seasons,)
The candidate for a farm under the scheme will not be the
owner of a farm at the time of application.
This undoubtedly will be a revolutionary move but it is one
that the times, particularly the Immediate future, would seem to
call for most urgently.
The organization is to hand.  An organization that Is undenominational in its work.  The University Extension of Antigonish who
will constitute the Approved Society.  In that you have experts in
Agriculture and men of the highest integrity - also and this is
very important - men who have studied their fellowmen and realise
to the full, the diversities of the human element that is to be
dealt with In Colonization.
In these qualifications lie success; failure is certain when
they are lacking. Were this scheme tackled on the general lines
indicated with high courage and understanding, it would be the
beginning of a new era for Canada. Every Province in the Dominion -2-
would need to follow suit, and for the first time in our modern
history the essential difference between the basic occupation of
Agriculture and Industrialism would-be rightly acknowledged and
vindicated. The resulting prosperity and human happiness would
be the best proof of the right, tackling of this great problem, of
the right solving of the most pressing and genuine human need. This
was succinctly stated at a Rural Life Conference last fall In Richmond, Virginia.
"Tho burning concern of the Catholic Church with Agriculture
arises from the altogether unique relationship which exists universally between the agricultural occupation and the central institution
of Christian, nay of all, civilization; namely the family. The farm
is the native habitat of the family."  It might be well to state here
and emphatically that the above is true in the thinking minds of
all other Christian denominations and the work can only be done if
all co-operate.
2.  Coincident with the colonization of the sons of Nova Scotia
on lands within tho Province a scheme for the settlement of seloctod
British families in Nova Scotia should bo initiated without delay.
This project may bo begun in such fashion that not only would
the families be a valuable asset, but thoir settlement would bo a
financial gain to the Province..
Tho families coming from tho British Isles, i.e. Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, would bo carefully selected and would comprise
both Protcstand and Catholic families.
*
Thoir selection would be tho care of tho Scottish Immigrant Aid
Society. Approval of each individual family would bo given by officers of the Federal Government stationed in Groat Britain,
The S.I.A.S. being an Approved Society would obtain from the
British Government funds on a 25/75 basis for tho work.  The
Society must obtain by private enterprise one quarter of the sum
required and then it is understood that tho Oversea Department of
the British Government would provide the other three quarters.
It is proposed that the people of Nova Scotia through their
Government, and other institutions, i.o. Banks, Railways, etc.,
place the quarter to the credit of the Society who would then
approach the British Government for the balance mentioned.
In direct dealing as between the Governments, the British
will pay only on a 50/50 basis. Dealing with an approved Society
they will pay, If they approve ox  tho seheme gonorally, on a
25/75 basis.
The Society appeals therefore for a sum of $200,000 which, on
above scalo would bring $600,000, providing thus a sum total of
$800,000 for the settlement of British families in Nova Scotia.
A firm proinise will bo obtained from the British Government
by the S.I.A.S. before anything is begun in this Province.
Tho money obtained as above will be expended oxclusivoly on
buying farms, and stock and equipment, for British settlers.
The selection of farms and the providing and purchasing of
the stock and equipment for the settlors will bo tho direct responsibility of the University Extension or of a body created ad
hoc, acting in co-ordination with the Extension Service of the
Provincial Department of Agriculture.
The Extension will be judges of what is necessary on each
farm and there will be no question of supplying all alike.  The
extent and nature of tho farm will be taken Into account in every -3-
case, and a guiding principle will be the saving of overhead' in'
each case. Supervision will be the work of the Extension in coordination .with the Provincial Service mentioned above.
The money above mentioned having been obtained as a gift,
will be loaned to the settler at 2%,
No part of the money will be expended on administration.
Administration funds will be obtained:-
1. from the Federal Government and from the British Government
on a 50/50 basis,
2. from Canadian railways, possibly, and other sources as a
private collection by the S.I.A.S, and thus on a 25/75 basis with
the British Government thus providing adequate administrative funds
for the proper carrying out of the purpose of settling British
settlers.
The British settlers will pay for their farms in the course
of 15 years - paying 2% interest on the unpaid balance. The stock
and equipment should be paid for in 10 years, the interest charges
on unpaid balances being 3%*
The collections in above will be done by the S.I.A.S. MEMO
Rev. A. Macdonell, O.S.B.
It Is proposed to get a colonization scheme under way for the
colonization and settlement of farms in Nova Scotia.
Families eligible for Farm Settlement are
1. Canadians now in Ncwa Scotia,
(a) Heads of families who have been tenants but
have not had the wherewithal to purchase a home
farm of their own,
(b) Sons of farmers who have worked at home, or
with other farmers, but have not been in a position
to purchase,
(c) Others who have for several years successfully
cultivated small holdings and are judged likely to
make a success of a larger holding.
2, Selected British settlors, with farming experience who
are anxious to settle on farm homes in Nova Scotia,
For this double purpose a survey should be made of all available lands in this Province suitable for cultivation - lands in
hands of municipalities, lands held by absentee owners and others.
As soon as a price is set, and the price should be set in view of
the little or no use made of these lands, then the Province should
buy.  These lands to be resold to selected men chosen by the Approved Society at the cut price paid for them.
1.  The settlers to be financed for stock and equipment by the
Government in accordance with the size and nature of the farm and
as adjusted by the Society,  In no case the financing to be above
$1000,  The settler will not be given contract for 18 months -
during that period he Is a tenant but paying as below.  The
settler would pay 2%  on the valuation of the farm and 3$ on the
price of the unpaid balance of the stock and equipment.
Ah  soon as he has paid for his stock and equipment the 2%  and
%  would no longer be paid and at the end of 10 years, if he has
his taxes paid up, and 75/. of the farm producing to the satisfaction
of the supervisors, he gets a clear title.
Until he has title to the farm he will not be allowed to farm
another place.
In no case will the settler be allowed to use the farm as a
convenience whilst working for wages at some other work,  (This
does not refer to working out at off seasons,)
The candidate for a farm under the scheme will not be the
owner of a farm at the time of application.
This undoubtedly will be a revolutionary move but it is one
that the times, particularly the immediate future, would seem to
call for most urgently.
The organization is to hand.  An organization that is undenominational in its work.  The University Extension of Antigonish who
will constitute the Approved Society.  In that you have experts in
Agriculture and men of the highest integrity - also and this is
very important - men who have studied their fellowmen and realise
to the full, the diversities of the human element that is to be
dealt with in Colonization.
In these qualifications lie success; failure Is certain when
they are lacking. Were this scheme tackled on the general lines
indicated with high courage and understanding, it would be the
beginning of a new era for Canada. Every Province in the Dominion -2-
would need to follow suit, and for the first time in our modern
history the essential difference between the basic occupation of
Agriculture and Industrialism would be rightly acknowledged and
vindicated. The resulting prosperity and human happiness would
be the best proof of the right tackling of this great problem, of
the right solving of the most pressing and genuine human need. This
was succinctly stated at a Rural Life Conference last fall in Richmond, Virginia.
"The burning concern of the Catholic Church with Agriculture
arises from the altogether unique relationship which exists universally between the agricultural occupation and the central institution
of Christian, nay of all, civilization; namely the family.  The farm
is the native habitat of the family,"  It might be well to state here
and emphatically that the above is true in the thinking minds of
all other Christian denominations and the work can only be done if
all co-operate.
2.  Coincident with the colonization of the sons of Nova Scotia
on lands within tho Province a scheme for the settlement of solcctod
British families in Nova Scotia should bo initiated without delay.
This project may bo begun in such fashion that not only would
tho families be a valuable assot, but thoir settlement would bo a
financial gain to tho Province..
Tho families coming from tho British Isles, i.o. Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, would bo carefully selected and would comprise
both Protestand and Catholic families.
Thoir selection would be tho caro of tho Scottish Immigrant Aid
Society. Approval of each Individual family would bo given by officers of the Federal Government stationed in Groat Britain.
The S.I.A.S. being an Approved Society would obtain from the
British Government funds on a 25/75 basis for the work.  The
Society must obtain by private enterprise one quarter of the sum
required and then it is understood that tho Oversea Department of
the British Government would provide the other three quarters.
It is proposed that tho pooplc of Nova Scotia through their
Government, and other institutions, i.e. Banks, Railways, etc.,
place the quarter to the credit of the Society who would then
approach tho British Government for the balance mentioned.
In direct dealing as between the Governments, the British
will pay only on a 50/50 basis. Dealing with an approved Society
they will pay, if thoy approve ox  tho scheme gonorally, on a
25/75 basis,
Tho Society appeals therefore for a sum of $200,000 which, on
above scale would bring $600,000, providing thus a sum total of
$800,000 for the settlement of British families in Nova Scotia.
A firm promise will be obtained from the British Government
by the S.I.A.S. before anything is begun in this Province.
The money obtained as above will be expended exclusively on
buying farms, and stock and equipment, for British settlers.
The selection of farms and the providing and purchasing of
tho stock and equipment for tho settlors will bo tho direct responsibility of the University Extension or of a body created ad
hoc, acting in co-ordination with the Extension Service of tho
Provincial Department of Agriculture.
The Extension will be judges of what is necessary on each
farm and there will be no question of supplying all alike.  The
extent and nature of tho farm will be taken into account in every case, and a guiding principle will be the saving of overhead in'
each case. Supervision will be the work of the Extension in coordination with the Provincial Service mentioned above.
The money above mentioned having been obtained as a gift,
will be loaned to the settler at 2%,
No part of the money will be expended on administration.
Administration funds will be obtained:-
1, from the Federal Government and from the British Government
on a 50/50 basis.
2. from Canadian railways, possibly, and other sources as a
private collection by the S.I.A.S. and thus on a 25/75 basis with
the British Government thus providing adequate administrative funds
for the proper carrying out of the purpose of settling British
settlers.
The British settlers will pay for their farms in the course
of 15 years - paying 2% interest on the unpaid balance. The stock
and equipment should be paid for in 10 years, the interest charges
on unpaid balances being 3%*
The collections in above will be done by the S.I.A.S. MEMO
Rev. A. Macdonell, O.S.B.
It Is proposed to get a colonization scheme under way for the
colonization and settlement of farms In Nova Scotia.
Families eligible for Farm Settlement ar©
1. Canadians now in Nowa Scotia.
(a) Heads of families who have been tenants but
have not had the wherewithal to purchase a home
farm of their own,
(b) Sons of farmers who have worked at home, or
with other farmers, but have not been in a position
to purchase,
(c) Others who have for several years successfully
cultivated small holdings and are judged likely to
make a success of a larger holding.
2. Selected British settlers, with farming experience who
are anxious to settle on farm homes in Nova Scotia,
For this double purpose a survey should be made of all available lands in this Province suitable for cultivation - lands in
hands of municipalities, land3 held by absentee owners and others.
As soon as a price Is set, and the price should be set in view of
the little or no use made of these lands, then the Province should
buy. These lands to be resold to selected men chosen by the Approved Society at the cut price paid for them.
1.  The settlers to be financed for stock and equipment by the
Government In accordance with the size and nature of the farm and
as adjusted by the Society,  In no case the financing to be above
$1000,  The settler will not be given contract for 18 months -
during that period he is a tenant but paying as below. The
settler would pay 2%  on the valuation of the farm and 3%  on the
price of the unpaid balance of the stock and equipment.
As soon as he has paid for his stock and equipment the 2%  and
3% would no longer be paid and at the end of 10 years, if he has
his taxes paid up, and 75/. of the farm producing to the satisfaction
of the supervisors, he gets a clear title.
Until he has title to the farm he will not be allowed to farm
another place.
In no case will the settler be allowed to use the farm as a
convenience whilst working for wages at some other work.  (This
does not refer to working out at off seasons.)
The candidate for a farm under the scheme will not bo the
owner of a farm at the time of application.
This undoubtedly will be a revolutionary move but it Is one
that the times, particularly the immediate future, would seem to
call for most urgently.
The organization is to hand.  An organization that is undenominational in its work.  The University Extension of Antigonish who
will constitute the Approved Society.  In that you have experts in
Agriculture and men of the highest Integrity - also and this is
very Important - men who have studied their fellowmen and realise
to the full, the diversities of the human element that is to be
dealt with in Colonization.
In those qualifications lie success; failure Is certain when
they are lacking. Were this scheme tackled on the general lines
indicated with high courage and understanding, it would be the
beginning of a new era for Canada. Every Province in the Dominion -2-
would need to follow suit, and for the first time in our modern
history tho essential difference between the basic occupation of
Agriculture and Industrialism would be rightly acknowledged and
vindicated. The resulting prosperity and human happiness would
be tho best proof of the right tackling of this great problem, of
tho right solving of the most pressing and genuine human need. This
was succinctly stated at a Rural Life Conference last fall in Richmond, Virginia.
"The burning concern of the Catholic Church with Agriculture
arises from the altogether unique relationship which exists universally between the agricultural occupation and the central institution
of Christian, nay of all, civilization; namely the family.  The farm
is the native habitat of the family."  It might be well to state here
and emphatically that tho above is true in the thinking minds of
all other Christian denominations and the work can only be done if
all co-operate.
2.  Coincident with the colonization of the sons of Nova Scotia
on lands within tho Province a scheme for tho settlement of seloctod
British families in Nova Scotia should bo initiated without delay.
This project may bo begun in such fashion that not only would
the families bo a valuable asset, but thoir settlement would bo a
financial gain to the Province..
Tho families coming from tho British Isles, i.o. Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, would bo carofully selected and would comprise
both Protostand and Catholic families.
Thoir selection would bo the caro of tho Scottish Immigrant Aid
Society. Approval of each individual family would bo given by officers of tho Federal Government stationed in Groat Britain.
The S.I.A.S. being an Approved Society would obtain from tho
British Government funds on a 25/75 basis for tho work.  The
Society must obtain by private enterprise one quarter of tho sum
required and thon it is understood that tho Oversea Department of
the British Government would p_?.vide the other three quarters.
It is proposed that the people of Nova Scotia through their
Government, and other institutions, i.o. Banks, Railways, etc.,
place tho quarter to the credit of the Society who would then
approach the British Government for the balance mentionod.
In direct dealing as between the Governments, the British
will pay only on a 50/50 basis. Dealing with an approved Society
they will pay, If thoy approve ox  tho seheme gonorally, on a
25/75 basis.
The Society appeals therefore for a sum of $200,000 which, on
above scale would bring $600,000, providing thus a sum total of
$800,000 for tho settlement of British families in Nova Scotia,
A firm promise will bo obtained from the British Government
by the S.I.A.S. before anything is begun in this Province.
The money obtained as above will be expended exclusively on
buying farms, and stock and equipment, for British settlers.
The selection of farms and the providing and purchasing of
the stock and equipment for the settlors will bo tho direct responsibility of the University Extension or of a body created ad
hoc, acting in co-ordination with the Extension Service of the
Provincial Department of Agriculture,
The Extension will be judges of what is necessary on each
farm and there will bo no question of supplying all alike.  The
extent and nature of tho farm will be taken into account in every -3-
case, and a guiding principle will be the saving of overhead in'
each case. Supervision will be the work of the Extension in coordination with the Provincial Service mentioned above.
The money above mentioned having been obtained as a gift,
will be loaned to the settler at 2%.
No part of the money will be expended on administration.
Administration funds will be obtained:-
1. from the Federal Government and from the British Government
on a 50/50 basis,
2, from Canadian railways, possibly, and other sources as a
private collection by the S.I.A.S, and thus on a 25/75 basis with
the British Government thus providing adequate administrative funds
for the proper carrying out of the purpose of settling British
settlers.
The British settlers will pay for their farms in the oourse
of 15 years - paying 2% interest on the unpaid balance. The stock
and equipment should be paid for in 10 years, the interest charges
on unpaid balances being 3$.
The collections in above will be done by the S.I.A.S. a
MEMO
Rev. A. Macdonell, O.S.B.
It is proposed to get a colonization scheme under way for the
colonization and settlement of farms In Nova Scotia.
Families eligible for Farm Settlement are
1. Canadians now In Noara Scotia,
(a) Heads of families who have been tenants but
have not had the wherewithal to purchase a home
farm of their own,
(b) Sons of farmers who have worked at home, or
with other farmers, but have not been in a position
to purchase,
(c) Others who have for several years successfully
cultivated small holdings and are judged likely to
make a success of a larger holding,
2, Selected British settlors, with farming experience who
are anxious to settle on farm homes in Nova Scotia,
For this double purpose a survey should be made of all available lands in this Province suitable for cultivation - lands in
hands of municipalities, lands held by absentee owners and others.
As soon as a price is set, and the price should be set in view of
the little or no use made of these lands, then the Province should
buy. These lands to be resold to selected men chosen by the Approved Society at the cut price paid for them.
1.  The settlers to be financed for stock and equipment by the
Government in accordance with the size and nature of the farm and
as adjusted by the Society,  In no case the financing to be above
$1000,  The settler will not be given contract for 18 months -
during that period he is a tenant but paying as below.  The
settler would pay 2%  on the valuation of the farm and 3%  on the
price of the unpaid balance of the stock and equipment.
As soon as he has paid for his stock and equipment the 2%  and
3%  would no longer be paid and at the end of 10 years, if he has
his taxes paid up, and 75/o of the farm producing to the satisfaction
of the supervisors, he gets a clear title.
Until he has title to the farm he will not be allowed to farm
another place.
In no case will the settler be allowed to use the farm as a
convenience whilst working for wages at some other work.  (This
does not refer to working out at off seasons,)
The candidate for a farm under the scheme will not be the
owner of a farm at the time of application.
This undoubtedly will be a revolutionary move but it is one
that the times, particularly tho immediate future, would seem to
call for most urgently.
The organization is to hand.  An organization that is undenominational in its work.  The University Extension of Antigonish who
will constitute the Approved Society.  In that you have experts in
Agriculture and men of the highest integrity - also and this is
very Important - men who have studied their fellowmen and realise
to the full, the diversities of the human element that is to be
dealt with In Colonization.
In those qualifications lie success; failure is certain when
they are lacking. Were this scheme tackled on the general lines
indicated with high courage and understanding, it would be the
beginning of a new era for Canada.  Every Province in the Dominion -2-
would need- to follow suit,, and for the first time in our modern
history tho essential difference between the.basic occupation of
Agriculture and Industrialism would be rightly acknowledged and
vindicated. The resulting prosperity and human happiness would
be the best proof of the right tackling of this great problem, of
tho right solving of the most pressing and genuine human need. This
was succinctly stated at a Rural Life Conference last fall in Richmond, Virginia.
"The burning concern of the Catholic Church with Agriculture
arises from the altogether unique relationship which exists universally between the agricultural occupation and the central institution
of Christian, nay of all, civilization; namely the family.  The farm
is the native habitat of the family."  It might be well to state here
and emphatically that tho above is true in the thinking minds of
all other Christian denominations and tho work can only be done if
all co-operate.
2.  Coincident with the colonization of the sons of Nova Scotia
on lands within tho Provinco a scheme for the settlement of seloctod
British families in Nova Scotia should bo initiated without delay.
This project may bo begun in such fashion that not only would
the families be a valuable asset, but thoir settlement would bo a
financial gain to the Province..
Tho families coming from tho British Isles, i.o. Groat Britain
and Northern Ireland, would bo carofully selected and would comprise
both Protestand and Catholic families.
Thoir selection would bo tho caro of tho Scottish Immigrant Aid
Society. Approval of each individual family would be given by officers of the Federal Government stationed in Groat Britain.
The S.I.A.S. being an Approved Society would obtain from the
British Government funds on a 25/75 basis for tho work.  The
Society must obtain by private enterprise one quarter of tho sum
required and then it is understood that tho Oversea Department of
the British Government would p_a./ido tho other throe quarters.
It is proposed that tho people of Nova Scotia through their
Government, and other institutions, i.e. Banks, Railways, etc.,
place the quarter to the credit of the Society who would then
approach tho British Government for tho balance mentioned.
In direct dealing as between the Governments, the British
will pay only on a 50/50 basis. Dealing with an approved Society
they will pay, if thoy approve ox  the scheme gonorally, on a
25/75 basis.
The Society appeals therefore for a sum of $200,000 which, on
above scale would bring $600,000, providing thus a sum total of
$800,000 for the settlement of British families in Nova Scotia.
A firm promise will bo obtained from the British Government
by the S.I.A.S. before anything Is begun in this Province.
The money obtained as above will"be expended exclusively on
buying farms, and stock and equipment, for British settlers.
The selection of farms and the providing and purchasing of
tho stock and equipment for the settlors will bo tho direct responsibility of the University Extension or of a body created ad
hoc, acting In co-ordination with the Extension Service of the
Provincial Department of Agriculture.
The Extension will be judges of what is necessary on each
farm and there will be no question of supplying all alike.  The
extent and nature of tho farm will be taken into account in every case, and'a guiding principle will be the saving of overhead-in'
each case. Supervision will be the work of the Extension in coordination with the Provincial Service mentioned above.
The money above mentioned having been obtained as a gift,
will be loaned to the settler at 2%,
No part of the money will be expended on administration.
Administration funds will be obtainedt-
1, from the Federal Government and from the British Government
on a 50/50 basis,
2. from Canadian railways, possibly* and other sources as a
private collection by the S.I.A.S, and thus on a 25/75 basis with
the British Government thus providing adequate administrative funds
for the proper carrying out of the purpose of settling British
settlers.
The British settlers will pay for their farms in the course
of 15 years - paying 2% interest on the unpaid balance. The stock
and equipment should be paid for in 10 years, the interest charges
on unpaid balances being 3$.
The collections In above will be done by the S*I,A,S. MEMO
Rev. A. Macdonell, O.S.B.
It is proposed to get a colonization scheme under way for the
colonization and settlement of farms in Nova Scotia.
Families eligible for Farm Settlement are
1. Canadians now In Ncwa Scotia,
(a) Heads of families who have been tenants but
have not had the wherewithal to purchase a home
farm of their own,
(b) Sons of farmers who have worked at home, or
with other farmers, but have not been in a position
to purchase,
(c) Others who have for several years successfully
cultivated small holdings and are judged likely to
make a success of a larger holding.
2. Selected British settlers, with farming experience who
are anxious to settle on farm homes in Nova Scotia.
For this double purpose a survey should be made of all available lands in this Province suitable for cultivation - lands in
hands of municipalities, lands held by absentee owners and others.
As soon as a price is set, and the price should be set in view of
the little or no use made of these lands, then the Province should
buy. These lands to be resold to selected men chosen by the Approved Society at the cut price paid for them.
1.  The settlers to be financed for stock and equipment by the
Government In accordance with the size and nature of the farm and
as adjusted by the Society,  In no case the financing to be above
$1000.  The settler will not be given contract for 18 months -
during that period he is a tenant but paying as below.  The
settler would pay 2%  on the valuation of the farm and 3%  on the
price of the unpaid balance of the stock and equipment.
As soon as he has paid for his stock and equipment the 2%  and
3%  would no longer be paid and at the end of 10 years, If he has
his taxes paid up, and 75/s of the farm producing to the satisfaction
of the supervisors, he gets a clear title.
Until he has title to the farm he will not be allowed to farm
another place.
In no case will the settlor be allowed to use the farm as a
convenience whilst working for wages at some other work.  (This
does not refer to working out at off seasons.)
The candidate for a farm under the scheme will not be the
owner of a farm at the time of application.
This undoubtedly will be a revolutionary move but it is one
that the times, particularly the immediate future, would seem to
call for most urgently.
The organization is to hand. An organization that is undenominational In Its work.  The University Extension of Antigonish who
will constitute the Approved Society.  In that you have experts in
Agriculture and men of the highest Integrity - also and this is
very important - men who have studied their fellowmen and realise
to the full, the diversities of the human element that is to be
dealt with in Colonization.
In those qualifications lio success; failure is certain when
they are lacking. Were this scheme tackled on the general lines
indicated with high courage and understanding, it would be the
beginning of a new era for Canada. Every Province in the Dominion -2-
would need to follow suit, and for the first time in our modern
history the essential difference between the basic occupation of
Agriculture and Industrialism would be rightly acknowledged and
vindicated.  The resulting prosperity and human happiness would
be the best proof of the right tackling of this great problem, pf
tho right solving of the most pressing and genuine human need. This
was succinctly stated at a Rural Life Conference last fall in Richmond, Virginia.
"The burning concern of the Catholic Church with Agriculture
arises from the altogether unique relationship which exists universally between the agricultural occupation and the central'institution
of Christian, nay of all, civilization; namely the family.  The farm
is the native habitat of the family."  It might be well to state here
and emphatically that the above is true in the thinking minds of
all other Christian denominations and the work can only be done if
all co-operate.
2.  Coincident with the colonization of the sons of Nova Scotia
on lands within tho Province a scheme for the settlement of soloctod
British families in Nova Scotia should bo initiated without delay.
This project may bo begun in such fashion that not only would
the families be a valuable asset, but thoir settlement would bo a
financial gain to tho Province..
Tho families coming from tho British Isles, i.o. Groat Britain
and Northern Ireland, would bo carefully selected and would comprise
both Protestand and Catholic families.
Their selection would bo tho caro of tho Scottish Immigrant Aid
Society. Approval of each individual family would bo given by officers of the Federal Government stationed in Groat Britain.
The S.I.A.S. being an Approved Society would obtain from the
British Government funds on a 25/75 basis for tho work.  The
Society must obtain by private enterprise one quarter of tho sum
required and then it is understood that tho Oversea Department of
the British Government would provide the other three quarters.
It is proposed that tho pooplo of Nova Scotia through their
Government, and other institutions, i.o. Banks, Railways, etc.,
place tho quarter to the credit of the Society who would then
approach the British Government for the balance montionod.
In direct dealing as between the Governments, the British
will pay only on a 50/50 basis. Dealing with an approved Society
they will pay, if they approve ox  tho seheme gonorally, on a
25/75 basis.
The Society appeals therefore for a sum of $200,000 which, on
above scale would bring $600,000, providing thus a sum total of
$800,000 for the settlement of British families in Nova Scotia.
A firm promise will bo obtained from the British Government
by the S.I.A.S. before anything is begun In this Province.
The money obtained as abovo will"bo expended exclusively on
buying farms, and stock and equipment, for British settlers.
The selection of farms and the providing and purchasing of
the stock and equipment for the settlors will bo tho direct responsibility of the University Extension or of a body created ad
hoc, acting in co-ordination with the Extension Service of the
Provincial Department of Agriculture,
The Extension will bo judges of what is necessary on each
farm and there will be no question of supplying all alike.  The
extent and nature of tho farm will be taken into account in evory _3-
case, and a guiding principle will be the saving of overhead in'
each case. Supervision will be the work of the Extension in coordination with the Provincial Service mentioned above.
The money above mentioned having been obtained as a gift,
will be loaned to the settler at 2%.
No part of the money will be expended on administration.
Administration funds will be obtained:-
l;    from the Federal Government and from the British Government
on a 50/50 basis,
2.    from Canadian railways, possibly, and other sources as a
private collection by the S.I.A.S, and thus on a 25/75 basis with
the British Government thus providing adequate administrative funds
for the proper carrying out of the purpose of settling British
settlers.
The British settlers will pay for their farms in the course
of 15 years - paying 2% interest on the unpaid balance. The stock
and equipment should be paid for in 10 years, the interest charges
on unpaid balances being 3$,
The collections In above will be done by the S.I.A.S. Ol)£ Scottish immigrant .At6 Society
THE    HANDICRAFTS.    FOLK-LORE    AND    CULTURE    DEPARTMENT
COMMITTEE:
FROM   THE   LONE   SHIELING   OF  THE   MISTY   ISLAND _. ,,     _     .      ..        _~»,.   .   ,       ; *
r   p   r    run niNC REV.  R. A.  MacDONELL.  (o s b.,m.b.e.. m.C.J
MOUNTAINS   DIVIDE   US.   AND  THE   WASTE   OF   SEAS— w"  r- "'   DUILLJI     u PRESIDENT
BUT  STILL  THE   BLOOD   IS   STRONG.   THE   HEART   IS pnmriMTnM Al    OITDTA M R.   N El LI E   M ACl N N ES
highland EDMONTON,    ALBERTA mr. duncan george Lawrence
AND   WE   IN   DREAMS   BEHOLD   THE   HEBRIDES MR,   NORMAN   MACINTYRE.   SECRETARY ^jqmrtwttt d $mmx$xatxm mtfr (&dxnxxmixm,
($$mxXXlX£XXX & (ftmratot.   ^yy^y ^
jiaa>77 . yy&ee/Z,
en.
TELEGRAMS, PARAMOUNT, ABERDEEN.
TELEPHONE,  CITY   2210.
I iD\)d Scottish TFmmigrant ^Ai6 Society
THE    HANDICRAFTS.    FOLK-LORE    AND    CULTURE    DEPARTMENT
YZ<X^A^^yy COMMITTEE:
FROM   THE   LONE   SHIELING   OF   THE   MISTY   ISLAND ' ^ _-_,     „      . ««..,-.   ,        , .
i-   f.   ,17-biiii  nihir REV.   R.   A.   MacDONELL.   (o S. B..M.B.E . M.C.)
MOUNTAINS   DIVIDE   US.   AND   THE   WASTE   OF   SEAS— *"       ' builwiiiu PRESIDENT
BUT   STILL   THE   BLOOD   IS   STRONG.   THE   HEART   IS CC_1_____I___J Al     RFRTA MWv-MSU^C   M»T»W+W»
HIGHLAND C.I_MVH_ini  I \_t\'i,     ML-DtrXIM MR,  DUNCAN  GEORGE  LAWRENCE
AND   WE   IN    DREAMS   BEHOLD   THE   HEBRIDES MR.   NORMAN    MftTlNTYRF.   RrnnrT^RY fObtuary 13, lg*y(
1*1
J-V^Z^,A7A,^ms.
Tarn vault a of tha of fort • of tba a* mere ia th*
Cloaaonald Colony in 1939 were far the aoat part disappointing.    «ith
or tero exceptions» tha eropo vara poor and the ntum thatatmm
<SUU« iBarit««iaftts to afford th* »attlare cuoh en*our«e»<*nt.    xtw
ir«a* of at* lead brought under cultivation lo tfc* Xr-st too
had warranted th* belief that th* settler* in this Colony would *ooa
he able to redo** ma lad*btedas*e an thoir aoatraav* cteadily.    _**
poor crop* harvested fehl» year, *ho» th* expectation* oar* running
his* for -w.Te thing bettor, have, therefor*, had a v*ty disheartening
effect.
la* aajortty of tha *ettier* began their f&ralng
operation* lo the isprlag of 1939 with high hopes of havia& definitely
reeehed the turning p_t_ft*    Tha laad oa met of  .he faxes* waa well
cultivated aad the arva prepared far »**d »&* larger than is any previous pM-H   Moreover, the aetilar* had expectations thai prl*** for
farm product* oero g»ln£ **» N «»»• profitable to than than thoy had
th* crop* ware aeeded under very favourable
dltlona*   Ther* waa aa aaplc *upply of aoieture la toe spring, m&
first six to eight waaka th* growth of the grata am
la the early part of the mmmx lam of rata began te re»
tard growth* hat tha orop* wer* aet severely affooted until towards the
« • I
end of July, shea a period of lotas*© heat b»«aa»   this laeted about
faar weak*, nod at the ead of th* p*rlod all the grain crops had __aj*
ferod wsverely •   Yh* «h*at ripened pr«aatur*ly*    _h* yield
th* quality was fair,   hoot of tt* oat aad rye
fe «ere failure, the yield belag mat? saall aad -he quality very
low.
tha d*preaalag psychological effect of the fall-
are to obtain the revenue the senior* expected from their crops ia
19S9 ha* baoa felt throughout th* Ooloay.   Haay of th* colonists are
eeylar. to iheaeelvest "_aat Is the use of trying any aars?   ua caa
pay for our IhWi"   Shis faellas has been accentuated beesna*
of fcbara have said* an earnest effort during the last fsv yamxa
to bring a* anafe land a* possible under cultivation, «hid* they ex*
pasted would place th*». in a position to obtain iaarea_t ng returns
ware quieiOy aad thus gradually enable thea to get clear of debt*
their indebtedness ami looks aore remidable to
thea than *vsr*    it ______!_*• of MM original advances •_* their fsrsa*
aa^ chattels aad the aeoussOated interest tiarami tax** paid by ths
Sompaay oa behalf of the settler*, mostly during the first eight years,
and the interest thsraon. w_**i*t*aa* aad other advance* oate through
th* 3**i*ty, sad hoapltai, noJleal, -*«hinery una other accounts fe"hioi.
ladlvidual settlers h«ve contracted directly.    Ia recent year* sao*t
of ths settlers hav* been paying their current tax** regularly.    _*•
aajority of th*a have alao paid off their e_*d grain advances and
substantial pay^nta against aaay othar ptaaalag obligations* * 3 *
th* greater part of th© oleariag and breaking that has been
ha* had to b* paid for la oaah, the work having generally
too h**vy for th* available horse pmax and had to bo done by
It would *e*a that the ti** ha* oo
thatic consideration tai_nt wall be given to soma a*aaa of easing th*
position of ton settler* la tola Ooloay In regard to their
a*** for lead, isqwroveaeats, chattel* aad subsistence*
gardiag those will be *ub»Utsd iseiedintely, with a re«o«*sendation
for iheir coaslderation.
As will tht seen from the individual reparte which
folios, sarfced progre** wa* aade ia the dwelepmat of saeet of _ta
farra* in tho Colony.    'Several hon&rsd acres of as* lead war* haought
under cultivatioo aad aaay additional arena were cleared ready for
ploughia^i In 1940*   'ft*© cultivated laad generally h«* been well
•ad the land shiah sac not seeded to crop was auaaar fallowed In m
Tha livastaek on the fara* is aseaally   .rowiag in
au.abers*   fh» better aarSeet for livestock aad livestock product* ha*
boon an incentive to the settlers to devote faore of their e ffort* to
the raising of livestock, particularly of pigs, »ad if th* present
condition* aoatlane, a *te*dy advance in tale dlreatiaa
be orowetad*
In fact, there ar* aaay eos-Corting features about
th* position of the asttlara la the Clandonald Colony, and if they
could esc a fair possibility of getting clear of debt, there eeeas to - I -
every reason to believe thay nould take heart and be encouraged to
effort* in tfcss future*
tha Genera! MMM of thia Costpaay is
into account darln. the six sonthe ending the dla% DaatenVr, and
together with vouchor in paynent of tha share of th* aaaretary of state
In these payaaat* will be forwarded by an early Mfta
aespcetfully aubaiitt*4,
Chief Otaatiaalonar*
iUiimK. Ha«aliet«r)
3*eyet*P7,
Oversea sottlaaeat
DOttiaions  iftlaa,
Casttoa Hon**,
fothill jStroet,
London, _..-*l, QiJ^m^rHjmhB  ®Q&mWlw
- 160 ear**, of which las aeree ;»ave a»
vat ion - occupied by ffllliaa sawio»e and family,
fhle ana hae coatiaued to give the society a lot of trouble.
Hla case has been bef »r* th* .MM Adjuatoan* jjoard in   lberte, and th*
Society ha* b**n authorissd to proceed with the canasllatloa of hi*
ooatraot, but scwo diffloultiee have arisen to delay action*
He *eed*d to crop in 1999, 40 cares of wheat,
of •«%■» 10 acre- of barley, 10 acres for feed, aad hi
ed about  a aeras*   Ha refuead to give the threshing return* or to
turn any part of th* crop over to th* ,ioel**y or to oak* a pajntsni
in eay other way. It la e»tlaafced that be threaiued 600 bushal* ef
wheat, 000 baehele of oats and 150 bushel* of barley*
• Ida «eres, of which 104 acres mar* not
tlvatloa - occupied by Charles Brady -and family, consisting of
fhla aaa had a poor crop ia 1939*   ft*
to 5'heat, 10 acres to oat*, 10 acres lo barley and 14 earns to rye*
Els total crop amounted to K>0 toatalla of wheat, 100 bu»hela of
oats aad 40 bushels of barley, the oat* end th* barley being only
fit for feed*   Hla patatoaa wow sl*o poor sad hi* vacate*!*
aa__f fair*
Ha ha* 4 ama9 4 calve*, 0 *aa*p, 3 horse*, a aow snd 3
pig* anal amm ohickeaa and turiseya.
Forty acrea ware *uanarfallo»*d and la acres fall-ploughed.   SWeatyfive acrea of mm land were cleared ready far breaking
next npriag.   Brady ha* paid vts.00 oa his taxes this year, but has
.-ana* no additional payment*.   He has sufficient feed for hi* lite-
stock* _ ■ _
• 160 aares, of which 96
vatlon • occupied hy John Mdtoaaail aad family.
the crop m thi* fana waa poor
040 baahels of wheat end a_0 bushels of oats having been
a total of do acres seeded to grain in the spring*    fhla ha*
flitappoiating to tha eettler who has not been able to
i* aaa paid hi* taarns in full.
aaffiaieat food on hand for his livestock*
or.   o. 4 - 160   acrea, of whloh 140 acres have now boon brought
cultivation - occupied by iobert :<mimm and family, who **tti*d on
thia far a originally.
oa this farm la 1899 aoauatod to §99
940 bushel* of oats, froa 60 acres seeded to the f<
and 90 aorea seeded to the latter,   th* settler alao brought 10
of na* laad. under cultivation, and ciear*d an additional area of 6
ready for ploughing in the spring*
Bat ha* ? horses, 3 sow*, ? calve*, a aaa and 10 plga,
and a anther of chicken* aad turfceye*   fM*9 is soffleieat food oa
hand for toe stock*   Tha potato crop wee fair.
of which IM acre* have bean brought under cultivation,   this fans is aoaupl«4 by Swan SaDaneil a ad family.
ill harv-eted 9lo0 bushel* of sheet, grades
6 at_d 9, froa. M MM aeeded, aM 013 bushels of feed oats froa
i.   He alao cleared 1ft acres of ma land, aad
of additional land under cultivation* haa 4 harass, 4 eo»a, 4 calves, a am and 10 plga, aad
He haa plenty of feed and had a fair crop of potatoes*
paid aad a pay.-is at on the contract a can be sxpsct-
is
i. 0 - 430 acrss, of which 47 *sr*a ar* aow under cultivation - M>
pled by fa* HaOaffcrty and fastlly.
tbl* settler is ra-ry baetoard, and he **•_* u&able to
%ay progrea**   His total crop this year waa 130 buehale of
wheat and 90 bushels of f**d oat* froa * total of M at9M
le alas araagjbt § acrss of new land under cultivation, and ?
*r.re ready for tha plough in the eoadag a.«riag*
He ha* 4 horses, I cows, 9 aalvaa and 1 aow*   He ha* aiao
a few chickens aad tortoys*
■ forty Is haadiaappad by hie family of yoaag children*
At Ma end of the y«*r the family***** receiving roll*-: from t_a
olpallty*
- Ida acres, or which M acres _*m Ma* brought nailer *ulU-
vatloa - -occupied by o*org* ataallweod and fMttffs
ffcia Is another backward settler, whoa* pregr*** has
been very unsatisfactory*   Ms s**d*d 30 auras %& wheat aad 10
to ants in the epriag sod narv*sted UQ bushels of toast snd I
bushels Of food oats*
He has only I aoraaa, 1 cow, 1 calf adifw
the family is on relief. -
- 4 -
. * 160 acres, of which 100 a._r©s wnve been brought under cultivation - occupied by Ma* -barlse joherty ead family*
4 bright feature in connection with the
farm (hiring UN aaa* year has been the breaking of lo acres of
land and tha clearing of Ii aor-S aore ready fas- th* plough in
spring*    About 40 acres sore also suaraerfsllowsd*
seedsd to grain arouated to 39 aores in whsat,
ii acres la oats and 10 aorea In fe*d crops, and m) bushels of
wheat aad 9*_ bushels of feed oats were a arveeted*    -hare Is sufficient f**d oa hand for the livestock, aonaistlng of 13 hersea, 9
and |  calves, a aow and 3 plga aad aoa* chickens.
BMjjM I • 160 acres, of which 109 acres hav© bean brought under cultivation - occupied by thorns 0 •twill and family.
_als farm was vacated by 9*9*412 aad hla faartlf in ifes
spring aad ao orop waa eced*d*   ft* aooiety la endeavouring to
fiaia possession of to* property*
• 160 a«r*a, of which 190 aerea have hman brought under cultivation - occupied ay Mm MeOaughsy and fatally.
harvested on MM fare in 1939 amounted to 7f0
buahsla of aMM «ad MM bushela of «*9at froKt h© MM9 aaad*9 to
«?h*at aad W acres ae*ded to acts.
The eettler has paid hie taxes awuatiag to MM.   Wa
lien of 168 and has a hospital bill of #196 to pay*   He ha*
a aaetU pnyaeot on his contract.
Oa tha farm he has -,t heraee, 3 oows, 5 .alvea, 9 _M.
aad a good number of ehiakeaa and MMftffti MJ »bieb he
has ana-la food on hand. _
farm tto* 11 - 190 ear**, of which d0 acrea »ave bo*a brought
■  %utloa - occupied by toreo Mcttnaon a«d faaily.
under culti-
Ihia Mtu_ eeeded 4b acres to sheet, 10 aorea to oat*, 3
to barley and 0 acres to fa*d crops, and harvested b90 bushsls
of whsat and eoo buanela of feed oats *ad 60 bushsls of f*ed barley.
He also cl**r*d 99 aoree of as* land end sun_*rfallc*ed 4fc asms.
lie null* a aaaU addition to his house during th*
He ha* ? baraas, -j cowe, 6 calves, a sow snd 9 plga*
hav* b**n paid and at leaat a smll payoent on the 6_9*
tracts is sxp**tod*
- i%Mm IM    MJ9f    f   MMJ  n   MBM    ajej M99 MMjM Mi9i M_M*
vatlon * occupied- by Patrick ileCaatbridg* and faaily*
Hftet of the cultlvatsd laad wee anaaarfallowed in 1939,
and only 13 acre* were sseded to sheet, id© bushel* being narvested
the re fro®*   the sefler also hraaght ■ aores of additional laad
under cultivation sad cleared 15 999*9* which are ready for piough-
|91 tola spring.
He has 3 harass, 4 cows, 4 calves, I sows and 10 pig**
le la paying his tuxes, but whether he will ale© be able to pay
thing on hla contract* is ^uaatloaabl**
of which 6- acres MM beea brought under c-Ition - occupied by ft* Hernon and fussily*
40 acres to grain crop* sad auaa*rfall« ed
>r of Ma cultivated laad*   Ho hnrveatod Ml bushel* of
■99* 3 and 3 aMM and 130 bussola of MX oats,   lie *|99 cleared 10
aores of new laad fe-hieh are ready for ploughing la MM*
■ orop suffered severely froa drought.    She garden and
potato crops ware also poor, toeufjh sufficltat potatoaa MM MMMftw
ed for the faaiiy a*ode*   Ala settler Mft 4 bsrees, ,5 MM* I oalvos,
sow, 6 pig* sad about 43 chickens* «. 6 -
/'ara |ftj 14 - 160 aorea* of sfelefc 93 acre* M*9 b**a brought uader euitl<
vaato**   mis farm haa been leased to ft* HeGaaa, 9r* aad »•
Ir* on probatloa.
.hirty aorea war* a*eded to wheat, 16 aorea to oat* aad
10 acres to food crepe aad 310 bushel.** of *k*at aad 380 bushels of
oata war* harvaetod*   the settlers alao brought uad*r cultivation 6
4 bar***, 3 aow*, 3 calves, one aow aad ft
l_*ra la aggie feed oa hand*   the taxea have been paid, and a
on toe contract* ie expected*
- ISO aorea, of which
vatlon.
1* under lass* to Alistoir latafioaeil, who
aad 3O0 buehela of feed oats, the remainder of the cultivated laad
being eusaMO. fallowed*   Hao-0on*ll also.brought under cultivation 9
aores of aealy olaared land aad clear** another 10 aoree ready for
ftieaaw    ay gfWta^. -•*   Jt **   ** '8^***''-*
Ii* has 3 horses, S eows sad 9 ealvee, am sea, 4
aad about 90 ohlekeae*   Ii* haa plenty af feed oa hand*   Hia
orop »©.* poor*
_ - IdO acres, of which 90 acre* hav* bo*n brought under cultivation*    It is leased to the widow of tho original occupant, Mto
Barber*. Phillip*, sad her son, Sdward*
0a this fart- 69 aoree war* a*»d*d to grain crop* end
bushels of ma, 3 aad 3 wheat and 890 Ouabain of fe«d oata wan
veeted*   tea asres of new laad that wore cleared la 1939 were bwu,;bt
under cultivation and another 10 aor** mm olearau ready for plough-
lag in. 1940*   About 10 acres also were au«*arfallow*d • « ? -
til* liveetook consist* of I hor*e* aad one foal,
4 oaiven, oa* now, 6 pigs and about 70 chickens*   sufficient hay sad
other f**d are available*    The garden aad potato crops were only fair,
2-1*0 acres, of shieh 113 a«r*n have MM brought uad*r cuitile, n - oeeupi-d by Jastss r hi Hips aad family.
this ssttlsr harve*t*d 630 bushels of Ma* £ aad 3 wheat
M0 bushel* of feed oat* froa 99 acres that **r* plantod to grain,
reaalader of the cultivated laad waa *a*a*rfallow*d*   About 10
of land that were cleared la 1938 were brought under cultivation and another 10 acre* sere cleared ready tor ploughing in the
Of I960.
waa seined by th* auaicipality far
9*9 not been r*l**e*d by the end of ths year,    tha** ia ample feed
for toe livestock, which consists of i home* sad one fatal, 3 cose,
3 calve*, oae sow, ft pigs sad about 73 chickens*   A Mtr crop of
- Ida acme, of which S3 acre* hav* boon brought under cultl-
- occupied by Anthony imllay aad family.
fhi* aaa had his crop, asaottatiag to 419 bushel* of Was.
3 aad 3 wheat and 300 buahela of feed oat*, eelaed by too aunlcipal-
ity for taxes,   tis plantod 73 acres to grain crops aad euwewrfal lowed toe rest of his ault ivataft land*   Ma also brought under cultivation 3 acre* of land that he cleared in 1998, mA cleared another
19 a ,r*a ready for ploughing in 1940.
plenty of hay and feed oa head for hla liveetook,
which consists of 4 horses, 3 cows, 3 calves, was sow, 6 pigs aad
stout m chloksas*   there am a fair crop of potatoes for th* fea>
ily*s needsi
■ • 0 *
- lag seres, of -which m acres have boon brought under cultivation - occupied ti^ tat* KttM Ml faaily.
this ana ao*d*d 36 acre* to ©heat, id acres to oats, is
acres to barley and 3 acme to other erepa*   Mo also aa»aa*rfallowed
99 acres, broke 3 aores of newly cleared laad aad cleared 10 acrea
of new land which are randy for ploughing la tha *pring of 1940*
Me haa 6 horaea, 3 oows, 3 calves, one sea aad 10 pigs,
of ohiekess and turkeys, and there la plenty of
f**d on hand for tows*   Se «l*o had a fair crop of potato***
Far^i-ic* §0 - 330 aorea, of which 76 acree hav* been braugbt aade* *ultl-
vatioa*
-a* uunsaa m haa and family loft thia fara at the and
of 1939, and it wa* leased to &ll*tair aa*L*n*U In ths spring*
He euceaerfallowed the whole of the cultivated land aad
also brought uador cultivation 33 aores of new land.   Another 19
were cleared ready for ploughing ia 1940*
- 290 acres, of i?hich 93 acrea have been brought under cultl-
vatiaft*
ttd* fax* is leaned to dodsrlak HaoUilaa, who
m acrea to wheat* 30 acree to barley and 10 aorea to feed crops in
too spring*   HI* harvest ajsouated to 599 bushels of wheat aad 300
bushels of feed barley*   fie also aasa*rfallo**d about 30 acrea,
broke 10 acres of a**ly cleared lead and cleared 10 aorea of ae*
land, which area is _***> for ploughing in the spring of I960*
His stock consists of & horsa*, 3 aaaa, 3 calves, 0
aheap, one aow* 94 pigs and son* *hiekeas*   there is aapl* feed oa
haa_ for to* livestock,   S* also had a good crop of potatoes for • 3 „
- 16. aorse, of whloh ill acre* have- MM brought under eulti-
- occupied by Hichael sevias*
nils ©ettlar seeded 38 oars* to wheat, 10 acres to oats
and 6 acrea to feed crop* la to* sprints and harvestsd 930 bushels of
vhaat ead 900 bushels of feed oats*   He also auaa*rfallow*d about 40
acree, broke 6 aoree of newly clearod laad aad cleared 1? aores, whig.
are ready for ploughing in the sprli*.
He baa 3 horses, f eows, & salve*, an* aow and 9 plga,
besides a nwaber of chicken* and turkeys*   This aaa haa bean haadi*
by having heavy hoepital end doctor*s blUs to pay.
- 190 acres, of which 69 aeres mm mm under cultivation -
by J*A* ^actollan sad faaily.
bo grain eropa, 300 bushels of
I 9 wheat, 990 basheie of feed oats and S3 buehela of feed barley
harvested on this farm.    Zha reminder of the cultivated land
was at_«e*rfailoe*d.    in addition ft acree of newly cleared laad worn
brought under cultivation, and b acree were e_ea_«d ready tor ploughing la 1940.
lenty of hay and food le available for the liveetook,
which consists of I houses, 4 cc*s, 4 calves, one son, 7 pig* and
about M ohi S_-im.   there was ala* a fair crop of potato***   this
faeily is in very poor
Farmfic. 94 - 990 acrea, of which 190 noma have aow been brou,ht under
oultlvntion - occupied by MM* Sato SfaPhee aad faaily.
M this fans 1093 bushels of wheat waa* harv**t*d froa
70 acres eeeded 9a Mft bushels of feed oate froa M *cre* aaa^ai.
About 13 scree war* aleo *e*ded to feed crops, W aeres auaatrfaltoa-
ed ead 40 aorea of ae* land wore cleared ready for .ploughing la 1940*
9 horse*, 9 ama, 3 salves, a sow   ad 9 plga*
H08 haa been paid on taxea*   3oa* household, _octor*s aa< 10
bills nave to be paid*   It is expected, however, that a small pay-
asnt ©a to* contract* will be and**
faam a*.* && - 160 M9f. of sfclah 43 acre* ar* ana uad«r cultivation.*
Phis far* In loaned to Uoaald iiacboe, who ae*d*d 19
acree to wheat and 10 mmtaa to feed crepe in th* spring of 1939*
Mm barveatod only 810 bushels of wheat*    in addition ho sumer-
falicaad m aeres and *lear*d 3 aeres of new land ready for th*
are 4 heroes, 3 cows, 3 calves, one an* aad 9
pigs, a* **ii a* a manber of chicks** aad turkeys*   Plenty of hay
feed ia available*
fax® lip, m - 160 aares, of which 39 acres have been brought under Mitt*
vatlon.   loosed to Saaaid HacPbea*
About 30 acre* wore a**d*d to wheat and M aeres to
oats,   th* harvest aswuntod to Ml bushels of wheat and 333 buehela
of oats*   f*n acre* of new laad were oloared ready for ploughing
in toe spring of 19*0.
thia f«m hsa te*n operated jointly with farm He. 33.
_ • 990 acres, of which 149 a*r*e hav* MM brought under 99*tion - 9M9fttM by are* J*eOa*tley <m£ faally*
0* this farm 93 acres were planted to MM** M acres to
oat* aad laaorea te feed crop*j mA 346 bushels of wheat and 140 —   11   —
busaeia of feed oats w*rs thf*sh»d*   About 19 aaree of sea land **r*
aleered ready for ploughing in to* spring of 19*0 aaft 6 acre* of
newly clear®!*, lead r*re brought untor cultivation*
ths livestock aonsi_ta of a horses snd 3 aolta, 8 cow*,
6 calv**, one sew and 9 plga, ead a number of ontoken* aad turkeys,
there is plenty of feed available for the liveetook*   a goad orop
of potato** waa *i*o harvested*   #74*00 hav* h**a paid *a account
of taxes*
mmtm>mmmmm
•■
farm ftp* ftft • 190 aore*, of which 181 aoraa have Von brought under «ultl<
vatiaa - 9*999-91 If Ml eVtftiail aMtMM 99 MM Mmt   . IvftaM
0»O*anor aad faadly*
thia aaa harvested 490 bushels of tie* 8 wheat and 900
buabsle ef feed oats fraa 47 acres pUatod*   Ms eumerfnllowed th*
re*t of his cultivated land and brought under the plough M *****
of land cleared in 199% and cleared 10 additional aeres.
He haa 4 horses, 4 cows, 9 .elves, one sow, 4 MM *a*
a number of chickens*    fbar* la ample food oa hand, aad a good orop
of potatoea w*re dug*
.
.
- 380 acree. of which 801 9*3*9 imta b#*a brought uad*r caitl-
- occupied by to* original family, Ma* 4*1* WaMftllaa aad
furdly.
froa 199 aorea a**d*4, 1330 bushels of stoat. 630
amahela of feed oat* «nd 449 butoel* of food barley war* harveftt-
ed*   the mat of toe cultivated land was *a*a*rfallowed, 6 aarv*
of newly cleared land war* brought oad*r to* plough and 19 acre*
of addltlaoal land were eleared.
tha liveetook oonsists of id hors-s, 13 caws, ..ivea,
19 aheap, 9 seas, 13 pig*, 90 ehiokea* and a few turfcaya* that* ie
«ae_* toad oa head*
__, - 13 -
, of which 90 acres hav* be*n brought under oultl-
vfetloa • occupied by toe original settlers, k.J. C*ll*y aad family.
this settler is not
get hie contrast
He planted about 90 acres to crop ia th* epriag, but
only harvested 190 bushels of He* 3 wheat*   M* has oaly oae
too oows, a calf aad a fax chicken**   There are nine
in the family*
farm Mo. ,P5 - 160 aorea* of shier. 93 acres have been brought under cultivation - occupied by Donald Jtoaiatyr* aad family*
this aettler needed 64 aorea in toe gprlag and
6O0 bushel* of wheat and 400 bu*h*ls of taaA oata*   He alaa
IB acres of laad ready for ths plou h in I960 aad plou bad 3
which had been cleared in 1936*
ia sttffieisat feed on head for the livestoo*,
consists of £ horses, too cows, I calve*, mm wm aad a few ohl_k_oa.
aclntyre la paying hie tax*- fcr 1939 sad will try to :*_* a payment
on his contract**   He has had te pay $33*00 on account of a hoepitel
bill*   there was a fair crop of potato***
- 160 acre*, of which 118 acre* hav* h**a brought under cultl-
- occupied by Jams* Devlin aad family*
this zata ,-arrestod 400 bu*h*l* of
aad 430 buahals ef oats*    Ma ftMft of M   cultivated land waa
, 9 acres ef newly cleared land were ploughed and 10
of additional lead ware cleared ready tor ploughing ia tba
of 1940*
Them Is sufficient feed on hand for to* livestock. slsting of 3 horses, 14 head of oat*la, 3 aow*, 13 pig* aad about
ehieteaas.    MM settler made better progress la 1999 than ia the
vious y*-.ra, and his praspsots are now aor* hop*fui.
- 160 a*ra», ef which 100 aoree have beea brought UKier euiti-
on - occupied by the original ssttlsrs, Alex* Moak aad family.
r*
thia a*ttl*r*s crop wm vary poor.    Only ISO bushels of
400 bushels of toed oat* war* harvestsd fram 41 aores plant*
ad.   the rest of toe cultivated laad sea eussaerfallowed.    In aAditle*
about 3 aorsa ef newly olearsd laad sere broke* aad 13 seres of
claared ready for th* plot* h«
Ampla feed is on tv*d for the liveatoek, con* 1 sting of
aad 3 tenia* 13 h*ad of cattle* 4 *ha*p, eee sow, 3 pigs
snd a number of ehietoas*   there was a fair orop of potatoes*
war* and* to to* hauae during toe year*
- 160 acres, of which 90 acre* hav* been brought under cultivation - oceupl*d hf taohlaa fasaoaaii and family.
'this man continues to malt* very poor pr*gp***t
haadlcapped to a great extent by shortage of bars* power*
In 1939 amounted to ftM bushels of Ma 3 wheat thrashed fram dO
He _lao cleared 10 aorea of am X&m ready for
in 1940*
the livestock aoaelsto ef 9 her***, 3 oo*** 2 oalvea,
p, an* pig and * toe *hiakaa*«   thai* waa a fair crop of - 18 •
- 160 core*, of which M
MvatIon - occupied by John MMMftJat- nad family, to* original
settlers on this
this settler sasaaerfslloesd tha
MM ia 1999*   ft* alao cleared 13 mmtaa ef new laad ready far the
H* ha* 3 eereea* 3 *owe* 9 *alv*e, • aha*p, eae sow* 3
pig* aad a few chicken*,    there ia ample feed oa hand,   lie alee had
■ fair orop of potatoea*
tlauea to be short of horse pester.
* 190 a«re», of
vatioa - Iwaead to &a_«t* Itoak* who pleated 30 acree to wheat aad
veeted 360 bushel*, the remaiad*r of the cultivated land
fallowed. Itoak alao ploughed 10 acme ef ma land that
ia 1,39* aad cleared oaother 10 acres ready cor ths plough in th*
Be has 4 horse*, 3 ***** 9 s<7_v*s, aaa sow aad 83 ehiei
stt-fielaat food on hand*
farm fin. 39 - 160 aarea, of which 79 acres have been brought under cultivation - occupied t
by   atriek
.-bout &0 acre* were e**ded nad 40
in 1999*    the hsrvaat amounted to Ml bushels of 'heat aad
-u-bola of oat**   Fifteen acres ef aaa laad wmm cleared
in 1940*
thie aaa haa 4 horse*, 8 sow** 8 oalves* aas sea
chick****   M haa auff Ictoat feed on hn    . -16*
fata **o. 40 - 190 acres, of whtob 83 nam* hav* b**n brought under cultivation - r._eupied by Sr neie Monaghan aaa family*
Mo* 80 aorea mama by Sonaghna in th* spring* he har-
310 buaheis of MM 3 end 3 wheat, 430 bushel* of feed oata
aad 300 bushels of f**d barley*   He alao pat up aa ample aupply of
toad tor hi* livestock »aa a fair sto«k of potatoes far hla family*
toe livestock consist* of 6 hares*, 14 head ef cattle,
Ml   9M, ■■-)    iftl "*;      9U tor   u ohi  t   . ,
- 160 aersa, of whloh 99 ***** are aow under cultivation -
to ISattos* Ooaaghaa from 1999-1939*
-hi* man MifiaMl 733 butoela ef wheat, gradin   90* 9*
a total of 46 aores pl«nt«d*   Es also hnmght uaaer toe plough
14 acres of laad that ware cleared in 1999, _M cleared 16 additional
not** ready for ploughing ia to* spring of 1940.
Be had a good garden and harvested a fair crop of
potatoes* there ia plenty of feed oa hsad for the llveetock,
elating of 4 horses* 3 eows and 9 salves*   this maa'a work oa the
far* la 1909 was vory satisfactory*
_ • 190 acres, of s'hich 60 noses hav* beea brought under cultivation*
This Mm is leased to    .    MHri who plantsd 43 aeres
to crap aad harvested f hi buaheis of wheat*   lie elan
cultivation 13 acrea which had been cleared la 1989, aad
fallow**: 3 acres.   Ha haa 7 hersaa and 19 Mad of cattle, with
sufficient feed on hand for thaas   An oftor mad* for the
of this tarn for eaah is receiving oonaideration. - 17 .
- I6u acre,;., of which 93 acrea nave now been brought unS*r
ovation - occupied by Jamaa .usask and family,  to* original
a*ttier* on this farm*
this eat tier ***d*d • total of 78 a*r**, fron whlah he
harvested 7M buehale of sheet, graiiag No*. 3 ead 3* 700 bushel*
of M* 8 oata* aad 190 bushels of feeo barley*   lie su**»rfallow*_
ths rest of toe cultivated laad, broke 6 acres ef aewly cl**r*d
MM and cleared 30 act** which ar* r**9y for th* plough ia toe
•priug of 1940*
H* had a mood garden ead a fair orop ef potatoea* and
has sufficient feed for his livestock, consisting of 7 horses* 4
cowc* 3 calves, I eows, 13 pigs aad a number of «hlck*as*
farm Bo. 44 - 160 aoree, *1M M acrae under cultivation - oooupied by
Oaaald „ilaoa and family, to* original setttor* oa tola torn*
this settler harvested 399 bushels of wheat, grafting
Sea* 9 aad 3, 390 bueh*le   of feed oata aad 810 Mahela ef barley
fr*a 69 acrea planted,   th* rest of hi* cultivated laad am* auwawr*
fallow***   He alao eleare-a 10 acres of am land which ar* ready
Mia garden aad potato crop wore fair*   Be haa suffle _» nt
feed for hla llveatock* which consists of 6 horses, 3 sown* 3 o*lve*,
one now. 4 aim* wad * fa* chlokene.   He built aa additional araaerr
mr*mmmmw      mwmw™ Wf       "mm      jf^^y^»     m^^m^m     mm     9 ww       ^^m>^^i~^rmw^m*mm9 »■—mm      -mWmm^m^m m     ^^»      ^m^^^mm » ^^m^mrm^mmr     ^/^m* mm^m^rm* 0
in tha fall*
*■--    ■■■■>. U - Ml MMftf M MMM IM 9M94 MM MM MftftftM MftM MlftV
vatlon - occupied by John seOonville and family*
this settler had 193 aarea ae*d*d to crap nM harveated
370 bushels of Hoe* I ftftft ft wheat, 790 buaheis of lie* 3 oata*   H*
aasmar fallowed th* rc__aind*r of hla cultivated laad* hreto 10 aorea
of aewly fleered land cat cleared an additional 10 aar-a ready for
ploughing ia the spring of 1940* Hs ha* plasty of fe*d on hand for his livestock sad had
a fair MMM* MM * geed crop of potato***   Hi* livestock constats
of 7 hereas,    1 head of oattle, I so-a, 14 pig* sad a tanner of chiasms*
Ouftaft th* aaaawr he built s lo.   her .
,-a,, MJaf " i0' MMhfcj M ft_ft9fc     I MftM 999 Mi    I _9  M_*M9ftMft ■
occupied by Oeugla* Iftwsrds aad family, tha original a*ttlera on
tola tars...
thia tone waa very beakward in hla farming opsretlon* fcr
,■_■*— t____aT
aanty years, but he appear* to have be*a mahlag bettor progreaa Mat 99
to* last too yaare*    la 1939 ho aeeded 3a aores to wheat* 19 aero*
to eat*, 7 **r*s to barley end 6 *er*« to feed orope.   Hla harveat
amounted to 990 buaheis of wheat* grading &os* 8 and 3, 310 buahel a
ef oat*, Ho* 8, find 90 bushels of feed barley.   He haa alao ample
feed on hand for hie livestock and a good supply ef potatoes tor
hi* family*
. „ —. u!-y* r""^ « ***•• • •"•» •* *m-
"    ftp**Mesftp-ft    eftaspBP     .MftM ft    iE§    £**M_pM   MMM   ftft   ftMcMMMH*
far* Up; 47 - loo aero*, of which 90 **r*a h*a* an* been brought una**
cultivation - occupied by Oaaald la*to*4 aad family, th* erigiaal
settlsr* oa tola farm*
Trent 70 acrea seeded, Jtoatood harv«*t*d 608 buahel* ef
Ma 9   h**t aad 889 bu*hel* of He* 3 oats*   He aoamerfalloaed about
10 aore* of cultivated laad and -leered lb acres of new laad racfty
for th* plough in 1940*   He • leo cut sufficient hay aad other feed
for his liveetook, aad haa a good aapply of potatoes for his family*
■_he livestock conaiata of 4 horses, 3 cows* & calves*
10 pigs aad a number of chickens. * 19 -
y*ra 8a* ^ - 160 acres, of which 06 aorea are under cultivation * ocaapled
by Uahlaa MoLelian aad family.
thia aaa plaatod 30 aorea to orop aad earner f el lowed the
remainder of hi* cultivated lad. He harvested soft bushels of wheat
aad 407 bushels of feed oats* He Bleared 10 aeres of new laad ready
for ploughing ia 1940*
Ha haa sufficient food oa hand for his livestock, which
consists of I torse** 9 eows, 4 oalves, on* ana* 3 pig* aad a fas
ehieksaa*   this man is act nekiw; wry fast progress, bat to ha*
better in the laet too year* thea previously.
- 160 asres, of which M aeres have new been brought under
I tvatta* - 999ftftMi by thorns* Oanlon aM family, toe erigiaal
oaoupftuta of this tor**
Ittis aaa had a very poor crop in 1939, harvesting only
10- bushels of Mo* 8 wheat and 1&0 bushels ef Mo* 3 Cats from a total
>6 acres planted in' the spring*   Be aumarfhilawed Id acre* aad
cleared 10 acres of new laad ready .far ploughias la th* aprla. of
1949.
He i* Tvktofl poor pregree*, be lag hand lcapped to e large
extent fef having too little ***** paver*   He haa planty af feed oa
toad aad alao had a goad crop of potatoes*
Hla liveetook sonniata of 9 toreee,   9 ***** 3 calvea,
aem^^w   mwar^a    *anB   ^****^m* *    a^^e    w**w^a. ssnav*
I - Mft mma, of whlan 100 acres ar* under cuitivatioa*
thia farm was surrendered in toe spring by th* original
eooupente, John MftMMh and family.
It «aa then leased to John £Oy, who *u_»*rf__. lowed Mft
vhels ef th* cultivated land*   Be alec cleared 10 acrea of new land • M -
there ar* 4 harass, 9 seas, 3 calves,
on* sow, 6 plga ead a fa* chicken**   the lesaee ha* pleaty at feed
tor hla stock*
ores, of   hlch 93 acme have been trough* under cultivation - occupied by Jam** Martin aad family, the original ecttiere
on this farm*
900 bushel* of ti*.
bushels ef feed oats eat 900 bushel* of feed barley*
about 19 acres ana cleared 10 acree of new land
for th* plough ia 1940*   He also pat up suffietont feed tor
hla livestock and had a fair cr»p of
M ban 0 horese sad one foal* 19 head of cattle* one
9 ft alga aad about 00 chick****   H* built a as* addition to his
90* x W during too year*
ef which 93 a«re» are now under cultivation -
ed ay Jama Urwin and family, the original settlers oa tht*
thia man only harveatea iftO buehale of Ha* 9
191 buehele of feed oata *M 169 bustola of feed barley
total of M aorea aeeded*   m eu -xwahllosed about 10
8 acre* of newly cleared l-m-3, .leered 10 additional aorea
ready for. ploakghlag ia toe apilag of 19*0*   m haa plenty of
feed on band fo* hla livestock aad haa a _e*d crop of potatoea
Hie livestock consists of 9 homea aad 3 foals, 16
of cattle, oa* aow, 6 piga aad about 90 chickens.    He
structsd a log hulidlag duria   the i*
3M acres, of which 96 acres a*« aow m&»v cultivation -
1930 by  toderlck Haalean aad fauily.
183 bushel* of theft oata*     the remainder ef hie
cultivated land waa eu**»r fallowed*   if* alao took* I *«re* of aewly
cleared lead* and cleared la addition I   acrea of new laad ready
in 1940*
the stock and haa a goad supply of potatoes for his family
Oarlag ths year a aew granary waa built*
- 160 acree, of which 69 acree era ae* under cultivation.
- thia far* ia leased to Petar _«w**u.«y,
to wheat aad fats** harvesting 310 bushels of in* 9 wheat aad
390 bushels of oata*   He alee cleared 18 acrea of aew laad*
ar* ready for toe plough in 1940, and a**n*rfallo«*ft about 1ft a
hla Isaac and vacated the farm in
- 160 acres, of which 116 acres have been brought under cultl
vatlon - 9*99ftMft hy MM* uary unoculcy and family, to* original
tier* on this
Ms family harveatod 690 buaheis of toe* 9 aad 3 "heat,
aad 900 buaheis of fee., onto froa M acrea pl#atod*   the rest of
ths cultivated lead «u easaarfallowed*   About 19 acree of aew land
were cleared ready for ploughing in 1940*   Mere was a fair orop of
potatoea* m& euffloleat f**d cor th* livestock wa* pat up*
the liveetook consist* of 3 horsss* 3 case* I calves,
one saw, six pig** aad 60 chictona*   A amall Sag building waa erected duria   the wiator* - M -
far* Ma* 86 * 190 acree, of shieh 116 acrea are new aader cultivation -
occupied by Archie tontk aad family, tha orl lnal settlers on this
-• .
Monk planted 69 acrea to iraia and harvected 900 bushela
Of So* 1 wheat, 190 bushels ot fsed oata eat 89 buaheis of feed barley*   He also put up a good supply of feed far hi* livestock, aa&
had a fair crop of potatoee*   About 39 nor** were ammmerfallosed,
9 acrea of aewly cleared laad brou ht under cultivation aad 9
additional acre* of aew laad cleared ready for ploughing ia 1940*
tha liveetook oonetots of 4 horses, 7 *owa, 4 calves,
«a* sow, 9 pig* aM about 90 chick .aa*
- 990 acree* of which 134 acree
Ivattoa - occupied by freak Bradley sad family, toe original
settlors on t is farm*
thia aaa*a deellngs with toe ao.lety hav* been fur fro*
•atlsf notary, but thai* d«*o act aaam to be any proa*** of law by
which he can he compelled to fulfill his obllgntloaa or to vacate
toe farm*   Xhl* year ha had M acrea in crap and harvested 300
Mshcla of l*o* 3 wheat, 900 bushel* of feed ante aad 33 buaheis
of feed barley*   He auara*rfallowed toe remainder of hie cultivated
laad, brought under cultivation 4 cores of awwly broken lnal sad
cleared 10 additional acres ready for plaaghlag ia 1940*
Bradley has B horcca* 7 cows, 4 oalves, 3 ease, 11 plga
aad about 70 cMctoaa*
Farm Ho, 99 * 160 acres, of which 63 acre* have aa* been brought under
cultivation*
tha farm **a rented to   atrlck toeeoy* Jr.. sad he
ceeded 9 acrea to cheat* 30 aeres to cat* aM 0 acree to feed
crepe*   He harvested SO bushels of 9a* 1 wheat aM 999 bu*hels
of Ho* 3 oata*   About m acree were sammerfallowed* 6 acres ot • M •
_. ___T_,     ___*(*___.__, _»_W    _a_to8_a.__     \ _.     ______» «A^aa_.     ___________    ti aa ______
estivation • ooeaaled br John Toss* aM ftodlr. to* ertatoal a
mwm*. w**an**vr «*   w   wwe_ii_qjr9**r**    wj    *rv***a    iiswr^anaa   wmaM*    fcta* .Jkm,^ $     miam     r.Tftjfl|ft ttt"i*     9P*.  .. trjHtoJTM
en thia farm*
About 40 acres were seeded to   heat, M e*r*e to oat*,
11 aoree to barley aad 0 aores to feed ore pa*    ^ha harvest nmeuntod
to 900 Mabels ot wtoat* grafting Ma* 1 and 9, 837 bushels of Ho* i
oats aM 190 Mahal* of tee* barley*   lagan   iao eu«w»r fallowed about
16 acrea aM cleared 1   sera a of as* laad r*ady for ploughing in th*
•priag.
tic aaa 8 horaea, 7 head ef oattle* 3 aowe, 10 plga aM
about SO *hlekeaa*   He ha* ample feed oa head far his atock, m&
lso a good supply of potato***
- 160 acres* ef which m acree have aa* been brought under
aalttvattog - occupied by   atrick >.jyl* and family, to* original
settler* on this far**
this settler harvested • poor crop*   from a total of £0
aorea ***d»1, only MO Mahals of wheat aM --<00 bushels of oats were
harvested*   About   I acres were eumraarfailowed* aM 19 acrea ot newly cleared land were broanht under the plough r*edy tor seeding in
1940*
_to liveetook canalate of 6 her sec* 7 cows* 6 colvac*
on* now* 10 pigs aM a awator of chickens ana turkeys.   Thar* 1*
ample feed en bead*
m * 160 acree, of which loo aores have be** .
1 - occupied by Alexander i_ae0oaald aM wife*
?re* 99 aerec aeeded* lae~*aald harvested 360 bushela
. wheat ead 907 huehele of feed oata*   Hla barley wee •**•
dried out*   He camnarfnllcaM 8 aorea aM cleared 9 acree
ef aew Ian:, ready for tha plough ia 1940*
He had a fair crop of potato** aM haa pleaty of feed
for hi* livestock, eonatotiai:. M 8 torcca, 7 cows* 3 calvea, en*
ace* 9 plga *ad about 60 chicken**   tto grala crop wee vary dis-
epp*luting*
______ - 160 acres, of which 4.3
been brought
colli*
•
re*dy for th*
lag of 4
<
auarasrfollow*d a aores, ploughed 9 acrea of land to at
aM cleared 10 additional acrea which are
la 1940.
were cleared in 1998*
horaec* 9
for their livestock* oonelet-
eaa sow, 6 pigs a*
cultivation - occupied by John
tiers oa this fi
Hacneil sad family, the original
wheat* grading Hoe* 9 aad 3* l&O
of feed barley*   Ho alao brought
ti*M9ft land, clear* _ 10
about SO
s ef feed a*ta* 190 bushel*
cultivation § acres of asnly
for the plough in 1940 *M
He has I horse*, ead
so*, 9 pig* and about 39 ahieke*
for the stock* aM a fair
> foal, 13 hoed of cattle*
there is plenty of toed avail*
of potatoea
• 190 a«re«, of which 9
tivatlon - occupied by tbamse fey aad taMly, the original settlers
on this farm*
I, tftft buehale of So* ft I
900 buaheis of feed oats maim harvested*   the reminder of the
cultivated Ian- was aaoaaavf allowed * aad U aores of 9M laM vara
cleared ready for plevghMe in I960*   tto aettlar al*o harveatoft
a fair crop of potatoes aad put as a @ood eupply of feed for hla
th* iiveatoch consieta of 8
, 6 cow*, 4 calve*, -
.».
1 sow*, 6 plga aad about 60 chicane*
fMft, ffi af • -*• *cr»a, of which 93 acre* hav* be*n hrou,Jxt under oultl-
vatlon • occupied by   ater itaQuckia aad family,  the original settlers
oa tole farm.
thia man harveated 704 bushel* of *M9ft« 309 buahele of
oata aad 133 bushels of barley from a total of 91 aorae aeeded*
«Mut 34 acree were _wu*aarfallowed, 13 aores of newly cleared land
__au__,e_. sad 8 additional acree cleared ready for slau *<___!_& ia
jjp«w»»^*jpafw**p     ammm/ama    amp   sewww*- ws*^»psawsi     aa wm waw     w#HLwesimmram    mp^mmm^^^      » >m-m*      ^mmmm^m^gammmmmmmr^-     a*a■ ■
1940*   there ia ample feed on hand for th* liveetook, sonstat lag
of 6 torses, 6 oewa, 6 calvee* & cow* aM 99 pig**
ftp*, 60 - idJ acree* of vatoh 71 acre* hav* toon brought under cultivation - occupied by JoM MOl'.livray and ftextiy under agreement of
sale einee the l*t !km*Mc#* 1997.
\% acrea seeded to grain, 900 bushels of rto* %
heat, 3/0 Mahal* of feed oata aad 100 bushel* of feed barley
s*.*s harvested*   **Glllivmy *u**rfallo*ed to* remainder of hi*
icltMaMl teni *M cleared IS *cres of new Into ready for caltt*
MM in 1940.
the livestock consists of 6
one tew, 0 pig* aM about 60 chtckeas*
aval labia*   He alao harvested a fair crop ef potatoea*
- 190 acre*, of whloh 90 acres have been brought under culti-
- occupied by JMa* Orant nM family, th* original settlers.
ir. hundred and fifty bushels of Ms* 8 aad 3 wheat. . 37 —
909 bttssele of food oata aad 130 bushels of feed barley were
ed on this IM* from a total of 70 acrea ee*d*d to grala.   the va»
:*inder of the cultivated laad was afcuaaerfhllowM and 9 core* of aa*
land were cleared ready to be brought under cultivation In 1940*
Urn livestock consists of 4 horses* 3 cos** 3 calv***
I MA about 60 ehickeae*    iter* is plenty of feed oa
crop of pototoee was else
- 160 acre*, of which 67 acree hav* bean brought under cultivation • ocsopied by John MeOaaald*
ef this farm took over after to*
teeth of his mother, Sirs* nor* Matfoaalft at the ead of IMft*   He
cultivated lead*   the harvest amraatod to 390 bushels of Mae* 3
and 3 when*, 3.9 buaheis of feed oat* and 130 bushels of feed barley*   McOoaaid alao cleared 13 acres of mm land shioh
far the plough In 1940.
 -2^
livestock ooasiats of 5 horses, 7 oows, 3 calves,
79 ohietens*   there ts plenty of feed nvallabia.
- ./•.    ..    ..   ,,    Ml    MftftftMC    svcMmMC    MaMM.Ml.9_l-
vatlon - occupied by   eter fc*uoaald aM family, th* original »ottler*
101 acres to grain *k
3 Md 9 wheat, 400 buaheis of feed oats aM 90
baatolc of feed barley*   He awamarfallowed about 60 acres,
18 cares of newly cleared land under cultivation, aad cleared an
additional is acrea ready for ploughing In i960*   He alao
ed a fair crop of potatoes for his family needs *M put up
feed for his liveetook, which consist* of 8 horses, 9 eowa, 4 oalves,
oae sow, 9 pigs aM about 60 ehtoions. - 160 aar.-B, M whiah 39 acres have toon brought under cultivation.
r, warn
occupied it since the 1st January, 1933* end it was leased to ftftpft
Matnilaa, who aeeded 9§ acre* to wheat, 13 acres to oats
fallossd the reel ef th* cultivated land*    Th<
990 buahele of Mo* 3 wheat end 990 buaheis ef feed oat*.   He alee
19 acres of sew land.
The livsntaok consist* of 3 horace, 3 cose* one calf,
aaa cow «id nbout to ohlokane, for which there le sufficient feed
Psrm^o. 73 - 160 acree, with 90 acres uadsr oultlvatioa - occupied by
Vincent sinleel sad family, too original settlers on ti. far**
fro* 33 aorea aeeded to grain, .-Inlsol harvested 960
bustola of ftto 3 whaat and 910 buahele of feed oata*    M aummer-
faltowed about 99 aorea and cleared la aorea of new laad ready for
ploughing In the aprlag of 1940.
the livestock onanists of 3 horaaa* 3 cow** 3 calves,
one sow aM 3 plga*   there is assets feed available*   the grain orop
waa badly dried out*
. ar, :.o. 74 - 190 acrea, of ahlCb M acree have MM brought under oultlvatioa, leased to ?i*k Itl.MUoM from to* let January, 1940*
tilhollaM planted 37$ acres to grain aM harvested 113
Mahele ef Re* 1 wheat aM 960 bushels of toed oata*   tho remainder
of the cultivated land 8*9 aummarfallowed* 3 acres of awaly cleared
land were brought under the plough* w4 IS additional acrea were
cleared ready tor ploughing In 1940*
the livestock consists of « horeec, 4 coos, 9 Mlvca* 9
stoop, one sow end shout 70 ohictens.    the settlor haa auffiaieat
feed m h«M for the livestock. f*ya le* 7S - 160 acres, of sbieh 94 acres havs mm brought under oulti-
vatlon • occupied by ftftfe Jessie ~*sto* and fanily.
to*** MCPhee to* tod thia plane under ieaee slaec the cprlag
of 193d.    In 1939 Aha had 43 aorea seeded to grata aM harveetod 340
bushels of imttm 3 »heat and 130 bushels of toon oata.   fho remainder
of the cultivated land wm suamarfallowed, 19 mvaa of newly cleared
land vers brought under the plough* *M 10 acrea of additional lend
cleared ready for ploughing in 1940.
is plenty of feed on hand for toe liv**to«k* whlto
I horses, 13 haa4 ot cattle, cms aw* 4 pig* aM 43 chickens.
, j 380 acres, of which 167 aoree MM bnan brought under culti-
vatiM - occupied fey John JJeeXatyr* aad family, the original settlers
a total of 190 acrea seeded to grain, **ciatyr*
I960 bushel* of stoat, grMiag ttoe* 1 Mft 8, aad 1130
bushels of oat*, grading Ho* 8 ft***   the reminder of his cultivated
land warn sums if fallowed*   He also hrauMt under cultivation 3 acres
of laad that were cleared in 1999, ato cleared 10 additional aeres
ready for pleughlag la 1940*   He Mft a good crop of patatoM and
put up sufficient feed for his livestock.
th* livestock coaalata of 3 ho res a *. oae foal, 19
of oattle* oae sow* 9 feeders and about 100 chlokeas.
of which 193 mvna have been brought under cultivation - occupied by AlcaaMar MMlllPi and fcaally, the original
settlers oa this farm*
UMiillM seeded 129 acres to grain and harveetod 789
buehela of stoat* No* 8* 000 buahele of feed oata and 110 buahele
of feed barley*   the reminder of the cultivated laad wm
fallowed.   Be alao cleared Ift acree of am land reMy for j
lag.in the apMag of 1940.   He ha* plenty of feed for hie livestock
aM a good cup-ply of ,so totes** the livestock oonsists of 11 horssa Mft 9
of cattle, 9 cms, I plga aad about 05 chiokeM*
• 160 acree, of *hieh 90 mm* to** Mm brought under ouitl-
• leased to   at rick M^aillM*
this nattier did not make mat progress la 1-30.   He
seeded altogether 13 aorea to grain aad harvested M Mahals of
whMt*   ths reMiaing M ejama of hi* cultivatM toad mm aavansr-
fallowed.   Me alao cleared 10 acres of aa* land, __lch axe ready
for ploughia*. in to* apriaa of 1940.
-She llveatock consist* of 4 tor mo, I cow* and one calf,
tother or not this tenant sill be given a Ism* far 1940 is to be
dMided*
* 160 acres, of which ftft99Ma1 hav* torn brought under culti -
vatlon - occupied by John fisher aM fa dly, the original settlers
i   tola
to whest, this Mft harv.etod 780
»ls of nos* 9 and 3 wheat*   la addition he plaatod 9 acres to
grMs, brought umSer cultivation 10 acre* of lead that
cleared in 1930 end cleared ■ additional acres ready for
lag in 1940*   He tod a good crop of potatoes sad also Mft sufficient ttod on hand tor hi* livestock.
there are 9 horses, 6 sow** 4 celVM, 3 eowi
and M chlckeM.
vatlon." thia tarm'haa toea occupied by are* Am tomato aM Madly
alao* January, 1939* - 31 -
a total of 73 aores seeded to graia m this farm,
609 buahele of Ho* a 8 aM 3 stoat mm harvested, aad 300 buebeU
oats*    About IS acrea were al*o seeded to clover, and
M'-sslMer of toe MltlvatM land wm suaMrfallowed*   &h?a<
IM had 6 acMs of land that wsre cleared in 1999 brought
cultivation, aad «leared S3 acrea ready for ploughing In 1940.
tha Map wm dam*.** by drought In July*
there Is a goad supply of potatoss on hand and
feed for the liveetook, which oonsists of 13 horses, 16 toad of
Mttle* 8 cheep* £ caws, 6 pig* aad about 90
» 330 acres, of which 113 aores nave been brought under cultivation - occupied by Alexander Hdteii aad family*
o -oil harvested 708 huatols of mm, 9 aM 3 stoat,
bushels of feed oats aM 190 buaheis of fowl barley fxa* M
eeeded to grata*   the rent of the cultivated load wm
About 10 acre* of land that mm ctoared la 1939 mm
cultivated ax«#«» and an additional 10 Mren of
reedy for ploughing in 1940.
the livestock com lets of 3 horcM* 3 cows* 3 calves,
om aow* 4 plga and about 90 ehiekeM, for which there is
feed on hand*   thaw wm &1m a fair amp of pototooe*
- 160 aores* of which M ocmc have been brought uader eultl-
• occupied by AlexMder Mrrycwt end f*Mly* to* original
settler* on tola farm.
All the cultivated land on this farm, with the exMp-
tlon of a few acre* upon which, green feM was grama, wm eumasr-
failcwM in 1989.    Vlma mma ot land cleared ia 1939 Mrs brought
under cultivation aM another 5 acree mm cleared ready for plough*
lag in 1940.
%%a livestock consist* of 4 bora*-, £ cms* i ealMs,
about 63 chiekCM*   thOM is sufficient hay and other ft fair crop of potatoea wee MftMtftftl tor to* family
- 160 acMC, of *.hich 93 asree Mm been brought under oultl-
lon * occupied by AtoxaMer MSatllan, Jr*, tho orI lnal occupants
of this
to grain oa this far** 1160 buatola
I   *h**t* which graded   oa. 3, 3 and 3, iron torveatod*   Xta
der of the cultivated laad was susmaarfallowed*    About 13 Mres of
am laad n» cleared .ready for ploughing In 1940*
the liveetook mm!etc of 6 toMss, 6 cow** 4 ealvoa, cc*
CM* 0 plga aM M ohiekMC, for which toerc is aufficiMt feed on
h^nd*   there wa* alto a fair crop of potatoes*
ttM - occupied by sre. i« __M_aa*e Md family, th* orlgiMl Mt-
0n this far*_ 119 Mrs* were *M<:ed to graia aM the
3*_ftM-_    l%_*    fttto9h   99 til %t%:*____! ____>___.    _L_S______f    _?_&.__.    _________ft_______f_______ _-J-B_fftllt _fMJ__U'■_    _______    _ft______t__r_l
area 904 bushel* of Me* 8 aM 3 wheat, 900 buaheis of Ho. 3 oaU
and «03 bushels of feed barley w*m harvested.   Meat 4 acree ef
newly cleared land wom brought nader eultlvntion, aad another 91
1 ore a w*ro cleared ready for ploughing la 1940.    _M gMia wm
by draught in July.
wm fair*   there is alM cufficiont
hay aal other feed on hand for toe livestock, which, consists of
19 tors**, 9 •**•• 6 calMS, oae sow, 9 f**d*r*Md about 100 * 390 acres, of which 14a acrea hav* hcc* brought under culti
t - occupied by Sftaard Devlin,  M9 original Mttler oa this
M* OMlia diM in MgMfta 1939, and the far.- ia bsiag
in the Msntlm* by his wiM* and children*   Om hundred
lorea «ere sMded to grain crops end toe remainder ef the
cultivated laad wm aawaerfallowed*   Free* the seeded area 603
bushels of Mo* s 8 and 3 wheat mm harMstod, nod XXQ bustola of
feed oata*   About 8 acrea ef newly etoared laM wom brought under
cultivation, and another lb acres were cleared ready for the plough
In 1940.
thia Mttler toe plenty of hay aM other feed for hla
livestock* to atoo toft a goto crop of potatoec*
th* livestock consists of 9 horses, 7 cows, 4 calve*,
one ms, 9 pig* aM about OO ohlctoM.
> 380 MM*, of which 193 *0M* hav* bee* brought under culti -
vetlea - occupied by llalMla MeOoaald aad family, the original
tiers on this farm*
79 urn maomA to grain on this form* 390 buahale
of ItM* * aai 3 wtoat sad 990 Mahals of feed oats were harvested*
Ma-teaald atraMrfallowed too reminder of toe cultlMtod landf
brought under cultlMtlon 10 mm* of land which to had cleared In
1939, aad cleared another 13 acre* ready for ploughing ia 1940.
M put Up sufficient hay aM other feed for his livestock* eemaistlns? of 3 horaes, 7 owe, 3 oalvoa, oae am, 6 pigs
it 96 chickens*   Be had a gated crop of potatoes for
- 190 mms, of which 19 aore* ban* besa brought under cultivation*
2hls farm mm leaaed to freak toOlea* who aaawerfalloeM all the cultivated laad sat cleared 18 aeres of M9 land, which are
ready for ploughing ia 1940.
ths 1 IMS took consists of I herMs, 4 town* 3 calvee,
one -mm, 6 pig* aad about 90 chiotoM*   there Is ample hay ead teed
U
Hejsjgg. - *-0 «c*m, of whloh 106 mm* h*M toeo brought uader Mlti*
vatlM - occupied by Jceeph 01mc ead family, the original Mttler*.
About 90, bustol* of whMt* grading 9m* ft* 9 and 6,
aM 400 bushels ef feed Mte mm haiveetod on thie farm from 78
aores seeded to grain* the remainder of tho cultivated lend was
L* while t Mrec of newly cleared lnnd mm brought
cultivation, cad eaottor 1.
ploughia.. in 1940*
lists of 6 homes, 3 CMC* 4 oalves,
cm cm, 7 pigs aM about TO ehleksM, for which ample food is
available*    th* Mttlor aMo had a goad Mpply of potatoes*   He
had to bore a aM Mil In the fall*   thia cost him £114*00.
ll_ mms MM man brought uader oultl*
...a. torsea aM family*
this ma seeded « total of M aoree to graia and
fallowed ito MmalnMr of hla ooltivatcd toad,    from toe
to harvested 900 bushel* ef -*Matt grMiag Mm* 3, 3 and 4, aad 100
bustola of barley*    the Mte tod to be cut Oar food*   He brou ht 19
mm* of newly cleared land uader cultivation, sal cleared an additional 10 acre© ready for plou^ias in 1940.
of potatoea aad put up sufficient hay
aad other r**d for hie livestock, oonsisting of 6 horses *. oae foal,
9 moo, ? salves, 19 cheep, one mo* 9 pigs and stout 100 chicken* Mr. :'w "-,n - ■• tiJ   ia* MM9   - ra lecc ttm M   m t calftfte
Mtion*    tho ort$lMl ©aoupaat of MM far** Peter 24aes*il, MM MM
the far?* to* cine bean operated by his sldee and children.
0M hundred *M forty .acres were planted to grain aM to*
Lader of toe cultivated laad wm auaaairfallcaM*   "fho harveat
MM to 199- bushel* ot toe* S and 3 stoat aM 1400 bushels of
to* 9 Mte.    ten acree of land that Mrs cleared in MM mm brought
uader cultivation, end another 10 acres were cleared end are
for ploughing in i960.
the livestock ooMlsto of 10 bars**, m MM ef Mttis,
18 amp, one aow, 10 plga aad about 70 ohiekaae*   thoM ia a good
•apply of feed oa hand tor toe stock, m& a fair crop of potatoes
harveeted for household needs.
- 100 acrea, ef vhlto 33 mni have toon brought under ouiti-
tlM - occupied by ib_lMla M*Ut
Xhl* ma harvsatod 990 bushels ef
430 bushels of feed oats from 33 sores see ed
ot his cultivated land «m flttaaier fallowed*   He
Mt*ftM under outtivntion I acres of laad thai were cleared la
1939 end cleared another 10 999*a which ar* ready for ploughing
U 1940.
the lives took conlatc of 4 horMC* 4 CMC* 3 cnlMc,
one sow, 4 plga and 30 chi-tone*    there la ample hay aM other
feed on hand.
_ * 190 aeMC, of whito IM ewea MP9 been brought under culti-
vatisa - otoaplod by Oolin Oollagtor aad fcMly* too original Mt*
tiers on tola
8 aad 3 wheat and 930 buahcia of Ma 8 oats*   He
tho rea*l.,d*p of hie cultivated land.   He also Mfttftftft • M*
oultiMtion 10 earee whloh tod been cleared toe
sad cleared. M cares ready for ploughing ia 1940.
Ha hn plenty of feed end. other feed for hie liMatock,
which oeaslste of 3 horses, I cows* 8 calves, oae sow, 0 pig* and
about 70 ohtotoas*   Ho alao has a good supply or potatoes.   Suriag
tha winter he built a lag
- 160 acree, of MftM 103 acrea have tot brought under culti-
MtlM -   oauptod by John i-*rrlck aad family* tha original Mttler*
on this
iterrick pleated 93 acres to graia aM narveated 760
bushels of --heat and MO bushels of fMd Mte* M «d» plaatM
6 acres to toon* gran, bfouitht under cultivation 9
9M been -leared ia the previous /ear, aM cleared
ready for ploughing la 1940.   About 7 acrea 99M
thai* is plenty of fMd available for the liveetook,
which oenalata of I horMs, a Mas, 3 onlves, one mw» 0 plga and
about 00 eh.i«k«as*   A fair crop of pototoM was harvested*
- 160 »cres, of which DO acre* have toon brought aader culti-
vatloa*   It is leased to -todsrlck IteotoMll.
the harvest on this far; ^as very poor Ming to tha
dry weather in July,    the oats were nlmoat casplotcly dried out,
only 101 bushels of feed being threshed fro® S3 acres ptoated*
the etoat yield wm 373 buatola of Mo. 9 from 14 *ctm aMded*
About 30 actoa mm auoMrfallowed*    in Mftltta*, 6 acree of lend
that were- cleared in the previoua year ware brought under cultivation, aad anther 90 aores were cleared ready tor ploughing in
1940.
there la aufflctcM feed oa toad tor the livocto-h*
■sb-tob eoaaisto of 3 horses* 4 cows, 4 calves, am sow* 4 plgc and
about 60 chicken.   '£M Mall]  Is in poor clrcumatcaoec.   fho
potato cm,- a__y fair* -37 -
!K3L^»aJSL - ^ •«r*»* of which 158 tore* h*M ben brought uader cultivation - occupied by .vlaxaadar -torrieoa <d*d family, the original settlers*
0* thia farm lift aorea were plaited to grain aM the
of the cultivated laad was surMsrfaltowed.    the crop herpetic 77_ buaheis ef *heet, 610 buatols of oata and 71 buehels
of barley.    Sorrleon also brought under cultivation lb aeroe of land
that had bean cleared la 1M9* *M etoared I acre* ready for ploughing In 1940.
ttoM arc a torMC, ft mm, 7 faftMft* one cm, 9 plga
sM sbMt 69 chickan en the farm, »ith c plentiful npply of hay
aM other feed available*   tMre wac cIm a fair crop of potatoee.
fmm* M - X90 acrea, of which 64
cultivation - MMpied by Hugh 0*9*111 aad family.
the crop on this far* was mrf poor, calf 130 bushels of
do* 9 wtoat nod 910 bushels of feed oats being harvested from 40
acres planted*    the remainder of th* cultivated laad was
fallowed*   the Mttler aim broke 10 aer:** of newly
and cleared ready for ploughing In 1940 another 19
ffmm. the fax*, however, was m email that
the family had to *ppl_, to the aauicipelity ^r relief
winter*
CM cow, 3
feed available,
spring*
M8#i»ta of 3 herns, 4 cms, 3 calves,
90 -hiokea**    It*re ie • good npply of
faaaafto* 9? - loo Mrs:*, of   hioh M
tZneii M9C11*
are
cultivation - leaaM
this **9 harvested 710 buahele of Ho*. 8 and 3 wheat
Md 100 bushels of feed eats fret® 63 mm a planted*   He alao
3 anas te Ma grass,   the remainder of his cultivated land euanrfallee_d,    in addition, he cleared 10 acta* of new land,   this
In reedy for ploughing in 1*40,
,ji 4 sown, 3 calves, 4 *to*p* Me an, 4
plga and about 30 tolokeaa*    .tor* 1* ample feed available.
• 160 acres, of tolto 106 mni have Men brought under lMtt
ration - occupied by Hugh OUMuMe aM family*
Oa tola farm 19 acree were aecdM to wftmt, 40 nres to
oata, 80 mm a to barley *M IS **mc to fsM crops, aM to* main-
der of to* cultivated land wa*
tM yield* amounted to 190 bushel* of to* 9 wto*t, 990
buetole ef lio. 3 oats ato 990 bushels of fMd barley.
the settler sin brought under cultivation 3 acres of
cleared in 1930, ssnd cleared another 10 acres ready for tho
plough in 194  .
He hn 6 hoMee* 4 cove, 3 csIvm, oae cm* 3
atout 90 ohietone.    then is plenty of feed on
of potatoes*
- Ida aores, of which 117 sons have been brought under cultivation • occupied by Ooaald MaeJUsllaa aM family, the original settlers n tola
Maf_ttl*_l planted 48 seres to wheat* 90 aores to oats,
barley and avanatrftel loved the reaatodar of hie cultl-
He harveeted 793 buetole ef He* 1 wtoat, 1300 buMels
ot 90* 9 nts and 150 bushels of feed barley.   He aim brought under
cultivation 5 99PM that had been clsnred in 1990, and
•nttor 30 acres ready for ploa*.hlai In 1940*
He haa 3 horns, 4 cms, 3 mIms, cm sm» 6 pigs aM i, with plenty of hay end other feed oa hand for their node,
H* also tod * goad crop of potatoes.
ijp.. lOd - MO aorea, of which 191 ear** ton now bean brought under
cultivation • occupied by John PmtollM aad family, the original settlers on this
en's crop amounted to 1390 buahele of Ho. 1 wheal
MOO bushels of to. 3 Mts, which won threshed from S3 sens
to the former and 70 nans planted to the lot tor*    the m
ot toe cultivated land wm ewaaerfallowM.   to addition,
this settler brought under cultivation 7 aeres of land that
cleared in toe previous yt»wt Mft cleared another SO aerei
tor ploughing ia Iftlfts
He haa 0 horMc* 98 head of nttla* am an* 0 pigs and
70 chickna, for which he to* plenty aft nay and other toed on hand •
Ha aln had a good crop of potatoes. A*'
The Scottish Immigrant Aid Society.
PROGRSSS R3P0RT
CLANDONALD COLONY
19 3 9. 13,  1940*
.Jeer air I
, .pyy..;  v,-■,.,! -lay,.
the results of toe efforts of the settlers in the
Clandonald Colony in 1939 were tor toe tost pert dlMppointlng*    tith
one or too exceptions, ths crops wars poor and the returns therefrom
mm ojaito laads<pnte to afford toe nttlers such MMMMMj   'the
Mded aren of an land brought under cultivation In the last tow years
had warranted the belief that the settlers in this Colony would soon
be able to .reduce th© indebtedness on their contract* steadily*   the
poor crops harvested this year, when th* expectation wen running
high fcr mm thing bettor, have, ttonfere, had a very disheartening
effect.
the majority of the settlers began their farming
operations In the spring of 1939 with hl#i hopes of having definitely
ranched the turning point*    Turn lend on most of the farms wm well
cultivated aad the urn prepared tor seed waa larger than ia any previous year.   Moreover, the settler* had expectations that prices for
farm products were going to be more profitable to them then they tod
been at any tin sine the Oolony wm established.
'ths cropc were needed under very favourable conditions,    there was an ample MMM •» aolsture In the spring, and
during the first six to eight weeks the grosth of the grnia wm
promising.    In the early part of MM ftMaM lack of rain b*gn to re-
tard growth, but the aropa were not nverely affected until towards the — 3 —
•M of July, when a period of Intense heat bo. an*    this
four ?ieeks, and at the sad of the period all the graia crops had
ferM -evenly,   the stoat ripened pnntorely.    the yield was
although ths quality wm fair.   MM ef the oat aad rye eropa,
ever, sere failure**, the yield being Mry small sad the quality vary
low •
the depressing psychological effect of the failure to obtain the revean the nttlen expected from their crops ia
1933 Sua been felt througtout the Oolony.   -Jany of the unionist* an
oaylag to ttoaaelveat "VMt la the use of trying any mm't   ic can
never -pay for our f arras*':'   this feeling ha* ben accentuated heeann
most of them havs aade an nrnest effort during the lent few years
to bring as amch laad as possible uader cultivation, whloh they expected would pine the® la a position to obtain increasing returns
aore quieiely «ad thus gradually enble thorn to get clear of debt.
their indebtedness now looks more formidable to
MM than ever*    It consists of the original advances for their fame
aad chattel* aad the aoeuiailstad Interest thereon_ taxes paid by the
Company on behalf of the nttlers, mostly during the tint eight years,
sad the internet thereon| subeietenM sad other advances jande through
ths Ooeiety, and hospital, medical, machinery and ottor aecounta which
individual nttlera have Matrcotod directly.    In reesnt ynn net
of the settlers _*M been paying the to current tons regularly,    the
majority of thea have alao pnlft off their seed grain advance® and
substantial payments agalaet ssa&y ottor pncelng obligations. aft*
tM greater part of the clearing and breaking that to*
has had to be i»aid for in onto, the work having gen rally
been too heavy tor the available- horn power and had to be done by
McMMM
Xt would seem that the tin to* con wtoa aympa-
ttotic consideration might Mil be given to mm sane of easing the
poeition of ths Mttlsra ia this Colony ia regard to their ladebtod-
ne*s for land, improvements, chattoIs and suba is tones.   Proposal a regarding then will be nbmltted iandlatoly, vith a rMoasamdatlon
for tMftft consideration.
Aa will be eeen from toe individual nporte which
folios, marked progress was MM in the doMlopmaat of mnt of the
In the Colony.    Several hundred 999M of ne« land aero b*>ut<ht
ir cultivation end may additional areas mm cleared nady for
ploughing in 1940.    'the cultivated land generally has been well wartod,
and the land which was nt ended to crop w«* sumMwrfallowed in aa
orderly aaaner.
the MftftfMfti M the farms ie steadily proving in
nu.-.bern*   the be-'.ter market for livestock and livestock prMuctc has
boon an incentive to toe Mttler* to devote men of their efforts to
the raising of livestock, particularly of piga, Ml if the present
favourable nadition continue, a steady advene la thia direction
may be expected*
In fnt, then are any comforting features about
the position of the PCMltePV ia too Clandonald Colony, and if they
could en a fair possibility of getting clear of debt, there asesas to - , -
bo every reason to be Have they would take heart and be
greater efforts in the future*
the Oeaeral Auditor of this Company is preparing
a atotanat of the npaymnto made en the far** *M chattel*
Into account during the six months ending th* diet MftMfthfti
together with voucher la payment of toe chare of the Hft9M_| of State
in thea* paymeat* will be forvardto by m early anil.
aespeetfully submitted,
Chief Oammisaioner.
(j*m*k* Mcallctor)
the MftVMMI t
Overna -Settta.smt
OamlalOM Of fin*
Oaxton Bonn,
Tothlll Street,
London, S.W.l,
ll imirimu. mmmm s_po.__a of «m Mi'iits m
0010MY.
- 160 aoM-a, of which ItKJ acne hav* a*
cultivation - onupied by William Sawtoe aM family.
thia man has continued to gin the society a lot of trouble.
Hla one haa been tofor* the -debt MJuetownt board in   lborta, aM the
SMlety has mm Mthorlnsd to proceed with the ennMliatloa of hi*
aontrnt, but sea* diffioultie* have arinn to delay action*
He Meded to orop in 1939, 40 nrn of *MM« 30 sons
of oata, 10 nn_ of barley, 10 acne for feed, sad to sumaarfallov
ed about Ift acrea.   Ho refuaad to give the threshing ntura* or to
turn any part of the crop over to th* Society or to e»k* • payment
in ny ottor say. it la- MticwtM that he throated 600 bushel* ot
wtoat, 600 bushels of oats aad 150 bushel* of barley.
* 160 nPPMt of which 104 sens ham mm been brought uader
tint ion - occupied by Charles Brady mid family, consisting of
en persons.
thia man hud a poo. crop la 1939*   He seeded 39
to wheat* 10 mms to oat*, 10 aeres to barley and 14 acres to rya.
Hie total crop amounted to 300 buaheis of vtoat, 100 MaMla of
Mte and 49 bushels of barley, the oats aad toe barley being only
fit for teed*   His potatoea wen also poor aad his vegetable garden
only fair.
lie has 4 eows, 4 calves, I sheep, I horses, a see and. I
plga nft saw Chicken and turkeys.
forty a«r*s were saamorfailossed aad 10 aeroe fall-ploughed.    SWeaty-flve aores of nw load wen cleared ready tor breakiag
next aprlag.   Brady _u paid Mfteftl on hie taxea thia year, but hn
MM n additional payments*   He hn nffiotont feed for his livestock* • ft*
- 160 aores, of which 96 aorea hove no*
cultivation - oeeupled by John SoOonnell and family.
the crop on tola farm wn mor again this year, oaly
640 bushels of wheat end 3b0 bushels of nts having Man harveetod
from * totol of 60 aores seeded to groin in the spring*   thia hn
been very dinppolntlng to too nattier who hoc not ben able to
pay anything on hie contracts, though he has paid hla tone in toll.
6 horses, 4 eowe, 4 calve*, a aow aad 3 pig*
M also ralMd a tarn chickens and turkeys tor horn* uss* Ho ha*
sufflcleat feed on haul for his livestock.
•
Five acrea of new land were brought uader cultivation
during the year and an additional 15 acrea were cleared ready for
the plough*   thirty-five acre* were cumncrfallowed*
- 160   acres, of which 140 aeres hma am man brought
tlvatlon - occupied by Hubert :M*aan nad family, who ssttled on
this far a originally.
the crop on this farm in 1939 amounted to 333 bunfaela
of flheat aM 940 buahele of oata, froa 60 aores ended to toe fornr
and 30 acrea ended to toe latter*   the Mttler aim brought 10 acres
ot a*w land under cultivation, and cleared an additional area of 8
ready for ploughing in the apriag*
He toe 7 horses, 3 cms, 7 oalves, a scar and 10 Mftftt
ir of chickens end turkeys*    th*.* is sufficient feed on
ie *tock.   the pototo nop w*s fair.
■•
. 490 aorea, of which 100 acres havs toon brought under cult 1-
VCtiM*    thia farm is oceupiM by Sen SoOonll a M fasdiy*
MOonll harvested 3130 buahela of sheet, grades Hon.
3, fro;* 90 acres seeded, «nd 813 bushels of fnd oats from
He also cleared 10 acres of we land, and brourht 94
acres of additional MM undar cultivation. r
• 3 •
He toe 4 torna, 4 cows, 4 calves, a sow snd 10 pigs, and
a few chicsen.   So nn plenty of feed and had a fair crop ot potatoes.
the taxes have been paid and a pay-ant on the contract* can be expect-
M when the grain la Marketed.
- 400 acres, of shleh 4? acres are now under cultivation - oo-
eupied by 9m* MaOafforty and family.
'Chin settler in mas^ backward, and to sMme unable to
tea.   Els total orop tola year sea 190 buaheis of
ead 90 bushels of feed oata from a total of M aorea sMdcd.
He sin brought 6 nrse of new land under cultivation, ma 7 acres
ready for the plough in toe coming curing*
He has 4 horses, ,   cowcc 9 calves ?*ad 1 an*   He hoc a;so
a few chickens and turkeys.
MoCafforty Is handicapped by his family of young children.
At th« end of the yMr the tomilysawro reviving relief froa the
oipallty.
- 160 aeres, of which 63 acree have beea btought uader cultivation - occupied by Oeorgc Omallwood aad tastily.
mis is anther bMkward Mttler, wton progree* hn
beea very un*atlaf*ctory.   Ho *Mdod 30 acrea to eheat and 10 acre*
to oat* la the eprine aad hams ted 840 buahele of Meat cad 90
huatols of toed ntc.
He has oaly 3 horses, I 9Mf 1 oalf *&& « tm chicken,
the fcmlly i* on relief. - 4 -
- 160 nres, of which 100 aeres nave ton brought under culti«
on - occupied by MM Charles ;*torty and f*..dly.
A bright feature in connection with toe progress on thin
farm during IM _htoa year has been the breaking of 10 aoroa of mv
land and the clearing of Ift acrea aore ready fcr the plough in   be
•pring.    About 40 acre* sere also
the area seeded to {train accounted to 33 acree in
13 acrea In oats and 10 sort.a la feed crops, and 400 bushels of
sheet and 343 bushels of faed oats were narvested.    there le *mffi«
cint feed n hand for the livestock, consisting of 13 horns, 3
acs?s and I calves, a sow aad 3 pigs and mm chlcMan.
- 180 acres, of which 198 nrea hen been brought under cultivation - occupied by thoman 0«SeiU aM family.
this farm wm mated by 0*Heill and his family In to
aprlng aad no crop we* seeded*   the society is endeavouring to regain posMscion of toe property.
.
form No. 10 - 160 acres, of which 180 acres havs beea brought under **_*!•
vatlon
- occupied by M. lioOeughay and family.
the crop harvested on this far a In 1939 anuatod to 770
butoclc of wheat aad IM buetole of oata, froa 56 mac aMded to
wheat aad SO aeres aeeded to aftftto
the settler haa paid his tana snouting to ;105, tha
lien of #61 and hn a hospital bill of
aim j»de a small pefaaM on his eoatrnt.
On the farm be has 9 horns, 8 ens, 6 ealns, a an,
19 feeders aad a good auator of chicken® and tux-toys, for ehlch to . 9 -
- 16a sores, of which M acres nave toon brought -under cultivate! - occupied by M»rdo lieKianon and family.
MM man nedsd 43 acres to wheat, 10 ears a to oats, 5
sores to barley snd 6 aeres to face crops, and harvested b60 bushels
of wheat aad 200 bushels of teed oata and 30 bustols of teed barley.
He aim cleared 33 acres of an lmd and auaawrfalloweg M
He bruilt a sell addition to his house during tne pet**
He has 7 horses, I cows, 6 calvea, a sow md 8 pigs.
the taxes have beea paid snd at least a emll pay-gent on the con*
treats is expMtod.
fart. M<»* IS - 160 seres, of which 73 acres have beea brought uader cultivation - occupied by Patrick atOambridge sad family*
Most of ths cultivated land was auamerfallewed in 1989,
and only 16 aeres %ere seeded to wheat, ISO bushel* bsiag harvested
there from*    the settler also brought B acres of additional land
under cultivation a_4 cleared IB asrsa, which are ready for ploughing tola spring*
He has 0 horns, 4 cows, 4 coins, a ens and 10 pi s.
H« la p*Fl»9 his taxes, but whether he will alto be able to pay anything oa his ceatroets is <_uMtlc*abl**
-,a L_J___J_- " l'-       ■'    t    -'     MM   II 99999      *•  09M toou. .-t '■-     . >.   -
vatlon - occupied by 9. Hernon and family*
Hernn nedod 40 acres to ga*M crops aad auanmrfnil* @d
of his cultivated laad.   II® harvested Mft buahele of
ma, 9 and. 8 wheat end ISO bushels of feed nts.   He also cleared 10
acres of an laad which are ready for ploughing la 1940.
the orop nftored nverely from drought,    tho garden and
potato eropa were alto pmr, though cutfleient pot-etna acre harvested for the fsunlly node,    thia ntfcler has 4 torna, 3 one, 3 selves,
cae an, 6 pigs and about 46 chicken. - I -
- 160 aorea, ot which 93 mms have been brought andn nlti-
vatlon*   this far.- ton man leased to H* ticOaisn, 3r* aM a* MoOaaa,
Or. on probation.
to -heat, it sores to oats and
10 aores to fMd orope aM 310 huatola of ^toat and 320 buaheis of
oata were harvested,    the settlers aim brought uader cultivation 6
acree of an land, aM cleared 13 ecrea ready for ploughing in the
spring.
they ton 4 torn*, 9 cows, 9 oalves, on mm aM 4 pig*,
there 1* sapie foM on hand*   the tone have been paid, aM a pay*
meat on toe contracts is expected.
ffityAf " ^ »a*»«t of which 9Q aorea have broa brought under cultivation.
this farm le under lease to Allctair _teo9on*ll, who
planted 69 acres to grain and harveatod 280 bustols of Ho* 3 wheat
aM 300 bushels of feed oats, the remainder of the cultivated laad
being aummsrfallowed.    MacOotwll alao.brought under cultivation 8
nroe of newly cleared laad aad cleared anther 19 aeres ready tor
toe plough in 1940*
He ha* 3 borne, 9 cows md ._ calves, on aow, 4 pig*
aM cheat 70 chickenc.   He hac plenty ef feed on hand.   Hie potato
crop waa poor.
.■__iP_.7__.J__ - H; MM** M ton* It MM MM MM MfthftM   -MM valftM
Mtloa.   It le lened to the widn of the originsl nnpnt, ttra*
Barbara Phillips, aM tor son, Iftward.
0a this farm 63 acree were neded to grain crop* and 390
buatole Of Ma• 8 cad 3 wheat and 330 buehels of feed oata wore harveatod*   tea asrea of nw laad that were cleared la 1939 were bxougbt
under cultivation and anther 10 acree were cleared ready tor plough*
lag in 1940*   About 10 acres alftft ware Mamcrfaltowed* A
- 7 -
the livestock nnstot* of I horns and one foal, 4 mm,
4 Mine, one en, 6 pigs nd nbout TO chicken*   sufficient toy aad
other feed are available*    The garden sad potato erope were only fair.
MfCJ been brought under eultl-
1 family.
this nttler harvested 639 bushels of to*. 2 and 3 wheat
390 bushel* of feed oat* from 39 aeres that MM planted to grain,
remainder of the cultivated laad was mmmerfallowed.   About 10
acree of land that 99M cleared in 1939 were brought under cultivation and anther 10 acree sere cleared ready for ploughing ia the
airing of 1940.
the crop was Mixed &f the municipality far taxes sM
had not been released by the end of the year,    there is ample feed
for toe livestock, which conlsfcs of 4 horns and one foal, 3 one,
0 calves, on saw, I pigs and shout 73 chickens.   A Ml crop of
potatoea wa* also harvested.
• 160 acres, of which M acres have been brought under cultivation - occupied by Anthony Mnllcy aad tastily.
thic an had his crop, _s*_uattng to 419 buaheis of Nos.
9 and 3 wheat and 300 bushels of feed oats, nixed by the municipality for taxes*   Etc planted II aores to grain crops and summer fallowed toe reel ef hla cultivated land*   He alao brought uMer cultivation 8 nres of land that to cleared in 1939, aad cleared anther
lb a,rea ready for ploughing in 1940.
He toe plenty of hay aM feed on head for hla liroatock,
whleh cone lata of 4 horne, 3 one, 3 ealroa, an sow, 6 pigs and
stout 80 chicken,    there ess s fair crop of potatoes for the family's .st.^y>jL.A- • II ' MM . s.a. h Mato    am mm MftftftM ftMM MlM«
vat ion - occupied by S*P. Italian and Matt?*
thia an needed 36 acrea to eheat, 14 acre* to
acres to barley aM 6 acre* to other crop*.   He aln
33 acrea, broke 6 acres of newly cleared land and cleared 10 acres
of am laad which are reMy for ploughing In to* spring of 1940.
H* has 6 horses, 3 oows, 3 calves, one sow and 10 pigs,
as wall ss a number of chickens and turkeys, aad there la plenty of
feed oa MM for thorn.   He aim had c fair crop of potatoea*
.-art. Ho. 90 - 390 acree, of which 73 acrea have beea brought under oulti«
vatieu*
»fa* ounan to toe and
of 1939, aad it wn leased to ftliatoir
to summerfallowed the whole of the cultivated land and
alao brought under cultivation 33 acres of now land.   Another If
acree were cleared ready tor ploughing in 19_0.
/apm, 70* ,$. - 930 aoree, of which 93 acres have bna brought uader culti*
vatlon.
this fart, is leased to noderlok MMftUaaj ^ho neded
M sores to wheat, 30 acres to barley and 10 aores to feed crops in
the spring*   His harvest amounted to 339 bushels of wheat and 930
bushel* of feed barley.   Be aln auaiaarfnUowed about 30 aores,
broke 10 aores of ae»ly cleared land and cleared 10 acres of new
land, which area is ready far ploughing   in the spring of 1900.
His stock consists of I horses, 3 cows, 3 oalves, 9
stoop* one an, to plga and one chickens*   there is ample toed on
hand for the livestock*   He alao had a good orop of potatoea for
hla on needs* - ...
_>
fttS. Hfti
,,...
- 160
acres,
of whloh 111
scree
have been brought uader culti-
vatlon - occupied hy Michael JevlM.
this nttler ended 33 acres to wheat, 10 acres to ntc
and 6 acres to fnd crops In the spring and harvested 930 buahele of
wheat end 300 buaheis of feed oats*   He also aamnrfallMCd about 40
aorea, broke 6 acre* of newly cleared land and cleared 1   acres, -hida
are ready tor ploughing in tha spring.
He haa 3 horses, 7 oows, e cnlvss, one no* end 6 pigs,
besides e number of chicken and turkaye*   this an to* ban handicapped by having toavy hoepital and doctor*e bills to pay.
Perm So. 99 * 160 acres, of which 69 acrea ere aow under cultivation •
 leassd by J* A* _&oi*Uae aad family.
Iron 49 acres seeded to grain crops, 300 bushels of Ho**
I and 3 wheat, 930 buaheis of fsed nts and 33 bushels of feed barley
were harvested on this farm,    the remainder of the cultivated land
was aumaarfallowed.    In addition 3 acree of newly cleared land wer*
brought under cultivation, and | acres were cleared ready for plonking la 1940*
Plenty of hay and feed is available for the livestoek,
which constats of 4 torses, 4 eo*e» 4 oalves, one sow, 7 pigs and
about M ehiaksac.   there was aln a fair orop of potatoea.    this
family la in very poor circumstances.
■ 94 - 3S0 acros, of which 190 nres tovs aow toon brcurht uader
cultivation - occupied ny MM Sate Hertoe and family.
On this farm 1093 buaheis of MM were harveetod from
70 tares seeded aM 700 bushels of fnd oats from 30 nrea aeeded.
About lb acres were aim aeeded to feed ©rope* 68 aorea eumnrfallov-
ed aad 40 acres of am land were cleared ready tor ploughing in 1940*
there are a horses, a mm, 5 ealros, a eoe   tod 9 plga*
13990 toe bnn paid m tons*    sosae household, -ootor's end grocery •10 -
bills have to be paid. It is expected, towevM, that a
meat on the natraote will be taade.
Faru Up*, gfe - 100 acres, of rhioh 13 acres are now under cultivation.
this farm is lesssd to Ooaeld PmcrhM, who ended 10
acree to »heat aM 10 nroe to feed oron in the spring of 1939*
he harveeted only 210 buaheis of wheat* In addition to sur_»r-
falloaed 98 asree aad cleared 3 acres 'of aew laad ready for the
there are 4 horns, 3 cms, 3 calves, one see aM 9
pigs, as sell as a nuober of chickens end turkeys* Plenty of hay
feed is available.
far* Ha* M * 160 aeres, of wfclM 56 acrea toVe beea brought under culti-
About 30 acres were ended to wheat and M acree to
nte* the harvest amounted to IN buahele of wheat aM 998 buaheis
of oata* fen acrea of a*w land were- cleared ready for ploughing
ia the spring of 1940.
'this farm has been operated Jointly with farm Me 89*
m - 380 acros, of which 148 nroa have too brought uader cultivation - occupied by MM MeOaulay aad family*
0a this faraa 60 acrea wen planted to *MM| ~3 acres to
Mt* and iseere- to feed erop»i m&  340 buaheis of -tost and 140 -11
bushels of feed nts MM threshed,    About 16 Mrs* ef it* land sere
cleared ready for ploughing in the spring of 1940 and 6 acres ef
anly cleared land «*ro brought under oultlvatlon*
livestock nasi etc of 0 horns and E ouita. g oowc,
_ calves, one sow and 0 pis*, «*ad a number of chicken and turkeys,
'-her* ia plenty ot feed available tor the llv**toek*   a good crop
of petotoee »« aim hameted*   f74*09 ton
Of MMM*
_ - 160 acres, of which 131 acne ton baen brought uader culti*
vatln - occupied by the original eettlera on this farms   l&ehni
O*0onnr and family*
thia mm harveatod 490 bushels of to* 3 VMM end 300
bushels ef feed oats froa 47 acres planted*   He suanrfallowed the
rent of his nltlvated laad aad llPamftM under the plough la aorea
of lend cleared in 1936, aad cleared 10 additional 99188*
He ha* 4 horns, 4 cost*, 3 calves, one 9Ma 4 pig* and
a number of ehietoa**   there ia askpis feed oa hand, aad n good crop
of po totem were dug*
Wm M %jm acres, of shlch 901 999*9 have been brcaftht under caltt-
vatlM - oeeupied by toe original family, <_»• Hal* Mag-Ulan and
fantip*
from 13_ aeres HlMi lb_o Mahal* of whnt, 630
bushels of fMd Mte ead 449 bushels of feed barley wore &arveat-
ed*   'Has wet of toe mltivntod land was su*a*rtol_J*rM| 6 acres
of newly cleared land were brought under the plough and 13 aor-s
of additional land were cleared.
the iiVMtoak nnsi*t* of 16 horses, 1ft cna,   I c-ilv**,
l.i stosii, 9 ac*s* la plga, M chicken and a fw turkeys*   there is
on
— -13 -
A mw wwU wm bored on this farm in 1939 at a
|73*00*   Ottor bills requiring payment total    ,bOj aad taxes asscunt*
lag to  il93 have bnn paid*    A payment on ths contract and chattel
is alec expected.
a, of which 160 aorea have toea brought uader cultl-
led by the original eettlera on tola farm!   John
Mac liian and family.
at aoree ned*d oa this farm in the spring, 719
busbela of  Siaat, 630 buaheis of feed Mte aad 960 bushels of feed
barley were harvested.    About 96 aorea of aewly cleared land were
broicen aM 10 additional acres were cleared ready for ploughing in
to* spring of 1940*
the cottier* alao tod a good crop of potatoes, and have
sufficient fMd on hand for thalr liveetook, nnsisting of 9 hoi
md 3 foals, 10 stoop, 99 toad of nttle, 2 ana sad id plga,
chickens.    1198*85 have been paid In taxes.
- 160 acres, of which 73 nrea have been brought under tolti-
this fans is aMcr lease to   ntrick Ousaok.
"ram 43 acree ended on this farm, 337 buetole of wheat
and 846 bushels of feed oat* were harvested.    About 5 acres ef newly
cleared laM sere brought under the plomdi Md 13 aoree of additional
laad were cleared ready for ploughing in 1940*
the Mt ler bad a pood crop of potatooe aM has caple
feed on band for his llvsetoek, which ooaaiats of 4 horMs, 2 case,
9 calves, on sow, 4 pigs tod a few ehtokeae.   Me has paid a year*a
itiag to  ...42,00. - 13 -
rM* wo* 32 - 169 acree* of which 80 aeres have toon brought under cultivation - occupied by toe original rot tiers, M*J* Kclley end thmlly*
this nttler is not maklag any progress, and en effort
to get hie mntrnot cannUed, tot without a&y
He planted abnt 90 come to orop In th* spring, but
only harvested 190 bushels of tie* 3 wheat*   H* ha* only on horn,
too cows, a calf and • fm chicken*   there are aln young children
in the family.
- 160 aero*, of which 93 acree Mm been brought under cultivation - occupied by Donald .Macintyre md family.
this nttler sesftM 64 acres in toe a rim- and thresh* d
900 bushels of wtoat and 400 bushels of feed oats* to aln cleared
10 aeres of laad ready for the plou h in 1940 and plou hod 9
which tod been cleared in 1938.
le mfflateat feed oa hand for the lives toe:, Mft
coneiats of II horns, too oows, I calves, one on snd a tew chickenu*
Paclntyre is paying his taxes for 1999 snd will try to .*M a payment
on hla contracta*   He haa had to pay 733.00 on noount of a hospital
bill*    There was a fair crop of potetom*
•
fcj* So. 34 - IM nrea, of which ,118 acres have been brought under cultivation - neupiad by James Devlin aad family*
From 31 aores seeded, this man narveetod 430 bushels of
wtoat aad 460 bustola of oata.    the rsat of th. cultivated lend wm
suaawrfallavM, 3 aoree ot newly cleared land were ploughed and 10
acres of additional land were cleared ready for ploughing In tbe
spring of 1940*
there la sufficient feed on hand for the livestock, - 14 -
slating of I horses, 14 head of cattle, | sows, XZ pigs and about 60
chickens.    MM Mttler made hotter progress ia 1939 than ia tha previous years, and hie prospects are now aore hopeful.
vatlon - occupied by the original Mttlera,  Alex* Monk and family.
thia settlerto orop was very poor.    Only 100 buahel* of
stoat aM -00 bushels at feed oats were harvestod from 41 acres planted*   the net of toe cultivated lead *oa NHMMalined.    In addition
about 8 acres of umly cleared Iato were broken aM 13 acrea of
additional laad were clearod ready for the pi4
Aapls fssd is on haM for the linstock, conlatlag of
9 horna &nd 9 fonts, 13 toad of cattle, 4 aheap, Me sow, 6 pigs
of ehiekonn*    there iu a fair crop of
to tiie houn during toe
Kara He* 36 - 160 mres, of whloh 30 acres have beea brought under niti-
vntlon - occupied by Laohlaa uueSell aad fatally*
this man continues to make very poor progress, being
handicapped to a great extoat by shortage of horn power.   Hia crop
in 1939 amoantod to Ml bushels of Ho* 8 wheat threshed from 30
acrea seeded*   He ulm cleared 10 aeres of mm lana ready for
ploughing in 1940*
the liveetook conlsta of 3 hems, 9 oows, 3 calves,
stoop, en pig and a few chicken,   there waa a fair crop of
wtmwaamuamMamwamamm -
• 10 -
j-ar.u .\Qyft7 - 160 acrea, of uhtoh 05 acrea hav* now bsea brought under
aultlvatton - occupied by John _teo0cugall aad family, toe original
Mttiers on this
this nttlsr smaaerfalined the whole of his nltinted
land In 1939*   He aim cleared lb acres of new lead rotoy for to*
plough in 1940*
Ha haa 3 home, 3 erne, 3 calvee, I cheep* on soar, 9
pig* Md c few chickens*    there is ample feed on nand*   He aln had
a fair crop of potatoea*
thia nam cannot aato mmh progress as long an M con-
to to chart of horn pc*M\i
farm to. m - 160 aores, of which ao seres ham toss brought under eulti-
vatioa - lened to Angus -Monk, who pleated M acres to wheat aad harvested 30O bushels,    the remainder of the cultlmted laad ma summer-
fallowed,   leak also ploughed 10 9MM of mm laad that eon cleared
in 1939, aad cleared anther 19 acres ready for the plough in the
spring of 1940*
4 horn*, 3 eowe, 3 calves* oae sow aM 86 chic
too nffiei-nt feed on hand.
• 160 acres, of which 70 acres have been brought under cultivation - occupied by > atrlek
bout 60 mmc won M*ded and 40
Eh* hcrvest amouated to Ml bushels of ?;toat end 930
of onto*   fifteen acrea of new land ser. cleared ready for
in 1940*
fhls man hn 4 horns, 3 cows, 3 calves, oae am and M
Is has sufficient feed on hand* Id -
-'era ^*j_M - Ml MMM* M MftM   1 89PM MM MM MM M MM culti.-
v*tlon - occupied by IP nola Monghan and family,
fpoa W aoree coeMd by temngnm ia the epring, he ter-
VMtod blO buaheia of Horn, 8 sM 3 wheat, 430 bushel* of feed nts
aad 300 buahele of toed barley*   He ale > put up m ample mpply ot
faed for hie livestock md a fair stock ef petatoss fcr hie family.
Xhe llvestnk nnists of 6 horns* 14 toad of oattle,
cm cow* 8 plga aM a _na_**r- of ehleto-a*.
• 190 mm*, *f which 99 mren ar* no* under cultivation *
mr\m   •—aa**esa»'^w    sy-^s.*1^*^********   **a*e*   watrnmamm-^   jaaFisrav*
this man harveeted 733 butoelc ef wheat, grading? Ho. 9,
a total of 43 acre* planted*   He aln brought uader the plough
14 aores of land that were cleared in IMS, aad cleared 19 additional
aorea ready for ploughing in the epring of 1940.
He had a good gardea aad harvested a fair crop of
potatoea*    -here ia plenty of feed oa hand for the livestock, consisting of 4 horses, 3 cows and 3 calms*   this naa'e work on tha
farm in 1939 waa maxy satisfactory*
Para MMJH * 190 seres, of which 60 eeros hav* besa brought under cultivation.
this torn Is leased to 0* Tonr, who planted 4b acree
to crap aM harveeted 700 buaheis of wheat*   Be also brought under
cultivation 16 acree whloh tod been cleared la 1938, and uunaer*
failowM 9 aoroa*   Ha haa 7 heroes and 1ft bead of cattle, with
sufficient fMd on hand for them*    An offer made far the pureton
Of this farm for each la receiving con*ideratioa. • If *
- 160 acres, of which 93 nres nam
cultivation - nnpied by Jans c-umos: and
nt tiers on this farm*
this settler seeded a total of 78 nrea, fro- tmieh he
harveeted 790 buahele at wheat, grMiag Hoc* 9 and 3, Too bushels
of 9a* 8 Mta* aM 190 buaheia of fnd barley,   to nuamrfallomd
toe root of to* cultivated land, broke 6 acrea of na^ly clearod
MM and cleared SO acre* which are ready for the plough in toe
epring of 1940*
Ho tod a fitted gardm aM a fair crop ef potatoes, and
hM vuffielmt feed for hie llveotoek, consisting of 7 borne, 4
a, 3 calves, M rows, 18 pig* sad a number of chickens.
- 160 acres, with 83 acrea under cultivation - occupied by
r/ilma and family, the original settlers oa this fe
this settler harveeted 609 bushels of wheat, grading
Sob* 3 aM 3, 390 bushels   of feed nto and 910 bushels ef barley
from 69 nr-a planted,    the rest of his cultivated land wan aaatl
fallomd.   He aln cleared 10 acrea of new land which ar® reedy
for ploughing in th* epring of 1940*
Hie garden and potato orop wore fair*
feed for hie livestock, which consista of 6 horeoe, 3 cms, 3 oalves,
on mv, 4 plga aad * fn chicken.   M built m additional granary
in toe fall*
farm So. 46 - 390 acrea, of which ISO acrea have bMa brought under culti*
vatlon - occupied by John : eConvllle and
thia nttler tod 133 acree seeded to crop aM harveatei
8*0 bushel* of Moo. a and 3 wheat* 780 bustola of Ho. _ oats*   He
auwmrfallowed the remainder of hla eultlvutod land, broke 10 cores
of v*wly clearoft land aM clearod m additional 10 acrea ready for
ploughing la the spring M 1940. He toe plenty of feed on toad for hiu lira*cook and tod
a fair gardm, ith a goad crop of potatoes* His liveetook nnisti
of 7 horses, IA toad of cattle, I sow*, 14 pigs *M n aaator of chi
baring the answer he built a log bam.
• 160 acrea, of which 99 eerec ar* nos under cultivation -
occupied by _*uglM Maarda aM family, the original set lors oa
tola tarn*
thic mm waa very bnkRard in hie farming operations fcr
year*, but to appear a to have to*a Mking better progress* dud n.
.ue last two years*    la 1939 to aeeded 3d sores to wtoat, 16 acrea
to oata, ? acrea to barley aM 3 acrea to fnd crops*   His harvest
accented to 380 buaheia of wheat, grading Boa* 3 and 3, 310 bush* s
Of oata, Ho* 3, aM 90 bushels of fMd barley*   He haa aim aaple
feed on tend for his livsstock and a MM eupply of potatoes for
hie ItoaUp.
the livestock consists of 4 horses, 6 toad of oattle,
one em, 3 plga end a ausaber of chick ns.
j arm aW 47 - 160 acres, of which 90 acres hnve aow toon brought under
cultivation - occupied by Ooaald MacLeod and family, toe or! tool
Mttlera on tola farm*
70 ncrea seeded, -faotood harveeted 908 buetol* ef
No* a sheet and Ml buaheia of No* 3 Mta*   He aum»rfallowed about
13 acre® of cultivated laad and cleared to nres of aew land ready
for the plough In 1940*   He aim mt mfficient hay ead other feed
for his livestock, and he* a good Capft-f of potatoes tot his family.
the livestock nnsists of 4 horns* 6 cms, 8 calves,
10 pigs and a number of chicken*. -  X-J   -
So._ 4» - 160 acras, of whicn 86 acres are under cultivation - ocouolM
by Laehln MnLellan and fanily.
This man planted 60 nres to orop and mmnerfallows,;: tha
of hi* cultivated land.   He tormstod 969 bushels of stoat
407 buaheis of fnd oats.   He cleared 19 acree of an innd reMy
In 1940.
Me toe sufficient fnd oa hand for his llvei
nnsists of I horses, 9 cows, 4 calves, on an* 3 plga and a
chieksM.   This «*n Is act making mry fact progress, hut to Ma
better in the last two ysars then previously.
.
- 160 acres, of ?.hieh M nroe have now town broui&t under
ivation - occupied by fhoasaa Conlon aM family, tha original
of thia farm.
this son had a raey poor vfav la 1939, harvsstiag only
10b bushels of Ho* Z wheat and IbO bushels of No. 3 oata from a total
of 36 acres pleated in the spring.   HO ewmerfailwto 14 nres and
cleared 10 nres of new land ready tor pioughin   in the spring of
1940.
a* I* makiag poor progress, being handicapped to a large
extent by having too little horn oner.    He ton plenty of feed on
sM also tod a good crop of potatoes.
His llvestocK consists of 2 horse*,   2 ocas,  a Mlvcs,
mm and about 60 chick.-no.
Fcrm Ho,* 80 - 160 acres, of which 1C0 acres ars under euitlvatim*
This farm was surrendered in toe spring by th* original
©acupanta, John   a torsoa and family.
It %m then leased to John Foy, who sutanartal lowed the
Of toe cultivated land*    He aim cleared 10 acre* of am retoy for ploughing in 1940.    there are 4 toreea, 3 erne, 3 calve a,
one aow, 6 plga and a few ehlckenn*    the leans haa plenty of feed
tor hla stock*
PI - 160 acrea, of   hioh 93 aoroe have been brought under culti*
vatlon - Q-Cupl-d by Jama _*rtin nd family, -tho ori iaal act % len
on thl* farm*
artln eeeded M acres   nd harmatod 300 bushel* of ftp*
9 wheat, 300 buetole of feed oat* aad 300 buaheis ef feed barley*
M auomsrfallowed about 10 acres and cleared 10 nres of new land
ready for the plough in 1940*   He etos put up anfflctont feed for
hla livestock aM toft a fair crop of potatoea*
He haa 8 horna and one foal, 16 head of Mttle, one
cm* 8 plgc aM about 80 ehlckenn*   He built n new Mdltion to hla
Mum 90* s 16* during the year*
■•UV   ...-■._._ ,;     -   lift   999*9f   ■      mmmmmm   I      MMM   Ml    Ml   MftM   C .S tPa S, L ..:    -
occupied by Jama a Kir*la and family, the original nttlere on this
farm.
thia man only harveeted 9M buahele of He* 9 wheat,
181 buaheis of «eed oata   nd Iftft bushels of feed barley froa a
total of 7b aoree ended*   ft* eu _*ntllowM about 10 acres, broke
8 acres of nwly cleared iopntt *M cleared 10 additional acrea
ready for ploughlag ia the sprin.- of 1M0*   He to* plenty of
feed on toad for his livestock ead has a good crop of potato**
stored*
His livestock consists of 9 horns nd 9 foals, 16
MM of oattle, one cow, 6 plgn aad about 90 chickens,    lie oon-
atruotod a log building duria   the year. -91-
So* 30 - 380 eeres, of which 96 seres are no* under cultivation -
MMpled since 1930 by Joderiek
IMa ram ended 68 ccrec «M harvested 330 bushels of
Ho. 3 wtoat aM S9b bushels of feed oats.      the reminder of hie
cultivated land was summerfallowM*   Ha aim broto - aoree of newly
clearod land, and clearod la addition I   aores of new lead read,,
for ploughing la 1940*
die liveetook oonelsts of 4 toross, 8 toad of mttle,
C*s mw, 4 pig* md shout 60 chiekonn*   He put up ample toed for
th* stock aM ha* n goad cuppiy of potatoes for his family need*.
our lag to* year a am granry was built.
».tubfi - 160 nsrea, of «hlch M aores top »»8 MMMf cultivation.
this farm I* leased to Peter Macauley, who planted 43
acres to wheat nd oate, harvesting? 310 bushels of Ho* 3 wtoat and
990 buatola of oata.   Ha aln cleared 16 mres of new land, which
are ready for the plough In 1940, and sux«s»rfallowed about 13 ncree.
thia am ankle very tpoer progroaa during ton toaure of
hla leeae aM moated the farm In Uovenfeer.
. 160 aoree, of which 116 acrea have bma brought under cultivation - occupied by 9n, Hary Macauley and fawily, the original paftm
tlere on this farm*
thia family harvested 630 buaheis of Nos* 8 aid 3 wtoat,
nd 900 buaheis of feed oate froa M nres planted*   the rest of
ths cultivated land a** *uin»rfallowM.   About 18 aoree of aow laid
were cleared ready for ploughing In 1940*   there mm n fair crop of
potetoes, Md sufficient feed cor the livestock was put up.
the livestock consists of 5 horns, 9 cos a, .;. calms,
on sm, six pigs, and 60 chickens.    A uaall log building -.'as ersct-
M duria*. the winter. Farm Ho. M - 190 acrea, of   hloh lib acree arc am under cultivation -
occupied by Artole mnk ant faisliy, the original settlera on this
aa- ..
plan tod M tore a to grain and harvested 900 bushels
ef Ho* 1 wheat, X9Q buaheia of MM oata end 66 bushels of food
ley*   He aln put up s good supply of feed for his llvaatook, snd
tod * fair crop of potatoea*    About 63 aorea were aumsaerfallowed,
9 acre* of aewly cleared land brou ht under cultivation aM 9
additional acres of now land cleared ready for ploughing in 1940*
the liveetook oonsists of 4 horns, 7 cows, 4 calves,
>» 3 pigs nod about 90 abloh>as»
Para lip. ff7 - 330 aoree, of whicn 134 acres ham now been brought uader
cultivation - oonpied by Frank bradley and family, the original
nttlers on t is farm.
thia mm** dealings with the soaiety ham been far
Mtlsfaetory, but there does not mem to to any proMcc of law by
which he can bo mmpalled to fulfill hie obligation or to vanto
the far-,    this year to had 96 acrea in crop and harveeted 300
buetole of »o* 9 wtoat, 600 buaheia of feed oats md 33 bush*Is
of feed barley*   He ea_e*rf&llow*d too remainder of hla cultivated
land, brought under cultivation 4 cores of newly broken laad aM
cleared 10 additional acres ready for ploughing in 1940*
Bradley has I  horns, 7 cows, 4 oalves, 3 mat*, U plga
ftnd about 70 ehieto*-N
FCC* HO. 99 * 160
cultivation*
63 nrea have
the farm was rented to .- atrlok tacMy, Jr., aad he
eeedod 6 aoras to wtoat, 30 acres to oats ate 3 acres to teed
crope*   II* harvested 00 bushels of m, I wtoat aM 639 bushels
of Mo* 3 mis*   About M acres were oummrfallowed, 3 nres of arnly olecred land brought under cultivation, and 10 aores of am
laad cleared ready tor ploughing,
fto livestock coasistc of 4 torn*,      oowa, 3 calves,
cnc cow aad 6 plga*   there is ample fnd on hand, as well a* a fair
crop of pototoM*
Farm So* M - 160 aorea, of which 0J acree tore am been brought under
oultivation - occupied by lira. Mary Morrison t*d faaily, the original
oooapante of this farm*
IM* M acres soeded, arc* Harrison harv.stsd 307
bushels of wtoat, 70 bushels of oats, 113 buetole of barley and
79 bushels of feed -grain.   About M acres were aummrfallowed |
19 acrea of newly cleared land were brought under th* plough aad
6 additional acres were cleared ready for ploughing ia 1940.   the
yield ef grain was very poor.
there ia ample feed oa hand tor the livestock, MM
elating of 4 norma, 7 oowa, 6 oalvea, oae aow, 6 plga aad a auaber
Of chicken*.
Farm Ho. 60 - 160 acres, of which 101 ncrec ham been brought uader cultivation - occupied by atriek taeeey aad family, the original eetttor*
on this farm*
tassey*s harvest amounted to 910 buaheia of Mea. 8 aM
9 wtoat, 100 bushels of feed oat* and S90 bushels Of teed barley,
whloh mam threshed from 90 nres seeded.    About 10 acres were
ccteawrfailowed and sa acres of ace land were cleared ready for toe
plough*   faaaey elm put up a good supply of feed for his liveetook
aad tod a fair crop of potatoes.
Bus livestock consists of 6 horn*, 3 oowa, 3 calves* 9
19 pigs aad about 70 chickens• - . -
- 160 acree, of which ioO
tivatioa - occupied by John Logn aM tastily, the original settlers
his fans.
About 40 cores were sMtod to   heat, 99 acres 1
>s to barley aM a seres to feed crope*   the harvest
to 900 bushels of wheat* grafting tos. 1 aad E* 987 bushels of Ho. 3
oata aad 190 buetole of fnd barley.    Logan   too aursaerfallowed aboul
16 aores aM cleared 1 ■- acres ef am land ready for ploughing in the
epring.
,'
He has 5 horses, 7 head of cattle* 3 cove, 10 plga and
90 tolek-na.   He has aiaple feed oa hand fcr hla atock,
aloe a good supply of pctotoes.
1-160 nres, of which 94 ccroc torn aow bssn brought
cultivation - occupied by   strict Ooyle and family,  the orlgtoal
Mttlers on this farm.
M   Mttler MincclM I pvM amp*     9** ■ totol of M
aorea needed, only 430 bushels of wheat aad 300 Mahals of oats were
nervested.    About    I acres were aumraerfallowed. sad 10 acrea of newly clearod laad «?ero brought under the plough ready for aeeftlag In
1940*
the llmatock nnietc of 6 torse*, 7 cows, 6 aslPCBi
i» 10 plga and a number of ohloton and turkeyn.    thsrs la
- 160 acres, of which 100 acres have torn brought under ouiti-
vatioa • occupied by Alexander MacOocukld Md wife*
m acrea neded, moaonald harveeted 660 bushel.
Ho* a wheat and 307 buaheia of feed oata.   iii a barley mm com-
pletcly dried mt.   He caeaaarfalined 6 aoree nd clearod 8
of nw lead ready far the plough in 1U40.
He had a fair orop of pctotna nd to* plenty of feed
for hla livestock, mnistlag of 8 herns, 7 on®, 6 calves,
anr* 6 pigs md about 60 chicken,    -the grain crop was very dli
appointing* so. 64 - 160 acres, of which 49 aorea have been brought under culti -
vatlon.
M Roderick IfeeHell,
•Mat from 3ft acres planted*
they also auaoerfallomd 9 aores, ploughed 3 aores of lead that
mre cleared in 1939, and cleared 10 additional nres whloh are
rctoy far the plough la 1940.
they ham pleaty of feed far
lag of 4 horns, 8 cms, a calves, mm am, 6
chi, ken.
Fern fto. 66 - ISO acres, of which r  aoroe have
sultlvatlon - occupied by John kteetoil and family, toe original Mttler s on this fans*
M*N*il neded 63 acres and harveatod 400 bushels of
wheat* grading Mm* 9 and 3, Uft buahele of fnd oats, 160 buaheis
of feed barley*   He elm brought under cultivation 6 acres of astfty
ol-.ared land, cleared 10 nres ready tor the plough In IM0 aM
about 30
M to* 6 horn*, ead on foal, 13 head of eattla, ene
am* 3 pigs and about 30 chicken*   there is plenty of fnd available for the stock, aM a fair crop of potatns were dug*
* 190 scree, of which 9   acrea ham mm
tivation - occupied by ftomaa Joy aM fteslly,  toe original nttlero
on this farm*
from 3b acres seeded, 403 buahele of Mo* 9 wtoat end
300 bushels of feed oata were harvested.    Ma reaaiadar of toe
cultivated lend mm suaaerfalined, snd lb nres of mm lend were
cleared ready for ploughing in 1940*   the nttler alao harvested
a fair crop of potatns and put up a gnd supply of fnd for his
stock*
livestock consists of 8 horns, 6 cows, 4 calms, • 99 *
6 pig* and about M chicken*.
* 160 Mres, of MMM M aer_a asm been brou,,;ht
vatlon • onupied by   -tor _feuuekia aad family,  the original nttlsrs
this farm.
thin man harveeted 704 buetole of wtoat, 309 buaheia of
oats sad 133 bushel* of barley from a total of 61 aorea aeeded*
bout 34 acrea were summer fallowed, 13 acres of newly cleared land
ploughM, and 8 Maitioaal aoree cleared ready tor plou.hin..  In
1940.   there ie ample feed on hand for the livestock, consisting
of 6 horns, 6 one, 6 calvae, I eows and 36
- Ida acres, of   Pieh 71 acree have toon brought wader cultivation - occupied by John scSitlivray aM family under agreement of
sale since toe let Soroaber, 1937,
83 acree seeded to grain, 600 bushels of No. 9
3 JO buetole of feed oats and 100 bushels of fnd barley
harvested*    ,-teOllllvray eaanorfallmed the remainder of his
cultivated land and cleared 13 aoree of new land ready for cultivation In 1940.
ths liveetook consists of 6 horses, 3 one* 9 mlvee,
oae em* 6 pig* and about 60 chlcknas.    the aattlsr has plenty of
feed available*   He also harveatod a fair crop of potatoes.
fat* ho. 69 - 160 aores, of ^hleh 80 aores Save Men brought uader cultivation - occupied by Jans Oraat nd family, the original settlers.
Ix hundred and fifty buetole of toe. I aad 3 «h**t, * 97 -
Is of food oata sad 100 bushels of feed barley were thresb-
ed on this Mi froa a total of 70 aores essded to graia.    the remainder of the cultivated land was miasmrfallowed and 8 acre* of am
land w*r* alaared ready to be brought under mltivetlon in 1940.
Si" livestock nnslets of 4 horns, 3 mws, 3 calvesi
on sow and about 30 chickens.    Inere la plenty of feed m hand.
A good crop of potatoes was aim harvested.
- 160 aeres, of whloh 67 acres have town brought under cultivation - occupied by John MeoOoaald*
of this farm took over after the
death or hia mother, :*rs. \rxon maJJomXH at the end of 1930*   He
seeded 39 acree to grain and aummsrfallowed the remainder of the
cultivated land*   fto harvest amoaatod to Ml bushels of Ma* 9
and I wheat, g « bushels of iaM oats aad 150 toehale of fnd barley.   Mniioaald aln cleared 16 *cree of now land which are reedy
for the plough in 1940.
the livestock con lata of 6 horns, 7 cms, 3 calms,
on sow and sbout 73 chicken,    mere is plenty of toed available^
IIQ. 71 - 390 a&ra»t of which 164 acres ban toon hrou^to actor cultivation - occupied by -otor Hoyonald end fesaily, th* original ntfciers
on this farm.
' tetMft neded 101 acres to grain aad harveeted 760
bushels of Hoe* Z md 3 wheat, 400 buaheia of feed oats end 90
bashela ef feed barley.   He auianrfallowed about 60 acrea, brought
19 acres of newly cleared land under cultivation, and clearod an
addition! |ft nres ready for plougaia*.  in i960*   He aim harvested s fair crop of potatoes for his family needs auto put up enough
toed for his llveatoek, which camlets of I horns, 9 nee, 4 oalvea,
one an, 9 pigs and stout 60 chicken* - Ida pftMfti of which 69 acrea have been brought under culti*
vatlon.
occupied it sinn the 1st January, 1939, and it wm leased to MftM
MhhllM, who neded 9- acree to wheat, 13 acres to nta md waaer*
faUowed the rest of ths cultivated land*    the harvest amounted to
230 buaheis of No. S wteat aad 390 bushels of fesd oata.   He aim
cleared 10 acres of new land.
the liveetook eonsieta of 3 horns, 8 cows, oae self,
sn md about 40 chicken, for which there is sufficient feed
on hand.
Far* Ho. 73 - 160 acrea, with 99 aorea uader cultivation - occupied by
rincent ilialnl and family, the original mttl*re oa MIC farm.
From 93 nres seeded to grain, Minisci harvested 960
bustols of to* 3 wtoat aM 910 buahele of feed oats*    to summr-
fallowed about 93 aores and cleared |ft aeres of atff laM roady for
ploughing in the *pring of 1940.
the livestock coaaist* of 3 horses, 3 cms, 3 calves,
on sow and 3 pigs,   there is «_pie feed available*    tha grain orop
was badly dried out.
Farm Mo. 74 - 160 acres, of which 64 acrea have bna brouiiht under cultivation, leased to Frank MlMllnM from toe 1st January, 1940*
Stalholland plaataft 37_r nres to grain and harvested 813
to hole of Me* 1 wheat and 960 bushels of feed oata*   the remainder
of the cultivated land was M_mrfallMad| 3 nres of aawly cleared
land were brought under toe plough, and 18 additional acres were
cleared ready tor ploughing in 1940.
the livestock consists of a. horses, 4 cove, 9 calves, 3
sheep, one sow sad about 70 chickens.    Ihe eettler has nfficlent
feed on band for the livestock* - 99 -
ffong i%tH ?>. * iS31 acrea, of which 94 acree have man brought under cultivation - occupied by Mft* Jessie MM md family.
Me. Mcshee hna tod thin plan under lease since the spring
of 1938*    In 1939 *to had 43 aarea seeded to grain and harvested 640
bushels of Mm 9   MM and 130 buaheis of toed oata*   the remainder
of the cultivated land waa summerfallowed, IS mama of mwly cleared
land were brought under the plough, aM 10 acres of additional lend
cleared ready for ploughing in 1940.
there ia plenty of fnd on hand for toe livestock, which
consists ol S horns, 13 head of nttle, on aow, 4 plga and 43 chickens.
Faro aa*. 76 - 380 aeroa, of which 167 acres have Men brought uader cultivation - mm pied by John Macintyre end family, the original nttlers
on this farm*
#rea a total of 190 acrea aeeded to grain, S&olatyre
harvested 1O60 buaheis of wtoat, gradiar Nos. 1 aM 9, and 1130
bushels of oats, grading Ho* 3 0***    Ths remainder ef his cultivated
land was suswarfallowed.   He also brought uader cultivation 5 aoree
of laad that were cleared in 1938, and cleared 10 additional aorea
ready for ploughing in 1940.   He had a good crop of potatoee md
put up suffiei nt food for hi* livestock.
the livestock consists of 0 horns md on foal, 19
of mttls, am Mte* • fnders and about 100 chickens.
ram Ho. 77 - 390 nres, of which 196 mr®& tore been brought under culti-
vatlon - occupied 9^ &lexandsr HMWll.iM and fatally, the NntftftMt
settlers on this farm*
anilUn seeded 190 acres to grain aad harveatod ?S9
buaheia of wheat, So. 3f 300 buaheis of feed nts and 110 bushels
of feed barley, tto reminder of the cultivated land MM aufmaer-
fallofied. Be aln clearod |ft aeres of um land ready for ploughing la the spring of 1940.   He hn plenty of feed for his livestnk
nd n good supply of ^totoes*. the liveetook nnelste of 11 toraae and 9 foals* 99 toad
of settle, 2 ens, 9 pigs md about 99 chickens.
JH 7a - 160 acrea, of »hieh 33 mm* have toon brought under cultivation - leased to Patrick Mektallm.
this mttler did nt asks much progress ia 19M*   He
aeeded altogether IS acres to grain and harveeted M buahele of
•beat,   -the remitting ;ts paMM of hi* cultivated toad mm aaaassr-
falined.   Me aln cleared 10 acres of mm land, which are ready
for ploughing in the spring of 1940.
-tha limntoM nnists of I horns, I ens md on ed f •
-hethsr or not this tenant will be given a lease for 1940 ia to be
decided*
jtoj JPJ, - 160 acres, of which 00Mres have been brought under cultivation - occupied by John Fisher aad fa-ally, the original nttiera
m tola farm*
69 acrea sndsd to wtoat, thia ana harvMtea 790
tie of Now* 3 and 3 wheat,    in addition he planted 0 acres to
grass, brought under cultivation 10 aeres of land that taw
cleared In 1938 and cleared I additional acres ready for ploughing la 1940.   He tod a good orop of potatoes am aln haa sufficient food oa hand for hi* livestock.
there are 9 horses, 0 one* 4 calves, 9 amat 6
?*m fry. M. " »W ««**•* •* ***«h ** ■•»•• *•« *®«n ****** under cultivation,   this farm toe been occupied by jarc* ton towrenn ©ad family
sine January, 1939* - 31  -
?Toa a total of 73 acres seeded to 9_*_M on this form,
603 bushels of Ho. a 8 aM 3 whMt -sere harveatod, end 300 bushels
of fMd oat*.    About M acrea were a_ftp scMcd to clover, und toe
reminder of the cultivated land was sussserfallowed*   Mrs. Lawrenn
lso ..ad 6 acree of land that were cleared la 1939 brought under
cultivation, and cleared SB acres ready tor ploughing in 1940.
the crop eae MmmM by drought In July.
there la a gcod supply of potatoes on toad md
fnd for the liveotnk, which oon*lsto of 13 horeea, 16 head of
oattle, 8 atoep, S sows, 6 pigs and about 80 chickens.
lib acres have been brought under cultivation - occupied by Alexmder HeMeil snd family.
_MMtt harvested 709 bushels of Hoe. 3 aad 3 stoat, 300
buetole of feed oats and ISO bushels of feed barley from 99 acrea
seeded to ftPftlM    the rest of the cultivated land was suanrfallowed.
About 10 acres of laad that MM olearoft la 1039 were added to the
cultivated area, aad an additional 10 acres of lend cere cleared
ready for ploughing is 1940.
The livestock eon.1st* of 6 torMs, 6 cm*, 6 oalves,
one sow, 4 pigs and about 00 chicken, for which there la asapit.
feM on hand*   there wac aim a fair crop of potatoea*
Farm.fto* 09 - 160 mow®, of «<hleb to aoree have been brought under cultivation - occupied by Alexander ^erryaaa and faaily, the original
Mttlerc on tola farm*
All tha cultivated land oa tola farm, with the exception of a fm acres upon whloh green fnd was grown, was eumnr-
fallowed la 1939.    rive nrea of land cleared in 1938 were brought
under cultivation and another I acrea were cleared reedy for ploughing in 1940.
me livestock consists of 4 horns, 2 cows, 9 calms,
on sow and about 6b chicken*   'Store la cufficlent hey and other - 39 -
fnd on toad.   A fair orop of potatoea was harveatod for the family
• 160 acrea, of which 96 acrea have toon brougnt uator eultl-
- occupied by Alexander MeUullan, Jr., the ertolaal mi
of this farm*
to grain on tola farm, 1160 buaheia
<.-raded -los. 8, 3 and 3, ware harvested,    the remla-
' the cultivated laad waa sutaaerfallowed.    Mtttt ll aores of
nw land were cleared ready for ploughing ia 1940*
the livestock conista of 6 horns, 6 cms, 4 oalves, on
am, 9 pigs end 60 chickens, for which then Is sufficient toed on
hand,   there was aim a fair crop of potatoes.
H| io. 04 - v,. I   tePCP.  I    I Ml  Ml   MMM   MM MM MteMj t; M M 99lt|«
vatlon - occupied by MM la tetolaaea Md family* the original Mft*
tlare*
On this far -i lift acrea sere pteMM to grain and toe
rent of the cultivated laad was sumasrfaltowed*   From th* seeded
area 904 bushels of Hoc* 2 and 3 wheat, 900 bushels of Ho. 3 oats
and 803 bushels of feed barley wore harveeted*    About • acres of
newly cleared land sere brought vaMP culti vat ton, aad anther 81
acrea were cleared ready for ploughing In 1940*   the graia
by drought la July.
the pototo crop wee fair,   there Is aln sufficient
hay a*i other feed on hand for the livestock, which coaaiata of
19 tor see, 9 99*9* 6 calves, one sow, 6 fMftWPCM about 100
chieto*** tied. 148 acrea hav* been brought under cultivation - occupied by Maard bevlin,  'he orlr.inal settler oa MM farm*
Mr. Oevlln died in August, 1939, sad the farsa is being
operated In toe mtalto by his widow and children*   On hundred
and ten acree ware ended to grain crops and too remainder of tha
cultivated Into waa auamrfallowed.   Fro   the ended area 608
bushels of Ho. s 9 md 3 wheat were harveatod, and 110 bushels of
feed oata.    About 5 aores of nowly cleared laad were brought
cultivation, and anther 16 core a were cleared reedy for the
in 1940.
thia rottler to* plenty ef hay and ottor feed for hie
livestock, to aim had c goad crop of potatoes.
fho livestock consists of 9 horns, 7 cms, 4
one em, 6 pigs and about 06 ahioknn.
far* Ho. m * 390 acme, ef whtoh 198 aoree have bom brought nder cultivation - occupied by Ualnlm toeOoaald nd family, the original
tiera on this farm*
7 I acree seeded to groin on tola farm, 880 bushels
Hn. II sad  I wtoat mft 990 bushels of feed oats war* harvested,
rfaltowod ths reminder of the cultivated land,
it under cultivation 10 acres of land which to tod cleared in
1939, and cleared another 13 acree ready for ploughing in 1940.
He put up sufficient hay aad ottor feed for his livs-
of I horns, 7 oowe, 3 calves, one sow, 6 pigs
He had a good crop of potatns for housc-
. arm Ho* .97 - 160 anas, of whlto 99 acres ham been brought under cultivation.
IMs farm MM leased to Frank Italian, who ^
all the cultivated land and cleared 18 acres of am land, which are
ready for ploughiag la 1949.
the livestock oonslete of I horns, 4 cows, 3 calves,
on*, bow, a plga aad about 60 chicken*   there Is ample hay aM
on hand.
Far* no. 98 - 160 aorss, of which 106 aores have ton brought uader Mltl-
vatlon - occupied by Joseph Glass and fax-ally,  the original Mttlere.
About MO buaheis of wheat, grading lies. 9, 3 and 6,
aM 400 bushels of feed nts were harvested on this farm from 79
aorea ended to grain, the reminder of the cultivated Into waa
I, while 4 acrea of newly cleared land were brought
cultivation, and another lb none were cleared ready for
ploughing in 1940.
the livestock oonsleta of 6 horns, I oows, 4 oalves,
on_ sow, 7 pigs and about 70 chic ton, for which aapla feed le
available,    the settler else had a gtod mpply of potatoes*   He
had to bore a an nil in the fall,    this cost hla $114.00.
Farm ffi»» .99 - 330 acrea, of which lie acres neve been brought under cultivation - occupied oy Donald -no:hereon and tardily.
■tola mm eeeded a total of 93 acrea to
fallowed the reminder of hia oultivatod land.    From the seeded
to harvested IM buatoie of   heat, grading toe* 9, 3 aad 4, and 100
bushels of barley*    the oats had to be cut  for fnd*   He brought IB
acrss of nwly cleared laad under cultivation, and cleared oa aftdlt-
lonl 10 acrea ready for ploughing in 1940.
tie had a good orop of potatoes end put up sufficient hay
Other   nd for hla livestock, consisting of 6 horses and on foal,
oowa, 7 oalvec, 13 aheap, on sow, 9 pi. a and about 109 chicken* • 990 acres, of which 164 acres have been brought uader ouiti-
the origin! ocnpaat of MM farm, PptoP MaoBeil, dies last
, aM ths far® has sine been cperctod by his widow and children.
On hundred aad forty acres were planted to grain aad tha
remainder of tha cultivated lend was cummrfalimed*   the harvest
amounted to 1900 bushels of Hoe. 9 md 3 MM aM 1400 bushels of
Ho* 8 Mte.   Tan acres of land that were cleared la 1936 were brought
99ft9P cultivation, end another 10 acrea were clearod eto are ready
for ploughing In 1940.
the livestock consists of 10 horns, 30 toad of nttle,
one sow, 10 pig* and about 70 chicken,    there le a goad
of feed oa hand for the clock, and a fair crop of potatoea
wac harvested for household
■ | .   .-.   g, * I | mn .- , .ioa   .  aeroa Mm l m MtMftM MftM atiftl*
vatlon - occupied by _telo*l» HacMell.
this aaa harvested 300 bushels of ■_•« 9 and 3 wtoat
aM 490 bushels of feed oata from 33 acrea anted to grain, the
remainder of hla cultivated land wac aunwerfallowed.   He aln
brought uader cultivation 0 acres of land that wen cleared in
1939 aad cleared mother 10 acree which are ready for ploughing
in I960*
the livestock consists of 4 horsee, 4 cava, 3 calves,
on am* 4 piga und 30 chictoae*   there ia ample hay sad ottor
tMd on hand.
- 160 acres, of which 198 Mree have beea brought under eultl-
- occupied W Oolin Oallagtor end f*Mly, the original settlers on this farm.
needed to train, Sella, nor harveeted 790
ihaat tad 930 buaheia of No* 3 oats*   He
i;4er of his cultivated land.   Ue aim brou M - 36 -
cultivation 10 acrea which hn4 been cleared
cleared 15 acree ready i'or ploughlag in 19*0.
He haa plenty of feed snd ottor fnd for hla live stock,
which constats of 6 norma, 8 cms, % calvea, one sow, 6 pigs and
about 70 chickens. He also haa a good supply at potatoes. Uiriag
the wiatsr hs built a lag bare.
- 160 par**, of whim ice acraa have been brought under culti-
- occupied by John Ocrrick and family, the original nttlere
on thia far©.
iterrlok planted 98 cere* to grain aM harveeted 730
buetole of *h**t and 900 bushels of feed nts. M aln plantod
6 acree to brom* grace, brought under cultivation 8 aores that
had beea cleared In the previous --ear, and cleared another 38
aores ready for ploughing in 1940. About 7 acres were auvmer*
fallowed.
There le plenty of feed avallabia for the liveetook,
which consists of I horaee, 9 cows, 9 calves, am mm,  8 pig* and
about SO ohlck-na* A fair crop of potatoes wa* harveeted.
Farm Ho. 94 - 160 acres, of which 90 aeres ham been brought mder cultivation. It is leand to MIpMM McuomII.
the harvest on this far < wm mary poor Ming to the
dry weather in July, the oats were almoat completely dried out,
only IBl bushels of feed balm; threshed froa S3 aores plantod.
the wtoat yield wm 373 buatols of Ho. 9 froa 14 acres aeeded.
About 30 cores were __u_mrfollowed* In addition, 6 aorea of lead
that were cleared ia the prsvlom year were brought under cultivation, aad anther 90 scree mora  cleared ready for ploughing in
1940*
there is sufficient feed m toad for the livento k,
which nnsicts of 3 horns, 4 eowe, 4 calves, on am,  4 pigs and
about 60 chickens, the faall. is In pnr eircuMtnoss* the
pototo crop vcp only fair. - 330 acrea, of which 111 acre* have bna brought uader cultivation - occupied by Alexander Uorrlna apft family, the original settlers.
On tola farm 113 acrea were plantod to groin cad the
ssainier of the cultivated land waa ammmrfallowed,    the crop harvested amounted to 772 bushels of    heat, 610 bushels of osta and 71 bushels
of barlsy.    Merrimn else brought under cultivation lb eeron of land
that had beea cleared ia 1999* and cleared I acree ready for plouM*
log la MM*
ar* I horses, I eows, 7 calves, one aow, 8 plga
85 MMMM M the farm, with a plentiful mpply of hay
and ottor feed available.    Thar* waa aim a fair crop of potatoes.
to. 96 - IM acres, of which 64 nres have aow beea brought under
cultivation - occupied ay Hugh 9*»elU ®m family.
the orop on this far* waa very poor, only 150 buehels of
Ho. 2 wtoat and. 810 bushels of feed oats being harvested froa 40
aores planted.    The reminder of the cultivated 1*M was caataar-
fnllawed*    the settler also broke 10 eer^e of nwty cleared lend,
and cleared ready for ploughing in 1940 another 10
the revenue from the farm, however, was m Bate!I that
the finally tod to M0*F to the municipality tor relief during the
winter.
.-3 livestock consists of 3 noma, 4^mw*» 3 calves,
r, 3 pigs snd about 60 MtaftNNh    there ia • good supply of
toed available, and about 89MM8 potatoes to last until the nxt
spring*
fee* 8*. 97
to Neil hcHetl.
- 160 asre.», of "hich S3 acree are wader cultivation -
thia aaa harvested 710 bushels of Has* 8 aad 3 whmt
md 190 bushels of feed onto froa 63 aorea planted.    He aim
9 mv$& to brome grass,    'the remainder of his cultivated lend - 30 -
ammrfaUmed.    In addition, ha cleared 10 nr-.s ef aew land*    this
is ready for ploughing in 1940.
B* ha* 4 norms, 4 rows, 3 eelroe, 4 ctoep, on cow, 4
plgc and about 30 shleken.    there Is ample feed available.
■
> 190 acre*, of -hloh 103 auras have been brought under cultivation - occupied by Bu*& 0*Bourke and family*
On tbls farm 12 acree were seeded te sheet, 40 acres to
a to barley   nd 13 acres to feed crops,    nd tho remain-
cultivated laad was maasrfall»wM.
th* yields amounted to ISO buaheia of He* 6 wtoat,  930
bushels of Ho* 3 oats and 330 bushels of feed barley.
the Mttler alpft brought under cultivation 3 cores of
lend^elearod In 1939* aad cleared another 10 acree reedy for the
in 1940.
lie torn 6 horses, 4 oows, 3 e&lvee, am sow, 8 pigs and
about OO ohiotom.    there Is plenty of feed on hand and a good atook
of potatoes.
t - 160 acme, of whloh 117 acres have been brought under cultivation - occupied by Donald Heeiellaa aad fatally, the original settlers on this farm.
;.iaol*ilan planted 49 acres to vtoat, 60 ceres to mte,
10 nres to barley and suaserfallowed the remainder of his eultl-
vated MMU   He harveeted 766 bushels of ftp. 1 sheet, 1300 bustoie
of Ho. 8 oata aad 160 bushels of feed bar ley.   He aln brought under
cultivation 6 acres that Ml been cleared in 1939, and cleared
another S0 nres ready for ploughing in 1940.
He haa 5 horna, 4 cows, 3 calves, one row, 6 plga and - 39 -
60 chicken, with plenty of hey cad ether feed oa toad for their
He alao had a good crop of petal
Farm No. 100 ♦ 990 aeres, of which 191 aorea ham .
cultivation - occupied by John i.ocLeilaa and. family, the original settlers en this '
thia man** orop amounted to MM bushels of Ho. 1 wtoat
ami 9900 buaheis of to. 3 oats, which were threshed from 88 sores
planted to the former aad 70 sores pluMM to the latter,    ihe remainder of the cultivated land was sumssrfallowed.    In addition,
this settler brought under cultivation 7 acres of land that
cleared la the previous year, and cleared mother 80 acres
for ploughing la 1M0*
He has 8 heroes, 39 toad of cattle, one son, 8 pigs md
70 chickens, IM which he has plenty of bay and other feed on toad*
He alM had a good crop of potatns.

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