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First reading-book Kwong, Ki Chiu 1890

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Array  -  -    --^m&    --tvs^l        .I^^WA^^^ggE-- —,   - -.J3*"****"S^p*jjl*(
The University of British Columbia Library   4H 4k M- fr ^ ifc  i
\
KWONG'S   EDUCATIONAL   SERIES.
(IN  ENGLISH   AXD • CHINESE.)
FIRST RE A
"ST
I
G-BOOK.
ILLUSTRATED   WITH   CUTS.
By KWONG Ki CIIIU,
IiAse Membkb of the Chinese Educational Commission in the United States; and Author op "English
and Chinese Dictionary": "Dictionary of English Phrases"; "Series of
Conversation Bocks": "Manual of Correspondence and
Social iJsages"; "Comprehensive
Geography", etc.
Shanghai: YTAH CHEUNG, 279 Honan Road.    KELLY & WALSH.   London
TRUENER & CO., 57 and 59 Ludgate Hill.  .Yokohama: KELLY & CW
Hongkong: KELLY & WALSH.    Sax Francisco: WING FUNG,
745 Sacramento Street.
1890. .
1
pW|HHP*WP>taiJMi»Mw ** ■*■ ***■ *m <tW ■• '-J». ■ ""'   »'-»*-
WMPW
u
ENTERED ACCORDING TO ACT OF CONGRESS, IN THE YEAR 1882,
By C. S. SYLVESTER and KWONG KI CHIU,
In the Office of tlie Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.
COPYRIGHTED IN GREAT BRITAIN.     ALL  RIGHTS RESERVED.
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V
HB PREFACE.
This boot is designed as a first book for learning to read the
English language. Some years since, the author prepared a book
for a similar purpose, by translating a primary reading-book published in England, and arranging the English and Chinese in
alternate lines. But the lessons in that book were not as interesting
as was desirable, neither were there any illustrations. It was there-
fore thought best to prepare this book, which in both these respects
he thinks is an improvement. Fine engravings illustrating various
subjects and scenes in different parts of the world have been procured, and the descriptions have been made interesting. Nearly
every lesson is accompanied by an illustrative picture. This is a
great advantage.
The lessons are also graded. Beginning with those which are
very simple, a gradual and easy advance is made to those which are
more difficult.
It is recommended that the teacher, for the sake of variety, and
of increasing the knowledge of the pupil, sometimes question him
upon the lesson which has been read.
The table of words at the head of the lesson may be used as a
spelling exercise.
To aid in acquiring the pronunciation of words, and also to facilitate the reading, the words are divided into syllables, and accented.
The author may perhaps be allowed to say that this book is
designed to be introductory to a series of Conversation Books and
a Geography, which he has prepared in English and Chinese, and
which he recommends to those who would gain a fuller knowledge
of English.
Hartford, Conn., (IT. S. A.)
§ August 1st, 1882. I K. K. m
0 CONTENTS.
P4      J/h
The Alphabet,
Page 10
5.
6.
rv
I.
8.
9.
10.
11
m
13.
14.
15.
18.
17
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24
25.
26.
27.
29.
•30.
dog,
-with a full-pa
Lesson.
1.    A hat,
V cup,
A cat and a
H   The quail.
Hens,
A bowl,    .
The pig,—with a full-pag
A tea-pot,
The goat,
Review,
The cow,
The fish,
The dog,
The owl,
The horse,
The crow,
The little mouse,
The tree, .
The fox and the otter,—
page cut,
The parrot,
The dove,
The stage-coach,
The black bear,—with i
cut,        ...
The clock and watch,
The white bear,—with *
cut,
The bird's nest,
The beavers, .
The butterfly, .
Mary's lamb, .
Three children,
cut
ge cut,
ith
full
full
full-
-page
page
Page, j Lesson.
.    11 i 31. Boy climbing a tree,       .     ||p
.    11 j 32.\ The sable,—with a full-page cut,
.   .12  33. Three kinds of birds,—with a full
.    12 page cut,       ....
.    13 34. Some deer,—with a full-page cut,
.    13135. Lumbering,      ....
.    15  36. The deer, ....
.    15  37. The water scene,     .
.   16 j 38. Sheep,—with a full-page cut,  „
.    16:39. The shoemaker,       .    |i     .
.    17 ' 40. The young robins,  .
.    17 | 41. The drunkard,
.    18 ! 42. Furniture,—with a full-page cut,
.   19 ! 43. A boy riding a dog,
.   21 j 44. The cuckoo,     ....
.   21 I 45. An oasis,	
.    22 46. Stewart's residence, .     |^
.    23  47. Making tar and turpentine,—with
full-page cut,      ^f|     .     ;§§§
25 I 48. A battle,	
26 49. A ship,—with a full-page cut,
27 50. A grasshopper,
28 51. Railroad  trains,—with a full-pag
cut,        .       .
31, 52. Emigrants and Indians,    .
32 53. What the bee sins:s to the children
I 54. Map and globe,
35 j 55. The gull, .'
36 j 56. Lead mining,   .
39 | 57. Indian encampment
40 i page cut,
41 | 58. A "Hansom cab,"
43 159. Lump-fish,
Page.
44
47
—with a full
49
51
52
54
56
59
60
61
G3
66
67
6S
70
72
75
/ .
79
81
83
86
87
90
91
98
95
17
9"
99 CONTENTS.
Lesson. Page. | Lee
The stilt 1001 76.
Peter Gray, 101  77.
Mountain of baboons, . . . 103 78.
The palace of the crown prince, . 105 79.
Aleutians catching whales, . . 106
A farm-yard,—with a full-page cut, 109 80.
Street scenes in El Paso, Mexico, . Ill 81.
Madrid,—with a full-page cut, . 113
Nominating Gen. Grant for Presi- 82.
ident,—with a full-page cut,        . 115
December,        .       .       .       .       . 118  83.
Three scenes in Paris,—with a full- 84.
page cut,       .       ...       ..       .121  85.
71.   The palace of the Tuileries,  |fp    .. 122 86.
The senate of France,     .       .       . 123
A Rocky Mountain scene,—with a 87.
full-page cut,        .       .       .       . 124!
Lumbering at Lake Tahoe,      .       . 127 i 88.
A school-room, — with a full-page
cut,       .      „       .       .       .       . 129 89.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70
72
to.
74.
75
SON.
Christmas bells,
Threshing by hand, .
The jabiru,
Page.
. 131
. 132
. 134
135
The United States Senate Chamber
—with a full-page cut, .
A safe,—with a full-page cut, .       .139
A mowing machine,— with a full-
page cut, 141
A mower and reaper,—with a full-
page cut, 143
The harvester,—with a full-page cut, 145
Sewing bv hand, . . . .147
A boat race,—with a full-page cut, 149
London Bridge, — with a full-page
cut, 151
Tower of London,—with a full-page
cut, jg? 155
The crown jewels of England,—with
a full-page cut,     .... 157
A June journey, e 160 ^ii~,:  —^ . -**--
— - .:-- -i. .—- —n-^
II
1
,Aaa)a
THE ALPHABET.
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ROMAN.
a
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b
B
k
K
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&c.
ITALIC.
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1    2
5   3
4   5
6 i
8    9
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ta   £
*   -fc
A
%
\i FIRST READING BOOK.
•
LESSON ll
*-«
A  HAT.
1            -#ffl
hat.
ft           I
a new hat.
-#,»!
the new hat is black.
ft #*!#.£&
is it my new hat %
&mm%i^
it is my new hat.
ftH8«*f«-
let me see my new hat.
t/
&$afftft.fffB
LESSON 2.
mziis
A  CUP.
—%%
*/
S1
cup.
a good cup.
a new cup.
it is my cup.
my cup is a good cup.
see my new cup.
it is srood to drink milk from.
C11)
%
*&tr>
W\ J
■attfc+IL&TO 12
r l
:1
■■';.l
ffl
fi
KWONG'S SERIES.
LESSON 3.
A  CAT  AND   A  DOG.
cat.
dog.   1
m
the cat.
the door.
rim
good cat.
good dog.
»«
see the cat.
see the dog.
tftfi
see the good cat.
see the good dog.
lft#»
LESSON 4.
THE
QUAIL.
quail.
two quails.
good quails.
two good quails.
see the two quails.
the quail is a bird.
it lives in the fields.
it makes its nest in the grass,
it lays effsrs in the nest.
v oo
did you ever see a quail ?
the quail is good to eat.
£•*-—
■«x-»
to
ibto
to
ftgft
pft rm &£
mm
m
'csvjrw (TH/»0'*>?
HRHBHHH    9H
BX&U'UUUnaKCM^ FIRST  READING  UOOK.
13
LESSON 5.
HENS.
hen.
good hen.
see the good hen.
it is my hen.
my hen is white.
see the hen run.
the hen lays eggs.
LESSON 6.
A   BOWL.
bowl.
a ^ood bowl.
a new bowl.
my good new bowl
see my good new bowl.
put some milk in my new bowl.
r* &r»*
# m
m&mm
»ft#«t
ft#*k»
mum
~m%
WL%i*%&mMM& 1
DIPEOVED SUFFOLK.
BEfiKSfllAS HOd
fWHW •
FIRST  READING  BOOK.
LESSON 7.
•
THE   PIG.
short
fat
run
ii
Ions*
o
flesh
white
black
corn
pork
1
pig.
two pi
a black pig.
a white pig.
a short black pig.
a long white pig.
see the two pigs.
the pig can run.
the pig eats corn,
give the pig some corn to eat.
the pig eats corn and is fat.
the flesh of the pig is pork. <r
16
KWONG S  SERIES.
J
1
LESSON 9.
THE   GOAT.
Mt
horns
rock
grass
o
field
saw
has
goat.
a black goat.
the i!\)at has liorns.
tlie eroat eats ^rass.
o                       o
see the black goat.
I saw a croat on a rock
•
the ^oat was in a field.
o
LESSON 10.
357Lgp
ft**
M.
•dfc AA
ft*MMfft.-
ft-g^t^
* ftSS*
m^f&a
1
REVIEW.
cat          dog
hen          hat
s;ood cat.
white cat.
white hen.
good dog.
white doff.
o
white hat.
black cat.
black hen.
black door.
o
black hat.
cup        bowl
. pig        quail
new cu}).
new bowl.
white, pig.
good quail.
my new cup.
my new bowl.
my white pig.
my good quail.
:*
«
t3fB
E3#H
8ft
raft
lift
8
61
8*111
«W?
ssa
il
■fi
mmm FIRST REAPING  BOOK,
17
LESSON 11
THE   COW.
Jlfcft*
red
tail
horns
m
ilk
a cow.
a black cow
a white cow.
a red cow.
my cow. my white cow.
my red cow. my good red cow.
my good white cow.
the cow has horns,
she has a tail,
see her horns and tail,
the cow gives good milk.
prt some milk in my neAV cup.
1 LESSON 12.
THE   FISH.
fins
scales
brook
lar^e
a fish.       a ^ood fish,
see the lar^e fish,
he has fins and scales,
the fish lives in the brook,
is the fish ffood to eat? *
o
the fish is good to eat.
we will eat the fish.
adrift**
ftfltf-Wfc
.ftt-S I
af A^agl
ftft^WffH
*§+3Lffi«.fftr.«
ft il
a
m
-6ft^
-afltt^
t*
a large fish. ~^&   -ll8$.   H£*a
fft*.e. §
ftSffiM*
ft&pT&S
ASST* ft
«W!H*ftftjR
« I
18
KWONG S  SERIES.
LESSON 13.
THE  DOG.
f£iS
to
name
runs
the dog.
the good clog.
o O
barks
loves
meat
then
the white dog.
see the sifood white doer.
■ o o
it is my do^.
tV CD
he has a name.
his name is Tip.
Tip runs.
Tip barks.
he loves to cat meat and milk.
the dog run i at the cow.
then the cow runs.
fi SK
it %
ftft
ft8ft
Utraft
Sftff6ft
•§«.*& ft
tt-fi
fiiffi#
?i5#^
s^ft^s^
ftft&ftft^
BBS FIRST READING  BOOK.
19
LESSON 14.
TH& OWL.
face
night
woods
gray
hoot
round
eyes
feet
claws
%
this is an owl.
see his round face.
see his large eyes,
he can see in the night,
he lires in the woods,
he can flv.
see what strong; feet and claws he has.
some owls are white and some are
gray.
O       J
did you ever see an owl ?
did you ever hear one hoot ?
1«
il ■    1
m M
.  & ■
ft#J& Split
nsta!»        a   ————
I
99
KWONG S SERIES.
song
sweet
sing
high
voice
shoots
fai'mer
flock |
here is a crow.
he is black.
he has a harsh voice.
he calls, caw—caw—caw.
he pulls up corn in the field.
the far mer shoots him.
the crow is not good to eat.
ZtA
mm
ft!t#-.!l3t
^K&.mnt
aHH^Plft
-St-
the crow can not sing a sweet song.
o o
he sits in the top of a high tree and
caws,
did you ever see a flock of crows?     i£ftJ|^iiL!|9llS
m
ii
LESSON 17.
THE  LITTLE   MOUSE.
mouse little house     >J*»Ji
1
crumb
here
snug
gray
hill
J]
B
ii
sure stay        Jcfe
old beg ill
Lit'tle gray mouse, lit'tle gray mouse, M&>hSL\M&>J*jSU
I beg you to stay in your snug lit'- 3&W{kM&%$1S
tie house.
If you come out here to eat but a gffi#ft.*>lftpr£#ft*
crumb,
The old cat will kill you as sure as S£-ffi#%^HKftz*fri
you come.
Lit'tle gray mouse, lit'tle gray mouse. $cfe>J*M*$fe'J*jlU
I beg you to stay in your snug lit'- 4^11 & 18 3:8? 15
tie house.
m FIRST READING BOOK.
LESSON 18.
THE  TEEE.
leaves
root
trunk
straight
branch'es
wheth'er
fruit
+AI5
m
ground
¥*        a?©
ripe pick
ap'ples pears
See this tree—how straight it is.
A tree has a trunk, roots, leaves, and
branches.
Can you see the roots of a tree?
No, for they are in the ground.
Can you see the leaves ?
I can.
What else can you see?
I can see the fruit and the branch'es.
What is the fruit good for?
It is good to eat.
I do not know wheth'er the fruit on
this tree is ap'ples or pears.
Which do you like best, ap'ples or
pears?
I like pears best, because they are
soft and sweet.
We will go to the' tree and see if
there are  an'y pears  on  it.    If
they are ripe, we will ask leave
to pick some to eat. mmmmimm
FOX.
rriDB. FIRST  READING   BOOK.
LESSON 19.
THE   FOX   AX1>   THE   OTTER.
fox ot'ter sight
ears smell night
eyes a-like' keen
near
catch'es
Here are a fox and an ot'tei
They do not look a-like'.
The fox has a large tail.
The ot'ter has a small tail.
The fox has long ears.
The ot'ter has short ears.
See what small eyes the fox has.
But his sight is ver'y keen.l|
He can see m the night.
He lives in a hole in the ground.
The ot'ter lives near the wa'ter.
He loves fish, and catch'es man y.
His fur is soft and fine.
4.
The fur of the fox is not fine.
But it is long and hair'y.
It is made into lap-robes.
The lap-robes are used in win'ter. Ill
.,:-
I
Hi-
26
kwong's series.
LESSON 20.
THE PARROT.
~+15
this
bill
stout
queer
hook'ed
green
mean
par'rot
read
talk
learn
climbs
ft
m
hand'some
fun'ny
2paS
l.
fi±
ft^fifa!
m
7E;
What bird is this ?
It is a par'rot.
What a queer bill it has !
Yes, the bill is stout and hook'ed.
When it climbs trees, it climbs with .£#JfoW!*flfc»ffl±i
its bill and its claws.
**
2.
Is it a white biro1 ?
No, it is green and red and blue.
Oh, how hand'some it must be!
Yes, and it can talk, too. I do not
mean that it can talk as we do,
but it can   learn   to   say some
words.
3. .    |
Does it know what the words mean ?
a do not think that it does.
n
-Hfr %Afc
ni FIRST READING BOOK.
%1
Gan the parrot learn to read? II11 ft•$IS#5
I never heard  of  one  that could l£^E?#f§S|f£il|lM
read.
What a funny bird the par'rot must Sll|fa*S^>$*
be!   I wish that I had one.
LESSON 21.
THE  DOVE.
~ +
ti
an-oth'er
dove
barn
built
know
S&       if
m
i
called side M 1^
wild sound
please through
holes   m tame f£
homes learn £p
Here is an-othfer bird.    Will you fcmmMtM^M%&%.&®
please tell me what it is ?
That is a dove.
Is it a wild bird, or a tame one ?
It is a tame bird.    You may see
them fly'ing a-bout' barns where
they have a home.
2. U'
Do they make their nests in the hav ?
No, rows  of  box'es  are built for
sent
•aHfttJi,Wpr»i>    1
wmsfrm
^"^Si
■rifitti i I
It
1
o
28
KWONG'S series.
them, in which they have their
nests.
Oh, now I know; I have seen some
in  George   Smith's   barn.    The
box'es  were  high   up,  and   the
doves came in through holes in
' the side of the barn.
Yes, and the box es or lit'tle hous'es
in which the doves live are called
dove-cotes.
I 8-
Do doves sing sweetly ?
O «/
They do not sing at all, but they
ut'ter a low, soft sound, which is
called coo'ing.
Will you not buy me some doves ?
I will feed them and take good
care of them.
If you are a good boy and learn
well I will get you some.
O «-
LESSON 22. I
THE  STAGE-COACH.
fi»ft*«^4u>MJS*JSft»«
1   '    II I
!Ay*a*3£%
**x-j»j&**aife» M
&£££ft>8fJII2.$£fJK£
+
§   #
ride
loth
whip
trot
driver
crack
leath'er
coach
easy
let'ters
bot'tom
front
sleek
dust
smart
win'dows
pace
cradle
tight
mail
door
ft
n
i
w
tt*
f
N.3I
Stft
i-tsk:
E*
iifevt
n
•"^i-i
VI FIRST READING BOOK.
29
This is a pic'ture of a stage-coach.
It is made to ride in. The driv'er
sits on his seat in front, and the
guard rides- be-hind'. You can
see them both in the pic'ture.
.2.
The horses are very sleek and
smart. How high they hold up
their heads. How fast thev trot.
They do not need to be struck
with the whip. The driv'er has
only to crack his whip, and the
horses 'will go at a fast pace.
o.
This coach is very easy to ride in.
It has large leath'er springs, so
that it rocks like a cradle. The
bot'tom and back of the seats are
cushioned with leath'er, so that
thev are soft to sit on.
!
ft-l««it j
mi
ft^tEifsttai wamm
sufniitt*
f    HI
ft*S-g£     I  •       J
Ji*#«,«tiitimi*4-*
It is made tight, so as to keep the
dust and rain jut. There are
windows in the sides, so that one
can look out and see the country
as he rides a-lon6.
This is a mail coach, and carries
the bag which holds the let'ters
and pa'pers from one town to another. jaiimu
mm**
m
1
^
MslS\
<!
\Sg~ FIRST READING  BOOK.
31
5- a
Would you like to ride in the coach •#<$ BS^jft¥S ^SSIfc
to-day? If you would, we will ®MM3iWM^MA16&
call to the driv'er to stop. Then
the guard will get down from his
seat, o'pen the door and let down
the steps for us,'and we will
get in.
trees
walk
hun'gry
hind
LESSON 23.
THE BLACK BEAR.
hog bear
dens win'ter
caves sleeps
chick'ens calves
II.  . '[$'
• See this black bear.
He looks some like a hog.
He has long, black, soft fur on him.
The bear lives in dens and caves in
the woods.
He can climb trees.
In the win'ter he sleeps.
He lives on berries and fruits.
But when he is ver'y hun'gry he
will eat pigs, chiek'engj and calves.
The bear can walk on his hind legs.
3. ^
The bear is ver'y fond of hon ey.
He will climb a tree to get it.
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IvWONG'S  SERIES.
If the bees sting him he lies down £$t$M fM-l^J&ttfStStt
on the ground and crushes them     J£
by rolling o'ver and o'ver. 'S^
The bear can be tamed. Slfbfilfi
He can be taught man'y tricks. ^1&$X%%^
He will walk   on   two   legs and #JK^3l?r£Sfi
dance.
LESSON 24.
THE  CLOCK   AND  WATCH.
&K
+ 1115
watch
-pic'tures
day
hour
case
pe'ri-ods
o'pen
moving
wheels
soil
f Kit. /S.T.
I:
H
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHimintg
di-vid'ed
yellow -
polish
scratch
brass
% 1.
clock     ^
want      gg
spring    ilfj
alive'     H
hand'some ^j§
»
^
w
JS
SI
re
1
ft'B-
Can you tell me, John, what these Wfltv^l6^^^»lft-(^fSTSS>
pic'tures are ?
Yes, sir, a watch and a clock. f^7fe4J^£i5 It*
Right.    What is the use of clocks *|*£itif£faJB%
and watch'es ?
To tell the time of day.    We want ftfn£to®$±fa&l%te%%ffi
to know when to go to bed and fl$:fefi>ffi#fll>#f±frif M
when to get up, when to eat our $|f?$fi§ Bfl^S^^ff9^Il»
meals,  and  when  to  go  to  our |Kj
work and to school. *
^^^^^H^^HnHHiEi ^^^^^^^H FIRST  READING   BOOK.
il
«±i*»j»»«r-aff.
What do the figures ou the clock
and watch de-note' ?
They tell the  hours  of   the  day.
There are twenty-four hours  in
each day.    These   are   di-vid'ed
in'to two pe'ri-ods of twelve hours
each.   That is why there are only
twelve fig'ures on the face of clocks
and watch'es.
i 8-
See, the hands move as if they were SfiKftfFS-ll Ji#nffi%i£I!ii
a-live'?  and when  the  watch  is
o'pen you can see the lit'tle brass
wheels go round.
Yes, there is a spring shut up in a
box, which makes the wheels and
hands ero round.
HI
tt%ffifiW*«Mt*i
4.
How strong the spring must be to
keep the wheels and hands moving all the time, day and night.
It must be a great deal of work iZ^MW^^.^'fiWJtJ&^i
to make a watch.
How pret'ty this gold case is, it is so $t&L&MttWM§9kU%
yellow and bright.
5. .   '
Yes, the ma'ker of the watch took
much pains to have it hand'some,
and to polish it so that it shines.
We must take care not to soil or ®ft&%>h$*%£ft&Wli*
scratch it.
ss
^zz
E J-—"    -   J*>*.
•;;   /
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O paw
ice
cage
FIRST READING BOOK.
LESSON 25.
THE WHITE  BEAR.
an'1-mals
cli'mates
brought
1.
n+£if
cool
swims
warm
££»
See this white bear.
He has long white fur.
He does not live in the woods, as
the black bear does, but he lives
near the wa'ter.
He eats fish'es, seals, birds, and the
like.
2.
In the pic'ture he has his paw on
some an'i-mal.
The white bear lives in ver'y cold
cli'mates. He walks o'ver the ice
and swims in the wa'ter. If he is
brought to a warm cli'mate he
must have ice in his cage to keep
him cool.
f.   3.
The white bear is a fierce ani-mal,
and some'times at-tacks' sailors in
the arc'tic regions. If this bear
is wound'ed, or if her cubs are
taken a-way', she will fight fiercely*
At such times it is dan'ger-ous to
ap-proach' her, for by one stroke
of her paw she could break a
man's arm or crush his skull.
Sft61 I
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1
36
KWONG S SERIES.
LESSON 26.
THE  BIRD'S   NEST.
eggs
some'thing
moss
n
wool
three
wings
*€
feath'ers
lined
bot'tora
Wb
a-way'
hair
breaks
*
cu'ri-ous
firm
sprigs.
*ll
-TV\tlJ
wi
See, here is a bird's nest. § JhitSlW^Sli*
Yes, and do you not see some'thing $y$7 j|Llf®&^
in it?
I do; there are three eggs.
7 OO
The eggs have a soft, warm bed to
lie in, for the nest is lined with
feath'ers.
Some birds make their nests on the
ground, and some make them in
the trees. A bird's nest is a cu'ri-
ous thing, so round, and firm, and
soft it is.
if?
ff FIRST READING BOOK.
37
Did you ever see a bird make her
nest ? She flies a-way' and finds
sprigs of moss, spires and roots of
grass, bits of string, horse-hairs,
and such things. Then she puts
them all to-geth'er, and makes that
lit'tle round cup which we call the
nest. You could not do it, and I
could not do it, but the bird
knows how.
I    f   3.
In the bot'tom of the nest she puts
feath'ers or bits of wool, to make
a soft, warm place for the eggs
and the lit'tle birds.
When she has laid the eggs -in the
nest she sits on them and keeps
them warm nian'y days. By and
by, the shell breaks open, and
the lit'tle bird comes out. He is
so small that he can not walk,
nor fly, nor feed him-self'.
4.
So the old bird takes care of him
till he is old e-nough' to take care
of him-self'. Ev'er-y day she
brings him food to eat, and ev'er-y
night she covers him up with her
wings while he sleeps. When it
rains she spreads her wings over
him to keep him dry.
H
*ft-*»J£j*#M*r.*l»ilsfl
&.1lt£AftK*r'ifji&,
W')»Slii» f*^f *Jft,*ffi
K*,**JR,X*tfi£JE'fr
Wit,   BH »<&*•?£»$ € FIRST READING BOOK.
5.
In a few weeks the young bird is i
old e-nough' and strong e-nough'
O o o
to walk and fly. Then he bids
his mother good-bye, leaves the
nest, and flies a-way'.
LESSON 27.
THE  BEAVERS.
bea vers       sharp       bark
traps
berries
sell
See   these
They   have
They gnaw
teeth dams
gnaw deep
riv'er broad
beavers,
sharp, strong teeth,
off the branch'es of trees.
They want the branch'es to build
dams.
Al.
The dams make the wa'ter deep,
and  make a good place for the
beavers to live in.
See their broad, flat tails.    They pat
down the mud with their tails.
They have holes in the mud in
the bank of the river.
3.
They eat bark, and roots; and leaves,
and berries.
The beaVer has yer y soft, fine fur,
The fur is good to make caps.
A fG
KWONG S SERTES.
Men set traps to catch bea'vers. s\&MWMif$$&
The men want the fur to use or to ABlSll^liffllScf?
sell.
LESSON 28.
THE  BUTTERFLY.
<&£
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if.
ftftft$fe>£ft4*
but'ter-fly use'ful beau'ti-iul tUf "|f    WJB
gar'den weather sometimes M 3t#C
flow'er spots snone $• 16
lion'ey sum'mer coun'tries "§f$| g;"*
i i   •    "     •
This is not a bird.    Can you tell ]Ifc#Jj
what it is ? §*
It is a but'ter-fly. j|jjj!
I saw a bird and a but'ter-fly to-day <£ B3S£~ J|«Si9llK£|i£
in the gar'den.
The bird was in a tree, and the but'. J|a#U*JI£EJfc J^t Mft
|f ter-fly was on a flow'er.    He had     MM±-Mh    BiSR+^-ft
black and red wings, and there     fi,SSS>
were spots on them.    The  sun
shone  on  his wings,  and made
O   ' i
them ver'y beau'ti-ful. j
jj    3- jj        •■■!
If you saw a but'ter-fly you may be '^^^i^^U^KXEfi
sure that sum'mer has come. They
% FIR8T READING  BOOK.
do not like the cold weather, and
are seen only in the sum'mer.
Birds and but'ter-flies spend the
sum'mer with us, and are gone in
the win'ter.
' I       . 4.
They love to sit on the flow'ers and
«/
suck the sweet juice. They do
not make hon'ey, as the bees do,
and are not use'ful to man, like
the bees.
In some countries there are a great
man'y butter-flies, and they are
ver'y large. In those countries
they fly in flocks, like birds, and
some'times sh on the rocks by the
side of the sea.
$A>
LESSON 29.
maby's lamb.
lamb
snow
arm
shield
followed
head
school
a-gainst'
chil'dren
play I
lin'gered
hearts
1
Ma'ry had a lit'tle lamb,
Its fleece was white as snow;
And ev'er-y-where that Mary went.
The lamb was sure to go.
mHTM
fleece
laugh
harm
re-ply'
ap-pear
a-fraid' KWONG S SERIES.
2.
It followed her to school one day—
That was a-gainst' the rule;
It made the chil'dren laugh and play
To see the lamb at school.
And so the teach'er turned it out;
But still it lin'gered near,
And on the grass it fed a-bout,'
Till Ma'ry did ap-pear'.
4-
And then to her it ran, and laid
Its head up-on' her arm,
As if to say,—I'm not a-fraid',
You'll shield me from all harm.
5.
What makes the lamb love Mary so ?
The lit'tle chil'dren cry;
Oh, Ma'ry loves the lamb, you know,
The teach'er did re-ply'.
As Ma'ry's lamb to her was bound
By love and kind'ness true,
So you, my child, will ev'er find
Love binds all hearts to you.
-taftfe;I$M
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Bgggm*^H***Bli.HH FIRST READING BOOK.
LESSON 30.
THREE  CHILDREN
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^^^P^^^^^^S^^^^^^^g
g^i
girl
sis'ters
bank
sun'shine
be-hind'
air
sifting
kneeling
health'y
shoul'der
rest
per-haps'
hap'py
sto'ries
seem en-joy'
grassy plan
1.
Look at these three chil'dren.
There are two girls and a boy.
I think the girls may be the boy's
sis'ters.
The girls are sit'ting on a grass')
bank, and the boy  is kneeling
down be-hind' them.
o
21.
A doll lies in the lap of one of the
girls.
I think they have been at play, and
have now sat down to rest and to
kl-
Sit
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44
kwong's series.
k**
m
tft^c
read.    You  see  that   the  girls &IL:&^Wir&?HsS5?£---
have a book in their hand, and
the   boy is   looking   o'ver   the
shoulder of one of them.
3.
I can not tell wheth'er it is a pic'-
ture-book or a sto'ry-book.    Perhaps' it has both pic'tures  and
stones.   They seem to en joy' it
ver'y much.
I     4.
It is good for boys and girls to be
out in the air and sun'shine.    It
makes them health'y and hap'py.
It is a good plan to have a book
to read when one is resting from
work or play. If we wish to become' wise and good we must
read some ev'er-y day.
RiX$J8i££BBBft>
LESSON 31.
BOY
CLIMBING   A  TREE.
helping  1
.SSiili/                       ^^
climbing ft IS
stands     1
B^^^%nHtB   hSw ■ AbBS
push'es     j£
won'der   !
|||||   la^^J^
.car'ry       $£n
sha'dy     J
1 among'    |&$
squir'rel i
5Ea§g&|2.v V     fjftfn   AS? /
moth'er    ^||
diz'zy      §
Msm Ink
boughs $m$
young     1
'jump        gift
ft
at
| 1. I
Two lit'tle boys!   One of them is Mf-~A,-AWiK,-~ Mfc&fe* FIRST READING BOOK.
helping the oth'er climb a tree.
He stands on the ground and
push'es him up in to the tree. I
wonder what he wants to get up
in'to the tree for. Per-haps' he
thinks it is cool and sha'dy
a-mong' the leaves. Per-haps' the
tree has nuts or ap'ples on it, and
the boys want some to eat.
2.
Boys and girls are as fond of nuts
and ap'ples as scruir'rels are, but
they can not climb the tree as
well as the s<juir reis can. The
squir'rel does not need any help
to get into a tree. He can run
up the trunk and out on the
branch'es as ea'si-ly as you can
mn on the ground.
3.
It does not make him diz'zy to go
up high and to swing on the
boughs. He can jump from one
tree to an-oth'er and not fall.
I hope this boy is not climb'ing the
tree to rob birds' nests.
I 1
Some bad boys take the eggs and
young birds from the nests, and
carry   them   a-way'.    Then   the
moth'er bird feels ver'y sad, and
does not know what to do.
I hope no boy who reads this book
will ev'er rob birds' nests.
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Xtt6ft^>ilM®^,*^i
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1
i i FIRST  HEADING  BOOK.
47
LESSON 32.
THE  SABLE.
sa'ble hangs back
branch       dead bush'y
S
ground      have
whis'kers
E+Hi
ttflHua*
wsa»±
This sa'ble sits on the trunk of a jfcSfffrKSU:
tree.
The tree lies on the ground.
A pine branch hangs o'ver his back.
2.
There is grass on the ground.
He has short ears and long whis'- IS If S3
kers.
He has a bush'y tail
I 3.
See his paw on the bird.
The bird is dead.
The sa'ble eats birds and hares.
B*±
mm-k
SJiBft
III
4. f^.
The sa'ble has fine fur.
It brings a high price.
It is made into muffs and cloaks.
These are warm clothes.
5.
The sa'ble lives in cold coun'tries.
Men catch him for the fur.
His skin is sent to other coun'tries.
So he is a useful ani-mal.
ffirflt II
a
AWiUBffiftaft
ftfc4ffc£JB<£*
I
_»  FIRST  READING  BOOK.
49
gram
turkeys
LESSON 33.
THREE  KINDS   OF  BIRDS.
spreads kinds
roost first
llf
Here are three kinds of birds.
They are all wild birds.
The first birds are wild turkeys.
How large they are.
2.
How one spreads his tail.
They live in the woods, and roost
on trees.
They eat nuts, grain, and grass.
They are good to eat.
ball duck swim
reeds nest float
1.
The next bird is a duck.
He lives near the wa'ter.    He hides
in the grass and reeds.
See his web-feet.
2.   -
He swims with his web-feet.
He eats fish and grain.
He floats on the wa'ter like a ball.
third moist brown
quail web-feet       throat
|      1.
The third bird is a quail*
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'«i  FIRST READING BOOK.
He does not have web-feet.
He does not live in the wa'ter.
He lives in the mpist fields.
2.
His nest is on the ground. it;
His wings are brown and his throat ^n^g^ii
white.
Men catch quails to eat. A&ffl &lilj£
51
II
6&
LESSON 34.
SOME  DEER.
hunt count flesh
fight slim sev'en
1.
These are deer.    Count them.
One,   two,   three,   four,   five,   six,
sev'en, eight, nine.
What short tails they have.
They have long ears, too.
They look some like goats.
Some have horns, and some do not.
2#
They fight with their horns.
Their horns are sharp and strong.
A deer can run very fast.
He has long, slim legs.
Men hunt the deer.
His fle*sh is good to eat.
:       3.
The deer has large, soft eyes.
He runs wild in tbe woods.
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52
kt/ong's series.
But he can be tamed.
Then he is kept in a park.
He will eat from your hand.
;i   4.
The wild deer is ver'y shy.
If he hears a noise he will run.
If he sees a man he will run.
But a tame deer is not a-fraid'.
mum
ttfctttfli'C-f:
3SC
HA*a*
EAiPTfe
LESSON 35.
LHMBERDSTG.
saw-mill
felled
stages
some'times
win'ter
at-tend'ed
differ-ent
mar'ket
dan'ger-ous
hun'dred
un-set'tled
pur'pose
fre'quent-ly
lum'ber
float'ed
logs
forests
regions
business
sev'er-al
journey
*
##J
*£
#
1*
*P* FIRST READING  BOOK.
1.
rfee! this riv'er is full of logs, and
the men are standing on them.
What are they do-ing ?
This pic'ture rep-re-sents' a scene in
one of the stages of lum'ber-ing,
or get'ting logs from the forest,
where they grew, to the saw-mill,
and then to mar'ket.
.3. f
Do the logs have to be carried far?
Yes, many hun'dred miles, some'-
tinies.' The for'ests in which the
trees grow are far a-way' in the
un-set'tled re'gions of coun'try.
The trees are felled in win'ter by
men who go in'to the woods,
build log-cabins, and stay there
for this pur'pose. The logs are
drawn on sleds to the bank of a
riv'er.
§• 4-
When spring comes, the logs  are
pushed from the bank in'to the
riv'er, and float'ed down till they
come to the  saw-mill.     In this
journey they must be at-tend'ed
by men in or'der to pre-vent' them
from lodging a-gainst' the banks,
or rocks,  or  bush'es,  and   thus
being stopped. I Iii
R>
54
KWONG S SERIES.
5.
Sometimes the men go down in
boats, or on rafts made from the
logs, and some'times they follow
a-long' the banks. Floating the
logs is a ver'y hard and sometimes dan'ger-ous busl-ness. The
men must often walk and work
on the float'ing logs, and fre'-
quent-ly they fall in'to the wa'ter.
It re-quires' sev'er-al weeks, according to the dis'tance, for the
logs to ar-rive' at the saw-mills
where they are made into lum'-
ber of dif'f er-ent kinds.
§  LESSON 36.
THE  DEER.
lying
fast'en
at-tack'
m
bright
swiftly
de-fends'
*w
resting
liinbs
sled
w.%
great
eat'en
finds
M
branching
tim'id
moss
wx
1
m.
*
m
s=tt
!*
raw \
FIRST READING  BOOK.
1.
Here is a deer. He is lying down
on the grass. He has eaten as
much grass as he wants, and now
he is resting. You can not see
his eyes in the pic'ture, but if you
could, you would see how bright
and soft they are.
2
JUt.
But you can see what great branch'-
ing horns he has. They look like
the limbs of a tree when the
leaves are off. The deer is a
very timid an'i-mal, but when
other anlnials at-tack' him, he
de-fends' him-self with his horns.
3.
The deer can run ver'y swiftly, and
few anl-mals can catch it.   Some'-
times men hunt a deer with do^
till he is tired out, and then shoot
him.    The flesh is ver'y good to
eat.
4.
■
The people of some coun'tries use
the deer to draw them o'ver the
ground. They fast'en the deer to
a sled, and he draws it like a
horse. He can go as.fast as a
horse.
oo
i
ftA-ir-,1 m&M±,E.&i£
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A
56
kwong's series.
5. %
It is so cold there that grass and Qifa^M^X.£.&&&§£.
grain do not grow; so the deer
can not have them to eat. But
he lives on a kind of moss which
grows there. When the snow is
on the ground, he push'es it off
with his feet and nose. Then he
finds the moss, and eats it. Do
you not think it tastes good to
him?
LESSON 37.
A   WATER   SCENE.
•AiIie.^* n ^
akm.
# ft
church
steam'boats
shore      M$
m
boat
sail
care'ful' tt
standing
oars
toward jE
coming
lifted
skating 3fc
playing
pleasant
§ 1.
en'joy    M3
ft
*
I
What do you see in this pic'ture?     i££jfcfi#fiftt.
I see a house, a church, trees, wa'ter, &JL~M\-~MM'jik\9fr'fo
and a boat.
Do you see any one in the boat?      &E#Aft^S
Yes, and I think I  see  some one #*fS-©fi~A£^||*
standing on the shore, but I am.
not sure,
sis
•^■BBflOl
**"*"■ first reading book.
67
9
«■ #
Is it a row-boat, or a sail-boat?
It is a row-boat. I can see the oars
which are lifted out of the wa'ter. But I can not tell wheth'er
the boat  is  going   toward   the
o o
shore, or coming from the shore.
3.
can not tell. Nei'ther can I tell
wheth'er the wa'ter is a lake or a
riv'er. But it must be ver'y
pleas'ant to live so near the clear,
cool wa'ter, and to row about on
it. Per-haps' steam'boats go past
the house ev'er-y day.
ftffi#8tt»ftij|Htt,
in
l**n  **D«J*#M*   ft
Yes, it is pleas'ant to have wa'ter
near the house in the sum'mer;
and then think how nice it must
be in the win'ter to have such a
good place for skating. I won'-
der if an'y chil'dren live in that
fine white house.
5.
I hope so, and then they can en-joy'
playing in the sand, up-on' the
shore, and can make lit'tle boats
and sail them. But they must be
care'ful not to fall in'to the
wa'ter. -mi H
>4      #
«!?>X«>JvttfiHk
99 ±
fill H^HHBBH»
fill
PI
e
09
G
g
o
OQ
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O first reading book.
59
wool
cloth
milk
LESSON 38.
SHEEP.
bodies
mut'ton
faces
lamb   &£^      £
flock   |£. '    *ft
mills   ft 9   '
*¥
Jft
1.
Here are three sheep.    They have jfc*WH^*B*   ftWJt^Mfl
wool all o'ver their bodies.
There is no wool on their faces and flilBSJEMfif 5
legs.
Sheep are tame and kind. *¥fbili$*»tt|i!iil>
2. | l|
They will come to you and eat from ft#ft'**&£ifc^#i:tt
your hand.
The cow gives us milk,  and the ^^ItftA^^&A*
sheep gives us wool.
Men cut off   the wool and make A||^€*ffl^lljBi%
cloth from it.
3. |||
Wool makes ver'y warm and strong t&*^^^^$l8^RI?W£$U
cloth.
There  are  mills   for   making the SlSfe
wool into cloth. §p
Many men work in the mills. ^AS^ffil
I"   4.| X
feneep eat grass and gram. im-rs*^/*.*x
A young sheep is called a lamb.        *3p^$Jlj£f>J>3F
The flesh of sheep is called mut'ton *2*£**^*
and is good to eat.
Did you ev'er see a flock of sheep? xkmJl$M.%^^§
msmm I iii      '
1
1
A
60
KWONGS SERIES.
LESSON 39.
THE  SHOEMAKER.
H + ftlJj
1.
You see what this lad is doing. He
has a boot in his lap lying
a-cross' his knees, and is pegging
on the sole. He has a hammer
in one hand and an awl in the
oth'er. Having made a hole in
the leath'er with the awl, he puts
in a wooden peg and drives it
tight with the ham'mer.
2. -
This is the way shoes and boots are
pegged by hand. But now machines' are used for much of the
work, both of sewing and peg'*
ging, so that it is done much
more rapld-ly and cheaply. Indeed', the work can thus be done
i    ■   t •■
#aft**AJ3Fffc.
I   II  I g
**» mm*m.&+fi FIRST reading book
fifteen or twenty times as fast.
The pegging machine both makes
the peg from a strip of wood and
drives it in'to the sole of the shoe.
This pic'ture il-lus'trates shoe-mak'-
ing by hand. The lad is seated
on his bench, which con-tains' his
tools. Some of these are in the
box by his side, and some are in
the drawer un-der-neath'. A tub
with wa'ter in it for soft'en-ing tho
leath'er is at his left, and scraps
of leath'er are scattered a-bout'
the floor. Some boots and shoes
hang on the wall, and doubtless
the lad "has e-nough' to do to keep
him busy.
LESSON 40.
THE  YOUNG  ROBINS.
tiny fa'ther quickly
chirped half pout'ed
cried words birdies
wi'ser heard mer'ri-ly
■f 1 *
In a soft, warm nest, in a sha'dy tree,
With bright lit'tle eyes and wings,
Sat a fine old bird with his chil'dren
three,
Such ti'ny, sweet-tempered things. 62
KWONG S SERIES.
II
And the old bird said to the dear
lit tie birds,
" I want you to learn to fly";
And the lit'tle ones mer'ri-ly chirped
the words,
I Dear fa'ther, we'll try, well try.
mj a
^?LH0
n
Q
o.
Now a lit'tle boy had a sum to-day,
And was   told   to   go  quickly
through it;
But he pout'ed and cried, and was
heard to say,
He was sure he could not do it.
4.
Do you think this boy was half as
good
•As the birdies that learned to fly ?
He would wi'ser have been—don't
you think he would ?—
Had he said, "111 try, I'll try:"
fB«*Ha#;W;ffiWnf§,
«£*ttffr
X
ttfttt JiMf I? Mag tt *n%
»* FIRST READING  BOOK.
LESSON 41.
THE  DRUNKARD.
63
ails
sick
clothes
ragged
drunkard
patched
bot'tle
bruised
un-steadl-ly
money
spends
cross
wife
drink
tavern
bran'dy
o'pi-um
ttfL
T>%
■km
i
mmmm
i
What poor old  man is this,  and ft*Afl[SJtff>a«ff7*»fi#
what ails him ?    Is he sick ?
9
He is a drunkard, and that is what
makes him look so. See, his
clothes are ragged and patched,
and his hat bruised. How sad
he looks ! How dull his face is !
He does not seem to be hap'py.
How do you know he is a drunk'-
ard I
ii
*£»'&«#.*!&   MM*m
hi
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.1
9 64
KWONG S SERIES.
-I
■ f
I! i
II
I i
misjmnm*    -I'M
Do you not see how un-steadl-ly he ^^aKfT^II>1i4nfl|fbjt^
walks,  as   if   he 'could   hardly     f&lffljS:^   fSttWilU^fi
stand up ?    Then he has a bot'tle
in  his   hand.    The   bot'tle  contains' rum  or bran'dy,  or some I
oth'er liq'uor. He has just bought
it at the house which you see in
the pic'ture.    That is a tav'ern,
and some'times liq'uor is sold at
tav'erns.
When a man drinks rum, whis'key, A«tWa-*a*^S»f!«*S%9-
or bran'dy, and gets drunk, he is     fl#35J§I$£i* "ffi-^liKX^ft
called a drunkard.    Then he does     J$ H JFSSg&t   1
not work, but wastes his time,
and spends his mon'ey for liq'uor.
He be-comes' cross and ugly.   He fttg]M8SvS#*§E*   JIMS
scolds and   beats  his wife  and     fl^/f»^nilf^lRf
chil'dren.    When one is drunk he
does not know what he is doing,
and some'times hurts him'self or I
kills oth'er peo'ple.
JcUffr
i»ja>
o.
a
;$S£»ATvI§mfttt
■fife
I should not think any one would Ji
drink  what  will harm  him-self      IkMhZ*
and oth'ers so much.
He  ought not  to   drink   rum   or ft^fiftttH^Kft^JH^rft
smoke o'pi-um, be-cause' they both ^ |f ^ g £ jfc jJJ \^
do   him-self and   oth'ers   much
harm.
"■*"■*'"'"■■  ■I
NI
chair
ta'ble
sola
sprii
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KWONG S SERIES.
LESSON 42.
FURNITURE.
a-like' writing-desks,
rocking-chair
book-cas'es
var'nished
JL
cover
vel'vet
be-cause'
1.
How man'y chairs can you count
here?
One, two, three, four, five, six, sev'en.
Two of them are a-like'.    One is a
rocking-chair.
How man'y solas ?
Four.
2.
How man'y ta'bles ?
Three.    One is a small work-ta'ble.
There   are   some   book-cas'es   and
writing-desks.
The solas and some of the chairs
have soft seats and backs.
They have hair and springs to make
them soft.
The covers are silk or vel'vet.
The arms and legs are cut in man'y
and queer forms.
The chair and ta'bles shine be-cause'
they have been var'nished.
4m*
0+Xfg
mil
513      H it
i i
II
m JL5>h JL+^ic^f M¥.%
:£&i^#£#PP3>#Ma*m
ft&tiVl&.m®i&. FIRST HEAPING  BOOK.
07
LESSON 43,
A  BOY  RIDING  A  DOl*.
f
■+£■
It"? IS®
growl
touch
snap
bit'ten
pa pers
willing
mas'ter
with-out'
cross mm
mouth m
bas'ket /tss
market r^
*Ci*.
MMi&
p
ft
How large and strong this dog must jftftl|E^ft^ffi^±^*iJ^:ifi
be to be a'ble to car'ry the boy     #fc
on his back.
Yes, and how tame and kind he M *#&-§!.$■* RttlJU W?f
must be, al'so. Some dogs are JEll^^^SI^AIEfii* R
cross and will hardly let one go
near them. If you touch them
they will growl and snap, so that
one must be care'ful not to be
bit'ten by them.
3.
Ill
But this dog is willing to let the  ft ^i £££?£$
bov ride on his back.    Some dogs
•tssum 111
68
KWONG S SERIES.
are very knowing  and can be ^-^SJSjSft^tt^Sf^l^^
«aa~aR»-*Mfift±A
trained to do man'y things. I
have read of a dog which would
go to the post-office to get the
let'ters and pa'pers for his mas'-
ter.
'     4.     I X
I have read of an-oth'er dog which %&~Wbi?s%Mffi&\%~M&
would car'ry a bas'ket to the mar'- Tff±JRSl» f&£JPiflf>|!
ket to get meat. Then he would
take the bas'ket in his mouth and
trot home with-out' touching the
meat. Was he not a faith'ful
^erv'ant ?
H*»»^*ftft*»tt#Afir
Ai%.
LESSON 44.
THE CUCKOO.
ffl+paff
\H
cuck'oo
name
breast
form
note
col'our
hatch
shy
feath'ers
or'chards
u *»
English W&
though
hand'some     keeps
1 I
This is a ver'y hand'some bird, both ft.^JP@.ffiSH,
in form and col'our.   It is called     X-SM®
the cuck'oo, or cow bird.    This
M
%®m FIRST READING  BOOK.
69
name is giv'en to it be-cause' of Jtftig^HftKSSfifiiSBfe
its note, which is some thing like
this,-
-cow-cow, cow-cow.
It is of a beauli-ful olive-brown
col'our, with a white breast. The
bill is yellow. The feath'ers of
the tail have large white spots on
them.
|; 3. / -
The cuck'oo is a shy bird, and does
not come ver'y near the house,
though it is some'times seen in
the orchards.
4.
The English cuck'oo does not make
any nest of its own. What do
you think it does? It lays an
egg in the nest of some oth'er
bird. Then it goes a-way' and
leaves the oth'er bird to hatch
the egg with her own.
' 5.
When the egg is hatched the young
cuck'oo push'es the oth'er young
birds out of the nest, and keeps
it for it-self. Does not that seem
like stealing a house ?
-fcfc« *
I
M
mm
t|
KWONG'S  SERIES.
LESSON 45.
Af\r   OASIS.
scene
cov'ered
thirsty
glad
grown
trav'el-lers
a-round'
jour ney
tract
spots
desert
stomach
11
shows
cam'els
.,_____„_   cn-dure'
'    1.
This is a scene in a desert- You
know what a desert is,—do you
I not? Then I will tell you. It is
a large tract of land, cov'ered
with sand, so that nothing can
grow on it. For miles and miles
there is no grass, nor trees, nor
wa'ter, nor anl-mals.
2. ff
But here and there in the des'ert are
green spots, where palm trees
grow and wells of wa'ter are
found. This pic'ture shows «uch
a spot.
•GU.
ft A
•a*
i
ii
SbS
-Bfftftl*. FIRST READING BOOK.
71
You see a group of trav'el-lers un'der
the trees and a-round' the spring
of wa'ter. How glad they must
be to find a sha'dy place to sit in
and cool wa'ter to drink*. They
get ver'y hot and thirst'y passing
o'ver the sands of the des'ert.
'     4.
Those anl-mals which you see
are cam'els. People travel o'ver
the des'ert with them in-stead' of
hor'ses, be-cause' horses can not
en-dure' such a hot, thirsty jour'-
ne7- 'I. '    ■ Ii
fSr,
D.
The cam'el can car'rv in his stom'-
ach e-nough' wa'ter to last him
man'y days, and the peo'ple car'ry
wa'ter in bot'tles. The green and
sha'dy spots which are found in
the des'ert are called o'a-ses.
HI
&%-mfiA.&mmm*%..
ftfl£ftl£iiW&»'&*fift..
fir»»tt»fTA»ft»a.fta
#0Fa.£«fMM6   ASPS*
9K&WM*
i *
«*IIJEI«»5*»JEaSJSifcH,
s^aft-saps*
10 Ill
KWONG S SERIES.
LESSON 46.
tt»±fi»*S
JOHtflCMEie
A. t. Stewart's residence, fifth avenue, jr. y., first class dwelling,
el'e-gant ' modern        wealth'y
fashlon-a-ble    im-mense'     million
charl-ty famine        re-lief
1. What a fine house! Yes; and
it stands in a good place. It is on
a cor'ner, so that it may be said to
have two fronts. You can see that
it is a ver'y large and el'e-gant build'-
ing, and that it is of the most mod'-
ern style.
2. Such a roof is called a man'sard
or French roof. It allows' of hav'-
ing rooms in   the   garret,  and is
111
I
ftlff*:
m
&ftl3
«#*#> .mmmMi
&
'M
ntum ftia^n5«,s
n4&i\
11   ftS:»i*»«|MIHK#, FIRST READING BOOK.
3
much em-ployed' at the pres'ent
time. In cities the buildings are
made high, be-cause' the ground on
which they stand is so costly.
Some'times they are sev'en or eight
sto'ries in height.
3. This house stands on Fifth Av'-
e-nue, a ver'y wealth'y and fashlon-
a-ble street in New York. It was
built by Mr, A. T. Stew'art, the
wealth'y mer'chant of that city.
He was a deal'er in dry goods, and
his busl-ness was im-mense'. At the
time of his death his trans-ac'tions
were es'ti-mat-ed to ex-ceed' six'ty-
five millions dollars yearly. The
store which he built on Broad'way
cost two and three-quar'ters milT-
ions dollars.
4. Mr. Stew'art was born in Ire'-
land, and ed'u-cat-ed at Trinl-ty Col'-
lege, Dublin. He came to A-merl-ca
when he was a young man, and
soon en-gaged' in busl-ness. His
busl-ness be-came' ver'y ex-ten'sive.
He had a'gen-cies in England, Scotland, Ireland, France, and Ger'-
ma-ny. He had al'so man'y mills in
A-mer'i-ca em-ployed'in man-u-fae'-
tur-ing goods.
5. Mr. Stew'art gave large sums in
charl-ty.    He aid'ed the I'rish dur'-
■U.
iP9*ft
•Kit, mmmmM
:#*i$f,   «:
■Sh
n%
:ftg<
a ttnimm.ftm 74
KWONG S  SERIES.
MAKING- TAR  AND  TURPENTINE. FIRST READING BOOK.
75
ing'the famine of 185f; and sent a
ship-load of flour to France after
the war be-tween' France and Ger-
ma-ny. After the great fire in Chi-
ca'go he sent fifty thou'sand dollars
to the suffer-ers. Dur'ing the civil
war he con-trib'ut-ed one hun'dred
thou'sand dollars to the Sanl-ta-ry
Com-mis'sion, which was an or-gan-
i-za'tion for the relief of the sick
and wound'ed sol'diers. Mr. Stew'art died in 1876.
11 LESSON 47.
MAKING  TAB   AND   TUEPENTINE.
re'gions lo'cat-ed        Jum'ber
tur'pen-tine     lampblack     juice
con-sumed'      in'dus-try       scraped
1. This is a scene in the pine re'gions of the South'ern States. It is
lo'cat-ed in a for'est. You can see
the trees standing here and there.
They are pine trees, snch as gr'ow in
the sand'y re'gions of the South.
2. They are ver'y val'u-a-ble, not
only for lum'ber, but al'so for the
oth'er prod'ucts which they furnish.
These prod'ucts are tur'pen-tine,
rosin, tar, pitch, and lamp'black.
The pic'tures rep-re-sent' the pro'-
cess-es of ob-tain'ing some of these
prod'ucts.
mmmmmm
fetf&f-       Mm J| 76
KWONG S  SERIES.
Mi
I
I-1     lift
1 *
3. The juice or sap of the pine
tree is called white tur'pen-tine, and
contains' these sev'er-al sub'stan-ces.
In or'der to obtain this juice, lit'tle
box'es or holes are cut in the trunk
of the trees near the ground, and
some of the bark is ta'ken off.
Then the juice which flows down
or is scraped down in'to the box'es
is dipped out and put in bar'rels.
4. By dis-tilllng this juice or sap,
spirits of tur'pen-tine and rosin are
ob-tained'. Then by burning* the
old and dead trees in tight pits tar
and pitch are ob-tained'. The smoke
which comes from burning pine
wood, being collect'ed, forms lamp'-
black.
5. All these sub'stances are ver'y
useful, and large quan'ti-ties of
them are con-sumed'. They are
made by peo'ple who live in or near
the pine re'gions, and, the man-u--
fac'ture of them is an im-por'tant
branch of in'dus-try.
nii*#mM&>pnjs*&trtt
»«ft+*«STaiW»^»IB*
»5L X
x 0**n-*>i?$*mM».
MMMM.
a ft^atatffl^ft^a^.
l-U&£A,&Jg'ft''k,]*&J£ft
Ii *■
FIRST  READING BOOK.
LESSON 48.
A  BATTLE.
H+A»
=m
y^S5^toa««Si^SS
mat
J iii ii 5^3»*<c lyr^gggggrogg
Ik
iM^s
guns
fight
marching
can'non
method
gen'er-als
colonels
galloping
pre'cious
lost
suffering
hoped
na'tions
war
kill
smoke
bat'tle
dis-putes' JUS
1. This seems to be the pic'ture of   1    ifcffllSc
a bat'tle.     You can see the  men
marching in long rows, with their
guns upon' their shoul'ders.    There
must be a great man'y of them, for
58
I.B.
A«£tt»B£>
ttJHTA*
^ I
1 ( '•
'IllllllllllliiiiH
I
>' Ii
ite-.inii.iiim'isii
Ii'liilill; ..!:-ii..'" llliiil
ll
III
11 K   I
UHNnft W   :ffifki|eef.3^***t:fH!M
ll l|! ||tf||l	
IP' ',1}     tOjffli  i
! kii iidnffiB FIRST READING BOOK.
they are seen all o'ver the field.
The smoke which you see comes
from the firing of guns and can'non,
and it shows where the bat'tle is
PPl:
-&ffiftiK£&
rag mg.
2. The persons who are on horse'-
back are the mounted offi-cers,
such as gen'er-als, colonels, &c.
They are has'ten-ing to an-oth'er part
of the field. You see that their
hors'es are galloping.
3. It is sad to think that men
should fight and kill each oth'er, and
that so many precious lives should
be lost. War causes much suffering, and it is to be hoped that na lions
will soon have some oth'er method
of set'tling their dis-putes'. If all
people were kind and just tow'ard
each oth'er, there would be no cause
of war.
II   &89&AM$£t**
mmfamm& mum
•m-
ill   ft8AfeR£t£l££fcii;
masts
voy'age
LESSON 49.
A  SHIP.
rig gmg
0+ftfiS
freight
deck south'ern
This is the pic'ture of a ship.
See what a quan'ti-ty of ropes surround' the masts. Those large, tail,
upright posts are the masts. There
are three. The mid'die one is called
the main'-mast. The ropes are called
the rigging.    They are used to ex-
A—
m I   ISIS It
ft«=*MB*
a
mxm^
ii
■BS
■finatfaflk 80
KWONG S  SERIES.
1
I
1     »
I Hi
lit
I
tend' and furl the sails, and also to
sup-port' the masts. You see some
men scattered a-bout' in the rigging. They as-cend' by means of
rope lad'ders, which are called rat-
lines.
The Sails are not ver'y dis-tinctly
seen, be-cause' they are furled or
fold'ed up. They are lying up-on'
those sticks which ex-tend' a-cross'
the masts, and which are called the
yards.
That is a large ship and will
car'ry man'y people and much
freight. There is plen'ty of room
for the people to live on the ship
during a voy'age, there being lit'tle
rooms like a bedroom in which
they can stay at night. When the
weath'er is pleas'ant they can be on
deck. In the pic'ture you see man'y
per'sons as-sem'bled on the deck.
Such ships as these cross the
o'cean car'ry-ing man'y pas'sen-gers
and much freight. Man'y go from
A-mer'i-ca to Eu'rope car'ry-ing cot'-
ton and grain, and bringing back
eml-grants. In the year 1868, the
val'ue of the cot'ton ex-port'ed from
the U-nit'ed States was $152,820,-
733/ '!'        ■.>   . jf
The cot'ton is grown in the south'-
**"^yft^«ARfe«±»*
9cfeH|BJ3,tSAffi*SB,   £
ft«H£«iiu£«£A*J»k
*U#«*B*JB£ABII
«,B«-,ffS+n*A+=:
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nr-TT—a-■■ ■"■"**"*"*■■ "■■ FIRST READING BOOK.
81
ern   states, which  were   for'mer-ly fg^j^-jSEHB^W^B^il^
slave states.    Those states pro-duce'     fi!u.jfcf£W$ffi$$%?$3STS
the best cot'ton in the world, and in
some of them it is the prin'ci-pal
crop raised.
LESSON 50.
A  GRASSHOPPER.
rich
common
leaping
plants
far'mer
crop m
in'sect tk^
hop'ping gfc
har'vest |g
harm H^
M&$£
itt#JWs*l,§> ikto
ftgft#£>
1. This is not a bird, al-though' it
has wings.  Do you know what it is ?
I think it is a grass'hop-per. -S^aS^SI
You are right, and it is a ver'y ftR9£    ftg^ttfijft
eom'n\on in'sect.
|i 2. There area oreat man'y kinds of   H    WI5:i^S^feff7faIf%
grass'hop-pers, and they have differ-     W^fevlife%i$fe>ffi@ii1lll!s»
ent forms and col'ours.    Some are     XWHfiSfe$i|?>
brown or black, some are green, and
in warm coun'tries there are those
which have bright, rich 'Col'ours. I
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8'
3. They live in the fields, and if
you walk  through the  field  on  a
bright sum'mer  day  you may see
them hop'ping up all a-round' you.
4. Though they have wings, they
can not fly a great clis'tance, as a
bird can. They hop along' with
long leaps. Their long, large hind
legs, which you see in the pic'ture,
aid them ver'y much in leaping.
5. They eat the grass and the
leaves of plants, and some'times they
do much harm to the crops. They
have been known to come in such
num'bers as to eat up ev'er-y-thing
growing in the fields. Then the
farmer does not have an'y crop to
harvest, and there is much suffering for want of food.
LESSON 51.
RAILROAD  TRAILS.
trains
con-venlence
bag'gage-car pas'sen-gers
rail'road sleeping-car
en-gi-neer'
1. Here are two trains of rail'road
cars, but they do not look much
a-like'.    Can you tell me why?
2. Per-haps' they are from different coun'tries.
HI   m®!^B34sgtSB#
spa cious
lo-co-mo'tive
■a
■mm
nm
aBfc
w
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i ftm~%>kMMm>
««. KWONG S  SERIES.
No, both pic'tures rep-re-sentr
A-merl-can cars and lo-co-mo'tives.
But one is an old style; the oth'er
is the new or pres'ent style. The
first pic'ture rep-re-sents' the first
cars which were made and used;
the sec'ond, such cars as are in use
now.
3. You see how dif er-ent the two
are in all res-pects'. The lo-co-mo'-
tive of the first train is much sim'-
pler and is made in a dif fer-ent
man'ner. The cars are still more
unlike those of the pres'ent day.
They are ver'y much like a stage'-
coach. The rails on which the
early cars ran were only flat strips
of i'ron which were nailed down to
long strips of wood. They were
not as safe as the pres'ent rails.
4. When and where were cars
like those in the first pic'ture employed' ?
A-bout' 1831, on the road run'-
ning west from Al'ba-ny, N. Y., to
TJ.'ti-ca. But ver'y great im-prove'-
ments have been made in con-ven'-
ience, safe'-ty, and speed since then.
5. Will you de-scribe' tfie last
pic'ture to me ?
The first carriage is the lo-co-mo'-
tive.   You see the smoke is'su-ing
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. FIRST READING BOOK.
85
from the smoke-stack. Just in front
of the smoke-stack is the headlight,
a large lan'tern with a re-flect'or,
which lights the track at night.
6. At the ver'y front of the engine, almost down to the ground, is
the pilot or cow-catch er. If anything lies on the track be-tween' the
rails the pilot will push it out of the
way, so that the cars will not run
o'ver it, and be thrown from the
track.
7. That lit'tle house at the rear
end of the lo-co-mo'tive is called the
cab. It is the en-gin-eer's' house,
where he stands pro-tect'ed from
wind and rain while he runs the
train.
8. Be-hind' the lo-co-mo'tive is the
ten'der. It carries the wood or
coal and the wa'ter. Next is the
bag'gage car, which car'ries the
trunks of the pas'sen-gers. Often a
portion of the same car car'ries the
bun'dles and pack'a-ges sent by express.'
9. Following the bag'gage car
are the pas'sen-ger cars. The ni'cest
of these are called pal'ace cars, or
drawing-room cars. They are more
spacious and are richly fur'nished,
and in-creased' fare is paid for rid'-
ing in them. -—
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86
KWONG S  SERIES.
10. There are al'so sleeping cars, + XWiS^JHffiSfe^f ft
for use at night, in which are beds RBgjfcJBft^ itfgfe
and oth'er con-ven ien-ces of sleeping-
rooms. If one is taking a long
journey, it is much ea'si-er to have
a sleeping-car, and thus rest at
night.
LESSON 52. Xl+Z
EMIGRANTS   AND   INDIANS. ^^B'JH A T$M A
roaming *m
*
a
rep-re-sent' miles
plains wet draw
rail'road wag'on sleep        >XM$t
them-selves' crossing sup'per    #fpq&P.
hundred Indians moving    "^ gpj^
1. What does this pic'ture rep-re-   |     jftfiSSfif®
sent'?
It seems to show a par'ty cross'- (Hfiffi—$ AlSil^PI^
ing the plains.     These peo'ple are      ^BjftJ3h*§f£ffiJlh
moving from the East to the West.
■•ist
ta
ajii
ft*
'■
^^^^HB-aHnB FIRST READING BOOK.
8'
They are going to find a home in a
new part of the coun'try.
2. They can not go on the cars because' there is no rail'road yet. So
they take a large wag'on, with man'y
hors'es to draw it, and thus carry
them-selves' and their goods man'y
hundred miles.
3. Much of the way they go
through a coun'try where there are no
towns or houses. So when they stop
at night they build a fire and cook
their sup per from the food they
carry with them. They have beds
in their wag'ons, on which to sleep;
and if it rains they do not get wet,
be-cause' there is a cov'er to the
wag'on which keeps off the rain.
The hor'ses are fed from the grass
which grows be-side' the road.
4. There are tribes of In'dians
roaming o'ver these plains, and some'times they at-tack' the trav'el-lers.
In this pic'ture you see three In'dians. One of them is a-bout' to
shoot at the driv'er of the wag'on.
I hope lie will not hit him.
|     LESSON 53.
WHAT  THE  BEE  SINGS  TO  THE  CHIL'DREN.
blos'soms
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buzz'ing       laggards   ^
sloth'ful        bloom sqnan'der Wf
12 88
KWONG S  SERIES.
dawning
dew-drops      gay'ty
la'zy fellows        prosper
i die moments     a-wake'
|
I am a lion ey-bee
Buzzing a-way'
O'ver the blos'soms
The long sum'mer day;
Now in the lily's cup
Drinking niv fill,
Now where the ros'es bloom
Un'der the Jiill.
Gayly we fly,
My fellows and I, x-ih
Seeking the hon'ey our  hives  to
supply'. ■; .;|.
2
aW.
Up in the morning—
No laggards are we—
Skim'ming the clover tops,
Ripe for the bee;
Waking the flow'ers
At dawning of day,
Ere the bright sun
Kiss the dew'drops a-way'.
Mer lily singing,
Busily winging -
Back to the hive with the store we
are bringing.
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®ft!iti FIRST READING  BOOK.
89
No i'dle mo'ments
Have we through the day,
No time to squan'der
In sleep or in play;
Sum'mer is flying,
And we must be sure
Food for the win'ter
At once to se-cure'.
Bees in a hive
Are up and alive'.
La'zy folks nev'er can pros'per or
thrive.
A-wake', lit'tle mor'tals!
No liar'vest for those
Who waste their best hours
In sloth'ful re-pose'.
Come out—to the morning
• All bright things be-long'—
And lis'ten a-while'
To the hon'ey-bee's song.
Mer'ri-lv singing-,
Busl-ly winging,
In'dus-try  ev'er   its   own   re-ward'
bring'ing.
in .
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LESSON 54
MAPS AND  GI/OBE.
mean mg
ob'jects
cen'tre
globe
ge-og'ra-phy
maps earth
stud'y       books
writ'ing    knowl'edge
rolled        printing
tel'es-cope
1. I do not know the meaning of
this pic'ture.   Will you tell me ?
2. With pleasure. The va'ri-ous
ob'jects which you see in it are
sym'bols of learning. In the cen'tre you see a large globe, rep-re-sent'-
ing the earth. It has lines upon it,
which are used in the stud'y o^
ge-og'ra-phy.
3. Then there are maps, one of
them spread out, with lines up'on it,
and two rolled up, standing behind' the books. On the pile of
books at the right stands an ink'-
stand and pen. If there were no
writ'ing   or   printing,   knowl'edge
A
%%
5p3
I
{Mt4UVft&9ftftH»;R*
A&* FIRST READING BOOK.
91
could not be kept nor made known
to oth'ers.
4. That tube which you see rest'- XWWfiHJE^±>fflJKlMJ,!l
ing on a three-legged stand is used S:M^MWi^%^M:f^LiM.\
for viewing the stars, in order to
learn all a-bout' their size, mo'tions,
&c. It is called a tel'es-cope. We
can not leam too much. The more
we know the hap'pi-er and more
useful we shall be.
MM&ftft*t>iNF*£
LESSON 55.
THE  GULL.
5. + 5.I
mm
CS%=9&^
5^"-S>
.^k'
^fcrsS^j*£rg
sea'bird cir'cling        ground
storms flying stiff
fall sailing blows
1. This is a large sea'-bird. It is
called a gull. I do not think you
ever saw one.    See, he is standing
*A SHI ^n
sin fit m
m $k efe
WfatM 92
KWONG'S SERIES.
m
nim!
iii
on a rock and looking out on the
wa'ter. His < wings are spread out,
as if he were a-bout' to fly.
2. What long and strong wings
o o o
he has. They are full of large, stiff
feath'ers. The gull needs large and
strong wings be-cause' he has to fly
so far. Often he is o'ver the wa'ter,
and if he were not strong of wing
he might fall in. When it storms
and the wind blows hard he needs
strong wings, so as not to be blown
a-way'.
3. What do you think the gull
eats? He eats fish'es. He catch'es
them him-self. When he is flying
o'ver the wa'ter, if he sees a fish
near the top of the wa'ter, he darts
down ver'y swiftly and seiz'es it.
Some'times gulls are seen on land
and in the fields looking for worms
to eat.
4. They can fly high, and it is
ver'y beau'ti-ful to see them circling and sailing in the air, as ea'-
si-ly as you can walk up-on' the
ground. They seem to en-joy' fly'-
ing as much as a boy en-joys' run'-
ning and play'ing.
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LESSON 56.
LEAD  MINING.
n
^
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c'^<^ \> -!
x^^
ES^«
P£
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mi ners
digging
sharp
light
work     I? night    g-f^
work'men ore        jnj
o-bliged' iron      ^ij
dark heated >)i%
1. What are these per'sons do'-   1     fchWUfH^
IDS!®
These are miners, and they are ?SffJ#JB±A%6fl[iBSffiffi
digging lead ore from the ground.
You   see   those   sharp  i'ron   tools ^al^^ttlifll-ffi*
which they have in  their   hands.
They dig the ore out of the ground ftflJHAa**fttt«ffi#flf
with those.
2. The miners are un'der ground,   li   JB±Afi*AJtft ■ I
Iffi 1 If'
mwmmami
Hb
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<A   ..- FIRST READING BOOK.
95
and it is dark there, so that the
work'men are o-bliged' to have
lights'. Lamps are hung up'on the
sides, and they give light e-nough'
to work by. They can work at
night as well as in the day'time, for
it is always dark as night in the
mine.
3. There is a small rail'road track
leading out to the mouth of the
mine. The ore which is dug is put
in'to cars and drawn out. Then it
is tak'en a-way' and heated, and
thus the pure lead is ob-tained'.
III   fltA#iI«fllR^SffPi
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LESSON 57.
INDIAN  ENCAMPMENT.
queer
roam
filthy
skilful
wear ing
stuck
tents
fierce
coarse
warlike Jj||gc
prai'ries
poles      m
1. Are not these queer looking
mAm.
to m.1.
Ifctt ¥E
Xi tt
ftA*«xjafjg2*;j;*B
people and houses? M\
Yes, they are Indians, such as B   Iff^If^ftHiWJflif
live in  some  of the west'ern  and     ifa%
new parts  of  the  U-nit'ed States.
They are not pleas'ant to look at,   ftA^^JHR-iJKS^fffSfcX
having but little clothing on their     JSggtffifi^Rff ffl^ .j|
bodies, being filthy and coarse,
and wearing feath'ers stuck in their
hair. TTfc
96
KWONG S  SERIES.
2. Those tents which you see are
their houses. They are made by
set'ting up a few poles and throw'-
ing skins o'ver them. They live in
these, and when they move they
take their tents with them.
3. They have dogs and horses,
both which are to be seen in the
pic'ture. They feed their hors'es
on the grass of .the prairies, and
they them-selves' eat the fish and
game which they get by hunting.
4. These In'dians are ver'y fierce
and warlike, and often at-tack
trav'el-lers and oth'er white people,
to rob and kill them. They have
fast hors'es and are ver'y skilful
riders. They roam o'ver the coun'try, and do much harm. The to'fcal
nu3n'ber of In'dians in the U-nit'ed
States is a-bout' 875,000.
.im.
ii &&a££fta,«a& m
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»Aa^M±SKS»6B*t.
£#*'>,   HH*A»tttt#
H-hfcWa^A,
': ride
seat
low
road
driv'er
six pence ease
nei'ther lame
com'f ort-a-ble en'ter
fine shilling  jg.
fleet car'riage jjf.£
1. Would you like to take a ride
this fine day? i5%
What shall we ride in ? 3Kff"J^ftf¥
Here is a "Han'som" cab.    The jfc##tggft   i^W£i*¥2!F
horse is fine and fleet, and the cab     £%$£
is ea'sy to ride in.
2. Can two per'sons ride in it?        ||    fb^^AS
Oh, yes, the seat is wide and the fg   ftil.iLp^gtfci      - 98
KWONG'S SERIES.
springs are strong.    It is made to
car'ry two per'sons.
3. Where will the driv'er ride?
Do you not see him seat'ed behind'? From that seat he can see
the road and drive the horse.
4. Is the cab ea'sy to get in and
out of ?
Yes, for it is ver'y low and the
whole front is o'pen. We en'ter at
the front, not the side. That is one
of the best things about' it. A
person who is old or lame can
en'ter and leave such a car'riage
ver'y ea'si-ly.
5. True. I am nei'ther old nor
lame, but I would en'joy a ride
to-day in that cab. You may tell
the driv'er to call for us in an hour.
How much will the fare be ?
6. If we ride in the two-wheeled
cab, or | Han'som," it will be sixpence a mile. But if we ride in a
" four-wheel'er," as it is called, we
must pay one shilling per mile.
The four-wheeled cabs are larger
and more com'fort-a-ble, and are
al'so drawn by a sin'gle horse.
There are six thou'sand one-horse
cabs in Lon'don, and the mon'ey
re-ceived by the cit'y gov'ern-ment
for their li'cens-es a-mounts' to £10,-
000 an'nu-al-ly.
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LESSON 59.
LUMP-FISH.
99
5 + AJg
S-W'a-'
fins warts spines $§ )J>fjjf
hor'rid rough        ugly W$l! ffi
north'ern       purple       ap-pear'ance ft fifif
1. What  an  ugly looking fish! 1 JfcJU^S*
Pray tell me what is its name. en IDE ^ 251*731
It is called the lump-fish. %x*^Mm*
I should think it was well named. 3SJS-R2ii8tr*#
It seems to have lumps and warts ffiSfflfi'SiR^S*
all o'ver its bod'y.    Then what hor - ffl**8*R*J&
rid   fins   it   has.    They look like
spines.
»#
«fflfS 100
KWONG'S SERIES.
1§
2. It is called the lump-fish, perhaps' be-cause' it has such a rough
and lump'y body. But, al-though'
it is so ugly in form and ap-pear'-
ance, it has beau'ti-ful col'ours,
being red, purple, and or'ange. It
lives in the wa'ters on the north'-
ern shore of Britain, and is some'times used for food.
• I LESSON 60.
THE  STILT.
stilts
reeds
a-bove'
*JE
raise
glos'sy
at-tempt'
ro'sy
tall
grace'ful-ly
mu
in'sects
lakes
strip
il
[ft
«±
£31 FIRST READING BOOK.
101
1. This bird is called the stilt.
Per-haps' this name has been giv'en
to it be-cause' its legs are so long
that it looks as if it were walking
on stilts.
2. You know what stilts are, do
you not ? Well, they are long strips
of wood which boys sometimes
fasten to their legs to raise them
a-bove the ground. Boys some'times fall when they at-tempt' to
walk on stilts; but I do not think
this bird will fall be-cause' of hav'-
ing such long legs.
3. The stilt lives by the sea'-coast
and along' the lakes and riv'ers
where the reeds and tall grasses
grow. They make their nests of
these grasses. They go in flocks,
and make their food of small fishes
and of the insects that are found in
the wa'ter.
4. The bird has beau'ti-ful gloss'y
back and wings of a black or dark
green col'our, with white or ro'sy
breast and a black bill. It is ver'y
tall, and walks grace'ful-ly.
LESSON 61.
PETER  GRAY.
chores
hon'est
ragged
livelong
pale
sale
errands
moth'er
hun'gry
III   ft££A*g&$%Xil
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102
KWONG'S  SERIES.
coat
never
mis-take'
jest
evil
dis-cernf
*
1.
Honest lit'tle Pe'ter Gray
Keeps at work the livelong day,
For his mother is poor as a mouse;
Now run'ning up and down,
Doing er'rands in the town,
And now doing chores a bout' the
house.
| ' 2.
The boys along' the street
Often call him Hungry Pete,
Be-cause' his face is so pale,
And ask, by way of jest,
If his ragged coat and vest
And his old-fash'roned hat are foi
sale.
I
But lit'tle Pe'ter Gray
Nev'er, any shape nor way,
Doth e'vil for evil re-turn:
He is fi'ner than his clothes,
And, no mat'ter where he goes, *
There is some one the fact to dis-
cern'.
4.      I   .
He is climbing up his way
On life's lad'der, day by day;
And you who, to laugh at him, stop
On the low'er rounds, will wake.
If I do not much mis-take',
To find him sit'tirig snug at th-3 top.
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*«4TSIB» FIRST   READING   BOOK.
103
LESSON fejj$
MOUNTAIN  GF  BAEOOXS.
ftSFJrflll
7^
?3i8^
laSiafe;
Timru
snts
i&
KsPiMy
MSSSS*
SsSassMi hfl WsBntnjSSarfflk.--
-ikE/i
^mm
herds capture
Afri-ca trouble-some
mon'key mis'chiev-ous
col-lec'tion veg'e-ta-bles
mas'ter * plan-ta'tions
1. This looks like an ar'my of
men, but it is only a col-lec'tion of
bab-oons'. The bab-oon' is one kind
of mon'key.    They are gath'ered on
army
moun'tain
ex-cit'ed
cunning
in-hablt
mm
II is
ft
Jft»i
mm-
mm
Mm K*
J£<fl-3K:«A»Rff SHHHHHHHHH
104
KWONG S  SERIES.
I
. m
the side of this moun'tain in great
numbers, and wheth'er they are
play ing or fighting I can not tell.
They seem to be very much excited a-bout' some'thing. Per-haps'
the men in the boat are going to
at-tack' or capture them.
2. The bab-oon' is a kind of
mon'key which has a long nose, and
a face which looks like the face of a
dog. Some of them are ver'y large
and strong, and ate a'ble to mas'ter
a large dog. They go in herds, and
are said to drive a-way' all oth'er
anl-mals. These large kinds in-hablt
the mo un'tains of Cape Col'o-ny, in
South Af'ri-ca.
3. They can run swiftly on the
ground, or climb trees easily, and
are trouble-some to the people of
the coun'try. They live on fruits
and veg'e-ta-bles and are ver'y cun'-
ning and mis'chiev-ous. They steal
and early a-way' the prod'ucts of
the plan-ta'tions. They are some'times capt'ured, but do not live long
when tak'en a-way' from their na'-
tive coun'try.
:*Oi$**ftate«>ftjS*H
*ftiaH*a»^A+iAa
III   ft«**p*B&»«##**
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*«Ailll»ft»B-*ffl^A FIRST  HEADING  BOOK.
105
0
LESSON 63.
THE  PALACE  OF  THE  CROWN  PRINCE.
iH
'Mali
$AAf\
daugh'ter
England
Prus'sia
homelike
prince
stead
stat'ue
em press
pres'ent
queen
Ger'ma-ny
dies
heir
throne
pal'ace
em'per-or        ffN
1. This is the pal'ace of the
Crown Prince of Ger'ma-ny. Do you
know what a crown prince is ? It
is that son of a king who is heir to
the throne. When the em'per-or
dies, the crown prince will be em'per-or in his stead.
2. This pal'ace is in the cit'y of
Berlin', in Prus'sia. It is a plain-
looking, homelike building, is it
not? There is a stat'ue of some
per'son on horse'back. Per-haps' it
is the  stat'ue  of the pres'ent em'
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106
KWONG S SERIES.
per-or,   the   fa'ther   of   the   crown
prince.
3. The eld'est daugh'ter of the
queen of England is the wife of the
pres'ent crown prince, and they will
some day be em'per-or and em'press
of Ger'ma-ny.
LESSON 64.
tBfiJMtfj^Av
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ALEUTIANS   CATCHING  WHALES.    SEilf |§fe A ffi®ifi
strange dwell
sor'ry des'o-late
ex-pert' foam
un-im-port'ant thrust
corner ^fJ|
region  ||
mostly if j
whales My^
3E
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MaB*Hj***"H**HH   B^HJrB^HS^BI.aSlB^BHHl FIRST READING  BOOK.
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A»iiJU   ttAJBUlKtt.
1. Do yon know where the A-len'-
tians live?
I do not, I am sor'ry to say.
2. It is not strange you do not
know, for they are a small and
un-im-port'ant people in one corner
of the world. They dwell in the
A-leu'tian Islands, which are off the
coast of A-las'ka. It is a ver'y cold
and desolate region, and ver'y few
people visit it. It is far a-way'
from from all set'tled coun'tries.
3. The peo'ple live mostly by
hunting and fishing. They sell the
fur of the seal and oth'er anl-mals
which they catch. They are ver'y
ex-pert' on the wa'ter, and go out in
small boats to catch whales. They
thrust spears in'to the whale till it
is dead.
4. What a large and pow'er-ful
anl-mal the whale is. See how he
lashes the sea in'to a foam with his
tail. Some'times he breaks a boat
and throws the men out in'to the
sea.
How man'y boats can you see in  ^Efi'f'Wi&l^
the pic'ture ? |j|
in A£Mi>m«j§£, •
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EH FIRST READING BOOK.
109
LESSON 65.
A  FARM-YARD.
sur-roundlngs    objects
CD
niod'ern
en-elos'ure
im'ple-ments
•
in'ter-est Ji
be-yond'
vis i-ble
re-clining   pool
spade pur-suit'
1. What a va-ri'e-ty of objects in
this pic'ture ! What does it rep-resent' ?
2. It is a scene in a farm-yard,
such as may be seen al'most an'y-
where in the coun'try. It gives a
view of a farm-house and its surroundings. Man'y ob'jects of in'ter-est are in sight. The house is a
pretty and con-ven'ient dwelling.
The roof of a modern barn or ear'-
riage-house is vis'i-ble just be-yond'.
In the same en-clos'ure a man is
ploughing.
3. The farm yard ad-join'ing is
filled with live-stock, farm'ing tools,
and the like. Some cows are stand'-
ing up, and some lying down, sheep
are re-clin'ing on the grass near the
margin of the. pool, and pigs are
feed'ing from the trough a lit'tle
"vay off.
4. Sev'er-al kinds of poul'try arc
roaming'a-bout' and en-joy'ing their
free'dom,—the ducks and geese swim
a
.ft A
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110
KWONGS  SERIES.
in the pool, the hens pick up their
food from the ground, and the tur'-
key cock proudly spreads his tail.
Va'rious farming im'ple-ments,—a
spade, a hoe, a cul'ti-vat-or, a fork, a
sickle, a scythe, a flail—are lying
a-round'. See if you can find all
these in the pic'ture.
5. A stack of hay or straw stands
in one corner of the yard, and a
load of hay is being carried to the
barn from the field where it grew.
Two men are riding on the load,
and two are walking.
6. Do you think you would * like
a farm'er's life? It is a ver'y
health'y, use'ful, and pleas'ant life,
and full of va-ri'e-ty, but it re-quires'
much hard work. But one can not
suc-ceed' in any pur-suit' with-out'
constant and se-vere' toil.
7. The farm'er's oc-cu-pa'tion is
most nec'es-sary of all. He rais'es
food, and with-out' food ev'er-y one
would soon perish. Farming was
the earli-est pur-suit' of man, and is
the most nat'u-ral.
r=**s.
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lit
LESSON 66. f\+^
STREET  SCENES  IN  EL   PASO,   MEXICO.   JUS®*!
a
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mm
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mc'er
pi-az'zas
brick
bon'net
mantle
earth'quake   pail
u'su-al-ly
Jar,
bal'anc-es
un-burnt'
Mexl-do
^
pro-tect'
ox'en
e-qua'tor j
shak'en
eus'toms
at-tached'
Ad
*BSrti
mm
1. This is not a large place, but it   | >jft#^:E#-*i6—Slfe>   8r£5
is an old one.    It is El Pa'so, in i£)i£8»ffiMlrWlli   Sttik
Mexl-co.    You see that both place J$A^IJiJ!ft$JiM§fi&%
and people look nic'er than in the jjg^   i£$^j||;£?$||j5!
oth'er   pic'ture.    The   hous es   are ^ g| g¥jg S^S4*
low, but well built.    They are, perhaps', made of un-burnt' brick.   You
see they have pi-az'zas be-fore' them,
in or'der to keep the house shad'y
and cool, ft Mexl-co is a hot coun'« TD
J. J-_<
KWONG'S SERIES.
try, be-cause'it Ties; near the e-qua-
tor. The houses $re u'su-al-ly made
low, in order that they may not be
shak'en down by the earth'quakes
which are com'mon in that coun'try.
2. The men whom you see in the
pic'ture wear hats with broad brims
to pro-tect' them from the sun.
They seem to.be car'ry-ing pails
filled with some'thing on their shouT-
ders.
3. Do you see that girl with a
wa'ter-jar on her head? She does
not touch it with her hands, and
yet it does not fall off. That is
be-cause' she baTanc-es it so perfectly. Any one can learn to do
that.
4. The la'dy whom you see in the
pic'ture is finely dressed.    In-stead'
of a hat or bon'net, she has a mantle tied a-round' her head.    That is i
the cus'toni there.
I think ox'en must be used there
for drawing carts and Wag'ons, because' in the pic'ture we see them
at-tached' to that heavy wagon.
II   i*aft'i£iA%ff««WB
hi »aA?t*jKaBte,fc en-grav ing
cap'i-tal
Spain
i'ron
con-tain'
re-fresh'ing
women
spires
fountain
bub'blins
dancing
nu'mer-ous   paintings
fre-quent'ed  a-dorn' armory
1. This is a beau'ti-ful en-grav'ing
of a Eu-ro-pe'an city.
What cit'y is it ?
It is Mad'rid, the cap'i-tal of
Spain. We caii not see much of
the cit'y in the pic'ture, but the
man'y' spires show us that there are
man'y church'es there. There are
said to be one hun'dred and fifty
church'es. They look much alike'
and con-tain' man'y paintings.
2. Then there are large, public
squares and long streets, the lat'ter
of which are lined with | trees.
Un'der these trees are i'ron chairs,
and early in the morning peo'ple
come and sit in them.
3. There are al'so eight foun'tains,
and in a hot, dust'y day the sight
and sound of the bub'bling wa'ter
is ver'y re-freshing. This broad
(street, or prom-e-nade' is much fre-
quent'ed by both men and wom'en;
ii w^*ii*ii»s*iua
i
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ill   W#*7Vffl»W
*«WE?Ei».'frAi6»»A* il
111
ii (j
•1
1 FIRST READING  BOOK.
115
and music, dancing, and fireworks tf&iftJfiiSHi^H^MC'tB tK
are often en-joyed' there.
4. In Mad'rid there are al'so large
public squares with nu'mer-ous stat'-
ues, but they can not be seen in the
pic'ture.
The large building at the left is
the Roy'al Pal'ace. It is a vast
building of white stone, 470 feet
on each side and 100 feet high. It
is built in the form of a square, and
in-clos'es a large court.
5. Man'y stat'ues a-dorn' the pal'ace, and the rooms are richly dec'o-
rat-ed with fres'co paintings. There
is al'so an ex-ten'sive roy'al li'bra-ry;
and the Roy'al Ar'mo-ry con-tains' a
large col-lec'tion of an'cient arms
and ar'mour.
*&5S*$i*BB'ff*t+£
LESSON 68.
NOMINATING   GEN.   GRANT  FOR  PRESI
DENT.
ceiling
crowd
scene
de-cide'
filled
pan'el
joy'ous
walls
as-sem'bly
can'di-date
galle-ries     g||g
con-ven'tion ^%
noml-nat-ed ^^
del'e-gates    9£
vot'ed   I     BM&U
^?£fifc
jjiyt,.
H
^A
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1. See, what a crowd of people!  I    3f f %Afai?«tl>        ;|
What have they come to-geth'er for, fflftSSlKffij&ftf^
and what are they doing?
They have  met to  de-cide' who jlfc^#ai%^5^-$lli^^>
#± ■■
Sli!
■■■H FIRST READING BOOK.
117
shall be vot'ed for to be-conie' Pres'-
i-dent of the U-nit'ed States.
2. In what place and in what
house have they met ?
In the city of Chi-ca'go, the lam'-
est city in the West. The building in which they are met is the
Op'e-ra-House. It holds a great
inan'y peo'ple. You see that it has
two rows of galleries, one a-bove'
the oth'er.    They are all filled.
3. You see al'so that the house is
ver'y hand'some and costly. There
are paint'ed pan'els in the ceiling
and on the. walls, and the woodwork of the galleries and of the
stage is much or'na-ment-ed.
4. When ftwas . this con-ven'tion
held, and who was noml-nat-ed ?
Jn 1868, and Gen. Grant was
noml-nat-ed.
5. In-deed'! Does this pic'ture
rep-re-sent' that scene ?
It does; and now you will understand' why the as-sem'bly seems so
joy'ous, and why the peo'ple have
ris'en to their feet, and are waving
their hats and hand'ker-chiefs.
6. How man'y del'e-gates were
pres'ent?
Six hundred and fifty; and ev'er-y
one of them vot'ed to have Gen.
.»j§jf*||§;
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KWONG S SERIES.
I
Grant  the  can'di-date.    When the -h$»
vote was passed, there  were loud
»**»>* A ;tti*MMtf>
cheers and great joy.
squir'rel
chest'nuts
stead'y
mer'ry
sleighs
flur'ry
worth
LESSON 69.
DECEMBER.
drop
ceased
clouds
au'tumn
noiseless
qui'et-ly
mellow
1.
mufflers
welcome
KJy
holly
choice
sur-prised'
sharp'en
f»±
®ipfj
m
as
fit
fS9
8 IS
I
«*»!
The squir'rel has made up his win'- W^fi^$3cflt^Si&7t^*»
ter bed,
And in it is snugly lying;
The chestnuts have ceased to drop Sg^ftl^E^lf2f$IBLfc%
o'ver-head;
The ducks have sailed by with wings
out-spread';
The clouds are all paint'ed in purple and red;
And the au'tumn in glo'ry is dying.
2.
Hur-rah' for the win'ter! Down from
the sky
Comes the snow, in a noiseless
flur'ry;
Oh, the snow does so much, so qui'et-ly!      '  1
M
i»*XB»B>
ii«x*»»9»air FIRST READING BOOK.
no
And   the   bells   they jingle;   the ^^M^tMMW
sleighs they fly;
The skaters shout when the moon ^j^fl# ^#fcAJcl£r#'?§
is high;
And the stars look sur-prised' at #^SB8S2&{BfiBE>
the flur'ry.
3.   j . HI,
Who says that Win'ter is grim and %\n%7iWM&W&^%*
old? '§.
He's a roy'al, mer'ry, good fellow ! f| £ £ t'$&U%%
What games are Hke his, so gay and WfpTS^^ftl^Jcft^Sft^fif
I"  bold? I m
What  sto'ries  like his  were  ever "SfV+tWMWfprffJ^-^^^
told?    1 ' a
What nuts!  they are worth their FffM^m^MM^M^
weight in gold;
His ap'ples are choice and mel'- Ili#,l^JfUS€L£:it»
low.
j 4. X    t-
Bring out the mit'tens! put up the tfMl\i^MM$¥MW\%$i
ball! i?Jg¥
See that the mufflers are ready!
Get down the sled from its nail on ililTJt^®SS—*(BU
the wall;
Sharpen  the skates, for fear of  a )§^WJkf£MWi?M$%
fail;
"The riv er is frozen !" will soon be *^ffi M Agytfuv^£>
the call;
And then who will think to be If ft If SS!^^
steady ?    H
16 i
I
ii
X WNT NEUF, PAEIS.   3. TJSS TUILERIES* PafcBIS,   & THE 3EaNAX2S OP FBAIW8* FIRST READING   BOOK.
Then give him welcome!  bid him
draw near,
En-wTeathed' with pine and with
holly;
He brings you pres'ents—he brings
you good cheer;
'Tis in fun that he slyly nips your
ear;
He freezes  your nose to make it
look queer;
,For Win'ter is good and is jolly.
LESSON 70.
THREE  SCENES  IN  PARIS.
cor-rect'    pen-in'su-la   France
fa'mous     plat'ed spanned
central     cor-rect' back'ground
1. Here are three scenes in the
cit'y of Paris, France. If ev'er
you go to that cit'y you can see if
the pic'tures are cor-rect'. If you
do not go, the pic'ture may help you
to know some'thing of the build'-
ings.
2. The first is called the 1 pont
Neuf,"—that is, the bridge Neuf.
You know that the riv'er Seine runs
through the cit'y of Paris. It is
spanned by twen'ty-eight bridges.
One of them is 480 feet long. This
is one of the two most fa'mous ones.
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122
KWONG S  SERIES?.
Ill   *W*+-vffift*KEg
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ft>jlbtt&ft£«> I
It was com-plet'ed by King Hen'ri
IV,  in   1604,  and   ren'o-vat-ed   in
1852.   -!; ^^^m'3
3. In the pic'ture only sev'en
arch'es are to be seen^ but the bridge
con-tains' twelve. Near the mid'dle
it rests on a small pen-in'su-la which
juts out into the riv'er and which is
plant'ed with trees. You can see
them in the pic'ture. These trees
form a back'ground to the stat'ue of
Henri IV, on horse'back, which*
stands in the cen'tral o'pen space on
the bridge.
4. Fine trees are plant'ed along'
the banks of the riv'er, and hand'some buildings stand on both sides.
You  can  see in the dis'tance the ^E^5iJ®WM±illl5JS>
towers and spires of some of these
buildings.
LESSON 71.
THE PALACE   OF  THE  TUILERIES.
ad-joining enlarged' sov'er-eign
con-nect'ed re-stored' de-stroyed'
cel'e-brat-ed gar'dens    mag-nifi-cent
1. The sec'ond pic'ture is the pal'ace of the Tuil'er-ies. This pal'ace
and the gar'dens ad-joining are sit'-
u-at-ed in the cen'tre of Paris, and
are famed for their beau'ty. The
building was be-gun' in  1566  by
*#*i±ftJR
m
ft
Ik
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3X
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I FIRST READING BOOK.
128
Catherine de Medl-ci. At first,
there was only the square building
which stands in the mid'dle.
2. But oth'er sov'er-eigns, coming
after, enlarged' it till it was nearly
a quar'ter of a mile in length. The
gar'dens were cel'e-brat-ed for their
beau'ty.
3. Na-po'le-on III con-nect'ecl the
Tuil'er-ies and the Lou'vre, thus
form'iiig the most mag-nif i-cent pal'ace in the world.
In 1871, the Tuil'er-ies was destroyed' by fire, but has since been
re-stored.'
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LESSON 72.
THE  SENATE   OF  FRANCE.
sen'ate        view rows _fcR^
dis-cussed' nation presl-dent inf 1$
re-port'ers  con-ver-sa'tion en-gaged'    Sl§*A
1. The third pic'ture pre-sents' a
view of the sen'ate of France. It
is here that the public busl-ness of
the na'tion is dis-cussed' and the
laws are made.
2. It seems  to be  a large and  ||
beau'ti-ful hall.    Stat'ues and paint'-     Ifcf^SWiftffsS
ings a-dorn' the walls and ceiling.
3. The presl-dent of the sen'ate |,|    £#tt#KR1l?%&&&3:
is seen in his desk at the left, and     j-^ &QMffijfK*M$i.fkM\
be-fore' him are seat'ed the re-port-
**(H^W* ■%*-»*#
jm.\ til
ii
124
KWONG'S SERIES.
ers at a long table or desk.    They JLfR 5*#ffr* IBS^BfSfb
write down what is said and done,     \^*M\
so that the pa'pers can print it.   B
4. At the right of the pic'ture X   &£*!££>###5^
the mem'bers  are  seen   seat'ed in    ^ftl|I&!lU;^5#ifi)U
rows.    Some of them seem to be .
en-gaged' in con-ver-sa'tion  or dis-
cus'sion with each oth'er.
5. It is ver'y se'ri-ousand im-port'- %   R>^mffl\Wmlxli\1ifcjLM
ant busl-ness to make the laws of a    ^A^WwSSRfb-il*
na'tion, and the men who are engaged' in it ought to be ver'y wise
and good.
-fc+H
Ml*
laugh
shad'ow
wig'wam
sun'rise
gaz'ing
"*
U3
3Z
LESSON 73.
A  ROCKY  MOUNTAIN  SCENE.
grand still
beasts mir'ror
re-flect'ed hunt'er
a-bun'dance sun'set
ad-mir'ing changing Jig
1. This is a scene of wild beau'ty  1     iftil^ttliJ^IfS
a-mong'    the    Rock'y    Mount'ains.
There is ev'er-y thing in it to make ^^S+^^SpTH^OIII^^
a pret'ty picture^—mount'ains, wa'-     ftBJb£,Wi\
ter, trees, sun-light', and the like.
2. How  those   mountain   peaks  ||    ^&®|ft-»Tl5ttS>-Jf AS
stand up, lofty and rock'y.    They     &«i3¥ffilUftftttv
rise a-bove' the ver'y clouds.    The
shad'ows of the  clouds float o'ver.
them and dark'en their sides.  II
ll
li
126
.kwong' s series.
The grand old trees lift themselves' high, as if they were proud
of their size and strength. They
shake their tops in the wind, and
seem to laugh and make mu'sic.
How old the trees are, we do not
know, but they have been growing
for man'y years, with only the Ind'-
ians and wild beasts to see them.
4. The wa'ter is still and glassy,
and the trees and oth'er ob'jects on
the banks are re-flect'ed as in a mirror. A lit'tle way from the wa'ter
you see an Indian hut, or wig'wam.
It is cov'ered with bark or skins,
and is a ver'y rude house.
5. Hors'es are feeding up-on' the
long, rich grass which grows in
a-bun'dance, and two men, who are,
per-haps,' hunters, stand up-on' the
bank gazing in'to the wa'ter, or admiring the scen'er-y. The air in
this re'gion is ver'y clear, and ob'jects can be seen at a great dis'tance.
When the sky and the mountain
.are bathed in the changing col'ours
of   sun'rise   and  sun'set, they are
ver'y beau'ti-ful.
ni -sfcS'feBisa $•*&*«
sMftin*
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7£-^wu> shores
logs
forest
steam'boat
board
floating
sur-round'ed
1. Lake Ta'hoe is a-mong' the
Si-er'ra Ne-va'da Moun'tains, in the
U-nit'ed States. It lies on the boun'-
da-ry be-tween' Cal-i-for'ni-a and
Ne-va'da. It is the most beau'ti-ful
of all the lakes in those moun'tains.
All along' its shores and on the "S^Slliife£W^i#^
slopes of the moun'tains huge pine
trees grow
i  FIRST  READING  BOOK.
129
2. So that the lake is sur-round'ed
by a forest. The trees are ver'y
tall and straight. They are al'so
very large, some of them being
five, six, or eight feet through.
Ver'y fine, wide boards are made
from them.
3. In the pic'ture you can see
some of these trees standing on the
banks of the' lake. How thickly
they stand, and how straight they
are.
4. If you look in'to the wa'ter
you will see a mass of logs floating
there. These are to be sawed in'to
boards and oth'er lum'ber. The
steam'boat which vou see is draw'-
ing the logs to the saw-mill, where
thev will be sawed in'to lum'ber.
There are man'y large mills, which
con-vert' the logs in'to lum'ber ver'y
rapidly.
LESSON 75.
A  SCHOOL-ROOM.
re-ci-ta'tion pu'pils       thir'teen
teach'er class school
schol'ars desk ink'stand
con-venlent o-ver-turn' blackboards
or'der-ly stu'di-ous   slates
1. This is an in'side view of a
school'-house.    It shows a room for
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'30
kwong's series.
stud'y and re-ci-ta'tion. Does it not
look nice and pleas'ant? See how
man'y pu'pils are in sight. Count
them.    I can see thirteen.
2. A class of four is reading.
They stand in line in front of the
teach'er. . The class is corn-posed' of
three girls and one boy. The
teach'er sits facing the school, so as
to see all the scholars. By her side
is the teach'er's desk, and her arm
is resting on it. On the desk are a
book and an ink'stand.
3. How pret'ty and con-venlent
the desks for the scholars are.
Each schol'ar has a seat some'what
like a chair, a desk in front to hold
his books and pa'pers, and an ink'stand on it. Some'times the ink'stand is fas'tened to the desk, so
that it can not o-ver-turn'.
4. You see two maps hanging on
one side ' of the room, and two
blackboards or large slates on the
oth'er side. The chil'dren can sit in
their seats and stud'y from these.
Can you read the mot'to on one of
the blackboards ? It is: 1 Chil'dren,
love your par'ents."
5. It ap-pears' to be a ver'y pleas'ant school. The schol'ars seem orderly and stu'di-ous, and I have no
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l*f*l FIRST READING BOOK.
131
doubt they en-joy' going to school
and studying. I hope they will
be-come' ver'y wise and good men
and wom'en.
frostfy
Christmas
grate'ful
heav'en
spray
LESSON 76.
CHRISTMAS  BELLS.
hark sim'plest
ringing       re-lease'
toil crumbling
pow'er par'ents
neigh'bours praise
SB-SI5   Ml
JUI
Hark! the Christ'mas bells are ring'-
Ringing through the frost'y air,
Hap'pi-ness to each one bringing,
And re-lease' from toil and care.
2.
How the mer'ry peal is swelling
From   the   gray old   crumbling
tow'er!
To the siu/plest crea'ture telling
Of Al-might'y love and pow'er.
3.
An'kle-deep the snow is lying,
Ev'er-y spray is clothed in white;
Yet a-broad' the folk are hieing,
Brisk and bus'y, gay and light.
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Neighbours    shaking-  hands   and HAH^    'Ml
greeting;
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Bless'ings give and joy re-ceive.' ^HKfaiMM.MHllWM.
swing
beat
LESSON 77. -fc + 't
threshing by hand  ffpjT7R
leath'er
bun'dles
lad'der
straw
rake m
ma-chine' ff
re-move'
grain
flail 5R^
1. What are these men doing? |    .jfcAf£fif
They   are   threshing   grain   by fifijPl^^lfJ'f?
threshing
short'er
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a FIRST READING BOOK.
133
hand. That which you see in their
hand is a flail. It is two strips of
wood fas'tened to-geth'er by a strip
of leath'er in such a way that the
short'er one will swing a-round'.
2. The bun'dles of grain are
spread up-on' the floor, and the men
beat them with flails till all the
grain is beat'en off. Then they remove' the straw with rakes, and
take up the grain.
4. This is the way in which men
used to thresh grain. Now there
are ma-chines', with which hors'es
thresh fifty or sixty times as fast as
the men can do.
5. But it is a cheer'ful sound to
hear the men threshing by hand in
a still win'ter day. The threshing
is done on the barn floor, as you can
see in the pic'ture, where the door is
thrown open and the fields and
fences are in sight.
6. The fowls are walking a-bout'
and picking up the stray grains
that fall out'side. O'ver-head is a
large pile of grain in bun'dles, and
the lad'der leads to it.
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KWONG S SERIES.
LESSON 78. -&+AI5
THE  JABIRU.   JBBJtA
frogs
bor'ders
flies
m&j6
wade
neck
shoot
9* i
marshy
rainbow
H meas'ure
IB   &
diffi-cult
timid
re-flect'
m
a
1. What a tall bird!
i  fti<sr^
E-t.
&#
Yes, it is one of  the largest of ||   fi&S^JS+i:—*#S1iJl*.
birds.    It is called the ja-bi'ru, and S$^cM5Sft>    SKUMsRii
is found in Aus-tralla.    It lives in Mi%\
^marsh'y grounds   and   along'   the FIRST READING BOOK.
135
bor'ders of lakes and rivers. It
feeds on fish, frogs, &c, and has
such long legs that it can ea'si-ly
wade in'to the wa'ter to get its food.
It will catch flies and oth'er insects
and eat them.
2. It is al'so a bird of beau'ti-ful
col'our. The head, neck, back, and
wings are of a rich, glos'sy green or
brown, and when the sun shines
up'on them they re-flect' the tints of
the rainbow. The breast is white
and the legs red.
3. The ja-bi'ru is a timid bird,
and it is diffi-cult to get near
e-nough' to it to capt'ure it or e'ven
to shoot it. But it can be tamed.
A large full-grown ja-bi'ru is said to
meas'ure four or five feet in height.
LESSON 79.
THE united states senate chamber.
Congress speaker     e-lect'ed
^>
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vice presl-dent    de-bates' earnest
un-der-neath'       galleries print'ed -fey
rep-re-sent'a-tives ob-serve' sen'a-tor TBLftdf
news'pa-pers        speech'es lift'ed g-gj
1. This pic'ture gives a view of
the Sen'ate of the U-nit'ed States in
ses'sion. The Sen'ate is the high'er
of the two legls-la-tive bodies
which   com-pose'  Con'gress.    It   is
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13"
al'so the small'er, being com-posed'
of two mem'bers from each state in
the Union. The vice presi-dent of
the U-nit'ed States is the presl-dent
of the Sen'ate.
2. You see this pre-sidlng of fi-cer
sifting in his chair, al'most un-der-
neath' the or-na-menf al arch'ways.
The men sifting at the ta'ble in
front of the desk are the re-port'ers,
who write down the speech'es and
de-bates', that they may be print'ed
in the news'pa-pers.
3. You ob-serve' that some sen'a-
tor is making a speech. He is
stand'ing in the space in front of
the speak'er's desk, and ap-pears'
ver'y much in earnest. He has both
hands lift'ed in gesfure.
4. There is in'ter-est to hear what
he has to. say, for you no'tice that
all the oth'er sen'a-tors are lis'ten-ing
at-tenfive-ly. This would not be
the case if he were a dull speak'er.
Look at the galler-ies also. They
are filled with persons who have
come in to hear the de-bate', and
they are ver'y at-tent'ive to this
speak'er.
5. The Sen'ate is a bod'y which
i rep-re-sents' the states as sep'a-rate
and   in-de-pend'ent  sov'er-eign-ties;
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139
while the House of Bep-re-senfa-
tives rep-re-sents' the peo'ple more
par-tic'u-lar-ly. The sen'a-tors are
chosen by the legls-la-tures of their
re-specfive states, but the rep-re-
senf a-tives are elecfed di-recfly by
the peo'ple of the state.
LESSON 80.
A  SAFE.
lock
safe
door
val'u-alxLe
se-cure'
heav'y
in'ner
oufer
thieves
fire
fire'proof
in'side
1. Here you see a safe. It is
made to keep mon'ey and val'u-a-ble
books and pa'pers in. What is put
in'to it is se-cure' a-gainsf thieves
and a-gainst' fire.
2. It is made of i'ron and is ver'y
strong and heav'y. It has a lock on
the oufer door, and one on the
in'ner door. It is not ea'sy for
thieves to o'pen or to break the
locks.
3. The safe is al'so fire'-proof.
That means that, if the house in
which the safe is should burn, so
that the safe should be-come' ver'y
hot, the things which might be in
the safe would not be burned up
nor much in'jured.
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thrown o'pen, so that you can see
the in'side. The lock on the in'ner
door is ver'y large and cu'ri-ous, as
you see.
LESSON 81.
A mowing machine.
hay mowing
bam cut'ting
acre ex-plain'
op'e-rate stirred
1. Is this a car'riage ?
Not quite. It is a ma-chine' for
mowing or cut'ting grass. It is.
drawn by hors'es, and the mow'er
rides.
" 2. Well, that is an ea'sy way of
doing work.
Yes and the work is done more
rapidly and- bet'ter by the machine' than by hand.
3. But how does the ma-chine'
op'e-rate ?
I do not know that I can ex-plain'
it to you; but you see that part of
the ma-chine' which lies a-gainst' the
grass. It looks like a saw lying on
the ground.
7e
4. Well, when the hors'es draw
the ma-chine', this saw moves back
III   H»1SDS |
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IMtff#tft£&  FIRST READING BOOK.
143
:md forth ver'y fast, and cuts the yftMSHt   W&M^tb~Wd&Z
grass off,   It takes but a lit'tle time     ^
to cut down an acre of grass.
5. Then, after it has been stirred $£   ^Mi%M~~B*Mj&$fcW%
and dried a day or two, it be-comes'     SW1fe%L\V$^kK.%M\
fragrant hay, and is fit to put in'to
the barn.
How much better  this way of JtSSlI^icfflSfi^^ft^
cut'ting hay than the old-fashioned •
way of cut'ting it with a scythe.
LESSON 82.
n+r
A
MOWER and reaper.
9JSX*
mow
east'ern
com'pli-cat-ed     Su
|
reap
double
com-par'a-tive-ly Xll
M$
seat
reap'er
e-co-noml-cal      *£M
W&M
niow'er
un-e'ven
re-spects'            SilHli?
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1.    This ma-chine'  can   do  two 1    "JftH
!B«ft=
things.
It   can   cut   down   ei'ther ttfll^^SS
-Si*
grass or grain. In oth'er words, it
can both mow and reap. So it is
called a mow'er and reap'er. It can
do double work.
2. I can not tell from the pic'ture
how it is made nor how it op'er-ates,
but you see that, in some re-spects',
it is like the mowing ma-chine'.
3. The wheels and the seat are
like those of the mowing ma-chine'.
I do not know what are the oth'er
parts of the ma-chine', nor how it
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cuts down grass and grain.  I should
like to see it work.
4. This kind of ma-chine' is not
much in use in the East'ern or New
England States, be-cause' there the
fields of grass and grain are com-
par'a-tive-ly small. It would not be
e-co-nomi'cal to have so costly a ma-
chine' for do'ing so small an a-mount'
of. work. Be-sides', the fields in
that por'tion of the coun'try are
more or less un-e'ven and rock'y.
5. That makes it dif'fi-cult to use
a ma-chine' so large and com'pli-
cat-ed.   H§
In the more lev'el meadows of
New England the mowing is. done
by a sim'ple mowing ma-chine', but
the grain is cut by a cra'dle. This
is an in'stru-ment com-posed' of a
scythe and sev'er-al long wood'en
fin'gers.    It is wield'ed by hand.
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hffls
binding
bun'dles
reaped
a-mount'
LESSON 83.
THE  HARVESTER.
heaps dis-trib'u-ted
tying
ex-tend'
driving
im-mense'
moun'tains
com-posed'
har'vest-er
1. This is a beau'ti-ful pic'ture.
See the Mils, the moun'tains, the
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KWONG S  SERIES.
i""
wa'ter, the trees, the hous'es, the
men, and the hors'es. The men and
the hors'es are, at work. They are
cut'ting down grain.' The ma-chine'
is called a har'vest-er. It does not
look like ei'ther of the oth'er machines'.
2. There are four men on it. One
is driving, and three are binding
the grain, that is, tying it in bundles. As fast as the grain is cut,
the men bind it and throw it off
in'to lit'tle heaps like those which
you see in the pic'ture.
3. The har'vest-er will cut the
grain as fast as the three men can
bind it. If there were no such
ma-chines', the im-mense' grain fields
of the U-nit'ed States could not be
reaped.
4. These ma-chines' are very use'-
ful in the prai'ries of the West.
The prai'ries are ver'y large and
lev'el tracts of land. They ex-tend'
man'y miles. The soil of which
they are com-posed' is free from
stones; so that it is ea'sy to drive
the ma-chines' o'ver the prai'ries and
cut the grass or the grain with
which they are cov'ered.
5. Im-mense' quan'ti-ties of grain
are raised in the  U-nit'ed  States,
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14;
In the year 1878, the a-mount' of
wheat raised was more than 420,-
000,000 bush'els, be-sides' the oth'er
grains. Most of this is grown in
the west'ern and north'west-ern
states.
6. Of course, this large  crop is -L   ft*J£S%HB#JB7.ft-»
not   all   con-sumed'  in A-merl-ca.
Much of it is carried to Eu'rope. £B-ftR$UB5MSfi£HiBli
There it is dis-trib'u-ted in the man-   m£tb%SMM&X&M%
u-fact'ur-ing dis'tricts, which do not
raise e-nough' for their own use.
The gold which is paid for the grain £1&WMI RTB&HUt
comes back to A-merl-ca.
LESSON 84.
sewing- by hand.
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te'di-ous
a-gain'
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tire'some
gar'ments
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sewing
lap
gen'tie-men
m
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wea'ried
boots
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slow
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shoes
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Mill FIRST  READING  BOOK.
149
1. This pic'ture rep-re-sents' twt
la'dies sewing by hand. Per-haps'
it is late at night, for there is a can'
die on the ta'ble, and hand sewing
is a ver'y slow process, so that it
must  often be pur-sued' in'to the
| SB*iI**B-.tttEffcI
night.
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2. It is ver'y te'di-ous aid tire'- l|    ftlX^ASBfil.    £#
some work, too. You see that one
of the woni'en is resting her head
up-on her hand, as if she were ver'y
much wea'ried. Her work has f all'en
in'to her lap, and she is too tired to
take it a-gain7.
3. She ought to have a sewing
ma-chine'. That would do the work
ver'y rapidly and ver'y ea'si-ly.
Nearly all the garments worn by
la'dies and gen'tle'men are now made
on a sewlng-ma-chine'. So are
boots and shoes. vX'
IrJo¥
LESSON 85. JSH*:£i5
A  BOAT  RACE.
ri'val fa'mous watching
ei'ther sit'u-at-ed u-ni-ver'sity
shouting oc'cu-pied dec'o-rat-ed
cheering thou'sand hand'ker-chiefs 1-3 3c ^ft
Bl. What riv'er is this | I    ftfiTffl %*
It is the riv'er Thames, in Eng'- «B#S-%£*8BJI
/ CD
land.    Trees  line   its   banks   and     ?>£&fIS^ frft
make it ver'y beau'ti-ful.    The word
fa *rS»- 150
kwong's series.
"Thames' means broad riv'er. It
is the largest riv'er in England.
The cit'y of Lon'don is sif u-at-ed on
the Thames, six'ty miles from the
sea. Ox'ford, the seat of the fa'mous u-ni-ver'si-ty, is on a branch of
the Thames.
2. But why are there so man'y
peo'ple on the shore, and what are
they doing ? See, the banks on ei'-
ther side are full of peo'ple.
Yes, they are watching a boat
race be-tween' the boat clubs of an
English u-ni-ver'sity and an A-mer'-
i-can u-ni-ver'si-ty.
3. In-deed'! What u-ni-ver'si-ties
are they ?
Ox'ford u-ni-ver'si-ty in England,
and Harvard u-ni-ver'si-ty of Cam'-
bridge in A-merl-ca.
4. You see the ri'val boats, with
their crews, in the mid'dle of the
riv'er. The peo'ple on the shore are
cheering them on by shouting and
by waving their hats and hand'kerchiefs. Some are waving 8 flags.
The stands and plat'forms e-rect'ed
to hold the peo'ple are gay'ly dec'o-
rat-ed with flags. Ev'er-y place from
which the race can be seen is oc'cu-
pied, and one or two hun'dred thou'«
sand peo'ple are wit'ness-ing it.
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UM*Am±M.®~--i-M\ FIRST  READING   BOOK.
151
MA*ii
5. How long a dis'tance was rowed &    BfeitSl
over ?
Nearly four and a half miles.
Which   of   the   crews  won   the
race ?
The  English   crew  of   Oxford 5J$ft*Bfi&A   |g£+£K
u-ni-ver'si-ty.    They won by a-bout'
six'ty-five feet.
When did this race take place 'I
August 27, 1869.     I m
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piers
tomb
flood
arch'es
trav'el
centre
LESSON 86.
LONDON  BRIDGE.
chap'el in-sur-rec'tions
re-mark'a-ble
A+*AfS
ex-cit'ins;
va'ri-ous
pas'sage
ac'tu-al
his-torlc
ttf#l
suc-ces sive
won'der-ful
pas'sen-ger
o-rigln-a-tor
1. Here is a pic'ture of Lon'don
Bridge. There are fifteen bridg'es
a-cross' the Thames at Lon'don, but
the most fa'mous of them all is
Lon'don Bridge. It is 870 feet in
length. It has a re-mark'a-ble his'-
to-ry. Many bridg'es were built at
this point be-fore' the pres'ent one.
The first one was built in 994. This
bridge and sev'er-al suc-cesslve ones
were de-stroyed' in va'ri-ous ways,
some by fire and some by flood.
2. But at last a stone bridge was
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20  FIRST READING BOOK.
153
buiit by a priest named Pe'ter,
which last'ed for more than six
hun'dred years. It was finished in
the year 1209. Pe'ter died be-fore'
it was finished. This wTas a won'-
der-ful bridge, made of stone, with
strong piers, nine'teen arch'es, and a
draw.
3. It had a gate-house with tow'-
ers at each end; and near the mid'-
dle was built a beau'ti-ful stone
chap'el. Be-neath' the chap'el was a
stone tomb o'ver the body of Pe'ter,
the o-rigl-na-tor of the bridge.
An-oth'er cu'ri-ous thing is, that
this bridge was like a street from
one end to an-oth'er. It had beau'ti-ful hous'es and oth'er fine build'-
ings on each side.
4. Man'y ex-cit'ing ana his-tor'ic
scenes took place on this bridge;
some'times it was the scene of mobs
and in-sur-rec'tions, some'times of
joy'ous gath'er-ings and pro-ces'sions;
and some'times the fire swept o'ver
it and de-stroyed' the hous'es.
5. In 1732, all the hous'es were
re-moved' from the bridge; and a
hnn'dred years lat'er, in 1832, the
bridge it-self' was tak'en down, and
the pres'ent one built. It was eight
years in build'ing, and cost $2,000,-
000.   It is 800 feet in length, 53 in
\as&% etm>m~=f-~is
m-Ji* rt#s*rE8 itm
III  *i-t«WH»IH±WM*»
&M<¥ram>h%mnit it&
WBJ«,£IlSfl->|iJ5gftm«,
X   ft*tMlAstlI»Kpr»
i&ffi^gsjg&afr^ns-,.
^AWH+-#4>aft*m»s
*,*«4«,ae a«»*«=
'■ff*H»fiAiW*aR»H£+E TOWER   OF   LONDON
R FIRST READING  BOOK.
155
width, and has Hve arch'es, the cen'-
tre one rising 24J feet a-bove' high
wa'ter mark. 120,000 tons of stone
were used in its con-struc'tion.
6. Lon'don Bridge is in the cen'-
tre of the busl-ness por'tion of the
cit'y, and the trav'el which pass'es
over it is more than that which
pass'es o'ver all the oth'er bridg'es
a-cross' the Thames. Pas'sage is
free, there being no toll. The
pres'ent bridge has no buildings on
it, as the for'mer one had. Those
which are seen in the pic'ture stand
on the land.
7. There is more trav'el on Lon'-
don Bridge than on any oth'er of
the fifteen bridg'es which span the
riv'er. By act'u-al count on one
day, from 6 a. m. to 6 p. m., the
num'ber of foot pas'sen-gers was
96,080, be-sides' those who passed
o'ver on horse'back (211) and in
car'riag-es (26,800).      'flR        jf
LESSON 87.
TOWER   OF   LONDON.
fort im-proved' ditch
ad'ded offi-ces struc'ture
barracks keepers pris'ons
mon'arch similar mu-se'um
1. What building is that wnich
looks so strong and so like a fort ?
ft£ft& * *SRtH*R«HKtR
-L   ftftfc£.i-(-f*jt*K£R,
2kittit%.2WJk1H$&nA
|n »*A^fflffl|lt»a#4
I mB.m-t,ti-fs.w.famM
SR^-R^fr****?-*
A+8,8Rigi§t-'ff+-
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156
KWONG'S SERIES.
That is a fa'mous building called ]fcjii^£li^#l&i|r
the Tower of Lon'don.
2. It is a clus'ter of hous'es and l| ffel
tow'ers, and stands on the bank of ivfH*
the Thames.    Be-tween' the wa'ter     -—i|{£*
tt**fc« !,*«,*
and the building there is a wall
and a ditch, as you see. It can be
seen from Lon'don Bridge. It is a
ver'y large and old building. The
space within' the walls is twelve
a'cres.
3. The age of the Tow'er is not
known, but it is man'y hundred
years, per'haps a thou'sand, since a
fort was placed up-on' the spot by
some one of the mon'archs. Oth'er
kings ad'ded buildings and walls
and im-proved' the grounds, till the
structure came to have its pres'ent
form.
4. It con-sists' of yards and short
streets, with chap'els, offi-ces, bar'-
racks, pris'ons, store'-hous-es, hous'es
for the keepers, and similar build'-
ings. In the ar'mo-ry and mu-se'um
are stored man'y things cu'ri-ous to
see. There is much ancient ar'-
mour, such as sol'diers used to wear,
and cannons tak'en in war; also d
ver'y large store of fire'arms.
$M%M'
ftW*t +
XI ft #£tt*S«**»?MMS
B,£B%BS*8J8J^**#* FIRST  READING  BOOK.
157
LESSON 88. gj-jE
THE  CROWN  JEWELS OF  ENGLAND.
font
jewels
value
pearls
purple
vel'vet
scaffold
six'pence
di'a-monds
of-fenc'es
ru'by
this'tle
con'stant-ly
guard'ed
million
com-mit'ted
bap-tized'
mag-nifi-cent
1. In the Jew'el Boom can be
seen the crown-with all the roy'al
re-galla. Some of these are shown
in the pic'ture a-bove'. The jew'els
and roy'al re-galia are kept in a
glass case and are con'stant-ly
guard'ed. For a six'pence one can
vis'it the Tow'er, and for an-oth'er
six'pence can see the jew'el house.
There are man'y vis'i-tors con'stant-ly. The val'ue of the jew'els
is said to be sev'en miU'ions dollars.
2. The crown of the mon'archs of
England, which is more than two
hun'dred years old, and is called St.
Ed'ward's crown, is here. It is
ver'y mag-nif'i-cent, having on the
top a cross of di'a-monds, and being
valued at £200,000. ^A lit'tle more
than two hun'dred years a'go this
crown was stol'en, but the thief was
caught  be-fore' he  had gone  far.
3. There is al'so an-oth'er crown,
which was made for her Maj'es-ty.,
*G&
&$
A+AiS
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:   % &A£*-K
* *$R«
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it      is&      a»s
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StJSflilWAaf*,   %A$k
«*ftilMW£AJ&a!, Slat
RW3PASR,   nftfRttR
■\asmM
II   ft#£I!B,BR.rffft*,
Sft*»]f± + ^,Jfili^5g^>
RR.-+««,   -Titf^BiJ,
ft.RJSSE.R*i$.Rft*itil"
iii st-a,*aR£iJB, THE  CROWN   JEWELS.
1. Queen's Diadem.   2. Prince of Wales' Crown.
3. Old Imperial Crown.   4. Queen's Crown.
5. Queen's Coronation Bracelets.
C« Temporal Sceptre.   7. Spiritual Sceptn. FIRST READING  BOOKi
159
Queen Vic-to'ri-a. It is made of
pur'pie velvet, hooped with silver
and a-dorned' with di'a-monds. There
is a ru'by in it said to have been
worn by Ed'ward, the Black Prince,
five hun'dred years a-go'. It al'so
con-tains' a ver'y val'ii-a-ble sap'-
phire. This crowii is es'ti-mat-ed at
£100,000.   I |    |
4. The Prince of Wales' crown is
formed of pure gold, while that
formerly worn by Prince Al'bert,
the hus'band of Queen Vic-to'ri-a,
con-tains' pearls, di'a-monds, and
oth'er pre'cious stones.
5. Then there is the Roy'al Scep'-
tre, which is of gold ofna-menfc-ed
with pre'cious stones, al'so with a
rose, a sham'rock, and a this'tle, all
wrought in gold. These are the
na'tion-al em'blems of England, Ireland, and Scotland. This sceptre
is two feet nine inch'es long, and is
val'ued at £40,000. There are al'so
sev'er-al oth'er rods or em'blems of
au-thorl-ty.
6. There is al'so a ves'sel for hold'-
ing the oil with which the sovereign is a-noint'ed on be-comlng king
or queen, and a cor-o-na'tion spoon
for pouring out the oil, cor-o-na'tion
'bracelets, and a font at which the
-Z&%Be*mzm*ri&nM
21 I
ill
100
KWONG S  SERIES.
roy'al chil'dren are bap-tized', a sil'-
ver wine foun'tain, and oth'er ar'ti-
cles.
7.- For man'y hun'dred years the
Tow'er was used as a pris'on for
those who had com-mit'ted political of-fenc'es a-gainst' the state. The
dungeon and pris'on bars are still
here. There are al'so the axe and
scaffold where-with' man'y per'sons,
kings, queens, no'bles, per'sons high
in office, suffered death.
LESSON 89.
A  JUNE   JOUKNEY.
rail'way shells bab'ble
poll-tics skirt hon'est-ly
bufter-cups past'ures dan'de-li-ons
ig'no-rant chewing breeze
Would   you   put   your   soul   in'to
sweet'est tune,
Take a rail'way ride in the heart of
June!
Go with'out com'pa-ny, go with'out
book,
Drink  in the coun'try with long,
loving look;
Care, busl-ness, poll-tics, leave far
be-hind',
And let na'ture's  sweet'ness  flow
o'ver your mind.
r
[*-?*J|.I»«a»XIF»M
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6
m
m
11
p.e. ratM.
-»\
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ft^«ftfi»^A*ff»
■ /
' il
v FIRST  READING BOOK.
161
Scores of wild ro'ses, as pink as sea %¥*TcMWl^~&*&W%$MiU i
shells, ^
Skirt the rough past'ures and flush 4ffiffl®ffi^asS4ftittW»
the deep dells;
Seas  of white  dai'sies, with  wide n!iW±^iitMD$iBM^+
o'pen eyes, £Pi£
Smil'ing   so   hoti'est-ly  up  at  the Sdw^^fyH^i^
skies;
Brooks o'er the stones bab'ble sweet ?F|7JC^^5_t>^if4^i|f^S*«
the old tune,
As we ride through the coun'try In ^^M^X&^^T7^MiW%
blos'som-ing June. §t
3. '    j '   | HI       '
Groups of mild caftle stand un'dei ^TS^Ifllttt
the trees, |g
Chewing their cud in the sleepl-est ^%$i^M\^Mk%$$\
ease;
Grazing, or lying, or standing mid- ^^'^iiS^#4,iSS*
stream,
The so'ber old cows are so used to £ft^#Wtt^ffi«fr>
the scream
And the rush, of   the train, they I,^*^#lKvlffiBBSt-^
scarce wink at the sight,
o      ' A£f5:
But the   calves   madly plunge  in Jn9.S5in Ri-uS^hfrif *
their ig'no-rant fright.
4. X
Now, a'cres of clover, the red and WttSfcl^^ftfife^f*
- the white—
Like rus'ti-cal beauties, so health'y $§II&JS«»$§$§*
and bright— 1G
KWONG S SERIES.
Fra'grant-ly bending in ev'er-y soft WW1RM&to&ffiU&%nW%
breeze,
Hummed   o'er  and  plundered by ^l&SJMftgg^EjEJffi*
armies of bees;
Here, too, are bufter-cups, yellow as XW^T^flt*E>&ltl&fe|gv
gold, |,   :
And great star'ry dan'de-li-ons, jolly JiiT^E^SM^S^SWib
and bold.  HhSCj
fS 11 Zo
A
$<jO C.2.
% ^l 6^5  

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