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The Chung Collection

Chinese and English phrase book and dictionary [unknown] 1910

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+      irtdLi      *-*«>       tt       lit      + CHINESE AND ENGLISH
P
ASE    BOOK
AND
DICTIONARY
Kntered according to Act of Parliament of Canada, in the year 1897, by Thomson Stationery
Company, Ltd., at the Department of Agriculture, Ottawa.
Kntered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1903, by Thomson Stationery Company,
Ltd., in the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.
1 ■ 1 «»oAo«i 11 1 ■ 1  '
This book will be mailed to any address on receipt of $2.00 in Postal or Express
Money Order or Postage Stamps.   Address :
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THOMSON STATIONERY COMPANY, LTD.
Booksellers, Stationers and Printers
325 HASTINGS STREET
ft .        VANCOUVER, B. G.  < .
PREFACE
•o$o
«o«o.a
This book is designed to enable the Chinese student to
speak in English and also to understand the meaning of the
words and phrases of that language.
The English phrases are arranged as follows, viz:
Above each phrase are a series of Chinese characters giving
the sound of the English words., and underneath are a series
of Chinese characters giving an exact translation or meaning
of same in Chinese language.
In that part of the book where words in English only
are given, there will be found on left hand of same, Chinese
characters giving the sound, and on the right hand, Chinese
characters giving' translation.
The compiler of this book has endeavored to bring
together phrases and expressions of such general use and
useful character applying to all kinds of professions, trades,
business relations, traveling, correspondence, names and
relative position of principal cities and towns in Canada and
the United States, by the aid of which persons unacquainted
with the English language can easily explain the meaning
of their various wants.
*     §'-:   ' ■'; .       .   :f f|'   T.J. G.
Vancouver, B. C, September 1, 1910. Si
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1 CONTENTS
PAGE.
Air, earth and /people ,. 1
-Celestial bodies  2.
Rulers and- relatives  2 .
■Climate and landscape  3
Minerals, timber and water  4
Time and seasons  5
Officials  6-
Prison officers and punishments.. 7
Trades and labors  7
Professions and criminals    9
Public    buildings    and    private
houses -.  10
Financial, commercial and manufacturing concerns _. 12
Oils, liquors and produce  14
Teas aud tobaccos  14
Nuts, spices and canned goods... 15
Meats and soups  16
Vegetables  17
Fruits .. 18'
Furniture and household goods.. 18
Toilet articles  23
Implements,   tools   and sporting
goods  23
Store supplies  24.
The human body  25 -
Furs :  27
Dry goods....  27
Clothing  28-
Shoes and hats  29
Birds.......  30
Animals and fish  31
Flowers  32
Colors ..A':  32
Money ... ~.  32
"Mercantile  33
Books  34
"Stationery  35
Traveling  3o
Human diseases  36''
Medicine '  37
/Ships and rigging  38
Weapons  39
Pictures j  40
Precious stones  40
Officers   41
Sports 1 41
PAGE.
Numerals i     42
Numbers     43
English.officials     44
Array and navy :..'...    45
United States officials jj     46
Meeting on business ,.    47
Asking for a cook 1 ,.    56
Breakfast     60
Dinner     66
Supper , 1 '.    74
Travel |l||     78
Farm works. ■     85
Laundry     89
General store.     96
Court-house   108
Collecting money due   117
Trial for murder.   121
Schools '. ...... 12P
Gardening   132
Landlord and.tenant ..'   141
Coal mining   148
Salmon canneries ;   157
Saw mills  165
Railroad work   176
Clearing land ....    186
Gold mining  197
Cutting wood .'. '... 218
01 board ship  223
About the: city : 231
Law  242
..Words alphabetically arranged,.. 263s
Names of peoples '  280
"Abbreviations I  280
Addresses ,  283
Directions on envelopes .. v 286
Correspondence 292
Commercial papers  345
"Continents _„.../  356
Trade ports of China.  358
.Trade ports of Australia 359
Trade ports of India ..,"... 360
Places in British Columbia 360
Principal, cities   and   towns   of
Canada  367
Principal   cities    and.   towns   of
■    . United States A. 372 a
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tffflasffi       Prime Minister
W'&A^At Lord High Chancellor ¥$A$WW
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P=im^±      Lord Privy Seal W£^0J&
^M&A B Secretary of State       &©&?■] If # Tffffc 45
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President of the Board of Trade
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Vice-President 'IS±SI^±©
Secretary of State        ^f IJI^'M #-£§,]
Secretary of Treasury
Secretary of War ^^J^lMffS!
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Postmaster General W±M±ff dEM&ilS' 47
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Secretary of Navy     " ^f J]|4f !JM#M
Secretary of the Interior
I   mMmmnmmm
Senator J IBJE^J
Congressman ^L§aUij3C
State Governor ±WW^^~
Chief Justice
Judge
Bt
Meeting on Business.
Ifllfillll
ft&kmm
How do you do, Sir ?
I
How is your health ?
I am very well thanks.
I am perfectly well.
|NHH 1
Where are you from ?
I live in this city. 48
Do you do any business here?
mMimA  .
Yes, I am a merchant.
ikmMJtMM, §     I
Where is your store ?
On D Street.
At the Corner of P.  Street,
What kind of business are you in ?
General merchandise, groceries and provisions.
Cigar manufacturer.
Chinese and Japanese curios.
^&TffJlJ^»7fKlt?'l±
Labor contractor.
J 49
Dry goods and drugs.
Do you sell retail?
No, only wholesale.
HBKB
I will come down to your store to see you.
«ittt»]PPIt f
Thank you ; if you will kindly call.
itmmtkzAmm
Is this your store ?
«f&Tff?C±5& :     lfij
Yes, this is my house.
im,tk^tm^fif± §
mSiMM^Amm   I
How is your business getting along?
1fft*?fcS:#Mlk±Ag%M.
T hings are very dull at present.
tft±A%£&H&MW£M
im ^ hh
>i>miWor
Do you sell tea ?
i ■BOB
50
Yes, tea, sugar, nut oil, and rice.
Show me some of your black tea?
itbiliiB**
Is this from Japan ?
mm
^^ii
No, it is imported direct from China.
3$WkMUM j
What price -do you sell it per box ?
AA^JtJlJ% % ||
Three Dollars and Fifty Cents.
MmimAmMfrttnLft
The price is too dear.    No, it is very cheap.
tmmnmm i mn-^mmx
How many pounds in a box ?
en pounds, done up in sixty small packages.
Have you any Roast Tea ?
AMfkU±
/    2Er 51
Yes, I have some fine Green Tea.
nmmmmmm
It has just arrived by the last boat.
tkmm. \
How do vou sell it ? 9
m±A&mm
In five pound boxes.
flBtfc$1$±
^hWAA^JLft
At 25 cents per pound.
m&mAftim
Do you think it is good ?
Oh, yes, it is excellent for family use.
I will take a box of each kind.
Let me see your best silk Handkerchiefs.
mm !»«£• ummm a
This is poor quality.    Ah! this is better.
ftTff#Y#&«Jv£&Tff**r 52
Which is the better of these two?
The Chinese silk looks a little coarse.
wnmmA $
But it will wear well.
The Japauese silk looks finer.
But does not wear as long.
AR±Mm3§ftm
Will the color fade ?
Ste,jkA^M
No, it is permanent.
m wmtAffi&:&
I will take two dozen of each.
fc^KJff A^^
I want a Chinese teapot.
I do not keep crockerv. Where can I get one ?
'C num.
Go to Mr. K.'s store.
Does he sell flower vases ?
mtfftk^K^^Y^Tfif
Yes, all sorts of China ware.
Where is his shop ?
imim&kmr.mft | . f
You just turn at this next corner.
S^Tff Jt«7ff jm=F Y
And take the left hand side.
$cmrwmAA-\'S.m
The number of the shop is 25.
Please make out the bill for these goods
«^iff,«m^-^J?&^^:itft:l:
And sign for the payment. "■
■■IMHIMI
54
m
5
Here is your money.
I have no change for this bill.
Have you got a smaller sum ?
MMnm^tk^jcZmfc     f
No, I have only this fifty dollars bill.
i%-nn?Mmwk^miMn
I will write you out a cheque if you like.
Very well, Sir.    Will you take them with you
No, you can send them up to my house.
^mmfkzm± \ f '
Please give me your address.
Send them to John E. Fly.
35.mnmmx-i-AWM®.m     |
Number 96, 5th Ave., near R. Street.
u ^m^s a% m^njk^±m.m 55
I will go up to Mr. A.'s store to see the teapot now.
Will you take a cigar with me ?
No, thanks, I do not smoke.
± mp\±
Thank you for your kindness
Here is my compliments to you.
Here is success to your business.
IK: fflfc A^^'ffl3&HMik±
I am smoking your health,
If you should want anything in my line, call
again.
fr
I can guarantee you satisfaction.
m-$ik*mmm$z
Tell all your friends in town.
ii BH
56
w ill come to see you again.
And will bring my wife next time.
Good-bye!    Good
Do not forget to deliver my goods to-day,
m\^-^^mm^M'W±mt
M®A$m&mm.t
Oh, no, I will send them up right away.
-a
Asking for a Cook.
S 5&iff#ffl' ' . 1
m&m^kmwjkM.hMmx.
Good Evening Mrs. T.  Do you want a servant?
Yes, I wish I could get a good cook.
Are you a cook ?    Yes.
3&^:iM
fkm&wM®n$i y
Where was your last situation
— 57
teA^M&Amm
In a Hotel or Restaurant ?
No, it was in a private family.
What were you paid per month ?
gpp|
Twenty-five dollars.
This is not enough for me.
ik%M&
How much do vou want ?
Forty-five dollars.
fk^mMm^m.m
Do you want to get your money every week?
»ft& &"ra#/!2fl&
I do not mind.    You may pay me by the month
^k-mmmAikmi
Who did you cook for before ?
ti^i-m& !  If.
I 58
Wft$L,x^3tmm
Mr. P. and Mrs. W.
Who is Mr. P. ?
«7ff#lJ%i§      .ffl :
The City Postmaster.
How long have you cooked for him ?
For the last two years.
fifrffif?  f
Are you willing to do other work ?
mnM*&mx$i
Yes, every kind of house-work.
ism Atimm&MWR±®.
Very well, I will try you a week.
ik^mthmn
If you give satisfaction.
I will pay you the sum you ask. 59
Do you want me to come to-morrow, then ?
Yes, you are to be here by six o'clock to-morrow.
« ^ssffi mmi fill p
Is that the general time everv morning ?
JOB.
*M-mm b -tsf
No, seven o'clock every Sundav.
&15JHP1£#A*
By which door shall I get in ?
VcmHi&BZFMAK       I
You can enter by the kitchen door.
The key is left in the lock.
Well, good-night Mrs. T.
ffii^ja-
Good-bye, Jane.
/i^tiilrfl
Be careful of the step.
n BBsnaapB
60
mtknsmnl'      •    '
Shut the gate, please.
^Mlult« 1 'IS
Is everything all ready for breakfast ?
t=».
m
Set the table.
Put the knives and forks on.
Warm the plates.
Cut the bread.
H«7]c
Make the water boil.
Air£
Strain the coffee.
^mSuBk
Breakfast.
mmmm^ft^
Breakfast is ready, Sir.
1       ^Miki$jm^iM± Al.
61
^7«Y
How long has it been waiting?
It has been ready for more than an hour.
Y
m&A^AmB
Let us go to the dining room
m*mM*mftmn
Will you have some oatmeal ?
No, thanks, hand me the bill of fare
™m±AfmK%-m%
tmmmtfcikz^
Have you anything besides this ?
m&mm.xM%®m&
Yes, hot cakes and corn bread.
M~ftMBMi&=F%-m
No, I don't care about them.
»«&»y
What meat shall I bring you ?
&m^mmfr3:
AmMmA~mm
Ham, bacon, beefsteak.
N mm
62
Mutton chop, pork chop, and mutton kidney
miknwm^
Please give me some sausage.
And half a dozen eggs.
m&feVrffiNrm
Would vou like them fried ?
mm
No, I want two boiled and four poached.
ik^-MiAQ I
What will you drink ?
mmsMfr    I
^ ?M#nA.        |  |
Tea or coffee.
I would like a cup of chocolate.
Give me a spoon.
Pass the sugar and cream. 63
jaaci. ~\
Salt, butter and bread.
Change this plate.
tkt¥MMM$}$W I
Do vou want some more meat ?
mMn
^W>\L
No, thanks, I have had plenty.
^ife
pBIL
®£Mt-
'•m
&rft3fc$S
Pass me the napkin.
Now I have finished.
You can take everything away.
Somebody has rung the door-bell.
At the front door or the back ?
The back door, Jane. 64
Oh, my ! it is the milkman.
Wait till I go for the pitcher.
tk^MMM^m^m
How much milk do you want this morning?
Two quarts, if you please.
ffit£^fJ\:AIf$TfT
Is that all 3^ou want ?
Yes, that will be enough to-day.
&iir,05ffla&j&Hifttf,a*
mmmnikm | :.
Has he given you good measure ?
Very fair, Madam.
Is the milk pure ?
No, I believe it is half water. 65
We will not take any more from him
Has the butcher boy come yet ?
* mmmmmm
No, I expect him every minute.
^»a&\h] Y
What meat did you order ?
mmkAmr m
A leg of mutton and beef roll.-
ikm*&MSX'k¥&i
What pie have you made for dinner ?
»>&^««   * is
Gooseberry and lemon.
Have you made any pudding ?
Yes, custard, sago, and rice.
ITffr doff-Di M^m t®%±
M-#q# pjn\^* Y
Have you ordered any vegetables ?
a^finfl tstlMMiis
I M
PS
66
Yes, but they cannot bring them.
mmmmm y
Has the new crockery arrived ?
Yes, it has been left in the hall.
Was any of it broken ?
The soup tureen was completely smashed.
Dinner is ready
Will you take some chicken soup ?
A little, if you please.
The soup is excellent.
What kind of fish would you like ? 67
mmwrn
Boiled salmon or fish-balls.
I will have some fried herring.
im\m&>b,*Mmfr
Pass me the sauce and pepper.
-nmmY
What is the bill of fare ?
'MMMMAM
Roast fowl and roast turkey,
M±4-mMi&A)M±m
UlfatffJt^XQ&t
Pheasant, goose and pigeon.
m^mmmm \
Corned beef and roast pork.
T.tttfJS*l!J[i±fi'
&¥-i%My.XMt&
Roast lamb, rabbit, and partridge
I will take some roast veal.
W& wlr ^J&zni
What vegetables have you got ? 68
mmifxmMw.        j
Baked potatoes and boiled onions.
Cauliflower, tomatoes, and beans;
mmm I ilpfl MttMffr
Bring me a little of each.
%-frmmm, mwms I   1
ikWM^MA   • |
Will you take tea or coffee ?
Neither, thank you.
I will take a glass of beer.
mikmm-mMLM
Please open me a bottle of claret.
And bring- a box of cigars.
mmMfrm.n±Mn±iu
ikimM'Mim TO®
Will you take some pie or pudding ?
Bring me some cranberry pie,
^*
yii\
VI 69
mltiM        | A' Iff
And a little Cape pudding.
Is the fruit fresh ?
^miltfl^BM*
Yes, it was bought to-day.
Here is your change, waiter.
Jane, take off the table cloth.
Put the castor on the side-board.
mmmmnm
Move the table to that corner.
Put the woollen cloth on.
M&kim
Sweep the carpet.
Tff-e^-fr&ij I
ffitik*&Btm
Wash the dining-room floor.
i ma
70
Clean the hall oil-cloth, and shake the floor-rag.
Sweep the bedroom.
mm
Make the bed.
Change the bed-linen.
Pull up the window blind.
Be careful of'the window curtain.
mMAymttm
Put some coal-oil in the lamp.
Wipe the lamp chimney.
mnp^mik
Bring some wood up.
Carry up a scuttle of coal for the parlor stove. 71
KAMmBA'M.
Polish the kitchen stove.
Iron the children's clothes.
&mAsmfavim±
Take a piece of cloth to dust the piano.
&mwfiMmm,W£iiTAm&&
mmmmmB I
Carry the rocking chair to the library.
Bring me a newspaper from the writing desk.
#frj%Mn±mb.ttwmfe%Mifr
mm$m&mft$.AtM
Take this order down to Mr. J.'s Grocery Store.
Get one sack of flour and two pounds of cheese.
^m&Mtir&% Y MmmM fttSTffr
Hitt itm xmm\^m^
Three bottles of pickles and two bottles of lemon oil.
^AmMimttmMAmMn^itM^
A*
One tin of cinnamon and one tin of mustard.
Tell him to send them up as soon as possible. 72
And come back immediately.
Si
l«
*u
Yes, I will return in about a quarter of an hour.
m^MmmMmm&,mmttM&
w&-m\mk^ii3mM~&
What time do you want supper to-night ?
Half-past six every evening.
\^m^±Amm^^
What meat is for supper?
Stewed venison, curried chicken.
u^mmm xmm
Pigeon pie, kidney pie, and pig's feet.
jftmm&ikmMmm
Stewed quail with liver and mushroom sauce.
Anything more ?
MlkWM
mmkMM^MeWrl
Yes, pastry, vegetables and some other things. 73
M
.it-*".
What cake have you made ?
$se«i :    a.
I have already made.
m£M&A$&m i   1
Sponge cake, pan cake.
Pound cake, currant cake.
Hot biscuit and fine brown bread.
Very well, we will have a good meal to-night.
Sing, make a good fire to boil the water.
^/4*a
Is it six o 'clock yet ?
Yes, Mr. N. has just come home.
mmmm
Set the dining table.
* 74
Put the castor in the middle.
Bring the butter dish and milk jug.
^frmAmtmmM
Put the baby's plate on the table.
*££.
Supper.
mm
mmmft't
Supper is ready, Sir.
Everything is on the table, help yourself.
Bring the teapot, Sing.
O -t- * *AA>
m wmmzA
Yes, wait for a moment, please.
Why, have you not made it yet ?
*# jft;JcIEJ&ft&
No, the water has just started to boil. 75
WM &*Rft"3lfI Y A
Why did you not get it ready before ?
m&Ar\^m^t&mA
Well, I thought you would like the tea fresh.
m^tmmMmnAA
And wouldn't like it if it was made too long.
mj tkm&mm
Very well, you are quite right,: Sing.
Go down the cellar and open the box.
Ui
And bring up two bottles of beer.
Where did you place the box ?
m&AMmnm±  y.
Near the coal oil barrel.
Bring me five clean glasses,
v^Pr
And one more cup of tea.
M«ijajspw#a 7
Sing, we have all finished.
B m&MmMmi
tkffi&smx.
You can bring the tray.
3&mfr,mm
And take away all the dishes.
P
M ^Kfo^itir | fix
When you have washed them all,
You can use this piece of cloth to wipe them with,
um±wt  _ ut
And put them up in the cupboard.
mmk&mnmmMZT   \   j
Then put the saucepans under the sink.
Clean everything nicely.
&.mkm^^^mxA
After you have finished all the work,
tkmm&mm^mB
You will light the lamp and bring it to the bedroom.
oC 77
Pull this blind down. .
WM Willi   I A ■ m
Split some kindling to make the fire in the morning.
Bring another pail of water from the pump. ■
ffl,!%ilhA I
Turn out the light.
&<&.
mitmBA&zAmMj       f
See that the cooking-stove fire is all out,
^Xwiik^M% §|§'
Before you go home.
MAAA&ffit   I
Everything is all right, madam.
Is there anything more you would like done ?
MMikmm,Am^n 1
tkAmm&tmBf^km^m
Be sure you lock the kitchen door when yon go.
m^mmumk^r
And take the key with you. ?&
Come at the same time every morning.
What will you have for breakfast in the morning ?
mm,A&¥ttmmMi&mm
mBM& scfim-ti
Cook everything you have in the kitchen.
mmmmAAtmtm\
I think I will sro home to bed.
ffl\^'
m?*
,&»
Good-night, madam.
Itffi
•S23Z
Mi*
«f>
i
,»*
nRiiri
Good-night, Sing, I hope you will sleep well.
mmmg
Travel
mmm
Are you going to travel ?
&A&M JIM W
^m Mmtitmrna j
Yes, I leave this place for awhile.
Where are vou off to ?
im-A/py 79
I am going to Los Angeles.
Where is that place ?
^mmmm^k^
In the State of California.
Oh, San Francisco !
No, it is a long way from there.
Is that a fact ?
mmdm®. a
Why, you astonish me.
U.A^tMik^M
Are you going away to-day ?
&AM-mm,mm  M
No, not till to-morrow morning.
iXU
M>.=£-
m
IA
How are you going ?
•fl *80
By boat or rail ?
I will take the train.
When does it leave the station ?
^T7frn@^m*fTfr« s
-kmmAAmm&Tmm%
20 minutes past 7 is the time.
Have you got your ticket ?
I am going for it this afternoon.
Where are you going to get it ?
&¥ftft3SAife
From the agent at the railway station.
Will it be a first-class one ?
No, I can't afford it.
Lim. 81
ikmmm^
How much will it cost you ?
m$msmM^±A
About $25.00.
^Ainm^m
Is anybody going with you ?
No, I am going alone.
How long are you going to stay ?
wm®&&Amn 1 ...
I shall be away about 6 months.
What kind of country is it ?
It has a fine climate.
The weather is most temperate.
A beautiful country to live in.
i. 82
tmn^m      1
Have you got any baggage ?
Not much, one trunk and a valise.
ikm&mmm^ |
Will you have the valise checked ?
*m,A&mmmftfF
mmA$m&w±-&
No, I will take it on the car with me.
M\mmMm%tt-t^±m
W¥A«r»Jg
Does the Conductor allow that ?
fp$tmmr&%B
M®&%nmLzm
Yes, I can put it under the seat.
temukAm | I'
What seat will vou trv to get ?
mm-®. | I
One near the back.
&jktm
They are the most comfortable.
ikmat^^-Am
Do you know the Conductor ? 83
Yes, his name is Mr. B.
mf-Mift&.M-fiim&ifo
Who is he ?
n±/7*7ff m I
Mm&femz5L%
He is a cousin of George C.
He was once a freight Conductor.
I suppose you are well acquainted with him ?
sJmfB
^
HHHP
Oh, yes, I aim, a friend of his.
fa SlTff j£H pg Hi ,fa #»nr
A^m^ffiilAJg; 1
Is there a porter on the train ?
Yes, but only in the first-class.
m~ft,A%mMmmjt<mi$
How will you get your meals ?
Mfm,A^Amm
mm:%A^zmwm&     g
I will take my meals in the dining car.
« 84
How much will it cost you ?
mMmMmm±A
That I do not know yet.
TBT
^felfef*
I
fBk
p
Will you have to sit up at night ?    No.
%m,Am&AmmM' f':  |: I
Does it cost extra money to have a bed on the train ?
n^M^±mu±mMmtkMftm^mnm
No, but you must carry your own bed-clothes.
m.KAmmmMSAk'iA^^A .
It is a great inconvenience !
It is a thing that cannot be helped.
mtm MmBmAm&AL I
Is it a safe road ?
Ste3$L
Yes, I believe so.
m&jk-mm&
Well a pleasant journey to you.
m&MW&M%ikJ®3:
IL 85
m
Farm Work
M"
iW
Where are your going ?
f^a W3riA:WBi
Good morning, John.
I am looking for a job at farm work.
mmmmmxm      .     if
Did you ever do anything of the kind before ?
Oh, yes ! I was born on a ranch.
How much will you work for ?
Thirty dollars a month and board.
It? WiMiWik \ l§
All right, I will hire you.
Can you plow ?
«ff£       #
Yes.    How many horses do you drive ?
« i?3cim±MAMM     A A OB
S6
Only two.    They are in the stable.
Put the harness on and bring them out.
mfWiikifi%Mi&^fri%M:
We will work on the vegetable garden to-day.
SkMikT-tlMWR
What are you going to plant here ?
Oh, some potatoes, beans, peas, and corn.
fa 'M JJffiTff^Tff,g"rff JgfllT
ik~F&mmAm&
What are you going to put in the big field ?
&&Awm*mMi>mm JSI
Wheat and oats.
itJSttui©-± S
MctiL&M&gr 'A:
Do you raise much on this land ?
Alt} A-HIli±«-10 iKjM
About eighty bushels of oats to the acre.
■■&
i&m ^ mmm m nm j&m &i
55
-» 4M
iffi^fe
ttfl^
How many acres have you ? 87
I have 160 acres.
What is it worth an acre ?
It is valued at $250.
Do you make much hay ?
mm^zn    l
Just enough to feed the stock.
We cut it with a mowing machine.
mm®M±$tfrj%$
How many cows do you keep ?
tfjttk^AMM
We have ten.
mm      S
Do you sell the milk ?
No, we make butter.
M -gMAtT 88
Bring the horse here, John.
We will hitch them to the wagon.
Be careful he does not step on the tongue.
Put the brown one on the near side.
Which side do you call the near ?
mAmMA^mmk I
&A.~m
The one on the left.
mm^rim.M
The other is called the off side.
mmzjmA&m
Be careful or you will run into that tree.
We will drive to the house.
It is supper-time, now. 8$
m^ikit^X
We will do the chores after supper.
Tie the team to the tree.
m b mk&mimkzxQ&
To-morrow I will show you your regular work.
g tin mmrfrA^smmn
Laundrv.
Have you any washing for me this morning ?
&A®aWWj«,wjra I 1
Yes.    How much do you charge a dozen ?
f|ifrj:F?l^tl5AXfe\i®ffJ'IS   fi
Forty cents a dozen.
What will you charge by the week ?
mmAXA&MW&
tmm^i^ I    j    ■.;
How many pieces do you have ?
A%mRm-mmn   |   |
About four dozen a week.
kkfe HT'trW
90
Have you many starched clothes ?
Not very manv.
Wit
T
Do you send handkerchiefs and table napkins ?
Yes, )^ou will get all the small things.
m~tit,A*m^Mm^mmm   I
nnmrnmrnz^mmmmim
Show me the wash and I will tell you the price.
mmmiftMm.mm&A.mmx
All right, here it is.
)mMMmi     t
I will charge you one dollar a week.
mmx^AMiwm^
You may take them.
1I -t
How soon will you bring them home ?
I will bring them back on Friday. 91
What day will you call for them ?
mmtm-$i     III'-. (A
I can come every Monday.
^WSMSmxm r AA
mm^m a-'WSaa
Try and call in the morning.
if WsMX%m&i?cM.    I
All right, I will be here about nine o'clock.
mm mm^-mumm^fe • 1
mmi.nAu&mm     - -a-a
Be sure and bring them on Friday.
^-^Mm^frm,^cBmm    ^
if&mzmftMffi®^
You will find all my things marked X.
Make the collars stiff with starch.
Do not tear nor burn them.
Shall I wash your flannels ?
^mmmAimm
tknmMmzjmmte
You may, but do not shrink them.
A^AtPYffjMit !!^^wniii^
92
^
I will do the best I can.
$^mAmmft$m
w mm. pTitb#-^#f#n§.
You can take all the flannels then.
»S^]MI^A&^
Don't put too much starch in the muslin dresses,
« mm-
All right, I understand,
m^n%#~&mAm m
And don't starch the children's dresses too stiff.
mmmm^mm 1
Can you wash lace curtains ?
«H?Tfr^-ffrim'l& Al A
Yes, I have washed them.
Do^not put in too much blue,
h^ieim '■'■■■■ I
And don't make them too stiff.
tk^tfWjm&M
Have you a good place for drying clothes ? 93
Yes, they dry in the yard.
mmmmm       Ipfil
Are the y out in the air ?
Yes, during the summer.
m^Aik&ii>imM& Y
Where do you dry them in the winter ?
In the drying room.
mnMmmm
Bring them back well dried.
iHHIIt ,««$;   If I .
mmhmftx       '
How do vou wash silk handkerchiefs ?
m&Ami$ &MKM!&tt
The same as the other things.
Don't put them in boiling water.
Wash them in luke-warm water,
ntTfrffe.StiMflJj   *1 fee WW
94
And iron when dry.
If ironed when damp they will turn yellow.
I will wash them as you wish.
tkmmn^m a -a
Can you wash blankets ?
Yes, I have done so.
Can you do them without shrinking ?
m^timm±#t.frff«       ...,''."■■
Yes, I will try.
wtm&&ft%mfflMi& |: m
Double blankets should be cut in two before washing
They would be more easy to handle when small.
imw,mmm,mkmAi$m$&
Don't rub the soap in the blankets. 95
Soap rubbed in blankets makes them thick.
SAX3M®M
It will also make them hard.
fkfiaW^mBitY      If A
How do you wish them done ?
Make some good strong soap suds,
H«^7jt I
And change the water often.
Don't rub them on the wash-board,
But take the hands.
A,mm±
mzxAMxm-kmm
Do your men smoke when working ?
Wvc±n^A$mi
-ami W 1
Some of them do.
^fatt«j|§
&Mmm&mm%x>tf
Smoke makes the clothes smell badly.
± a Mtt*i%±Afi*$tmM 96
Do you notice it ?
f H
"TV
m
Yes, very much.
miM$m&
mimxAx^-kM
I will tell my men not to smoke.
All right, take the bundle.
ft WkWk H
mnm;;
General Store.
■Si
Have you got any black beaver cloth ?
Yes, we have some.
&£«-« §
How much is it a yard ?
We have it for one dollar a yard.
mmn^mijmmM
Have you any better quality ?
1* 97
Yes, here is a piece for five dollars a yard.
Can you make it any cheaper.
^iW.Si&fAE
&Xil^Y    ll
How much do vou want ?
Enough for a pair of pants.
KMtt^«fattm±
That will take only two yards.
If you take eight or ten yards I will make it cheaper
How much off a yard ?
I will make it $4.50 per yard.
&mmm&nr$3ttL%iMtiL
nAm®.
Give me eight yards.
-mmm y
in
How much money does that come to ?
1 »*» ■HMH
98
Give me $36.00.
&%M®Ag±Rm
Do you want any needle ?
tAWMikU
Yes, give me two dozen.
fnff &mmm
jftr-|*E9PtHR1it^a:-%
That will be 24 needles which will cost you ten cents,
Bfm%mHiA& mMfeM^±A.mft
tki\vj£$tftoMti&
You will want some thread.
Have you any cotton thread ?
We have plenty of cotton thread.
Give me six spools for 20 cts.
&m^±im$&.¥mi&ft       |	
Do you want any cotton lining ?
. You may show me some. 99
Here is a good quality.
You can give me two yards.
Atmm*m   j   § |c
Is there anything else I can show you ?
tmimtkm*m mmA   |   I
Have you any braces ?
&AM:,Wrfr §
Yes, the finest variety in the city.
Show me what you have.
mimAA®.      p. ,11.
What do you ask for that pair ?.
jft&HI-frfc  1 f     U
These are worth 70 cts.
imA&±>bt&ft
Have you none cheaper ?
m sms-^miffiWimn J   ?   g
Yes, here is a pair for 50 cts. with patent fasteners.
mm Mtmm.m^^^ft^±7Em.im^
i ■"
100
1'
Have you any English flannel ?
mtmtk.rjmmjmm
^   IE*#jSiH:»J
Yes, just got in a shipment.
Show me the best quality.
jftl^H^-II
Here is some at 30 cts. a yard.
mmAmmi&ftMtfL
How much do you want for ten yards ?
A&fkr
it
«m
a
I will take $2 for that much.
mm .j&ffirw&Bffl£
if nAmn
All right, give me ten yards.
Mft  %jm& 1
Have you a cheaper cotton ?
Yes, we have it very cheap.
m~ft,mtmM^m,
What will ten yards of this cost ? 101
1=1
itntkr
Will give you that for $1
mmSkAB^muB
Have you any one yard wide ?
$LAM!kM&m   If
m jlblilM-lS       I
Yes, that will cost 50 cts. per yard.
Mi\i,B*mM±%<i&ftM&
I will take five yards of that.
Do you want any blue Denim ?
UAmMik^m.m±
Show me some.
How much do you want for this piece ?
Jtfc1if£iAM-!!S
That is worth 25 cts. a yard.
tkWM'ifmW;
Have you a better kind ?
*• «H^
Yes, here is a piece at 30 cts. 102
&>
Give me the better piece.
Have you any white socks ?
%LAM!kMM±
% nmmm §
Yes, we have several kinds.
nmx^mMm    |-
Show me a good quality.
What is this pair worth ?
mmm
Forty cents a pair.
mm&mmAn^
How much would you sell six pair for ?
That will cost you $2.
(be.
Do you want a black felt hat ?
Yes, show me one.
irrfuMMH        .111 103
Here is a   fine hat just your size.
»M#£.:#7ff^u  :AY-
$t—fttk%M.1g&    1   ; fiffi
What do you ask for that one ?
^m^^m^Bm \ aaaa/
skwmmAiB. I  AAA
The price of this is $2.
^nm--ftifm
I like that other one better.
imB^mM
tirWuit-wm
Will you take this one ?
Would you like to buy one pair of shoes ?
Let me see what you have.
mnmMAAA
What size do you take ?
s^vM
Number six.
MEt±
Have you any with elastic sides ?
4J 104
I will go for an hour or so.
mz-WAM&kffirmm
I have never been inside a Court House.
mtMzjm&Amm±t
ikmmrnmim
Do you know anything about the Court ?
t&»,M&M\»iiia^w.f I
Why, how is that ?
mjfim.B t
No, not in this country.
MJ\M!k~ft,mm i
I have just come from China.
l£miT\AMfflm?k  ■■     I
Then it ought to interest you.
•if&
I expect it will.
Is this the court room ?
Yes, this is where he will be tried
m Ttr tkwmmm^MM
1c
* 105
Yes, here is a pair of gaiters.
^Ttr^^-rtfjgMfamifl*
Will you try them on ?
m^A%mm%
mm^MAmm
That pair hurts  my foot.
Bfmxn
Here is a pair a little broader.
They feel much better.
Are the soles pegged or sewn ?
This pair is pegged.
mtknmmm
Will you show me a pair with sewn soles ?
mmAwmjmm±?m^
\^_~. i._
Here is a good pair.
Don't you want an umbrella ?
i 106
»
You might show me one.
tl/.
kRfF
jit-jemjurw
Here is a good strong cotton one.
What do you ask for it ?
Will give it to you for $1
mmmmA,^mmA4
mmfM'Wm
Has it good steel ribs ?
$iiaTm#TffiijiMi±
if HTO«J&
Yes, and will stand the wind.
I must sell you a rubber coat.
£*Srff,£&^«SREJg
ikti(£t$.ftt$m     AA
Have you one with a cape on !
&AM^±MM%
¥■
No, we are just out of that line.
MMRm-fiMMttBM
M&kmfitftR
When will you have any ?
f 107
"tVH
They will be here on the next boat.
How long will that be ?
In about two weeks.
iii
Jfflfl^
tlmm
Do you keep any rubber boots ?
*UAffl.Mikm&nfc±
m mm I
Yes, several kinds.
Show me a good pair.
What size do you wear
m&MAm   I
Let me try a pair of number five.
m mm, mmmM E-&
iititAiiii
That pair is too small.
«AH-3rf&-p>i&
Here is a size larger which will fit.
mMffi±BfeMfe*mm
n ■n
106
We have a good line of mitts,
I
!$Lqk>l
*$M
Show me a woollen pair.
SJtWA
Those are not large enough.
jltSljUiM   |
What is that pair worth ?
mm,Bim±
We are selling these at cost for 40 cts.
m^Mfr^mmMA^Amft
Do you want anything else ?
I will call again next week.
. mm
Court House.
mf±
What is the Police Court ?
^.wnmrnzmmm
A Court presided over by a Police Magistrate.
« Mmkum M%Mm% ^ mm m 109
Where is the Court held ?
mm* jmwq     |i§
In a large room in the City Hall.
The Court opens at ten every morning.
What cases are tried ?
m&zmmmzA
All breaches of law and criminal offences-
&
Has that prisoner been .stealing ?
IftTfK 0 «»|^7lf *^
Yes, he was caught by the police yesterday.
i j Mm UT *§ KmH Hr ,M SI
lEit-tL-S I
What did he steal ?
4gffcj£iffJi!l&
Y£*ftTM
Some wood from the mill-yard.
Did they put him in the cells ?
W 110
He was placed there over night.
mmi$M^&MM&ffi
To have a trial in the morning.
m±mm$&M$m*M
^-Am^tAmtm s
A man saw the person take the wood
Who did he complain to ?
He swore out a warrant before the magistrate.
What was done with the warrant ?
Given to a policeman.
$Jffi,g.#$"fff:£
He then had power to arrest the thief.
A warrant must be signed by the magistrate.
±mz kmm (&m %mmnmm am ±zm)
Who is that man in the box ?
1*
41 ill
mm   §
He is the witness.
im%mvAim
He saw the prisoner stealing.
What is that book in his hand ?
wm^BtMummi
The Bible.    The clerk hands it to him.
What for ?
To take the oath.
ok.
See, the witness kisses the book.
mmAXAm
Must he speak the truth ?
mmx^mimnrnzA
If he does not he will perjure himself,
^^MT-itfnA.MffilM1)!^^^
Which is worse than stealing.
jffe^Tff{g±^±«l^
w
k ona
1 12
itmmmzm     |    f
Is it a serious crime ?
Yes, a judge is very severe for such offence.
Perjury, is giving false evidence.
^■mmA^mmMmmMmm
m.mxmwm
That prisoner has paid a fine.
1
i/«WE&
Who takes the money ?
vtmtmik
It is given to the clerk.
What does he do with the money ?
mmmn^±tmik
^mMiA^mnm
Puts it in the bank to the credit of the city.
What if the fine is not paid ?
MAtP^
The prisoner is placed in jail.
Kmmmmjmm^&M%.
w 113
ffiMilt+rA-tfe
Who are the 12 men sitting together ?
mumm^     |§f
They are the jury.
MR!! 'j    I
mMmmmmmmm
Must all cases be tried by a jury ?
mmMmu-$\%-*Mgmu.mm
xm &w.Am&immm
No, a prisoner may elect to be tried by the judge.
Then a jury is not necessary.
$ssm m urn, n« ■
There is no jury in a Police Court ?
The magistrate tries the case alone.
$iTSE-I^A# f|
Look at the crowd over there.
*m,lkPi%ftkMEM
^A^^-M
Has anybody been hurt ?
%m MikM^m
No, I think not. 114
A man has been arrested.
What has he been taken for ?
He has stolen 2 boxes of fruit.
Where did he steal them ?
From the shop around the corner.
tefl^BM.!
Will he be tried this day ?
Yes, he will be tried this morning.
Are you busy to-day ?
No, I have nothing much to do.
^nAmmy
Let us go to the Court.
4\ 115
«««£A;iJfJ£
Who is thtHnan on the stand in the centre ?
He is the magistrate.
WkA&WMR I
Where is the prisoner ?
jllp.ll^llll I
is&mx |        _.        . Jlfj
He is downstairs.
S^.*^lgJi* Y
Why do they not bring him up ?
They must search him first,
And take his name.
Mm,^Mm±
mtmmm-Azm        §
Then they will put him in the prisoner's box,
And the magistrate will hear what he has to say.
m % > fmBM Mmmmm mm
m^mmzm^urnI
What is the box beside the magistrate ? mifm
116
mmpWs.Bfpzm
That is the witness box,
0^Tff,^i&7frt#±
m&wm$Mmjg z p «
Where they hear the evidence of his accuser,
»$l mmm ^nmm ,rm&
x%)W k mmM&kftm §
Or anyone who knows anything about it.
fa i M&M s MSlMff MOM
#im iPTatt^-n a y
What are those men at the magistrate's feet ?
mmmmmA
They are the newspaper reporters,
xmmm^A
And those men with the gowns?
MkM±%MX§m I
They are the lawyers.
M&K%M    I
One for the prosecutor,
mx-M^-Ammi
®-£3I2EA
And the other for the prisoner.
He has been found guilty,
m
4 And sentenced to six months' imprisonment.
I m, # ®m jp Jt« « mi I
Are they taking him away ?
\tm^
3sw*JS®
He will have to go to jail,
mmmmmx      I
And work for the Government.
Siiili^^CTM     I
He will be chained to another prisoner,
mm^mkmmm^
>=»
And will work on the roads.
Does John Smith owe you any inoney ?
1W M±mMAMtkm$k
Yes, $20 for wages.
Itiff ,3g*WT**, ^-%\An
Will he not pay you ?
No, he has no money. 118
Do yon want to collect it ?
ttA:«M_HMn@
Yes, if he is worth it.
Place the matter in your lawyer's hands.
A man named Rogers borrowed $300 from me.
Has it not been paid ?
$ftimn*§#
No, but IJiold his note.
M,Am?$&MWh
mmmx
When was it due ?
A$mm s
Over a year ago.
Has he paid the interest up to date ?
All but fifteen dollars.
1».
4 119
»
Show meva^copv of the note.
JWJW¥«,fa#Mi*j
$MMA&t&
Here it is in full.
tojgj-fcf;
JH^"rfi\ijwtJ!i-i
$300.00.    Vancouver, Dec. 10th, 1890.
m&-^ftA®,mmm&   I
One year after date I promise to pay
m^mzmxAjATi |
To H. Elliott the sum of three hundred dollars.
I
^mmifm
For value received with interest  .
n^&Amjm^ \ |
At 8 per cent per annum.    (Signed) J. Rogers
I have a note against R. Hood for $100.
wiw%hM%&WA¥fflmft& ■
mmA I
Is it clue?
^TffPBft        I
* itm-AA^XAA^ARAAm
No, it was drawn 13th June, 1892. at 1 year.
MMmitiffl&&&&M&ffitofoA®ffit
*
-4
If ^SrJ
lfl&
Wjv
1.20
Then it will not mature till June 16th, 1893.
«Y,A/1+H*«
Why is it not due June 13th ?
mjmm.n&mmM:
M«HBAfj!
Because three days' grace are allowed.
^&m b jm nA&mimn-~mm
If the last day is Sunday the note is due Monday.
MnAmmmjmium^mjm^Am
a~Ah
WMMtitWLM
Do vou want to get the cash for that note ?
%i^mmuvmnA^xxm y§j|
Yes, I need the inoney.
mmMknmik
The bank may discount it for you.
KMMimmM^A   I |.
What would they charge ?
AI<]#M-^&      I
About 10% (per cent).
#ij-b% j«#a+m
For $100 you would get $90.
=¥wmmAAmw$m
tf1
4 121
The bankfeeps $10 for every $100.
WL*&mzxw-.A*immm
Can a note be collected after many years ?
mmnMmmMnm.^akM §
mmz^xm-A^-zA
Not longer than 6 years after due date,
Except when interest has been paid.
m^wmz b   g§
Then the time dates from that day.
izjm&AMmBm 1     I
^S16iEMA^Ii
Or where the maker acknowledges in writing.
Must the rate of interest be in writing ?
xmmMmmwiAm
If not only 6% can be collected.
m^Ami%±mftMrmm
What do vou mean by murder ?
^MAMMM^
ftm±MfrA^.$£
Causing the death of a person with previous intent.
^&m±Mn&m^±xmmmM
■I 122
If it should happen to be an accident ?
MM
J£LAf
«&&&
That would be called manslaughter.
0i^^c£7fr» I
What is the penalty for murder ?
mmj^s&m^mm §§■*
Jl^EA^^iM.MTO
The prisoner, if found guilty, is hanged.
tezs$m$-, if KM mm j tmmtk
For manslaughter he is sent to prison.
Murder cases are tried in the Supreme Court
mmi\m,mmMK,±xmm
mmAmm^zm
Before a judge and jury.
^■AMiim.mmmm
sIM^MASi
Who has charge of the prisoner ?
The sheriff and his deputy.
t$& ft ft, mmmmI mwm
Where do they keep him during the trial ?
W 123
a
«#Adfe« I
In the prisoner's box.
stJim^-mnzA
The trial may last a week.
wm&&rmw®§
mmm mm®, mmmmm
The prisoner may have a lawyer to defend him.
mx^mMtm%MMmmm
The Crown Attorney conducts the prosecution.
Is he known by any other term ?
'He is generally called Q. C.
Jlt-atHHSfiffl-S
What is that intended for ?
im~ft,Bmmmi
xmmm.z m m ipt®ia m-=
Queen's Counsel, who acts for the Crown
mmtAAM.mE.%.    1
The Crown witnesses are examined first.
mAmmik-ft^*mr»xm A
ikWAfimmm
Has the .prisoner any defence ?
mm ^x^m^Mfkmm±
mm 124
mm m^mAimmxim§$i
He has witnesses to prove an alibi.
What do they sware to ?
That he was elsewhere when the crime was done.
0 Mir ,j»?frfD ,A n-^U Mmft
itffiifMMJM
Would that be a good defence ?
ii0-^ji£#«±     i
Yes, no jury would convict on such evidence.
Then the Judge could acquit the prisoner.
What is done after all the witnesses are examined ?
The Crown Counsel addresses the jury.
mAA&wmzA&m&
Who speaks to them next ?
n±±g*HJM7ff
Jit mAZWi ffi        1
The Counsel for the prisoner.
If 125
Does the judge make any remarks ?
iWJ^mMmikmm
W,H 13 ?Mm irir ii AS^iJltW
Yes, before the jury retire to consider the case.
mmMAtmwjmm&AW.mm
They bring in a verdict, guilty or not guilty.
rjk^frMmmwtMm&Mnms&m
What is done with the prisoner if found guilty ?
^mmn,n±nx^mm^ff^m^m fi
mmKBMmmR t
He is placed in jail till the date of hanging.
ftSBfflS j     ■
Who fixes the date ?
^jillls    .   ' H  - i. I' fl
mmm^mumimm        |
The judge has power to name the day and place.
Who does the hanging ?
ti*#pff,;&^£ "I   ■>*'
«^itM,ffl^iE3jS-~Aftm
The Sheriff must or find some one to do it for him.
Taking the life of another is a most serious crime.
■j m§. tt I fatt® mi, tm wm± am mmu 126
Who is the Bailiff ? |
He is an assistant of the Sheriff.
m$l$T&MtltimMitt&J]tf
mnwnx®.Ammm^m
When goods are seized for rent or other causes,
The Bailiff is placed in possession.
Jt#nfrtt:£«il#]f
Can any of the stock be removed by the owner ?
Not unless the debt is paid or satisfied.
n\#^-rfr^^^7fr«,faj!j^m^
mmiz&mmBMWm
Mm
Sheriff's sale is made after a certain time.
# ft iA&mmmmRMfc&m
Are you going to school ?
When I get a certificate.
Did you ever go before ?
WA-mni&MA
|| I  :    1>|D
'I 127
mm-^%A
About a year ago.
&nMm.
Y
&AW
What class were you in ?
mmxm
The third reader.
$HWJ i  I        I
&3m&.tkzmr
How did you manage your lessons ?
I got along fairly well.
rgMMMMfflVb
What sort of lessons did you have ?
ASr
We started with arithmetic.
mmm,xumm f       1
Then we had geography and grammar.
m9mA^zn.mm& §
Whose grammar book did you use ?
9k±,toffi$> K$cA,A7fT
fcffl-^ll^E»-#
We used the Carlyle grammar.
'i m
It is a very good book.
mmmmMm&m
Do all t!ae schools use it ?
mMm,n±^^,A^m
Only in Newfoundland.
What lessons do you have after grammar ?
We have reading, spelling and writing.
^sm^mfrMm m%
Do you have to read in classes ?
No, we read individually.
M,mmmmmmm
tkMXM^
You have to work pretty hard,
AmMAMM    I
ik^mmig
If you want an education.
ntt,AmmMmnw
ft^-mrm
Are the teachers strict ?
MD?B Y <± fflffl 129
tMllilfi
Not as a rule^
What are the school hours ?
From nine till twelve,
x&si&3m&
And from half-past one till four.
mmttm&fmm.&mA
mjkM- * *$ b w & ra mmm
Then you have the rest of the day to yourself ?
§ AAA&jmm M ftlkm Jl5*clttt
# «i$»m §
No, we always have home-work.
mnif^tkiim m
Do they give you very much to do ?
Sometimes, and sometimes not.
-b^Mm^mx
mmtkM&zBx
When do you have holidays ?
^UA&.xmm I
$$mmAB |
Saturday of every week.
m^.mMnmmM
<i)n 130
mmmm
That is very accommodating.
frmmm,mmmx
It gives one a rest from study.
iM8,«$Ttf,tt^rfirk«i
Have you been to school in China ?
$LAWtM±ti$&Mmk   §     1
^mMmx^m
I went nine years to school there.
A^mmAm^.
To a school or college ?
mm±A^M^mh
35.^2AM*m     1
Five years to a public school,
tfe« MmaiG ft -,±*«s-
And four years to a private college.
You received a very good education, then ?
Oh, nothing extra.
%MW^±m I
ikmmm^mmifm
Do you like the English school best ?
itfi
'I
W0 131
ra*s«Y
Or the Chinese school.
faJW&d:*^
I cannot say ; I like them both well.
Which is the easiest to learn ?
The English or the Chinese ?
3
7)
The English is the easiest.
W&W.^izgitii
The Chinese is the most difficult.
Did you know any English before you came here ?
tkAMMmrmm &a,au
No, not any.
rnxxmik
I do not know much of it yet.
^tP\BJltefattI»
Infill
You speak it pretty well.
"V 132
littl
1 think \ ou are flattering me a .
mrlA&,ttforfIfrBMm&
Oh no, you speak it properly.
$sMsA3:m.mMm.Em
Every word nicely.
f mm
Gardening
fkfpMMMMXA^;  '■■
Do you want to hire a gardener ?
UAm&A,W}\i®M
I am in need of one.
l&/kM.%M ttH
&f$ti I'M Y
What wages will you pay ?
Twent\ -five dollars a month
I cannot work for that.
%mA®A¥B
ikMM^X I   I
How much do you want ?
ifmfeMAn
i Give me thirty.
mmMmnm §
You can begin at twenty-five a month.
Can you make it $30 ?
t&AMmMmttml     §
If you suit me I will give you more.
i§|AfomMmmiiAm   I
When will I begin ?
Am$&&%% |
You may start at the first of the week.
AMmf pil ATfr ^fa ttW&
^^mvmwxftzm.
Let me show you where the tools are kept.
mmffiAMmm^M
They are always to be found in this building
siPi- b jmimwm U
On Monday you plow the garden.
J      J XA O
With that plow ?
&±B&% 1U"»-U.
134
w&teft&mm y
Yes, but the point is broken.
sr-ff, a mn m nut,»«
Will you get a new plow-point ?
TO-A^JHItW^il   i     •
Yes, the first time I go to the foundry.
What is the foundry ?
wmmmzm
The machine shop where the plows are made.
Do you use the team for plowing in the orchard ?
x^m^%mz |
No, take the single horse plow.
m.i&nBtm*s±&%
Be careful and not hurt any of the trees.
» nu MmnmmtkMn^
Where is the single whiffle-tree ?
You will find it on the seed drill.
m
£
i 135
£
Are the tugs the right length ?
You had better make them a little longer.
AtmmMM*mmM%i
tktymA&&MAM*LX%. j
What do you want me to do this morning ?
•-JDIU
: mstw (x^mmmm
You may harness the horses to the wagon.
AM4Mjmm^±Mnmft I
Where is the neck-yoke ?
ik&ftBA&m&mM%&\v&
You will find it on the sleigh under the shed
Drawn a load of manure over to the strawberry patch.
l£«»E#f fatt» I Effia^Tfr^Jf-Sg §§||
mm-mm       iff ■  m
Shall I place it in heaps ?
mnjftfcximfflLWiiB. t
No, scatter it around with the fork.
DU fM«OT ,M^:±f* M
Some of those apple trees must be trimmed.
'^fatt^iii^n^^JSTfr-^jiji. 136
&ffl|g« j
Do you use a saw ?
tmj%itimtiL7]        a
No, take this pruning-knife.
mtmwwwfr'' %
What will be done with the brush ?
mmmt^xt^bm    # H
mm-m    m
Pile it in a large heap.
fkiRMMit^MMMJ^
Do you want the cherry trees trimmed ?
ffi.tt^m.ximmm   J
Yes, and also the plum and pear trees.
&$zxmjk^m$mmm
After dinner you may spade the onion bed.
When will }'ou put in the seed ?
As soon as the ground gets drv enough.
m%AamMi8Am
It may rain to-night and keep it too wet.
P0Mi»S^,«lii!2±J]na*arf
# 13!
Bring me some cabbage plants from the hot-house
Where will we set them out ?
mAm\
9mm
In the south part of the garden beyond the corn.
®^#±iA,fatt^mm^-^^t^;f
nmwAmmifm
Shall I hoe the potatoes ?
^.mmn-mfMW&^Jrm |
Not till Monday, as we must plant the celery.
p\ r$&% m jmmMfi m&- ,n&m >i
Do you plant it in trenches ?
nMmifttmmmmm
We must dig the ground and get it ready.
»"ffrMnwmmm^m^m .'..
mxMMz^$mm&      U
The weeds should be hoed out of the carrots.
imiti&jfctfMMttn-m I
Shall I use the cultivator?
x^dkmmmm.
No, yoit can do it with a hoe.
MMmm^xmif 138
mmmwmzw
The grass on the lawn wants cutting.
*lI-j^\BB. B&
Have you a lawn-mower ?
You will find it in the wood-shed.
mmzmmMnfflz
it must be oiled well before using
mmzw$m-m
Rake all the cut grass in a pile.
Shall I use the wheel-barrow to carry it away ?
mm* M&mnAmftif
Take it or the large basket.
ikm^Mmmjm ■ |
Do you see that picket off the fence ?
^m.Bm^Matm±
Get the hammer and nails and put it on again.
^mit Mm tkm jgmg jsjl
JfcSF18JiT
The hinge on the gate is broken.
I 1391
WTill you get a new one ?
mw&&mBm&±
Look in the repair shop on the upper she
&&, ^m s&a^a^flie &tf
%%X^m^MM.
I don't see it there.
ilteffl&^MHT      I
It was used on the stable door.
p@DfHr JTrfr mka$ *&#&&
"'fi'tiWIli^
Some of the cherries are ripe.
^fatt^^M^Jtt
Shall I get the ladder and pick a few ?
^^M^xmrnmrnnnm .
You may also bring a pail.
Do not break any of the limbs.
mn^-MMikffiffxm    .
Are any of the apples ready to pull ?
Some are quite ripe.at the top of the tree
'i>j£M>pg^itifatt^« 1 FSB!
140
A»mi,Msmm \    |
Be careful and not bruise them.
%-mmMmnttJA-ifm
That branch is overloaded with plums.
Mfm&Ammmm
You might get a board and prop it up.
mx^ mMfc mmwm < rsii
mumm^m    ■        ? .
A large quantity are lying on the ground.
«#f&,tffl ikm I %mm &ntm
ikm&m£mMm
Will you leave them there ?
mm *«
It would be better to feed them to the pig*
»^»i»jey
Where will I put the apples ?
feMBftZm
In a barrel in the corner of the shed.
IktyMMymVcWmm
Do you want the lawn watered ?
mAmmumm®:
You may get the hose and turn on the water
AM^mfXMmm^nMm
$0
I 14
Give the flowers a good wetting.
-k^mJkAWM M
After tea you may go for a row.
%$,mm,AimxMm.   I   fl
Take some tomato plants across the river.
11 MJ%m&$ S HmB9 e
wptfmi%ft£
Will I give them to Mr. Jones ?
mmMmmmmm        *
m&nik-\ ■ jRH| m
He will pav you 10 cents a dozen.
mmMAmftMmm
Landlord and Tenant.
nnmmm^
tkmmnmm  f     |
Have you a house to rent ?
MHI.U .ililWfftn
I own three that I will rent or sell.
^£ iS^0iM]M->fa»
&mmzm3kWALm y        ^
What are your terms for the twro story house ?
» AM vTOt&Tfr M '1 M±
#n ±M®8L-\'it     I
Ten dollars a month, rent in advance.
mixmmffiMmf&Ax . 142
-*m3kMm£Y
What do you ask for a year's lease f
&UAm$iA¥mM^~tii       a, f'Hi
m-~8A^m!knmm ii
W7ill take $100 if you pay taxes.
mm^mMMinm\nn Am m±
That is a bargain.
0^7frj)SJEftf ft      f
ikm&iwcmkf I    m
You had better give me a lease.
AE^mADj%m^i   ■■;■■§■■ II
For what length of time ?
^»±\fatt# '   fl-   ,-#■      %
mfthx^-        |§§
Make it out for three vears.
mWcmm&xm~&MJkxm y
What if I shall want to leave in the meantime ?
Give me 3 months' notice in writing.
mmM^mm*mMm%.     I
mnnzM&Mjtt!btw&
What is the necessary time for a monthly tenant ?
]
One month's notice to quite is enough.
mmmmxMmjmmmn mm
1'MI 1 A 1
143
The place I am quitting don't suit me
miAftifAM | I
Have you occupied it long ?
&A:,S1i2!fLPBIR H
Only a few months.
kSff-UlfeilgY        I
What is wrong with the house ?
mmm WWKHf
The roof leaked and spoiled my goods.
n&wMMmmm^it± t
tk%mrmxm&
Did you claim damages from your landlord ?
Yes, but could not recover anything.
iTifKA)niP\Mnsm.«!B      I
sum y jkAflmnmmWiM
Why could you not get damages ?
mx^mmm\m\      |
I did not notify him in writing.
t$mi\Mmmmm%fc .1   ;
&mmmmmmm
Did you speak to him about the leakage ? 4-
mjmm&        •■§. ■%■
Yes, and several repairs were made.
m\mm&m$&JMMMm
xmm.iitm7k
That did not keep out the water.
BWK^MMMm      I
AVhen wras your rent due ?
^Bf7fi\A:i®-ffi
X^mM
Not over a week ago.
p\faEJE^»K-£
I want to leave it at once.
^^Jl^tt^PH^i
mkmnn&nm&
You must then pay for the month.
But I have only been here a week on this month
A*m.,W WlWl M&ScikWrt:
That makes no difference.
0«JB#6hfc
WLmmm&mm-11 jussss
What if I had only been one day over ?
&mft&&mmMmffiE
ikftw^-n «
You would then pay for the month. 145
You had better stay till the end of the month.
A:£MJf?M.i^mfatt,M.i
nz$mmm.mn I
My tenant cannot pay his rent.
What do you intend to do ?
&UAMmm
mmmMmmm
Make a distress when the rent is due.
mmmf^MAimm.
He has gone away and locked up the house.
mm Mg&Mmim.Kftx
Can you break the door open to distrain.
^A^mn^m^Mmmm
xif.vmmmitxMmz^
No, do not even open an unfastened window.
M MWftltmK M^im ,ASL
That would be illegal.
What must I do when the tenant returns ?
mAmnffii
Try and get into the house.
mm.mmA^mmM m ±
*«. r
$46
Then tell him or anyone in charge
^RmmMmfkmMX^
That you intend to distrain for rent.
BAmmMmm^n
A notice must be served on the tenant,
mm m ± M±^$?m ^nm^
mmmmw
Which gives the amount of rent due.
A bailiff generally makes a seizure.
m. %-?mMWM MW&nt
Can I sub-let the place ?
%Mmximmk I
If you have the consent of the landlord.
fttt,A&m&\Kmmmfi    a
&xmnnAm gfmge^Rt
You cannot let for a longer term than your own
A.w\m,¥mmm^A%  % j§
Who should do all repairs ?'
w:j*«r jy& j-ijk II- ■ I ^ ^ Sip
The tenant must make them.
WE&jmmt    x%, a At.. ■147
Unless the landlord agrees in writing to do so.
Even then he must be notified of the want.
^ft^MlTfr^tW^fatt^
ik^wmm        fj    if
Do you want to rent a farm ?
iRA:W Jl^M | :    :|' +>
Have vou one to rent ?
I would lease 50 acres for 5 years.
wumft y
Where is it located ?
fa^rtrPi,:
AmmxMi
About three miles out of town.
»H&0»*i&ll,fatt1i-   AAA
MMmiSY
What rental do you ask ?
tm&$&MAvm ■"
Ten dollars per acre.
8tff«s;WAJT®ffJK
Have you any land you want cleared ?
mkmm<Amm^ 148
There are several acres I want put in shape.
m&&wmm$mMmM
tkn&gmammstAm
What will you give me to take off the timber ?
%fflfoJfflniMj8ffitt,t$mK
IkffimfK&tA
You may have the use of the laud for 5 years.
All stumps and stones must be taken out.
M^iftMMmifiW:Aim%LM®m
Do you want the land fenced ?
UAW,nnm-J:
mugMM.mkHk$t
I will pay you extra for doing that.
irmm^AMxm ,«iu 0
Coal Mining.
tkiZWfeRW®
Where are you going, John ?
ffl&AMM 1t
*$iii1tiT.
To work iu the coal mines.
Have you ever worked there before ?
&AK&&:$mA        t
W* 149
&fmxmmjm
This is my first attempt.
««4TffJaf§
tkm&mmAXM.m
Have you all the tools wanted ?
-,6JU.£«£i
I have got a shovel and pick.
titMMW
xu
fe'j&mkmmm
They will furnish you with the rest.
mm JMfcirk ^±^$Tff
«M-fl.A
You will require a torch-light.
A*mjm% y Mmm   I
Where will I get one ?
The Company will give you a lamp.
m&m.%A^m'A
All the miners have alight.
# £M^j£ f
Where do they carry it ?
^tlUWlPB
mtmzmm   |
At the peak of their cap.
niW.fatt^ ■-—^H-
450
It is easily carried there.
8&m$.mx%. m-.
When shall I begin work ?
^$K±£jfiJE$ ff
m^Ammvi p
Be at the shaft at 6 o'clock a.m.
The whistle will blow at 5.
At first you must drive a mule car.
Down in the mines ?
You will draw coals to the main shaft,
The mules are all kept below.
How long is the main track ?
ifMAsmMmm
Over a half mile.
faE,m&tt\»
i
— 151
Where do the branch lines lead to ?
mu.n^n^mMm   a
To all parts of the mines.
mjW/ufatt^*
What lines shall I work on ?
aMU*
X3C
QA-M&&&%
The first gallery to the right.
You can take six cars at a time.
How deep is the shaft ?
*Ti^iff,«tt
It is over 600 feet.
P@mfKfaE,:,W±±!fI#>
Are they ever sunk any deeper ?
.»oSE,?f-»iifeE
m mmm^it^mm: ( ak^km
Some go to the depth of many fathoms.
'bmmtkMttjakjm
How is the coal brought out of the mine ?
imt>; n*3i&,m$M:Mtt $&*
"Mtt*>
f 152
mm&mzmiftm&iA&nxmnzm)
By means of two elevators.
mmMffM^imn I *
These are hoisted by engines.
fk^^M^MmW
Xm^tk p; ■:"■■
The foreman is calling vou.
tmMw§MfrM
What does he want ?
mm Mm i  i
You are the new man ?
Your health is good ?
^*H:,;W#' #     -At:
mif.ft*.
Yes, sir, verv good.
®mmftA
We must have strong men.
&Ml£Miim~B
You will be on the day shift.
X^MikM^-MMtM
Next week you may draw to the dock.
imi%,AmfeMJ\mM .  I 153
Amnmzm
Where the vessel is lying ?
What are those iron rails ?
They will be used for the new7 track.
]Mi;W,A7ff^mffiSt t
m&xmu$mm
Do they have iron rails in the mines ?
Yes, and cars drawn by mules.
miftMm^imnjm
xAm-m%f$&
They will soon build a new line.
temAAmfcrnA^mMfoJa
Take a load of coal from the next seam.
Shall 1 fill up the car ?
Just put in a half load.
:#TfKM,»tt#
Why not take out a ton ?
1wp\j£Hj^H- I 154
MaM-ili
There is a grade to go up.
Hum* with the next load.
T?iJJp:±^;gjiff#. ,|   1
mm&m& ||§
It will soon be time to shift.
immnmAMMm®,    |
W7hen will they have the engine track ready ?
AfflmM&.Kmmm^m
As soon as the grading is finished.
fe-tljIM-ti^i I
Where will it run from ?
fin.
From the mouth of the shift to the wdiarf.
tti€ KMAMtttmnsmm n
mmm^X:
Look out for that car !
l&MX-.B-t:
What has happened to it ?
The coupling has broken.
pj%frMi\iAmm%.
i 155
Do vou see that coal seam ?
ikmrnmrnimm
Take your pick and undercut it.
mAmmm-Mimm
How deep will I go ?
im^mtm.
Si AX AM
To the depth of two or three feet.
Mft.fattli^faiW^
iJitfviv^^A*
Take the wedge and drive it in.
Where is the sledge hammer
mtmjmmmikM,
&tk&£&
At your left hand side.
n@AJ&tt)«  #
That pick is too heavy.
BnimMn.m
ikxm^Rmmm §
Can vou not find a lighter one ?
i&An^M^m
You mav do some blasting.
AJ%M>mmr&
*** 156
mm^mjkm»sM&  |
Where is the dynamite and fuses ?
ffl,nm)&ik*MmM±
tEUkMZB
They are kept in the store room.
m 1 mAnmk
Ask the manager to send a supply.
Two cartridges will be enough.
mmmm$i&kM       |
Come over here with your shovel.
^«ilt-^±*S
Shall I load up this car first ?
imm^mmif
When you have finished this pile.
:£A&.»7fT^7frm
»«»-tl jlli£
What is that pump for ?
wm.Bm.A
To raise the water out of the mine.
mft^ftnm
Is it worked by hand power ?
nmmMfim y il 1 W
X&.MM^BMZft I
No, power is used fronr the engine room.
MM Y ,mt Afff, imMMVMM
mm-ikmm^^-vi.mmm^. ' 1
Why have you two shafts in this mine ?
One is required for the pumps and ventilation.
m.tAr\rmm 1 ^nmMm-Am^m
XA&&kAA,&mA$&
The miners ascend and descend in the other.
M^^^^Mm ^ m. Mi^Ml
Which one takes out the ore 1
m&nmim-A        § |gf|
The one which has the cage attached.
nm. j •;#mn^<mm Rip m,
Is there auy danger of the cage falling ?
No, there is a safety clasp.
MMKi$jmimwft
Salmon   Canneries.
•rmwkmx   I
What buildings are those across the river ?
^^S>jS^±\Mi5^±,^$E 158
They are the salmon canneries.
How many men do they employ ?
A&ira+Aft-^.        f
About forty during the season.
How long does the run last ?
ifmxjwgm'ti!
&Aft^Xft §
From May until July.
All the fish are caught by Indians.
Mmmm^mMim   •
ikUBMXHkm    |
Are vou looking for work ?
n^MMMMX.
I want a job in the cannery.
i£Wmm,MKWkm
You may begin at once.
Take this knife and sharpen it. ikmmmA^MmMTi^R
Have you a grindstone or a whetstone ?
& a, m tmt^mM «Tfr*t
You will find one out in the shed.
AmmMMMMKA |
I will show you how to clean the fish.
Slit the fish open and take out the insides.
mm,mmmyi;mmgiM,Mm.m
Hkmmmnm&
Where shall I put the refuse ?
Mffl/hAfl
Into that large box.
Put the fish into the cleaning vat.
*fctoifK!Saffl;&4^it
Shall I get some clean water ?
Turn on that cold wrater tap.
m%B,m
They must be thoroughly cleaned 160
Bring in a case of empty cans.
%-frm JE-Knfr Mtiifcm tR
&rMMJS Y |
Where do you keep them.
MA.^ff ' /
I n the store room.
nmmmx j
How shall I carry them ?
if&m&mm
Take the truck from the shipping room.
MLMmffljmnmx-M
m.Amm&M y
What is that large boiler ?
^n-nt.Bm^Mm :i
M%A$Umfa- a .      '||
That is used for cooking the salmon.
0^7fTAfrfifWM WfM
ikmim&smm
Do you cook the fish in the cans ?
UAm,mm\mK&
&;£*-, MA&
They are first cut up and put in the tins.
mmmatmm-mmA.        -■
Then placed in the boiler and steamed an hour
^^mKffMMmmLim y
Mi
4. 161
*3*,§Nl
a^Ato y
What is that man doing ?
He is soldering the cans.
Must thev be air-tight ?
The contents would spoil if not sealed
**m@ifc,irifit*^,^ttia0}.
mmmm^nm
That floor is very dirty.
BS'MJ^rff'
*gX*MMM&>Wm
The foreman wants it scrubbed out.
tm%MmAi\iAm.mM
3§ftffljlfc7jcf5JK
Shall I use the hose ?
&$&AMAftnjm       !i
SkimttffltitAi
You had better turn on the wrater.
A&^M%K$$m      I
3%Am$gsiimm^.
Where will I find the broom ?
Look behind the back door. 162
it
■3SHSB8fe*3*
This room must be cleaned every morning.
ikifrmMW&mAnmm
_tnu
Hand me the paste pot.
4fc$Fi!££7
It is nearly empty.
mmjk&mmm    IH
imnmM^Minmzmm
You must make more to finish labeling this lot.
Aim$.mAmmki$mpfrjkm
&£Si«Y£MJtj£      I
Where do you keep the labels ?
mUAM^^P^   I
&mxz%i |
On a shelf up-stairs.
Hl|is#f
There are only a few lving there.
MR*
-to
fMfBat
^
Get a new case from the store room and open it.
^upf InUr, ttir W^I^iM Jt H!
HIE ft »
Fetch them down the hoist.
-^Attiit^aii®
The box is too heavy to handle alone.
nm x, n mmm, %mm, w&
I ^WAWJk     I
Get a mau to help you.
Are all the cans labeled ?
I have only a fewT to finish.
mAmm®i&
Get a packing case and fill it.
mmmm%z I
Nail on the cover and have it marked.
tk&&nw e mm .mnm
wm^hAAMM^m
The engineer wants more steam.
umM&Amxm 1 I
&mx&&     f|
The wood is not dry enough.
Split up some dry kindling.
How many pounds of steam do you require ?
ifX&%MnAMMAAm& ft
S^^A+0 I
Not less than 80 lbs.
rA&fi*%ffii&%. 164
tifcMW.M7k
The roof is leaking.
o
p^TtcEf^fie
Have a carpenter repair.
mmskAm.Mfflnm^myiM
Rake out the furnace and open the damper.
mMMt&ik-ftMmMyiAAtti E
Where shall I put the ashes ?
ffl£Ep->^#$\Pja5"rfr
Throw them in a heap back of the shed.
Are they of any use ?
-Sa^fatt.m&Aiff
They can be utilized for making lye.
$ffi\%ZWtm&%A&
Are these boxes ready for shipment ?
&&7ri«±,^i&^»1
xA%m*mM*&
As soon as the shipping directions are put on Saw Mills.
When will the mill open ?
A*m,w%mMyc '   J
miftxmMMfm %
They will be running the first of the week.
Are they putting in any new machinery ?
Mnmmm^mn y      hs
Another gang|is being fitted up.
'MMAimm I
Are any sawyers wanted ?
3£SI8c0f Y ,*f* I
No, we are in need of men to pile lumber.
M.m^mmMf^Mm^UE I
m^m^B^nimA
Go over to the office and see the manager.
^^^MmmxMmmn^fkm
MAAiSMmmmm    |       I
Don't go too close to that circular.
tmMvj%AMB&&m I
What is that saw used for ?
-^7fK0#?A:TfK£l 166
WMAM8L fflif
It takes the slabs off the logs.
mmxAftmMw.xfe
mMWs'&AA.xm^mm^.
How do  they put the log on the carriage ?
ifu.xmx^^xmnm
It is lifted by those dogs.
mX-ftMttM%AM
nut mm m%$m isa a*
Hand me the kant-hook to turn that log.
:m,A&$kJmBM
nMX)fm.mm^Mm
Take the lever and pry on the other end.
mxmEMmtm, &?mt.)
That is a long stick of timber.
0^ifrjiETffM>fattfSE
What will it be used for ?
W®^M%A~ftA®
It will make a spar for the ship.
mMMM^Mim^xm .
What is done with the slabs ?
^xwA^xx^m
fmwk I
They are cut up into strips.
M^m%mm.A^mm Do they make laths ouTof them ?
167
Yes, and also pickets for fences.
m^MimMm%Mm^4m
Stand clear of that gangwTav.
Bring a wrench from the engine room.
■^^i©^fe,tts^iai$ti     |
stwzmmAjm       |
Is that bolt loose in the truck ?
It looks as if it wanted tightening.
P@*i±.P>£7ff^ttP@Jf«1ff    I
Turn the nut to the right when fastening it,
3rm,fnffm^Aim^m m I
The thread is worn in the bolt.
Get another one the same size.
There is too much sawdust lying here1.
m.xmmtejmiti,mm$& : ; 168
mmmf~&
What will I do with it ?
Get the horse aud cart and draw it awav
^Mif±Mm pju mm &mm jhh
Where do you want it put ?
mu.AWmM
Over iu the lumber yard near the dock.
faE,Mf*aEfc,.Wff
tkmmm. -mm m mm
You can use that load to fill in the slip.
All the rubbish must be dumped there.
M&nm.&tfAtim^v}im$&
jitA*^li-M
This large timber goes on board the ship.
tm j&m m e Mm £$.mm
All hands push on this car.
nm<M-tf,%iki\iA
i&fcA&nmiimimw-      |
Steady ! or it will run off the track.
mmmMmn^ffitt.mm
wmf<&&&k&
That is far enough, stop it here.
B^rfUfcMtt,±gP@$l: 169
Lift up on your end.
Mttll^AM      j_
Let us have more slack on the cable.
mw\iMmmM^mnpm
That is quite tight, haul away.
Bmm,imm$k   |
What has that tug in tow ?
g«\0^«up
-iRAA^fl
A boom of logs for the mill.
'Hfi'fBl^ffi^
Where were they brought from ?
£&±Mm,A»mm^ §
Away up the coast from the Company's limits.
m^^A.immmtkAti
Xvtf±.m.if'7kA'i7
Don't walk on that log in the water.
mmfiMMi
You have no spikes in your boots.
Take this pike-pole to balance yourself.
«iff Mifflb JB.■^^^ Am tt 170
Shingles are sawn from cedar.
sm y ,M,mmxmm
Why won't the pine do as well ?
mMKKMV£ftAffi%r
It is not as light and durable.
Hurry up with the shingle bolts.
muLMLfr
Sort over these shingles.
M#JE,&7ffiNfc&
Don't pack up any culls.
mmMMfk^^
nAn$mm%%m
Put another nail in that baud.
Ms
m
oh
The belt has slipped off the'pulley.
n^iMmAmmiAnn-m
Get the step-ladder and put it on again.
That new man is smoking. 171
pp'ltVVAi7fJ
Tell him to put awray his pipe.
Don't he see that notice ?
MIHpl^ 1   1
No smoking allowed on these premises.
mx @ w^%%&mxmmt
A spark may fall and set fire to the building.
mxmMmmMm^k y jh ws
Do they run this mill at night ?
n=sV/
They work both night and day.
w&mx.ffimmM
fc-^&Mm-ks&mx.
The night gang commences at 7 p.m.
Mffi& I ffi M M>b ,XM
mftm&my
How is the place lighted ?
By electricity, there is the dynamo.
nm&^MAimMi)WJm&%
Incandescent lights are used in the mill. 172
AMMAM,$&tik£m
Large arc lights are placed in the yards,
M^XAm*lY
When do the workmen get paid ?
UABXABf   f
On the 15th of every month.
Do all mills pay in that manner ?
UMmm^xmB'xm
Some have pay-day every Saturday.
Who keeps our time ?
vXM±M\'B-
Us? ^ PH ~y ~k* ^"
The clerk at the office.
0}%kmMM$kX
Don't let that plank fall.
8102^,3488-
,M>Ji#*
This is the planing mill.
What is that large notice posted up.
J&W 0#?& J»tt± Jfcfcll
1^ %A%M fp ' if"
No admittance except on business.
MmmmMM^Xb^-fkA
M^fflAiWJK
Will they allow us inside ?
ikftm&n^BWAffi If
You must first get permission from the office.
Ammm^mmxmftM®±
What is done here besides planing lumber ?
They manufacture sashes, doors and blinds.
M3c m mm am &mm jgw
m.xfEM$m^M
That work looks fine.
B&M&
Is it done by hand ?
No, it is sawn with a scroll saw.
MMnmpm^xmAfcvj-zmfi-
Stop that planer.
m^-.Bxm^
What is the matter with it ?
&Mm^~iM±m 174
Don't you see that spike in the board ?
«^:ig,B±»,H**ifc    I
It* would break the machine.
Ikm&^MMM
Don't you smell smoke ?
ftffljg*Y I
Where does it come from ?
5ffl4Trfr,nHmttiE
mmx^mB
Look down in the boiler-room.
Everything is all right there.
mMZM^A
The lumber-yard has caught fire.
&ftE-til,iffirff,!®ftY
Don't you seethe blaze ?
Run and sound the alarm.
^Mm^n^w,
Telephone for more help.
P Here comes the firemen.
^hAm&\V9tfc
All hands get buckets and carry water.
Don't stand with vour hands in your pockets.
mrnn^xA^MA^m 1
nr$cAA±$#
Help the firemen with the ladders.
^i,^1*Y^t,m±^UPff
Mi&AY
How did it take fire ?
«,Rtg»2n.
It caught from a spark out of the chimney.
mjmmmttiMMtfftAim
Do you think there is danger of the mill burning ?
The fire appears to be heading for it.
&km&}XMM~&
Which direction is the wind ?
»AJ€ft«P:£ §
It is blowing the flames toward the mill. 176
flJi^Kttt'IP |
Throw water on these shavings,
'jm.
K
v
Is there any insurance ?
tmMMikMPmx
im^ximmi
The policy ran out last week
nmmjmMmn
IB
Railroad   Work.
j   I   »$: f
-H:#f^aEAMim
A gang of men are wanted for grading.
What wages do vou pay ?
One dollar and a quarter per clay.
mnmMmmmrMm
Does that include board ?
*T7fr0,®tei«     f
No. ^'ou find your own food.
$S,A#A3c#
■\immm&
What are the hours ?
3g.£a^jy&
I
111 177
mfcnBnxMMx
A day's work consists of 9 hours,
$mxmmAwmm&
The foreman will show you where to wrork
m%xmmffiAMm
i£.mmxmm%L ■
Bring a spade from the tool house.,
%-frim>&, tt?§l^,*njL&,£F±
Where do I commence ?
ffltK,i£tEffI± 1
^sxfm
At the gravel bed.
mft,mm>&
How far is it from the bridge ?
^fcp0,tt«,#«
About three miles.
They are now loading up the flat cars.
aA«-UJl!3&
What is that large machine used for ?
^Tff, Bmmm^Am*
&mm.^mzi ffmum w
They load gravel with that steam shovel. 178
^iy^A«   I
How many men does it require ?
&XikXAffitf®-.MM3$.
M4^H^
It takes at least three.
How do they remove the gravel from the train ?
im,wmttjmmm,wm^mm
MAHim
By using a large scraper.
»^Tff,«#?&,Tff:8fe*E
The engine drags it along the cars.
TM,3»SJlIl#Hc
This large chain is broken.
im&timB
Take it over to the blacksmith shop.
Can he repair it ?
The blacksmith will weld the links.
Mrtwmn$&wmfr±
mmMif        |
Wait until it is finished.
mmM.mmmmik'tii   <
*
«« j§m«HS#ra& y
What if he is too busy ?
^ttj»7frffiJt3c
Tell him it is wanted at once.
J.»,P@^TfK^i3tRg|l±
Where will we dump this load of earth
mM$&.m*mmwMtt&±
nrnxmrnm %
Put it down in the hollow.
.EpH
njkmfSm&kMM,
John, you had better drive this team
&<A£MmA$Msikm
Rfr,£M&mm
And Ling, take hold of the scraper.
mmfrMmMtt.nw
Don't let it go in too deep.
M-i&A&WMnXR
Where is the other gang working
&mmziu#
On the opposite hill.
%m&mAMm
tk&MVt&mM
Let the horses rest a minute.
fiJ^pr±,$7frnEMM 180
i
*aXS<$
Is it hard work for them ?
It is a heavy haul when using the scraper
BMmmm        I
Break up this hard clay.
&m*iim     j
What will we use ?
mmMAm
Try the pick on the hardest part.
mmnm^tmyntM i
snw&Rm Y
Why not use the plough ?
There is onlv one span of horses.
mmt,mm~tiinMm §
mMmmm y
What are the rest doing ?
&&ft^mm
i&AW^AZX
They are at work hauling timber.
Mkm®,ttf^m&
ft* MM
Where are they taking it to ? xm&zmm i
Down to the creek for the bridge.
Why don't they build it of iron ?
mmM^Awwiimm
Trestle-wrork is very much cheaper.
SMlfAW^iiY        j
What is that large machine on the bank ?
mm\Bmmm^^nm
That is a pile driver.
BKMfrjgW^llE
iVAWAAAmX
It drives those big timbers into the ground.
The bridge over the large river is of iron.
Why is that engine in the centre ?
«^Tlf,0HK,H^*nlT
Mmy^HftMit^m     I f
The drawbridge is swung by steam power.
Smaller ones are turned by hand.
±mm§... 182
&K-Mm.mmxi y
How do they handle those heavy stones ?
By means of a derrick.
nMMiAMBft
Mtik&mMtikAfi
Swing the crane over to this rock.
Give me more line.
~ #*
.**•*
All right, hoist away.
*^mJ3t^,^-U^4AAY |
Who are those gentlemen inspecting the works ?
Those are the officials of the road.
jlt-^iSiA^ttY
Who is the tallest one ?
n£#TfrJ$$YTfr.JlI
mffi&tzmzABm    .•».
He is the President of the Company.
mim, tm&&& ,fatt^mft^c
tikA&mmM^mmm
The man talking to him is the General Manager.
%»3: ,m®Mm.nm,%$&&$&, fttkm
iii Who superintends the construction of the road ?
ft""
4,-t
The Chief Engineer of the division.
life suitiipiSB8i
Will they give us any orders ?
No, they will direct the foreman.
nm&nmmmA~ft&
How can we get through that rock ?
$fm,^kii,B&
Is there no room ou the river bank ?
Not enough to make the road bed.
r\mmnMmM,W'3
ikM&SiWR
What do you propose doing ?
imAMMmM
The only way is to tunnel the rock.
itmmkzx    §
Is it dangerous work ?
tm.mnmmiT®. 184
Not if great care is taken.
Look out below !
issues
A large stone has broken away.
BSIII#JA
That is a warning for the men
BMm MM^ ^M'X
We must do some blasting.
wamxwm^mwx
Ask the foreman for a few dynamite cartridges
-WMrFffiiimiiiiJi
Don't let it fall^br it will explode.
Bring a fuse with you.
Here is a deep cut.
nfttiiM&m
How can the snow be kept off ?
MJWf-^jitfatt I
<m 185
It will require a snow shed.
&kmmxAmm
Here comes the construction train.
All hands stand to one side.
What are those timbers for ?
3£3S5g±,l@E#
#ffl«mM# .      A
They will be used for culverts ?
&A7mMAMmmffim$i p mzw
A new switch is wanted by the water-tank.
Where do we get the ties ?
&m$xMmm,mm
There is a pile near the semaphore.
m%*mMffl;m,ikftM%,A
n%AW,A^-~m
Take the lorry and get a load.
mmmMm^m
Look out for the cars. ;^"www^
186
-A&mmrn^,
Here is a man wnth his foot fast.
He has caught it in the frog.
mmmn x%mM#
Clearing Land.
4M&
L
How much land is in this block ?
immmMtkHi^m
m.M-^AX^m^MXAA.^m M
There is 160 acres, of which 35 are cleared
lt^7}rsiii®^±iifefla^fattm^^
m.mmMAmM
Is there very heavy timber on it ?
&xmMmzmAM  I
Up on the highland the trees are large.
^^MAm,n^m^Mm
Have you any prairie land ?
There are a few acres near the river.
JHj£,«RH^;&^E
That part can be easily slashed
BV\M%fmMj$mm
<m
i Do you want this land put in shape ?
MAmMMMmm      It!
^mnitmftm.mmnm |
I wish to have the whole place under cultivation.
rnkmrnmrnm
WTill you give me a trial on it ?
«,a^m,m«^ph      f "I
That depends on the price you ask.
Bmnx.mmm.Aum'yt-    .
I wrill contract to do the work at $100 per acre.
mmMmmMmr&MmimmmM
I cannot spare the cash.
tkmn-^^MMmnAii
You can give me half cash and the balance in food.
Amm^ttWMm^m^
Can't we make some other bargain ?
imm,>bmxm* Iff:
Don't those terms suit you ?
m%±m,j%A 1 {>-"    .a."."  i
I have no money in hand.
fL 188
Here is another offer which may do.
Give me the use of each acre cleared for five years.
Will you agree to take out all stumps and stones ?
m$&A, m.m^ jmh M^mBMm m *
I will make it ready for the plough.
mmMm^m^-wm
mmmi&M^m
That low part must be drained.
B^Ajm^Mmwi m
wtk-n^mttttAm
Will you supply the tiles ?
That would cost too much.
0iBf±,ffi«    J
Just dig an open drain along the fence.
mmmmi^^mmxm-um
Shall we build a dyke down in the flats ?
^mm^nu.m,mmn.AM±
mfm^
It had bettei be done.
yJ&L 189
W7m mmM&k-§n
The tide sometimes covers a part of it.
nm^my e jpA,fattPH
MAif»-tl35
What shall be done with the large trees ?
They can be cut up into fire-wood.
Get the cross-cut saw\
*$S^±Pj$f
C3
.life  ^^rgX^SM-^ Y
What length shall we cut the wood ?
S^±,^i»Pl,#^
mRM&ikMZ&Bt   |   I
Four feet, which is the length of cord-wood.
How many feet high is a cord of wood ?
tifXA^AA^jm^Mim
ftmmR\%ARm
It must be four feet high and eight feet wide.
mmwM3AMmM3m
What makes the saw pull so hard ?
It must be very dull.
^^\ 190
m
i
We had it filed the other day
nAA&Mxm^ 111
Hand me the wedge and mallet.
fikM.ftmteMm.mq I      -HI
It will run easy now when the cut is wedged.
Don't bear down on your end
That makes it pull twice as hard.
BmmAmMm^mm   fl
iit^fgnfa-siijs       i
What will this wood be worth a cord ?
It should bring $4 in the city.
mkmtmzmM&m
Will you give me the wood on the land ?
mmA®mjm,%ftM   ip
^m^jkmmn-^     a
No, you can only have one-half.
mkiZMMmxA
You can then make $2 on every cord. mnfommzm^xR
Who pays for teaming.it to market ?
zkx^mm.mmm     mm
ikmmmm.uxA
I will do that part of the work.
*kffli&MBif\Mtfn®.       if
■J1JIAm,«mmi %'■
There is a large part covered with ceda
mmmmmifmm
Will we cut that into shingle bolts ?
m&.mmB®&.BimM&] I
You can do so,  but we want rails.
Amm,Amw^$& if  1
What will you do with cedar rails ?
mmAu^xmwm   mi
Make fences for the ranch..
mmx^tm^ f    ;| |
That wood is easily split.
&M^-xmm. j f
It will last for years and not rot.
mmmMmx-MAMm^m I
n
The men are asking for water to drink 192
fay
* •
:fe»],MP*§
That salt meat makes them thirsty.
Bffi&mMfe&fcik
&-£15lHW7}c3&
Where do you get the water ?
»,A^ff*\RiiiJ-J
Over at the spring one-half a mile away.
faE^^±#^,€t^ttJlS*^,li
That is a long way to go for water.
0 m jragJI^fPfiifr
mmtk^MA#&
Why don't you dig a well ?
)hc
*
miSl^PF
You could have one near the cabin.
fk^^mmmm^.
How deep do you think we must dig ?
imMAWAmmwi
You mignt strike water at 14 feet.
A:* M mmm *r, $m&3
How will we throw out the dirt ?
nAmt&mft
Get a windless and bucket.
^m,A®mMm%m
— 193
Is there any danger of it caving in ?
mt$t Mfknm ^fatt, ma M
ikmmmw&&    J
You had better put in .a prop.
That will keep the sides from falling in.
m.mm7mim §
That is good drinking water.
Btm^^fr^mm I
Will you get a pump for the well ?
m^A^um^ftm^ I I     %
ftjn&m3mftA*iffifm&&
No, a rope and bucket will do for awhile.
When we get the farm cleared I will have a pump
Pile all the brush in one heap.
%
iBb/rrt-.
When will we burn it ?
A*m,m*w I
As soon as it gets dry. 194
m^-AMumm^.
What is wrong with that man ?
m^m\)Amm
He has cut his foot with an axe.
mmm^^if I
Is it badly cut ?
mmi&WiJi&mm    §
He has nearly taken off his toe.
mm, tk m mmn mwk
Pull off his boot and sock.
w^fatt v&rfr ** Mm,m±:
Bind it up so it won't bleed.
Go over to the doctor with him.
«EJ&^iff,1t:±i! I:
Here is 9 acres I want cleared.
MmiM®&J£rTtAMmk
nmmmmMm
Will we build a fence round it ?
fM^Mmmf
When the trees are all cut down. m.tmm ujh y   I
What are those small trees for ?
UMJmx&&Lto
They are to be set out in the lot
i>/p_
a±
a
A
Plant them among the stumps.
mmmMmAmmx
They will grow there all right.
»^j>
S.SK-
Build a bridge across that creek.
We will want to drive a wagon across it.
1%MW&A
Get two long pieces of timber.
^fiil5-_EHnti\fatt\i§E
mmmMmm
Then lay poles across them.
^mmm^^xm
prra«jg
Will that be strong enough ?
TOB-^±MgB,HIfttt
Of course it will.
fafUHr.RBfllSB- AAA/:-. 196
mAmM%m.Mffi#
Light a match and set fire to that brush.
*«-fe if? Jgfltfctfe Y JfiB^fWr
Can't you get this big root out ?
®AAg&mMMM
We have tried, but it is still there.
mmm&, a *miff ,Tff i&$&n
Let the oxen have a pull at it.
WnB&tiflt&i&Wrft
Back up a little more.
ftikMto&SkAM
Hook the chain on the big end.
Are you ready ?    Haul away.
nmwi&mmxm
Put a pry under the root.
Here is a bed of clay.
totem M&tttt&&
What use can we make of it ?
&AmM^ffiMtfM
m
I*'U + $k&frmn
*
It would make good bricks.
We would need a machine to press them.
»BngM* JM~#7fr Jt
MfffcMZMMIfcte
After the bricks are pressed they are dried.
iftis ■M^m^m:^^MMAMm
Are they ready then for use ?
ftmmmif \
They must be burned first in a kiln.
wm& A*m>& m, Buk-ygr
&«   AB±i&
Gold Mining.;
Pile
Where did you get that ore ?
fn^A^0fa      I
XMAHiAmtmM
Up in the mountains northeast of here.
mmmnmMxmm.ffiii
Do you think there is any gold in it ?
i&AmMimMikms&Mm
Wfimik^\MMniim7B±^-
I cannot tell you ; it looks like quartz.
m&AM.mAM*mm 198
m
4
immn y
What had I better do ?
Have you staked out the claim ?
tfLAmMMJ^M   Hi
No, I have not done so yet.
MMmxn^M I
<£>Mi&m3£-
sr
Have you a miner's certificate %
ttLAmx^mmfiM
wMAmmm&
Where can it be got ?
£mmftm&Mmr\% m>
Apply at the registry office.
^mmMt^mmjmffiM±
ftgn&g®. y
What will it cost ?
IkMnxA:
You must pay $5.
Amm,xmjm m$m '&
How long will it last ?
O
#»im,RHMf '■■""A-:' ff
It will be good for one.year.
to* 199
How many acres have you taken up ?
ifSifkm^JtA&m^ #f
BAAWM.ikMM&AM^
40 acres, which is all the Government will allow.
mmmnLmmftmMm^it^.mm^
ik^mM^mum if
Do you want to locate a claim ?
fc«Rtf: I
I wrould like to do so.
w»-j ^5<
Art
M-AMIX& M-   A   »3
What length must the claim be ?
m^xdmn&m^ 1 Qfe
-^rmmx^x^rz^ {m&fem&m
100 feet wide, and not more than 300 deep.
mmmmMMmx\m%,m^m^m I,
mxm^-Mmmmimn i
Its surface boundary must be four straight lines.
mwmxAimmmm^MmfflMM * k
How long ago is it since you located the claim ?
$TIBiOT,^Tfrtfj iff .AA&WAM&B.
-^RttA fA    : I'  |
Not more than a month ago.
PAS^EJlSfiSra1 I
tmmmkzmmm.-ftftmmft kzmm
Have you filed your oath with the Land Agent ?
&AM,AM±,m±^#EP¥ I
i2l*- 200
I have not done so.
itmmm^mMxAB
The oath must be filed within thirty days.
m^AMmmm^x m Mmw
bmwmnmm
Is there any fee to pay ?
fmMMikmMX
m.wnm&$kmmx-jt
There is an entry fee of $5.
mnmmMmwhmwmjB
fcimAMnmt&Mik j
The agent will give you a receipt.
MumMmjiAMim
wmmftM p mt y
How long can I then hold the claim ?
ifm-M^^MmMMM
x^^mkwmm        l
For five years, if you improve it.
xjrAmxj$ftAMwm.tttf!
How much must be spent every year ?
Not less than $100 a year.
n^m,%mmmmMM
That will be $500 for the five years.
0 %n» Mmm&iW AmtM±
|1\ i.;v v- ■^■mw
nmkt
After that you may buy the land.
!lttPU0,AM»» I
tk$mmM&     m       |
Who do you buy it from ?
tJittA^^ttir
The Government, who holds the land.
What price do they ask ?
Atc-AM^ % X. A Aim
$5 per acre and $50 for the survey.
mrmmm^Mm, 1 wmim mSSt
mmmMxx^m §
Can you hold it for another five years ?
&mmnMmwM-~B^xmA
You may if $100 worth of work is done every year.
Am.miMMmiTm^xmmmftm
The agent's receipt must then be renewed
ntf^jt^
nwM^
Will any charge be made for the renewal ?
mmMikxm jmf-n Mm
^?Amik^mkxjt   §
It will cost you five dollars for every receipt.
mmMXAJMrm a^»muma
3*-^<i.
_0$!& - Jtm.
202
What do you swear to in the oath 9
^^AxmmmnMx If
mmm p &wnMMWi a
You tell where the mine is and its size.
ARmMM* ll Mm mmm±
^imm^zm p ,wmmm&
Do the same rules apply to placer mining ?
Exactly the same fees are to be paid.
m7m±^jmAttzi&
Washing gold is placer mining.
m^mAm\xm@^
n^itAMmif^.
What will I do with this quartz ?
im^j&^ximm  is
■■fiMHf I
Take it to an assayer.
mmm.&m §   fi
He will tell you what it is worth.
mmmRAMwnmm± as
WM
What do you think it will pay ?
m^Am.mmmx
At>jrW7c--£
About $200 to the ton.
1>r*i
I 3SAR Sl^SkTttUER
There is a lot of silver and lead in it.
The assayer will give you a report.
When are you going out prospecting ?
instil*J
Have no means to go out at present.
lkfm A&A&mkA^.
Can't you get some one to grub-stake you ?
^A^^mMMmm^A     a
I didn't think of that.
^miffa.ttB
mx&AMfttt Mtm^mk
Mr. Jones the grocer might supply you.
$m P ,M^ !£*«
What terms could we work on ?
You could give him one-half of what you find.
How much food will I want ?
wmtmmmA
/i>aat 204
mm* X B
Enough to last sixty days.
mmnMBm^xmM
You may get many miles away from a settlement,
Am^^cfk^mm^nmM^^m §
Shall I take a gun or rifle ?
Ak&ifUm.
It would be a good scheme.
^m&mmik        |   |
Wild animals might attack you.
$&Mtkm^MW:A |
Don't forget to take lots of matches.
tfm JM^±,fatt, -n^Tff
^.mmh^mp y
What tools shall I take ?
&gp>
You will want a pick, shovel and axe.
Am^MmmMmmMmjm
Had I better take a tent ?
&t£mxmm&.
&mmmmifimv&
You can build a shack that will do.
^®w,tta,B*n*&ftfc
iiU«i I can't carry all these things.
^wxmmMmkmm
M^MMMIf-mmAji
Buy a pack mule for $40.
mmm$&.¥mmiTB
It can live on grass and not cost you anything.
mmm^mmiMmj^AAMikm
Where do you strike that claim ?
MAfMiS,0£it      I
&mxxm&m &imzm
On lot 19 on the north side of the ridge.
Have you cut a trail to it ?
&API Jlffi^i&,ffiP@
I have some men working at it.
!m^'AW^-^7tXUM£
You must do at least $100 worth of work per year.
A«,t&Pi^ iff, WMtmm^AffiW&MM
mBfflWWWKi
What will you do with the ore ?
mmAKAnxftffi
Haul it to the smelter.
immjtmm&mi 206
Do the mining laws of Canada
JltnXIgmM-ttMiktiL
Mttmxmm
Differ from those of the United States ?
#ftA«^±,fatt^A^,Tfr
There is some difference.
ttnmmMmx-TJTtfflLXMA-^ «
The U. S. laws require $100 worth of work a year.
MAffimmm%&Mmnnw^±ffiw®m.m
^^-xA^xxA^-mmMMmmifitx^:
When must the work be done if located in 1892 ?
Amm,w& w, mmm M*m, mmm
£+A^Jf,ftM^i£itMa£P t     •
Within twelve months of taking up claim.
^xmMi.mMnmm^±m
Any buildings or trails cut are improvements.
Mik^frM^mz.&mmim •
mmmxtyimAm
Do you think this is a good mining district ?
fttAlnjmmM'if^MmRftv
The ore seems to pay well.
a^fa,^±af!^«
iktt&WBMM1&%:$.
Have you had any assayed ?
$LA£,M?k^&m&
m
4
ViVktil I sent down a few specimens.
What did they turn out ?
m
&
AX.A—-%
Fifteen dollars to the ton.
IWiSilil
m^x^M^mm
That is a high grade and should pay.
Bi&mMAifcmMmj%.x
What is that heap of earth piled up ?
^rfr0te,fatt3,i±J
That is the mouth of the shaft.
anm jmxMn fj|§ n
M^PffilBaS
Is that mine in operation ?
^"ffr0*,Hiltt^#
SjitraM^
Yes, it has been running for years.
Mit^ASS
How many men do they employ ?
if%?ki)CM$M$l%i
«: A, ft A+5f S A-ht
From 65 to 80 miners.
ttit ^ ±m& ,iiR m ,*m 208
- ^wxMAmft ^max zxx^mm fe
One foreman, two shift bosses and 25. shovelers.
Mm-%jmm%mMm Mm&Mmm
How much ore can they take out in a day i
A.Am$mnA-g-%.
Two hundred tons in 24 hours.
wsm tt, mmm a j jijs±
Do they use steam power ?
mAAm.mmm
No, it is done with water power.
mn-tix®L~& 1
What wages do they pay ?
&fe±j±nx
tg-tr^A^KSHTC-B
Miners get from $2.50 to $3 per day.
Mm^nmJMrm^jm^m$J^m
fM» A MAXm A, Hx A£ Bit
Engineers and blacksmiths get from $3 to $4.
him Mmmmmm^im.i^jmmm
W#£ P WS&m P Sfe53*J5'J3&
How does placer differ from quartz mining ?
immAxmA7,mtAX^.M^n
Placer mining is washing gold from gravel. iiiiiMtfi, m\m mm e m e a^
MMm.,mwTfim p £*£*&£#
Bench diggings means any mine on a bench
OO O J
^5^g P ,&^t*fc*:*r        %
In quartz mining you drill into the rocks.
m&^AAwmAmm& l
Creek digging is mining in the bed of a river.
It may also be in the bed of a creek or ravine ?
^%%W^A^Wk^M\X^^m.MALA
Bar digging means a mine in the bar of a river.
oo       o
f!l^JI±,lMH^fLfatt\E^E
Dry diggings are where water never overflows.
J OO o
Hill diggings must be on a hill by the creek.
Must the hill front on the river ?
It should front on the creek or river.
tornm ^WkAm m ,$ e
What is the meaning of "ditch " ? 210
A flume, pipe, or race, for carrying water.
ES«<M,fa^Tfr,«mm Mm
They must have the water to wash the gold.
Free miner is one who has a certificate.
i#^*^,^Tfr«,tttlfl:7ff,Mrfrtett«
xt%s m a, ntmm± <««
Can anyone hold a miner's certificate ?
imikMMmK*mm£im
xwzm^m ix ;\m mn
Any person over 18 years of age can hold one.
MMmMmmmMttumMif
^Hg*^'lA»ai
Can you sell it to anyone ?
&A^$&m&M!kn
&kxtmMmm%mA
It cannot be given or sold to another party.
ww\miM^m$M.WMm  4
^^ik^JM^
What if you should lose it ?
®^tt,A:M±#j
mz&m%zAzmjm)m
You can get a copy from the Recorder.
What must be paid for the copy ?
ymm^^xn®-
Mi
4
V.tklL^ It will cost you a dollar and marked u substituted."
M*mMAAm7BMmmMPmMAu.m
&i&m&MxMMm&m
Can you wash goid and not take out a certificate ?
&AmmWk^Mmx\mMMm-kttm i
%mkmx^mm-tkWLAAA7t,%mnmm
If you do so you may be fined $25 and costs.
^ttAB±#, Am^ MmmmMm m±
What would the costs amount to ?
It might be $10 or more.
■■■^tmn&geWk
You would be put to a lot of trouble.
Alf%^>fI,E^fatt M%
^Aikmmnitm   1
Can you wash gold in the winter ?
MAMmm^MnAij 1
In some places you can.
a>i>s^±,Am I
MSftSAAug-
There is too much snow and ice.
i^Tfr fcipi nM m \ mm
When is the best time to work the bars ?
AnrnAwmmMmm 212
&7mi jmm^iu&m&mn
At low water, as all the bars are bare.
m^mjMmMmM^^-
xn .«««&
What makes the river so high in July ?
«±,^E#A>iara
jtfcAlila^S^T
The snow which melts off the mountains.
nmMAMte-&nMiAxmm
&mmjAt'M±mtt
How do you stake out a mineral claim ?
«ATfrtt MX&S&s&B 1
tmnmwdiMAXA
You must have two posts four inches square,
A%%mALjsMx,Am^,mm
Mm^m-.mx
They must be numbered one and two.
nmm^nBMMmm  1
Place them at either end of the lot.
X^m ft M, MTIS,fatt, PM
MM&mx^m^.
How high must they be above the surface ?
#?A, liTff fi%. M®. iX Mpmx.
^ABR   I
Not less than four feet.
p\^Tfr,^Af»
That will give them a chance to be seen.
Bm^mmM^x^m^
m ;sMMikZ%&z    ..
You should write your name on post No. 1.
A$mA±,m&x,m&M
mMBX,mmuz£
Also write the date and name of claim.
mm^MtmMm,±mi&m
mjkmmmtkm$&&mn E.m%MM^xm
Mark it '' Initial Post.'' f
mmkm.m&x
tkmmmxwmtwm
You must state in what direction No. 2 lies.
AMIffiff $c0,«» XH E*i>il±
It is north-west of No. 1.
Ri£AM±«,fattffi
Then mark it down on No. 1.
^MP@'#;,3cF&Ell
It is unlawful to move that post.
mtm&%m&jmtt,Bi%±
tkmmwM.^nm
You should also make a statement
A&MmnMmmmm
That the claim lies to the right or left of posts.
Bm&MMAm^MWMMm&A
Jlt^llS^JltM    I
Should that be written on the post?
J%B^m&M&A .214
m
4
mnw**
^mt
It must be marked on post No. 1.
m&m.m&AAm^m.
&ZM p &m-m M&m
Your claim lies on one side of the line.
A£J6Jf ±^Si&,fattA«f §
tkimimmr
What line do you mean?
4SMM3M m .    i
A direct line between posts No. 1 and 2.
w mm.mmMxm^mMm ti
ikinMM&Ztttim
Do you want to buy my claim ?
mAmjm,K&m
&mkMum. y
What will you take for it ?
nxxB.M^
Give me fifty dollars.
im^wmfm      I
The transfer must be in writing
ikn^mmm^m
Will you give me a deed ?
ffi
^-.XM
That is not necessary.
Ammxxikmmm
♦tttnii- 215-
The writing must be signed by you.
nm^mm^iuMA
m±mMm%fm t z®. ,nmmm p m
Can a miner hold a claim after certificate expires ?
wmt^imm&m $&ttmmi&tf®m±ft&
No, he must get it renewed.
MMMmA^mmn
Where can a miner look for gold ?
mm%A^Mxm&
Upon any lands in the Province.
mnmikmMnmikA
Except Government reserves for townsites.
mm f mrnMB mx.x-^^t
■mm^vm .nmmAzm.m w&
Can a claim be located in an Indian Reserve ?    No.
m Amm 7 m±m p zm.ftxmmn
Nor on land lawfully occupied for placer mining.
M^n. %mmn ,mwrn Axxm^, # w
■^mmmm. a, mmnxmmzm
A free miner may cut timber on crown lands.
mffi^wzmmifeM%iifc±Vi ..
And on timber leases if for mining use.
m^mF&m,mAxx^,Am:       '■■•■ ■Si
r <M-W*r
216
How large may a creek claim be ?
&kxmmmn~-gRZ£
It must not measure more than 100 feet.
psiiTfr l pmm k, %ffim%
mmwmitAymmmm^
And it shall follow the course of the stream.
Mmm&^itwtm±MttMmfflm.
How wide is the claim ?
im-fcm^&M
From the base of one hill to that of the other.
tt^mnKfattw^Mfatt .w&m
XimmMMit^, pft%m&Gfr mm p
A free miner may lease a placer claim.
m^K^M^mMxm*7,AkM
For how many years ?
mfxtkmm
Not more than ten years.
nm^mmm
mmm^mA"<
How much land can he lease ?
ifmmmMmm
m^m ?mxwm §
In dry diggings, ten acres
Mf
4
!-U'W : In creek diggings one-half mile in length.
&iu&mmxsiM ,-**&#>
On bar worked before 1J miles.
%mmmAM*mMm'\&tt
tk^wm^mmmwAmR
Where can you get a lease of these claims ?
mr\^ArW$mj®tt&m&M
From the Gold Commissioner.
First put a stake at each corner of the claim.
ATtr,^ETfr^,R@MPf^,fatt,^^ji
Posting a notice on one nearest other claims.
mm&Minmm ,%n%:&m\ mi±m
What must be written on the post ?
mm%-wm,%nmx
Your name and where the ground is situate.
A±MmMfcim,mmAA&i
mxm&mA ,mmA%k
Also how much land and extent of lease.
^ ,mmmMmmm&.M¥&m
A like notice must be put in the Recorder's office.
mMmmMm^M ^m w,fa$±
A-/
7HT
IBP. 218
&mk%\mmmm±im .1
Then you write to the Gold Commissioner.
mkA^m^±mm&zmm
Give him your name and number of certificate.
iU*A^,®i*^E,fatt"rpMtt«
M^mMfcMM
How much land and where it lies ?
fmm&MtmmMm
xmm'&Mikmmnmm
Also the rent to be paid and time you want it.
:»i jm%mxMim, aw 1
^rfgffi^ilWAial
Can you lease it to another party ?
«^ iff % J1PMA R\*til
Not without the consent of the Gold Commissioner
n\m± * 111 * ,fatt*^l&,m
t=t
Cutting Wood.
Good morning, madam.
^m-ikm^MMmm     p
Do you want any wood cut this morning ?
m.-rfA&*pMM$mffl
There is a pile I want sawed and split.
MnmMtmMWM&Mm.mikm
4
Mi
m &~^&AmB   I
You may carry it into the shed
AM.mmMm-m
tk^mmm.
Have you a sawr-horse ?
mA%m^x
There is one on the other side of the coal-bin.
n tmm. &w&nffi mh m^ mm
mmmAUkkmrn
Pile it up nicely in this corner.
mmm^M^M, mm ^
IkWMgWLSm
What do you charge a cord ?
mt.AxmMM     *
$1.50 for cutting, splitting and piling.
mMB^mft.xm&.mitm&Mm Mfr
Do you want these slabs cut up ?
%±AWtkm,mm±jm
Yes, they will do for kindling
mm^ms&M'fmm
Pile that up in the other corner
«0ip,i,H;».fT,niA
nm^xmAMnm
Shall I carry some into the house ?
&m,imm>bmmif± 220
Bring in a few armsfull.
%-frmM^xmm
Have you another axe ?
&A,lSPj£ii|r,R@7fr
What is the trouble, is yours broken?
mm l tmpm, nm > a mmm*
jit^UffiDr 7
The handle is broken.
&Mfi?AAv& ':
There is not another about the place.
iir^Tfif R\HPi£PW M&JAX^m
Shall I try and borrow one ?
^m.mmMmMmm
m®im^m,±ffift&m.
Ask our neighbour, Mr. Smith.
RW.JIYMEIt&iifrjffM
mpu%MfeWkm-m
He may lend you his for a while.
mmMAmm^mmm
I wish you would split that wood finer.
m.&zmnA^AM.
Those sticks won't go into the stove.
^xmmM^-miMm^n
m
4
■■MM 221
Are any of them too long ?
&»fatt1t,M
Some might be,sawed again.
&m#)fi£iiSJE
&- b mmmm\\ y
How many cords can you cut in a day ?
■&%ik&M3M,mvm
One cord and a half if I work hard.
w.mMmt&w,KttM®.m
ikmrnnxm
You should make good wages.
^m^x^mm
I have finished the job, madam.
^^mfkmnmM^
«5tiIiIt^St* Y
Have you returned the axe ?
fkAMM^mm
I have just taken it back.
i&&mm,mwm
im^mft^yk Y
Did you thank the gentleman ?
wmm^imm-x
mn&Mgmi&ffifeZ3%n
Yes, I thanked him for the loan of his axe.
H7fr,^ffi$iS,TO^,fatt,^±p@7fr 99?
What shall I do with these chips ?
&&mm± i nx jkmmx
mmAmn
Carry them to the house.
ffimti£MteiT±
&w&m «# , ±tkMm
Can I do anything else for you ?
®mt,mikm%.&±\ xa
I am house-cleaning; you may help me
^mfx^m^An.M±%
i
/TA2
um)Af
Tidy up the kitchen first
mm^n^m.Am
^«««hjiy
WHiere shall I empty these ashes ?
m^m^nmjkm^m
mmummM f
Throw them out into the lane.
Help the servant take down the stove,
#}MmAm$&&titm&
Don't get any soot on the carpet.
m^mikj^^PAm
itM'MMMXft
The pipes must be taken down first.
-fcfflm±dm%mm.,Am 223
Take them apart at the elbow.
$fi|BlPA,R0#A.»?§
mmmm
That stove is heavy, can you carry it ?
mwwMgm
We can manage it all right.
5R:
At&AX&mmMft    m
Don't let your end drop.
»1AII,M
Rest a minute; it's getting heavy.
2£
vm.
dbrfe
£,K
l&mllUTO a
mm 1 lit tt ^ |p| inffi® bkz,
You may take off the lids.
AWfatt A^iJ
•   l &mx
On Board Ship.
-*;l-\
tkm»tM'&
Where are you bound for ?
ffl&A*M I  I
&A®nm
I am going to America.
ftp.
m*
m.
A(
When do you except to get there ?
^B±A,RE
-^BCk\
nig' 224
*!
4
m^x.^mn7m
It will be a three weeks' voyage.
fk~fi AmBM^ms,
Have you a second class ticket ?
^AJ!Ifi:i£-lc#7|r,S«   ;.'■■
^m.Wj^WA^UA
No, I am going steerage.
M-tmis-m.mmim
nmfk^^MAm
I hope you will have fine weather.
^A«,&#s#Pfr     ,
What are those small boats on the deck ?
^^AAfcrnm^^mti
B:Axm
3LELAE
Thev are the life-boats
-Ml
^S&^jj-Itt*
They are used in case of danger.
^3&Aifr,B?n7frA'Htt-Sy
How do they put them in the sea ?
c
They let them down with block and tackle.
m w&A^mmm &mxm
Those are the life lines hanging up.
* 'Until ui
—MB 225
&m^MMAX7Km
Here are the life preservers in these boxes.
m^mmMmnm. mtrnMrnx.
-MftM^HflJY
What makes the boat roll so much ?
There is a heavy gale blowing.
mnmMmmm^M.m
What are they setting the sails for ?
&RWifeTft&3m
To help steady the ship.
What is that small craft coming ?
mmsBmmvtf&ktf.wm
That is a pilot boat.
BtmMmnnk
They will put a pilot on board.
■temmMumm^^ f     fc
«7KA,3IMfA®
The pilot will steer the ship into port ?
wMMAmmmmMM   s
m.M7mm%iMMAmm
Who are those men from the tug ?
tt&%±3:^m,te&      -■'■■■■ ■" M 226
m%m±A&f¥zg. ammmAzw&
They are the quarantine officers.
^mmm^mx^. §
Why are they coming on board ?
To inspect the passengers and crew.
mm ±it, j*t mm MmM^.
pm&mx^mmm
All on board will be examined.
mm^mmxm&
They will issue a clean bill of health.
mm^^u&m%.mxmm±
How long will we be kept in quarantine ?
mm&vc-B
We may be here one day.
Here is the Custom House Officer.
mnm ,$m~ftf}iifAMM®
He has been talking to the Captain.
mmmMi^^Jmmm
4§ib] libit*
He is coming this way.
mnm.mmtkm^
4
< lUWlll.rl 227
Who is that officer with him ?
ti^TffBfitffe&^i*
m^-g^AAH
That is the purser.
StftXAikBm §
The gentleman is speaking to you.
mmx> mt±M.® ma
He wants to know if you had a good trip,
mmiM.mxAZMmm,
I enjoyed it very much.
WTere you sea-sick at any time?
rdtfc to
mAm^M^mtk^
WWM B ^tiifS^*
For the first two days I was very ill.
TOATfrffij*, $mm M^m
mxxAwmkim f
Were you well treated bv the officers ?
They were all very kind to us.
mm&^m&M-m
What is that light on the shore ?
&nmB&&nffi 228
That is the light house.
Btm,i8%it?±
&£&MMiM P 5& \
How far is it to the harbour ?
mttmMifcm
Am^-^mA
About an hour's sail.
fl£fc,HJIYJUfr
We are ih the Gulf now.
m&mtAmM I
Are we sailing with the tide ?
^.m^frMxtm
No, the tide is against us.
M.nm nmM&m. *&m
We are passing through the Narrows.
There is a swift current against us.
MtemMm^mti^M^mj^m
nmmw&xm'mm
Shall we go up on deck ?
nmmifTk^m
We can have a better view.
ii 229
MMm^pHa!
Do we anchor out in the Inlet ?
No, we lay alongside the dock.
<zg:
ift&iHtff*
w
l/ook after your baggage.
^^ J oo     o
«BittPft,yv^EWD
We have a tax to pay on landing.
m$LMmxmx^m%.
mfmm«!tA_£
To whom do we pay it ?
ffi»fc>JtfcH3>iiB
nmrnmrn
To the Collector of Customs.
>ffl;»M,fatt±«.
What is the amount ?
%—^AXXA       |!
Fifty dollars for each person.
^ttM*r«l,;?R@ffi,fa#
nw%ft,xn&*wm
Do we pay a yearly tax besides ?
%±mxMmwx,m&
Only the regular poll-tax.
%mjmmwM$&&± f^~
230
■%,t .u.
-* >./
Have you ever been in Canada before ?
a AM EilH ,® &«s Al A
itf?i,-ft—=P A HA +-E^*MEp#
Yes, I go there in 1885.
« Ai^m 0 R@IM»l*
Do you require to pay the tax ?
ttAStl Y Mxtmx
m&A&&mMMm*x:n y.mmw&mi
No, I lived there before 1st July, 1S86. #*
m xmmm a, AUTMii 'm$m*&%.m
m&tz&.xmwAm$i,Mnm&
Any one arriving after that date pays the duty.
mfkm,^MAMnmB,xn s m
mtmixmrnwrnrnk
Here is the collector with your certificate.
mm jmwm MXAMtttm
iit^A p z b x m^smzz
It gives the late of entry and name of port.
$ki&& * m&^xfnmmwM,
Can you return from China without a certificate ?
T&mm.tt^mk^xMMmibftu
You must first get a permit from the Collector.
Amm Mm^, mMm, m&jmmm
mwm&mntkzmmm
He will ask you for your certificate.
i!c«,p#7frA, ^Ami&ttM
4
IkWr^b- 231
*n«Ai m A^M-jtmns.
Before sailing pay him $1.
mmim&mmmk
He will give you a certificate of leave.
MfnmJjAEitr^tt^.fatt^tt
ni
ill 63U' miJ*%2AA±shr
That will allow you to come back.
'TV
Bmm^.^AMmm
mkzmwLMm&ik H
Your entry fee will then be given back to you
Ammmhmm^AmmA
$ktpZAm
About the City.
Ip
>./
r
Shall we take a walk ?
mfjmnMmftixttm
Yes ; let us go around the city.
MmMmfMUMm,Am
mmfii^mxm-mmm
Are there many grand sights ?
^.M.xfkmmm
There are some fine parks.
The residences are all well built. ^»—
4
232
m mm y
W7hat material is used ?
&jL.m,im,Am
Brick, stone and wood.
-^li,Tffffi.©itfe,lF
y^.
The Banks and Government buildings are stone.
m&MmzmMm^
Brick is used for building the stores.
«, W, AWi£S A^Tff^
Most of the dwellings are of wood.
^±,fatt^t^n^,iSfattiP
MAfiin
Coal is used for fuel.
-*5TOrfi\Arfr¥l#
titmAMmm^BMR       1
Which are the finest buildings in the country ?
mmuzm
The Parliament buildings.
ni£l7!J ,5 M^cWxaifeE
The Members of Parliament assemble there.
nx&xmim?*x&w%mM
$cmmAA^-Am
The I/ieut. Governor has a grand residence. MmftmAA&xmmif
The grounds are large and well kept,
What building is that ?
^-^S,^"rfr0
That is the new City Hall.
Bnm,mn^mif\
mft^zm^mm   ■
The Mayor has an office there.
-«,W,lSfa#±,fr
ipi*
—-^fr
^AE/BJWnfic-3-iSinS.
Where is the Council chamber ?
fmm.nmmmjm
$mxAB I
The large room up-stairs.
tmfeMMm
The Council meet there on business.
nmmmMm.mhmtkA
Who are in the Council ?
^^mft^^MP
The Mayor and Aldermen of the city
How often are they elected ? 234
Once every year the elections are held,
xi^Kxmmm^m
Can anyone vote ?
imtkm.w
teimmmzA^mnn
No person, but a property holder.
Mfm.Aummm.im
mmimAnmmmmmm
Can a man paying rent vote?
mu%,xmm,m |
^wxsin^AXAm.m-'A^mxm-
He may if he pays $60 a year rent.
mm^tfmxwxmimMMM
ikANmiikZ7nw$.
Where do you pay your water bill ?
«AS,APiW-«
fej^nlZM^B
At the water-works office.
m&mmBuzn^Bm^
It is next door to the Treasurer's office.
mtem^mm&Mm&m&MM±
#M•3iAa^ll*M«A
The City Engineer's offices are up-stairs.
mim i mmfa#±, -SiiTfr m
m*z®mx%wx,ftmft&mWt
The Health Officer is in the same building.
mm±j%®& .nm, m n^^m
4 235
x\Lmft&
What is that place with the high wall ?
i&tem.Bx^-^^xnA^
m a- -ffiZJg,
That is the Count^Jail.
BifllHHHl
ABB^-mAm
The Penitentiary is a larger building
mKm&m&mx
The prisoners must work there.
mmm^x^.
What do they teach them ?
All kinds of works and trades.
mmuMm'Amm^m
Xm$rfr$}J&M 1
The Government controls it.
CTfnp«i,pfffiS.Mi
Who is that man with a rifle ?
vtmiB%.&±u&ffl&
He is one of the guards.
XWiM^W A26-£, IE IlJ ft H«1E
He will shoot any prisoner who tries to escape.
nm&mikx^m, ^m^mw$ 236
—*-w
SEAMS
Here is a gang of men grading the street.
m-m&mA
They are the chain gang.
8&MM&M&WX.&
Why are they working there ?
m.W}A$3&M
The Magistrate has ordered them out.
n^mmn JtmMfMtM
Have you been down to the wharf ?
^LAmmMnmn a
They are building a new one. ^
It is for passengers and freight.
umm.ximMMm.nm   -
Watch them unload the steamer.
MSfflJfcfcY
Where did she come from ?
mmtMttm aaI
i&mmij Mwmmmm
The Orient and carries the mail.
m
i
iknnfe. 237
ikmmmmm^zM «
She has a  large cargo of tea.
^fflrff,tt#?&-fc&,Mttft '
Do the steamers (carry lumber ?
No,-they take flour and merchandise.
MJmffi% Y MmMWl&X
The lumber is taken away by the sailing ships.
nu e ,nm timmg jtm&frm
There is a barque loading at the mill dock.
mnm^mt M^mnmm m
What is that ship anchored out for ?
She is taking out her ballast.
mtm.m^MAWAmm
Let us go on board the steamer.
m^mM^^nmih y
uxfoA^Ammmm
Look at this big steam barge.
5ip@^cifr,intli!i«?§
What is she loaded with ?
%£nm,nnw&±
wmBmMi*
2$C 238
4
Granite for the new post office.
%mn,xnnw±xm±
ItfeWH^jli: Y
Where do they get it ?
From the quarry up the coast.
nmmbrnMnvjA
How do they unload-it ?
imn^&M
fliffi Atl ffiff
They use a steam derrick.
nAmMm^mft
Have you been out to the museum ?
HAmMMnfflVUik
^&tkmzwm&
No, what part of the city is it in ?
MM*\ffiw,te&m,nmmM
It is in one of the suburbs.
R@a^iff,0llfatt,;M h
imt\-Zm-&i£&M.i£iMM.
The belt-line cars go near there.
mrMArmm^-tLM.®.
W7hat is that large glass house ?
&nm,BmfeMBmM±
ai*j 239
mM&m&mim&nzm § $
That is the conservatory.
BWftAtemnmwffl     a ;§.
xmfm&xmiwf x
The chapel is up on the hill.
nm&,miM%tmmi x
Is that a factory with the tall chimney ?
■ 10 mmmm &x nwm, m i
That is the power house.
m/mHftffimmjm^xm
It supplies electric power for the tram cars.
mm^MMM&%.^$mUX
»Mtm.ZMAm
Do they furnish the lights for the city ?
mmikm .mm.wAm    l
nmmAm&mm t
They have many large lights on the streets.
n&iakMfem,%nmffl.n   i
mm-nsmmi (imi*A)
Some parts are lighted by gas.
m\,&&MMm
The gas works are over in the east end.
nnmn.^M&mAnmm
tmi£.mkmzm%.&
Have you passed the Custom House ?
HLAfmsnMmmf± i : a
&*M% 240
It is over the post office.
pS^ifr ,fa E^,W±fa#i±
The Bank is on the other corner.
nMnm^nmjvf^
Do you want that cheque cashed ?
JttA«0#JBTff |a      ;!a
wmfoMMwrnA
Hand it to the Teller.
Jffc»@Jffi**B.4*
itmwAkmm
The cheque is not "marked."
n^nm.nm
&sm&%m.kzfttt
Put it in the ledger-keeper's wicket.
mmMnmm^^nu
Is that a school-house on the hill ?
nmBMm^mfx^nmm
That is the Public School.
Bnm .n^Eft Amsm
The High School is on the next street.
nAm-£$&,nm%nA&mAfiMm
f£M^& 7 '■     i
The scholars are out at recess.
nm^B^MMmmm
4 BH
What games are they playing ?
&ffi^nx&%.
Foot-ball and lacrosse.
w&mMmM^x
A9k-gmuMftmmMM
The University is in the west end.
nAfkmmm ,nm Mnmrn j
iBIJtlSliffi KZ&ffi®.
Where is the asylum for lunatics ?
It is over near the Hospital.
mxmffi &3kmfA'&m
Do you see that house next the hotel ?
b± am , 0 #f±,s\ nmnrn
That is the theatre.
0^,a$^|Bft J
M-tAM^S:
Here is a very large church.
mnmM^^BiuMft
Would you care to see the organ 1
mam MmnMi*
mmBjkmw^     .
You can hear it played on Sunday.
A«RH,S«,3c«
■v 242
><
m
Law
p*?
What is the meaning of a threat ?
&nmtffi&Mttv&M
mwMAAjktmmm
Telling a person you will do him some harm.
xfrm.f&m,Afflmj&B,>b±A
You may say you are going to whip him.
AISm,A«OT,.«
m&rm*.imik     mi   ■
He might be in great fear of you.
Could he bring an action for a threat ?
m&Qfrmjm&rmm
Yes ; if you prevented him from working.
mm.nnAxmA&mjm/&&
JT^-timTA   (imTA^A-ffiJKIiifr!)
Assault is laying hands on a person.
^.^nm^mm^m^m     j.
&WAfflm%®&m®£MM) |
This prisoner is on trial for burglary.
tkmx^mm .nm^*m$&,¥ h mm
Are there any other charges against him ?
&MM?kmTAfeM%mm
4 243
He is charged with carrying concealed weapons.
mnm^^xmiummm®.
How was he captured ?
ifWmMMM I .
A detective was put on the case.
«#il£ttfeiESft i
The stolen goods were found in his possession.
nmw^^±M^tmm.mAM^m m
He tried to pawn a gold watch.
m^mMnMmm^m -
Did he have an accomplice ?
mfcxskAximm
The man who helped him cannot be found.
n^r±toim,w\^Ai       1
M-tiJEliAY   I | '
What witnesses have you ?
W^fkXMA I
mmAmmm
The second-hand dealer will give evidence.
n^&fcMm^m.mmm
mAzmmmM        f •
The prisoner's counsel asks for a remand.
nx^m^MmmMm^n.M% . 244
tg
m
Will the judge grant it ?
nmnm^^nm I
That depends on circumstances.
Bmn^^^mnm
Why are you not read}- to proceed ?
mw^n^mMimMiiA
mnftmAxmmm        §y
An important witness cannot attend.
Has he been served with a subpoena ?
mm Mmmx^x^myc
xmnn&^^-^m.nzA
He cannot be served for a week.
Jlt£§l«IS+ B
The case will be remanded for 10 days.
■mm ,«4uf £ ,«#*
ife##jH:IEA«aj«l
Will you let the prisoner out on bail ?
No, the crime is too serious.
M.n-BU,nmMAm±
The bookkeeper swindled his employer.
n h^E,lff^& Jicifr^g^T
2mmM 245
■HHBI I
He will be prosecuted.
mmm^-M^mmk   il
«miifcm*»a§       Ii
Can you prove the fact ?
A false entry is in the ledger.
feEISMAjm'BZM    | J|f§|
He is suspected of committing forgery.
mnmMmmMixmm^Amm
Is he under arrest ?
His employer has sworn out a warrant.
»,«* Y ,«,«* JP
M
■&&
**
What is the nature of this crime ?
mnm,nuM.MWkmi)mL
I mw.&k AAm . ft
A police officer was shot by this man.
m mmnM®Mmn.M2kmx
iBge^Mii 1    j -a
Did he make a confession ?
mi
^
^Mieram*
li-Sflftt  fth
A confession was extorted from him.
><
i^#,RiTffji
■m 246
»«#tfjL P Mm ?
Was there any malice aforethought ?
mmMMik^WRfm
No, he was trying to escape arrest.
M,m.mmjm&Mmm%j^m
-fBiHAUAS^I
He will be tried for murder.
mmwmm^sfa y
When was the post-mortem examination held ?
Am m, n^±B*& i p@$t & nmmn
W B XXWkliB
Yesterday afternoon at the police station.
MmmMmmMn,x^m.m^p^
imtm&mwxm
Did they extract the bullet ?
&nMmmm^nmn
They found it in the body.
n^tmMn^m ..
it^Ax^wmmm^
The assassin had a revolver.
n~&ft,£MMffl&
ilt?f iATE-frJtt P nf A •
The bullet was of the same calibre.
^*B?Ufifrfatt^ix^«
mmxmm
He was sent up for trial.
4, xknmmiTA §       I
Hitting a man with your fist.
bto^iira p jmmym <MM$m
Kicking him|or|spftting in his face is battery.
m7]tfmmMM\Am^Tjm p
Cutting or stabbing with a knife is wounding/
mfcMm^M^xmmxnmMfc • ■
$cA%mM}$Wim §§t ,
A man will be punished for wounding.
Except in self-defence.
R@?l,B£Ptt,«ffi I
wmmmwx®i iff
A criminal action would be imprisonment.
mMxmkmmm M%Mxmm^i
«7'HAJai*l2A# I
Wounding a person would be criminal.
No action can be brought for assault.
When in defence of your wife or child.
^HMifr,fattAffitt,fa:^i&
mimz^-m^ms §
But don't strike a blow after all danger is past.
A,^ififmM,E^#,^tt€^^^Ma^T|rfS"f6- [~
248
ikn%$,-A8tikzmm
Can you kick a man out of your house ?
mAWm.3iM MttAifX
im^i&AMm.xtmn
Hot if he comes in quietly.
n^iAiScffiiawj
itt^mmxAJkm$km&
If he breaks in you may throw him out.
nnm^mm.Am^mmM
m%*m~4^m£;.tkmmmm
If he won't go you may use force.
ikMttnM
Did you win the suit ?
&AAnm 1
11I«fitffc7
The case was dismissed.
]^*n7fr,n¥Tfr,i=di7ffMTfr
Do you pay any costs ?
J&AXMikMA        .       ||   §
The plaintiff must pay all costs.
mmim Amm        m
Have you heard about the murder ?
XLAmM&nBm    a
A woman was raped and killed by a negro.
MMXMimMm&m.nu^n
Mfei
4
■_ 249
Have they caught the fiend ?
fonmn.n
The police caught him.
nx&mMm §
mEfMBiH
He is in the cells.
A mob tried to lynch him.
B
UMMm
•»/■*-*   V7FC
mfFmSHlfEi!!!       «
Did they get hold of him ?
tknammMttm
J»ftf7,*«#AJr£
The mob couldn't break into the cell.
The coroner will hold an inquest.
n^mMmmmMtm  ,
mmMn^mzB
The body is in the morgue.
n^m.nm^n^m a i
The murderer was tried at the assizes.
nm w&Mmefflm. mnmm±
IkMmirm,
Did you hear the evidence ?
&AmnMmm « iH 250
I heard the Crown Attorney speak to the jury.
i£mn,mumm,±mmMm'
What was the verdict ?
imm.n^m
The jury found him guilty of willful murder.
&^1i),mmm&tmA%\
The judge then spoke to the prisoner.
He asked him if he had anything to say.
mmt^AnttA^ArnkmAmt .
The judge then passed the sentence
nm.fe!%jmnwMA       I
That he should be hanged.
0is$cJf»fi     i
&m&mi.\m%LB
The sheriff took him to the jail.
^#tt,^M#^t,;&     §•
mBMfcn&kMxmnz w
He will be executed iu a few weeks.
m.fflm%-M±Wr±MMW®.
Do you think he will get a reprieve ?
4 251
There is no chance of it.
f? ^7fr,^Bt±,fattR@ I
mMfrW&A&Xik
It would be running counter to the popular feeling
There is a case of manslaughter.
MnmM$mMtf3:m&R
nt^mmnmrnmm
Will it be tried by the Supreme Court ?
mmmM^mMnmxmm
fcmmztmn%kAZAffir*\
The trial will come up at the fall assizes.
mmmmmxmMmmMmx
jitlg-^Ifiitfrfm-S
What are the facts of the case ?
^■^.tmxMftmm xt
One man shot another while gambling.
Had they been good friends ?
^A^l-ttiiiA
#AH«ii#i5ira
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Will the prisoner be hanged ?
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He will get a long term in prison ?
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It may be for twenty years or for life.
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What is that man on trial for ?
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Arson ; he set fire to a hotel.
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He will be sent to prison for life.
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What are those loud shrieks ?
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That is one of the prisoners.
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Whipping him with a lash.
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What is the crime ?
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Seduced a girl under 14 years of age.
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He will be in prison for life.
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The prisoner attempted to commit rape.
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Was the girl under 14 years of age ?
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She was not 14 years old.
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He would be whipped and put in prison for life.
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If the girl is over 14 ?
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He would get seven years.
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A man can be hanged for committing rape. 254
What is this blue paper ?
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A subpoena from the High Court.
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You must attend Court this sitting.
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Here is a dollar for witness fees.
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Be in the Court Room at ten o'clock
It is the first case cn the docket.
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No loud talking in the Court Room.
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Suits concerning lauds and estates.
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From the Supreme Court to the Court of Appeal.
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The highest Court is the Privy Council.
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Serve him with a judgment summons.
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He will be ordered to pay a small sum each month
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It was adjourned from last Court.
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I will appeal to the High Court.
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All executions are put into his hands.
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It was in my coat hanging on the fence
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There was no one else about.
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Was the case tried this morning ?
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What does he want to prove ?
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That he has a good character.
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The Clerk of the Court is calling you.
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Walk up to the witness box.
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Always speak the truth.
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The judge can also have him whipped.
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And over 14 years of age,
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Will be punished with two years in prison.
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Procuring girls for houses of ill-fame,
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Or making any threats to get them there,
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Will be imprisonment for two years with hard labor.
Into how many degrees are crimes divided ?
Into three degrees : first, second and third.
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What is murder in the first degree ?
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The unwarranted killing of a person with malice.
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What is the third degree of the crime ?
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Causing the death of a person through carelessness.
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The penalty is imprisonment from 7 to 21 years.
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The judge passes the sentence and states the terrm
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In the U. S. the Governor may grant a pardon.
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Yonder 280
Name of People.    4^ \M A 45
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Manchurians  MM A
Mongolians  i^Lla A
Japanese  p ^ A
Malays  ??SA
Hindoos    EHJScA
Persians  SUA
English      55H A
Irish  ^JTfrA
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French  ffitjffi A
Germans  M\M A
Spaniards     ,  AS 7K A
Russians  MBM A
Portuguese  jS}^ A
Canadians  4b3^5? A
Americans    B^ISA'
Mexicans     I? Tfjlif A
Peruvians  ^$'1} A
Hawaiians  ffi^Lil A
Dutch     WW A
Danes    ^A
Swedes    fM
Messrs.   Gentlemen.   Sir.... ^M^WMM
Mr.    Mister  3fc£^illf§
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M.D.      Medical Doctor  Sdr
Capt.    Captain  ^U pip
Esq.     Esquire  3u5E/<_r
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Hon.    Honorable  AA^-SI
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Addresses.
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Your obedient Servant.
Worshipful Sir.
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Mr. A. or Dear James.
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Mr. B. Dear Sir.    My Dear Sir.    Dear Friend.
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Your affectionate father or mother.
Your dutiful son.    Your affectionate son.
Your affectionate brother.    Your loving brother.  286
His Excellency Lee
The Viceroy of Two Kwong
Canton.
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Hon. Lai
Consul-General
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Sam Yip Society
825 Dupont Street
San Francisco
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Chinese Consulate
Benevolent Association
728 Commercial St.
San Francisco
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To.
The Honorable
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Premier and Provincial Secretary
of British Columbia
Yictoria,
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To Hi
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ancouver
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City Magistrate
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ancouver
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Mr. Lai Chong
Importers and Commission
Merchants
25 Government Street
Victoria
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Messrs. Wah Chong & Co.
Wholesale Merchants
With a parcel
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Seattle
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Chin
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Flour Dealer
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Messrs. Tun Sung Tong & Co.
25 Second Street
Portland
Oregon
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Mr. J. J. Tungpuls
care Mr. A. Smith
From Yokohama
Tai Kee
Victoria
B.C.
Per Empress of India
Mr. king Tai
242 Jorvoies St.
Hongkong
W. R. Thomas, Esq.
104 W. Street
By kindness
Mr. Campbell
with $100
Nanaimo
B.C.
m £ ^ S
I
ram 292
Vancouver, B. C.
I U April 25th, 1892.
Dear Madam,
I   received  your kind invitation  to dinner,  but  I
am sorry to say that I will not be able to be present as I
t
have pressing business to attend, and returning thanks for
the same.
Yours truly,
I J. B. Cook.
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Victoria, B. C,
August 15th, 1892.
Dear Mr. P.
Mr. Marshall, a friend of mine, has arrived to-day
from London, England, and is stopping with me. I shall
be very glad if you will come and take dinner with us
to-morrow evening at half-past six o'clock, as I have no-
doubt you would like to make his acquaintance.
Yours truly,
J. B. Jung.
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Mr. B,
Vancouver, B. C,
October 7th, 1892.
My Dear Sir,
Please accept ray best thanks for your kind present,
■which I appreciate very much.   I am very scarry that you
should incur such ejqpense on my account.   Hoping you are
getting well,
Yours respectfully,
J. P. G.
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125 Johnson St.
Victoria, B. C.
AV December 5th, 1892.
Dear Joe,
I have not been able to see you for a long time and
regret that I could not do so, but really I have not had a
moment to spare. I hope, however, to see you here on next
Tuesday's boat. I beg you will accept as a small token of
my regard the two tins of Velong Tea which Mr. Baily will
give to you.    Please give my compliments to Mrs. Grant.
Yours truly,
T. J. G.
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Victoria, B. C,
December 24th, 1892.
A., Esq.
My Dear Sir,
Accept my warmest thanks for the beautiful present
which you sent me at Christmas.
Yours sincerely,
F. K.
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Victoria, B. C,
December 23rd, 1892.
Mr. C.
My Dear Sir, .
Please accept this small token from me.    Hoping you
may have a joyful Christmas Day.
Yours respectfully,
B. O.
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i Dear Mr. G.,
On my return from Victoria this morning at eleven
o'clock, your letter was placed in my hands. I will see Mr.
T. this evening on the subject and will let you know the
particulars to-morrow morning.
Yours sincerely,
B. R.
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Victoria, B. C,
.^; November 5th, 1892.
Mr. Franklin,
Dear Sir,
We have received vour letter of the 2nd inst., enclos-
ing the twenty dollars' rate which we have forwarded to
Tai Chong & Co. of this city. We beg to say receipt for
the same was sent to you by yesterday mail.
Yours truly,
E. Jervis.
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47 Front St.,
New Westminster, B. C,
October 5th, 1892.
Mr. Besip,
Purser of the otr. Yosemite.
I send you by the bearer the opium tin ; please carry
to Bow Yune & Co., Corner Government and Commenent
Sts., Victoria.
Yours respectfully,
F. K.
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Vancouver, B. C,
November 2nd, 1892.
Johnston,
Dear Friend,
I should like to have the Chinese and Knglish book
of mine that you have. Hope you will oblige me by returning it as soon as possible.
Yours truly,
H. MOGDY.
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Vancouver, B. C,
November 6th, 1892.
B., Esq.,
Dear Sir,
It is now a lonor time since I have seen you, but I
have often thought of you. I hope you are enjoying excellent
health. Everything is very dull just now, and I am much in
need of money at present. I shall be much obliged if you will
return at your earliest convenience the sum of $300 (three
hundred dollars) which you borrowed from me on the 15th
of December last.
Yours truly,
C. B.
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Victoria, B. C,
■ :f[ '?■-;•'•' '" December 29th, 1892.
Mr. RETHE
Dear Sir,
I respectfully beg to apply to you for the loan of $50
as I want to buy a few presents for the New Year. Hoping
you will kindly pay my next month's wages if advance,
I remain,
Yours obedient servant,
C. W.
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10 Carrall Street,
Vancouver, B. C,
November 15th, 1892.
Mr. Brown,
Gen. Pas. Agent of C. P. R. Co.,
Dear Sir,
As your Company's Steamship Empress of Japan
will leave here for Hongkong on Saturday next, I wish to
engage three first-class cabins for six passengers. I would
like if possible to have the three together and oblige,
Yours truly,
Bowu,.
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Portland, Oregon,
December 25th, 1892.
Messrs. U. P. S. S. Co.,
Gentlemen.
I beg to inform you that I have five thousand sacks
of flour which I intend to ship per your Company's Steamship for Hongkong on next trip. Please let me know what
the freight is per ton.    Hoping it will be moderate.
I am, Gentlemen,
Yours truly,
Honcox.
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1 305
Victoria, B. C,
June 13th, 1892.
Mr. Hall,
Manager of London Insurance Co.
Sir,
I beg you will please to effect a policy on 15 cases
of Groceries I am now shipping from here to Skeena River
on the steamer Louise to the amount of $750.00, against all
risk.'   Bearer will hand you the charge.
I am, Sir,
Yours respectfully,
Bonson & Co.
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Vancouver, B. C,
January 10th, 1892.
Mr. Carl,
Dear Sir,
I have the honor to inform you that I have started
in this port as an Importer and Wholesale Grocer, under the
name of Wilson & Company, for the purpose of dealing in
the produce of the Province.
I shall be happy to communicate with you,* and
any orders you may see fit to place with me will receive my
best attention.
Yours very truly,
A. Wilson.
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Victoria, B. C,
l|; January 28th, 1892
Dear John,
Allow me to introduce you to my friend Mr. Yow Non
of this city. He purposes remaining a week in your town, as
he has some railway business to attend to, and should he
stand in need of any assistance or information you will greatly
oblige me by attending to him with your usual friendly
ability.
Your affectionate friend,
James Deas.
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Vancouver, B. C,
November 29th, 1892.
Mr. Boyd.
Dear Sir,
A tradesman of your town, whose name is written on
the enclosed paper, has just forwarded to me a large order for
my goods. Not having had any transaction with him, and
being naturally desirous of ascertaining if he is trustworthy,
I should esteem it a great favor if you would give such information as you are able upon this point.
I must apologize for the trouble I am giving you,
which, however, you will probably excuse on account of the
importance of the affair.
Yours truly,
J. Mutton.
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Victoria, B. C.,
November 1st, 1892.
Gentlemen,
A notice appears in the Daily Times of last evening
that your office is in want of an Interpreter and Translater,
and I beg leave to apply for the situation. You will see by
the testimonials enclosed herewith that I am quite able to
fill the vacancy.
I remain,
Yours truly,
T. H.
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Vancouver, B. C,
August 27th, 1893.
Mr. Banfoud,
Sir,
Your kind note to hand this morning. After a
minute investigation of the affairs of Joseph & Co., I am
sorry to inform you that not more than ten per cent, will be
obtained ; it is even doubtful if this small sum will be
realized.
I regret that you are so deeply concerned in his
failure, and any service that I can render you here, you may
freely command.
Your obedient servant,
Steward.
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Victoria, B. C,
November 14th, 1892.
Hon. Craft,
Police Magistrate.
v.
Dear Sir,
I  have been  informed  that you   want   a   Chinese
Interpreter in the Court House, and I beg leave to apply
to you for the situation.    For references I refer you to Mr.
B., the Superintendent of Police at New Westminster.
I remain,
Your obedient servant,
A. W.
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Portland, Oregon,
January 3rd, 1893.
Messrs. Bailey & Co.,
Gentlemen,
I beg that you will consider me as an applicant for
the situation as second clerk now vacant in your firm.    For
three years I have been third clerk in Mr.  Mable's office;
my object in leaving their employ being that of improving
my position.    I trust I shall give  you  every  satisfaction
should you favor me with the appointment.
I am, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. Howley.
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Portland, Oregon,
November 14th, 1893.
Hon. Green,
Sir,       j f[   .
As I am suffering from a severe cold I am unable to
attend to my duties to-day, but I hope 1 shall be able to
resume them again in a few days.
I am, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. Moore.
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Portland, Oregon,
March 3rd, 1893.
Mr. Thomas
Dear Sir,
I beg to inform you that I have a prospect of being
employed in the firm of Messrs. Fanning & Co. I had an
interview with these gentlemen this morning and have beeu
asked for a reference. I have taken the liberty of giving
them your name. The length of time I had the honor of
serving you and the general satisfaction which you expressed
at my conduct and ability, led me to hope that you will
speak favorably of me and that you will add this to the
numerous obligations conferred upon
Your obedient servant,
F. Davis.
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L 315
San Francisco, Cala.,
February 1st, 1892.
9
Hon.   BOARDMAN,
Collector of Qustoms,
Dear Sir,
I beg to'offer myself for the situation of Interpreter
that is now vacant [in^'your department. I have been in
business here for the last ten years and can speak English
fluently. I have not the least doubt but that I can give you
entire satisfaction.
I am, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. Cowley.
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Vancouver, B. C,
April 25th, 1892.
Mr. Someday,
Sir,
I understand that you have a vacancy of Chinese
*
agent in vour establishment. I wish to obtain that situa-
tion and would be glad to come on trial for a moderate
salary and I believe that I will give you satisfaction. Should
you kindly answer my application I will send you references
I am, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. Thomas.
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Vancouver, B. C.,
;/* _ October 29th, 1892.
Mr. BonTEr,
Sir,
I have sent this morning by drayman the articles,
of which a list is appended herewith, to be disposed of at
your next sale by public auction to be held in your sale
room on the 12th of next month; the commission to be the
same as agreed upon, viz., ten per cent.
I am,
Yours faithfully,
Wm. Munro.
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Vancouver, B. C.,
June 5th, 1892.
Dear Mr. D.,
Enclosed find Twenty Dollars which I have addressed
to you in care of Mr. Henry Grant, which I trust will reach
you safely.    Please return me a receipt for the same.
Yuurs very truly,
H. R.
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Portland, Oregon,
September 21st, 1892.
Messrs. North Pacific S. S. Co.,
,{^ Agent,
Sir,
I shall be much obliged if you will inform me if your
Company has a vessel bound for Vancouver, B. C, or when
you have any expectation of sending one there.
I am, Sir,
Yours obediently,
Chas. Hanberley.
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New Westminster, B. C,
July 26th, 1892.
Mr. Fowler,
Dear Sir,
We shall feel greatly obliged by your settling the account
—$2,000—for the goods you have bought during the last six
months. We had hoped that our necessities would not have
compelled us to ask you for this amount until you could
have made payment convenient to yourself, but our engagements compel us to call on you for an immediate payment.
Trusting to vour goodness to attend to this account as soon
as possible.
la.  Henper.
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San Francisco, Cala.,
July 18th, 1892..
Messrs. C. & Co., I
Gentlemen,
Please pay to my family cook, Ah Tin, the sum of
forty dollars ($40), being wages for the month of June, and.
please charge to our account.
Yours sincerely,
Mrs. B.
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Vancouver, B. C,
September 20th, 1892.
Mr. S. J. Pitts & Co., |
Dear Sir,
I beg leave to introduce to your respectable firm
my particular friend, Mr. Wilkin, of this city, who is the
bearer.
He visits Victoria in the way if business, and as his
credit is unquestionable and extensive I shall be glad to see
you open an account with him, fully assured that it will be
for your mutual interest.
Yours respectfully,
Dawson.
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Victoria, B. C,
October 1st, 1892.
Mr. Morris,
Dear Sir,
Please deliver to the bearer two dozen ladies'   best
handkerchiefs, the cost of which I do not want to exceed.
Nine Dollars per dozen,  and charge to my account, and
oblige,
Yours sincerely,
Fewster.
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Victoria, B. C,
February 9th, 1892.
Messrs. Garow & Co.,
Gentlemen, \
Please send me the leathern ware as per note below ;
let it be of a good quality and tasteful pattern. Ship the
same in 20 bales by the first train for. Vancouver connecting with Victoria, securing its insurance on the lowest
terms possible ; you will consign the goods to my address,
care of Messrs. Gibson & Co., Vancouver, to whom you
will enclose the Duplicates and "Bill of leading with Invoice
to me.
Yours respectfully,
Mansell.
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Vancouver, B. C,
July 6th, 1892.
Messrs. C. P. N. Co.,
Gentlemen,
Referring to a shipment from Hongkong of forty
cases of Patna opium per steamship Empress of India, which
was short by two cases when delivered here on 22nd of April
last. I shall be much obliged if you will pay me as soon as
possible the cost of the missing cases, valued $480.00 each.
I enclose the bill of lading and receipt for 38 cases only.
I remain, Gentlemen,
Your obedient servant,
C. R.
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Victoria, B. C.,
May 7th, 1892.
Messrs. Hanneson & Co.,
Gentlemen,
You will please observe from the enclosed price
current that rice is on the rise. It will therefore be for
your interest to make us an early and as large a consignment as possible, also send us samples of your green teas,
with the prices, and oblige,
Yours truly,
Kwong Hing & Co.
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Victoria, B. C,
I June 23rd, 1893.
Mr. Andrew,
Dear Sir,
The Bank of B. C. drafts mentioned in yours of the
10th inst. 1 have presented and cashed, and on the 25th of
this month paid to L,ai Chong & Co. on your account the sum
mentioned.    Enclosed find receipt for the same.
Yours truly,
N. & C. Co.
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Victoria, B. C.,
December 27th, 1893.
Mr. H., 5
Dear Sir,
The New Year being near, I wish to pay up all my
debts within this week. And I ask you to kindly pay me the
balance of my account, amounting to $250 (two hundred and
fifty dollars), and oblige,
Yours truly,
B. C.
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15 Government St.,
Victoria, B. C,
|      October 1st, 1892.
Messrs. Hudson Bay Co. ,
Gentlemen,
You  will  kindly  deliver  to  the  bearer   the   goods
mentioned below, and charge to our account, viz. :
1 Box Brandy.
2 Boxes T. & B. Tobacco.
Please send the bill and oblige,
Yours truly,
1 K. C. W.
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Victoria, B. C,
May 6th, 1892.
Mr. Baker,
Dear Sir,
Your favor of the 28th of April has received our
immediate attention, and we are happy to say that we have
been able to execute your order in such a manner as we
think will give you perfect satisfaction. In order that there
should be as little delay as possible we have forwarded the
goods per rail, and you will receive them in about 10 days.
Holding ourselves at your further disposal and assuring
you of our desire to attend to your interest,
Yours very truly,
Kelley.
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$ l?#Jfel| ^i- November 25th, 1892.
Messrs. Connon & Co.,
Gentlemen,
I beg to inform you that I have returned to you by the
N. P. rail the 20 cases of salt ham which you shipped to me
on the 2nd of October last. The goods appear to have suffered considerable damage, owing to which I cannot expect to
effect an advantageous sale.    Enclosed is Bill of Lading.
I am, Sir,
Yours truly,
W. Hall.
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Victoria, B. C,
December 22nd, 1892.
Mr. Locke
Dear Sir,
I send you to-day by Wells, Fargo & Co., 2,500 native
cigars worth $5.00 per thousand, to which I beg your attention in disposing of at the highest possible price. I do not
wish to make a sacrifice of the goods, and hope you will do
your best for my interest.
I remain,
Yours respectfully,
J. Guater.
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1     Seattle, Wash.,
; November 21st, 1892.
Messrs. Foster & Co.,
Gentlemen,
I read in the San Francisco Call of yesterday that
Californian Orange can be purchased on favorable terms i-h
your market, and consequently something might be done to
advantage in this article. Would you, therefore, have the
goodness to purchase on my account say 200 cases of the
best description and ship to my address by early rail from
your port. Transmit the Invoice and Bill of Lading as soon
as possible.
Yours respectfully,
C. Lewis.
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^fl.San Francisco, Cala.,
December 22nd, 1892.
Messrs. Robson & Co.,
Gentlemen,
In reply to your letter of the 6th inst. The &oods
ordered have been shipped per steamship " Queens " and left
here to-day at 2 p.m. ; enclosed find the Bill of Lading and
Bill of cost. Consign the amount, $227.00, to our address.
As all the articles are of superior quality we hope you will
,procure good prices fcr them.    Waiting your further orders,
We remain,
Yours respectfully,
E. McDonald.
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Portland, Oregon,
December 23rd, 1892.
My Dear James,
Enclosed find the sum of $500 with which I beg you
will purchase for me two dozen good silver  hunting case,
watches.    Hope you will select tasteful patterns and ship
to my address at an early opportunity for Christinas trade.
Yours faithfully,
H. Raywood.
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New Westminster, B. C,
..   1    .      |    . November 10th, 1892.
Mr. C.
Dear Sir,
I send you by my clerk $100 (one hundred dollars),
to pay the last bill, and will be much obliged if you would
deliver me by Joe, my drayman, the articles according to
the enclosed order. |*!j
Yours truly,
K. M. C.
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Vancouver, B., C,
;| July 20th, 1892.
B. R. Esq.,
Dear Sir,
Your order dated 16th inst. was received this morning.
Please receive and sign for the articles which I send by the
boy Harry.
Yours truly,
C. W. & Co.
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Victoria, B. C ,
AAA rl- '■ May 18th, 1892
Messrs. T. W. Bros., ,.ff>; -l-^
Gentlemen,
The C.P.R. Steamship  1 Empress of India"  has
arrived from Hongkong;  I beg to acknowledge the receipt
of your letter to-day saying that our goods are now in bond
at your warehouse; we shall be very much obliged if you
will ship them to us by the steamer 1 Islander " to-morrow.
Yours truly,
W. C. L.
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■,.    Victoria, B. C,
J%., jjj|(: A^Ml. February 25th, 1892.
Mr. H. R. .        .^
Dear Sir,
I have purchased for you one hundred cases of wine
in accordance with your instructions, each case containing
eighteen bottles, the cost of which is $7.20 per case.
Please let us know when to ship them to you, and oblige,,
Yours truly, l-\
K. W. K. & Co.
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Victoria, B. C,
March 9th, 1892.
Mr. B.
Dear Sir,
Your favor received at 9 o'clock this morning. You
want 1,000 mats of rice? I am very sorry to say that I
have not that much on hand, but I assure you I will have
five times as much by the next steamer, "Empress of
China."
Yours truly,
K. O. C. & Co.
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Clinton,
■■    .Jill' •   February 5th, 1892.
Messrs. H. W. Co.,
Gentlemen,
I beg to inform you;that I have not received any of the
goods mentioned in your letter of 25th ult., the Bill of
Lading is to hand now, though the goods are ten days
overdue. p|
Yours trnlv,
T. K.
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Victoria, B. C,
*£- ]j ' February 10th, 1892.
B. C., Esq.,
Dear Sir, |f|
We enclose herewith the Invoice and Bill of Lading
of 500 mats of rice and 100 cases of merchandise ; total 600
packages. We are shipping,these goods to-day by the C. P.
N. Co.'s steamer, "Islander" to you, care of Mr. Gladwin,
Ashcroft, B. C. Please enquire for them and write to us at
once.
Yours truly,
R. O. L. Co.
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:.|    : J" Victoria, B. C,
.fj ^r     ^|E J March 15th, 1892.
Hane, Esq.,
Dear Sir,
In conformity to your favor of 26th of Feb., per Mr.
Gladwin, Commission Agent, I have shipped to your order
per steamer "Islander," via Vancouver, goods amounting
with charges and insurance to $1,575.00. I enclose Bill
of Lading and Invoice, and will accept your draft at 6
months to cover the amount. I have no doubt that you
will find the goods satisfactory, as they are new and tasteful
patterns.
Yours truly,
Hing Tai & Co.
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PR Cariboo, B. C,
April 18th, 1892.
Mr. HASELL,
Dear Sir,
In reference to your letter of the 14th inst., I beg to
say that I am in receipt of your drafts on the Bank of B. C.
in favor of Messrs. the Hudson Bay Co. for $1,000, and that
of Mr. Turner for $5,000, the former at 30 days and the
latter at 90 days, to which I desire to draw your attention.
I need scarcely add that further consignments will depend
On the result of transactions already made with yon.
Yours very truly,
Reid.
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"I 345
ii9 Fiscard Street
Victoria, July 29th, 1892.
Miss Smith.
BOUGHT OF   KIISTG  TJL1  &   CO.
DEALERS IN"
GENTS' AND LADIES' DRY GOODS
1892
June
25
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1 Ladies' Silk Umbrella
1 Doz. Gents' Silk Handkerchiefs
6 Yds. Plain Crape, per yd. 90
10 Yds. White Shirting, per yd. 18
4 Yds. Blue Velvet, per yd. Si.75
Cr lj  '
By Cash received
By Mrs. J. Smith
Balance
34
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16 Government Street
y: Victoria, March 30th, 1892.
Mrs. Wilson,
To KwoxGr Lee Yeist Dr.  1
DEAUSR  I>f
FRI IT AND VEGKETABIJES
1892
\pril
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1 Sack Potatoes, 90 lbs.
10 lbs. Tomatoes, 5c.
5 lbs. Turnips, 5c.
1 Doz. Cabbages, 60c.
2 Doz. Sweet Corn, 40c.
Received Payment
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45 Fiscard Street
Victoria, August 25th, 1892.            B
Mr. Johnson.
M,w „F WINGItPUNG                      I
DEAXJER IN
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS,
July
JJ
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1892
5
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5 Cases Nut Oil each 72 lbs. $8.25
4 Chests y.s. Tea, each 40 lbs. 25c.
20 Mats Rice, each 48 lbs. $78
Received Payment
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Mr. H. Bell
17 Dupont Street
Vancouver, August 2nd, 1892,
To  TAJAI   SAJSTGr ■&   CO.  Dr.
General Merchants
Aug.
1892
To Provision Supplies during the
month of July
Received Payment
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i6 Commenent Street
If A Victoria, B.C., July 29th, 1892.
Messrs. C. P. S. S. Co. ' . . §}
1 To HONG WO & CO.   Dr. I
Importers and Merchants
April
189;
10
For short delivery of Partia Opium
shipped from Hongkong on
Steamship Empress of Japan arrival here being box weight 160
lbs. 40 bales each $12.
48c
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4 Johnson Street
Vancouver, B.C., January 11th, 1892.
Mr. C. Fuak
To WAH   KEE  Dr.
LAUNDRY.
1892
Jan
IO
Washing 100 pieces Cloth, por dcz. 25
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5 Woolen Shirts, per shirt 10
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1 Night Shirts, per shirt 10
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15 Pair Socks, per doz.     10
12
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20 Handkerchiefs, per doz.25
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NOTICE.
A meeting will be held in the hall of the Chinese
Consulate, Benevolent Association building, next Tuesday,
the 5th, at seven p.m., to arrange for a celebration on the
birthday of the Emperor Kwong Sui.
Dated June 1st.
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TO LET
Apply to L,ai Fung & Co.
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Arabia
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An nam
Malay Peninsula
India ;
Baluchistan
Turkev
Europe
England
Ireland
France
Holland
Norway
Austria
Switzerland
Sweden
Hungary
Spain
Scotland
Wales
Belgium
Denmark
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Portugal
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Africa
Morocco
Alycria
Tunis
Tripoli
Egypt %i ^lllf.-"
Abyssinia
North America
Greeenland
United States
Canada
Central America
Iceland
Mexico
West Indies
South America
U. S. Colombia
Guiana
Paraguay
Bolivia
Patagonia
Peru
Venezuela
Brazil
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Argentine Republic
Chili
Ecuador
Australia
New Guinea
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New Zealand
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Spice Island
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Java
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Amoy
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Singapore (Malay Peninsula)
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Malacca
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Sydney
Adelaide
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Bombay
Calcutta
Colombo
Kurachee
Tuticorin
Vizagapatam
Madras
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Alberni
Alert Bay
Agassiz
Abbotsford
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Aldergrove
Alkali Lake
An nier ville
Ashcroft
Athrim
Barkerville
Barniston Island
Bear Uake
Beaver
Beaver. Creek
Bella Bella
Bella Lolla
Big Bar
Blaine Wash
Bonaparte Valley
Boundry Bay
Bronsville
Cache Creek
Carthewville
Cassiar
Centreville
Cedar
Cheam
Cherry Creek
Chilcoten
Chilliwack
Chemainus
Clover Point
Cobble Hill     fj
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Columbia Lake
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Clover Valley
Comox
Corfield    £ _ \
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Cowichan
Cranbrooke
Danman Island
Dover Port
Delta
Departure Bay
Dog Creek
Douglas Lake
Donald
Duncans
Drynock
Elgin
En derby
Empire Valley
Esquimalt
Fernie
Field       -
Fairmont Spring
Fort George
Fort Simpson
Fort Rupert
Fraser Lake
Gabriola Island
Galiano Island
Georgetown
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Golden
Goldstream
Grand Fooks
Granite Creek
Grant Prairie
Greenwood
Guan Brook
Hall Prairie
Harrison River
Harrison Hot Springs
Harvey Creek
Hatzic Prairie
Hazelton
Hope
Hornby Island
Illecilliwaet
Inverness
Irvings
James Island
Johnson Landing
Kamloops
Keefers
Keithley Creek
Keremeas*
Kettle River
Kootenay
Koksilah
Ladners Landing
Laketon
Langley
Langley Prairie
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Lower Nicola
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Lulu Island
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Maple Bay
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Marny Mission
Matsqui
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Metehosin
Mayne Island
Metlakahtla
McDame Creek
McLeod's Lake
Minnie Lake
Moodyville
Mouth Quesnelle
Mount Lehman
Moyie
Mud Bay
Naas
Nanaimo
Nanoose Bay
Nelson
New Westminster
New Caledonia
N. W. Junction
Nicola Valley
Nicola Lake
North Bend
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Nicomen Island
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Okanagan Mission
Osoyoos Lake
Pavilion Mountain
Parksville
Pavilion
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Pender Island
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Plumper Pass
Fopcum
Port Essington
Port Hammond
Port Haney
Port Kells
Port Moody
Princeton
Prevost Island
Quesnell Forks
Quadra
Quamichon
Quilchenna
Revelstoke
Richmond
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Rockford
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Savanas
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Sidney Island
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Spallumacheen
Spalsum
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Stanley
Steveston
St. Mary's Mission
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Surrey Centre
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Vancouver
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Westham Island
Windermere
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Principal Town Names of Canada.
Alameda       Assi.^E^^^
Alexander     '. . Man. jS tl \M BJT
Alexandria   Ont. RP
Algoma    Ont.II
Almonte    Ont. 11
Alton     Wk;  Ont J;
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Arnaud- Man.Jiri#C
Arnprior   Ont.jfifSjg %
Arthur.     Ont-SS^
Athens  Ont.
Austin Man.pj^
Aylmer Ont.^&^P-f
Ayr Ont.
Bagot      Man.-%
Balgonie Assi.^]?frtr$C
Banff Alb.^ff
Bantry Alb.^ll^J
Barclay Ont.fe}^
Barnsley    Man.mxllk^M
Belleville Ont.Jflf Ijffll^
Bowmanville Out.fiJJg^Pg}'
Barrie Ont. E^fS
Brandon Man.J^.^|g §1
BrockviHe Ont.^?^|0j^
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Berlin       Ont.
Brighton Ont.^p^I
Brantford Ont.^J^^
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Calgary Alba.^|gf I]     ,
Collingwood        Ont. ^5^* 369
Cornwall On.t.^f^Q
Cayuga". Ont
Carleton Place Ont
Coe Hill Ont.ttlf S&
Charlottetown P. E. I-X
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Carman Man.'
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Drumbo  Ont.^^t^
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Gait Ont.||^iJ
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Georgetown Ont. ST/nJi"
Goderich Ont.H JT^JVp
Gravenhurst . . Ont.j^^fcgl 370
Gleichen Ala.ftBr^
Garden River Ont. j^ff^E
Gull Lake Man.^S&M
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Hamilton Ont.^^il
High Bluff Man.icS ff
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Harriston Ont.~F2^7ff ©
Halifax ,. . . .N. S JF&fl$"tff
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London Ont. fH®
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Milton Ont.#jj^ff
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Orillia Ont.tf i^fjp
Ottawa Ont.^RpfT^Q
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Peterborough Ont ^flf^^l
Prince Albert Sask.Eg®Tff ?j|#J 371
Portage La Prairie  . .  Man.^ft^M^f jI
Port Hope   Ont.#KI§
Perth    OntJE±
Quebec         Que.HJfH '■'*?
Sudbury  Ont.^EfU
Stratford    Ont.Tfffl^
Selkirk      Man.^J^
Sarnia  . . .  Ont.^^C
Smith's Falls .......  Ont. 7ff 1^41^
St. John N. B.fiJ|#
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St. Jonn's    Que.flll#
Sherbrooke   Que.-^^Jlt
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Shelburne   Ont.^^^C
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Southampton    Ont ^~h^@
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St. Catherines   Ont.ilJjB^XlljJ
Starbridge   Que.Tfn5^^(J?a
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Renfrew   Ont.^^ll   -
Ridgetown    Ont.^lJ^^
Riviere du Loupe.. . .   Que.^flJ ffiUlJf 372
Regina Assa.H^J£3C
Richmond   Que.#J?§j8i
Red Deer   Ala.^ljj**
Toronto   Ont.flJ
Winnipeg   Man.^C^:
Woodstock Ont.§frffilf
Dawson J. T.^fg
Hunker   J. T.J5J?lc
White-Horse J. T.^Pji
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Principal Cities and Towns in the United States.
Atlanta    Idaho.U@^^
Austin      Nev. jSiTffSI
Aubrey     Ara.^rl^flj
Alma   Ark.DlIlj^lt
Arkadelphia   Ark.5rl^itflH#
Augusta   Ark.^^gTfif
Alamosa   Col.jJ&J&jKE
Aspen    Col. jgTff Jt
Amonito   Col.ffijfe^l
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Aberdeen   Dak.||E^-
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Ashton     Dak. J$TfP3f
Athol   Dak.R@#S§-
Anacortes   Wash.5g$fc|f§
Anatone    Wash.§jfc^|
Asotin       Wash. iSHfS
Albany   Ore.Silicic
Astoria      „   ±£7fc3lflJ
Airlie      ,,   }%&& %13
Alvord Ore.j£J&7ffl
Ashland     ,,    jgTffgr
Arlington     „    QRRf jl
Acton           ,,    Jglg
Albina   |     „    '^feWfo
Auburn    ^     ,,    )@/^
Aurora     |   Jg^J
Alameda    Cal.Ji&tt^Wl
Adin        ,,    BgJi
Alturas       ,,    5&^Sft^
Anaheim     ,,   #^i^
Antioch     j    #$i#?
Arbuckle       1   J&HE&
Areata     I   5&D^M
Arroyo     „   lul^^
Aburn     ,,    R|1L^
Azusa     ,,   Jg^rlM
Applachicola   Fla^tlEJ^^Ij
Atlanta    GaJ@^^
Abingdon 111.  BlSl^|| ■
Albion     „    ffllJtjIl
Alton         I    Pggfr®
Astoria     I   ^Tff^lj
Atlanta     |   D@^it!l
Attica Ind.Rgfgil
Auburn          ,,   Jil^fc
Aurora    • ,*|   JEL^tU
Atoka Ind. Terr.j£j^jgt
Adel Iowa.^&ittli^
Atlantic     j    55^^
Abilene Kas^S^l
Atchison ■    1 374
Adairville . . . . Ken.Jg^f Ijf^
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Alexandria. . . . . La.P^^lil^flJ
Auburn Me.^^
Augusta
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Ayer Mass,
i\thol     ,,
Akron   ... ..Ohio.Jgfir
Ashland,. „   P^Tff^
Allegheny Pa.^M^iC
Altoona    ,,   ]&Wk
Allentown...    „  5&^|lJ
Andenreid    1  Jjftfjl^lj
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Appleton Wis.ll^J^llf
Ahnapee  . .  Wis. j^:||#$
Alpena Mich.fl|Jt$C
Ann Arbor f|    H35E
Austin    Minn.^TffSI
Anoka	
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Ada   . .    ,,     MM.
Aberdeen Miss.^j^Jk
Ash Grove Mo.jSTf-f fifc^O
Ava „ RgH
Amsworth Neb.^^Ddr
Austin Nev.^Tff^
Asbury Park N. J.^Tfif^iJtfl
Albuquerque N. Mex.O^^f^^
Albany    . . . N. Y.'j&^&fk
Alleghany N. Y.^&^/ffj
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Auburn N. Y.-f^C
Bangor Dak. pp5lc
Bismarck    |!   ■*r» fP iB
Brookings       ,,   ^5&@
Burdette !     |   flMfi^J
Blackfoot    Idahc^ftjfjj#
Boise City...      |    ^tff^cifi
Belleville     111. J^B^jQIft
Belvidere      | ^WBM
Benton	
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Braidwood   1 ^^]W
Bushnell §1   | *fi:fc#C.
Bedford Ind.^v
Bloomfield      ,,   ^tjfjff:
Bloomington      ,|    ^jt^fl
Bluffton      j    JG#@
Boonville      ,,    ^QS&
Brazil      |    f^m
Bedford Iowa.^£v|ff
Bloomfield      „   ^Hifrl^
Boone      ,,    fcik
Burlington     „    E^©
Blaine    Wash.-^||$C
Baker City    Ore.gll&lcWi
Brownsville      ,,
Beaverton       ,,   ,fc
Bakersville    Cal.^^DS&
Benicia       ,,  ^^j&
Berkley    ,,   ^b^J
Bodic    |  $fc3jg
Bridgeport ,.     „  -^ljYa#K
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Bel Green Ala..^5?&j$ti!|
Birmingham    ,, fG59^
Bisbee Arza.ppTff $f
Batesville Ark.^7ffffl£&
Bentonville	
Berryville.	
Bald Mountain       ...
Boulder    „   lfc$&$J
Bonanza.       ,,  ^fJcBJ
Breckenridge	
Buena Vista	
Bridgeport   Conn.-^^lJVn$fc
Brooklyn    ,,    JfiffiM
Beliot  .       Kas.-^{^|^
Burlingame     ,,    E^*^
Burlington      „    E^fl
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everley     „    ^Q5flJ
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rocton            ,,    MMM.
ay City       „    JfL^Uli
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Big Rapids    Mich.^Q
Blue Earth City....   Minn.^?li3&±^tfe
Brainord    I    -¥giME
Bay St. Louis   ......  Miss.^^ff :fc
Brookhaven p     ,,    ^J5^|ffi^ |
Bethany    I Mo.i&Jjftfl]
Bolivar       ,,    fJicJ^fiS
Boon ville     ,,    ^w^
Butler     I    ^xM
Beatrice Mont.^^db
Blair     ,,    -^^
Belmont Nev.#]j!&frll
Bayonne      NJ.-^^-fJC
Bridgetown . . . .     „    ^OfeflJ
Bernalillo   N. Mex.^]^^
Ballston       N. Y.-%|^Tfif$|
Batavia     ,,    ifcJLffi
Belmont     ,,    ^I&f$      i
Binghampton . .    ,,    Mi^$jf
Brooklyn     ,,    Tflli^all
Buffalo ll     j    ^K^it
Brockport     I    ^lt§5^     ff'-
Bellefontaine. ..." O. -£J^^g
Bellaire     ,,    -$j|^
Bucyrus     ,,    ^ iSjplb
Bethlehem    Pa.^S&^J^t
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Iowa City.    Iowa.^fnjffl^itll
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Los Angeles .. ,    1   SR^j&fl]
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Leadville CoL^Ol^
Lincoln Neb.jJ^JU
Leavenworth ........ Kas.^^^lt
Louisville I Ky."f|fdt^I
Lansing Mich.^J!/}^
Lafayette   Ind.^ff^J
Lynn Mass.fJIig
Lowell     I    ^fflSS'
Long Branch N. Ygft^jfaffi
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Lexington  . . Ky.M^IS
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Little Rock Ark.|lJ]^t&
Laramie City WyMMfk^ifc
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Minneapolis Minn.$|j}-i| 385
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New Albany Ind.^l^^cl^
Newton     Kas.^$|     &
Newport   Ky.%i$v
New Orleans La.l^flljll
New Bedford    Mass .^^^
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Norfolk      Va.ffiJJfg
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Ogden City Utah^lg^Jfi
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Princeton Ind.^^lfj'IM
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Richmond Va.^lJ^fB]
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Stockton     ,,   7ff#3g
Salinas      ,,   Ki|ifc±
San Diego       ,,    Uj^gfc
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San Luis Obispo      ,,    Uj^'i^J^Tfl
San Mateo      ,,    UjMII
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St. Augustine  Fla.^^^TffS
Silver City   Idaho.^^E3^%
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South Bend  Ind.^-tjg
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Springfield Mass TfT]^^^
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St. Joseph    ,,
Santa Fe  N. Mex
Schenectady N. Y
Saratoga Springs    ,,
Seneca Falls   ,,
Sing Sing N. Y
Syracuse     ,,
Springfield O
Stenbenville.    ,,
Scrantou Pa
Sunbury    ,,
San Antonio ., Tex
Sherman.	
Sulphur Springs	
Salt Lake City    Utah,
Sheboygan .... jj Wis.
Superior      ,,
Tacoma  Wash.
Tenino i.. j      ,,
The Dalles Ore.
Tuscarora Col.
Truckee Cal.
Talahassee     ,,
Terra Haute.; Ind.
Topeka   Kas
Taunton  , Mass.
Traverse City ■ Mich,
Tecumseh Neb
Toano Nev.
Trenton.; N.J.
Tonawanda   N. Y
Troy N. Y.
Toledo O.
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Uxbridge  Mass ^7ff^^Js?n
Unionville Miss .^Ttiffl 9u
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Vancouver  Wash.^^E
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Valparaiso Ind.ffl^fQf !j^
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Wankegan  ,  Ill.^Uft1
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5"*" Cable Address:    "I^eeyune."    Codes:    A. B. C. 5th Edition.     Slater's 5th Edition.
Chinese Telegraphic Code.
|H    Factory:
jg Market Alley
P. O. BOX 290
VANCOUVER, B. C.
LEE KEE, Mgr. CANAD    1
|lj"HU">H|flE!£g

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