Open Collections

The Chung Collection

Chung Logo

The Chung Collection

An annotated time table of the transcontinental and other main line routes of the Canadian Pacific Railway [unknown] 1911

Item Metadata

Download

Media
chungpub-1.0114652.pdf
Metadata
JSON: chungpub-1.0114652.json
JSON-LD: chungpub-1.0114652-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): chungpub-1.0114652-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: chungpub-1.0114652-rdf.json
Turtle: chungpub-1.0114652-turtle.txt
N-Triples: chungpub-1.0114652-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: chungpub-1.0114652-source.json
Full Text
chungpub-1.0114652-fulltext.txt
Citation
chungpub-1.0114652.ris

Full Text

  —J-  - - -. ,,-'-^.   - -mP:-       ■ ■-■. ■_-..----    ■ . £     ■     -■ _■ M
— fej!L!u'ifi'f"!'"*'**"*^ri:^ l\yt*w^y,PBWT"t'yi^"JI/e'IL'i MM^^iJKy*f*fc™iM71Jl
ll
sSrtJftfVt1'" >fip^
?5**
'£*£
>ft
•**> I
. «".* .«.
fe!i®
■LtxffB
Jlwra
i, r*£    ft 3|
-fi
fiW ©
f»#
i'-rJ
I PS 1
W4i? u
n
i_
ifci-
iK .. ,£j „,:,.,, ■£*-, .    ■ -f - £(?■■ *""f' tj- :" •!  • '^SV'.mm* ^j^a-'M ^).t.^.; -: fV"--V
w
The University of British Columbia Library
THE
CHUNG
COLLECTION
1
ai
«***" » iiii ——i——<■*
Tjm
fyt   f   72x. A-D.Mttlg*. JffWMWPW >wiUM*iffcii><w*^^^wawgaaiiu'f|iim...fp ^
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
ANNOTATED  TIME TABLE t#   I
!fcl
a   r%»s
»nn. = ■■ Ill
I AN
ANNOTATED
TIME   TABLE
•OF THE
TRANSCONTINENTAL   AND
OTHER MAIN LINE ROUTES
OF THE
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
With the Compliments of the European Manager. ■<
*]
K
•*» •****" t»- FOREWORD
w
E all know how the Canadian Pacific has helped to
make a nation." In these memorable words His
Majesty King George V, then Prince of Wales,
addressed the Lord Mayor and citizens of London at a historic
banquet in the Guildhall. In these words our present King,
who as Duke of Cornwall and York returned across Canada
from his circuit of the Empire in 1901, summarised three
generations of Canadian progress. Before the Canadian
Pacific Railway was built, the Dominion of Canada lay disunited and weak, its vast territories in the west regarded as
worthless deserts. But since that not very distant date time
and space have been bridged, the provinces bound together,
large cities fostered, inexhaustible mineral wealth brought to
light, and the limitless prairies populated with happy and
prosperous communities. Such wonderful happenings seem
the more spectacular in that the promise for the future
remains only half fulfilled. Every railway is a great artery,
invigorating and supporting the country it serves; it is hardly
an exaggeration to say that Canada owes its development and
its present status mainly to the Canadian Pacific Railway.
The construction of this railway is one of the heroic
records of the triumph of personal optimism over superhuman
obstacles. Originally undertaken as a political enterprise to
secure the union of the isolated province of British Columbia
with the federation of Eastern Canadian provinces, the undertaking was very soon handed over to a small group of imperially inspired men, who constructed and operated the railway
on sound financial lines without regard to party politics.
Painfully delved through the primaeval rock along the shores
of Lake Superior, flung across the comparatively unknown
prairies, crawling by slow degrees through the unexplored
mountains, and always towards the setting sun, the line on
which such destinies depended gradually reached towards its
consummation, until at Craigellachie, a little village on the
lower slopes of the Gold Range, the climax was achieved.
There, on November 7th, 1885, the last spike was driven home,
and   the   lines   coming east met those   going west.     The circumstance (as an observer has put on record) which brought
together so many human beings in that remote spot in the
heart of the mountains was in every respect noteworthy. ' In
a few minutes the train was again in motion. It passed, over
the newly laid rail amid cheering, and sped on its way, arriving
at Port Moody the following morning, where a connection was
made with the Pacific on November 8th." The first through
train left Montreal for Vancouver on June 28th, 1886. Today a double daily transcontinental service each way is maintained; and there are few more famous trains in the world
than the " Imperial Limited," which leaves Windsor Street
Station, Montreal, every night of the year at 10.30 p.m., for its
2,898 miles run (105 h. 30 m.) to Yancouver. •
The many varied and successful developments of the
Canadian Pacific have earned it the right to be called the
largest, most flourishing, and most powerful industrial corporation in the world. It owns or controls over 16,000 miles
of track, over which, in the year 1910-11, nearly twelve million
passengers and nine thousand million tons of freight were
carried, while it possesses five fleets of altogether 69 steamers
on two oceans and on the great inland waterways of Canada;
it has for sale over seven million acres of land in Western
Canada and four and a half million acres in British Columbia;
it is irrigating an area of three million acres in Southern
Alberta; its telegraph system extends along the entire length
of its road; it is the largest operator of hotels on the
American Continent. It employs about 85,000 persons in four
continents, of whom some 75,000 are located in Canada; if to
these be added the men in rail and rolling mills, lumber mills,
car, locomotive and kindred establishments, and their dependents, it may be safely said that one-fifteenth of the inhabitants of Canada derive their income, directly or indirectly,
from the Canadian Pacific Railway.
As a colonising agency the Canadian Pacific Railway takes
perhaps its highest rank. It was one of the first advocates of
the policy of creating communication in advance of settlement, and, having attracted immigrants from all lands and
helped them in their early struggles, it finds its own prosperity
in serving them. The pioneers and surveyors who made this
railway builded a nation, and forged one of the strongest links
in the chain which now binds together a mighty Empire. Observation Car I^PaPSP™* "■ CONTENTS
PAOE
FOREWORD _--0
NOTES ON TIME SYSTEM      ----- 8
ANNOTATED TIME TABLE—
Quebec and Montrea.—Eastern Division       -
SHORT LINE—
Halifax and Montreal—Atlantic and Eastern Divisions        - 12
ROUTES TO MONTREAL FROM BOSTON, NEW YORK, PORTLAND, ETC.     19
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE—
Montreal and Chalk River—Eastern Division  21
Chalk River and Port Arthur—Lake Superior Division        -       -       - 26
Port Arthur and Broadview—Manitoba Division  31
Broadview and Swift Current—Saskatchewan Division       -       -       -37
Swift Current and Fields-Alberta Division -  40
Field and Vancouver—British Columbia Division        -       -       -       - 54
PACIFIC COAST LOCAL STEAMSHIP SERVICE 76
THROUGH LINE, ST. PAUL AND MINNEAPOLIS TO WINNIPEG -        -    79
Soo Spokane and Kootenay Routes (via Crowsnest Pass)-^  - 81
TRANSCONTINENTAL LAKE ROUTE—
Montreal and Toronto—Eastern and Ontario Divisions        -       -       - 92
Toronto and Owen Sound—Ontario Division  95
Owen Sound and Fort William—Lake Route       -       -       -       -       - 96
MUSKOKA ROUTE—
Toronto, Sudbury, and Winnipeg --------97
Condensed Time Table of Services    -------   99
steamer services    -  100
LANDS    -  -        -        - 101
TELEGRAPHS 101
DOMINION EXPRESS CO. -        -        -        -        - 101
HOTELS --- ----102
SLEEPING AND PARLOUR CAR SERVICE      - 103
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY—
Directors and General Officers 104 X
iM
NOTES  ON  TIME  SYSTEM
A TLANTIC Time is in force over the section from Halifax, N.S., to
Vanceboro, Me., EASTERN Time from Vanceboro to Fort William, Ont.,
Central Time from Fort William to Broadview, Sask., MOUNTAIN Time from
Broadview to Field, B.C., and PACIFIC Time from Field to Vancouver, The
difference in these times is in each case one hour; journeying westward, the
traveller should put back his watch one hour, or, eastward, forward one hour,
at the places mentioned.
On lines west of Fort William the twenty-four hour system of time is used,
in which the hours are numbered from one to twenty-four, beginning from
after midnight. To convert ordinary p.m. time into railway time, or olce versa,
12 is added or subtracted respectively. Thus: 5.30 p.m. Is 17.30, and 19.35
is 7.35 p.m.
V
n
sssr    -    -&>. The Old
Ramparts,
Quebec
Sous le Cap Street,
Lower Town, Quebec I    mwm
=~'.-mvr~'mr*~~~mfxjf*wp~n vr. September, 1911.
Canadian Pacific Railway
Annotated Time Table
QUEBEC and MONTREAL: 173 miles
(Eastern Division)
Miles
from
Quebec
0
Westbound
Train
Leave
t 1.30
P.M.
Q
til
S
P
Q
OS
<
Q
2
<:
W
2
as
w
i
w
<:
m
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
East-
bound
Train
Quebec—Population 90,000. This old City occupies
the base and summit of a lofty crag projecting into
the St. Lawrence. Jacques Cartier, the first
European who sailed into the river, spent the
winter of 1535 at the base of the cliffs, and French
fur companies soon after established here a headquarters for trading. As the settlement grew, and
the fortifications were enlarged, Quebec became
the stronghold of Canada, remaining so until
captured by the British under Wolfe, in 1759. No
other city in America is so grandly situated
or offers views from its higher points so diversified and lovely. In Upper Town, on the highlands,
are the public buildings, churches, convents,
schools, business blocks and hotels, chief among
which is the Chateau Frontenac, on Dufferin
Terrace. Lower Town is the commercial quarter
and abounds in irregular narrow streets and
quaint old houses. Enormous transactions in
lumber go on here annually. The surrounding
country is remarkably interesting in scenery,
history, and opportunities for sport, and the city
is a delightful resort both in the summer and
winter months. The railways reaching the city
are the Canadian Pacific and Quebec and Lake
St. John, the latter extending to Lake St. John,
Chicoutimi, and the head waters of the Saguenay.
To Levis, on the opposite bank of the St. Lawrence,
come the Grand Trunk, the Inter-colonial and the
Quebec Central. Transatlantic steamers of the
Canadian Pacific, Allan, Canadian Northern,
Donaldson, Dominion, and other lines call here
in summer, and local steamers depart for the
lower St. Lawrence and the Saguenay rivers.
Arrive
9.40
Places
of
interest
Q
Railway 6c
steam-
ship-
connec-
tions.
Miles
from
Montr'l
173
*3;
i
t Additional trains leave Quebec for Montreal at 7.30 a.m. (week days only), 11.30 r»m, (daily), and
5.10 p.m. (Sundays only), arriving Montreal at 2.00 p.m., 6.30 a.m., and 10.10 p.m.
All times shewn in these tables are subject to change without notice. **•*§
10
QUEBEC LINE
Miles
West
East-
Miles
from
Quebec
bound
Train
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
bound
Train
from
Montr'l
Leave
Are   ancient  settle-
Leave
8
Lorette
ments,  originally
166
14
No
Belair
seigniories, fronting
160
26
Stop
Pont Rouge
upon the St. Lawrence.
/8.58
148
31
St. Basile
Powerful rivers come
143
35
[2.31
Portneuf
down from the hills at
8.41
138
39
Deschambault
frequent intervals, giv
134
43
No
Lachevrotiere
ing   water   power   to
131
46
Stop
Grondines
almost  every  village.
128 -
53
P.M.
La Perade
The fishing  is  excel
8.14
120
58
3.05
Batiscati
lent   in   all   of  these
8.04
115
65
Champlain
streams,   and   one  of
P.M.
108
75
Piles June.
them (the Jacques Car-
98
tier) is a noted salmon
river.   All the villages are quaint and picturesque
in the highest degree, and French is almost univer
sally spoken.    Lorette is mainly a settlement of
Christianized Huron Indians, founded 250 years, ago.
Portneuf (pop.  1,541) is a thriving factory town,
devoted principally to shoe-making and wood-pulp.
•
From Pdes Junction a branch line extends  to the
farming district of GRANDES Piles, 27 miles north
ward, near the great Shawinigan Falls in the St.
Maurice, a stream affording fine fishing. The great
•
water power here is utilized by enterprising com
panies.    A branch now runs direct from Three
Rivers   to   Shawinigan   Falls   and   Grand   Mere.
Eight miles below the falls is the prosperous village
of Grand Mere, at which are the extensive works of
the Laurentide Pulp Co.
78
a 3.34
||Three   Rivers—Population 14,000.    At the mouth of
Z7.35
96
73.44
the St. Maurice, and at the head of the tide-water in
a 7.25
P.M.
the St. Lawrence.     It was founded in   1618, and
P.M.
St..
IV/Iauric e
played an important part in the early history of
Canada.     It is eminent for its  Roman  Catholic
iTinui i\*w
River
institutions, and is one of the prettiest towns in the
province.   The chief industry is the shipment of
lumber, and over $1,000,000 has been invested in
mills and booms above the city, where logs are
prepared for the domestic and foreign trade.   There
are large iron works and machine shops here, where
stoves and car wheels are manufactured in great
numbers   from   the   bog-iron   ore   for which the
vicinity is famous.   Steamers ply daily to adjacent
river villages.   The route now lies across the lowlands   stretching   be-
Mills
and
iron
works
86
Pointe du Lac
tween    the    northern
88
93
4.08
Yamachiche
bank of the St. Law
81
99
4.18
Louisevllle
rence   and   the   hills
6.54
75
103
No
Stop
Maskinonge
which   lie   at   a  con
71
108
St. Barthelemy
stantly   increasing
65
113
St. Cuthbert
distance from the river.
61
116
4.44
Berthier June.
This is   for  the most
6.27
57
124
5.00
P.M.
Lanoraie                            1
part a perfectly level
P.M.
50
/Flag Station.                                                   g Refreshment Station Ah
Anse a l'Eau, Tadousac
<Bj
Si /fl
I QUEBEC  LINE
Miles
from
Quebec
130
133
137
146
150
155
160
163
168
173
Westbound
Train
Leave
Ancient
Customs
No
Stop
P.M.
5.54
6.10
Q
Arrive
6.30
P.M.
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
and close cultivated plain, cut up into narrow fields,
that characterize French farming districts throughout the older parts of Quebec and result from the
continual subdivision of bequeathed estates. The
compact villages are very prosperous and much
resorted to in summer by city people. In each
one the churches and educational or charitable
institutions of the Roman Catholic faith are the most
conspicuous buildings. Near Louisecille (pop. 2,900),
where Lake St. Peter is seen, are the St. Leon
(saline) Springs. fBerthier and Lanoraie junctions
are the stations for populous river-landings of the
same names, reached by short branch lines.
Lavaltrie
Vaucluse
L'Epiphanie
Mascouche
Terrebonne
St. Vincent de
iQuebec June.
Bordeaux
Mile End.
Paul
From Lanoraie
diverges a branch line
northward to JOLIETTE
(pop. 5,000), St. Felix
(pop. 2,500), and St.
Gabriel de Brandon.
At Terrebonne the north
branch of the Ottawa
is crossed. Here are
the limestone quarries
which furnish most of
the stone used in the neighbouring cities, and in
railway bridge-building and other heavy masonry.
The large building passed at St. Vincent de Paul is
the provincial penitentiary. At Quebec Junction the
Ottawa Subdivision is joined and followed around
the base of Mount Royal into Montreal.
Montreal—Place Viger Station and Hotel, a handsome structure erected and operated by the Canadian
Pacific Railway Co.
East-
bound
Train
Leave
Lake
St.
Peter
P.M.
P.M.
*4.40
Leave
0
g Refreshment Stations.
t Additional trains leave Montreal for  Quebec at 9.00 a.m.  (week days),  11.30 p.m. (daily),
and 1.30 p.m. (Saturdays only), arriving Quebec at 3,25 p.m., 6.45 a.m., and 6.30 p.m. SHORT   LINE
HALIFAX and MONTREAL:  759 miles
(Atlantic Division )
Miles
West
from
bound
Halifax
Train
A.M.
0
8.00
Leaves
daily
except
Sun
days
o
w->
U  g
5 ^
r25   d>
., «J
9>
t o
2 ■*
< X
►J rt
HtS
<*
DC
9
14
8.27
41
^9.12
45
h9.20
A.M.
stations—Descriptive notes.
Halifax—Population about 55,000. The capital of
Nova Scotia, and, from its long association with
the army and navy of the Mother Country, the most
thoroughly English city on the continent. The
fame of its magnificent harbour is known in every
land, and it is universally acknowledged to be the
finest in the world. Halifax is the present winter
port for the British mail steamships, and is a
military and naval station. It is a strongly fortified city, chief of the fortifications being the Citadel,
elevated 256 feet above sea-level, and commanding
the city and harbour; McNab's and George's Islands
in the harbour are also strongly fortified, the former
said to be impregnable. The fortifications, the Arm,
Bedford Basin, the Dockyard; the Dry Dock, largest
on this continent; Point Pleasant, a public resort
owned by the Imperial authorities, and leased to the
City of Halifax; Dalhousie University, St. Mary's
College, Pine Hill Theological College, the New
Naval College, and the many public buildings,
gardens, etc., etc., are all well worth a visit. Halifax
has communication with all parts of the world by
steamer and sailing vessels, and enjoys a very important trade with Europe, the United States, the
West Indies, etc., etc.
Bedford
Windsor June.
Shubenacadie
Stewiacke
The Dominion Atlantic
Railway, whose trains
from Halifax branch
off at Windsor Junction
to the west and south
to Yarmouth, gives an
alternate route to St. John, N.B., by a splendid
steamer service across the Bay of Fundy, between
Digby and that city. The railway traverses that
land of national and romantic associations, the
matchless Annapolis Valley, scene of many a stirring incident in olden days, and famed the world
over as the home of Longfellow's Evangeline. There
is also a branch of the Dominion Atlantic connecting Windsor and Truro.
East- Miles
bound I from
Train    Montri
P.M.
10.00
Arrives
daily
except
Sundays
Communication
by str.
with
West
Indies
etc.
9.33
A8.51
A8.43
P.M.
The
Evangeline
Route
759
750
745
718
714
Dining Car between Truro and Mattawamkeag.
h Flag stop for passengers for or from Moncton or points beyond. Orchard, Ranching, and Farmyard Scenes in Nova Scotia
JS i a I
PI
I SHORT LINE
13
Miles    IWest-
East-
Miles
from
Halifax
bound
Train.
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
bound
Train.
from
Montr'l
Leave
•
Leave
62   ,
[9.50
• ruro_Population 7,000.   A pretty and thriving town
8.15
697
i
10.05
in the midst of most picturesque scenery and having
18.OO
A.M.
one of the finest natural parks in North America,
within one half mile of the Railway Station.   Good
trout fishing is to be found in the neighbourhood.
In the Stewiacke Mountains there are moose.    In
the spring and fall grouse are plentiful, and geese,
brant, duck, curlew, and snipe are common.   From
Truro a branch line runs to Pictou, from whence
steamers depart to Charlottetown, Prince Edward
Island.    A second branch runs to New Glasgow
P.M.
Moose,
Trout
and Mulgrave, on the Straits of Canso, where con
caribou.
and
salmon
nection is made with steamers for Cape  Breton
and
grouse
fishing
Island.   The railway is extended through the island
to the Sydneys, which have become great industrial
centres, and give promise of further future development.    From them historic Louisburg is very easily
reached   by   rail.    A capital   service   has  been
inaugurated between North Sydney and Port aux
Basques, Newfoundland—the sea voyage only occupying six hours—there connecting with the Reid-
Newfoundland Co.  Railway, which  traverses the
centre of the island to St. John's on the eastern
coast, and connects with the fine steamship service
to the different bays of  Newfoundland and to the
Labrador coast.
shooting
A.M.
The Acadian   Iron
79
10.37
Londonderry
Works are three miles
7.25
680
109    11.34
Oxford June.
from     Londonderry,    a
6.20
650
121    12.00
Spring Hill June.
branch line extending
5.58
638
138
12.35
Amherst
to them.     Oxford has
5.22
621
148
b.54
Sackville
extensive  factories,   a
5.02
611
179
fl.55
Painsec June.
profitable industry
3.59
580
P.M.
being the manufacture
of the celebrated Oxford cloths.   From Oxford Junction a branch runs to Pugwash and to Pictou.   Near
Spring Hill are important coal  mines—and from
here a branch line extends to the watering place
of Parrsboro on the Minas Basin.   Amherst (pop.
P.M.
Fishing
10,000) is a manufacturing town with several good
and
hotels.    Shooting and fishing are both fair, the
Minas
shoot
Basin
ing
game   comprising   moose, geese, and duck;  and
salmon trout are plentiful in the lakes.   A few miles
from Amherst are the remains of Fort Cumberland,
of historic  interest as the scene   of   hard-fought
battles between the British and French in the early
days.    Sackville has a fine college and Methodist
academies, and   is  situated in a choice grazing
country.    Railway connection is made from Cape
Tormentine, from which Prince Edward Island is
Up   * ■
/ Flag Station.
> *.l
y '..&
\
14
SHORT  LINE
Miles
from
Halifax
186
200
209
232
254
Pictur
seen
276
Westbound
Train
Leave
P.M.
a 2.10
/ 2.30
Headquarters
of Intercolonial
Ry.
P.M.
2.52
3.10
3.55
4.36
a
IT)
esque
ery
a 5.20
75.55
P.M.
Stately
buildings
Bay of
Fundy
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
reached. From Painsec Junction a branch line extends to Point du Ch§ne, connecting with steamers
for Summerside, Prince Edward Island.
I Moncton—Population 14,000, is situated on a bend of
the Petitcodiac River. It is the centre of the Intercolonial Railway system, the head offices and workshops of which are located here. It has many
important industries, prominent among which is a
cotton factory. Within eight miles of the city
natural gas has been discovered, and in the same
territory oil in paying quantities has also been
found. An interesting feature of the river is the
" Bore " of the incoming tide, when the water rushes
in with great force in a huge wave, often seven feelj;
high. Hunters for Northern New Brunswick usually
outfit and start from here.
East*
bound
Train
Leave
Salisbury
Petitcodiac
Sussex
Hampton
The first part of th©;
journey from Moncton
to St. John lies through
an unattractive region,
but between Petitcodiac!
and Sussex is a fine
farming country, and many pretty views are obtained from the train. In the beautiful Kenne-j
becasis Valley are some of the finest New Bruns-i
wick farms. A great many small lakes lie to the]
east and south, where large trout are abundant. Inj
the immediate vicinity is a wealth of scenery, thej
rounding hills and abrupt heights forming pictures
that cannot fail to please.
St. John, N.B—Population 57,000. This is the won-;
derful " new city" that rose from the ashes of the
terrible conflagration which destroyed old St. John1
in June, 1877, devastating nine miles of streets, ana
causing a loss of between twenty and thirty millions
of dollars. The citizens were resolute and enterprising, and stately buildings soon filled the great
gap left by the flames, and there is nothing now left
to indicate the awful calamity. Old St. John, with
all her romantic tokens of French rule and Acadian
simplicity, is lost, but new St. John fills her place
admirably, and is now a busy modern centre.
St. John is a maritime city—the winter port for the
Atlantic steamers—and a great feature is the Bay
of Fundy and the great harbour, an inspection of
the fine docks, to which the Dominion Government
are at present making large extensions, and different craft being always of special interest to a
visitor. The St John River," the Rhine of America,".
with its wonderful " reversible cataract," should be
P.M.
I 3.45
a 3.35
High
tide
P.M.
3.10
2.50
2.10
1.30
ft >»
o> vi
Hills
Heig
Miles
from
Montr']
573
559
550
528
505
P.M.
/12.40
a 12.00
noon
g
o
t-
CQ
c
o
2
2
c
c
JC
CD
o
<D
•—i
£
•+•*
vow
xi
TJ
>>
C
• *-4
Vi
tt
Q
St. John
River.
and
hts
483
t Refreshment Station.
%L - - r_
1. St. John
2. Old Colonial House, Fredericton
3. C.P.R. Elevators, St. John
m  SHORT LINE
15
Miles
West
from
bound
Halifax
Train
Leave
CO*
2
c
XI —<
o vi
i—» o
. >-
•** +•>
OTg
©^
£ c
•$ *
.a
>»
r—<t
•1-M
ri
1
278
290
299
313
320
7.06
P.M.
341
J 7.42
351
d 7.59
360
a 8.15
/  8.30
P.M.
St. An
drews.
Seaside
Resort.
366
a 8.42
/  7.50
Eastern
Time
Vance
boro
to Fort
William
371
g 7.58
382
g 8.09
387
g 8.16
392
/ 8.28
401
g 8.43
414
g 9.03
P.M.
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
seen by every visitor; also the fine suspension
bridge and railway cantilever bridge near the falls.
Near Rothesay, on Kennebecasis River, is one of
the finest rowing courses in the world. A trip up the
St. John River to Fredericton by steamer will reveal
all the changing beauties of that stream. The
magnificent steel steamer, | Prince Rupert," plying
between St. John and Digby, N.S., makes connection with the Dominion Atlantic Railway at Digby
for Halifax and Yarmouth, this being a favourite
route between the chief cities of the two provinces;
and the Eastern Steamship Co.'s Line gives connection with Eastport, Me., Portland, and Boston.
Good trout fishing and
Fairville
Westfield Beach
Welsford
Hoyt
Fredericton June.
shooting   can  be   had
comparatively near the
city.     At  Fredericton
Junction  connections
are made for the city
of   Fredericton, sometimes called | the Celestial City."   Population 7,600.
It is the capital of New Brunswick, and is well
worth a visit.
Harvey
Magaguadavic
McAdam June.
Presque Isle, Me., to the
At McAdam Junction
connections are made
for Woodstock, N.B.,
Houlton, Me., and
north, and St. Stephen,
N.B.,and the beautiful watering place, St. Andrews,
N.B., to the south. St. Andrews is situated on
Passamaquoddy Bay, and as a summer resort is
not surpassed by any point on the Atlantic coast.
East'
bound
Train
Leave
Alternate
route to
Halifax
A.M.
11.50
</11.17
J10.58
10.45
A.M.
Vanceboro—The   first   station   after
boundary between New Brunswick
J10.10
d 9.55
/ 9.40
9.25
A.M.
a
Atlantic
Time
Vanceboro to
Halifax
crossing the I
and the State
of Maine. It lies close to the beautiful St. Croix
River, the outlet of the boundary chain of lakes, and
is an excellent point for the sportsman. Standard
Time changes here from "Atlantic" to "Eastern"
Standard, and west-bound passengers should accordingly set their watches back one hour.
Lambert
Forest
Eaton
Danforth
Bancroft
Kingman
Lake
The country about these
stations is wild and
rugged, and intersected
by streams and lakes
—a good territory for
the sportsman. The
villages are all new
and progressive.
9.13
8.05
St..
Croix
River
g 7.58
g7.41
g 7.35
/7.27
g 7.12
g 6.53
A.M.
Miles
from
Montr'l
d Flag for passengers for or from west of Mattawamkeag.
/ Flag Station.
g Flag for passengers for or from Mattawamkeag and west, or for or from Vanceboro and east.
480
469
459
446
439
418
408
399
393
388
377
372
367
358
345 za
m
i-e
16
SHORT  LINE
Miles
from
Halifax
Westbound
Train
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES.
East-
bound
Train
Miles
from
Montr' 1
Leave
Here    the    Penobscot
Leave
-
42a
9.34
M attawam keag
River is crossed, and
6.37
336
444
n 10.07
Seboois
many canoeists  make
h 5.52
315
456
A10.28
Lake View
this station   their   ob
h 5.33
303
■   466
10.53
Brown vi He June.
jective point, descend
5.17
293
483
Onawa
ing   the    river    from
276
P.M.
Moosehead Lake, a trip
that offers great inducements in the way of fishing
and scenery.    At tBrownville Junction the line of the
Katahdin  Iron  Works Railway is crossed.    The
A.M.
Lake
Onawa
scenery along this section of the line is considered
to rank among the finest in Maine, Lake Onawa
being, perhaps, as pretty as any of the numerous
waters.   At Wilson Stream the road runs close to
the base of Boarstone Mountain.   Two stately iron
bridges will be noticed before Greenville Junction, a
busy little town on the shore of Moosehead Lake,
the grandest of all the countless waters of Maine,
Good
and hu
fishing
nting
NIGHT
is reached.   The fish-
A.M.
499
12.00
Greenville June.
ing and shooting of this
4.05
260
510
A.M.
Moosehead
section is exceptionally
249
515
b 12.27
Somerset June.
good.
6 3.37
245
517
No
Askwith
This is a very popu
No
242
526
Stop
Mackamp
lar   point   with   those
Stop
233
531
Long Pond
who  love the rod and
228
539
1.05
Jackman
rifle,  as   within   easy
3.00
220
552
Holeb
reach are any number
207
563
1.52
Lowelltown
of trout waters and rare
2.20
196
good shooting grounds,
moose, caribou, deer, bear, grouse, etc., being found
within a short distance.   There are several hotels
Moose
La
head
ke
that offer excellent accommodation. Guides, canoes,
etc., can be obtained on the spot.    Moosehead Lake
is about forty miles long by from one to fifteen wide,
and its scenery is unsurpassed.   From Greenville
Steam
Green
er from
ville to
Junction steamers run to all the points of interest,
Mount
Kineo
including Mount Kineo and the popular hotel at its
Game
Tro
and
ut
base, the Kineo House.    JXCoosehead is a small
station, also upon the lake shore.   Near Askwith
station the Kennebec River leaves Moosehead Lake.
Trout Brook is, as its name indicates, close to good
fishing water.    From Jackman the Moose River and
its chain of lakes, where game and fish are abundant, are easily reached.   Long Lake is a link of
this chain.   Holeb and Loxoelltown are small stations
near the boundary between Maine and Quebec.
h Flag for pa
ssengers for or from east of Mattawamkeag and for or from west of Gr<
Renville Ji
mc.
b Flag for th
rough passengers or those destined to stations where regular stop is mac
--"■ -■* - ■	
le
■5K.
SHE- SPORTING   DAYS   IN
NEW   BRUNSWICK.
1. Skinning a Moose Head
2. The Most Popular Pastime
3. A Hunters' Camp
4. A New Brunswick Deer ■4 SHORT LINE
Miles
West
from
bound
[Halifax
Train.
567
577
583
2.45
591
598
608
3.36
621
v4.03
630
4.21
A.M.
635
638
641
648
652
Spider
Lake
658
670
680
684
688
692
No
Stop
5.00
5.15
A.M.
Magog
and St.
Francis
Rivers
A.M.
5.46
Owl's
Head
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
We now reach the
Boundary mountains
which divide the State
of Maine from the Province of Quebec, and
the remainder of the
journey is through
Canadian territory.
Lake Megantic is
twelve miles long by
from one to four wide, and like Moosehead it is a
favourite spot with sportsmen. Near Lake Megantic
is Spider Lake, the Geneva of Canada," where the
Club House of the Megantic Fish and Game Club is
located. At Megantic Station sportsmen can find
fairly good accommodation, and secure guides for a
shooting or fishing trip. From here, Levis (opposite
Quebec) is reached by the Quebec Central Railway.
Boundary
Ditchfield
Megantic
Spring Hil
Milan
Scotstown
Bury
Cookshire
Birchtown
Bulwer
Johnville
Lennoxville
Sherbrooke
At Lennoxville, distant
three miles from Sherbrooke, connections are
made with the Boston
& Maine Railroad running south to the summer resort of Newport,
Vt., situated at the southern end of Lake Memphre-
magog, where it connects with the Montreal and
Boston Air Line of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Sherbrooke, the metropolis of the English-speaking
district of the Eastern Townships, is a picturesque
and attractive city, with a population of 17,000, and
possessing many busy factories and business establishments that compare well with those of much
larger cities. Here connection is again made with
the Quebec Central to Levis, opposite Quebec. The
rapid Magog and St. Francis Rivers unite their
currents here, and the falls of the Magog are well
worth seeing. They provide a valuable water power
which is used for electrical development.
Magog is situated upon
the shore of Lake
Memphremagog — a
magnificent sheet of
water dotted with many
islands and surrounded
by rugged, heavily
wooded hills. This lake
is a justly popular resort for summer tourists, who
never weary of its lovely scenery. Its two famous
mountains—Orford and Owl's Head—are the most
imposing of the neighbouring heights.   From Magog
Rock Forest
Magog
Eastman
South Stukely
Foster
Fulford
No
Stop
10.46
10.38
P.M.
Falls
of the
Magog
10.04
9.28
P.M.
101
89
79
75
71
67
v Stops on signal for passengers to or from Sherbrooke or Megantio and beyond.
s 18
w
m
m
m
SHORT LINE
Miles
from
Halifax
:-
Westbound
Train
Leave
697
708
715
719
727
728
729
733
740
744
749
751
754
757
759
Str. to
Newport,
Vt.
A.M.
$6.37
7.08
/J7.28
7.32
/7.40
/7.49
8.02
8.15
n 8.23
8.30
A.M.
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Lach
Rap
Q
w
0)
>
i-i
<
me
ids
Station a steamer makes a circuit of the lake daily,
during the summer season, touching at all important
points, including the fashionable resort of Newport,
Vt., at the southern extremity. This cruise by
steamer forms a delightful side-trip and reveals all
the beauties of the lake. At Foster the Drummond-
ville Subdivision of the Canadian Pacific Railway
is crossed.
At Brigham Junction the
Montreal and Boston
Air Line diverges for
the White Mountains
and Boston, and at
Farnham the Stanbridge
and St. Guillaume Subdivision of the Canadian
Pacific Railway is
crossed. From Iberville Junction a railway
runs to St. Hyacinthe
and Sorel. St. Johns
(pop. 6,300) is a busy
and prettily situated
town on the Richelieu
West Sheffbrd
Brigham June.
Farnham
Ste. Brigide
Iberville June.
Iberville
St. Johns
L'Acadie
St. Philippe
St. Constant
Adirondack June.
Highlands
Montreal June.
Westmount
|Montreal (Windsor St.)
East-
bound
Train
Leave
River. Crossing the
broad St. Lawrence by a wonderful steel bridge a
fine view is obtained up and down the river. Just
below are the famous Lachine Rapids. This bridge
was built by the Canadian Pacific Railway. The
channel spans are each 408 feet long, and lofty
enough to allow the passage of the largest steamers,
and it is justly considered one of the engineering
triumphs of the century. On the north shore of the
SL Lawrence we reach the pretty little village of
Highlands—thence on to Montreal Junction, whence
the several lines of the Canadian Pacific Railway
extend to Toronto, Hamilton, Niagara Falls, Buffalo,
London, Detroit, Chicago, Quebec, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Vancouver and Pacific Coast, Sault Ste. Marie,
St. Paul, New York and Boston. From here we enter
the City of Montreal and run along elevated tracks,
until the train stops under a lofty ceiling and we
have arrived at the stately stone structure known as
the Canadian Pacific Railway Co.'s Windsor St.
Station. 1 ■   ^ii  W&t mfi   Slllllll > -
Miles
from
Montr'l
P.M.
8.45
8.21
8.15
7.35
n 7.29
7.25
P.M.
M vi
W
o
£*E
Q £
Q
OT
>  C!
vi ctf
<o
_1
Win
Str
Sta
62
50
44
40
32
31
30
26
19
14
9
8
5
2
0
dsor
eet
tion
/ Flag stop.
tt Stops at Westmount to take on and let off passengers for or from St. Johns, Que., or beyond.
t Flag stop for passengers to Montreal or beyond on week days only.
3 Refreshment Station.
j Flag for passengers for Montreal or beyond.  '.Si
3L °-y'i""a-'
-iu-tff'nw ,■ = .
Connecting Routes to and
it   from Montreal     I
Northbound
Trains
Lv.
A.M.
f7.45
Ar.
tlO.15
P.M.
Lv.
P.M.
*7.15
Lv.
A.M.
*9/»30
Ar.
*9.55
P.M.
Ar.
* 10.00
A.M.
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Lv.
P.M.
*6.55
Ar.
*7.30
A.M.
Montreal is but a day's or a night's ride from the
principal cities of the United States on the North
Atlantic seaboard—New York, Boston and Portland, Me.—and there is a choice of several routes
111 from the first-named place.
ew York and Montreal:
■p.- ' 384 miles.
Adirondack Route, via N.Y. Central
New York Route I — Is by the
New York Central up
the east shore of the
picturesque Hudson
River to Albany, N.Y.;
thence via Utica and
the attractive summer
resorts of the Adiron-
[Montreal dack Mountains (Sara-
nac Lake, Paul Smith's,
Loon Lake, etc.), crossing the St. Lawrence River
on the Canadian Pacific Bridge above the Lachine
Rapids, and into the Windsor Street Station at
Montreal. This trip may be pleasantly varied in
summer by taking the steamer in the morning from
New York up the Hudson to Albany, and thence by
rail as above.
Rutland Route, via Troy and Rutland
Mew York Route  II—Is by the
New York Central to
Troy, and thence Rutland Railroad by way
of the east shore and
islands of Lake Champlain to Iberville Junction, from which point
IMontreal the   trains  utilize the
lines of the Canadian
Pacific Railway, landing passengers in the Windsor
Street Station, Montreal. Ill
Southbound
Trains
Ar.
P.M.
f 10.50
Ar.
A.M.
t8.00
Lv.
P.M.
*8*42
Ar.
Ar.
A.M.",
* 10.20
Ar.
P.M.
*7.20
Lv.
A.M.
*7.26
Ar.
A.M.
*8.50
Lv.
P.M.
*7.35
Lv.
I Refreshment Station. * Daily, Snnday;included f Daily, except Sunday.
h On Sunday leave New York 9.40 a.m. k On Sunday arrive New York 8.33 p.m. 20
CONNECTING ROUTES TO AND FROM MONTREAL
Northbound
Trains
Lv.
A.M.
19.30
§9.40
Ar.
|8.30
§9.40
P.M.
Lv.
P.M.
*8.30
A.M.
12.32
4.55
Ar.
*8.20
A.M.
Lv.
P.M.
*9.30
A.M.
12.30
2.07
4.55
*8.20
A.M.
Lv.
P.M.
*6.55
Ar.
*7.15
A.M.
Lv.
A.M.
♦10.00
P.M.
1.37
5.23
Ar.
*9.00
P.M.
Lv.
A.M.
f9.05
P.M.
1.42
3.30
5.23
19.00
P.M.
Ar,
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
D. & H. Route, via Troy and Saratoga.
ew York K°UJE mJ~\s %lso hy>
the New York Central
to Troy, thence Delaware and Hudson Rd.
via the west shore of
Lake Champlain. This
route can be varied in
summer via steamer
through Lakes George
I IN/lon anc* Champlain at an
expenditure of about
12 hours' time and slight additional cost in price
of ticket.
Southbound
Trains
Ar.
P.M.
f8.42
§8.33
Ar.
A.M.
+10.00
§ 9.00
Lv.
Boston and Montreal:
1 341 miles.
Yia Montreal and Boston Air Line
Boston—From Boston there is a through service by
Canadian Pacific trains. The route traverses the
most interesting parts of New England, skirts the
White Mountains of New Hampshire, and runs
through the rich valleys of Northern Vermont, with
the Green Mountains in view, and along Lake
Memphremagog, and through the English settled}
portions   of   Southern
Plymouth Quebec   to   Montreal,
crossing the St. Law-
Newport rence by the Canadian
Pacific    cantilever
bridge, just above the
city, and stopping at the
| Montreal Windsor Street Station,
from which transcontinental trains depart.
Portland, Me., and Montreal:
286 miles.
Via the White Mountains
| Portland—From Portland, the route lies through
Southern Maine and Central New Hampshire,
entering the famed White Mountains at North
crossing the startling Crawford
Notch to Fabyan and
Lunenburg, and thence
Ar.
P.M.
*7.52
Conway,  and
Fabyan
St. Johnsbury
Newport
to St. Johnsbury, Vt.,
from which the same
route as from Boston
is followed to Montreal.
Maine Central trains
run from Portland to St. Johnsbury, where connection is made with Canadian Pacific trains.
I Montreal
During the summer
months through sleeping and parlour cars
are   run   between   Kennebunkport,   Old   Orchard,
Portland and Montreal.
P.M.
4.25
.12.35
A.M.
*9.00
Lv.
Ar.
P.M.
f7.55
4.27
2.30
12.35
P.M.
19.00
Lv.
Ar.
A.M.
*7.20
Ar.
|| Refreshment Station.
* Daily, Sunday included.
2 Sunday only.
f Daily, except Sunday.
P.M.
*8.01
Lv.
Ar.
A.M.
*7.27
A.M.
3.40
P.M.
11.25
P.M.
*8.00
Lv.
Ar.
A.M.
*6.50
3.50
2.10
A.M.
11.25
P.M.
8.00
P.M. .
.
Dominion Square,
Montreal
Place Viger Hotel, Montreal
St. James Street, Montreal X-
i i "V
•"Transcontinental Rail Route
MONTREAL to VANCOUVER: 2898 miles
MONTREAL and CHALK RIVER: 243 miles
(Eastern Division)
Miles
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains
0
©
o
.   o
*$ vi
vi p,
o o>
*-• ■»-»
£ C
c ©
O "TO
S c
« o
w o
>  <U
28
vi
a
o
T3
<
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
10.30
P.M.
vi
Q
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Eastb'nd Trains
Montreal~~(Windsor Street Station)-^
Population (with suburbs) 592,000.
The chief city and commercial capital
of Canada is situated on an island
formed by the St. Lawrence and
Ottawa Rivers, and on the site of the
ancient Indian village of Hochelaga,
visited by Jacques Cartier in 1535.
A trading-post was established here
by the French 250 years ago; and
this was the last place yielded by the
French to the British in 1760. For
many years it was the chief centre
of the fur trade. Atlantic steamships
of the Canadian Pacific, Allan, Donaldson, Canadian, Northern, White
Star-Dominion, and other well-known
lines run here. The St. Lawrence
River and canals bring this way a
large part of the trade of the Great
Lakes. Numerous railway lines,
mostly controlled by the Canadian
Pacific and Grand Trunk Companies,
radiate from here in all directions.
Both these companies have their
principal offices and workshops here,
and both have great bridges over the
St. Lawrence River. The city has a
far-reaching trade, and great manufacturing establishments; has fine
wharves of masonry, vast warehouses
and grain elevators; imposing public
buildings, handsome residences and
superior hotels, one of the best of
which is the Place Viger Hotel, which
is combined with the C.P.R.'s East
End Station, and is operated by the
Company. The Canadian Pacific has
two stations. From the Windsor Street
Station trains leave for Toronto,
Detroit, Chicago, St. John, N.B., Halifax, New York, Boston, Portland,
Sault Ste. Marie, Duluth, St.Paul, Minneapolis, Winnipeg and Vancouver;
and for Ottawa by the Short Line. From
the Place Viger Station, trains run to
Ottawa by the North Shore Line, to
Quebec, Mont Laurier in the.Lauren-
tian Mountains, and Local points.
Imper'l
Limited
Arrive
8.55
A.M.
vi
Q
Rail
connec
bo
©
P.
c
a
o
P. &o
o «J
O  P.
c^ ©
si
C  ©
O   W
M 9
ta *0
©  G
>  O
CO  ©
9-i
vi
C
o
*3
<
way
tions
Miles
from
Vanc'r
2898
To
New
York I
384.
to
Boston
341
miles
1 Refreshment Station.       Dining cars run between Montreal and Vancouver on Transcontinental trains. m
22                             TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
1
Miles
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Eastb'nd Trains
Miles
from
Vanc'r
Imper'l
Limited
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
1 Leave
v    1
P.M.
All     transconti-
2
§10.35
Westmount
nental   trains
§8.49
^
2897
5
10.40
Montreal June.
depart from  the
/8.43
2893
Windsor    Street
A.M.
Station, and run through to the Pacific
Coast without change.   The railway
lines through the city are on a high
stone viaduct, and thence on the brow
of an embankment until   Montreal
Eastern
Vanceb
FortW
Time
oro to '.
illiam
Junction is reached, where the lines
to New York, Boston and NewEngland
points, and the Maritime Provinces,
via the St. Lawrence bridge, diverge,
and then strike west through a beautiful and   highly cultivated district
sloping down on the St. Lawrence
River, along the bank of which an
almost  continuous  village   extends
from Western Junction to Ste. Annes.
Thousands of Montreal people live
here   in   summer.   A little beyond
Montreal Junction the old village of
Lachine on Lake St. Louis, an expansion of the River St. Lawrence, is
seen at the left,
10
Doryal
and   above   the
2889
2886
2883
12
Valois
trees   further   to
15
Beaconsfield
the left a view is
a^is                                 had of the great
steel bridge built by the Canadian
Pacific   Railway   Company   across
ik
that noble stream.   Lachine was for
>»
>•»
a long time the point of departure of
vi
O
the early trading military expeditions;
and it was from here that Duquesne
set Out in 1754 to seize the Ohio Valley—an expedition that culminated
in  the defeat of Braddock.   One of
the five  mouths
vi
Q
21
§11.01
Ste. Annes
of    the    Ottawa
(2878
24
11.10
Vaucjreuil
River is crossed
2874
by a   fine  steel
bridge at Ste. Annes, at the head of
the   Island   of   Montreal.    Directly
under  the bridge are the locks by
means of which steamboats going up
the Ottawa are lifted over the rapids
here.   Ste. Annes was once the home
of the poet Moore, and is the scene
of his well-known Canadian  Boat-
Song.   Here are the splendid build
ings of the Macdonald Agricultural
College.     At  Vaudreuil,  the. trans
continental  road for over ten miles
skirts the south side of the pretty
Lake of Two Mountains, on whose
shores are the fashionable summer
ing    resorts    of
30
Como
Como and Hud
2868
33
Hudson
son Heights.   On
2866
41
pi 1.35
Rigaud
the   opposite
p7.46
2858
shore of the lake
/Flag Station,      p Flag Sundays only.      $ Flag stop for passengers for or from Ottawa and west. The Notch,
Montreal River
Parliament
Buildings,
from the River,
Ottawa
Caledonia
Springs Hot
i
ti
if!
J
m
J . 'I.
J:
! 4
; i
PR TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
23
Miles
from
Montr'l
j Westb'nd Trains
49
58
66
70
75
80
95
99
112
116
as
I
p.
o
no
O o
§1 be
vi vi
£ P.
vi  m
•** -S
O as
.- ■»-»
P. 52
■
i o
13 °
»-. a>
C   ©
o«
Ow
la
si
ta «
3>£
©
vi
C
o
•^*
•»—»
T>
<
O
c
o
g
o
Q
©
o
a.
«j
O
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
A.M.
12.10
Arrive
Central
Station
1.30
A.M.
Union
Station
a 1.55
J2.05
A.M.
vi
Q
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l j
Limited
Leave
is established the famous Trappist
Monastery whose silent inmates are
largely engaged in agriculture and
dairying. At Rigaud, on the left, is
seen Rigaud Mountain, near whose |
summit is a curious deposit of stones—
a bare, desolate, isolated spot around
which vegetation is luxuriant. There
is the usual legend of its being the
Devil's Playground. Five and a half
miles beyond Rigaud the Province of
Ontario is entered. St. Eugene, a
very flourishing French-Canadian
town,, is the first station passed in
Ontario, and eleven miles beyond is
Vankleek, a thriving English-Canadian town. Cale-
St. Eugene
Vankleek
Caledonia Springs
Alfred
Plantagenet
Pendleton  tj|
Leonard
Navan
donia Springs is
a favourite health
resort on account
of the medicinal
properties of its
waters, a fact
which has led
the Canadian
Pacific Railway
to operate here one of its magnificent
chain of hotels, and beyond it are
several villages of recent birth which
were brought into existence by the
construction of this section of the
C.P.R. Before reaching Ottawa, the
Rideau River, which connects Lake
Ontario at Kingston with the political
capital, is crossed, and the banks of
the Rideau canal are followed to the
Central Station in the heart of the city.
Ottawa—Pop, 86,000. The Federal
Capital of the Dominion is picturesquely situated at the junction of the
Rideau River with the Ottawa. The
Chaudiere Falls, which here interrupt the navigation of the Ottawa
River, afford water-power for a host
of sawmills and other manufactories.
Vast quantities of lumber are made
here from logs floated down from the
Ottawa River and its tributaries.
. The city stands on high ground overlooking a wide valley and contains
many fine residences, the Royal
Mint, Victoria Museum, large hotels,
etc. The stately Government buildings, however, overshadow all. Rideau Hall, the residence of the
Governor - General, is in the city
limits. Many improvements have
been made in Ottawa at the cost of
the Federal Government, and it is
now held to be worthy of the description of the most picturesque capital
in the world.   The driveways in and
A.M.
7.20
5.55
Central
Station
/5.30
a5.15
Union
Station
Lum
mak
»—«
vi
Q
vi
u
*-»
G
© /-\
w O^
£ bo
vi vi
+2 P.
O ©
tj3
G vi
vi **
.*«
c ©
G in
q, G
Xs ©
G
O
o
CO
G
o
©
©
Ct/5
D^
S?   •
h ba
1 I
O G
m .5
1 s
vi o
G <+■<
2 g
*-•   .
—. P.
£S
a*
•m*
<
ber
ing
Miles
from
Vane'r
2850
2841
2833
2828
2824
2818
2804
2800
2787
2783
Refreshment Station. V...
m
24
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
Miles
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains
Imper'l
Limited
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Leave
121
125
131
140
N
St
o
op
144
151
155
160
168
171
A.M.
2.58
ft 3.47
about the city are unexcelled. It is
also well called " the Washington of
the North." Most visitors, if unprejudiced, will agree that both titles
are not inapt, for Ottawa possesses
charms of situation and surroundings, which, coupled with the foresight which has characterized the
laying out of the city, have made it
one of which not only every citizen,
but also every Canadian may well
be proud. From here the Maniwaki
Subdivision runs north to the town
of Maniwaki, and opens up the sporting possibilities of the Gatineau and
its tributary streams and lakes in a
way that makes it easy for the city
dweller to spend a few hours in the
open air at his favourite pastime.
The Waltham Subdivision, along
which the sportsman may find the
best of fishing and abundance of
game, also runs from this point. A
subdivision of the Canadian Pacific
Railway extends southward to PRES-
COTT, on the St. Lawrence, where
ferry connection is made with Og-
densburg, N.Y., and rail lines to New
York.     Leaving
Britannia
Bells Corners
Stittville
Ashton
Ottawa (Central)
the railway
crosses the Ottawa River on
^^ the Royal Alex
andra Bridge and skirts the city of
Hull (population 15,800), and again
crossing the Ottawa a couple of miles
up stream returns to the city and
enters the Union Station.. In the
passage over the two bridges admirable views are obtained of the city
and of the Ottawa River, which is the
third largest in Canada. From the
Union Station the railway follows the
south bank of the Ottawa River for
a distance, and on its wide stretches
may be seen enormous quantities of
saw-logs held in "booms" for the
use of the mills below.
Carleton Place (Junction)—Population
5,000. Junction of a subdivision running south to Brockville on the
St. Lawrence River, crossing the
Montreal-and-Toronto line at SMITH'S
FALLS. At Carleton 'Place are large
woollen factories, stove foundry and
railway and other workshops.
Proceeding from
Carleton   Place,
Almonte
Snedden
Pakenham
Arnprior
Braeside
the line takes a
north - westerly
course, still following the beau-
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
Miles
from
Vanc'r
N
St
PP
A.M.
4.20
2778
2774
2768
2759
2754
2747
2744
2738
2731
2727
k Flag stop for passengers to Winnipeg or beyond
J u
How to Carry
a Canoe
m
m i
in
B* TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE                            25
Miles
from
Montri
Westb'nd Trains
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Eastb'nd Trains
Miles
from
Vanc'r
Imper'l
Limited
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
Leave
173
Sand Point
tiful Ottawa Val
2725
178
Castleford
ley^    which,    to
2720
182
■*
Russell
Pembroke   and
2716
186
4.30
Renfrew
beyond,   is  well
2.51
2712
195
Haley's
cultivated by
2704
202
Cobden
English, Scotch,
2697
208
A.M.
Snake River
and German far-
A.M.
2691
211
Graham
mers.    Large
2687
clear   streams
come rushing down to the Ottawa
>%
from the hills at the west, and these,
>N
km*
vi
and the Ottawa as well, afford fine
vi
(    .;   .
Q
fishing—maskinonge, trout, and bass
being common.   There are frequent
bright and busy manufacturing towns,
and saw-mills occur  at favourable
places all along the  river.   At Almonte (pop. 3,500) are large woollen
mills and other manufactories.
Q
:
Fact
ories
A.M.
<Pakenham (pop. 2,200) and Jlrnprior
(pop. 4,200) are also important manufacturing   points.      From   Renfrew
(pop. 3,500) a subdivision   runs to
Eganville, and it is also the junction
of the Kingston and Pembroke Railway, extending southward through a
district abounding in iron, to KINGSTON (at the head of the St. Lawrence).
'Pembroke (pop.  6,000) is the  most
important    town
Kings
Pembr
A.M.
ton &
oke Ry.
221
5.31
Pembroke
in   this   section,
1.46
2678
226
Stafford
having   many
2672
231
Petawawa
substantial     i n-
2668
238
Thistle
dustries and
2661
243
6.18
Chalk River
commanding    a
1.10
2656
A.M.
large part of the
trade of the lumbering districts towards the north.   The Ottawa River
is again navigable for a considerable
distance above and below, and steamboats   are   frequently seen.    From
Pembroke to  Mattawa the railway
continues along the west bank of the
Ottawa, whose valley narrows, and
the Ottawa flows deeply between the
increasing hills.     Little towns are
growing up around the saw-mills,
A.M.
Fish
Ga
and
me
Timbe
r Mills
which occur wherever water power
is to be had.   As the wilder country
is approached, opportunities for sport
with gun and rod increase. CHALK RIVER and PORT ARTHUR: 749 Miles
(Lake Superior Division)
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Imper'l
Limited
Chalk River is the western terminus of
the Eastern Division and eastern terminus of the Lake Superior Division,
with an engine-house and the usual
railway buildings and appurtenances.
Matt aw a (pop.
Wylie
Moorlake
Mackey
StoneclifF
Bissett
Deux Rivieres
Klock
2,000) is an old
fur-trading   post
of  the Hudson's
Bay    Company,
but at present of
most importance
as a distributing
point for the lumbering   districts   and    agricultural
country  about   Lake Timiskaming.
From this point a subdivision runs
to Timiskaming  and  Kipawa, and
from   each   station   famous  fishing
and hunting grounds may easily be
reached.   At Timiskaming there is
steamer connection with Haileybury,
from which place canoes and guides
can  be  procured,  and  an  endless
series   of   trips,   unsurpassed  anywhere, can be made, including those
to the  peerless Timagami  district.
From  Kipawa Junction  there is a
short line to Kipawa, and exploring
about the beautiful lake of the same
name furnishes   an   ideal   holiday.
Those who love the wild will find
their every desire satisfied in this
part of the country, game and fish
being in plenty, and the comforts of
civilization not too far off.    It is also
a favourite centre for moose hunters,
and  guides and
Eastb'nd Trains
Mattawa
Calvin
Eau Claire
Rutherglen
Bonfield
Nosbonsing
Corbeil
Cliffe
supplies   for
shooting expeditions may always
be obtained here
An   attractive
point for tourists
is   Lake   Timiskaming, and no
more   enjoyable
canoeing can be imagined than in
exploration  of these  waters which
abound in fish as the country does in
game.   To the south of the railway
is Algonquin Park, established by the
Ontario Government as a forest and
game preserve.   At Mattawa the line
leaves the Ottawa and strikes across
toward Lake  Nipissing, through a
somewhat wild and broken country,
Arrive
1.00
A.M.
P.M.
10.50
V
Valley
Mat
of the
tawa
Miles
from
fanc'r
2656
2651
2641
2632
2628
2618
2605
2594
2584
2577
2571
2565
2558
2554
2548
2544
/ Flag Stations. SPORT AT KIPAWA T
—^---'"-=—H7~—"- Miles
from
Montr'l
360
370
375
384
387
394
403
409
416
423
428
433
La
Nipis
Spor
opport
A.M.
a 10.10
10.30
ke
sing
11.10
11.17
P.M.
12.45
vi
Q
ting
unities
with frequent lakes and rapid streams.
Fishing and shooting are excellent.
Little villages surrounding saw-mills
continue to occur, and newly-made
farms are not infrequent. There is
plenty of good land near by, but the
railway here, as in many other
places, follows the streams and the
"breaks" in the country, and the
best is not seen from the car windows. Bonfield was originally intended as the eastern terminus of
the Canadian Pacific Railway, to
which connecting roads would run,
but with the change of control from
Government to Company the transcontinental line was extended to Montreal. A mile beyond Cliffe is
Nipissing Junction, the junction of the
Grand Trunk Railway from Toronto,
etc., coming north by way of Lake
Simcoe. Its trains run on to North
Bay, where connection with the Canadian Pacific Railv/ay trains is made.
| North Bay—Pop. 6,000. The capital
town of Nipissing District, situated
on Lake Nipissing, an extensive
and beautiful sheet of water, 90
miles long and 20 wide. Steamers
ply on the lake, and the district
is much frequented by sportsmen.
North Bay is a railway divisional
point, with repair shops, etc. The
Ontario Government Railway, known
as the Timiskam-
Beaucage
Meadowside
Sturgeon Falls
Cache Bay
Verner
Warren
Hagar
Markstay
Stinson
Wanapitei
Romford June.
ing and Northern
Ontario Railway,
runs from here to
Cobalt,Cochrane,
etc., in the Timiskaming country.
This railway has
been   materially
assisted    in   its
traffic   by some
famous   mineral
discoveries made
along the line of route, the chief being
the silver mines at Cobalt.   From
North  Bay to Heron Bay, on Lake
Superior, the line traverses a comparatively wild region, where forests,
meadows, lakes   and   rocky ridges
alternate.   The scenery is striking
and in places extremely interesting.
There are wide   intervals  of good
agricultural land, and the settlements
already extend for 100 miles beyond
Lake Nipissing; but timber cutting
is as yet the principal industry.  The
lands   belong   to   the   Province   of
Ontario, and are   open   to settlers.
The large, clear, rock-bound lakes
P.M.
9.20
9.00
8.19
8.11
6.50
vi
Q
2538
6.05
4.33
2528
2524
2515
2512
2504
2495
2490
2483
2475
2471
2466
vi
Q
Tim
ber
I Refreshment Station 28
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL  ROUTE
Miles
We&tb'nd
Trains
from
/lontrl j
Vanc'r
Imper'l
Express
Limited
Leave
Leave
A.M.
P.M.
a 4.00
a 1.00
Leave
P.M.
/ 10.20
Arrive
A.M.
a 6.20
400
16.27
I 1.10
447
452
458
470
475
a 7.50
a 2.35
I 8.00
I 2.45
486
495
512
529
6 9.40
4.37
546
561
567
578
596
Ss
>»
r—1
•—»
vi
vi
Q
Q
Copper^
nickel
and
gold
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
are in places so numerous that, with
their connecting arms, they form a
labyrinth of waters covering great
areas and. offering matchless opportunities to sportsmen and canoeists.
Bear, moose,and deer abound throughout this region, and the fishing in the
many lakes and rivers is capital.
Sturgeon Falls is a thriving village.
Leaving the station, the railway
crosses directly over the falls of the
Sturgeon River.
e.   j. • i    Sudbury    is    the
Sudbury |   junction  point
where the main line from Toronto
converges with the main line from
Montreal.
Toronto
Sudbury
For descriptive
notes see pages
97 and 98.
Sudbury
Azilda
Chelmsford
Larchwood
Bahnsen
Cartier
Stralak
Pogma
Metagama
Bisco
Ramsay
Woman River
Wakami
Ridout
Nemegos
From Sudbury
(pop. 4,000) the
important" Soo "
Sub division
leads off to Lake
Huron, and
thence along its
shore and the
Ste. Marie River
to Sault Ste.
MARIE, 179 miles,
at the outlet of
Lake Superior,
where an immense iron bridge
affords connection     with    two
American railway lines, one extending to Duluth, the other to St. Paul and
Minneapolis, and thence on through
Minnesota and North Dakota to
Moose Jaw, on the main line
of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Passengers can in summer by
taking the " Soo " train from Montreal
travel to Sault Ste. Marie by this
line and thence take steamship to
Fort William. Within a few miles
of Sudbury, and reached by two short
lines of railway, are the most extensive copper and nickel deposits known
in the world, and the vicinity has
also, in the Moose Mountain Range,
the largest iron range in Canada.
Large quantities of the ores have been
shipped from the mines, and a number of smelting furnaces are in
operation near Sudbury reducing the
ores on the spot. Game is abundant
in the neighbourhood.   Approaching
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l
Limited
Toronto
Express
Leave
P.M.
/ 6.37
a 6.27
Z5.20
a 5.10
2.58
vi
Q
Min
Leave
Arrive
P.M.
a 3.30
Leave
A.M.
I 6.55
a 6.45
Z5.42
a 5.32
h 3.42
vi
Q
ing
Miles
from
Vanc'r
2459
2452
2447
2441
2429
2424
2412
2404
2387
2369
2352
2337
2332
2321
2303
h Flag for passengers to or from Toronto or beyond   jfa.m
(gfa
TRANSCONTINENTAL  RAIL ROUTE
29
Miles
Westb'no
i Trains
from
Montr'l
Vanc'r
Express
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
Leave
P.M.
P.M.
612
a 12.15
a 7.15
I 12.30
17.30
627
642
658
672
9.23
682
694
708
724
744
4.55
12.15
760
P.M.
A.M.
768
774
800
819
828
844
P.M.
A.M.
863
9.10
4.30
877
894
910
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Phelan a good view of the high falls
of the Vermilion River is to be had
for a moment; and from here to
Bisco   the   scenery  is   particularly
fine.   Cartier is a
||Chapleau
Pardee
Wayland
Dalton
Missanabie
Lochalsh
Hobon
Grasett
Amyot
White River
Bremner
Mobert
Trudeau
divisional point,
with the usual
collection of sidings and railway
structures. Bisco
is situated on ah
extensive and
irregular lake
called Biscotas-
ing, and has a
considerable
trade in furs and
lumber. Chapleau
(pop. 1,250) is. another divisional
point, with railway workshops, and
is a bright railway town. Farming
operations on a small scale are carried
on here. The town is charmingly
situated on Lake Kabequashesing, the
waters of which flow into James Bay.
Near Missanabie, where Dog Lake is
crossed, a short portage connects the
waters flowing southward into Lake
Superior with those flowing northward
into Hudson Bay. Furs are brought
here from the far north for shipment.
Nineteen miles south of Missanabie is
excellent trout fishing,and the country
contains minerals, and several mines
are operated near
Heron Bay
Coldwell
Middleton
Jackfish
Michipicoten on
Lake Superior.
Beyond Missanabie for sixty
miles are many
very heavy rock cuttings. White River,
in addition to buildings common to
all divisional stations, has yards for
resting cattle en route from the Northwest to the eastern market. From
White River Station the railway
follows the river of the same name to
Round Lake, and then crosses a level
tract with occasional rocky uplifts to
the Pic River, which is crossed by
a high iron bridge; and a mile
beyond is Heron !Bay, from which
for sixty miles the line is carried
through and around the   bold and
harsh  promontories of the north
|Schreiber
Rossport
Gravel
Kama
shore of Lake
Superior, with
deep rock cuttings, viaducts
and tunnels constantly occurring, and
at frequent intervals, where the rail-
a 12.00 a 12.50
9.50
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l
Limited
Toronto
Express
Leave
P.M.
12.15
7.30
A.M.
A.M.
3.10
Leave
A.M.
Zl.05
8.25
P.M.
P.M.
4.05
Miles
from
Vanc'r
2286
2272
2257
2240
2226
2216
2204
2191
2174
2154
2138
2131
2125
2099
2079
2071
2054
2035
2021
2005
1989
Refreshment Stations.
~   -   --■  -  -       ■..        - -   -  , ;i
TRANSCONTINENTAL  RAIL  ROUTE
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l
Limited
way is cut put of the face of the cliffs,
the lake comes into full view. No
part of this wonderful scenery should
be missed by the traveller, who should
be on the look-out before reaching
Heron Bap. The great sweep around
Jackfish Bay is particularly fine.
Jackfish is the great coaling station
for the railway on the north-east
angle of Lake Superior, and near it
gold and zinc mines are being profitably operated. Beyond Scbreiber
(a divisional point and refreshment
station) a chain of islands separates
Nipigon Bay from Lake Superior,
and the shore of the bay is followed
to and beyond Nipigon (pop. 400).
From this point trips can be made to
Nipigon Lake, the trout fishing on
which and the tributary streams has
been declared to be the finest in the
world. The Ontario Government has
recently, by Order in Council, set
aside Lake Nipigon and the land for
twenty miles around it as a Forest
Reserve, thus retaining the sporting
advantages of this wonderful region
for the public for all time. Between
Rossport and Qraoel some of the
heaviest work on the entire line
of railway occurs. The constantly
changing views on Nipigon Bay
are charming.   All of the streams
emptying    into
Nipigon
Chanel
Dorion
Ouimet
Pearl
Loon
Lake   Superior
contain speckled
trout  in   plenty,
and in  some of
the streams, the
Nipigon  River
especially,   they
are noted for their large size—six-
pounders    being    not    uncommon.
Nipigon River, which is crossed by
a fine iron  bridge   a  little   before
reaching the station, is a beautiful
stream, well known to   sportsmen.
Everywhere    on    Lake    Superior,
whitefish and the large lake trout are
common. Three miles beyond Nipigon
the railway turns around the base of
Red Rock, a high bright-red cliff,
and avoiding the heads of Black Bay
and Thunder Bay, takes a straight
course for  'Port Jlrthur, and from
the higher elevations delightful views
of Thunder Bay are to be had.
Port Arthur—Pop. 15,000. At the head
of Lake Superior. Owns its own electric railway, light, power, telephone
and  water   works.     Has   modern
lumber, smelting, and grain industries.    It has substantial buildings
Leave
"vi
Q
Toronto
Express
Leave
Superb
A.M.
12.52
f 11.35
P.M.
l.eavin
Supe
P.M.
1.50
Miles
from
Vanc'r
view
g Lake
rior
10.43
P.M.
Easter
FortW
to Van
11.52
A.M.
n Time
illiam
ceboro
1972
1960
1950
1946
1939
1933 ;-i  &O.U ."\>H~V-W1±
TRANSCONTINENTAL  RAIL ROUTE
31
Miles
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains
STATIONS—Descriptive Notes
Eastb'nd Trains
Miles
Vanc'r
Express
Imper'l
Limited
Imper'l JTorontO
Limited {Express
from
Vanc'r
and hotels, wholesale houses, extensive school system, two magnificent
hospitals,   the   judicial   centre   for
district of Thunder Bay, and is the
western terminus of the Lake Superior Division of the Canadian Pacific
Railway and a port of call of its
Lake Steamship Line.
PORT ARTHUR and BROADVIEW: 687 miles
(Manitoba Division)
Miles
from
Montr'l
995
998
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
Express
A.M.
Easter
ol.25
Z24.45
Centra
Fort W
to Broa
Imper'l
Limited
A.M.
nTime
a9.10
Z8.30
ITime
illiam
dview
STATIONS—Descriptive Notes
Silver
vi
a
TheH
M
ines
vi
a
arbour
Fort William Pop. 20,000.   At
the mouth of the
Westport Kaministikwia
River, a broad,
deep stream with firm banks, affording extraordinary advantages for
lake traffic. The fine steel lake
steamships of the Canadian Pacific
Line ply between here and Owen
Sound (see pages 96 and 97).
At Fort William westbound passengers should set their watches back one
hour, in conformity with | Central"
standard time.
From their beauty of situation,acces-
sibility and the opportunities for sport
in the neighbourhood, Fort William
and Port Arthur have become favourite resorts for tourists. A long promontory   of   basaltic   rock   on   the
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l
Limited
opposite side of the
" Sleeping    Giant,"
bay, called the
whose Indian
legend takes one back to aboriginal
days, terminates in Thunder Cape,
behind which lies the once famous
Silver Islet, which has yielded almost
fabulous wealth, though now the
mines becoming flooded have been
abandoned. Pie Island, another
mountain of columnar basalt, divides
the entrance to the bay, which is
flanked on the west by Mackay
Mountain, overlooking Fort William.
Looking west, between Pie Island
and Thunder Cape, Isle Royale
(now becoming a popular summer
resort) may be seen in the distance.
Fort William was formerly a
very important Hudson's Bay Company's post, and was the great rendezvous of the hunters, voyageurs,
and chief factors of the Company.
The fur house of the old fort is now
P.M.
Easter
Z 10.30
a21.10
Centra
Ci
Toronto
Express
A.M.
nTime
Z 11.40
al0.20
ITime
Miles
from
Vanc'r
1903
1900
1VJC
vi
O
Thu
B
wealth
vi
O
nder
ay
" The 24-hour system is used On lines west of Lake Superior.   By this system the A.M. and B,M. are
abolished, and the hours from noon to midnight are counted as from 12 to 24 o'clock.; 32
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
Miles
from
Montr'l
1003
1009
1019
1029
1036
1049
1067
1080
1093
1108
1136
1143
1158
1172
1178
1189
1194
1200
1207
1213
1223
1233
1241
1242
1253
1264
1276
1280
1289
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
Express
Leave
5.10
n6.50
a 9.20
Z 9.30
The
of the
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
£9.20
h 10.50
h 11.52
13.05
k 14.22
k 14.32
14.55
k 15.07
k 15.30
k 15.52
a 17.40
Z 17.50
Lake
Wood*
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
used as an engine house. The harbour is noted for the great coal docks,
and some of the largest grain elevators in the world overshadow all.
There are railway workshops and the
usual    buildings
Neebing
Murillo
Kaministikwia
Finmark
Buda
Raith
Savanne
Upsala
Niblock
English
and sidings inci-
denttoadivisional
point. From Fort
William to Winnipeg the railway
traverses a wild
broken region,
with rapid rivers
and many lakes,
but     containing
valuable forests and mineral deposits.
Murillo is the railway station for the
Rabbit Mountain silver district, and
four miles from the station are the
Kakabeka Falls, where the Kaministikwia leaps from a height rivalling
that of Niagara. The falls are best
reached from Fort William by railway.
The railway follows up this river to
Kaministikwia, and then ascends the
Mattawan and Wabigoon Rivers and
there is excellent
Bonheur
Ignace
Raleigh
Tache
Dyment
Dinorwic
Wabigoon
Barclay
Dryden
Oxdrift
Eagle River
Vermilion Bay
Gilbert
Edison
Pine
Hawk Lake
Scovil
Margach
Kenora
trout fishing near
all the stations as
far as Finmark.
At Eagle two
beautiful falls are
seen, one above
and the other below the railway.
The scenery is of
the wildest description and deep
rock-bound lakes
are always in
sight. The Saw-
bill mining country is reached
from Bonheur station by Government   waggon
road. Wabigoon
(pop. 250) is the point of departure
for the Manitou mining region and
the Lower Seine and Rainy Lake
country can be reached by this route.
Steamers operate on these waters
during navigation, and in winter there
is a good sleigh road. At Dryden
(pop. 840) the Ontario Government has
established an experimental farm.
There being large areas of good land
especially suited for mixed farming
and dairying, settlement is progressing rapidly, the chief advantages of
the district, besides the facility with
Eastb'nd Trains
/20.26
h 19.04
ft 17.55
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
Higher
Nia
Toronto
Express
Leave
than
gara
16.55
k 15.30
^ 15.17
14.53
k 14.37
k 14.18
k 13.53
Z 12.10
al2.00
T
Wabi
Dis
6.10
n  4.06
a
1.30
1.20
he
goon
trict
Miles
from
Vanc'r
1895
1890
1879
1870
1863
1849
1831
1819
1806
1791
1773
1755
1741
1727
1721
1710
1705
1698
1692
1685
1675
1665
1657
1656
1645
1634
1623
1618
1610
g Refreshment Station.      / Flag Station.      h Flag for passengers to or from East of Fort William
or west of Ignace. k Flag for passengers to or from East of Ignace or West of Kenora.
n Flag for passengers for or from Fort William or Winnipeg and West. Grain Elevators, Fort William
Kenora a.
ssm*.
^ TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
33
Miles
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains
1292
1303
1320
Vanc'r
Express
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
18.00
vi
Q
1333
1341
1354
1361
1367
1372
1376
1389
1395
1401
vi
Q
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
f 20.03
f 20.28
which the land is cleared, being the
111 proximity of good
Keewatiri markets, the  il-
Busteed limitable  supply
Ingolf of    timber    and
water, abundance
of fish and game, winter employment
for settlers in the lumber camps, and
healthfulness of the climate. Kenora
(pop. 7,000), at the principal outlet of
the Lake of the Woods. This district
is one of the finest summer resorts in
America, and is Increasing yearly in
popularity with sportsmen and tourists.
The Tourist Hotel is a first-class
house with all modern conveniences.
It is an important mining centre with
several large saw-mills, the product of
which is shipped westward to the
prairies. It is the key to the goldfields
now being developed in its immediate
vicinity and in the Rainy Lake and
Seine River districts to the south,which
are reached by steamer, the route lying
through one of the most picturesque
regions on the continent. The Lake
of the Woods is the largest body of
water touched by the railway between
Lake Superior and the Pacific. Its
fisheries are very valuable, the annual
shipments being large. The lake is
studded with beautiful islands. Its
waters break through a narrow rocky
rim at Kenora and Keewatin, and fall
into the Winnipeg River. Near Keewatin are the immense works of the
Keewatin Power Co., creating one of
the greatest water-powers in the world,
making of the Lake of the Woods a
gigantic mill-pond with an area of
3,000 square miles, and affording
most convenient sites for pulp-mills,
saw-mills, flouring mills and other
establishments
for  supplying
the  needs  of
Western Canada
and manufacturing  its products
on their way to
eastern markets.
At   Keewatin    a
mammoth    flour
mill is owned and
operated by the Lake of the Woods
Milling Co., and built of granite quarried on the spot.   Numerous pretty
lakes are passed, and Manitoba is
entered just after leaving Ingolf.   At
Whitemouth, where settlement is reaching large proportions, saw-mills again
occur, and beyond, to Red River, the
country flattens out and gradually
Telford
Rennie    1
Darwin
Whitemouth
Shelley
Julius
Molson
Norquay
Hazelridge
Oakbank
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l
Limited
Toronto
Express
Leave
11.49
Miles
from
Vanc'r
1607
1596
1579
vi
Q
vi
Q
.«
I re
1566
1558
1545
1538
1532
1527
1522
1510
1504
1498
«
/ Flag Stations. ]L
1
34
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL  ROUTE
Miles
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains |
Vanc'r j Imper'l
Express Limited
Arrive
1414
al3.20
Z14.00
Visit
Land
Rail
conne
Arrive
o21.40
Z 22.35
vi
Q
CP.R.
Offices
way
ctions
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
assumes the characteristics of the
prairie. From Molson, a subdivision
runs to Lac du Bonnet. The main
line runs via Norquay and Hazelridge
and at St. Boniface (population 6,500)
the Red River is crossed by a long
iron bridge and Winnipeg is reached.
[Winnipeg—Alt. 757 feet. Population
152,000. Capital of the Province of
Manitoba, formerly known as Ft.
Garry (pop. in 1871,100). Situated at
the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers, both navigable by steamboats, it has been, for many years, the
chief post of the Hudson's Bay Company, which has here very extensive
establishments. Winnipeg commands
the trade-of the vast region to the
north, east, and west. The city is
handsomely built, superior brick and
stone being available, and has sixty
miles of electric railway in the city
and forty-four miles of suburban track,
parks, hospital, great flouring mills,
grain elevators, huge abattoirs, many
notable public buildings, including
Provincial and Dominion offices, and
is the greatest grain market in the
British Empire. The Royal Alexandra, owned and operated by the
Canadian Pacific Railway, ranks
amongst the finest hotels in the world.
It was erected at a cost of $1,250,000,
and is most handsomely decorated
and furnished. The hotel is adjacent
to the Company's Railway Station,
which is also a magnificent building.
The chief workshops of the Canadian
Pacific Railway between Montreal
and the Pacific are here, and the
train-yard contains more than 110
miles of sidings, the largest individual railway yards in the world.
The principal land offices of the
Canadian Pacific Railway Co. are
in the city, one being at the station,
and near the station are the chief
immigration office of the Dominion
Government in the West, and immigrant sheds. The Railway Co. owns
many of the odd numbered sections
in the belt of land extending 24 miles
on each side of the track between
Winnipeg and the Rocky Mountains.
Settlers can here leave the transcontinental train and go on when suited.
Sectional maps and pamphlets giving
valuable information as to the nature
and character of the lands traversed
by the Road are supplied to those
who desire them free of cost. Agents,
at all points along the line, can give
I Refreshment Station
Imper'l
Limited
Eastb'nd Trains
Leave
8.00
a 7.10
vi
Q
Vi.it
Land
Toronto
Express
Leave
Z21.25
al7.50
vi
Q
CP.R.
Offices
Rail
conne
way
ctions
Milep
from
Vanc'r
1484
MCW)   Miles
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
Express
Imper'l
Limited
1
5j
1422
1430
1437
1443
1450
1455
1463
1470
1478
1486
15.30
No
Wes
Subdi
(4
a
24.05
•th-
tern
vision
full information and prices of the
Company's lands in the vicinity of the
respective stations. The Canadian
Pacific Railway has two subdivisions
leading southward on either side of
the Red River to Emerson and Gretna,
on the U. S. boundary, connecting at
the former point with the train service of the Soo Line for St. Paul and
Minneapolis. Two subdivision lines
of the Canadian Pacific Railway go
south-west, the first to ARCOLA in
Saskatchewan, thence to Regina
through the Moose Mountain country,
a section now being rapidly settled,
and the second to NAPINKA in
Southern Manitoba, connecting at
Souris and Napinka with the subdivision from Brandon through to
Estevan, the junction with the new
Soo-Pacific line; and two other subdivisions run north and north-west,
one to Selkirk, Winnipeg Beach,
a new summer resort, 50 miles from
Winnipeg, and GlMLl; and the other
to Stony mountain, Stonewall,
and TEULON, 40
Bergen
Rosser
Meadows
Marquette
Reaburn
Poplar Point
High Bluff
miles north of
the city. Though
the country here
is apparently as
level as a billiard
table, there is
really an ascent
of 100 feet from
Winnipeg to Portage la Prairie.
There is a belt of fertile land west
of Winnipeg, and from Rosser as far
as Poplar Point the scattered farms
visible are chiefly devoted to dairy
products and cattle breeding. Beyond Poplar Point farms appear
almost continuously. The line of
trees not far away on the south"
marks the course of the Assiniboine
River, which the railway follows for
130 miles. Reaburn is half way
between Montreal and Vancouver.
Long Lake, a favourite resort for
sportsmen, is passed after leaving
Reaburn.
Portage la Prairie—Alt. 854 ft. Pop.
7,000. On the Assiniboine River. The
market town of a rich and populous
district, and one of the principal grain
markets in the province. It has large
flour mills and grain elevators, a
brewery, biscuit factory, and several
other industries. The North-Western
Subdivision of the Canadian Pacific
Railway extends from here 266 miles
n o r t h-west   to
ed
Q
vi
Q
Burnside
Bagot
wards Prince Alfo e r t.    Between
5.30
No
Wes
Subdi
16.25
■in
tern
vision
1477
1469
1462
1455
1449
1444
1435
1429
1421
1413 36                              TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
Miles
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Eastb'nd Trains
Miles
from
Vanc'r
Vanc'r
Imper'l
[mper'l   Toronto
Express
Limited
Limited Express
Leave
Leave
Leave
Leave
1492
16.09
24.48
MacGregor
Po rt a g e   la
4.53
15.44
1406
1499
Austin
Prairie   and
1399
1507
Sidney
Brandon, stations
1391
1513
Melbourne
succeed one an
1386
1520
17.10
1.50
Carberry
other at intervals
4.09
14.59
1378
1529
Sewell
of five or eight
1370
1536
Douglas
miles, and many
1362
1542
Chater
of them are surrounded by bright
1357
and busy towns; and at nearly all
are tall and massive elevators, with
now and then a flour mill.    From
MacQregor a subdivision extends 56
miles   to   Varcoe.     After   passing
through a bushy district, with fre
quent ponds and small streams, con
taining many stock farms, for which
The
Assini-
ine
it is peculiarly adapted, the railway
bo
rises from Austin along a sandy slope
to a plateau, near the centre of which
is situated Carberry (pop. 1,200), an
important grain market. From Sexoell
it descends again to the valley of the
Assiniboine.     The   Brandon   Hills
are   seen   towards   the   south-west.
From Chater, the Miniota Subdivision
of  the Canadian Pacific Railway,
running north-westward towards the
Saskatchewan country, is operated
to Miniota, a distance of 71 miles.
Four miles beyond Chater the Assini
boine is crossed by an iron bridge
and Brandon is soon reached.
1548
al8.00
a2.40
||Brandon —Alt. 1,194 ft.   Pop. 13,000.
Z3.15
r i4.i5
1351
Z18.10
Z2.50
A divisional point; one of the largest
grain markets in Manitoba; and the
distributing market for an extensive
and   well-settled  country.     It   has
grain elevators,  flour  mills,  large
planing mills, banks, and a number
of manufactories.   The city is beautifully situated on high ground, and
has well - made  streets and many
substantial  buildings.   A Dominion
Experimental Farm and a Provincial
Asylum are established within the
city limits.   Subdivisions run north
to Minnedosa, Yorkton, Sheho, etc.;
south to Deloraine, Lyleton, etc., the
Areola Branch to Regina, via Areola,
through the Moose Mountain country.
At Schwitzer June, it connects with
the Souris Subdivision which  runs
south-west to Es-
a3.05
Ag
wheat
il4.05
reat
market
1556    18.35
3.15
Kemnay
t e v a n,  on   the
2.50
13.50
1343
1563    18.50
Alexander
Soo-Paciflc line,
x 13.33
1335
1572    19.06
Griswold
connecting West
r 13.15
1326
1580    19.20
Oak Lake
ern Canada with
x 12.57
1319
1588
Routledge
the   Middle and
1311
1595    19.48
Virden
North - Western
x 12.28   1304
1603   /20.05
Hargrave
States of the
x 12.15   1295
1612    20.23
4.53
Elkhorn
Union.    Beyond
1.10
12.00   1287
1
| Refreshment Station.                  / Flag Station.
x Flag for passengers from West of Moose Jaw or to East of Winnipeg  : TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
37
Miles
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Eastb'nd Trains
Miles
from
Vanc'r
Vano'r
Express
! Imper'l
Limited
Imper'l
Limited
Toronto
Express
Leave
Arrive
Leave
Leave
1618
Kirkel la                       Brandon the rail-
1280
1626
20.55
Fleming
way draws away
1273
1634
21.13
Moosomin
from the Assini
x 11.16
1264
1641
Red Jacket
boine River and
1257
1650
21.40
Wapella 'X
rises  from  its
x 10.47
1248*
1658
Burrows
valley to a roll
1241
1664
22.06
Whitewood
ing or undulating
x 10.24
1234
1671
Percival
prairie well occu-
1227
pied by prosper
ous farmers, as the thriving villages.
at frequent intervals bear evidence.
Virden and filkhorn are market towns
of attractive districts, and at the lat
ter   place   is an   Indian  Industrial
School erected by the Dominion Go
vernment.     The   new   Saskatoon-
Appro
aching
Edmonton line branches off at Kirk-
Saskat
chewan
ella and runs through a rich farming
■country studded with  thriving  vil
lages and towns to Saskatoon, Wet-
askiwln and Edmonton.   A mile east
of Fleming, the Province of Saskatche
wan is entered.   Moosomin, the first
town reached in that Province, is the
Mo
Moun
station for Fort Ellice at the north
and the MOOSE MOUNTAIN district
at the south.    From Whitewood the
Pi^
ose
tain
country northward is accessible by
'^cJ|
a bridge over the Qu'Appelle River.
'Percival stands upon a ridge 100 feet
higher than the general level.   All
the way from Brandon to Broadview
pi the frequent ponds and copses afford
Cen
TRAL
excellent  opportunities   for   sport—
Ti
ME
Cen
TRAL
water fowl being abundant.
(Broad
view to
Ti
ME
Fort W ftlliam)
Z23.15 & 9.55
i             1
1679
a22.35
<z6.55
Broac    ew
1 1220
BROADVIEV
V and SWIFT CURREN"
(Saskatchewan Division)
1": 245 Miles
MUes
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains
STATIONS—Descriptive Notes
Eastb'nd Trains
MUes
from
Vanc'r
Vanc'r
Imper'l
Imper'l
[Toronto
Express
Limited
Limited
Express
Leave
Leave
Arrive
Arrive
1679
Z21.45!
Z6.05
Broadview—Alt. 1,960 ft.    Pop. 1,200.
o22.05
a 8.45
1220
Mounj
TAIN
A railway divisional point, prettily
Moun
tain
ME
Ti
(Broad
ME
view to
situated at the head of Lake Ecapo in
Ti
f%r$~
Fie
Id)
an excellent mixed farming district
Lake.   A   reservation   occupied by
Cree Indians is not far away.   The
standard   time   changes    here    to
" Mountain "—one hour slower.
Westward    the
j 1
1687
Oakshela
line    follows   a
1211
1695
Grenfell
gradually rising
1204
1703
Summerberry
prairie. Qrenfell,
1196
1710
22.45
Wolseley
Wolseley and
7.46     1188
1719
Sintaluta
Sintaluta   have
1179
1724
Dingley
already  become
1175
1730
23.23
7.50
Indian Head
important   local
20.11
7.09     1169
markets.  A little
{ Refreshment Station,
x Flag for passengers from West of Moose Jaw oi
* to East of Winnipeg.
' Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r j Imper'l
Express Limited
Large
Far
Wheat
ms
rt
pelle
1
TRANSCONTINENTAL  RAIL ROUTE
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
beyond Sintaluta, Indian Head (pop.
2,000) is approached. The Government farm is situated on the north
side of the railway, and on the south
is the Government forest nursery.
In this locality are numerous large
farms on which great yields of
wheat are obtained. The town
of Indian Head is making rapid
growth, consequent upon the successful farming of the district
around it.
Qu'Appelle—Alt. 2,134ft. The supplying and shipping point for a large
section. A good road extends northward to Fort Qu'Appelle, and beyond.
Fort Qu'Appelle, 20 miles distant, is
an old post of the Hudson's Bay
Company, beautifully situated on the
Fishing Lakes in the deep valley of
the Qu'Appelle River. There are
several Indian reservations in its
vicinity, and  an   important   Indian
mission and
Eastb'nd Trains
McLean
Balgonie
Pilot Butte
school. For eight
miles beyond
Qu'Appelle station the country
is somewhat wooded. At McLean
(which stands 150 ft. higher than
Qu'Appelle, and 400 ft. higher than
Regina) the great Regina Plain is
entered. This plain extends westward as far as the Dirt Hills, the
northward extension of the Missouri
Coteau, and these are soon seen
rising on the south-western horizon,
a dark blue line. The plain is a
broad treeless expanse of finest agricultural land, with little change in
the soil to a depth of twenty feet
or more. Balgonie station is in
the centre of a large grain-
growing area. Passing Pilot Butte,
a rounded hill lending its name
to an unimportant station near
by, Regina is seen spread out on the
plain ahead.
ReginD—Alt. 1,885 ft. Pop. 18,000. The
capital of the Province of Saskatchewan and the distributing point for
the country far north and south. The
Moose Mountain Subdivision extends
southward from Regina to Areola,
connecting there with the Areola Subdivision, thus giving an alternative
through route between Regina and
Brandon. Beyond the station the
Exhibition Buildings and Lieut.-
Governor's residence may be seen
on the right, and a little farther, on
the same side, are the police barracks*
Imper'l
Limited
Toronto
Express
Leave
Qu'Ap
Val
Leave
Miles
from
Vanc'r
pelle
ley
vi
Q
TheR
Pla
18.40
vi
o
egina
in
5.48
1160
1151
1142
1135
1127 FARMING   IN   WESTERN   CANADA
Threshing
m |
llJSSraaiJI
SEP"" '$£$$.
| ^(jipJWMj
mn
HE
WftysP^
Reaping
»«^^<4«w^ii^«Ai^M^.v^^iPl3
^*^*^'«M^m«i»«SiB^^
A Prosperous Farm
His Own
Oat Crop ZL
1» TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
39
Miles
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trams
1781
1789
1797
1807
Vanc'r
Express
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
1.50
1814   b2.05
Z2.25
1822
1830
1840
1849
1859
1868
1880
1888
1896
1904
1913
1918
Leave
10.30
a 10.45
Ml.15
TheB
pla
Game
wild
uffalo
ins
and
fowl
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Grand Coulee
Pense
Belle Plaine
Pasqua
On the south bank
of Wascana Lake
the new Provincial Government
buildings for
Saskatchewan
are being erected at a cost of
$1,500,000. From Pasqua a subdivision extends south-east through
Estevan to the international boundary
line at Portal, where connection is
made with the Soo Line from St. Paul
and Minneapolis, and it is by this
route that passengers from the Middle
States travel to the Pacific Coast.
Trains run through between St. Paul
and Minneapolis and Moose Jaw,
where connection is made with the
Transcontinental express trains.
Moose Jaw—Alt. 1,767 ft. Pop. 15,000.
A railway divisional point. The name
is an abridgement of the Indian name,
which, literally translated, is 1 The-
creek-where-the-white-man - mended-
the-cart-with-a-moose-jaw-bone."The
city is situated in a fine agricultural
country, extending from the Elbow of
the Saskatchewan on the north to the
Dirt Hills on the south. The finest
stock yards on the line between Winnipeg and the branches are located
here. Mills and elevators indicate the
district's wheat-producing qualities.
The Outlook Subdivision of the C.P.R.
runs  from Moose Jaw to   Outlook,
119 miles.   From
Boharm
Caron
Mortlach
Parkbeg
Secretan
Chaplin
Ernfold
Morse
Herbert
Rush Lake
Waldeck
Aikens
Moose Jaw the
line steadily rises
on the eastern
slope of the
coteau and winds
through an irregular depression
to the basin of the
Chaplin Lakes—
formerly known
as the Old Wives
Lakes — extensive bodies of
water having no outlet and consequently alkaline. The northernmost
of these lakes is reached at Chaplin.
The country is treeless from the eastern border of the Regina Plain to the
Cypress Hills, 200 miles, but the soil
Is excellent nearly everywhere. The
prairies about and beyond Chaplin
Lakes are marked in ail directions by
old buffalo trails and scarred and
pitted by their " wallows." Antelope
may now be sometimes seen, and
coyotes and prairie dogs. Near Morse
1 Refreshment Station
Imper'l
Limited
Eastb'nd Trains
Toronto
Express
Leave
17.30
Z17.15
al6.45
Wild
Leave
4.49
Z 4.35
a 4.15
fowl
Miles
from
Vanc'r
1117
1110
1102
1092
1085
1077
1069
1059
1050
1040
1031
1018
1011
1002
995
985
980 ■   ~T-T-T-™
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL  ROUTE
MUes
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
] Express
Arrive
Imper'l
Limited
Arrive
Cana
Agricu
dian
Itural
Comp
Far
any's
ms
a 6.05
al5.20
Arrive
Arrive
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
is a salt lake, and not far beyond is
Rush Lake, a large area of fresh water
and a favourite resort of water fowl
—swans, geese, ducks and pelicans—
which at times congregate here in
myriads. At Rush Lake there are
some splendid farms, and on the south
side there is one of 700 acres under
irrigation. There are a number of
these in various districts aggregating
about 110,000 acres.
Swift CurrenU-Terminus of the Saskatchewan Division.
Eastb'nd Trains
MUes
from
Imper'l Toronto  J™,™,
'Limited Express  Vancr
Leave
Cana
Agricu
Comp
Far
Z13.10
Leave
Leave
dian
Itural
any's
ms
Z24.55
Leave
IFT CURRENT to  FIELD:  464
(Alberta Division)
les
Miles
Westb'nd Trains
1
Eastb'nd Trains
Miles
from
Montr'l
1
Vanc'r
Imper'l
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Imper'l fToronto
from
Vanc'r,
Express
Limited
Limited
Express
Arrive
Leave
Leave
Arrive
1924
Z 6.15
115.30
;i Swift Current-Alt. 2,400 ft. Pop.2,500.
a 13.00 a24.45
974
A railway divisional point, on a pretty
stream of   the same name.     Swift
Current is  in  the centre of a very
large agricultural district, extending
from the International boundary on
the south to the Saskatchewan River
on the north.   The soil is particu
larly adapted for grain farming and
the country is being rapidly filled up
with American and Canadian settlers.
The Government has erected a Meteorological Observing Station.
From    here    to
1933
Beverley
Medicine Hat, on
966
1938
Seward
the   South  Sas
960
1945
Webb
katchewan River,
954
1952
Antelope
the line skirts the
947
1960
7.26
Gull Lake
northern base of
939
1968
Carmichael    |||
the Cypress Hills,
931
1974
Tompkins
which gradually
924
1981
Sidewood
rise towards the
917
1988
Crane Lake
west, until they
911
1996
Cross
reach an altitude
903
2009
8.57
Maple Creek
of 4,790 ft., and in
10.30
22.21
890
2022
Kincorth
places are cover-
877
ed with valuable
timber. Gull Lake is another growing
town surrounded by splendid farming
land and has two good hotels.   At
Crane Lake there is another large
stock farm.   This farm, 1,200 acres
of which are irrigated, is entirely
I Refreshment Station.
i i-  »w»<
3»i
.".""»« Mr ■■«"» Corral of Horses
.--^y&l^y
Alberta Sheep
:1
Shipping Cattle at Winnipeg.  TRANSCONTINENTAL  RAIL  ROUTE
MUes
from
Montr'
12027
12034
>2039
12050
2056
2065
2072
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
Express
Leave
Sto
Rai
/9.52
/"10.15
210.40
Crow
Pass
Coal
Hi 1.05
Nl.30
Imper'
Limited
Leave
sing
20.00
snest
Route
M
mes
a20.15
Z 20.40
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
devoted to stock raising, 7,000 cattle
and 500 horses being usually on
the range. The satisfactory results
obtained from working farms at
various points on the line proved the
value of these lands for farming, and
resulted in attracting the attention of
settlers and capitalists to this section
of the country. It is, however, specially valuable as a stock-raising
district. It is impossible to conceive
of a better stock country than that
lying between the Cypress Hills and
the Railway, Rich in the grasses
that possess peculiar attractions for
horses and cattle, the valleys and
groves of timber give ample shelter all
seasons of the year, and the numerous
streams flowing out of the Cypress
Hills afford an unfailing supply of
water. The handsome profits realized
by the stockmen testify better than
words to the value of this district
for cattle raising.
Forres
Cummings
Walsh
Irvine
Pashley
Dunmore
Lakes and ponds,
some fresh, some
alkaline, occur
at intervals to
Maple Creek. At
this station are
extensive yards
for the shipment of cattle. The town
is supported by trade with the cattle
ranches, and farming is successfully
carried on in the vicinity. From
Forres to Dunmore, rocks of the
Cretaceous age occur, in which the
remains of gigantic saurians and
other extinct animals are abundant.
At Dunmore there is what may be
taken as a typical mixed farm, for
not only are capital crops raised, but
a number of valuable horses and
cattle are also bred and pastured
here. From Dunmore Junction, the
Crowsnest line leads off westerly
through the Rocky Mountains, to
Kootenay Lake and to the mines of
the Kootenay, in whose greater development it is proving a powerful
factor by supplying cheap fuel for
its smelters from the Fernie mines.
(For descriptive notes of Crowsnest
Pass Route, see pages 81 to 91.)
From Dunmore the main line drops
into the valley of the South Saskatchewan, which is crossed by a
fine steel bridge at Medicine Hat.
Medicine Hat—Alt. 2,171 ft. Population 6,000. On account of the immense flow of natural gas and other
advantages, Rudyard Kipling chris-
Z8.20
a7.55
Mines
Z 20.15
al9.50
827
/flag Stations.
a TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
tened it "The town that was born
lucky." It is situated in the valley
of the South Saskatchewan and is
the centre of a magnificent mixed
farming district. Apples, plums, and
small fruit are quite at home here,
and a demonstration farm is operated
by the Provincial Government. A
divisional point, with large railway
shops all operated by natural gas.
An important station of the Royal
North-West Mounted Police. There
is an abundance of coal all through
the district, but the light, heat and
power in the city is derived entirely
from natural gas, which is sold to
manufacturers at 5 cents per thousand cubic feet, and for domestic
purposes at 13J cents. The snowfall
here is lighter, and the winter shorter
than anywhere else in Canada east
of the Rocky Mountains. There are
thre"e large brick plants, abattoir,
flour mills and extensive greenhouses here.   Beyond the river the
railway rises to
Eastb'nd Trains
the high prairie-
plateau   which
extends,   gradually   rising,    to
the base of the
mountains.     At
Redcliff     the
railway  crosses
a fine stock-rais-
ing    country,
where   some   of
the largest herds
of    Galloway
cattle    in   the
world are  to be
seen.   There is a strong up-grade to
fBowell,   then   a  rapid   descent   to
Suffield, followed by a steady rise.
Bow River occasionally appears to
the south.   The prairie here is seen
to advantage, and before August it is
a billowy ocean  of   grass.    Cattle
ranches   are spread  over   it,   and
farms  appear   at  intervals.     The
entire country is underlaid with two
or more beds of
Redcliff
Bowel I
Suffield
Carlstadt
Kininvie
Tilley
Bantry
Brooks
Cassils
Southesk
Lathom
Bassano
Crowfoot
Cluny
Gieichen
Namaka
Strath more
Cheadle
Langdon
Shepard
good coal, and
natural   gas   is
frequently found
in   boring   deep
wells.   This gas
is   utilized  at
Langevin,     in
pumping water for  the  supply   of
the railway, and both there and at
Tilley it can be seen burning brightly.
From this station, on a very clear
/Flag Stations.
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
Natur
Toronto
Express
Leave
ias
/7.06
/19.37
/19.22
/19.00
18.44
/18.27
/18.12
/18.03
17.49
/17.32
/17.19
/17.07
16.54
Miles!
from I
Vanc'i
16.05
15.30
15.04 Demonstration Farm, Irrigation Block, near Calgary
On a
" Ready-Made
Farm,"
Nightingale
New Settlers Arriving at a Western Town f :
=1 TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
43
Miles
from
lontr'l
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
Express
Imper'l
Limited
Arrive
First
of
Roc
Arrive
sight
the
kies
>252
17.50
18.15
Calg
advan
vi
Q
a 2.45
Z 3.15
ary s
tages
stations—Descriptive notes
Eastb'nd Trains
•Imper'l
Limited
Leave    Leave
Toronto
Express
day, the higher peaks of the Rocky
Mountains may be seen, 120 miles
away. Near fBrooks the Duke of
Sutherland is developing an estate
and conducting an important colonisation scheme for Scottish farmers.
At {Bassano the Canadian Pacific
is building an immense dam for irrigation purposes. At Namaka are
located some of the most productive
farms in Western Canada and very
rich harvests are reaped annually.
From Gleichen to Shepard the line
traverses the Western section of the
Canadian Pacific Co.'s 3,000,000
acre irrigation project and the canals
and ditches are crossed at several
points. The farms which are being
cultivated by the method of irrigation are seen on each side of the
track, and at Gleichen and Strathmore
the Experimental Irrigation Farms
are located close to the line and the
results from the application of water
in growing crops and trees may be
noted. Beyond Qleichen (alt. 2,900 ft.,
pop. 500), the Rockies come into full
view—a magnificent line of snowy
peaks extending far along the southern
and western horizon. AtLangdon the
railway falls to the valley of the Bow
River.
Calgary—Alt. 3,428 ft. Pop. 55,000. This
is.the most important city between
Winnipeg and Vancouver. It is
charmingly situated on a hill-girt
plateau, overlooked by the white peaks
of the Rockies. The city owns and
operates the street railway and electric lighting systems. It is the centre
of the trade of the northern part of
the great ranching country and the
chief source of supply for the mining
districts in the mountains beyond,
and is rapidly developing into a large
wholesale and milling centre. Excellent building materials abound in
the vicinity. Lumber is largely made
here from logs floated down the Bow
River. From Calgary, a subdivision
runs north to Edmonton on the Saskatchewan, and another subdivision
south to Macleod, thus throwing open
a new and vast country which is
annually attracting settlers in large
numbers. The Irrigation Canal of the
Canadian Pacific Railway Company
takes water from the Bow River at
Calgary and the works of this undertaking, which are the largest in
America, are well worth a visit. The
area embraced in this scheme is three
millions of acres lying to the east of
Calgary on both sides of the railway
a
vi
Q
2.35
2.05
Impor
o
Cal
Miles
from
Vanc'r
14.30
14.05
tance
f
gary
#*
647 3.
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
STATIONS—Descriptive Notes
line, the different canals being seen
from the train as Calgary is approached from the east. From Calgary
the Bow is closely
Keith
Alt. 3,553 ft.
Cochrane
Alt. 3,749 ft.
Radnor
Alt. 3,865 ft.
Morley
Alt. 4,067 ft.
followed and by
the time Cochrane
is reached, the
traveller is well
within the rounded grassy foothills and river
" benches," or
terraces. Here
the valleys are seen to cut the mountains transversely. Further on, in
the main ranges, as distinct from the
foot-hills, the valleys will be found
running parallel with the mountains,
north and south, and these valleys
open into each other across the mountain ranges by the passes, or what is
locally known as | divides," the lowest of which is 5,000 ft. above sea
level, the highest 7,000 ft. Geologically the transverse valleys by which
entrance is made to the mountains
represent the grooved course of
ancient glaciers, and many of the
rivers flowing in these beds can be
followed directly up to the remnants
of these ancient glaciers. The remnant glacier of the Bow River to-day
occupies a field thirty miles long by
six to ten broad. Extensive ranches
are passed in rapid succession—
great herds of horses in the lower
valleys, thousands of cattle on the
terraces, and flocks of sheep on the
hilltops may be seen at once, making
a picture most novel and interesting.
Saw-mills and coal-mines appear
along the valley. After leaving
Cochrane, and crossing the Bow, the
line ascends to the top of the first
terrace, whence a magnificent outlook
is obtained, towards the left, where
the foothills rise in successive tiers of
sculptured heights to the snowy range
behind them.
Morley is interesting to the tourist as
the reservation of the Stoney Indians,
once the most warlike tribe of the
native races of America, but now one
of the most industrious and peaceful.
Eastb'nd Trains
Kananaskis
Alt. 4,220 ft.
Approachi ng
Kananaskis the
mountains suddenly appear
close at hand and seemingly an impenetrable barrier, their bases deeply
tinted in purple, and their sides flecked
with white and gold, while high above,
Imper'l
Limited
/Flag Station.
Toronto
Express
Leave
/13.48
13.25
12.55   TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
Miles
from
I Montr'l
2309
2314
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
Express
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
Kanan
Fa
askis
lis
20.20
/20.30
Entra
theR
nee to
ockies
T
Three
he
Sisters
Geo
of
logy
the
moun
tains
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
dimly outlined in the mists, are distant snowy peaks. The Kananaskis
River is crossed by a high iron bridge,
a little above where it joins the Bow,
and the roar of the great falls of the
Bow (called Kananaskis Falls) may
be heard from the railway.
Exshaw
Alt. 4,225 ft.
The Gap
Alt. 4,232 ft.
At Exshaw is one
of the largest
cement works in
Canada. Here
the difference between the ordinary upland stream and a glacier-fed
river is first noticed. Tumbling from
great heights, the former may be
foamy and tumultuous; but the latter
is always milky-green, with the sediment of glacial silt, infinitesimally
fine particles formed by the grinding
of the ice over the rocks.
The mountains now rise abruptly
in great masses; a bend in the line
brings the train between two almost
vertical walls of dizzy height. This
is the gap by which the Rocky Mountains are entered. Through this gateway the Bow River issues from the
hills. Beyond it the track turns
northward and ascends the long valley between the Fairholme range on
the right and the Kananaskis range
opposite. The prominent peak on
the left is Pigeon Mountain, and in
approaching the station called The
Gap a magnificent view is obtained
of Wind Mountain and the Three
Sisters, also on the left. A remarkable contrast between the ranges
ahead is noticeable. On the right are
fantastically broken and castellated
heights; on the left, massive snow-
laden promontories, rising thousands
of feet, penetrated by enormous alcoves, in which haze and shadow of
gorgeous colouring lie engulfed. The
jaggedness of profile observed from .
the plains is now explained. These
mountains are tremendous uplifts of
stratified rocks, of the Devonian and
Carboniferous ages, which have been
broken out of the crust of the earth
and slowly heaved aloft. Some sections, miles and miles in breadth and
thousands of feet thick, have been
pushed straight up, so that their strata
remain almost as level as before;
others are tilted more or less on
edge (always on this slope towards
the east) and lie in a steeply slanting
position ; still other sections are bent
and crumpled under prodigious side-
Peculi
of mo
seen
arities
untain
ery
/ Flag Station. TRANSCONTINENTAL  RAIL ROUTE
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
pressure, while all have been broken
down and worn away until now they
are only colossal fragments of the
original upheavals. This disturbed
stratification is plainly marked upon
the faces of the cliffs, by the ledges
that hold the snow after it has disappeared elsewhere, or by long lines
of trees, which there alone can maintain a foothold; and this peculiarity
is one of the most striking and admirable features of the scenery. Many
ranges of prodigious mountains like
these must be traversed before the
Pacific Coast is reached, and grandeur and beauty will crowd upon the
attention without ceasing, as the train
speeds through gorge and over mountain, giving here a vast outlook and
there an interior glimpse, then exchanging it for a new one with the
suddenness of a kaleidoscope. Observation cars, specially designed to
permit of unobstructed views, are
attached to " Imperial Limited," so that
none of the scenic wonders need be
missed.
Can more—Alt. 4,284 ft. Near Canmore
are large coal mines. A striking
profile of the Three Sisters, the third
or farthest south rising to an altitude of 9,743 feet, is obtained, with
Wind and Pigeon Mountains looming
up beyond. On a hill behind the
station, and all along the embankments of the valley traversed by the
railway, are group after group of
isolated and curiously weathered
conglomerate monuments called
| hoodoos "—giant earthern pillars,
ten times the height of a man—some
of them—composed of hard enough
material to withstand the erosions
that have played havoc with the surrounding bank. On either side of
the beautiful level valley the mountains rise in solid masses westward,
until the great bulk of Cascade
Mountain closes the view. Five
miles beyond Canmore the Rocky
Mountain National Park is entered.
Bank head—Alt. 4,490 ft. The pass narrows suddenly, and as the mountains
are penetrated the scenery becomes
grander and more awe-inspiring.
The walled masonry shooting up in
Seven Peaks on the left is Rundle,
called after an early missionary to
the Indians. Here the line for a
time leaves the Bow and strikes up
the valley of the Cascade River,
directly toward the face of Cascade
Mountain, which, though miles away,
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l
Limited
Toronto
Express
Leave
MUes
from
Vanc'r
Obser
Ca
T
Three
Case
Moun
Beau
■cen
alo
the
vat ion
rs
12.05
he
Sisters
ade
tain
11.38
ty of
ery
ng
Bow
580
567 Banff Hotel
Looking down
the
Bow Valley  fflfc
MMMteiflittfc*i£kfatiUfl
■ ■m-i».i>*M.aM
-.■..,-», ,-*•..    !—...,---
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
Miles
from
Montr'l
2334
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
Express
Leave
a 21.20
Z 21.30
Roc
Moun
Pa
Case
Moun
Nana
moun
seen at
Sta
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
6.20
6.30
ky
tain
rk
ade
tain
es of
tains
Banff
tion
STATIONS
is apparently but a stone's throw distant, and which seems to rise in
enormous mass and advance bodily
to meet us. This marvellous effect
should not be missed by the traveller.
Banff—Alt. 4,521 ft. Station for Canadian National Springs and Hot
Springs. This Park is a National
Reservation of 5,732 square miles,
embracing parts of the valleys of the
Bow, Spray, and Cascade Rivers,
Lake Minnewanka and several noble
mountain ranges, and beyond the
| Divide," the Yoho Valley, and the
country to the west and south of it.
The Park is the largest in the world,
being nearly half as large again as
the famous Yellowstone Park in the
States. No part of the Rockies exhibits a greater variety of sublime
and pleasing scenery, and nowhere
are good points of view and features
of special interest so accessible, since
many good roads and bridle paths
have been made. The railway station
at Banff is in the midst of impressive
mountains. The huge mass northward
is Cascade Mountain (9,825 ft.); eastward is Mount Inglismaldie, and the
heights of the Fairholme sub-range,
behind which lies Lake Minnewanka.
South-eastward from Inglismaldie,
in the same range of the Fairholmes,
the sharp cone of Peechee (called
after an Indian chief), closes the
view in that direction; this is. one
of the highest mountains visible.
To the left of Cascade Mountain, and
just north of the track, rises the
wooded ridge of Stoney Squaw
Mountain, beneath which lie the
Vermilion lakes, seen just after leaving the station. Up the Bow, westward, tower the distant, snowy, central heights of the Main range about
Simpson's Pass, most prominently
the square, wall-like cres of Mount
Bourgeau. A little nearer, at the
left, is seen the northern end of the
Bourgeau range, and still nearer, the
razor-like back of Sulphur Mountain,
along the side of which are the Hot
Springs, and on whose summit, at
8,030 ft., an observatory has been
established. The isolated bluff southward is Tunnel Mountain, while just
behind the station, Rundle Peak,
9,665 ft., rises sharply, so near at
hand as to cut off all the view in
that direction. Just before reaching
the station, the train passes along a
large corral of 800 acres in which
are about one hundred buffalo, the
last specimens of the monarchs of TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
MUes
from
•Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
Express
Banff
Imper'l
iLimlted
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
C.P.R,
village
Hotel
the plains.  In well-constructed cages
are specimens of the various wild
animals found in the Rocky Mountains.    The village of  Banff is a
short distance south-west of the station, on the hither side of the Bow,
and the Canadian Pacific Railway
Banff Hotel about a mile farther on.
A steel bridge takes the carriage-
road across to the magnificent hotel,
built by the Railway Company, on
an eminence between the foaming
falls in the Bow and the mouth of
the rapid Spray River.   This hotel,
which has every modern convenience
and luxury, including baths supplied
from the hot sulphur springs, is kept
open from May to October, and thither
people from all lands flock in numbers.   It is most favourably placed
for health, picturesque views, and as
a centre for canoeing, driving, walking, or mountain - climbing.   There
are also a sanatorium and hospital
in the village, and a museum of more
than local interest has been established by the Government.     Eight
miles  from  Banff is Lake Minnewanka, on which a fine launch has
been placed.  There is capital fishing,
the trout being of extraordinary size.
Wild sheep (the big-horn) and mountain goats are occasionally to be seen
on the neighbouring heights.    Some
extraordinary   fossil   remains   and
markings of mammoth pre-historic
creatures are found on the mountain
slopes surrounding this lake, as well
as on  Cascade  Mountain.    At the
upper end of the lake is the valley
of   Ghost River, a strange   region
where the mountain rivulets gurgle
off into subterranean reservoirs and
the   granite walls  are  pitted with
caves.   Between Banff and the lake
is Bankhead, where are located the
anthracite   mines, operated by the
Canadian   Pacific Railway, whose
output will shortly provide the country as far east as Winnipeg with
fuel.   The hot springs are at different elevations upon  the eastern
slope   of   Sulphur    Mountain,   the
highest being 900 ft. above the Bow.
All are reached by fine roads, commanding glorious landscapes.   The
more important springs have been
.improved by the Government, and
picturesque bathing houses have been
erected and placed under the care of
attendants.   In one locality is a pool
inside a dome-roofed cave, entered
by an artificial tunnel; and adjacent,
another spring forms an open basin
of warm sulphurous water,   Since
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l
Limited
Toronto
Express
Banff
village
Miles'
from
Vanc'r
CP.R. Hotel
Banff
Spri
Anth
co
Hot
ngs
racite The Canadian Alpine Club,
although only 5 years old,
has a membership of which
many a more venerable institution would be proud ;
and to its annual meet and
camp, held at some spot in
the Rockies, come famous
Mountaineers from the New
World and the Old
(Photos by Byron Harmon) ~L_. eSBZSmiSi
Miles
from
Montr'
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r J Imper'l
Express! Limited
2340
Pilot
Castle
2351
2358
Saw
and
ran
and
Mts,
back
Bow
ges
the opening of the railway: these
springs have been largely visited,
and testimony to their wonderful
curative properties is plentiful.
Twenty miles south of Banff is
Mount Assiniboine, the Matterhorn
of the new world, the ascent of which,
after several unsuccessful attempts,
was made in the autumn of 1901 by
the Rev. James Outram and a party
of Swiss guides. The way to it leads
through beautiful valleys studded
with transparent blue lakes and parklike prairie openings.
Sawback—Alt. 4,537 ft. Upon leaving
Banff the railway rejoins the Bow
and follows it up through a forested
valley. The view backward is very
fine. The Vermilion lakes are
skirted, and ahead an excellent view
is had to the right of Mount Bourgeau and the snow-peaks far to the
west, enclosing Simpson's Pass.
Then a sharp turn discloses straight
ahead the great heap of snowy ledges
that form the eastern crest of Pilot
Mountain, 9,680 ft., the landmark of
mountain trappers, for it is seen and
easily recognizable from both ends
of the Bow Valley. Hole-in-the-
wall -Mountain is passed upon the
right, against whose side can be seen
a cavernous opening to a mountain
grotto. This cave is 1,500 feet above
the valley bed, 12 feet from floor to
roof, and runs back in the mountain
for 160 ft., where a round chimneylike aperture gives glimpses of the
open sky. A little beyond the station
Castle Mountain looms up ahead, on
the right, a sheer precipice of 5,000 ft.
—a giant's keep, stretching for eight
miles, with turrets, bastions, and battlements complete".   A natural draw-
- bridge, portcullis, and gateway can be
plainly distinguished against this
ochre wall. The back of this
mountain is a gradual slope,
glacier-covered and overlooking a
wild region of canyon, torrent, and
bridges of rock.
Castle—Alt. 4,660 ft.
Eldon —Alt. 4,817 ft.
Castle station is
at the base of the
great peak whose
name it takes.
After passing this
point, the mountains on each side
become exceedingly grand and prominent. Those on the right (northeast) form the bare, rugged, and
sharply serrated Sawback subrange, with a spur, called the Slate
Saw
ra
back
nge
548
540
m
#1 1
TRANSCONTINENTAL  RAIL  ROUTE
Miles
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
Express
Imper'l
I Limited
Leave    Leave
2368
Verm
Pa
22.55
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Eastb'nd Trains
Miles
from
Mt. T emple
7.55
ke
Mountains, m the foreground at
Laggan. On the left, the lofty Bow
range fronts the valley in a series of
magnificent snow-laden promontories. At first, enchanting glimpses
only are caught through the trees,
as you look ahead; but before Eldon
is reached the whole long array is in
plain view. Turning to the left, and
looking back, the central peak of
Pilot Mountain is seen, like a leaning
pyramid high above the square-
fronted ledges visible before. Next
to it is the less lofty, but almost
equally imposing, cone of Copper
Mountain, squarely opposite the
sombre precipices of the Castle.
Westward of Copper Mountain, the
top of Vermilion Pass opens through
the range, permitting a view of many
a lofty spire and icy crest along the
continental watershed, from whose
glaciers and snowfields the Vermilion River flows westward into the
Kootenay. Most prominent on the
east side are the precipitous face of
Storm Mountain, 10,309 ft., and the
snow dome of Mount Ball, 10,825 ft.
West of the entrance Into Vermilion
Pass, towering up tier after tier is a
chaotic sea of mountains; and beyond, standing supreme over this
part of the range is the prodigious,
isolated, helmet - shaped mountain
named Temple (11,626 ft.) —the
loftiest and grandest in this whole
panorama. This great snow-bound
mountain, whose crest exhibits precipitous walls of ice flashing blue in
the sunlight, becomes visible at
Sawback Station, and from Eldon
almost to the summit its white-
crowned precipice is the most conspicuous and admirable feature of
the wonderful valley.
Laggan —Alt. 5,037 ft. Beyond Laggan
the railway leaves the Bow and ascends a tributary from the west,
which courses through a gap in the
Bow range. Looking upward to the
right, north-west, towards Bow Lake
and the huge rounded snow-capped
peak of Mount Daly, a view is obtained of the glacier. It is a broad
crescent - shaped river of ice, the
further end concealed behind the
lofty yellow cliffs that hem it in. It
is 1,300 feet above you, and a dozen
miles away. Further north are other
glacial fields, one of which is the
source of three great continental
rivers flowing to the three different
oceans, the Athabaska or Mackenzie
River   flowing   to   the  Arctic, the
Imper'l!Toronto   £™»
Limited Express* V^
Leave
(Mou
Ti
Fiel
Broa
Pilot
Cop
M
vi
Q
Mt.T
22.10
La
Lou
iCha
vi
Q
Leave
NTAIN
ME)
dto
dview
and
per
ts.
emple
10.15
ke
ise
let
530 £SES5Bn
Valley of the Ten Peaks
Lakes in the Clouds, near Laggan
J •
-'■rf^ W- ■»— TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
51
Miles
from
Montr'l
'estb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
Express
Lake
theC
Imper'l
Limited
8 in
louds
Mt. Vi
ctoria
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Eastb'nd Trains
[mper'l
Toronto
imited Express
Saskatchewan to the Atlantic, and the
Columbia to the Pacific. The glacier
presents some exceptionally interesting features, among others an
enormous cavernous passageway,
the size of a railway tunnel, running
for miles back under the ice, cut out
by subterranean rivers. This is also
the region of Mounts Columbia,
Bryce, Athabaska, Forbes, Robson,
and other peaks, the last named
being the highest yet known in the
Rockies, exceeding 13,000 ft. in
altitude.
Laggan is the station for the Lakes
in the Clouds.   Ponies and vehicles
are in summer here in waiting for
tourists intending to visit these picturesque lakes, which, perched on
the mountains' sides amidst the most
romantic   environments,   are   rare
gems whose loveliness and charm
surpass all description. Lake Louise,
5,670 feet, which is the first, is 2\
miles from the station by carriage
drive over a splendid road which
has just been constructed across the
face of the mountain.  On the margin
of this beautiful lake there is a comfortable    Chateau   Hotel,   recently
enlarged,   where   excellent   accommodation is provided.   There is a
bridle-path to Mirror Lake, 6,655 feet
up the mountain, and a still further
ascent to Lake Agnes, during which
a   magnificent  view   of   the   Bow
Valley and the surrounding mountains   is obtained.    Both lakes lie
literally above the clouds, nestling
in   the   rocky  cirques  among   the
peaks of  the Beehive,  St.   Piran,
Niblock, and   Whyte.    Trails also
lead across the stream draining Lake
Louise to Fairview Mountain on the
left side, to the Saddleback still farther eastward, from which one can
look across an abyssmal gorge 2,000
ft. deep to the avalanches of Mount
Temple, the forested vale called Paradise Valley, the scarred battlements
of Mount Sheol, and the pinnacled
heights of Castle Crags behind Fair-
view Mountain.    Other trails lead
round to the right of Lake Louise
directly on   to the  glacier   bed  of
Mount Victoria, the great palisade of
snow 11,355 ft. high that shuts ott
all view to the south.    This trail
also connects with the route to Abbot
Pass, a deep canyon between Victoria and Lefroy, 11,220 ft.   A stiff
climb over this pass and down to the
rear of Lefroy and Victoria leads by
a chain of beautiful mountain tarns
to O'Hara Lake and Cataract Creek,
Lab
theC
Miles
from
Vanc'r
s in
louds
1 I
TRANSCONTINENTAL  RAIL ROUTE
2375
2377
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r j Imper'l
Express Limited
Valley
Ten
23.25
Leave
of the
Peaks
8.30
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Sum
of
Roc
mit
the
kies
which flows directly down to Wapta
Lake on the main line at Hector Station. O'Hara Lake, recently opened
to the public by a well-made pony
trail from Hector, is a worthy rival
of Lake Louise, and presents features
of wild Alpine grandeur in its surroundings that cannot be surpassed.
It may be reached from either Laggan or Field. The roadway eastward
along the Bow River rounds to the
rear of Mount Temple and descends
to a beautiful vale called the Valley
of the Ten Peaks, in the midst of
which lies Moraine Lake, an emerald
gem set in a glacier crescent; for
the Ten Peaks engirt one side of the
lake like a scimitar and between each
pair of the peaks is fathomless snow,
with the ribboned green of a glacier
hanging down to the valley bed. In
these waters the supply of trout is
exhaustless. In the surrounding valleys big game—goat, big-horn, and
bear — abounds. Northward from
Lake Louise are the Slate and Wapu-
tehk ranges, and overtopping all, like
the sky-line of a citadel, with white
edging on every rock, ledge and
crest hidden in the clouds, is the
great buttressed mass called Mount
Hector, after Sir James Hector, of
the Palliser expedition in 1858, one
of the first to explore the Rockies.
A monument is here erected to his
memory.
To enable visitors to climb and
explore in safety, the Canadian Pacific Railway brings from Switzerland
a number of Alpine guides of the
very highest class. One of these is
always stationed at Lake Louise. The
others will be found at Field, Emerald
Lake, and Glacier. These men are
permitted to return to their Swiss
homes each autumn, all expenses of
travel being borne by the Canadian
Pacific Rail-
Stephen—Alt. 5,329 ft. way. TheSta-
Hector—Alt. 5,207 ft.       tion  at   the
summit of the
Rocky   Mountains.     Mt. Stephen—
one of the chief peaks of the Rockies
in this latitude—is named in honour
of the first President of the Canadian
Pacific Railway Company.   Here is
the " Great Divide," and a sparkling
stream separates into two, the waters
of one flowing to the Pacific, and
those of the other to Hudson Bay.
From here{the line descends rapidly,
passing the beautiful Wapta Lake at
Hector, and crossing the deep gorge
of   the   Kicking   Horse   River just
beyond.     The   line   clings   to   the
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l
Limited
Toronto
Express
Big
MUes
from
Vanc'r
same
Sum
of
Roc
524
522
nut
the
kies
^=
J 3S3SSB0
"The Great Divide '
A
Mount Stephen and Cathedral Peak
HH V ajQTTWjM*:
MEM
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
Miles
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
Express
Yoho
Cath
Moun
Imper'l
Limited
Valley
edral
tain
vi
Q
STATIONS-
mountain-side at the left, and the valley on the right rapidly deepens until
the river is seen as a gleaming
thread five or six hundred feet below.
Above is a serrated sky-line whose
craggy margin hides the glaciers
and the real summit of the range.
Looking to the right, the Yoho, one
of the grandest mountain valleys in
the world, stretches away to the
north, with great, white, glacier-
bound peaks on either side. Looking forward to the right, the heights
of Mount Field are seen. On the left
the basilica-like spires of Cathedral
Mountain loom against the sky, and
just beyond is the duomo-like head of
Mount Stephen. On its shoulder is
seen a vast, shining, green glacier,
the forepart of this monster, which
hangs obliquely forward, measuring
nearly a thousand feet in length, and
its lower outer edge showing a vertical depth of almost a hundred feet.
Here, too, can be seen a silver-lead
mine on the mountain-side, 2,500 feet
above its base. Passing through a
short tunnel, and hugging the base
of. the mountain closely, the main
peak is lost to view for a few minutes;
but as the train turns sharply away
it soon reappears with startling suddenness, and when its highly-coloured
dome and spires are illuminated by
the sun it seems to rise as a flame
shooting into the sky.
Coming from the east the road
first enters the corkscrew tunnel of
3,200 feet, under Cathedral Mountain.
Emerging from the tunnel twist the
track runs back east across the Kicking Horse River, and then enters the
eastern spiral tunnel of 2,910 feet
under Mount Ogden, and after describing an elliptic curve emerges to
again cross the Kicking Horse westward. The whole thing is a perfect
maze, the railway doubling back
upon itself twice, tunnelling under
mountains and crossing the river
twice in order to cut down the grade.
Put in brief, the work which has
now been completed is as follows:—
Length of two tunnels, 1| miles;
length of cutting outside of tunnels,
7 miles; increase in length of track,
4| miles; reduction in grade, from
4.5 to 2.2; approximate cost of work,
$1,500,000; number of men employed, about 1,000, with complete
outfit of steam equipment. Time of
work, twenty months, from October,
1907, to July, 1909; 75 carloads of
dynamite were used, or upwards of
1,500,000 pounds of   the explosive.
Q
A~aW 54
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL  ROUTE
Miles
irom
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains <-
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Eastb'nd Trains
MUes
from
Vanc'r
Vanc'r
Express
Arrive :
Imper'l
Limited
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
Toronto
Express
Leave
Arrive j
The cost of explosives alone came to
over $250,000.
During the tunnel  work, for the
■
first time in Canada, steam shovels
were operated by compressed air;
one of these machines was installed
at the working head in each tunnel,
the cutting being worked from opposite ends.    Despite the complicated
work caused by the spiral shape of
the tunnels, they met. exactly, and
the work has been completed with
i
1
j
marvellous exactness.
!
This is not merely the greatest
piece of tunnelling ever attempted in
Canada, but the first introduction of
this spiral system of tunnels on this
continent.
1
The result of this work Is, that
where on the old track with its big
grade it took four engines to handle
a train, now only two engines are
needed.    The four engines used to
■    ■
i
i
be able to make only four or five
miles an hour, now the two engines
are able to make twenty-five.  In this
way the cost of operating a train
over this difficult piece of line is cut
to about one-third of the old cost,
with an improvement in the time of
running, while the element of danger,
inseparable from high grades, has
been practically eliminated.    It is
these factors which have induced the
C. P. R. to go to such tremendous
expense to reduce this famous " Big
(Mou
NTAIN
Hill" grade.
(Mou
NTAIN
Ti
MB)
Ti
ME)
:   2388
a24.15
a 9.10
|| Field—Alt. 4,064 ft.   Terminal Alberta
Division.    Trains   leave   Field  on
/20.40
78.40
511
Pacific time—one hour earlier than
Mountain time (see British Columbia
Division).
FIELD
and VANCOUVERj 510 Miles
(British  Columbia Division)
Miles
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains
stations—Descriptive Notes
Eastb'nd Trains
MUes
from
Vanc'r
Vanc'r
Express
Imperi
Limited
Imper'l
Limited
Arrive
Toronto
Express
Leave
Leave
Arrive
2388
Z23.25
/8.30
|| Field—Alt. 4,064 ft.    At Field   is a
charming hotel managed by the railway company—the Mount Stephen i
a 19.20;
a 7.25 j
511
(Pac
IFIC
House — not far   from the base of
(Pac
IFIC
Ti
Fiel
ME)
d to
Mount Stephen and   facing   Mount
li
Fiel
me)
d to
Pacific
Coast
Field.   This is a favourite stopping
Pacific
Coast
|| Refreshment Station. i**a
jA
Mount Stephen
House, Field
I
r
y
11
^1
7 4  Miles
from
Montr'l
I Vanc'r j Imper'l
| Express Limited
place for tourists, and has been
recently enlarged to meet the wants
of increased travel. Field combines
all possible attractions for the mountain tourist. It is at the point by
which is reached that great glacier
field first seen northward from
Laggan, and is only—as it were—a
stone's throw from all the mysteries
and wonders of an upper ice world.
There is excellent fly-fishing for
trout in the lakelets and streams
near the village. Two thousand
five hundred feet up the right-hand
slope of Mount Stephen, along an
easy bridle-path, is a wonderful fossil
bed, an area of 150 square yards,
where the mountain side has tumbled
forward and disintegrated in a rock-
slide of shaly, shelving limestone
slabs. These slabs, which cover a
large area beyond the chief patch,
for the most part consist of thin,
laminated plates or layers. On a
sharp knock the layers separate, revealing countless fossil specimens,
fern-like and perfectly marked, principally trilobites and agnostus. The
summit is only four or five thousand
feet above the fossil beds, and offers
a splendid and exhilarating ascent to
climbers with a steady head for
narrow ledges. Looking down the
valley from the hotel, Mount Dennis
is seen on the left, and the Van
Horne Range on the right. The two
most prominent peaks of the latter
are Mounts Deville and King, the
former on the right. Fossil beds are
also found in the Van Horne Range.
The Ottertail group with its sheer
wall, snow caps and abrupt declivities giving unexpected views at every
turn, is particularly attractive to the
climber.
A trail crossing the bridge of the
Kicking Horse River, to the base of
Mount Burgess, leads through a forest
of spruce and balsam to a natural
bridge of rock, under which the river
pours in a cataract. Five miles
farther along the same trail is
Emerald Lake, a lovely expanse of
green water nestling in the forest to
the rear of Mount Burgess and completely surrounded by lofty peaks,
whose green, ribboned glaciers can
be seen protruding from the rocky
cirques of the upper slopes. A
chalet here offers excellent accommodation for tourists wishing to
spend some time at the lake, or to
visit the great Yoho Valley which
lies beyond.   An excellent trail has
The
Val
Yoho
ey 56
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
Miles
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains 1
Vanc'r j Imper'l
Express! Limited
kkaw
lis
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
been cut round the end of the lake
and up the gravelly saddle of rock to
the right, where one passes through
a forest into the very lap of the summits. A tarn lies in the centre of
this upland meadow and the trail
leads to its right-hand margin into
the gorge of the marvellous Takak-
kaw Falls. These wonderful falls
are amongst the finest known in the
world. An enormous volume of
seething, boiling water rushes over
the precipice on the far side of the
narrow gorge and shatters down the
rock side in clouds of foam, a sheer
drop of 1,200 feet. The Takakkaw
Falls are one of the most striking
views in the mountains and ought
not to be missed by any tourist, especially as they can be reached by
one day's ride from Field, and the
great Yoho Canyon and Twin Falls
can be reached in another day. The
pony trail here passes directly below
the ice of a series of-fine glaciers
which cover the east face of the
Emerald Mountains. An inspection
of the ice tongue of the Yoho Glacier
and the cave from which its glacial torrent pours, should not be
missed. Beyond, to the west, lie the
Twin Falls of even greater interest
than the Takakkaw, owing to a
perpendicular drop of two vast
columns of water and the' dense
clouds of steam-like spray caused by
their concussion with the rock floor
below.
Eastb'nd Trains
I mper'lj Toronto
Limited Express
Ottertail
Alt. 3,690 ft.
Leanchoil
Alt. 3,679 ft.
Two miles beyond Field, very
lofty, glacier
bearing heights
are seen at the
north. The line
follows the Kicking Horse, whose
narrow valley divides the Ottertail
and Van Horne ranges. Mount
Goodsir (11,663 ft.), the highest of the
Ottertail group, is seen from Ottertail
Creek. The Ottertail to the left appears sheer and pinnacled, with no
amphitheatre among the craggy
heights, while the Van Horne to the
right are ochre-coloured in their
slopes and show an undulated succession of trough and crest among
their summits. About a mile away
from the valley bed of the Kicking
Horse River, at the base of the Otter-
tails, is a strange field of rakish
looking "hoodoos," with pillars left
standing by the wash of mountain
torrent, with stones tilted at all sorts
of tipsy angles on their heads.   The
Miles
from
Vanc'r
Van
Ra
Horne
nge
502
493 1. Kicking Horse Canyon
2. A Fruit Grower's Home at Wilmer, Columbia Valley
3. Beaver Canyon, Beavermouth
«■*"■'*  vUW
, Westb'nd Trains
Miles
from   j Vanc'r
Montr'l Express
Leave
Wester
of
Kic
Horse
2411
/24.24
Imper'l
Limited
n slope
the
king
Pass
Lower
of
Kic
Ho
2416
2424
2430
The Co
and
Selk
canyon
the
king.
1.04       9.59
lumbia
the
irks
line, which has gradually curved
towards the south since crossing the
summit at Stephen, runs due south
from here to Leanchoil, where the
Beaverfoot River comes in from the
south and joins the Kicking Horse.
At the left, the lofty peaks of the
Ottertail Mountains, walled, massive,
and castellated, rise abruptly to an
immense height; and, looking south,
amagnificent.'range of peaks extends
in orderly array towards the southeast as far as the eye can reach.
These are the Beaverfoot Mountains,
appearing to slope away from the
railway. At the right Mount Hunter,
a long, gradual, slope, pushes its
huge mass forward like a wedge
between the Ottertail and Beaverfoot
ranges. The river turns abruptly
against its base and plunges into the
lower Kicking Horse Canyon, down
which it disputes the passage with
the railway. Near Palliser can be
seen a group of hoodoos in process
of formation#
Palliser—Alt. 3,283 ft. The canyon
rapidly deepens until, *beyond Palliser, the mountain sides become vertical, rising straight up thousands of
feet, in a bronze wall crested by a
long line of unnamed peaks, and
within an easy stone's throw from
wall to wall. Down this vast chasm
go the railway and the river together,
the former crossing from side to side
to ledges cut out of the solid rock,
and twisting and turning in every
direction, and every minute or two
plunging through projecting angles
of rock which seem to close the way.
With the towering cliffs almost shutting out the sunlight and the roar of
the river and the train increased an
hundredfold by the echoing walls,
the passage of this terrible gorge will
never be forgotten.
The   train   sud-
Qlenogie
Golden
Alt. 2,580 ft.
Moberly
Alt. 2,546 ft.
denly emerges
into daylight
as Q olden is
reached. The
broad river ahead
is the Columbia
moving northward. The supremely
beautiful mountains beyond to the
left and south are the Selkirks, rising
from their forest-clad bases and lifting their ice-crowned heads far into
the sky. They extend in an apparently unbroken line from the southeast   to   the   north-west,   gradually
At the
theR
foot of
ockies
482
475
f Flag Station. a,
TRANSCONTINENTAL  RAIL  ROUTE
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
melting into the remote distance.
Parallel with them and rising eastward, to the right and the north from
the Columbia, range upon range, are
the Rockies, only the loftiest peaks
to be seen just now over the massive
benches upon which they rest.
Golden is a mining town upon the
banks of the Columbia, at the mouth
of the Kicking Horse. During the
summer, steamers make trips up the
Columbia to Windermere on the lakes
at the head of the river, 85 miles
distant. This picturesque valley is
admirably adapted for fruit growing,
and is rapidly filling up with settlers.
A very fair automobile road runs
from Golden right through the
Columbia Valley to Cranbrook on
the Crowsnest Branch of the
Canadian Pacific Railway. From
Golden to Donald the railway
follows down the Columbia on the
face of the lower bench of the
Rocky Mountains, the Selkirks all
the way in full view opposite, the
soft green streaks down their sides
indicating the paths of avalanches.
Soberly * is the site of the oldest
cabin in the mountains, seen just to
the left, where a Government engineering party, under Mr. Walter
Moberly, C.E., engaged in the preliminary surveys of the railway
route, passed the winter of 1871-2.
Donald
Alt. 2,574 ft.
Beavermouth
Alt. 2,435 ft.
Donald lies in
the shadow of
the Selkirks.
From here the
railway
crosses the
Columbia to the base of the Selkirks,
always wooded in contrast to the
naked stone of the Rockies. A little
farther down, the Rockies and Selkirks crowded together force the
river through a deep, narrow gorge,
the railway clinging to the slopes
high above it. Emerging from the
gorge at Beavermouth, the most
northerly station of the transcontinental route, the line soon turns
abruptly to the left and enters the
Selkirks through the Gate of the
Beaver River—a passage so narrow
that a felled tree serves as a footbridge over it—just where the river
makes its final and mad plunge down
to the level of the Columbia. Here
a natural bridge is seen across the
boiling torrent.
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l Toronto   Vanr>r
Llmited Express   vanc r
MUes
from
Sport
mines
Koot
Val
Leave
and
in the
enay
ley
74.40
459
447
/Flag Station.
<KS*W 3558MHI
iMafe
IWuMti!
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
59
Miles
from
Montr'l
2456
2462
2466
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r j Imper'l
Express Limited
Big
Superb
of
Selk
Stony
Bri
trees
view
the
irks
Creek
dge
STATIONS—Descriptive notes
Six Mile Creek
Alt. 2,617 ft.
Cedar—Alt. 3,143 ft
Bear Creek
Alt. 3,673 ft.
A little way up
the Beaver the
line crosses to
the right bank,
where, notched
into the mountain   side,    it
rises at the rate of  116 feet to the
mile, and the river is soon  left a
thousand feet below, appearing as a
silver thread winding through the
narrow and densely forested valley.
Opposite is a line of huge tree-clad
hills,   occasionally showing   snow-
covered heads above the timber line.
Nature has worked here on so gigantic a scale that many travellers fail to
notice the extraordinary height of the
spruce, Douglas fir, and cedar trees,
which   seem   to be engaged  in   a
vain competition with the mountains
themselves.    From  Six Mile Creek
station one sees ahead, up the Beaver
Valley, a long line of the higher peaks
of the Selkirks, en echelon, culminating in an exceedingly lofty pinnacle,
named Sir Donald (10,808 ft.), which
is seen more closely at Glacier House.
Again, from Mountain Creek Bridge,
a few miles beyond, where a powerful torrent comes down from high
mountains northward, the same view
is obtained, nearer and larger, and
eight   peaks can be   counted in  a
grand array, the last of which is Sir
Donald leading  the  line.     A little
farther on, Cedar Creek is crossed,
and not far west of it is a very high
bridge spanning a foaming cascade,
whence one of   the most beautiful
prospects of the whole journey is to
be   had.    So   impressed  were   the
builders with the charm of this magnificent picture of mountains, that
they named the spot The Surprise.
The principal difficulty in construction  on this  part of the  line was
occasioned by the torrents, many of
them in splendid cascades, which
come down through narrow gorges
cut deeply into the steep slopes, along
which   the   railway   creeps.     The
greatest of all these bridges crosses
Stony  Creek—a noisy rill   flowing
in the bottom of a narrow V-shaped
channel 300 feet below the rails—one
of the loftiest railway bridges in the
world.   As Bear Creek station is approached, a brief but precious glimpse
is caught of Mount Tupper through a
gap in the cliffs on the right.   This
station is 1,000 feet above the Beaver,
whose upper valley can be seen penetrating the mountains southward for
a long distance. The line here leaves
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l Toronto
Limited Express
Miles
from
Vanc'r
Beaver
cent
the
Valley
Valley
442
437
432 60
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
Miles
J^o   Vanc'r
Montrl Express
Westb'nd Trains
Leave
T
snow
2473
Mo
Macd
Her
Ra
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
he
sheds
unt
onald
mit
nge
3.40
Peaks
glacie
Roger
12.30
and
rsin
s' Pass
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l
Limited
Toronto
Express,
the Beaver and turns up Bear Creek
along continuous grades of 116 feet
to the mile. Many of the difficulties
of the railway from snow in the
winter occur between Bear Creek
and the summit on the east and for
a similar distance on the west slope
of the Selkirks, and these have been
completely overcome by the construction, at vast expense, of sheds, or more
properly tunnels, of massive timber
work. These are built of heavy
squared cedar timber, dovetailed and
bolted together, backed with rock,
and fitted into the mountain sides in
such a manner as to bid defiance to
the most terrific avalanche. Beyond
Stony Creek Bridge, the gorge of
Bear Creek is compressed into a vast
ravine between Mount Macdonald on
the left and Mount Tupper on the
right, forming a narrow portal to the
amphitheatre of Rogers' Pass, at the
summit. The cowled figure of a
man, with his dog, on the western
edge of one of the crags shapes itself j
out of the rocks, and gives the name '
of Hermit to the range. The way is
between enormous precipices. Mount
Macdonald towers a mile above the
railway in almost vertical height.
Its base is but a stone's-throw distant, and it is so sheer, so bare and
stupendous, and yet so near, that one
is overawed by a sense of immensity
and mighty grandeur. This is the
climax of mountain scenery. In
passing before the face of this gigantic precipice the line clings to the
base of Mount Tupper, and as the
station at Rogers' Pass is neared, its
clustered spires, resembling in one
spot a line of heavily burdened camels
now known as " the camels coming
out of Egypt," appear, facing those
of Mount Macdonald, and nearly
as high. Apparently these two
matchless mountains were once
united, but ages ago some terrific
convulsion of nature rent them
asunder, leaving barely room for the
railway.
Rogers' Pass—Alt. 4,309 ft. This pass
was named after Major A. B. Rogers,
by whose adventurous energy it was
discovered in 1881, previous to which
no human foot had penetrated to the
summit of this great central range.
The pass lies between two lines of
huge snow-clad peaks. That on the
north forms a prodigious amphitheatre, under whose parapet, five
or six thousand feet above the valley,
half a dozen glaciers may be seen at
Leave
Bear
T
snow
MUes
from
Vanc'r
Leave
Creek
he
sheds
Des
thro
Bear
gor
Rogi
er
15.09
cent
ugh-
Creek
ge
Pass
3.40
426 Rogers' Pass
Mount
Macdonald  TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
Miles
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r j Imper'l
Express; Limited
2474
ANa
Res
Source
Illecil
tional
erve
of the
lewaet
STATIONS
once, and so near that their shining
green fissures are distinctly visible.
In this direction, at the head of the
largest glacier, may be seen a group
of sharp serrated peaks, clear cut
against the sky. The tallest is Swiss
Peak, so called in honour of the members of the Swiss Alpine Club, who
first stood upon its highest pinnacle.
The changing effects of light and
shadow on this brotherhood of peaks,
of which Tupper and Macdonald are
among the chief, can never be forgotten by the fortunate traveller who
has seen the sunset or sunrise tinting
their battlements, or has looked up
from the green valley at a snowstorm trailing its curtain along their
crests with perchance a white peak
or two standing serene above the
harmless cloud. On the south
stretches the line of peaks connecting Macdonald with Sir Donald,
Uto, Eagle, and Avalanche, from
south to north—the rear slopes of
which were seen in ascending the
Beaver. This pass valley has been
reserved by the Government as a
national park.
Selkirk Summit—Alt. 4,351 ft. Summit of the pass. The mountains to
the right are: Tupper, the group of
castellated granite crags directly
above the pass; Hermit, a rounded
height; the Swiss Peaks, distinct
from the peaks on each side by
deeply notched ravines; Rogers'
Peak, sloping down a gradual skyline to Sifton, which is separated by
a deep ravine from Grizzly, which in
turn stands opposite to the pyramidal
heights of Cheops, a veritable Titan
of this group, with the profile of a
hatted Napoleon plainly silhouetted
against that face of Cheops overlooking the vast glacial field of the whole
Hermit Range. On the crags of the
Swiss Peaks a second cowled figure
with his inseparable dog can be seen
as if a companion of his brother on
Mount Tupper; and looking out of
the pass towards the west, and over
the deep valley of the Illecillewaet,
is Ross Peak, a massive cleft summit carrying an immense glacier on
its eastern slope. Leaving the summit, and curving to the left, the line
follows the slope of the Axial Range,
of which Sir Donald is the chief.
At the right is the deep valley of the
Illecillewaet, which makes its way
westward by a devious course among
numberless hoary-headed mountain
monarchs, winding  in  leaps, cas-
Thes
of
Selk
Overlo
the
of
Illecil
ummits
the
rks
oking
gorge
the
lewaet Br
62
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
Miles
from
Montr'l
Westb'nd Trainsj
Vanc'r   Imper'l
Express Limited
Leave    Arrive
The
Gla
2476
3.54
a 12.43
/12.53
Cougar
ValUy
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
cades, and falls betwixt forests of
tropical luxuriance and clefts worn
through ancient morainal heaps.
Directly ahead is the Illecillewaet
Glacier of the Selkirks. Passing a
long snow-shed (not through it, for
an outer track is provided that the
summer scenery may not be lost) a
sharp curve brings the train in front
of the Illecillewaet Glacier, which is
now very near, at the left—a vast
cascade of gleaming ice falling
4,500 feet from the summit of the
snow field in which it has its source
—one glacier of a group of glaciers
all together—the ice field, of which
the Illecillewaet is one of a number
of outlets, embracing an area of
about ten square miles.
|Glacier House—Alt. 4,093 ft. The station and hotel at Qlacier are within
thirty minutes' walk of the Illecillewaet Glacier, from which, at the left,
Sir Donald (10,808 ft.) rises a naked
and abrupt pyramid, to a height of a
mile and a quarter above the railway. This stately monolith was
named after Sir Donald Smith (Lord
Strathcona), one of the chief promoters of the Canadian Pacific
Railway. Farther to the left are
sharp peaks—Uto, Eagle, Avalanche,
and Macdonald—second only to Sir
Donald. Rogers' Pass and the snowy
Hermit Range, the most prominent
peaks of which are called the Swiss
Peaks, are in full view. Again to
the left, at the west end of the Hermit Range, on the south side of Bear
Creek, comes Cheops, so named after
the Great Pyramid, the tomb of the
Pharaoh Shufu (Cheops) who lived
about 3,700 B.C., and in the foreground, and far down among the
trees, the Illecillewaet glistens across
the valley. Somewhat at the left of
Cheops the shoulders of Ross Peak
are visible over the wooded slope of
the mountain behind the hotel, which
is called Abbott. Between Ross and
Abbott in the background is an
enormous wall of snow. This is the
Mount Bonney Glacier. To the right
of Ross, between Ross and Cheops, a
glimpse is caught of the Cougar
Valley where are the wonderful
caves of Nakimu (Indian for Grumbling Caves). This is the Asulkan
Glacier in the Valley of the Asulkan
Creek, a gem of mountain beauty,
where a series of white cascades
foam through vistas of dark spruce
114.54
la 14.44
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l {Toronto
Limited Express
Leave
Great
of
Selk
Mo
Sir D
and
pea
Moun
ran
Leave
Glacier
the
irks
Z3.24
unt
onald
other
ks
vi
Q
tain
ees
Miles
from
Vanc'r
423
Refreshment Station
•are   Miles
from
Montr'l
j Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
Express
Names
pea
of the
ks
T
Illecil
Gla
Mar
La
he
lewaet
cier
ion
ke
and fir, where falls leap from ledges
above in clouds of flying spray, and
shining open meadows lead the traveller to listen for the tinkle of the
Alpine herd. The peaks going from
right to left are—Afton, the sharp
apex; the Rampart, an oblong wall;
the Dome, a rounded rock; Castor
and Pollux, two sharp spires farthest
south. To the left of the Asulkan
Glacier comes a forested dome, Glacier Crest, the western boundary of
the Great Illecillewaet Glacier, which
is banked on the other side by the
lower slopes of Sir Donald, from
whose summit an immense number
of glaciers can be seen. The hotel
serves not only as a dining station
for passing trains, but affords a most
delightful stopping place for tourists
who wish to hunt, or explore the
surrounding mountains or glaciers.
The Company has built a large
annex to the hotel to accommodate
the increasing tourist travel that is
not satisfied with the short stop
made by train, and this has been
recently enlarged. Here in the heart
of the Selkirks every comfort and
luxury are found, and here many
gather annually to spend the summer
amidst the wonders of nature. The
Illecillewaet Glacier is exactly two
miles away, and its slowly receding
forefoot with immense crevices of
abysmal depth cutting across the
crystal surface is only a few hundred feet above the level of the hotel.
Several good trails have been made
to it, and its exploration is practicable. A splendid view can be obtained of the Great Glacier from
Glacier Crest to the left of the Great
Glacier, and 3,000 feet above the
hotel another view is seen from the
trail at the foot of Sir Donald which is
to the right of the ice. Easy trails also
lead to Marion Lake; on Mount
Abbott, 1,500 ft. above Glacier House,
opposite the hotel, high among the
trees, is Cascade summer house,
directly above the mountain torrent
seen tumbling down the green shoulder from Avalanche Peak; to the
head of the Asulkan Valley, where
the ice flow of two main branches of
the glacier meet; and at the summits
of Mounts Avalanche, and Abbott.
Good routes have also been mapped
by the guides up Eagle and Sir
Donald; the former being an easy
climb. This peak is so named from
a large rock figure exactly resembling an eagle which is perched upon
the knife-sharp edge of the mountain.
Trai
poin
van
Is to
tsof
tage
■*mmmwxB* 64
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
MUes
from
Montr'l
2483
2491
2498
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
Express
Leave
The
Silv
er
5.06
Can
of
Illecil
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
Loops
mines
14.09
yons
the.
lewaet
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
It is seen to best advantage from the
trail leading to Mount Avalanche.
Rogers' Pass above, and the Loop
below, are within an easy walk. A
glacial stream has been caught and
furnishes fountains about the hotel.
Game is Very abundant throughout
these lofty ranges. Their summits
are the home of the mountain goat,
which are seldom found south of
Canada. Bears also are seen frequently in this vicinity.
Continuing the descent from the
Glacier House, and following around
the mountain-side, the Loop is soon
reached, where the line makes
several startling turns and twists,
first crossing a valley leading down
from the Mount Bonney Glacier,
touching for a moment on the base
of Ross Peak, then doubling back to
the right a mile or more upon itself;
then sweeping around to the right,
touching Cougar Mount, on the other
side of the Illecillewaet, crossing
again to the left, and at last shooting
down the valley parallel with its
former course. Looking back, the
railway is seen cutting two long
gashes, one above the other, on the
mountain slope, and further to the
left, and high above the long snow-
shed, the summit range near Rogers'
Pass is yet visible, with Sir Donald
overlooking all.
The Illecillewaet
River is here of
no great size, but
of course turbulent. Its water is
at first pea-green
with glacial mud, but rapidly clarifies. About lioss 'Peak station are
many silver mines penetrating the
crest of one of the lofty hills north of
the railway, and a mammoth cave
on Cougar Creek has recently been
discovered, about 2,000 ft. above the
track. This cave, whose recesses
have not been fully explored, contains
many chambers, some of which are
of surpassing beauty. Roads are
being constructed, by which it will
be made easy of access. Caribou
occur in numbers from here down to
the Columbia.
Albert Canyon—Alt. 2,227 ft. Just east
of the station the train runs suddenly
along the very brink of several remarkably deep fissures In the solid
rock, whose walls rise straight up,
hundreds of feet on both sides, to
wooded crags, above which sharp,
distant peaks cut the sky.  The most
Ross Peak
Alt. 3,456. ft.
Illecillewaet
Alt. 2,710 ft.
I Eastb'ndTrains    Mijeg
Imper'l (Toronto Lfe-
1 LimitedlExpress   va
Leave I Leave
me
Game,
and
mi
13.14
Gorge
Illecil
lumber.
silver
nes
2.01
of the
lewaet
416
407
401 ^scafani I
V ■raggs* ii <*>—r^ uaati nafe
TRANSCONTINENTAL  RAIL ROUTE
Miles
from
Montr'l
2508 a
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
Express
Arrive
Imper'l
Limited
Arrive
2519
Base
Selk
a 6.00
/6.15
T
Colu
of the
irk s
a 15.15
/15.35
he
mbia
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
striking of these canyons is the
Albert, where the river is seen nearly
150 ft. below the railway, compressed
into a boiling flume scarcely 20 ft.
wide.
Twin Butte—Alt. 1,907 ft. This station
takes its name from the huge double
summit near by, now called Mounts
Mackenzie and Tilley. After passing
the station, there looms up at the
right the conspicuous and beautiful
range named Clachnacoodin. As the
western base of the Selkirks is
approached the narrow valley again
becomes a gorge, and the railway
and river dispute the passage through
a chasm with vertical rocky walls,
known as a box canyon, standing but
ten yards apart. The line suddenly
emerges into a comparatively open,
level and forest-covered space, swings
to the right and reaches Revelstoke,
the northern gateway to the wonderfully rich mining camps of West
Kootenay.
|| Revelstoke—Alt. 1,475 ft. Population
3,500. On the Columbia River—a
railway divisional point and a gateway to the great West Kootenay
mining camps. The Hotel Revelstoke, facing the station, has all
modern conveniences. A fine tourist
resort—fishing, hunting, boating, and
mountain climbing can be enjoyed
here. Mount Revelstoke, immediately
north of the city, can be climbed by
the Lindmark trail, and from the summit a magnificent view of glaciers,
mountain peaks, valleys, and rivers
is obtained. On the summit of this
mountain is.one of the most beautiful
Alpine parks to be found anywhere.
A comfortable chalet has been provided for the accommodation of
tourists. The Columbia, which has
made a great detour around the
northern extremity of the Selkirks,
while the railway has come directly
across, is here much larger than at
Donald, from which it has fallen
1,071 feet, and 28 miles below Revelstoke expands into the Arrow Lakes,
along which there is much beautiful
country, and where the opportunities
for sport are unlimited. A steamer
makes regular trips of some forty
miles up the river. It is a most
delightful trip by rail from Revelstoke to Arrowhead and steamer
down the beautiful Arrow Lake to
Nakusp  past the   famous Halcyon
/12.00
all.40
724.55
a24.45
Side
on
Colu
a
Ar
La
trips
the
mbia
nd
row
kes
| Refreshment Station. -*=
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Hot Springs, a well-known resort,
where there is an excellent hotel
with villas. Opposite Halcyon is
Halcyon Peak (10,400 ft.), and there
are pretty waterfalls near the hotel.
There are trails to different points on
the lake and to the mountain's crest.
Game is plentiful, and there is excellent boating and fishing. Nakusp is
near the foot of the upper lake, on the
moraine of an old glacier, where rail
communication is made with Rosebery, on Slocan Lake (from which the
Canadian Pacific Railway steamer
Slocan runs to Slocan City at the
southern extremity of the lake, where
there is rail connection with the
Lower Kootenay River), and with
Sandon, in the very centre of the
rich Slocan silver-mining regions.
From West Robson, the Boundary
Subdivision runs along the banks of
the Lower Kootenay River, a magnificent fishing water, to the picturesque city of Nelson. Another
Canadian Pacific Railway steamboat
plies between Nelson and Kootenay
Landing, making connections with
the trains of the Crowsnest Pass
route at the latter place, and other
steamers run regularly to the numerous gold, silver, and copper mines on
the Kootenay Lake, affording opportunities for enjoying the magnificent
lake and mountain scenery of this
picturesque locality. The Columbia
River is bridged at West Robson,
and trains run through from Nelson
to the great smelting centre of Trail,
and to the town of Rossland, a mining
camp of phenomenal growth, the
wealth of which has been demonstrated by actual production. Still
another subdivision runs from West
Robson through the Boundary Country
of Midway (99 miles), and is opening
up another very rich mineral region*
On the Columbia River, and the
Arrow, Slocan, and Kootenay Lakes
is a steamship service, operated by
the Canadian Pacific Railway Company ,which is unsurpassed on American waters. The steamers are speedy,
sumptuously appointed, and have all
the advantages of the latest modern
construction.
Resuming the journey on the main
line, the two peaks south-east are
Mackenzie and Tilley. The mountains beyond are in the Gold or
Columbia Range, and the most prominent one of them in view, towards
the south-west, is Mount Begbie, im-
i Imper'l
Limited
Eastb'nd Trains
Toronto
Express
Miles
from
Vanc'r
T
Koot
Dis
he
enay
trict
Gold
R
ange 1. S.S. "Okanagan" on Okanagan Lake
2. Lord Strathcona driving the Last Spike of the Canadian Pacific
Railway at Craigellachie, November 7th, 1885
3. Steamer on Arrow Lakes
IP -g**—<p
a
**• Miles
from
Montr'l
2533
2547
vi
Q
2551
2564
Lovely
T
last
8.24
9.15
Ga
and
TheSh
Lak
he
spike
17.39
18.33
me
fish
uswap
es
the Gold Range
is at once entered by Eagle Pass, which is so
deep cut and direct that it seems to
have been purposely provided for the
railway, in compensation, perhaps,
for the enormous difficulties that had
to be overcome in the Rockies and
Selkirks. Lofty mountains rise
abruptly on each side throughout,
and the pass is seldom more than
a mile wide. The highest point
reached by the line in this pass is
Summit Lake, 7 miles from and only
400 ft. above the Columbia. Four
beautiful lakes — Summit, Victor,
Three Valley, and Griffin—occur in
close succession, each occupying the
entire width of the valley, and forcing
the railway into the mountain sides.
The valley is filled throughout with
a dense growth of immense trees—
spruce, Douglas fir, hemlock, cedar,
balsam, and many other varieties—
giants, all of them. Sawmills occur
at intervals. At Craigellachie the last
spike was driven of the Canadian
Pacific Railway on Nov. 7th, 1885—
the rails from the east and the west
meeting here.
The Shuswap
Lakes are the
centre of one of
the best sporting
regions on the
line. Northward
within a day caribou are abundant;
the deer-shooting southward within a
reasonable distance is very good, and
on the lakes there is famous sport
in deep trolling for trout during the
proper seasons. The London Times
has well described this part of the
line:—"The Eagle River leads us
I down to the Shuswap Lake, so
| named from the Indian tribe that
" lived on its banks and who still
I have a j reserve' there. This is a
" most remarkable body of water. It
" lies among the mountain ridges,
1 and consequently extends its long
I narrow arms along the intervening
1 valleys like a huge octopus in half-
" a-dozen directions. These arms
1 are many miles long, and vary
I from a few hundred yards to two
I or three miles in breadth, and their
I high, bold shores, fringed by the
" little narrow beach of sand and
Malakwa
"Sicamous June.
Alt. 1,156 ft.
Salmon Arm
Alt. 1,158 ft.
9:38
8.45
Gr
Shus
La
and its
22.45
22.00     316
eat
wap
ke
sports
Refreshment Station.
/ Flag Station.
I  ^[W'Mi.Uk.jWw
J.WLMJUJimi'J' TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
Okan
Subdi
Penti
agan -
vision
cton
Spor
oppor
ting
t unities
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
a
pebbles, with alternating bays and
" capes, give beautiful views. The
" railway crosses one of these arms
I by a drawbridge at Sicamous
| Narrows, and then goes for a long
" distance along the southern shores
1 of the lake, running entirely around
I the end of the Salmon Arm."
Sicamous Junction is the station for
the mining and agricultural districts
to the south, where there is large
settlement. An excellent Canadian
Pacific Railway hotel here makes
splendid headquarters for those wishing to remain over to shoot, fish, or
make a daylight trip through the
mountains. There is excellent trout
fishing within a few minutes' paddle
of the hotel between April 1st and
July 1st, also September 15th and
November 1st. Small craft are
always obtainable.
A branch railway runs to Vernon
and Okanagan, at the head of Lake
Okanagan, a magnificent sheet of
water, on which the str. Okanagan
plies to Kelowna and to Penticton, at
the foot of the lake, from which the
mining region to the south is reached.
At Penticton a strong Land Company
has purchased an extensive tract of
land, which it is preparing to irrigate
on an extensive scale. There is excellent hotel accommodation at Penticton for travellers to and from the
Hedley and other mining camps.
Vernon is a charming spot, and the
whole country is a veritable earthly
paradise. Near Kelowna, on the lake
shore, thirty-five miles from Vernon,
Lord Aberdeen, formerly Governor-
General of Canada, has a fine farm,
and another holding of 13,000 acres
a few miles from Vernon, employing
a small army of men, and growing
fruits of all kinds that the temperate
zone will produce. Farther down the
lake are Peachland and Summer-
land, which are making considerable
progress. This is a land of vineyards and orchards, which is now
having a remarkable development,
as well as a Mecca for keen sportsmen,.for there is an abundance and
variety of large and small game,
including caribou, bear, deer, bighorn, and mountain goat. Resuming the transcontinental trip, a writer
says: " For 50 miles the line winds
" in and out the bending shores,
" while geese and ducks fly over the
" waters, and light and shadow play
I upon the opposite banks. This lake
" with its bordering slopes gives a
" fine reminder of Scottish scenery.
Eastb'nd Trains I
Imper'l
Limited
Toronto
Express
Min
Vine
an
orch
ing
yards
d
ards
Miles
from
Vanc'r S=2S*t232=E2l£E
Lord Aberdeen's House, Vernon  2599
2606
2612
2614
2630
/10.01
10.30
/10.34
/11.08
2648
Ranc
the Tho
Val
Old
settle
a 11.45
/11.55
The
Thom
hes of
mpson
ley
vi
Q
time
ments
a21.15
/21.25
North
pson
" The railway in getting around it,
" leads at different, and many, times
towards every one of the thirty-two
points of the compass. Leaving
the Salmon Arm of the lake rather
than go a circuitous course around
the mountains to reach the southwestern arm the line strikes through
the forest over the top of the intervening ridge (Notch Hill). We
come out at some 550 feet elevation
above this 'arm,' and get a magnificent view across the lake, its
I winding shores
Notch Hill
Alt. 1,692 ft.
Squilax
Chase
Shuswap
Ducks
I on both sides
" of the long and
I narrowsheetof
1 water stretch-
"ing   far  on
I either    hand,
"with    high
mountain  ridges for the opposite
background.   The line  gradually
runs down hill until it reaches the
level of the water, but here it has
passed the lake, which has narrowed into the south branch of the
Thompson River.   Then the valley
broadens and the eye that has been
so accustomed to rocks and roughness and the uninhabited desolation
of the mountains is gladdened by
the sight of grass, fenced fields,
growing crops, haystacks, and good
farm houses on the level surface,
while herds of cattle, sheep, and
horses roam over the valley and
bordering hills in large numbers.
1 This is a ranching country extend-
I ing far into the mountain valleys
I west of the Gold Range on both
I sides of the railway, and is one of
I the garden spots of British Colum-
I bia The   people   are
comparatively old settlers, having
come in from the Pacific coast, and
it does one's heart good, after having passed the rude little cabins
" and huts of the plains and moun-
1 tains, to see their neat and trim
" cottages with the evidences of
I thrift that are all around."
Kam loops—Alt. 1,160 feet. Pop. 4,000.
Divisional point and principal town
in the Thompson River valley, begun
years ago around a Hudson's Bay
post. The north fork of the Thompson comes down from the mountains
200 miles northward, and here joins
the main river. It is a beautiful
spot, whose dry invigorating climate
pre-eminently makes it a desirable
u
a
it
u
«
«
u
/21.24
/20.42
/20.37
/20.08
vi
Q
Agricu
develo
/6.00
a 5.50
Forks
Thorn
Itural
pment
/19.35
a 19.25
of the
pson
300
292
286
284
268
25
/Flag Stations.
Wm
01 ~L_
1-
m
m
70
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
Miles
from
Montr'l
2656
2662
2673
2680
2695
2708
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
Express
Leave
K
am
Indus
of the
'12.16
/12.31
Kam
La
12.58
/13.14
13.50
/14.26
Imperi
Limited
Leave
me
loops
tries
region
loops
/22.27
23.21
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
resort for health and pleasure and
the abundance of whose furred, feathered, and finny game adds to its
charms for tourist and sportsman.
The broad valleys intersect at right
angles. There is a background of
hills, and fine groves line both banks
of the streams. Steamboats are on
the river, and saw mills briskly at
work, giving employment to a large
number. The triangular space, between the rivers opposite Kamloops,
is an Indian reservation, overlooked
by the stately Mount St. Paul. The
principal industries around Kamloops
are cattle and horse raising and
fruit growing by irrigation. The
latter industry is progressing very
rapidly as this district is well adapted
for all kinds of fruit culture. This is
the supply point for a large ranching
and mineral region southward and
for the valley of the North Thompson, especially in the Nicola valleys.
The mines being operated in the
immediate vicinity of the town are
largely similar to those of Trail
Creek, principally gold and copper.
The town operates its own electric
light and water plants.
Tranquille
Cherry Creek—Just below Kamloops
the Thompson widens out into Kamloops Lake, a broad, beautiful hill-
girt sheet of water, along the south
shore of which the railway runs
some twenty miles. Half-way a
series of mountain spurs project into
the lake, and are pierced by numerous tunnels, one following the other
in close succession. At Savona the
lake ends, the mountains draw near,
and the series of
Savona Thompson River
Walhachin canyons is en
tered, leading
westward to the Fraser through marvellous scenery. Quicksilver mines
of great value are being operated in
this locality. From here to Port
Moody, the nearest point on Pacific
tide water, the railway was built by
the Dominion Government and transferred to the Company in 1886. At
Walhachin there is the only commercial orchard
Ashcroft
Alt. 1,004 ft.
Spatsum
of some ten
visible from the
main line,
through which a
monorail system
miles is to be built.
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l j Toronto
Limited! Express
Leave
*a
Kam
3.55
Leave
MUes
from
Vanc'r
me
loops
/19.02
/18.45     236
243
/18.17
/18.00
17.23
/16.50
226
219
204
190
Flag Stations. White's Creek Bridge, Fraser Canyon
~-T«n»o
UM"IH~
># ;-: 2720
2727
2733
2737
Cari
dist
T
Bl
Can
14.53
/15.09
/15.25
/15.37
Grot
for
ofr
boo
rcti
he
ack
yon
24.20
esque
ms
ocks
Ashcroft (pop. 600), has developed
into a busy town, being the point of
departure for Cariboo and Omineca
goldfields in the northern interior of
British Columbia. Trains of freight
wagons drawn by long strings of
pack mules, laden with merchandise,
depart from and arrive here almost
daily. There are extensive cattle
ranches in the vicinity, and considerable farming is done. Three miles
beyond Ashcroft the hills press close
upon the Thompson River, which
cuts its way through a winding gorge
of almost terrifying gloom and desolation, fitly named the Black Canyon.
Spence's Bridge
Drynoch
Alt. 760 ft.
Thompson
Gladwin
At Spence's
{Bridge the old
wagon road up
this valley to
the Cariboo gold
country crosses
the river; and the railway is here
thrown over the mouth of the Nicola
River, whose valley to the south is
an important grazing and ranching
region into which a subdivision of
the Canadian Pacific Railway has
been built to the village of Nicola.
Below this point the scenery becomes
very striking and peculiar. The
train runs upon a sinuous ledge cut
out of the bare hills on the irregular
south side of the stream, where the
headlands are penetrated by tunnels,
and the ravines spanned by lofty
bridges; and the Thompson, in the
purity of a trout brook, whirls down
its winding torrent path as green as
an emerald. Sometimes the banks
are rounded cream - white slopes;
next, cliffs of richest yellow, streaked
and dashed with maroon, jut out;
then masses of solid rust-red earth,
suddenly followed by an olive-green
grass slope, or some white exposure.
With this fantastic colouration to
which the brilliant emerald river
opposes a striking contrast, and over
which bends a sky of deepest violet,
there is the additional interest of
great height and breadth of prospect,
and a constantly changing grotesque-
ness of form caused by the wearing
down of rocks of unequal hardness,
by water, and wind, into towers,
monuments, goblins, and griffins.
The strange forms and gaudy hues
of the rocks and scantily herbaged
terraces impress themselves most
strongly on the memory. Five miles
beyond Drynoch,   Nicomen,  a little
/ Flag Stations.
Ash
and
Cari
tra
2.52
16.21
/16.02
/15.47
/15.37
Fant
can
seen
Ascen
th
Thom
Riv
croft
the
bon
de
astic
yon
ery
ding
e
pson
er
178
172
166
161
S«l
B.I TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
mining town, is seen, and on the
opposite bank of the river gold was
first discovered in British Columbia
in 1857. The mountains now draw
together again, and the railway winds
along their face hundreds of feet
above the struggling river. This is
the Thompson Canyon. The gorge
rapidly narrows and deepens, and
the scenery becomes wild beyond
description. The frowning cliffs opposite are mottled and streaked in
many striking colours, and now and
then, through breaks in the high
escarpment, snowy peaks are seen
glistening   above  the   clouds.    At
Lytton, a small
Lytton
Alt. 695 ft.
Keefers
trading town, the
canyon suddenly widens to admit the Fraser,
the chief river of the province, which
comes down from the north between
two great lines of mountain peaks,
and whose turbid flood soon absorbs
the bright green waters of the Thompson. The railway now enters the
canyon of the united rivers, and the
scene becomes even wilder than
before. Six miles below Lytton the
train crosses the Fraser by a steel
cantilever bridge, high above the
water, plunges into a tunnel and
shortly emerges at Cisco. The line
now follows the right-hand side of
the canyon, with the river surging
and swirling far below. The old
Government road, built in the early
'60's, and abandoned since the opening of the railway, attracts attention
all along the Fraser and Thompson
valleys. Usually twisting and turn-,
ing about the cliffs, it sometimes
ventures down to the river's side,
whence it is quickly driven by an
angry turn of the waters. Six miles
below Kanaka, where it follows the
cliffs opposite to the railway, it is
forced to the height of a thousand
feet above the river, and is pinned
by seemingly slender sticks to the
face of a gigantic precipice. The
canyon alternately widens and narrows. Indians are at times seen on
projecting rocks down at the water's
edge, spearing salmon or scooping
them out with dip-nets, and in sunny
spots the salmon are drying on poles.
Chinamen are noticed on the occasional sand or gravel bars washing for gold; and irregular Indian
farms or villages alternate with the
groups of huts of the Chinese.
Imper'l
Limited
Eastb'nd Trains
Toronto
Express
Leave
2.00
15.23
/"14.43
Upper
and cr
of the
Salmo
gold
Leave
Valley
ossing
Fraser
n and
Jdust
Miles
from
Vanc'r
156
140
/ Flag Station.
-a a.   .-..-j; Old Cariboo Bridge, Spuzzum
ii  TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
Miles
from
Montr'l
2769
2785
2796
2809
Westb'nd Trains
i Vanc'r
Express
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
a 17.00
717.10
/17.46
The
Can
18.15
/18.45
End
can
Sil
Leave
a 2.30
7 2.40
Great
yon
of the
yons
ver
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
I! North Bend
Alt. 495 ft.
Spuzzum
&£orth ^end (a
divisional point)
is a desirable
and   delightful
stopping place for tourists who wish
to see more of the Fraser Canyon
than is possible from the trains. At
Boston Bar, a few miles below,
where mining operations are Carried
on, the principal canyon of the
Fraser commences, and from here
to Yale, 23 miles, the scenery is
not only intensely interesting, but
startling. It has been well described
as "matchless." The great river
is forced between vertical walls
of black rocks, where, repeatedly
thrown back upon itself by opposing
cliffs, or broken by ponderous masses
of fallen rock, it madly foams and
roars. Ten miles below North Bend
is Hell Gate, near which a projecting
narrow rock is called Lady Duffer-
in's Walk. The railway is cut into
the cliffs 200 feet or more above, and
the jutting spurs of rock are pierced
by tunnels in close succession. Near
Spuzzum the Government road, as if
seeking company in this awful place,
crosses the chasm by a suspension
bridge to the side of the railway, and
keeps with it, above or below, to Yale.
Ten miles below Spuzzum the enormous cliffs apparently shut together
and seem to bar the way. The river
makes an abrupt turn to the left, and
the railway, turning to the right, disappears into a long tunnel, emerging into daylight and rejoining the
river at Yale.
Yale—Alt. 223 ft.
Hope— Alt. 216 ft.
Yale is at the
head of navigation and was formerly an outfitting point for miners
and ranchmen northward. It occupies a bench above the river in a
deep cul de sac in the mountains,
which rise abruptly and to a great
height on all sides. Across the river
from Hope is the village of the same
name—a mining town and trading
post, whence trails lead over the
mountains in different directions.
South-westward may be seen Hope
Peaks, where great bodies of silver
ore are exposed, and only await
suitable fuel to be worked profitably.
Below Hope is the bottomless Devil's
Lake. The canyon widens out and
is soon succeeded by a broad, level
valley with rich soil and heavy timber. The rude Indian farms give
place to broad, well-cultivated fields,
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l
Limited
Toronto
Express
Leave
/ 24.50
\a 24.40
Leave
714.15
la 14.05
Entra
theF
Can
Cari
wagon
Ho
and
Appro
theC
Moun
Agric
nee to
raser
yon
Miles
from
Vanc'r
129
114
boo
road
12.54
/12.24
pe
Yale
aching
ascade
tains
ulture
102
89
I Refreshment Station.
/ Flag Stations. 74
TRANSCONTINENTAL  RAIL  ROUTE
Miles
from
Montr'l
2817
2828
Westb'nd Trains
Vancr
Express
Leave
2837
2846
2856
2865
2872
2874
/19.05
19.30
Harr
Spri
19.52
/20.12
Mount
20.38
8 20.57
S 21.13
8 21.20
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
5.01
ison
ngs
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Baker
6.08
8 6.44
8 6.49
which become more and more frequent, and vegetation of all kinds
rapidly increases in luxuriance as
the Pacific is approached.
Ruby Creek
Agassi z
Harrison Mills
Nicomen
liuby Creek is
named from the
garnets found in
the vicinity. At
Agassiz, overlooked by Mount Cheam,
is a Government experimental farm
where fruit and grain are grown in
great variety. Agassiz is the station for Harrison Springs (hot
sulphur), on Harrison Lake, five
miles north. These springs are
famed for their curative properties,
and are visited by invalids from
everywhere on the Pacific Coast.
The Ste. Alice Hotel affords accommodation, and the country about is
most interesting.   At Harrison JXCills
the Harrison
River is crossed
just above its
confluence with
the Fraser, where steamer is taken
for the Chilliwack District. The
steamer " Vedder " operates between
Harrison Mills Station and Chilliwack Wharf. Chilliwack Valley is
situated on the south side of the
Fraser River opposite to Harrison
Mills Station, and comprises over
55,000 acres of rich agricultural land
and is famed for dairying, mixed
farming, and fruit growing. Two of
the finest equipped creameries in the
Dominion are operating at Chilliwack, producing over one-half million pounds of butter annually, also
the largest fruit canning company in
the country is now in operation there.
The city of Chilliwack has a population of 2,000 inhabitants, and has the
advantages of city water, telephones,
and electric light. Until the opening
of the Fraser River route, in 1864,
the only access to the northern interior of the province was by way of
the Harrison Valley. A few miles
beyond Nicomen, Mount Baker comes
into view on the left, fifty miles away
—in the state of Washington—a
beautiful isolated cone, rising 14,000
feet above the railway level.
Mission June.
Whonnock
Haney
Hammond
From Mission
June, a subdivision crosses the
Fraser River and
runs to the international   bound-
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l
Limited
Leave
Toronto
Express
Leave
22.22
/22.01
Mount
21.19
8 20.42
820.35
11.44
11.25
Miles
from
Vanc'r
81
70
61
53
Bak
er
10.44
/10.21
/10.06
10.00
42
33
27
25
/ Flag Stations.
8 Stop to let off or pick up passengers from or to points east of Agassiz.   2881
2890
2886
2889
2894
Conne
for
Pacific
Po
Big
Leave
ction
U.S.
Coast
inU
Trees
a21.41
a22.14
9 21.53
* 22.00
822.15
Al
Burrar
a 7.10
a 7.43
«7'27
8 7.33
ong
d Inlet
ary where rail connection is made
with the Northern Pacific Railway
for Seattle, Tacoma, Portland, and all
Oregon and California points. This
line gives through connection for all
the prominent points on Puget Sound,
and for Portland and San Francisco.
(See Condensed Time Tables.) Eight
miles beyond, at the crossing of the
Stave River, the finest view of Mount
Baker is had, looking back and up
the Fraser, which has now become a
smooth and mighty river. The celebrated Pitt Meadows are traversed,
and a couple of miles before reaching
Westminster Junction the Pitt River
is crossed. Immense trees are now
frequent, and their size is indicated
by the enormous stumps near the
railway.
Westminster June.
(Westminster)
Pop. 13,000
A subdivision
diverges here
to the important city of
Westminster on the Fraser River, nine
miles distant. The town is the headquarters of the salmon canning industry, which is represented by a
dozen or more extensive establishments. It has also large saw-mills
(the product of which is shipped
largely to China, South America,
Africa, Europe, and Australia), and
the Provincial Asylum and Penitentiary are located here. Steamers
ply regularly to Victoria.
Port Moody
Barnett
Hastings
Port ^HCoody, at
the head of. Burrard Inlet, was
for a time the
terminus of the
railway. From here to Vancouver
the railway follows the south shore
of the inlet, and the outlook is most
delightful. Snow-tipped mountains,
beautiful in form and colour, rise
opposite, and are vividly reflected in
the mirror-like waters of the deep-set
inlet. At intervals along the heavily
wooded shores are mills with villages
around them, and with ocean steamships and sailing craft loading with
sawn timber for all parts of the
world; on the other hand, and towering high above, are gigantic trees,
twenty, thirty and even forty feet
around. Passing Hastings, formerly
a watering-place, the young city of
Vancouver soon appears.
Conne
from
Pacific
Po
720.15
719.40
Salrao
lum
indu
S-20.03
* 19.56
Pac
Ti
Vane
to La
ction
U.S.
Coast
ints
Lj
9.42
9.10
n and
bar
stries
17
9.32
9.26
f 9A2
13
9
4
ific
me
ouver
ggan
t Stop to let off or pick up passengers from or to points east oftAgassiz. 76
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL ROUTE
; Miles
' from
(Montr'l
2898
Westb'nd Trains
Vanc'r
Express
Arrive
a 22.25
[10.25
p.m.]
C.
Steam
723.00
[n.oo
p.m.]
<D
Imper'l
Limited
Arrive
a 8.00
a.m.
9
P.R.
ships
/10.00
a.m.
O
>%
Comm
advan
Re
P. v«
a> o _,
o **- vi
<d rt o
Jz? in
vi 3
o
>
a)
ercial
tages
eso urces
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NQTES
Vancouver—Pop. 115,000. The Pacific
terminus of the railway. The nearest ocean port to the great wheat
lands. Until May, 1886, its site was
covered with a dense forest. From
May to July its growth was most
rapid, but in July a fire, spreading
from the surrounding forest, swept
away every house but one in the
place, and, with this one exception,
every building now seen has been
erected since that time. The situation is most perfect as regards
picturesqueness, natural drainage,
harbour facilities, and commercial
advantages. It has already extensive
wharves and warehouses ; many
hotels, the Vancouver, operated by
the Canadian Pacific Railway, being
a splendid and handsomely appointed
structure; churches, schools, etc., all
of the most modern character. It
has many buildings of brick and
granite, and some of its private residences would do credit to cities of a
century's growth. It has many
miles of asphalt streets, and cement
sidewalks, has an electric street railway, and is lighted both by gas and
by electricity. Its sewage system is
second to none, while an ample supply
of pure water is provided by means
of pipes laid under the Inlet from a
mountain stream opposite. There is
a regular steamship service to Victoria, Nanaimo, and San Francisco
to China and Japan, to Sydney, Australia, via Honolulu, H.I., Suva, Fiji,
and Brisbane, Qd., and Puget Sound,
and Alaskan ports, it being one of
the principal points of departure on
the coast for the Yukon, Cape Nome
and other northern goldfields, and
an outfitting headquarters, for miners
and prospectors. The Canadian Pacific Railway White Empress Line,
whose steamships are the finest
twin-screw vessels on the Pacific,
takes the shortest, safest, and most
pleasant route to the Orient.
The country south, towards the
Fraser, has fine farms, and is adapted
to fruit growing. The railway running from Vancouver to Steveston
intersects this district and gives access to the salmon canneries at the
mouth of the Fraser River. The
coal supply comes from Nanaimo,
directly across the Strait of Georgia,
and almost within sight. The scenery
all about is magnificent—the Cascade
Mountains near at hand at the north:
Eastb'nd Trains
Imper'l
Limited
Toronto
Express
Leave
719.30
[7-30
p.m.]
C.
Steam
a 18.45
[6.45
p.m.]
vi
o
Leave
7 9.00
a.m.
P.R.
ships
a 8.30
a.m.
Comm
advan
Cross
Gulf
Geo
o
Q>
a
>..
<D
>
*—*
O
o
c
vi
>
t
CD
vi
CD
in
vi
a
MUes
from
Vanc'r
ercial
tages
ing the
of
rgia
0
I Refreshment Station.
© Additional steamship leaves Vancouver 13.00 (1.00 p.m.) daily, arrives Victoria 18*0 (6.00 p.m.). —rr"Tnmiynn?i«l
JIn Stanley Park, Vancouver
Parliament Buildings, Victoria  TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL  ROUTE
Miles
from
Montr'l
From
Vancouver
to
Yokohama,
4.283;
to
Hong
Kong,
6,371;
to San
Francisco,
1.133
miles.
2977
Victoria
is 3,363
miles,
via
C.P.R.
from
New
York or
Boston,
and
5,700
from
Liverpool via
Montreal
Steamship
Steamship
Arrive
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Trans
steam
Scene
sp
Beau
surrou
CP.R.
S.S.
leaves
Vancouver
for
Victoria
13.00
[1.001
p.m.]
daily
Pacific
ships
[2.30
p.m.]
a 14.30
717.00
[5.00
p.m.]
ry and
ort
tiful
ndings
the mountains of Vancouver Island
across the water at the west; the
Olympics at the south-west; and
Mount Baker looming up at the southeast. Stanley Park is a magnificent
public pleasure resort. Opportunities
for sport are unlimited at no great
distance—mountain goats, bear and
deer in the hills along the Inlet;
trout-fishing in endless variety; and
Capilano Canyon, a few miles across
the Narrows, affords a pleasant outing. A stay of a week at Vancouver
will be well rewarded. A splendid
Canadian Pacific Railway steamship
connects with Victoria daily, a ferriage of about four hours through a
beautiful archipelago. The I Princess" Steamships are the fleetest
boats on the Pacific Coast Service.
Steamships for Yokohama, Kobe,
Nagasaki, Shanghai, and Hong Kong
depart every two or three weeks in
summer and every four weeks in
winter, and for Honolulu, H.I., Suva,
Fiji, and Sydney, Australia, via Brisbane, Qd., every month. At Hong
Kong passengers make connection
with steamers of the Peninsular and
Oriental S.N. Co., North German
Lloyd and Messageries Maritimes
Lines, for Colombo and other points
on the Around the World route, with
steamers of the China Navigation
Co., the Eastern and Australian Navigation Co., and the Nippon Yusen
Kaisha, which ply between Hong
Kong and Australia.
Victoria —Pop. 40,000. Capital of British
Columbia, charmingly situated at the
southern extremity of Vancouver
Island, overlooking the Straits of
Fuca to the Pacific, and beyond the
Gulf of Georgia, the mainland. Across
the strait are the beautiful Olympic
Mountains, and far away to the east
the white cone of Mount Baker is conspicuous. The climate is similar to
that of the South of England. Besides
the magnificent Government buildings which rank amongst the most
handsome in America, the city has
many fine public and private structures, and the Canadian Pacific Railway Co. have erected a palatial
Empress Hotel. Beacon Hill Park
affords a fine view of the waters and
the mountains on every side. The
city has an extensive trade, and
many large commercial houses,
which do a very large outfitting trade
Steamships leave Vancouver 10.00 o'clock (10.00 a.m.) dally except Tuesday, arrive Victoria 14.30 (2.30 p.m.)
Leave Victoria 17.00 (5.00 p.m.) daily, arrive Seattle 22.00 (10.00 p.m.) daily.   On Sunday 10.00 a.m. direct
for Seattle, arriving 20.00 o'clock (8.00 p.m.)
9. c
72      o
®,5, .2
CD  G  G
HtOt/)
714.15
[2.15
p.m.]
a 13.15
[1.15
p.m.]
Steam
theCa
Pacific
way Co
British
biaC
Service
Victor
Vane
da 78
TRANSCONTINENTAL  RAIL ROUTE
Miles
from
Montr'l
Steamship
Steamship
Arrive
Arrive
Steam
ship
conne
ctions
T3
•"N
CO
|
rt  g
o.
rt A
o
*£Q
o
oo
*■* _—
.—*
o oo
._.
.ri ^S
V
mu
o <i>
+. o
O ~
rt o
•    •♦-•
S3 d
*-«.P
OJ  <D
*T2   O
ecJ v
oo
^.O
3   »*H
O Q
8   -H»
C OJ
C  <D
O *i
vi *-■
>^3
o
TO
vi
t3 in
CD
in ©
s> >
>»
3 T
h £
m
r-   rt
Q
G
o
3064
a 8.00
c22.00
a.m.
[10.00
p.m.]
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
for the Yukon. The Chinese quarter
is always interesting to visitors. The
Esquimault & Nanaimo Railway extends north-easterly 78 miles to the
great coal mines at Nanaimo, and on
to Wellington, passing through a
fruit-growing and farming as well
as very pretty country in which are
several pleasant summer resorts
near which good shooting and fishing are obtainable. Many people
who have achieved independence
have taken up residence in this section during the past few years.
Steamboats afford connections with
Vancouver and British Columbia
mainland, and with Puget Sound
ports, and steamships depart about
every five days for San Francisco,
connecting there for Southern California, Mexico, and South American
west-coast ports. Steamers from and
.' to Vancouver for Japan, the Hawaiian
and Fijian Islands and Australia
stop at Victoria, many tourists taking
the steamer at this port, and there
are regular sailings for Alaskan
points both for tourists visiting the
wonderful fiords of the north coast,
and those intending to explore the
great gold belt of the Yukon. Esquimalt Harbour, two miles from
Victoria, was formerly the British
naval station and rendezvous on the
North Pacific, with naval storehouses,
workshops, graving docks, etc.
Seattle-Pop. 300,000. Reached by the
splendid Princess steamships of the
Canadian Pacific Railway. A beautiful and progressive city which is
attracting many visitors to this
charming commercial metropolis of
the Pacific Coast.
Steam
Steam
ship
ship
Leave
Leave
£
•—«
vi
T3    .
in £
> vi
CD 2
« CO
>-. 00
CO   .
Vancouv
ancouver
o>
*m*
. w
gl
</)•£
» *■*
o rt
m
>-,
Q
>>
vi
Q
7 9.00
'23.30
a.m.
[11.30
p.m.]
Miles
from
Vanc'r
167
Local Steamship Service on the Pacific Coast.
Steamships leave Seattle 9.00 (9.00 a.m.) daily, arrive Victoria 13.15 (1.15 p.m.) daily. Leave
Victoria 14.15 (2.15 p.m.) daily except Sunday, arrive Vancouver 18.45 (6.45 p.m.) daily except Sunday.
On Sunday a steamship leaves Seattle 9.00 a.m. direct for Vancouver, arriving 18.00 (6.00 p.m.).
An extensive steamship coast service is provided in connection with the Canadian Pacific Railway. From Vancouver steamers ply dally to Victoria; to Nanaimo daily. Also at regular intervals
to Northern British Columbia ports, west coast of Vancouver Island, and to Skagway, Alaska, where
connection Is made with the White Pass and Yukon Route during the summer season for Dawson,
Atlin, and other Yukon points.
From Victoria, steamers depart daily for Puget Sound ports and every Wednesday for San
Francisco.. Steamers from both Vancouver and Victoria to Puget Sound make connection at Seattle
witb trains for Portland, Ore., San Francisco and Southern California. **•$%.
Empress Hotel,
Victoria
CP.R. Steamer "Princess Charlotte" (Vancouver-Victoria-Seattle)
Fruit Ranching on Vancouver Island
ml  Northbound
Miles
» from
St. Paul
0
10
130
147
167
180
196
202
211
224
245
259
North'n
Express
Leave
P.M.
5.00
5.40
a  9.10
7   9.20
9.48
/10.20
10.43
11.59
12.35
1.10
2.50
A.M.
STATIONS
St. Paul
Minneapolis
Glenwood
St.
Paul
to
Glenwood
vi
Q
perous
Towm
Alexandria
Parker's Prairie
Henning
Richville
Dent
Vergas
Detroit
Ogema
Mahnomen
Thief River
The lakey way in the
firmament of Minnesota
lakes much resembles
in outline a gigantic
fish-hook, with the eye
at the Twin Cities, the
shaft running north-,
west as though i» ages
past some titanic bass
had struggled with it.
This belt is not comparatively wide through
the first hundred miles
of its length out from
the Twin Cities, but
broadens as it turns
northward, through a territory which is at once the
beauty spot and the black bass preserve of the great
Northwest. West of this region the country smooths
down and sobers off into the famous prairies of the
Red River Valley, every foot of which is capable of
furnishing its quota of wheat, corn, and other cultivated crops. East the land varies from prairie to
pinery, but the Park Region itself is a territory with
slightly rolling surface, where wood rimmed lakes
are divided by wooded prairies, and where prosperous farming has not harmed but heightened the
charm of the scenery. At Qlenwood the Winnipeg
line leaves the main line and strikes north towards
the Canadian Boundary.
Jllexandria, the first important town reached, has
seen years enough to remove from it many of the
necessary marks of early rawness. In the city are
well-made streets shaded with symmetrical trees,
lawns well kept, and a type of residences that tells
of prosperous content after strenuous years. It is
completely surrounded by lakes. Lakes Victoria
and Geneva lie about a mile east of the town and
extend five miles north and south. Between these
is Geneva Beach, where are situated, among other
summer hostelries, the Geneva Beach Hotel and its
colony of pretty cottages.
Summer
Resorts
Flag Station. 80      THROUGH  LINE ST.  PAUL &  MINNEAPOLIS TO WINNIPEG
Northbound
Miles
from
St. Paul
North'n
Express
396
406
462
Leave
Alexandria
to
Emerson
vi
P
<3<o
O r»
2 > <»
■S**g
CD H
!>   CD   CO
CQ c
5 u
S 53
fe °
A.M.
a 5.15
7 5.30
5.47
c7.30
Emerson to
Winnipeg
STATIONS—Descriptive Notes
From Alexandria northward to the White Earth
Reservation the scenery in its nature varies but
little, being a succession of well-tilled farms, of
beautiful groves of magnificent timber, and of picturesque sheets of sparkling spring water. The
country is rich enough to support many busy business centres. 'Parker's 'Prairie is a rapidly growing
town. Ottertail is located on the shores of Great
Ottertail Lake, and already has a population of
several hundred. I^ichville and Dent are all located
advantageously in splendid farming territory, and
are towns of great promise. 'Detroit (pop. 3,000) is
an old-established town for this section of the country. It is finely located in the midst of numerous
lakes, and having within a small radius a great
number of summer hotels and cottages. It is recognized as one of the coming cities of the State.
Northward from Detroit until the Canadian boundary
is reached, the country, although farmed to some
extent, is as yet almost virgin territory. For fishing
and hunting the country just described stands without a peer. The fish predominating is of course the
black bass, although pike, pickerel, crappies, and
perch are plentiful. Throughout the country north
of Detroit and through the Indian reservations, the
lakes, of which there are many, are virgin. Game
is plentiful, prairie chicken are found everywhere,
and duck of a dozen varieties flock to the immense
feeding grounds of wild rice and celery. Partridge
and quail are plentiful, and the goose shooting is
also good in the season.
■merson Sixty-five miles   from
Winnipeg the boundary
is crossed at £merson
(pop. 1,500), the most
southerly town of the
Province of Manitoba. Emerson has grown rapidly
during the past few years and promises to attain a
much more prominent position in the near future,
being now an important station on the new through
Canadian Pacific line between Winnipeg and the
South. 'Dominion City, the next stop, with a population of 400, is fifty-five miles from Winnipeg. The
route to Winnipeg is up the fertile valley of the Red
River of the North. On either side are seen great
stretches of prairie land that are now mostly under
the plough, and the thriving settlements found every
few miles give the country an air of great prosperity.
In olden days Fort Garry and the Red River Settlements were reached by following the current in
small boats, and later on shallow steamboats were
used for transportation purposes. The land along
the rivers was taken up long before the back country was opened, and consequently some of the farms
in this neighbourhood have been under cultivation
for several generations.
The best and most convenient connection between
Winnipeg and the Twin Cities, Minneapolis and
St. Paul, is afforded by the through Canadian
Pacific-Soo Line Route, by way of Glenwood and
Emerson.
Dominion City
Winnipeg
Southbound
South'n
Express
Leave
Fishing
and
Shooting
Game
P.M.
7  7.05
kz 19.50
19.30
7 18.00
Miles
from
W'nlp'g
Prairie
Land
65
55
0
BS SooTSpokane and the Kootenay
(Via Crowsnest Pass Route)      lip!
Dunmore and Kootenay Landing: 392 Miles
(Alberta Division)
Miles
Soo
West
from
Spo
bound
D'more
kane
Train
Leave
Leave
P.M.
A.M.
10.30
11.00
11.10
11.45
A.M.
P.M.
4.48
5.55
a 19.10
a 11.20
*
7 19.30
7 12.05
Daily
Daily
23.00
0
7   2.45
23.25
10
18
/24.05
25
/24.25
33
/24.42
41
1.05
48
/ 1.20
56
1.40
65
71
77
5.05
Z30
82
90
Mountain
Daily
Time
Moose
Jaw
to
Koote
nay
Landing
STATIONS—Descriptive Notes
St. Paul
Minneapolis
Hankinson
Moose Jaw
St.   Paul  and
^Minneapolis, the
Twin Cities of
t h e Wes tern
States, politically
two municipal
corporations, but
in substance one large community
of over half-a-million population, are
the social and commercial centres of
the Middle States. St. 'Paul is the
capital of the State of Minnesota, and
the terminus of nearly all the railway lines in the Western States.
From St. Paul to Moose Jaw.the train
rushes through the lakey way, and
a panoramic view of lakes, rivers,
forests, and farms, etc., is obtained,
which will not be easily effaced from
the traveller's memory. Qlenvaood,
Hankinson, and ZXCinot are flourishing towns passed en route. At JHCoose
Jaw the main line of the Canadian
Pacific is reached and followed to
'Dunmore.
Medicine Hat
Dunmore
Bull's Head
Seven Persons
Wbitla
Winnifred
Bow Island
Burdett i llfp
Grassy Lake
Purple Springs
Fincastle
Taber ;      wm
Barnwell
Chin M
From 'Dunmore
(alt. 2,308 feet),
the Crowsnest
Pass Branch
runs nearly due
west (south of the
main line of the
Canadian Pacific
Railway) to the
mining regions
of the Kootenay,
providing the
shortest route to
the great ranching -districts   of
P.M.
1.55
1.15
A.M.
7.05
13.45
a 13.10
Southern Alberta
and the gold and silver-lead mines
of Southern British Columbia. The
completion of this road is notable
from an engineering standpoint for
the celerity of construction and the
skill shown in overcoming serious
obstacles.
a  4.05
a  3.50
/ 3.17
/ 3.02
2.28
/ 2.12
2.00
1.25
P.M.
5.20
4.40
A.M.
10.45
17.30
17.05
a  9.30
/ Flag Stations. 82
CROWSNEST PASS  ROUTE
Miles
from
D'more
99
109
Soo
Spokane
Leave
6.10
116
124
Westbound
Train
Leave
/ 3.15
3.50
Collieries
4.10
4.25
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Coaldale
Lethbridge
Alt. 2,982 ft.
The route for
the first hundred miles runs
through an al-.
most dead level
prairie, broken in places by deep
coullees. The first point of any
importance touched is Lethbridge,
where coal-mining is extensively
carried on by the Alberta Railway
and Irrigation Company, which also
operates a railway to the international
boundary, where it connects with
another road to Great Falls, Montana.
The output of the Lethbridge collieries
I is very large, a market being found
in the locality, in British Columbia,
in the adjoining State of Montana,
and as far east in Canada as Winnipeg. The town has a population of
10,000, owns the electric light and
power plant, waterworks, etc. The
district of which it is the centre was
formerly one vast cattle range, but
now is known as the home of the
celebrated Alberta red wheat.
West of Lethbridge there has been
completed by the Canadian Pacific
Railway one of the most gigantic
engineering works in Canada, the
bridging of the Belly River and the
Old Man River, replacing twenty
wooden bridges by two immense steel
viaducts, one 5,327.6 feet in length
with a maximum height of 314 feet
above the river and the other 1,900
feet in length with a height of 146
feet above the bed of the river. The
cost of this work exceeded two million
dollars. The former is one of the
notable steel structures of the world.
It required 645 cars to transport the
steel used in the construction of the
viaducts, and nearly two thousand
cars of material were used in the
building of these mammoth permanent structures.
This and other important improvements prove the policy of this Company is to spare no expense to make
its line the best in the world.
Kipp—Is an old Indian trading place at
the confluence of the Belly and
St. Mary Rivers, and the scene of
many a conflict between the early
white traders and the Indians.
Monarcli—Is another old trading post.
From it on a clear day a view is obtained of the Rockies, the square-
topped giant to the left, almost fifty
miles away, being the " Chief," which
East-
bound
Train
Leave
'24.47
24.30
Irrigation
24.00
23.45
Soo
Spokane
Leave
Miles
from
K'tenay
Land'g
6.20
294
284
276
268
Flag Station 1. C.P.R. Freight Train Crossing the Prairies
2. New Bridge at Lethbridge
3. A Cattle Round-Up
: -3d  Miles
from
D.'more
Soo
Spokane
Leave
132
140
Ranching
Pearce
jjMacleod
Pop. 1,500.
Alt. 3,128 ft.
150
156
161
170
/6.08
6.25
On the Old Man
River is one of
the most typical
of western ranching towns where
the Horse is still
King. It Is the headquarters of the
ranching district of Southern Alberta.
The country around is most favourable for stock-raising, there being
plenty of feed and water, with excellent climatic conditions. The mean
temperature here is higher than that
of Central Ontario, a fact which is
largely to be attributed to the moderating influence of the "Chinook"
winds which are wafted from the
Pacific Ocean. 3fcacleod is a divisional point of the Crowsnest Division
of the Canadian Pacific Railway,
and the southern terminus of the
Edmonton, Calgary and Macleod
Subdivisions by which Calgary (108
miles) and Edmonton (300 miles)
and the towns and settlements of
Northern Alberta can be reached.
Peigan
Chokio
Brocket
Pincher
Alt. 3,793 ft.
Sporting
opportunities
Following up the
Old Man River
the railway passes to the south of
the Porcupine
Hills, between
which and the
Livingstone Range of the Rockies
there is an ideal ranching country,
evidenced by the thousands of sleek
cattle seen feeding on the nutritious
grass which everywhere covers the
prairie. Westward from Macleod the
Rocky Mountains are almost continuously in view, rising sharp and
clear out of the western horizon,
while the intervening country is a
panorama of undulating plain—Victoria Peak to the south standing out
in bold prominence, and beyond it
Castle Mountain, one of the grandest
in the entire range. As the mountains are approached the earth's surface becomes seamed with the numerous streams, small and large, which
flow towards the Saskatchewan from
their source amidst the eternal snows
of the Rockies. In all the streams
trout of various kinds abound, from
the small, speckle species to the
20-lb. bull trout. Waterfowl, prairie
chicken and the various other kind
of grouse are plentiful, while further
on in the mountains the more ven-
22.20
22.05
Ranching
Refreshment Station.
/ Flag Stations. 13.
CROWSNEST PASS ROUTE
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
turesome sportsmen can gratify their
ambition amongst the grizzly and
; black bear, elk, mountain sheep, and
mountain goat. About six miles after
leaving   Macleod,   a   row of   large
\ boulders placed in a direct line mark
the existence of a glacial age, these
having been evidently brought here
- by some prehistoric icefield. Four
miles east of Pincher (pop. 1,200), Pincher Creek is crossed on a bridge 800
Jp:- feet long. In a valley to the right is
the Indian Industrial School, where
a large number of aboriginal youths
are being educated and instructed in
the various trades of the white man.
The thriving town of Pincher Creek
lies to the south of the railway.
Cowley—Is situated at the crossing of
the south branch of the Old Man
River, which is crossed on a splendidly constructed bridge. To the
right lies Massacre Butte, where a
number of years ago a party of
German prospectors were butchered
by Indians* only one young girl being
saved from torture*
Lundbreck
Hillcrest—At the crossing of the Middle
Fork, a glimpse is caught of a pretty
little fall, where the waters of the
■; river tumble and foam over a crescent-shaped; precipice on their way
"•' to Join the Old Man River. From
here to Crowsnest Lake, the railway
follows the valley of the Middle Fork,
which narrows into deep canyons
and again broadens. Coal underlies
a large portion of this region, and is
seen cropping out in many places, at
some of Which mining operations are
being carried on. The mountains
seem to have suddenly grown nearer
and rise abruptly In great masses on
either side, forming an apparently
impassable barrier. "The Gap,"
however, provides an entrance, and
the train swings into this narrow
defile between almost vertical walls,
• that on the south being the base of
the Turtle Mountain, whose flat,
turtle-like proportions can be seen
silhouetted against the sky for many
miles easterly. Frank Is the name
of a new coal-mining town which
has grown rapidly. Passing the cold
sulphur springs, which are visited by
many for the curative properties of
the waters, Blair-
Frank f||| more is reached.
Blairmore Looking   to   the
Coleman north - west,   the
SerVtihel: first   view  of
Crowsnest Moun-
East-
bound
Train
Leave
21.50
21.40
21.16
Coal
Mining
Soo
Spokane
Leave
21.10      3.17
20.58
20.501/2.58
Miles
from
K'tenay
Land'g
215
211
199
197
195
192
188
/ Flag Station. I
1. St. Eugene Mine, Moyie
2. Coal Mines, Lethbridge
3. Gold Washing
a
t  s
in  CROWSNEST PASS ROUTE
85
Miles
.„ from
t)'more
Soo
Spokane
Arrive
210
Westbound
Train
Arrive
Fish
Daily
a 10.25
7 10.35
a 8.45
I  9.00
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
tain is seen, a circular monolith with
its base deeply tinted in purple and
green and; crowned and capped in a
shimmering, dazzling mass of snow
and ice. It dominates the entire
region, and seemingly at its base are
seven distinct pillars as if guarding
the mother mountain. Ten miles
westward Is the Crowsnest Lake (alt.
4,390 ft.), a beautiful sheet of water,
alive with trout. While it is frequently calm on this lake, it is often
described as the birthplace of the
wind which blows across the prairies.
About half way up this lake is the
source of the Old Man River, which
flows out of a hole in the side of
Sentinel Mountain into the lake.
This cave can be entered for some
distance, and the stream is supposed
to be fed through a subterranean
channel. The scenery along the lake
is continually shifting and changing,
always grand and always the reverse
of-monotonous. Leaving Crowsnest
Lake the line follows the shore of
Island Lake (alt. 4,409 ft.), which
might readily be taken for a huge
mirror, so clear are its waters, landlocked on every side. Immediately
to the west of the lake the Summit of
the Rockies is reached, the elevation
being 4,427 feet, and here the traveller crosses the dividing line between
Alberta and British Columbia, where
the mountain streams flow in both
directions, to find its way either into
the Saskatchewan and into Hudson
Bay or into the Kootenay and Columbia rivers and the Pacific.
Crowsnest
Alt. 4,410 ft.
of Michel Creek,
After passing
Summit Lake
the railway descends the valley
and   threads   its
way along the steep side hill of the
mountain, which towers far above to
the left, while to the right, hundreds
of feet below, the Michel is seen like
a thin silver thread, winding and
twisting in and out as it hurries
along to join the Elk River. Then
comes the "Loop," where the line
makes some amazing turns and
twists, until finally, after turning up
and crossing the south branch of the
Michel, it doubles back to within a
stone's throw of itself, and by looking
upwards one can clearly discern the
railway cutting, a long gash in the
mountain directly overhead. Three
miles are covered to make this distance of less than 200 feet.
East-
bound
Train
Leave
Crowsnest
Lake
Soo
Spokane
Leave
Miles
from
K'tenay
Land'g
Daily
■i 3|
7 20.25
ki 20.15
72.35
a 2.25
182
-m 86
CROWSNEST PASS ROUTE
Miles
from
D'more
215
217
223
224
228
238
246
248
254
264
Soo
Spokane
Leave
11.05
11.50
Westbound
Train
Leave
9.15
9.31
/9.34
10.04
10.20
10.42
11.02
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
Loop—As the train swings off to the
west again, huge, rugged mountains
appear on all sides, jagged and
naked, their frowning sides and lofty
peaks scarred and seamed, but they
are easily circled. Coal again appears cropping out beyond the Loop.
McGillivray
Michel
Natal m
Alt. 3,810 ft.   At
Michel, the junction of Michel
Creek   with   the
Elk   River,   the
line turns   southward   and   follows
the valley of the Elk River, which can
be seen from the car windows, tearing and foaming
Sparwood
Hosmer
along as though
joining in a mad,
merry race
against the train. Elk River is one
of the largest of the mountain rivers,
and in high water presents a formidable and grand appearance. The
Elk River is followed to Fernie.
Fernie—*s a thriving town built in the
heart of the mountains and surrounded by densely wooded flat-
topped hills and ridges. Distant
from the town some five miles, and
connected by a branch line, are the
celebrated Fernie coal-mines. The
Company have now about 700 coke
ovenS at Fernie, which is the centre
of the largest coal areas in America.
(Pop. 4,500.)
Cokato—The line here passes through
thickly timbered woods, fir, tamarac,
and cedar growing in large quantities.
Morrissey—ZXCorrissey Creek, a noisy
little rill crossed by a 50 ft. span
Howe truss bridge, is.a pretty mountain stream of clear, sparkling water.
Elko—Alt. 3,040 ft. Two and a half
miles east of <?7£o the line crosses
the Elk River, which continues on
its southward course to join the
Kootenay. About a mile below the
crossing is the Elk River Canyon
which extends several miles in which
the water drops 600 feet in seething,
foaming masses. The scenery is
wild and the environments are
grandly beautiful. Here the traveller gets a last glimpse of the projecting angles, lofty peaks, and
frowning precipices, which, rising
from their wood-encircled bases and
lifting their ice-crowned heads far
East-
bound
Train
Leave
Soo
Spokane
Leave
19.46
19.15
/19.07
18.30
18.10
/17.50
1.35
24.39
17.30
Miles
from
K'tenay
Land'g
177
175
170
168
164
j 54
146
144
138
128
/ Flag Stations.
Vi
_^
j Kootenay Lake
from Nelson
II
I
Sheep Mountain,
Elko
Looking up Slocan Lake, Roseberry
mes
wN
W
'-"■UkliJUUMJUl^waB  Miles
from
D'more
Soo
Spokane
Arrive
JafFray—Leaving Elko the line strikes
north-westward through a series of
gravel banks which terminate in an
open, grass-covered country.
299
309
a 13.55
7 14.05
/12,21
a 12.45
7 1^2.55
Agriculture
Wardner—Alt. 2,434 ft.     At  Wardner
the line crosses the Kootenay River,
which is here some 780 feet wide and
crossed by a magnificent Howe truss
bridge with a 170 ft. swing span to
allow of the passage of river steamers
plying on the Kootenay. The Kootenay flows south into Idaho, and returning pours its flood into Kootenay
Lake, in British Columbia, over 100
miles to the west. Leaving Wardner
the line continues in a north-westerly
direction following the west banks
of the Kootenay, running through
growths of magnificent large shade
trees and passing in and out through
natural parks, while away in the
distance, grimly overlooking all, is
Sand Creek Range, the "Steeples,"
Mount Fisher, and Saunders Peak.
Isidor Canyon, a deep cleft in the
earth, is skirted, and the grade
begins gradually to drop,
Fort Steele*—Fort Steele, the centre of
the Fort Steele Mining Division, and
a prosperous mining town, lies seven
miles  north of the railway, and
reached by stage from the station.
is
Cranbrook—AIL 2,964 ft. Pop. 4,000.
A railway divisional point, a typical
western railroad town, is charmingly
situated in a hill-girt valley, surrounded by a dense forest growth,
and overlooked by the white-tipped
peaks of Baker Mountain. Cran-
brook is the centre of trade for the
mining interests in this locality, as
well as for the rapidly growing
ranching industries. Fruit-raising
is also proving an additional asset to
this locality. Col. Baker has here a
ranch of several thousand acres, and
all kinds of farm products are raised.
In the lateral valleys, which frequently occur, are also fine agricultural lands, which are attracting
settlers. Cranbrook has, besides the
shops of the railway, a number of
well-stocked stores, chartered banks,
hotels, churches, schools, etc.   It is
/16.05
7 15.45
a 15.35
7 22.25
a 22.15
93
83
Flag Station
pi
f CROWSNEST RASS ROUTE
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
M; the principal lumber manufacturing
point in East Kootenay, having.numerous saw-mills operating within
its limits.. The place is lighted by
electricity, and as a residential town
it has no superior in British Columbia. A subdivision of railway connects the North Star, Kimberley, rand
. .   Marysville with Cranbrook.
Wattsburg .-*-$
Swansea—At Swansea the train com-
liajnences its winding course along the
|r|:. beautiful Moyie Lake.   This magnifi-
Igf cent sheet of water, ten miles long,
lies between mountain  ridges, and
occupying the whole valley, forces
the railway into the mountain side,
in one instance disappearing through
a tunnel 450 ft. in length.    On Moyie
Lake are situated .extensive galena
mines; large deposits of silver and
lead ore have been located, and are
now being worked to paying advantage.
Moyie (Alt. 2,997 ft)—Is prettily situated
at the southern extremity of Moyie
Lake, near which are the St. Eugene
isfs group of . mines. Trout and game
abound here; grouse and partridge,
as well as larger game, being found
in large, quantities. Winding down
the north bank of the Moyie River,
the   railway   penetrates   a  thickly
l§§|wooded,  heavily timbered country;;
giants in cedar, fir, tamarac, cotton-
wood, and larchtowering on all sides.
Aid ridge
Tochty
Ryan
Yahk
Looking across
the Moyie River
from    Tochty,   a
splendid view of
the Yahk Mountains is obtained.
At Yahk Station
the valley of the Moyie which continues on its southward course to join
the Kootenay River in the neighbouring State of Idaho is left, and by ascending the valley of Summit Creek
to Summit Meadow (alt. 2,860 ft.) the
summit of the Purcell Range Of the
Selkirks  is   reached.     Yahk is the
Junction point for  Kingsgate, Spokane,   and   Portland   via   the  new
International Route.
East'
bound
Train
Leave
Daily
/15.18
14.50
Fish
and
Game
/14.42
/14.24
14.10
13.55
Soo
Spokane'
Leave
/21.30
Miles
from
K'tenay
Land'g
75
74
63
20.53
61
53
48
43-
Kingsgate—The boundary town and
junction point with the Spokane International Railway, a link in the
new Scenic Route to Spokane; and
7 13.30 I 20.30
/ Flag Stations. Miles
from
D'more
Arrive
Pacific
a 20.00
Time
a 19.20
a 11.30
Spokane (Wash.)—a rising commercial centre (pop. 100,000). Has many
fine buildings, parks, pleasant driveways.
Portland—Continuing the journey the
through train arrives at Portland on
the Willamette River (pop. 250,000)
where direct rail connection is made
with all points on the Pacffic Coast.
Many large factories and fine public
buildings: and often called the | Rose
City," owing to the wonderful wealth
of roses to be seen everywhere. The
climate is unsurpassed and the death
rate averages some 9.5 per thousand.
364
/14.38
371
377
382
15.04
Daily
/15.21
15.38
/15.50
Ducks
and
Wild
Geese
GoatfelU(Alt. 2,857 ft.)—And now the
downward course towards the valley
of Kootenay Lake is commenced, the
railway following Kid Creek, on the
northern slope of the range, until
Kitchener Station is reached, where
the Goat River Valley is entered.
Kitchener—Several miles beyond and
about four miles east of Creston the
line crosses the canyon by a 150-ft.
span Howe truss bridge, 165 feet
above the river bed. The Goat
River compressed into a boiling
flume, goes tumbling and foaming
over the sharp, jagged rocks nearly
200 feet below. When the river is
in flood it is difficult to imagine a
grander or more magnificent spectacle. Near Kitchener are great
iron deposits which are being developed.
From Creston the
McNeiilie line follows the
Creston southern slope of
Wynndel Goat Mountain
until the flats of
the Kootenay River are reached.
These flats are a famous resort of
wild geese, wavies, and duck, and in
the spring and fall of the year it is
no uncommon sight to see flocks of
thousands of these game birds feeding in the marshy places of the flats.
Extensive reclamation works have
been constructed by a strong English
syndicate near Bedlington, on the
international   boundary,   the  object
/13.36
13.00
Ikht
f 12.35
12.20
/"12.00
Daily
28
21
16
11
/Flag Stations.
WSJB 90
CROWSNEST PASS ROUTE
Miles
from
D'more
Westbound
Train
389
Leave
16.05
392
16.15
Arrive
To
Nelson
Thrgh
West
Kootenay
and the
Boundary
District
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
being to reclaim these lands so remarkable for their fertility.
Sirdar—(Alt. 1,713 ft.) Following the
western slope of the Purcell Range
to Sirdar, a divisional point, and beautifully located on the waters of Duck
Lake, large flocks of geese and ducks
are again to be found. Three miles
further on is Kootenay Landing.
Kootenay Landing_where the navigable waters of Kootenay Lake are
reached and a beautiful vista of
mountain scenery is opened up.
Here the Kootenay River, which has
flowed south through East Kootenay
and Idaho, and turned north again
pours its waters into Kootenay Lake
—a magnificent sheet of water. At
the Landing the Company has constructed a slip for transferring to
barges the immense quantities of
freight which are from here distributed to the mines of the Slocan,
Nelson, Rossland and other points.
From Kootenay Landing the passenger takes steamer for Nelson and
after a most delightful sail of 52
miles, the young, thriving, energetic
city which, now boasting a population
of 7,500, bids fair to become the inland metropolis of southern British
Columbia, is reached.
From Nelson (alt. 1,671 ft.) there is
direct rail and water communication
with all the mining regions of West
Kootenay and the Boundary district.
The Boundary Subdivision of the
Canadian Pacific parallels the Kootenay River to its junction with the
Columbia River, which is bridged at
West Robson, continuing thence
through the Boundary country to
Cascade (alt. 1,468 ft.), Grand Forks
(alt. 1,583 ft.), Greenwood (alt. 2,298
ft.) and Midway (alt. 1,770 ft.). This
region is rich in mineral wealth, and
smelters at Grand Forks and Greenwood testify to its rapid development.
Another subdivision runs to Trail,
the smelter centre, and to Rossland.
Another Canadian Pacific Railway
line branches off at Slocan Junction
(13 miles from Nelson) to Slocan
City on Slocan Lake, where steamers
ply to New Denver and Rosebery,
where the Nakusp-Slocan Subdivision
is taken for Sandon, the centre of the
Slocan silver-lead mining district.
Kaslo and other points on Kootenay
Lake are also reached from Nelson
by Canadian Pacific rail and steamer.
From West Robson connection Is
made in summer with the main trans-
East-
bound
Train
Miles
from
K'tenay
Land'g
Leave
11.40
11.30
0
On
Lake
Kootenay
Mines
and
Smelters  ■ Variety
of
scenery
continental line of the Canadian
Pacific by steamers on the Arrow
Lake to Nakusp and Arrowhead,
whence there is rail communication
with'Revelstoke, the winter connection being via Slocan Junction and
Rosebery to Nakusp, thence to Arrowhead as in summer.
The steamers of the Canadian
Pacific Railway Company on these
inland waters are speedy, well-appointed, electric-lighted craft, and the
scenery is of that charming pictur-
esqueness characteristic of the mountains of British Columbia. A trip
steadily growing in favour is to cross
the continent by the main line, returning by these lakes and the
Crowsnest Pass—or vice versa—as it
enables the traveller to see a large
portion of the mountain country in
different latitudes.
Route
to
Revelstoke n
GREAT! LAKES ROUTE
(SUMMER MONTHS ONLY)
Montreal and Toronto: 338 Miles
. (Eastern and Ontario Divisions)
Toronto and Owen Sound: 122 Miles
(Ontario Division)
Owen Sound and Fort William: 555 Miles
(Great Lakes Steamships)
Miles
West
- East-
Miles
from
bound
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
bound
from
Montr'l
Train
Train
Vanc'r
Leave
Arrive
Daily
Daily
P.M.
From   the   Windsor
A.M.
0
/ 10.00
Montreal
Street Station the run
8.05
2917
2
§ 10.05
Westmount
to   Vaudreuil   is   that
§ 7.59
2915
5
10.10
Montreal June.
described on the trans-
7.54
2912
continental trip.    The
Q
road traverses a well-settled section which borders
Change
10
Boston
Q
S5
on Lake St. Louis, an expansion of the St. Lawrence
for
Quebec
34i
miles
<
River, of summer villages.   A mouth of the Ottawa
1/J 2
is crossed at Ste. Anne
10
tt
Dorval
de Bellevue, a place of
The
Ottawa
2907
12
to
<
Valois
historic interest, where
River
2905
15
W
Beaconsfield
Tom  Moore conceived
Bridge
2902
The
and wrote his "Cana
Ottawa
dian  Boat Song."   Passing across  Isle Perrot, a
Kjver
Bridge
second mouth of the Ottawa is crossed at Vaudreuil
—another historic spot
20
d 10.29
Ste. Annes                                (population 1,406), from
d 7.30
2897
24
10.36
Ottawa
River
Vaudreuil                                 which    the    Montreal
and      Ottawa      Short
Line   branches   off   along   the   Ontario   bank   of
the   Ottawa   River    to    the    Dominion   Capital.
The   St.   Lawrence   curves   away   towards   the
south, while the railway keeps on a direct course
/ 7.25
2893
t Additional trains leave Montreal for Toronto at 8.45 a.m. daily, arriving Toronto (Union Stn.)
G.55 p.m. Also leave Montreal 10.45 P-m. dally, arriving North Toronto at 7.50 a.m., and West Toronto
8.05 a.m. daily.   Dining cars are run on day trains between Montreal and Toronto,
2 Flag to take on passengers for or let off passengers from Peterboro' or beyond.
d Flag for passengers to and from Montreal or points east, and to and from Toronto and points west.
/ Flag Station. FRUIT FARMING IN ONTARIO
1. Hoeing Gooseberry Plants
2. Bee-keeping a Profitable Sideline
3. An Apple Orchard
>j9
Oft
'.■'JWUMJ Im TRANSCONTINENTAL LAKE ROUTE (SUMMER  ONLY)
93
Miles
West-
East-
Miles
from
bound
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
bound
from
Montr'l
Train
Train
Vanc'r
Leave
Leave
P.M.
A.M.
35
q 10.53
St   Clet                                  i    towards Toronto, pass-
y  7.11
2882
41
St. Polycarpe June.
ing through a beautiful
2876
44
No
St. Telesphore               ^.
farming country, with
No
2873
47
Stop
Dalhousie Mills
many    orchards,   and
Stop
2872
51
Glen Norman
with tracts of the ori
2866
54
Green Valley
Glenroy
Apple Hill
ginal  forest  here and
2863
57
there.   At St. Polycarpe
Farms
2860
63
Junction   the   Grand
2854
69
Monckland
Trunk Railway is
2848
73
Avon more
crossed, and at Kemp-
2844
79
Finch
ton   the Prescott Sub
2838
87
Chesterville
division of   the Cana
2830
93
Winchester
dian Pacific Railway,
2824
96
Inkerman
extending northward to
2821
101
Mountain
Ottawa and southward
2816
108
Kempton
to Prescott, where con
2809
120
Merrickville
nection is made during
-
2797
summer   months   with
the River St. Lawrence steamers, and during sum
mer and winter by ferry with the New York Central
and Hudson River Railroad for all important points
in New York State.   At CKCerrickville, a considerable
manufacturing town, a fine iron bridge carries the
line over the Rideau River.
A.M.
A.M.
129
a   1.15
||Smiths Falls—Pop. 6,500.   Junction with Ottawa and
/   5.10
2788
/    1.25
Brockville   Subdivision  of   the   Canadian   Pacific
Railway; and at Carleton Junction, 13 miles northward, with the transcontinental line of the Canadian
Pacific Railway.   The town has a number of important manufactories, for which falls in the Rideau
River afford ample water-power.   Superior bricks
are made here, and  good building-stone abounds.
There are excellent refreshment rooms at the station.
a  5.00
134
Elmsley
2782
141
1.47
Perth—Pop. 4,500.   A prosperous town with a number
of mills.   Quarries of fine building stone and deposits of mineral  phosphates  are worked   in  the
vicinity.    The town  is  modern, and has  modern
lighting and water systems.   For 100 miles beyond
Perth   the   countrv   is
4.41
2776
148
Bathurst
more or less broken by
2769
156
Maberly
05
rocky uplifts   and
2761
166
2.33
Sharbot Lake
largely   covered   with
3.59
2751
175
Mountain Grove
timber.    Iron,  phos-
2742
181
/   2.56
Ardendale
phate,    asbestos,    and
t   3.29
2736
191
t   3.13
Kaladar
*                      /                                                   7
other valuable minerals
t   3.13
2726
199
Hungerford
abound.   The Kingston
2718
207
3.40
Tweed
o
& Pembroke  Railway,
2.44
2710
217
4.01
Ivanhoe
from  Kingston  on  the
2.24
2700
225
Central Ont. June.
o
St. Lawrence to  Ren
2692
234
Blairton
frew on the main line
2683
q Flag to let passengers off Saturday only. y Flag Monday and Thursday; only.
8 Refreshment Station. t Flag for passengers to or from Toronto or Montr eal or beyond.
^•2 94
TRANSCONTINENTAL LAKE ROUTE (SUMMER ONLY)
Miles
from
Montr'l
Westbound
Train
Leave
A.M.
4.48
5.26
A.M.
i
Rice
Lake
canoes
and
■port
A.M.
No
Stop
6.18
f 6.32
No
Stop
7.24
7.35
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
of the Canadian Pacific Railway, is crossed at
Sharbot Lake, a favourite resort of sportsmen, and
especially noted for the good fishing it affords.
Close connections are made here by Canadian
Pacific Railway day trains from east and west
for Kingston, via the K. & P., on the line of
which railway are many picturesque spots. Tweed,
on the Moira River, a logging stream, is a busy
town in the centre of a rich farming and dairying district. Connection is here made with the Bay
of Quinte Railway for Tamworth, Napanee, and
Deseronto (and Kingston by day train from the
West). Central Ontario Junction is at the crossing of
the Central Ontario Railway, extending from Picton
and  Trenton  on   Bay of Quinte, northward to a
number of   large and
extensively worked iron
mines. Havelock is a
railwaydivisional point,
with the usual buildings. At Norwood a fine farming country is
reached, for which this is the market town.
||Havelock
Norwood
Indian River
Peterbpro*-P°P* * 8,000. On the Otonabee River,
which here falls 150 feet within a few miles, affording an immense water power, which is utilized by
many large mills and manufactories. The city is
well built and has a large trade. The surrounding
country has extraordinary attractions for sportsmen and pleasure seekers. Beautiful lakes, rivers,
and waterfalls occur in all directions, and the fishing is especially good. The Peterboro' or Rice Lake
canoe, so well known to all sportsmen, is made here,
and with one of them a great extent of territory may
be reached from this point. Steamship and railway
lines radiate from here in all directions.
Cavan
Manvers
Pontypool
||Burketon June.
Myrtle
Glen Major
Claremont
Locust Hill
Agin court
Leaside June.
Don
||Toronto (Union Station)
Market stations for a
fine agricultural country. Wheat, rye, oats,
barley, butter, cheese
and fruit are largely
produced, and much
attention is given to
cattle raising. From
Burketon Junction a subdivision of theCanadian
Pacific Railway runs
to Lindsay and Bob-
caygeon. Express
run through by
trains
way of Toronto Union Station to Toronto Junction.
Toronto (pop. 420,000), the capital and chief town of
ONTARIO, and the next city to Montreal in the
Dominion, is situated on Lake Ontario, and has a
East-
bound
Train
Leave
A.M.
1.51
1.31
1.01
A.M.
Fishing
resorts
P.M.
No
Stop
11.53
No
Stop
10.41
10.30
Miles
from
Vanc'r
2679
2673
2664
2655
2646
2637
2633
2625
2615
2610
2606
2599
2591
2583
2580
2579
\ Refreshment Stations. Flag   tatlon.
h Flag stop for passengers to Lindsay Subdivision from east of Tweed.
Additional train leaves Toronto for Montreal at 9.00 a.m. dally, arriving at Montreal at 7.10 p.m.  I TRANSCONTINENTAL LAKE ROUTE (SUMMER ONLY)
95
Miles
West
East-
Miles
from
bound
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
bound
from
Montr'l
Train
Train
Vanc'r
Leave
most complete railway system, reaching out to every
important place and district in the province.   It has
immense manufacturing establishments, and some
Arrive
Com
of the largest commercial houses in the country.
mercial
Its educational institutions are widely known.   Its
importance
people are nearly all of English or Scotch extraction,
and while the city has strongly marked English
uJ
s
characteristics, it is distinctively western in the
intensity of its activity and energy.   In addition to
Rail
the numerous railway lines of the Canadian Pacific
way
and Grand Trunk  companies centring here, the
w
outlets
Northern  Division of the Grand Trunk Railway
System extends northward, past Lake Simcoe to
North Bay on Lake Nipissing, where it connects
with the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway
Transcontinental Route.   Canadian Pacific trains
run via Hamilton and Welland to Niagara Falls
and Buffalo, making close connection for Rochester,
Syracuse, Troy, Albany, and New York.   At Toronto
Junction the London and Owen Sound Subdivisions
of the Canadian Pacific Railway diverge, the former
extending to London and Detroit, connecting at the
latter point with the Wabash  Rd. for St. Louis,
Chicago, and other western United States points,
and the other during the summer connecting at
Owen Sound with the Canadian Pacific Railway
Co.'s lake steamships for Sault Ste. Marie and Fort
William.
<
m
338
P.M.
/   1.00
||TorontO(Union station)—Regular trains leave Toronto
for Owen Sound at 7.50 a.m. and 5.15 p.m., and
P.M.
a 12.45
2579
Daily
Owen Sound for Toronto at 6.30 a.m. and 3.20 p.m.
Daily
except
These trains run daily except Sundays and stop at
except
Friday
and
Sunday
all stations.   During the summer season a Steam
Wed.
ship Express leaves Toronto on sailing days about
Friday
1.00 p.m., carrying day coaches and parlour cars.
384
Melville Junction
2533
387
2.45
||Orangeville_Pop4 4>0oo.   A farming centre, as shown
11.12
2530
P.M.
by the elevators at the station.
P.M.
391
Fraxa Junction—Subdivision to Teeswater.
A well-cultivated plat-
2526
394
Laurel
eau,   furnishing   lime
2523
398
Crombies
and  building   stone.
2519
403
Shelburne
The   lakes   of   this
2514
406
Melancthon
region,   especially   at
2511
41Q
Corbetton
Homing's  Mills,   four
2507
miles   from   Shelburne,
are noted for extraordinary trout.
-
I Refreshment Stations
""mnnugy^B 96
TRANSCONTINENTAL LAKE ROUTE (SUMMER ONLY)
Miles
from
Montr'l
4 4
419
421-
424
431
436
440
447
452
460
735
Westbound
Train
Arrive
Daily
except
Sunday
and
Friday
Arrive \
P.M.
a 4.50
I 5.00
P.M.
Dally
except
Sunday
and
Friday
Port
of embarkation
for the
Upper
Lakes
P.M.
1.00
Daily
except
Mon.
and
Sat.
Railway
connections
STATIONS—Descriptive Notes
Dundalk—The road is here  1,300 feet above Lake
Ontario.
Proton
Saugeen Junction.
Flesherton_A brisk agricultural village. A little
east of Flesherton are Eugenia Falls, and many
most picturesque brooks and cataracts, abounding
in fish.    A rolling tim-
Markdale
Berkeley
Holland Centre
Chats worth
Rockford
bered and well-watered
region. Fine farming
in the valleys. Lumber, cordwood, and tan-
a^^imB-^——^^—^^^^—!.    bark   are   exported
largely.     Scotch   and
Irish people predominate.    Limestone abounds, and
lime is made.
Owen Sou nd_.Pop 12,500. The port on Georgian
Bay, for Canadian Pacific lake steamships, leaving
westbound about 5.00 p.m. daily except Friday and
Sunday. This town has grown rapidly since the
building of the railway;.and is the shipping point
for a vast area of farming country. The town is
situated at the mouth of the Sydenham River at the
head of the sound, and is surrounded by an amphitheatre of limestone cliffs. The region is well-
wooded, and in summer is visited by large numbers
of tourists. Within two or three miles are pretty
waterfalls, and a handsome park at which there is
an excellent hotel. Building stone and brick clays
are abundant. Manufactures, especially of cement,
furniture, and woodenware, are increasing, and an
immense elevator for the storage and distribution of
Manitoba wheat to eastern millers has recently been
erected. Shooting and fishing in great variety are
easily obtainable. In addition to the steamships of
the Canadian Pacific line for Fort William, local
steamers depart regularly for Manitoulin Island
and all ports on Georgian Bay during the season of
navigation.
Sault Ste. Marie_pop i3?000. Steamers leave daily
except Saturday and Monday going West, and daily
except Tuesday and Thursday going East. Passengers can go ashore while the vessels pass through
the lock. Connection is here made with the Soo-
Pacific line which leaves the Canadian Pacific
transcontinental route at Sudbury, crosses the
Rapids of St. Mary's, on a magnificent iron bridge,
and runs westward to Gladstone, St. Paul, and
Minneapolis, and after traversing the States of
Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota,
rejoins the transcontinental route near Moose Jaw,
in Western Canada.   Connection is also made with
East-
bound
Train
Miles
from
i Vanc'r
Leave
2503
Daily
except
Wed.
and
Friday
2498
2496
2493
2486
2481
2477
2470
2465
Leave
A.M.
/ 8.50
a 8.00
A.M.
Daily
except
Wed.
and
Friday
2457
Sport
1.00
P.M.
Daily
|Bxcept
Tues.
and
Thurs.
12182 C.P.R. Great Lake Steamer in Lock,
Sault Ste. Marie
W^1
31  1010
1015
Arrive
Daily
except
Sunday
and i
Tues.
A.M,
® 6.30
© 7.30
A.M.
the Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railway for
Duiuth and points on the south shore of Lake
Superior, and steamers for Lake Superior (South
Shore), Michigan, Huron, and Erie. From the
"Soo" enjoyable side trips may be made to the
Desbarats Islands on the north shore of Lake Huron,
Mackinac, etc., etc., and the Michipicoten Goldfields
on Lake Superior.
Port Arthur—See page 30.
||Fort William—Steamships from Owen Sound arrive
daily except Sunday and Tuesday, and leave daily
except Monday and Wednesday for the East.
Daily
except
Mond.
and
Wed.
P.M.
t 3.0C
X 2.0C
1908
1903
© Arrive Port Arthur 11.00 ajn., and Fort William 12.00 noon, on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday,
% Steamships leave Fort William and Port Arthur one hour later on Tuesday and Friday.
F6r Route west of Fort William see Transcontinental' Rail Route, page 31. It is at Fort William that
the Lake and Rail routes unite.
Steamship route is during season of navigation only, from about the middle of April to the end of
November, weather and water permitting.   Sailings are subject to change without notice.
While water is low on Lake Superior, steamers may omit Port Arthur, calling only at Fort William.
In sucb cases ticket holders to Port Arthur or beyond will be supplied, if they so desire, with rail transportation, between Fort William and Port Arthur.
TORONTO and WINNIPEG: 1237 Miles
(Via The Muskoka Route)
Miles
from
Toronto
0
3
5
28
51
96
109
Vanc'r
Express
Leave
P.M.
10.20
10.30
10.42
Daily
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
||Toronto
Parkdale
West Toronto
(See pages 94-95) The
Muskoka route via C.P.
short line to Winnipeg
from Toronto not only
brings these two cities
within 36 hours of each other, but opens up a virgin
tourist region which possesses innumerable attractions to the sportsman, and which will soon be the
summer home of thousands. The line runs through
portions of the old settled agricultural districts of
the counties of York and Peel and the full length of
the historic county of Simcoe.
Bolton June. —Passing through North Parkdale and
West Toronto, which are growing in importance as
manufacturing centres, and several other pleasantly
located towns, the line diverges at Bolton June, from
the Owen   Sound and
Alliston Upper Lake route,and at
Coldwater June. |   ColdwaterJune, crosses
the road now being built
by the C.P.Ry. from Victoria Harbour to Peterboro',
which is to be a great grain route from the West.
,    Crossing   the   Severn
Severn Falls j    River the wilds of Mus
koka are entered, and
for miles the forests and lakes and rocks of this
picturesque region  furnish   pretty views.    There
Toronto!
Miles
Express! ^,g
Arrive
P.M.
3.30
3.20
3.12
Daily
1237
1234
1232
1210
1187
1142
1129
| Refreshment Stations.
m
§i§ Muskoka route
STATIONS—DESCRIPTIVE NOTES
are falls on the Severn River, and at Bala on the
Muskosh River, both cataracts of no ordinary
beauty.
Bala (Falls)_Pop. 800.
(Muskoka Lakes)_Bala is the gateway to the great
clustering Muskoka Lakes, through which thousands of tourists enter the 1 Killarney of America "
every summer. The island-dotted Bala Bay is a
magnificent sheet of water, and in it and the surrounding waters is excellent fishing. Through the
many lakes communication is established during the
season of navigation by the splendidly equipped steamers of the Muskoka Lakes Navigation & Hotel Co.
IMuskoka—(A divisional .point, alt. 742 feet), is the
station for all points on Lake Joseph, one of the
largest of the Muskoka Lakes, which can also be
reached from Gordon Bay, another delightful summering place.
Parry Sound_pop. 4,000. The road at Parry Sound
skirts the shores of Georgian Bay, giving admirable
views of that great inland water, which has 30,000
islands among its other attractions. The town is
reached by a steel viaduct 1,700 feet long, and
120 feet above the valley of the Seguin River,
which furnishes power to a municipal plant, which
supplies light and power at extremely cheap rates.
Parry Sound is a growing town, and the advent of
the C.P.Ry. has greatly increased its prosperity.
Point au Baril—One of the beauty spots of the region
Point au Baril, from which splendid views of the
Georgian Bay archipelago are also obtained.
Byng lnlet-(Alt. 575 feet, pop. 1,200), is located in
an arm of Georgian Bay, and has a splendid
harbour with water deep enough to float the largest
ships. Lumbering operations are here, as elsewhere along the line, extensively carried on.
the outflow of
Romford June.
The French  River
which,   with   the
1 Pickerel   River,   gives
Nipissing into Georgian Bay,
is crossed on a splendid   structure   with   a
span 0 f 415 feet.   Rocks
of  the   glacial   period
here north.   At Romford the
main   transcontinental   line   of   the   C. P. Ry.   is
reached, and its tracks are followed on the way west
to Sudbury and around the north shore of Lake
Superior to Winnipeg and Vancouver.
For description of the route between Sudbury and
Pacific Coast, see pages 28 to 76.
Toronto
Express
2 11.25
11.15
Leave
A.M.
10.30
9.10
7.10
6.55
A.M.
Leave
Miles
irom
W'nip'g
1117
1105
1083
1058
1044
1025
1020
983
975
Refreshment Stations.
f Flag Station.  *fi CONDENSED TIME TABLE.
NOTE.—The days given in the first column apply to one train only, viz., the IMPERIAL
LIMITED, but this will serve as a basis for calculation of all others.  For full information
as to all services, see the Company's "Folder A."
1—2   Imperial Limited.                                       3—4   Toronto—Vancouver Express.
11—12 Soo—Spokane—Portland Express.        13—H St, Paul—Seattle Express.
WESTBOUND—READ DOWNWARDS.
EASTBOUND—READ UP.
Day        Time
1
3
11
13   |
2
i
12       li
New York (via N.Y.C.)
(via Rutland Rd.)
(via D. & H. Rd.)
(via Toronto)   ...
Sat.
1)
M
Eastern
it
11
tt
A.M.
A7 4S
9 30
A9 30
P.M..
7 15
6 55
6 55
NT.
12 35
A.M.
P.M.
P.M.
P.M.
A1050
8 42
A8 42
A.M.
10 20
7 26
7 20
7 50
A.M.
A.M.
A.M.
8 05
8
Boston	
Portland, Me	
HALIFAX, N.S.       A
ST. JOHN, N.B.
QUEBEC       	
M
it
10 00
P.M.
8 30
__
__
_
7 52
7 27
_
spm—
M
it
A9 05
8 00
P.M.
5 55
9 30
—
—
	
A7 55
6 50
—
Fri.
it
Atlantic
ti
A.M.
8 00
P.M.
5 55
—
—
10 00
NN.
12 00
P.M.
10 00
NN.
12 00
—
Sat.
Eastern
1 30
11 30
.
1
	
__
PM.
3 25
A.M.
6 45
MONTREAL	
Ottawa	
North Bay      	
ii
Sun.
»l
ii
it
ti
P.M.
10 30
A.M.
2 05
10 30
A.M.
1010c
P.M.
150C
10 45C
—
-
10 00
F
A.M.
8 55
5 30
P.M.
9 20
P.M.
7 00D
3 20D
A.M.
7 05D
—
TORONTO    	
Owen Sound	
Sault Ste. Marie
Muskoka         	
Sat.
H
H
Sun.
it
ti
it
ti
10 20
A.M.
2 30
1
1
,     j        ,
1
1 00
5 00
1 00
—
P.M.
3 30
A.M.
11 25
6 55
P.M.
12 45
A.M.
8 50
P.M.
1 00
Sudbury	
Port Arthur    	
FORT WILLIAM   ...
Kenora 	
»
Mon.
it
11
11
Central
11
P.M.
1 10
A.M.
8 58
8 30
17 50
6 27
1 10
24 45
9 30
,„ .
—
A.M.
6 30
7 30
P.M.
6 37
10 43
10 30
12 10
6 55
11 52
11 40
1 30
h~—
3 00
2 00
Chicago	
Sun.
11
_
„   .j
9 15
10 15
A.M.
2 45
21 25
16 25
14 15
5 48
4 35
8 37
9 10
A.M.
7 55
St. Paul, Minn.
»
ti
Tu.
»
it
tt
__
1
P.M.
10 30
A.M.
11 00
P.M.
5 00
P.M.
5 20
P.M.
1 55
WINNIPEG	
Portage la Prairie
Brandon	
Regina	
Moose Jaw      	
Lethbridge      	
Fernie   	
Cranbrook
i»
11
tt
Mountain
it
22 35
24 05
2 50
9 20
11 15
14 00
15 30
18 10
24 45
2 25
19 30
12 05
7 30K
8 00
5 30
3 15
18 40
17 15
17 30
13 45
K18 00
Wed.
it
tt
11
tt
11
■
—
6 10
11 50
14 05
3 50
10 20
12 55
—
—
—
6 20
24 39
22 25
24 30
18 10
15 45
Spokane, Wash.         J
Kootenay Landing    ...
11
Pacific
—
20 00
19 20
—
14 00
7 00
—
it
Mountain
—
—
16 15 E
—
—
—
—
11 30E
—
CALGARY     	
Banff    	
Laggan 	
Field     	
Glacier	
Revelstoke      	
North Bend    	
Mission Junction
VANCOUVER
tt
11
tt
11
it
Thur.
11
ti
11
1:
11
Pacific
ti
tt
11
11
ti
3 15
6 30
7 55
8 30
12 53
15 35
2 40
6 08
8 00
18 15
21 30
22 55
23 25
3 54
6 15
17 10
20 38
22 25
._, .
4 10
7 37
9 05
9 45
14 13
16 35
4 05
7 15
9 25
2 35
23 30
22 10
20 40
14 54
12 00
24 50
21 19
19 30
14 30
11 30
10 15
8 40
3 24
24 55
14 15
10 44
9 00
22 45
19 30
18 10
16 35
10 25
7 35
20 25
17 00
14 30
VICTORIA    ...        B
Seattle, Wash....        §
M
• 1
11
it
14 30
20 00
14 30
8 00
—
14 30
20 00
—
14 15
9 00
9 40
23 45
23 30
23 45
23 30
—
Seattle, Wash....         |
tt
It
11
14 30
—
—
14 30 i
—
—
-SZ1—■
9 40
5 10
23 15
Tacoma, Wash.
tt
17 25
—
—
17 25 i    —
5 101
|gj
—
Portland, Ore....         |
II
t»
11
22 30
—
11 30J
22 30 i    —
23 15]
21 00J
11 20J
San Francisco...         |
Sat.
L2 28
—    21 18J
12 28 j   —
11 20
—
11 20
A Daily except Sundays.                                 B Steamer between Vancouver—Victoria—Seattle.
C Arrives Fort William 22.30, Winnipeg 11.35, connecting with Vancouver Express.
D Leaves Winnipeg 18.20 (connecting with Toronto Express), Fort William 8.45 a.m.
| Via Curzon.                     f Arrives Toronto 7.35 a.m.                     G Leaves Toronto 10.30 p.m.
H By C.P.R. Steamer Owen Sound—Sault Ste. Marie—Fort William.   Westbound daily except
Friday  and  Sunday.     Eastbound  daily except  Monday and  Wednesday.    Journey
occupies 43 hours,
| Via Sumas Junction and N.P.R.                     J Via Kingsgate.                      K Via Emerson.
m.%
99 CANADIAN    PACIFIC   STEAMERS.
ATLANTIC   SERVICES
Montreal, Quebec, and
Liverpool
Montreal, London, and
Antwerp
Montreal and Bristol
Empress of Britain
Empress of Ireland
Mount Temple
Mount Royal
Lake Michigan
Montrose
Montcalm
Monmouth
Lake Manitoba
Lake Champlain
Montfort
Montreal
Montezuma
Lake Erie
Milwaukee
PACIFIC   SERVICES
Vancouver, Japan, China
Empress of China
Empress of India
(Yokohama, Kobe, Nagasaki
Empress of Japan
Monteagle
Shanghai, Hong Kong)
Vancouver, Australia
(Honolulu, Suva, Brisbane,
Sydney, Auckland)
Makura          "\
Zealandia       >
Marama         )
Canadian Australian
Royal Mail 5.5. Line
GREAT   LAKES! SERVICES
Owen Sound, Sault Ste. Marie,
Assiniboia
Athabasca
'Port Arthur, and Fort William
Keewatin
Alberta
Manitoba
PACIFIC    COAST   SERVICES
Vancouver,    Victoria,
Amur
Princess Charlotte
Seattle,  'Prince
Beaver
Princess Ena
Rupert,     Northern
Charmer
Princess May
British    Columbia,
City of Nanaimo
Princess Mary .
etc.
Czar
Princess Royal
Joan
Princess Victoria
Nanoose
Tees
Otter
Transfer No. 1
Princess Adelaide
Transfer No. 2
Princess Alice
Queen City
Princess Beatrice-
BRITISH    COLUMBIA    LAKE   AND    RIVER   SERVICES
Aberdeen
Kootenay
Rossland
Bonnington
Kuskanook
Sandon
Columbia
Minto
Slocan
Castlegar
Moyie
Valhalla
Hosmer
Nelson
Ymir
Kaleden
Okanagan
York
Kokanee
Proctor
Whatshan
FERRY   SERVICE
Michigan
Ontario
ARTHUR   PIERS,
Manager, Steamship Lines,-
MONTREAL.
V
100 aamctaa ■*-
**/$  LANDS.
The Canadian Pacific Railway has for sale 8,500,000 acres of choice farm lands in Manitoba,
Saskatchewan, and Alberta.
Prices range from $8.oo to $25.00 per acre for lands suitable for mixed farming and grain growing,
according to quality and location.
160 acres, or one quarter section of land at $10.00 per acre may be obtained for settlement upon
making a cash payment of $239.70. Interest only on the outstanding purchase money is payable at
the end of the first year. The balance of purchase money is payable In nine equal annual instalments of
$200.00 each, which include interest at 6 per cent. Purchasers who do not undertake to go into residence
upon the land within one year from the date of purchase are required to pay not less than one-sixth of
the purchase money down and the balance in five equal annual instalments with interest at the rate of
six per cent, per annum.
The valuable lands allotted to the Canada North-West Land Co., Ltd., are for sale at the office of
the Land Dept.
For detailed prices, maps, and full particulars, apply to
F. T. GRIFFIN,
C.P.R. Land Commissioner, Winnipeg, Man.
j ALBERTA  LANDS.
This company is developing by means of irrigation three million acres in the Bow River Valley of
Sunny Southern Alberta. Combination farms are there obtainable upon terms within the reach of all;
the irrigated portions raising small fruits, alfalfa, and all grain, root and fodder crops; the non-irrigated
lands producing winter wheat, cereals, etc., besides providing the world's finest pasture. Splendid
yields, good markets, low taxation, cheap living, abundance of water, and the valley's unexcelled climate
lead thousands to establish homes upon its fertile lands.
A further two million acres, the greater portion of which is situated in Central Alberta, is now being
offered for sale at low prices and upon exceptionally advantageous terms.
For detailed information, maps, and prices, apply to
J. S. DENNIS,
Manager, C.P.R. Irrigation and Land Interests
in Alberta and British Columbia,
Calgary, Alberta.
TELEGRAPHS.
The telegraph system of the C.P.R. not only extends along the entire length of the railway, but also
reaches every point of importance off the lines of Railway in the Dominion of Canada.
The Commercial Cable Co. (Mackay-Bennett System), gives the C.P.K. the most direct connection with Europe, Asia, and Africa.
Also in direct connection with the British Pacific Cable to Australia, New Zealand, etc.; the
Commercial Pacific Cable to the Hawaiian Islands, Philippine Islands, China, and Japan; and the
Commercial Havana Cable to Havana, etc.
The Postal Telegraph Co. of New York and San Francisco enables the C.P.R. to reach all
important points In the United States,
The Halifax-Bermuda & Direct West Indies Cable Co. gives connection with Bermuda,
Jamaica, and points in the West Indies.
Direct connection with the Dominion Government Telegraph line to the Yukon and points in
Alaska.
A tariff of charges for Telegrams is posted at all Telegraph Offices, and is kept by all Sleeping and
Parlour Car Porters.
JAMES KENT,
Head Office, Montreal. Manager of Telegraphs.
DOMINION EXPRESS COMPANY.
MERCHANDISE,   MONEY,   VALUABLES,  ETC.,   FORWARDED  BY FAST SERVICE
TO ALL PARTS OF  CANADA AND THE WORLD.
Drafts and Bills (with goods C.O.D.) collected.
MONEY  ORDERS. FOREIGN   CHEQUES.
FOREIGN  POSTAL REMITTANCES.
The best medium for sending remittances to any part of the world.
Money transferred by Telegraph or Cable.
TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES.
FOR TOURISTS AND TRAVELLERS.   In denominations of $10, $20, $50, $100 and $200
with equivalents in foreign moneys printed on each cheque.   Self identifying.   Accepted by Express
Agents, Banks, Railway Co.'s, Hotels, etc., and by 15,000 correspondents in foreign countries.
Positively the best form of Travellers' Credit ever devised.
W. S. STOUT,
General Offices, Toronto, Ont. Pres. & Gen. Manager.
ibi
nSES!
w
m CANADIAN  PACIFIC  HOTELS.
\1^HILE the perfect Sleeping and Dining Car Services of the Canadian Pacific
Railway provide every comfort and luxury for travellers making the continuous Overland Through Trip, it has been found necessary to provide Hotel
accommodation at points of interest among the mountains and elsewhere.
For detailed information see the special "Hotel System" Folder.
(The Rates quoted are per diem, and usually on the inclusive
American plan.)
BALFOUR, B.C.—Kootenay Lake Hotel. A new Tourist Hotel, opened 1911. $3.50 and upward.
(See page 90.)
BANFF, ALTA.—Banff Hotel (open from May to October), in the Canadian National Park, on the
eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains, is 4,500 feet above sea level, at the confluence of the
Bow and Spray Rivers.   $3.50 and upward.   (See page 48.)
CALEDONIA SPRINQ8, ONT.—Caledonia Springs Hotel Is situated at the famous Caledonia
Springs, about 300 yards from the station.   Low weekly rates upon application.   (See page 23.)
CALGARY, ALTA."
construction
-A New C.P.R. Hotel.   At Calgary the Company has decided to build an Hotel,
to be commenced during 1911.   The plan and general arrangements of the other
Hotels of the Company will be followed, and every known modern convenience will be installed.
(See page 43.)
FIELD, B.C.—Mount Stephen House (open from May to October), a Chalet Hotel, 50 miles west of
Banff, at the base of Mount Stephen, which towers 8,000 feet above. This is a favourite place
for tourists, mountain climbers, and artists. The lovely Yoho Valley is reached by way of Field.
$3.50 and upward.   (See page 54.)
Emerald Lake Chalet (open from June to October), a most romantically - situated
Swiss Chalet Hotel, with accommodation for thirty guests. The gateway to Yoho Valley. The
Chalet is seven miles from Field Station.   $3.50 and upward.   (See page 55.)
GLACIER, B.C.—Glacier House (open from May to October), in the heart of the Selkirks, within
forty-five minutes' walk of the Great Glacier, which covers an area of about thirty-eight square
miles. The hotel has recently been enlarged to accommodate the ever-increasing travel.
$3.50 and upward.   (See page 62.)
LAGGAN, ALTA.—Chateau Lake Louise (open from June to October) is a quiet resting-place in
the mountains situated by Lake Louise, two-and-a-half miles from the station at Laggan, from
which there is a good carriage drive. A convenient base from which to explore the Lakes in
the Clouds.   $3.50 and upward.   (See page 50.)
McADAM JUNCTION, N.B—McAdam Station Hotel is especially convenient for commercial and
other travellers, owing to its location at the point of junction of the main line and the
Company's branch lines intersecting New Brunswick.   $2.50 and upward.   (See page 15.)
MONTREAL, QUE*—The Place Viger, a handsome structure immediately opposite the Viger
Square, at Place Viger Station, one-and-a-half miles from Windsor Station, and at a convenient
distance from Steamship Docks, is most elaborately furnished, the general style and elegance
characterising the Chateau Frontenac at Quebec being followed. $3.50 and upward, with
special arrangements for large parties and tljose making prolonged visits. (See page 21, and
also special pamphlet, "Place Viger.")
QUEBEC, P.Qr—The Chateau Frqntenac, in the quaintest and, historically, the most interesting
city in America, is one of the finest hotels on the Continent. It occupies a commanding position
overlooking the St. Lawrence, its site being, perhaps, the grandest in the world. $4.00 and
upward, with special arrangements for large parties and those making prolonged visits. (See
page 9, and also special pamphlet, ** Chateau Frontenac")
REVEL8TOKE, B.Cr-Hotel Revelstoke, situated between the Selkirk and Gold Ranges, at the gateway to the West Kootenay Gold Fields and the Arrow Lakes. $3.00 and upward. (See
page 65.)
8T. ANDREWS. N.Br-The  Algonquin (open fro.n June to September 15th) has recently been
thoroughly renovated and much enlarged.    Best natural golf links in Canada.   $3.50 per day
and upward, with special inducements for those making prolonged stays.
Also the INN (open from July 1st), beautifully situated near the water.   $2.50 and upward.  (See
Page 15.)
8ICAMOU8, B.C.— Hotel Sicamous, built on the shores of the Shuswap Lakes, where the
Okanagan branch of the Canadian Pacific Railway begins. $3-50 and upward, (See
page 68.)
VANCOUVER, B.Cr—Hotel Vancouver, situated at the Pacific Coast terminus of the Railway, is a
magnificent hotel designed to serve the larger commercial business of the city, as well as the
tourists who find it profitable and interesting to remain a day or longer. $4.00 and upward.
(See page 76.)
VICTORIA, B.Cr-Empress Hotel, newly completed, the most beautiful Hotel on the Pacific Coast.
Situated near boat landing.   European plan.   (See page jj.)
WINNIPEG, MAN.—The Royal Alexandra, a newly completed 300 room House, situated at
the Railway Station. Furnished with every modern convenience. European plan. (See
page 34.)
HAYTER REED, Manager in Chief,
Hotel Department, C.P.R., MONTREAL.
xoa 1. Vancouver Hotel
2. Palm Room, Empress Hotel, Victoria
3. Chateau Lake Louise, Laggan  SLEEPING, PARLOUR, AND OBSERVATION
' § CARS, ETC. |
\ long train journey was formerly accompanied by a certain
** inevitable amount of discomfort. With the introduction of the
various sleeping and parlour cars, however, this discomfort has now
been obviated, and passengers are assured of easy, luxurious, and
pleasurable travelling. The Canadian Pacific Railway operates its
own services, finished and furnished in the most sumptuous style and
fitted with every convenience.
The Sleeping and Parlour Cars are finished outside with polished
mahogany, and their interiors with rich carvings and beautiful fittings.
The berths are wide, high, and long. The curtains, blankets, and
linen, made expressly for the Company, are of the finest quality.
Writing paper and envelopes are furnished free to first-class sleeping-
car passengers on transcontinental trains; and to keep travellers
somewhat informed upon current events, a summary of the day's news
is bulletined in the sleepers and at the Company's hotels in the
mountains.    Smoking-rooms are provided.
Compartment Buffet-Library-Observation-Sleeping Cars are
.run on transcontinental trains. They contain a drawing-room,
compartments with lower and upper berths and toilet facilities, a
buffet capable of serving light refreshments, a well-selected library, a
writing desk, a smoking-room, a large observation room fitted with easy
chairs, and an observation platform at the rear end.
Drawing Room compartments are found in standard sleeping
and observation cars. They form entirely separate compartments in
which absolute privacy is obtained.
Tourist Sleeping Cars are in operation for holders of second-class
tickets to points west of Fort William, and are fitted on a similar scale
to standard sleepers.
Meals.—A dining car is attached to all long distance trains, and
meals are served a la carte. Tickets via the Great Lakes include meals
and berths on board the vessels.
Cafe Cars are run on many short distance trains, and at the
stations marked || in this Time Table refreshments may be obtained.
Any Canadian Pacific Railway Agent will quote Rates for the above Cars.
TIME  LIMITS.
Tickets other than those sold at feres designated as " Limited "
are good for travel within the time limit stated from date of issue, and
allow break of journey at any point on the Canadian Pacific Railway
on application to the Conductor. " Limited " Tickets are good only
for continuous travel.
103
ii
:m
is#3
«S9
masm Canadian   Pacific   Railway  Company
BOARD  OF   DIRECTORS.
*Mr.  RICHARD B. ANGUS  Montreal
„     ADAM  R.  CREELMAN,   K.C.	
Hon. JAMES DUNSMUIR       -  Victoria, B.C.
Sir  SANDFORD  FLEMING,  K.C.M.G.  Ottawa
Mr.  HERBERT S.  HOLT  Montreal
„     CHARLES R.  HOSMER -       -	
Hon.  ROBERT   MACKAY,   Senator	
Mr.  WILMOT D.  MATTHEWS  Toronto
* „ I DAVID McNICOLL -       -  Montreal
* „     EDMUND B.  OSLER,   M.P.  Toronto
*Sir  THOMAS  G.   SHAUGHNESSY,  K.C.V.O.      -       -       - Montreal
Mr.  THOMAS  SKINNER        -       - London
*The Rt. Hon. LORD STRATHCONA & MOUNT ROYAL,
GCMG
*Sir WILLIAM  C.  VAN  HORNE, K.C.M.G.- -   Montreal
* Executive Committee.
GENERAL  OFFICERS.
Sir THOMAS G.   SHAUGHNESSY,   K.C.V.O.,  President and
Chairman of the Company  Montreal
Mr.  D.  McNICOLL,  Vice-President      ------
Sir WM.  WHYTE,   Vice-President  Winnipeg
Mr.  I. G. OGDEN,  Vice-President  Montreal
G.  M. BOSWORTH, Vice-President	
W.  R. BAKER,  C.V.O., Secretary, and Asst. to the President -
A.  R.  CREELMAN,  K.C, General Counsel -       -
E. W. BEATTY, General Solicitor	
J.  W.  LEONARD, Asst. to the Vice-President        -
G. J. BURY, General Manager, Western Lines       ... Winnipeg
R. MARPOLE, Gen. Executive Asst. for British Columbia      - Vancouver
H.  E.  SUCKLING, Treasurer     -       -       - .     -       -       - Montreal
JOHN  LESLIE, Assistant Comptroller  „
C.  E.  E.  USSHER, Passenger Traffic Manager     - „
W.  R.  MacINNES, Freight Traffic Manager -
ARTHUR PIERS, Manager of Steamship Lines     -       -       - Liverpool
J.  G.  SULLIVAN, Asst. Chief Engineer, Western Lines -       - Winnipeg
H.  H. VAUGHAN, Asst. to the Vice-President      -       -       - Montreal
A.  D.  MacTIER, Asst. to the Vice-President - „
F. W.  PETERS, Asst. to the Vice-President - Winnipeg
C.  MURPHY, Gen. Supt. of Transportation, Eastern Lines      - Montreal
WILLIAM  DOWNIE, Gen. Supt. Atlantic Division      -       - St. John, N.B.
F.  P. GUTELIUS, Gen. Supt. Eastern Division    -       -       - Montreal
JAMES OBORNE, Gen. Supt. Ontario Division     - Toronto
J. G.  TAYLOR, Gen. Supt. Lake Superior Division        -       - North Bay
J.  T.  ARUNDEL, Gen. Supt. Manitoba Division   -       -       - Winnipeg
J. J.  SCULLY, Gen. Supt. Saskatchewan Division - Moose Jaw
A. PRICE, Gen. Supt. Alberta Division  Calgary
F.  F. BUSTEED, Gen. Supt. British Columbia Division        - Vancouver
JAMES KENT, Manager of Telegraphs  Montreal
F. T. GRIFFIN, Land Commissioner    -       -       -       - Winnipeg
J. S. DENNIS, Manager of Irrigation and Ld. Interests, Alberta
and B.C.  Calgary
GEO. McL. BROWN, European Manager   - London
OTTAWA  AGENCY.
The Company's Agent in Ottawa, who will answer all enquiries and furnish all
information, is^—
Mr. GEORGE DUNCAN, City Passenger Agent, 42, Sparks Street.
104 \m rl'bso     *FC
it HO4^ ec - boo
o<
jo»
1/0075%
a ^>d
i   

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.chungpub.1-0114652/manifest

Comment

Related Items