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The Chung Collection

Chinese and English phrase book and dictionary [unknown] 1913

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Array   *fl>
#
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fit&cfiM Ihda  CHINESE   AND   ENGLISH
PHRASE BOOK
.AND.
DICTIONARY
»<>>«
Entered according to Act of Parliament of Canada, in the year 1897, by Thomson Stationery
Company, Ltd., at the Department of Agriculture, Ottawa.
Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1903, by Thomson Stationery Company,
Ltd., in the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.
» 1 » « *
This Book will be mailed to any address on receipt of $2.00 in Postal or Express
Money Order or Postage Stamps.   Address:
pa
±*#€ftlt«aiiBT«A*
Prom
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Phone Sey. 2958
G. S. FORSYTH & CO.
BOOKSELLERS AND
STATIONERS
CORNER   HASTINGS & HOMER STREETS
VANCOUVER, B. C.  H
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&&3r PREFACE
This book is designed to enable the Chinese student to
speak in English and also to understand the meaning of the
words and phrases of that language.
The English phrases are arranged as follows, viz:
Above each phrase are a series of Chinese characters giving the
sound of the English words, and underneath are a series of
Chinese characters giving an exact translation or meaning of
same in Chinese language.
In that part of the book where words in English only
are given, there will be found on left hand of same, Chinese
characters giving the sound, and on the right hand, Chinese
characters giving translation.
The compiler of this book has endeavored to bring
together phrases and expressions of such general use and use
ful character applying to all kinds of professions, trades,
business Yelations, traveling, correspondence, names and
relative position of principal cities and towns in Canada and
the United States, by the aid of which persons unacquainted
with the English language can easily explain the meaning of
their various wants. Hii
T. J. G.
Vancouver, B. C, December 12, 1013. *
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H ir 3
B CONTENTS
Air, earth and people	
Celestial bodies   	
Rulers and relatives  	
Climate and landscape 	
Minerals, timber and water  ....
Time and seasons  	
Officials	
Prison officers and punishments..
Trades and labor	
Professions and criminals 	
Public    buildings    and    private
houses	
Financial, commercial and manufacturing  concerns   	
Oils, liquors and produce	
Teas and tobaccos	
Nuts, spices and canned goods...
Meats and soups  	
Vegetables	
Fruits	
Furniture and household goods...
Toilet  articles   	
Implements,   tools   and   sporting
goods 	
Store supplies   	
The human body	
Furs	
Dry goods ... .*	
Clothing	
Shoes and hats	
Birds	
Animals  and fish  	
Flowers	
Colors 	
Money .'
Mercantile	
Books	
Stationery	
Traveling	
Human diseases 	
Medicine	
Ships and rigging 	
Weapons	
Pictures 	
Precious stones	
Officers	
Sports	
1
2
2
3
4
5
6
7
7
9
10
12
14
14
15
16
17
18
18
23
23
24
25
27
27
28
29
30
31
32
32
32
33
34
35
35
36
37
38
39
40
40
41
41
PAGE
Numerals  42
Numbers  43
English officials   44
Army and navy  45
United States officials  46
Meeting on business   47
Asking for a cook  56
Breakfast  60
Dinner  66
Supper  74
Travel  78
Farm work  85
Laundry  89
General store  96
Court house  108
Collecting money due   117
Trial for murder   121
Schools  126
Gardening  132
Landlord and tenant     141
Coal mining    148
Salmon canneries  157
Saw mills     165
Railroad work     176
Clearing land    186
Gold mining    197
Cutting wood     218
On board ship     223
About the  city    231
Law  242
Words  alphabetically arranged.. 263
Names of peoples .' . 280
Abbreviations  280
Addresses  283
Directions on envelopes    286
Correspondence  292
Commercial papers     345
Continents  356
Trade ports of China  358
Trade ports of Australia  359
Trade ports of India   360
Places in British Columbia  360
Principal   cities   and   towns   of
Canada  367
Principal   cities   and   towns   of
United States  372 a
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SS^Hl Weapons
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$B;*C ^Howitzer
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J^Mi-Trigger fl^g
Cartridge fi£|&?n
a:m    Bullet |§#]
,^Grape-shot g%£|]£
^CH^Bomb $1
^HJgStink-pot HfJfPA
^*S^Dynamite       ^i§S
j/ClH     Gunpowder ^5&JT
j/C^^|CJaisson fpj|
J|5f>    Spear ^^
71 Knife ^#
Three Point Pike
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Iron Bar jSlliB
MM Dagger |ft|g
/JVflfipBowie Knife $&$$#
IB Sword $
jfcj^f    Rocket
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Afe    Torch
^^U    Handcuff       t
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'feUiS Pictures
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i^lHilFull Len6th
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jt^Picture Frame   EGJI^jc
^5 Jlffi Precious Stones
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jjijj    Coral
3$|J$.    Agate
7XH     Crystal
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JH^iJ     Loadstone
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4^5   Yellowish Qnartz
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SI^J     Marble
HIt^E?     Soapstone
^5     Flint
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fLhAM   Officers
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±{>X First Mate f^fff}
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Numerals
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2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
20
21
22
30
One
Two
Three
Four
Five
Sk
Seven
Eight
Nine
Ten
Eleven
Twelve
Thirteen
Fourteen
Fifteen
Sixteen
Twenty
Twenty-one
Twenty-two.
Thirty
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50 Fifty
60 Sixty
100 One Hundred
101 One Hundred and One   j|fJBfl
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102 One Hundred and $wo;g|£g jfjg fif jftjfcB
lioOne Hundred and Ten MWkMtfblk 43
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—*'§'—-»-|-^ 112 One Hundred and Twelve
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—'IfHtp  120 One Hundred and Twenty
—WH+ 13° 0ne Hundred and Thirty
21 "Q" 200 Two Hundred
21"gffg— 201 Two Hundred and One j|
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210 Two Hundred and Ten
220 Two Hundred and Twenty
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300 Three Hundred
400 Four Hundred
1000 One Thousand
1100 Eleven Hundred
1200 Twelve Hundred
1300 Thirteen Hundred
1400 Fourteen Hundred
2000 Two Thousand
3000 Three Thousand
10,000 Ten Thousand
feM   100,000 One Hundred Thousand
g-g"# 1,000,000 One Million
Numbers
-■*
1st   First
ft* 44
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2nd   Second
3rd   Third
4th   Fourth
5th   Fifth
6th   Sixth
7th   Seventh
8th   Eighth
9th  Ninth
10th   Tenth
11th   Eleventh
12th   TweLfth
13th  Thirteenth
20th  Twentieth
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Z1+—-?§>21st   Twenty-first
2l^t*Zl"^^2nd Twenty-second
21+H^23rd  Twenty-third
Zl+i#25th  Twenty-fifth
H+"^    30th  Thirtieth
:£-|-_^.g£31st   Thirty-first
S£Si       Sovereign # f$\jfr
iC^^i       Prince of Wales d^I^Ift^^
ifffl^ffi    Prime Minister #Ft$i**rffnff
"&X^±  Lord Hi^h Cha^ellor        j£fc$|Tirj#
tfci^zb  Lor<* President of the Council
mm
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nnmmmm
mX& Secretary of State ^®ffif WW*^ ^gRfgfU First Lord of tbe Treasury
& tmnmm*m®m
fffi|&+Ei President of the Board of Trade
^f^^B Secretary of State for Foreign Offic
$IJMGovernor General ^ifc^^^lS'
ieutenant Governor ffi'fi'Sliir^Pzfc-
XpP^CS Minister of Public Works
of Finance ffiOTHWtt#tftUf
of Railways and Canals
of Cu8tom8^|r*l4rft#-^*|fi
of Militia   |it*TO##5£jfd:
of Agriculture
of Inland Revenue
of the Interior
of Justice     fLJEfivft ffl#E£ft
of Marine and Fisheries
Army and Navy   - ^HIISlBjg
General
Lt. General
Major General l%tt~
Brig.-General ift-hn£&
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Lt. Colonel
Major
Field Marshal
Quarter Master
Serjeant
Artillery
Infantry
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fE Cavalry
Sharpshooter
Lancer
Soldier
Admiral
7Xgj|ji^lr:   Commodore
7K8BIiJ$F Captain
i^MI^M Commander
7K6u1bKp1 Nav|gatin? Lieutenant^
llf f§ United States Officials.
ffift President ^$±®
3MM& Vice-President ®±«i$±©
JtffcfcE Secretary of State       ^?lj|4f 'Mti ±BP
^o|5^CS Secretary of Treasury
R3B^CE Secretary of War ^flJPM'JPllTJ *Q
flftfe® Attorney-General ffci'MIEJEtttt
Iffi^B Postmaster General %t+M±VRsEf[l&$&
tU38ci*r 47
fS^SPAESec^etary of Navy     %fflkffltft)ffil
ft oR^C 15 Secretary of the Interior
mmmmmtm%mmm
±WM      Senator HJEflT
"F^M       Congressman jgfi   w@t'JjC5C
State Governor, ±IP©S^
Chiefjustice $n##±ife±
f/S
Jttdge
&&
Meeting on Business.
How do yon do, Sir?  —
How is your health? ^|
I am very well thanks.
^^*^*±^lisili
I am perfectly well,
Where are you from?
I live in this city.
mmm%m 48
m¥%&m&titmm
Do you do any business here?
Yes, I am a merchant.
Where is your store?
On D-
Streetv
Street.
%m*± n
At the Cor. of P. 	
What kind of business are you in?
General merchandise, groceries and provisions,
mmmm±Mmi±*mm&%mn
Cigar manufacturer.
Chinese and Japanese curios.
mitiMmmtik-tii*mm±>
Labor contractor. 49
Dry goods and drugs.
mm±Mmm&±
Do you sell retail?
m±mmEm
No, only wholesale.
I will come down to your store to see you.
Thank you; if you will kindly call.
Is this your store?
*&*ifr*^±&
Yes, this is my house.
How is your business getting along?
Things ar# ver^f dull  at present*
m±*®&imM$mm        # .
Do yon sell tea? So
Yes, tea, sugar, nut oil, and rice,
M±*MM&,K\MmMmm±
S'how me some of your black! tea?
Is this from Japan?
No, it is imported direct from China.
What price do you sell it per box?
Three Dollars and Fifty Cents.
mmmMm%%m%     - V|.
itmm w&,immm^llm ^
The price is too dear.   No, it is very cheap.
How many pounds in a box?
Ten pounds, done up in sixty small packages;
mm.mm^±m.±mm&^ #
Have you any Roast Tea? Yes, I have some fine Green Tea.
It has just arrived by the last boat.
ftfoMY ...
How do you sell it?
In five pound boxes.
®mmm±
At 25 cents per pound!
mmrnvkftm®
Do you think it is good?
Oh, yes, it is excellent for family use.
m «* »* m±:%ytttm o^*
&®mm-m Mm
I will take a box of each kind.
03
Let me see your best silk Handkerchiefs.
This is poor quality.   Ah! this is betterj
ikw(®mm^mmj l 52
Which is the better of these t\\uv
«&.,»#*r*tt#ft*ffl
itrnkumamm      1
The Chinese silk looks a little coarse.
»^fcJB^*«aB^l»I,5±
mmmx I
But it will wear well.
'Affltat&jm&:
The Japanese silk looks finer.
*WKJfc*^*.*#Yf     #
But does not wear as long.
A*r±,&\*D3E*IB I
Will the color fade?
No, it is permanent.
m w»*.afEir
I will take two dozen of each.
f$tHJ£A££
I want a Chinese teapot.
*w«£ft*AH
I do not keep crockery Where can I get one?
Go to Mr. K's store.
Does he sell flower vases? v
*mr*te»,** y s*
•Yes, all sorts of China ware.
,Where is his shop?
m»*****
You just turn at this next corner.
^*,««*,&*T Y
And take the left hand side.,
£tt*Jg,tH£ttft$
The number of the shop is 25.
»»B^tt»,;&*#iiiitfc
Please make out the bill for these goods,
M®%Wcim    I
And sign for the payment. 54
Here is your money:
f«V^*^&
I haye no change ioi^s^jriijk
Have j^oii got X^majTet stunt
No; I have only ihi$ jiity dollar niH
I will write you7 opt ^, cneqiiejiyouiit;
mm^^M^i   ''
Very well, Sir..  Will y<j>u pjg| them VUlir^otd
No, you can send them tip to jny htfuse.
&MW&Zi&k
Please give me your address.
wm*$.m*mLm±
*H,,
Send them to John E*. Fly.
Number 90, 5th Ave., near K. Street. "^H
l will go up to Mr. A's store to see the teapot now.
Will you take a cigar with me?
mrn^^M±m^±m^'i
&WY&T-MM
No, thanks, I do not smoke.
Thank you for your kindness.
ffi$I¥^:ti&*     I
There is my compliments to you.
mm**mmm$M3:
Here is success to your business.
ft»*^ll*ffl^ifc«ifc±
I am smoking your health.
If you should want anything in my line, call again.
I can guarantee you satisfaction.
m%&*mmaiaz
Tell all your friends in town.
a&n&^ttgB 5°
I will come to see you again.
And will bring my wife next time.
mmMm^^^ma.M^^
Good-bye!    Good afternoonf
^Btmmimmzn
Do not forget to deliver my goods to-day.
Oh, no, I will send them up right away.
Asking for a Cook.
Good evening Mrs. T.    Do you want a servant?
#;&»*H**tt*IR5^*ie«
Yes, I wish 1 could get* a good cook.
« gSHMIBlWBMlli,«
Are you a cook?   Yes.
&&&WJ1M* Y
Where was your last situation?
5fflB$*^«$*9c^»I:
a 57
In a Hotel or Restaurant?
SMSM"^*®
No, it was in a private family.
$us«i* ni»$ut*?i]
What were you paid per month?
Twenty-five dollars.
#$&» Um	
This is not enough for me.
How much do you want?
E9+S7C i-
Forty-five dollars. ^k
*MM**r# |     d-■:■'■ ■
Do you want to get your money every week?
I do not mind.    You may pav me by the month.
&-i&]»a«y      it..
Who did you   cook for before? 5»
Mr. P. aud Mrs. W.
Who is Mr. P.?
itfc*$Him
The City Postmaster.
n%.mM±&m
How long have you cooked for him?
For the last two years.
Are you willing to do other work?
\ es, every kind of house-work.
Very well, I will try you a week.
mmm*i®m3M® I
If you give satisfaction.
I will pay you the sum.you ask. Do you want me to come to-morrow, then?
&&&wmxMMm6t if
Yes, you are to be here by six o'clock to-morrow
itm^m^m^tmm !
Is that the general time every morning?
No, seven o'clock every Sunday.
ftMFlPfc#A^
By which door shall I get in?
ftffiftg^^nBBA
You can enter by the kitchen door.
25
The key is left in the lock.
Well, good-night  Mrs. T.
fflS&#^Jt***&
Good-bye, Jane.
#»-*    I   f
/J>»frifc$lft
Be careful of the step. 6o
S&BilfcllPl
Shut the gate, please.
Is everything allr^ady for breakfast?
mm
f$et the table..
^kE^m
HkitfJlti'MXtt
[Put tlie knives and forks on.
*\Varm the plates.
mmu
Cut the bread.
Make the water boil.
FlttiltiraA^
Strain the coffee.
Breakfast.
Breakfast is ready, Sir.
«ft*^*$$iiH: ^T^iStYl
How long has it been waiting?
It has been ready for more than an hour.
«fc*&3yflL¥KH* I    '   t
Let us go to the dining room.
\\ ill you have some oatmeal?
mm*%&mimm
No, thanks, hand me the bill of fare.
Ha\e you anything besides this?
Yes, hot cakes and corn bread.
MiSMMMm^m ■      ^4
No, I don't care about them.
What meat shall I bring you?
Ham, bacon, beefsteak. 62
Mutton chop, pork chop, and mutton kidney
mk&W8k%&
Please give me some sausage.
mz&nfc -±11 m *k BSTfer M
And half a dozen eggs.
mm^msfm
Would you like* them fried?
No, I want two boiled and four poached.
What will you drink?
Tea or coffee.
I would like a cup of chocolate.
Give me a spoon.
*UB«**
Pass the sugar and cream. 6j
Salt, butter and bread.
0ffc,A«M!JtJtuw
t&ilttl
Change this plate.
Do you want some more meat?
No, thanks, I have had plenty.
Mm±®*b&mm I
Sft£il]£$
Pass me the napkin.
Now I have finished.
iMfe&*Hfc* f
You can take everything away.
WA^rltfr
Somebody has rung the door-beM.
^m^n^m
At the front door or the back?
2k
The back door, Jane. 64
Oh, my! it is the milkman.
nn mim.imx
Wait till I go for the pitcher.
%&,Emtm4m>m I
How much milk do you want this morning?
mm &mk I
Two quarts, if you please.
Is that all you want?
Yes, that will be enough to-day.
m*nfflm$m®mMm
E3.-M
im
z>
mik
Has he given you good measure?
Very fair, Madam.
Is the milk pure?
No, I believe it is half water. We will not take any more from him.
mmn&mikm.am.m
&*W it** Y
Has the butcher boy come yet?
No, I expect him every minute.
ikM-bfa Y
What meat did yon order?
A leg of mutton and beef roll.
mmM¥s®*,mmM
What pie have you made for dinner?
Gooseberry and lemons
izftsmMmmti
Have you made any pudding?
R^mtk^m .2
*Mc*iOi,i®*,£fi*
Yes, custard, sago, and rice.
«*^*fl**B*ll**±
Have you ordered any vegetables? m
66
Yes, but they cannot bring them
n*„A»mn#*i* | 1
**?#££>!* Y     |    I
Has the new  crockery   arrived''
Yes, it has been left in the hall
Was any of it broken?
m~i$M&nttttm
The Soup Tureen  was completely smashed.
*Ma»*,iii*tiiswf»L*tf*
u inner is ready
JSY**
ftttttim I
Will you take some chicken soup?
«#»#        I   ;,
A little, if you please
The soup is excellent
What kind of fish wonld yon like? *b
i%l
Boiled salmon or fish-balls.
if%
I will have some fried herring.
Pass me the sauce and pepper.
wnnm.nmMmMffi
-&£* Y
What is the bill of fare?
Roast fowl and roast turkey.
m±$mMmM±9m
Pheasant, goose and pigeon.
Corned beef and roast pork.
=?tiffi*mmM±*\-
Roast Lamb, rabbit, and partridge*
I will take some roast veal.
»ffl»JfcfrJ!t±lfitt
Jfcfr-ttJtelSY
What vegetables have you got? 68
Baked potatoes and boiled onions.
Cauliflower, tomatoes, and beans
•*jw*j£y mm mmmti
Bring me a little of each*.
tk^mnnik
Will you take tea or coffee?
mm^mMM-tfr    1
Neither, thank you.
mk*ws
1 will take a glass of beer
^fflBHft«awr*-«#*
Please open me a bottle of claret.
And bring a box of cigars.
Mm^mn±Mtt±i&*&
Will yoii take some pie or pud ling?
Bring me some cranberry pie. And a little Cape pudding.
mmMm&ttM*
Is the fruit fresh?
JWfffM* M*
JMtffc«*BH*
\es, it was bought to-day.
**,«!i*.»*ia*
Here is your change, waiter.
Jane, take off the table cloth.
Put the castor on the side-board.
TOf5*«r.»&ifc
Move the table to that corner.
Uti&HiMMfiEKfY
Put the woollen cloth on.
Sweep the carpet.
*tt*HtfW     I
mucx^mmm. \
Wash the' dining-room floor. 70
('lean the hall oil-cloth, and jshake the floor-rug.
&m,teit?m%m i*%Mm*mi&*% y
ftmmm I
Sweep the bedroom.
mfc
Make the bed. *<*
Change the bed-linen.
tmmi
Pull up the window blind
Be careful of the* window curtain.
m-kjzmjmn^&m*
Put some coai-oil in the lamp.
m$&i&MmMnm
Wipe the lamp chimney.
Bring some wood up.
Carry up a scuttle of coal for the parlor stove.
^mM^mmM^^m^n^m^u 7»
Polish the kitchen stove.
WHlMH&Hi *«B
Iron  the children's  clothes.
Take a piece of cloth to dust the piano
tf«**,ffl#^B-*«?*.;»MIfr
Carry the rocking chair to the library.
Bring me a newspaper from the writing desk
^mjm±w^Mmfemizmi
Take this order down to Mr. J's Grocery Store.
Br-^a^n^^i* ^
Get one sack of flour and two pounds of cheese.
Ma«tf£*Y.g«ffi5&-«4***.
HSf^£ Xi>filt#NHl& *
Three bottles of pickles and two bottles of lemon oil.
m$Am.nwft&MMAmMtftinitMm
One tin of cinnamon, and one tin of mustard.
%Lffl®tf&mXMmi&MMtt&ttih
m%El^!®ikM&±.   i*
Tell him to send them up as soon as possible.
gmmM*n^&W'&mifi&m 73
And come back immediately;
mmmstnmmm
Yes, I will return in about a quarter of an hour,
m>*ymm*mmmM**jW®ttM&
What time do you want supper to-night?
Half-past six every evening.
&fa*^±.€&m&it
What meat is for supper?
:Jh»
Stewed venison, curried chicken
**8s&#,-ic»$
Pigeon "pie, kidney pie, and pig's feet
mmm*&ikmMmm>   k
Stewed quail with liver ami mushroom fcauco
*Y§£S^$±SE,M*I*€.0r* Ui
Anything more?
%Mft*)m*%%mm   $
Yes, pastry, vegetables and some otlici   things.
mtiMm%^fe%%mMm.mv&Rm What cake have you made?
I have all ready made,,
imM&*mm®
±**nur«
Sponge cake, pan cake.
Pound cake, currant cake..
Hot biscuit and fine brown bread.»
Yery well, we will have a good meal to-night
Sing, make a good ure to boil the watgs;'
Is it six o'clock yet?
Yes, Mr. N. has just come home.
I* JUScJifc^*^
j  Set the dining table. 74
Put the castor in the middle.
Bring the butter dish and milk jug.
^mvftmftMmm^-
Put the baby's plate on the table.
mn%-feMW*,kmE$m
Supper.
Supper is ready, Sir.   '
Everything is on the table, help yourself.
mmm&i&E%mM±3:B%
Bring the teapot, Sing.
^^ MAI
# m^mmzK
Yes, wait for a moment, please.
« mf MXMM16
M \k*.m.&ik
Why, have you not made it yet?
*# itfcjE%m& 1   ■
No, the water has just started to boil. IS
Why did you not get it ready before?
«R^*V£«,*JM**    tf
®&®fcik*n.!km%
Well, I thought you would like the tea fresh.
m*%KttBm**MmiG   4#
And wouldn't like it if it was made too long.
mmm«\m.mimsM                  §
Very well, you are quite rigut, Sing.
&&nm*?&stm*B   1
Go down the* cellar and open the box.
*afctte*Mg*,g«*i*± |-
And bring up two bottles of beer.
mm^-^^Mnmnn^ |
Where did you place the box?
m&Mmnn± |       I       ■«,'
Near the coal oil barrel.
^Wimwm^m      Jp
Bring me five clean glasses.
*-fr^ttefe«*D«Pnr               -§,
Ajid one more cup of tea.
■isiiwtiij,',..        . "£.;..•.- 76
^T«&
S
ing, we have all finished.
You can bring the tray.
mmn'tarns       fl t %
And take away all the dishes.
When you have washed them all,
»cl)lfflJfc»*ll5SJft I      I    .
You can use this piece of cloth to wipe them with.
And put them up in the cupboard.
&%ikftMfcffi$mzT     WS M
Then put the saucepans under the sink.
Clean everything nicely.
wmwL^&m-Ljt   r       Til
After you have finished all the Avork.
ikw&mitmmkzmB   M,   . f
You will light the lamp and bring it to the bedroom. 77
Pull this blind down.
Split some kindling to make the fire in the morning
Bring another pail of water from the pump.
Turn out the light.
tmm^M.zkmmi
See that the cooking-sty)ve fire is all out,
■BBfc,tt«*]tttte»lMI     I
Before you go home.
Everything is all right, madam.
itmmmn mmmM±
Is there anything more you would like done?
M*Mikmm*?m%ft §
Ik^iBrMtitmFl&^ikm
Be sure you lock the kitchen door when you go.
mnttmnmM 1
And take the key with you. JS
Come at the same time every morning.
msfik*mL-m'km&'<
What will you have for breakfast in the morning?
Oook everything you have in the kitchen.
mtmmttm   fir
I  think I will go home to  bed.
>V>
pB*
ft mm mm
Good-night, madam.
pB
#
Good-night, Sing, I hope you will sleep well.
1
Travel
/E:
&£itM:2
Vre vou ffoiim to travel*'
R3MMJ&
Yes, I leave this place ior awhile.
Where are vou off to?
>&3zmm 79
I am going to Los Angeles*
mtJV6Lm±tomt
Where is that place?
■&m.mnmmkm §
In the Sta-te of California*
Oh, San Francisco!
j*^
7E*
No, it is a long way from there.
lkiB»1!L*JH*#«* |
tt&m   I    L
Is that a fact?
mmtwsm
Why, you astonish me.
flt^«**&*M
&*B%m. M -
Are you going away to-day?
&%&mmm&Mm
7&W*W®5-7}£ lift   ,
No, not till to-morrow morning.
How are you going? 8o
g9t£?PAEl3&
By boat or rail?
I will take the train.
When does it leave the station?
**T*«fil^*« EL
20 minutes past 7 is the time.
Have you got your ticket?
I am going for it.this afternoon.
Where are yon going to get it?
**t&«sAjfc   •      I
From the agent at the railway station.
itiimmwMifcw&tt.itimm $
Will  it  be a  first-class one?
No, I can't afford it. How much will it cost you?
jftH-rSx
Abont $25.00.
m&%m®&m
Is anybody going with you?
#*IBifcifcilHMt±3£
No, L am going alone.
&£&EflA       1
How long are you going to stay?
nm&3MM*ffltm
I shall be away about <> months.
M.
*±j
H^Hnfr Y
What kind of country is it?
It has a fine climate.
«tt*,(HH?*c«
The weather is most temperate.
«fll£*ft±.$it6*ij
WMZMMM   §
A' beautiful country to live in. 82
Have you got any baggage?
&3MMikmmm
Not much, one trunk and a valise.
nmm*mm'mmmmwfi
&««&»»**Y
Will you have the valise checked?
No, I w il   take it on the car with me.
WkmkMitZ I
Does the Conductor allow that?
Yes, I can put it under the sjeat.
■&&ffiifc*#Y
What seat will you try to get?
One near the back.
EL8:*&«      i.
They are the most comfortable.
ifrSUM?*A&
Do vou know the Conductor9
fifc5fcJk*HR*ff 83
Yes, his name is Mr- B.
.mm
Who is he?
tt^*J^
mm&mmzsift
He is a cousin of George 0
*»**-^flWf#fi»H
«Mftfciit*tt**A*     $
He was once a freight Conductor.
***ja*-«4*asir
I suppose you are well acquainted with him?
£«*a*^3&ffl»jeiHffe.#±*
Oh, yes, I am a friend of his.
witf^ftfttta-fittft*
**ffl*f*T*IIA£. I
Is there a porter on the train?
Yes, but only in the first-class.
Mi5*A%mMmw-*®tii
8ca«jmr£y M
How will you get your meals?
®m&&MzmBM'k      •
I will take my meals in the dining car.
imm.m*%mMiftftM-t 84
How much will it cost you?
That I do not know yet.
tkM&^&im&Mtii
Will you have to sit up at night?   No.
Does it cost extra money to have a bed on the train?
tT*-B@l:±^:±ttijfi5^ffiaDE#^^i&,ig
No, but you must carry your own bed-clothes.
It is a great inconvenience!
It is a thing that cannot be helped
»*^iff0mn,j£fft£
mmmz %
Is it a safe road?
Yes, I believe so.
Well a pleasant journey to you^ ax
Farm Work.
■§KM *■  m
Good morning, John.    Where are yor going?
&*tf*H:TJfc* a m
I am looking for a job at farm work.
Ac
Did you ever do anything of the kind before?
til ^««Ba*1fl:        t- *■
Oh, yes! I was born on a ranch.
W* £i**.*£3l& .f     *
How much will you work for?
Thirty dollars a month and board.
mmmUffiMmnk
nmimik     I
All right, I will hire you.
Can you plow?
Yes.   How many horses do yon drive?
*t* mcm^j&m 86
Only two    They are in the stable.
mm n&mni&mpm i
^^ttMmmfmmm,^
Put the harness on and bring them out.
We will work on the vegetable garden tod.
mm/&%nM-&&%miim. n mm
tt«ftT-tllil»3£
What are you going to plant here?
Oh' Some potatoes, beans, peas, and corn.
§ >imem*,j§*,#* jp&t m
ikTtiftttm*Lm&
What are you going to put in the big field?
&#3MM*mMnMwm
Wheat and oats.
m*Mm*m±
&tm&mgg
Do you raise much on his land?
*KlA-HHSI±«»-HIW*     I
About eighty bushels of oats to the acre
®&i«?i*l&.;Httn@,ffi^tfJ&
How many acres have you? Do you sell the milk?
up
No, we make butter.
» *»Atr
I have 160 acres
W hat is it worth an acre?
ft»Hfitt,*±HW*
It is valued at $250
S
ikm%&£
Do you make much hay?
•Fust enough to feed the stock.
ftffitHFttMim
We cut it with a mowing machine
&#&£ft«Y
How many cows do you keep?
ftX$&±M3:WL
We have ten. S8
Bring the horses here, John.
We will hitch them to the wagon.
Be careful he does not step on the tongue.
»#&* i^T*ia*#.^Hg
Put the brown one on the near side.
ffljMfeffcSffiY        ||
Which side do you call the near?
The one on the left.
The f.her is called the off side.
M^MAifoit     - i
Be careful or you will run into that tree
W e will drive to the house.
It is supper-time, now
H^*,S«.fS 8c,
&k--
We will do the chores after supper.
mm&Mttm
Tie the team to the tree.
mu mk.tkmm&ZTy®
To-morrow I will show you your regular work.
&mm,}$fflmf%3:*$Mm®®L ^t
Laundry.
I mm
Have you any washing for me this morning?
w ik®m£WL-~tm&
Yes.    How much do you charge a dozen?
ni$*ii?mfem3zxmM$m
Forty cents a dozen.
W hat will you charge by the week?
smm^xfeMwh.
How many pipces do you have?
mxikm^M^ti.  ■""■...-  1;
About four dozen a week. 9°
Have you many starched clothes?
&^£&**Tte^;£±
*&£  §
Not very many
&m*rti*£fti:**
Do you send handkerchiefs and table napkins?
Yes, you will get all the small things.
Show me- the wash and I will tell you the price.
mmnmfi,MmMfflmR3:*ntem±
All right, here it is
Qmik-jt-mam
I will charge you one dollar a week.
immxm^mnmm® -%
Yon may take them.
fttfc&ttttBgffiY
How soon will yon bing them home?
I will bring them back on Friday 9i
fcB«c**JfcY
What day will you call for them?
I can come every Monday.
i&fom,mftmxm
Try and call in the morning.
*aUItt*5Ifr,H;»iMr
ft $&*»*./&»#**
All right, I will be here about nine o'clock.
*tHW»SB*!iflilil
Be sure and bring them on Friday.
*ffiMm*<frm*%%mm "
You will find all my things marked X.
Make the collars stiff with starch.
wmmmm®  |
Do not tear nor burn them.
Shall I wash your flannels?
#Bh£»*5£ttM»
Yon may, but do not shrink them.
^M*AtBK\*iHifc *.. 92
I will do the best I can.
^ &mm*ftt&%<Mte  ':
You can take all the flannels then.
^&M£;&iftSiS3>]&:A£^
Don't put too much starch in the mnslin dresses.
All right, I understand.
#*#
And don't starch the children's dresses too stiff.
MmMmrfenMik±&m±M±>
&ttftttlR%&&. t
Can you wash lace curtains?
Yes, I have washed them.
Do not put in too much blue.
And don't make them too stiff.
mmMmwm^
ik^nm-nm^M   z
Have you a good place for drying clothes?
fa
I# 93
Yes, they dry in the yard.
fr* KS&Hfe-fe
XJft&A$!lJ£ s
Are they out in the air?
\ es, during the summer.
**«tMI-;»H Y
mm^mk&mmmm
Where do you dry them in the winter?
In the drying room.
Bring them back well dried.
«fcA«a*ntiY
How do you wash silk handkerchiefs?
ffM^«***fc;0lftBi&4*
The same as the other things
»^«*^ffiiffW
Don't put them in boiling water.
Wash them in luke-warm water.
"**^aiia#* 94
$mmft§
And iron when dry.
Mm*l&M5;M%
If ironed when damp they wittl turn yellow
®mitm&n%
I will wash them as you wish.
^5fflS&l$r*fl.3£*;*c**
Can yon wash blankets?
mnjmWmtcm^
Yes, I have done so.
Can yon do them without shrinking?
Yes, I will try.
Double blankets should be cut in two before washing
&pm%tmMwmm.m!km&
They would be more easy to handle when small.
nm .mmmM^m^tmm
Don't rub the soap in the blankets.
tftii*£*HIM>*tt 95
«tiH8£ft£ttJEjftJ|!
Soap rubbed in blankets makes them thick.
SLxmmmm
It will also make them hard.
ik%amiimMfttitx      t
How do you wish them done.
m&tftm&tfcfc  i.
Make some good strong soap suds.
«^#*ffiS3«^Hf
And change tfye water often.
mmMmnmwM®
tnmtmvmm
Don't rub them on the wash-board.
But. take the hands.
A,*&&jfc± I
^zxkMxn-kmm
Do your men smoke when working^
Some of them do.
■   :l
Mm&%f%%*ft
Smoke makes the clothes smell badly.
± a MWi%±fRv*m®m 96
Do you notice it?
Yes, very much.
nmrnxk^si-k'.
I will tell my men not to smoke.
ft ttftfi
All right take the bundle.
&u m$m&
General Store.
Have you got any black beaver cloth?
ik^:MM^k^Wi^B^m± f
Yes. we have some.
How much is it a yard?
We have it for one dollar a yard.
IkGtfiikm&B:
Have you any better quality?
&3z,mtkmimmm **% ,Yes, here is a piece for five dollars a yard.
M*2?^     I
Can you make it any. cheaper
'&g&£Y
How much do you want?
Enough* for a pair of:pants.
[That willtake only two yards. .
ilf you take eight or tfen yards I will make it chekper.
•How much off a yard?
I will make it $4.50 per yard.
mmwmmm3m9cM&
Give me eight yards;
i How much money does that come to?
irate**fc.*r*Hmtft' .98
Give me 136.00.
Do you want any needles?
Yes, give me two dozen.
ft*&'*ffl*ns!
That will be 24 needles which will cost you ten cents.
Bmmj&mmk @ mM±%\m
You Will want some thread.
Have 3on any cotton thread?
We have plenty of cotton thread
mmmm,nm*mMm I
1*«A»*1B«Wft
Give me six spools for 20 cts
Do you want any cotton liniug?
You may show me some 09
! Here is a goo$. quality.
!You o4n giveine two yards!
;Is there anything else X can show veil?
Have you any braces?
Yes, the^fine'st variety In the city.
Show me what you have.
What do you ask for that pair?
These are worth 70 cts.
&*,3&fe'fri&*
Havp you none cheaper?
Yes, here is a pair forSO cts. with patent fasteners. IOO
>
Have you any English flannel?
W X^t^mit^m
Yes, just got in a shipment
n$}mft*$.u®
Show me the best quality.
Here is some at SO cts a vard
,>bmwm%*m& g
How much do you want for ten yards?
1 will take $2 for that much
mmm*mm®* Bmfe i -
ft n-\-®M
All right, give me ten yards
Have you a cheaper cotton9
Yes, we liave it very cheap.
-N&litia^SS® fa  a? ••
What will ten yards of this cost?
«fn&?ii&.«tf&*if±' * tor
Will give you that for $1.
JfcWW-HllH*    1
Have you any one yard wide?
M iitiitM~t&
Y'Cs, that will cost 50 cts. per y&rd.
*** BmmM±%m9m&
®m$.&im
I will take five yards of that.
Do you want any blue Denim?
Show me some.
&mkm&g®&
How much do you want for this piece?
JMMIA&-HIL
That is worth 25 cts. a yard.
K*,S&±»JMfe*JWl
Have you a better kind?
Yes, here is a piece at 30 cts. X02
Give me the better piece.
*iM^*tr»* i
Have you any white socks?
mmk,m&±% \
Yes, we have several kinds.
«**£a#8«fr»*i-
Show me a good quality.
J»JM&#.8Hfrtt
What is this pair worth?
J88c*fik*±
Forty cents a pair.
How much would you sell six pair for?
That will cost you
Bmm^±^mr\
Do you want a black felt hat?
ft n-mmvk
Yes, show me one. Here is a fine hat just your size.
m&*t#£*£*^fc §
it-ft$miim&
What do you ask for that one?
»^©**¥e«
jitfHifca
The price of this is f 2.
$,$>nm-ftftW}   I
I like that other one better.
Will you take this one?
Would you like to buy one pair of shoes?
$m.mmk%& l
Let me see what you have.
What size 'do you take?
WtM3zl&
Number six.
tk^mmmmmwuk
Have you any with elastic sides? io'4
1 will go for an hour or so.
tzmm^^mn y m&
&*f-Aj§i»1ftiI 3
I have never been inside a Court House.
Do you know anything about the Court?
No, not in this country.
MAm^.B
T-m*T-&itm®
Why, how is that?
I have just come from China.
&i!fc#*.flrftiB£ifc
Then it ought to interest you.
»Mntf I.
I expect it will.
±£&±1MB«
Is this the court room?
&*&is«
Yes, this is where he will be tried.
«* WftLM&W io.S
Yes, here is a pair of gaiters.
Will you try them on?
Sim^ttAJpS
That pair hurts mv foot.
tt-mmwi
Here is a pair a little broader.
m,ummm*ttnw
mwkft%%
They feel much better
ftwmMfemt
Are the soles pegged or sewn?
This pair is pegged.
*v<
K
Will you show me a pair with sewn soles?
mm^mmjm^tmm^m
Here is a good pair.
• 0S
&#
Don't you want an umbrella? 106
ecwKWT
You might show me one.
lit-MIR!?^
Here is a good strong cotton one.
What do you ask for it?
Bttitt&ifc-*
Will give it to you for $1
mmftM^
Has it good steel ribs?
fft*PH^#**S&^±
ft &zim&L
Yes, and will stand the wind.
M^mmmm^nn a
I must sell you a rubber coat.
Have you one with a cape on?
m ^xmim.m
mm
No, we are just out of that line.
UP S3££*:K-MttB*
£&-&-J,
When will you have any?
zmm,3MM& They will be here on the next boat,
J$ffl»JKflL«?«Sft**
$AA#3i
How long will that be?
In a'bout two weeks.
&%mmm<k
Do you keep any rubber boots?
* mm      I
Yes, several kinds.
Show me a good pair.
What size do you wear?
^et me try a pair of number fives.
imxm     I
That pair is too small.
B»*Jfi±J£
Here is a size larger Which will fit
m.mm±MftAifewmvft to8
We have a good line of mitts.
mm.jwnA«mM±      ■**
Show me a woollen pair.
0fftB~&tiSrtt
Those are not large euougli.
%±J£*\Mfe.\6fiM*
What is that pair worth?
ft***^Btta±
&MittiMM.mWL®%
We are selling these at cost for 40 cts.
=3&iHv&*BH.:lf±:¥f4ttJ;5fc
utwmx  1
Do you want anything else?
KmMmm*$m±
I will call again next week.
Court House.
mft±
What is the Police Court?
A Court presided over by a Police Magistrate io9
Where is the Court held?
In a large room in the City Hall.
mmmmm.mn^mftm
itmmm^-ttimm   j
The Court opens at ten every morning.
What cases are tried?
«*D*,Effi»
fRGimzwimzk
All breaches of law and criminal offences.
MmQm-fejmmMmftimmm ±
Jfc&IE\fr«®
Has that prisoner been stealing?
ffi*.B»$#^^*m^
Yes, he was caught byv the police yesterday.
M^mm^mMnm^i&M^m
What .lid he steal?
&&•**»»
Some wood from the mill-yard.
>m*ttiimmm& t
Did they put him in the cells? no
He was placed there over night.
£®^*7bmm 1
To have a trial in the morning.
***
#-A»j|ttA*itt£    I
A man saw the person take the wood.
Who did he complain to?
He swore-out a warrant before the magistrate.
&mtm^%.       '  I
What was done with the warrant?
Given to a policeman.
®m*um$i$x
te*ffi£ttffi*ffi*fcK
He then had power to arrest the thief.
i^.£te3&ffi»**r.;&Btt
A warrant must be signed by the magistrate.
iiwau«**iii,»*&-ti?&*#j
^«i Al»3ECA«W^*1»iilE \0f 421
Who is that man in the box?
I Ill
M^SEA
He is the Witness.
sm**»&±
<E»J1*I3EA*»
lie saw the prisoner stealing.
mm*tem&m^itim*
What is that book in his hand?
»*.BhB$» f
The Bible.   The Clerk hands it to "him.
What for?
fg§t
To take the oath.
Jffijfcft«±
See, the witness kisses the book1.
Must he speak the truth?
*wtik±!i4&*at±
^*tfUEMHgiB2A
If he does not he will perjure himself.
iw«*r*^iffli«rtMt**^
jaHWwriffi
Which is worse than stealing. 112
stmmmz
Is it a serious crime?
Yes, a judge is very severe for such offence.
Perjury, is giving false evidence.
wmtM'fiimmm-fiAMmtM
mtilkmWM
That prisoner has paid a fine.
Who takes tlie money?
5^H2
^
It is given to the Clerk.
»H***^s^l^^lt
m&m£Wit®L&
What does he do with the money?
Puts it in the Bank to the credit of the City.
mmm^nMnm^mAmn^m
%t&mmi3:*x&m
What if the fine is not paid?
jttlEABP^S
The prisoner is placed in jail. U3
fflg^jlfc rrAJiltffi . f
Who are the 12 men sitting together?
They are the jury.
Must all cases be tried by a jury?
*JIJ.Jfc*BA8*Dlig8c«#
No, a prisoner may elect to be tried by the judge.
0fa^fflpgsw I it
Then a jury is not necessary.
^jM'j«,n&*gtfij
There is no jury in a Police Court?
*&**»»?UH»***?th;
The magistrate tries the case alone.
&fci&*^fi*;»*n*.3Si8f
ITMS-^Ai
Look at. the crowd over there.
«nkB*fcg*w»e#
Has anybody been hurt?,
tt*«gftfKttfti
No, I think not.
m £ssn ri4
W-Aftlfc
A man has been arrested.
*2fc*ft*-$l3£2£*ifc
What has he been taken for?
4§tt7pfi3t£3l
He has stolen 2 boxes of fruit.
Where did he steal them?
«IL*»H
&mft$tm& i
From the shop around the corner.
Will he be tried this day?
mm*mmm&*ikitim
Yes, he will be tried this morning.
Are you busy to-day?
No, I have nothing much to do.
fMHA*£Y   |
Let us go to the Court. >'5'
&&wmzk%m%.
\\ ho is the man on the stand in the centre?
&mnx*%mn.Mm®
{giPflmir n
He is the magistrate.
Where is the prisoner?
He is down stairs.
Why do they not bring him up?
They must search him first.
And take his name.
:**£
^
iii>
 , kZ _
Then they will put him in the prisoner's )>ox.
And the magistrate will hear what he has to say,
..if «ai«jfe-nffl y
What is the box beside the magistrate? Tl6
That is the witness box
B8*-*&iWfcHri»t 4-
m&mmtejfc%zu&
Where they hear the evidence of his accuser.
*»fifA 4E«»#JfcfW
Or* anyone who knows anything a>bout it.
What are those men at the Magistrate's feet?
»££±£,«*Mii&*ai,# '      fl
ttftfttfRA       jL.
They are.the newspaper reporters.
x^-mmwk
And those men with the gowns?
mm%±x^±mL
mm&wtm
They are the lawyers.
s&*>
One for the prosecutor.
And the other "for the prisoner.
He has been found guilty. JI7
And sentenced to six months' iini)risonnient.
mm. mMm^±m,nm *#ra
Are they taking him away.
He will have to go to jail.
mm$&MffiMM%m
And work for the Government.
mms&^tefpfflffi
He will be chained to another prisoner:
And will work on the roads.
\mMm®.&i&n
:.±mx^mik   I
Hoes John Smith owe you any money?
iW^±mA^^mkmm   n
Yes, $20 for wages.
M'$Mm$m*:¥&m
Will he not pay you?
mmmmz:
No, he has no money.
8&Mfc*S!S$tfic n8
Do you want to collect u?
mm #&«iflt#
Yes, if he is worth it.
lg*^tta^*^±Bl
Place the matter in your lawyer's hands.
■lN**Mitf.*K*UIMfc±- *i
*f-A£»£.18a«=Bll
A man named Rogers borrowed $300 from me.
«*&&« .«®^©*T#.#fiJi
Has it not been paid9
$fc*PB.tt\i§«! M
No, but I hold his note
JR. ASBff BrtPJfft
ftttSPftY J
When was it due?
13
Oxei a yearago
las he paid the interest up to date?
tt* Wl. fcBffl*J*. OT&
All but fifteen dollars.
*».A*#JWT«i "*
ft
Show me a copy of the note-
ttmn%.*&
Here it is in full.
$tro*.img& I
$.•{00.00.   Vancouver, Dec. 10th, 1890.
is$*i@».:k *j e *m>i>m±
MSX-*ft.mmM3:     £■
< )ne year after date I promise to pay
To.H. Elliott the sum of three hundred dollars
For value received with interest
:fm^MmaM±mmw
S^AAM.fcMS1 I
At 8 per cent per annum, signed J. Rogers..
».M£Ui.l§.&li±
fr
•^P»*
■ *n^»
I have a note against I*. Hoo.l for |100.
?ij»y m    <& f
Is it due?
JHf«fc
No, it was drawn 13th June, 1892, at 1 year.
*.H*i|rftft.tftft*'. hshhb m&> «hm 120
. iiJ-TAH^L+H^v^B -rjfc.7ift£
Then it will not mature till Juno 10th, 1893
^mmmx-nm y ,Emmft±mmif5m
/&fl?Y.*/3+H3cH]£ SB        »: \
Why is it not due June 13th?
»*i«.iWSM8!^'
*SHBA1f       2   i     ■£
Because three days grace are allowed.
If the last day is Sunday the note is due Monday.
IMt.*H**Hii.^*ilia.^lft.K*ft3fc*
Do you want to get the cash for that note?
M.Mffliifc®
Yes, I need the money.
&ft&»tmf8ifotnt!t3tik e.
The Bank may discount it for you.
What woijjd they charge?
*$#*-^ ■     " m
About 10% (per-cent).
For flOO yoit would get *90. The Bank keeps $10 for every f 100.
Can a note be collected after many years?
wm*m®MAmvft*x&M
Not longer than G years after due date.
Except when interest has been paid.
mmmmzB I
Then the time dates from that day.
%*i&mwz±AmBm I
WLmm±mmx^m   i *
Or where the maker acknowledges in writing.
xt
mm,.
Must the rate of interest be in writing?
If not only 6% can be collected.
What do you mean by murder?
&8t&M*ftfflf
3fcffl4«.^AS561 §
Causing the death of a person with previous intent. laj
If it should happen to be an accident?
That would be called man-slaughter.
Bw*vjm*xitim
vmizim y
What is the penalty for murder?
The prisoner if found guilty is hanged.
n^mmm,Mm®mm,ft-fim
For man-slaughter he is sent to prison.
Murder cases are tried in the Supreme Court*
*»ff*n*.3Sffi39S&.±2*tt    |
M&m&mwiszm        >
Before a judge and jury.
%-AM&fe*mmmm
»#$jlfc3EAffi
Who has charge of the prisoner?
ttm*.xte#ft^.s$#«
The sheriff and his deputy.
M&mMmmti^mm
Where do they keep him during the trial? "3
,In the prisoner's box.
The trial may last a week.
The: prisoner may have a lawyer to defend Mm.
M^^m^nmM^MM.mm'm
itxm$mffikfe&
The Crown Attorney conducts the prosecution.
n/cmnmm^mn^^m
Is he known by any other term-J
He is generally called Q. C.
What is thaCintended for?
mm,Bm$m*m
xmmmzmMBtmsim
Queen's Counsel who acts for the Crown,
ffl »*»,«: Jftfc&ftlB
fi£KA£ffl«5ls
The Crown witnesses are examined first
tc^k^Mmik
Has the prisoner any defence?
m.ifc&m^mkmm:
■ 124
He has witnesses to prove an alibi.
jtfe$r*^«.#i#Mtt.M»».
What do they sware to?
That he was elsewhere when the crime was done.
Would that be a good defence?
i?Bi£.ie#&®±f|
ftMtcM^Ami^m^m
Yes, no jury would convict on such evidence.
«. mmn w&WBL,mm to®
m^^mmtkitmk^    f
Then the Judge could acquit the prisoner.
m%mikwmmz&,!im!%®32. L
What is done after all the witnesses are examined?
The Crown Counsel addresses the jury.
ftjcmmfimM&mftMmm
m~&wmzk%.m&
Who speaks to them next?
itwAzsum     V
The Counsel for the prisoner. izS
Does the Judge make any remarks?
triti,nfefeMMikMm   J
^-HwUMiK^iraASiJiJife
Yes, before the jury retire to consider the case.
a*. «*&«*•!. ®*jfflm*itr.«*ii*
They bring in a verdict, guilty or not guilty.
MQ$Mm.fflfo*&mmMv\mmm
jH3EA*S£T!M!l£«5fciI3£
What is done with the prisoner if found guilty?
tt#*fl.3t±»3s^#it.&ttfc.aifr*
i*te-*eJMJMIBKfiJ      I
He is placed in jail till the date of hanging.
Who fixes the date?
The judge has power to name the day and place.
Who does the hanging?
wg.m%MMm®%'$b-'kim      f.
The Sheriff must or find some one to do it for him.
*teflti»*.tt#'Mkffi»i«:*»?
*fcfllA£*.*fcJa*iB«£JIM£■'■«•"   *      *?
Taking the life of another is a most serious crime ij£"
Who is the Bailiff?
He is an assistant of the Sheriff. Up
mni$*$.M.mMAmM:<kim
When goods are seized for rent or other causes^
itmmmm%m
The Bailiff is placed in possession.
Can any of the stock be removed by the owner?
m&mm n±mMmmnM n&& .2!
mmemxs&&&%   ?
>Not unless the debt is paid or satisfied.
Sheriff's sale is made after a certain time.
Are you going to school?
R3MMJ5.±-&m
When I get a certificate.
**££.©**&#*£'
Did you ever go before?
•**.:m:fiir«.«.3fil:f*tt
R 127
*?!*f«A
About a year ago.
&A4i$ftY
What class were you in?
WtMISM^I
The third reader.
How did you manage your lessons?
I got along fairly well.
&S41MY f
What sort of lessons did you have?
We started with arithmetic.
mmm*M±m±x&
mmm^xnmn
Then we had geography and grammar.
ikmmk
Whose grammar book did you use?
We used the Carlyle grammar. It is a very good book.
mMmmmm&ik   3
Do all the schools use it?
tB».^±#Sfr.;*;*PB
Only in Newfoundland.
i<mMxM-&xm%.i
Wrhat lessons do you have after grammar?
We have reading, spelling and writing.
Do you have to read in classes?
ujzimmjm-^mi
No, we read individually.
m.mmMmmmm
You have to work prettv
If you want an education.
Are the teachers strict?
3gJMB»Y^±il«
hard
en I£&
Not as a rule.
What are the school hours?
From nine till twelve.
And from half-past one till four.
ntf.&#*4*B£M$l!£:l
Then you have the rest of the day to yourself?
^3«fc*H£*.Wtt;&*Jffl3fcBtt
No, we always have home-work.
m*mMm&,im®.
Do they give you very much to do?
Sometimes, and sometimes not
td>0Mm>t^\
m&&mzBr
When do you have holidays?
4$&iSI¥AB
Saturday pf every Week. *3°
ttit&mim  |
That is very accommodating*
It gives one a rest from study.
nB«.»*.ttii*^Ji!i
Have you been to school in China?
I went nine years to school there.
J£s$|f*.ffl±*S&!tr
To a school of college?
Five years to a public school.
xmmmmu   J
And four years to a private college.
You received a very good education, then?
^MBtt.HI&S^'t.nKBtni^ it
^.il4i^it I i
Oh, nothing extra.
Do you like the English school best?
t!^i«iTM?'J*.±i!3&.»* i3i
Or the Chinese school.
W*M*£$k*±£m
tmffim&%.mm%m* m
I cannot say, I like them both well.
Which is the easiest to learn?
»te,;R*B Y Jfi*
The English or the Chinese?
nnm^WM.nmk^
The English is the easiest.
1&vsm ']*.&Ǥ B Y
The Chinese is the most difficult.
»&*.#*&±.&tt>&
;Did you know any English before you came here?
No, not any.
I do not know much of it yet.
&m%Mft
You speak it pretty well.
3k±mmMmmm J32
I think you are flattering me a little.
«•
Oh n6, you speak it properly.
-frfinfcfi        J
Every word nicely.
^?iif.0>*^ij
Gardening
&*Jtfr1«IA:l
Do you want to hire a gardener?
I am in need of one.
tm&xm    At
What wages will you pay?
^•te*.5ftlfe^W
Twenty-five dollars a month.
tcximm
I cannot work for that.
wvm-B s
ikmrnz y
How much do you want?
ftMfeMJzC »33
Give me thirty.
iftmMmim
You can begin at twenty-five a month.
3&%-%MmmmmMffi
ikmnB-fitm f
Can you make1 it $30?
®3MmMmim
If you suit me I will give you more.
fttf3zftm,%ffl&®3:m
When will I begin?
You may start at the first of the week.
3Ji**r.iia*^c*.*ijim®
m&ftmmM?zm
Let me show you where the tools are- kept.
mmtt^Mimm,'%M
They are always to be found in this building.
m.jm-n*tkmmmm
On Monday you plow the garden.
%xmj%&%mm
With that plow? J34
ftflMlffiftftMY
\ es, but the point is broken.
«.A^m*.«@
fkw^m^^mm m
Will you get a new plow-point?
Y es, the first time I go to the foundry.
#*j^**.iiw*&*wi*lh
What is the foundry?
m^mm^zn.
The machine shop where the plows are made.
ikmmM,mimm-&
Do you use the team for plowing in the orchard?
.&
tax
No, take the single horse plow.
M.&nm&mn±%%
Be careful and not hurt any of the trees.
m&ttmMmK\MM&Amnw£
Where is the single whiffle-tree?
ik&rmmz%m®/mn&
You will find it on the seed drill
^m^m^-m^imm *35
Are the tugs the right length?
You had better make them a little longer.
What do you want me to do this morning?
You may harness the horses to the wagon.
3km*mk'fi%^±Mimft
Where is the neck-yoke?
5H1CT.M5I&      I
You will find it on the sleigh under the shed.
^ffl&#H.£#**5£.#TO&
Draw a load of manure over to the strawberry patch.
femmmMttXMMEtmft&Qmimfe
Shall I place it in heaps?
'km.im.&mMMi
mftMftxtmmLfc
No, scatter it around with the fork.
Some of those apple trees most be trimmed. '36
ikmi
Do you use a saw?
mm.mitmm^.7]
No, take this pruning-knife.
«LJ«8c*#Jt»m4-
What will be done with the brush?
Pile it in a large heap.
iktommit&MMffil
Do you want the cherry trees trimmed?
&*mm®*x®mMkMm
Yes, and also the plum and pear trees.
-k%*m*&mmitmmm  m
After dinner you may spade the onion bed.
ftttftsmag    i
When will you put in the seed?
*wm*giikMte%.
As soon as the ground gets dry enough.
®*^«TOgJi:IUgtt0#itt
It may rain to-night and keep it too wet.
mmmmMmmm&m T37
&ftm&WMmm*®
Bring me some cabbage plants from the hot-house.
^m>bM&mmmmiftMft± '
Where will we set them out.
&mibm&mM*¥.m#i <M
In the south part of the garden beyond the corn.
Shall I hoe the potatoes?
#»J£#&f*.RflH:   «
Not till Monday, as we must plant the celeiy.
Do you plant it in trenched?
«B^i«.B#«tei--■'■■
nwmftttmmmm *       n     .*•
We must dig the ground and get it ready.
mimMM&mMm^M^m
tkMLmttz$M%m& ti
The weeds should be hoed out of the carrots*
fMt*fflifc«J* Iv
Shall I use the cultivator?
No, you can do it with a hoe «3*
&®mstwmz
The grass on the lawn wants cutting.
Have you a lawn-mower?
You will find it in the wood-shed.
mmmmMmx. m
It must be oiled well before using.
MWffitiLMmW&M'K^m.    .
mmzmjm-*k$
Rake all the cut grass in a pile.
MmjmmmMmmm
Shall I use the wheel-barrow to carry it away?
0" E9
#&i£g*.l*fftE&E.M?iIBB. ma
Take it or the large basket.
®mMt$MtiiAeft&
Do you see that picket off the jfence?
»SB-H#«.*l#»»i: # .
Get the hammer and nails and putiit on again.
JfcHrHMITi is
The hinge on the gate is broken. '39
Will you get a new one?
Look in the repair shop on the upper shelf.,
*m*nmmL%nQB&tt
I don't see it there.
^^B.n@fe I M
ftBJBT&BBIf"!
It was used on the stable door.
mmmM^gn^mpmsL
Some of the cherries are ripe.
>frfatt.T*M.®l*      '*
$Jira*flMWftft>r* *
Shall I get the ladder and pick a few?
*K.*fcSTWiff.E«lBffii#
You may also bring a pail.
mmMm^^^mmm       %
Do not Break any of the limbs.
Are any of the apples ready to pull?
Some are quite ripe at the4o]fce$ the tree.
_ - -. •   ■. 140
Be careful and not bruise them.
Mtt8&.»tt"w;t*#       r%.
That branch is overloaded with plums.
B^#?&.^*«E^.^±tf m
You might get a board and prop it up.
A large quantity are lying on the ground.
WiMB&tt.ng.$ftftJB
Will you leave them there?
It would be better to feed them to the pigs.
^tkfmmfmy
Where will I put the apples?
ffiMm%ifa,m&$m     ff
tEMBftZm     j
In a barrel in the corner of the shed.
mmm%tM®=?mAmn%.  t »
Do you want the lawn watered?
ik*s0&m m$ftik* »*•      P
You may get the hose and turn on the water.
3zmgftft±Mmm%n*®w f'" 141
mmtm                                       i
Give the flowers a good wetting.
' *m***±.»»»                              it
After tea you may go for a row.
Hf**'Jft.^JfiOT*iMt              *            I
ftA^ffittariift                            I
Take some tomato plants across the river.
m&Mm®$m.m%±Am&
Will I give them to Mr. Jones?
ffl^.^SJffi.HR€^    1
He will pay you 10c. a dozen.
'
*cffl&.»^;fc.ni4TIi
£§±*S6£
Landlord and Tenant.
Mmmmmr              -i
Have you a house to rent?
mzMft±jm                 ■.£    J
I own three that I will rent or sell.
^»,B&TO«ypfc»           3* a
Wha* are your terms for the two-storey house?
sb^b.* Mm&m*ft±,
Ten dollars a month, rent in advance.
1 What do you ask for a year's lease?
Will take } 100 if you pay taxes.
That is a bargain.
B&TMBBtt
tkmftmtimi .
You had better give me a lease.
For what length of time?
Make it out for three years.
What if I shall want to leave in the meantime?
Give me 3 months' notice in writing.
What is the necessary time for a monthly tenant?
^mjmki^mm^mm^mA^^
One month's notice to quit is enough. 143
ttm*&nmA%®itm:
The place I am quitting don't suit me.
Have you occupied it long.
Only a few months.
ftgtf-HHSIY
What is wrong with the house?
»*BB.#:±;«±
The roof leaked and spoiled my goods.
nmtiMMmmm**^
Did you claim damages from your landlord?
Yes, but could not recover anything.
fc*,Affi"\M*N3JfeHR
jft#Y.ft*ffii*»meK£
Why could you not get damages?
I did not noti^him in writing.
Did you speak to him about the leakage?
fr^mft 144
Yes, and several repairs were made.
xtfeMMttm* -
That did not keep out the water.
mmmv
When was your rent due?
sif*.^:@ffi
Not over a week agdl
iftttSftfe
II want to leave it at once.
You must then pay for the month.
But I have only been here a week on this month.
Am:,%mmnM®&mm ±
That makes no difference.
BmM&®±       ■-
What if I had only been one day over?
You would then pay for the month. HS
Yon had better stay till the end of the month.
tt&fr*i$mRmMMAm.nm
&zm%f}®mn
My tenant cannot pay his rent.
What do you intend to do?
Make a distress when the rent is due.
$M*mft&&ifi*5;n^MibR
mmmmmsism
He has gone away and locked up the house.
mmtM%mMmmkJkft±   *»
&mmmimA$i&%>mi&®
Can you break the door open to distrain.
«*> %Mn&Mft'i&mifii&m
X1ff*WlMfflMt*%mZ&*
No, do not even open an unfastened window.
That would be illegal.
K*Pa*,fcjfllftB»ffi     |
What must I do when the tenant returns?
Try and get into the house,
m
i*.^JB«».»± 146
mm&Mk&stwm
Then tell him or anyone in charge.
?e*3MMJmikmMXfe
That you intend to distrain for rent.
itmwmnn%*a        1
A notice must be served on the tenant
mmm ±.m* %&«.«»&«
Which gives the amount of rent due.
A bailiff generally makes a seizure.
®mmttm*nm...
Can I sub-let the place?
«^R«.^s$*    . •   %   jg
If you have the consent of the landlord.
You cannot let for a longer term than your own.
Who should do all repairs?
Hzwf<
■
The tenant must make them. »47
&#m£&mnwwMwm
Unless the landlord agrees in writing to do so.
liven then he must be notified of the want.
ftjt%,mmwMmiti®;jmn>
Do you want to rent a farm?
Have you one to rent.
I would lease 50 acres for 5 years.
ȣ*. mmm&^m
&wmmij\
Where is it located?
«l»*Ha.;£*nf*        f
About three miles out of town.
ifrffiflMlffiffiY
What rental do you ask?
^.fP^**
Ten dollars per acre.
Have you any hind you warn cleared? I4»
v
There are sex era 1 a ores I want put in shape.
ikn&MRAzukmitxm
\\ hat will you give me to take off the timber?
®fflmA®mAimm.mm
ikmmjfcs.*   *'
\ mi may have the use of the land for 5 years-
Ml stumps and stones must be taken out.
'HS&*Ht.JIife*!L1i*^.i
Do >ou want the land fenced?
I will pay you extra for doing that.
m\\m^^m±m,fnm. b
Coal  Mining.
!k£Mm®M® ■ "i
Where are xou going, John?
To work in the coal mines.
Have you ever worked there before?
a»B.«fitA    i§ 149
&mnxmn%m
This is my first attempt,
fc*#.***JBfg &
Have you all the tools wanted?
&3cMm*wmM®i   1
ft ft*** I
I have got a shovel and pick.
%imMwmi&Mm®
m^nikmmm      k
They will furnish you with the rest.
^ffl^.©&*^:.$±*^*
Iksmfr-mik
You will require a torch light. "
3fflmM®YMfe%
ft£«*J35
Where will I get one?
m,mm.i&*
p«
itfc&l#-ll^i§
The Company will give you a lamp.
All the miners have a light.
Where do they carry it?
auk***!*
At the peak of their cap. i#>
It is easily carried there.
m-mmx®.
When shall I begin work?
'Be at the shaft at 6 o'clock a. m.
st%m$.timm        ;«*
The whistle will Jblow at 5.
At first you must drive a mule car.
i«A*.^ji*».rasfr-fc
Down in the mines?
You will draw coals to the main shaft.
mim&mvj&MnmM&i
ift®rtf8@fcTffi       *
The mules are all kept below
t^kr^mmmSiti
How long is the main track?
4MUEB*!- -
Over a half mile.
burM it
':■  %A 15*
ttmfr®M£:mm&
Where do the branch lines lead to?
To all parts of the mines.
&fSt£HLimi£
What line shall I xvork on?
The first gallery to the right.
^A*^#f'J4M^
ikfmmLX-tl
You can take six cars at a time.
%'&Am±-£Mm^
How deep is the shaft?
*Fft.fc*.;»8to
It is over 600 feet.
mni^A'iG^±m.m3
Are they ever sunk any deeper?
S»«*B.3HBifcftEI ■&.
Some go to the depth of many fathoms.
>bmm^Amx&Am       ^
How is the coal brought out of the mine?
ftni$Mvi&MnnAm*tt* 152
m m a mzm&mmxg. n ± m
By means of two eievatorsr  •
nMM®.ffi®mmft
$Aftffi± :l
These are hoisted by engines.
The foreman is calling yon.
4E»T4lSS
What does he want?
&mi$lZkW: J
You are the new man?
Your health is good? *
Yes, sir, very good.
^M.S$# *■'-'■
We must have strong men.
mW8M±MBXf^
^k^&mnm-B
You will be on the day shirt;
3fflm,$-$ft0Mtt
Tmnikw&%M,m
Next week you may draw to the docl*.
«a -V 3.
Ztt) 1   ,w
xim&zm
Where the vessel is lying.
ffl,ftwibm*mi&M                # .
iiifti^*;*4Lffi5&
What are those iron rails?
ttffi,£±*B!*».*                                ::vj
They will be used for the new track.
-1 1
**jffl»*^*:¥.*HSJfiffll                 ssra
Do they have iron rails in the mines?
un&.m&mMK*      |
Yes, and cars drawn by mules.
m*mm.-k&mnjm
They will soon build a new line.
fcmmm.QWMnm   ■           |f
'   fl
Take a load of coal from the next seam.
«ttfMirtt*5».W«L;&IB*S
Shall I fill up the car?
£8&J&#8M.t*Hr
Just put in a half load.
**.s«i.*tett*                 * r;|
Why not take out a ton?
1Wl.JfcJI.tttt                                       'l;
J 154
There is a grade to go up.
;3urryrsvith the. next load.
Tf!I.S±^.^*#     *■■■'''■■"
It will soon be time to shift.
When will they have the engine track ready?
Kffl&.M&*%Mm®M&m
%mmmftM%
As soon as the grading is finished.
3S*#^3S*^&i^1*»W*
ft<&££42Jt£ 'p'
Where will it run from?
mMmmASam    .'*'■ ■
fta«iPMJSfta
From the mouth of the shaft to the wharf.
Look out for that car!
AY
What has happened to it?
The coupling bas broken. 155
8c!s6Jim&$S&A
Do you see that coal seam?
t&^EB.i5&g
Take yotir pick and undercut it.
&3fflMmA§imm
How deep will I go?
ft&*mt&%i&
To the depth of two or three feet.
mmMm&Am^3 *
Take the wedge and drive it in.
»jfj£t.£l6Ji§3ii
Where is the sledge hammer?
At your left hand side.
That pick is too heavy.
Bsrnmjsmm
Can you not find a lighter one?
«^n#,ttswni
ikmmm
You may do some blasting. •156
*S*?L*fcfeffi*S
Where is the dynamite and fuses?
m,ni&&*.Mm*m±
&&MZB
They are kept in the store room.
mmAftjfyik
Ask the manager to send a supply
ti£ftnXtkMM*mMWM
Two cartridges will be enough.
mmmmxttm
Qome over here with your shovel.
mitrtx%±
Shall I load up this car first?   •
£&J£#¥,i.&*-fc.«
When yon have finished this pile.
s^a.»*.fc*.$c& I
What is,tiiat pump for?
»*.lB».A
To raise the water out of the mine.
Is It worked by hand power? *57
No, power is used from the engine room.
JB.I&Y.»*^*.ftiE».JH**
Why have you two shafts in this mine?
«ffi*ffi«tt.Jg8f*#
One is required for the pumps and ventilation.
my^■fcmMmim&m \m
IAftJMM:,E&»^«
The miners ascend and descend in the other.
Which one takes out the ore?
»ii&tt.Jftll»W"-;
The one which has the cage attached.
MM*mfeWfiAmteMMfe% ■
Is there any danger of the cage falling?
&*#.e»M,W#;&ttte.fHh
No there is a safety clasp.
».*mnr.«3H-tffi*ff
Salmon Canneries..
»WWkft±
What buildings .are those across the river? 158
They are the salmon canneries.
mmgAik y
How many men do they employ?
ftXikMfcl&m*
A3^H+Af(-#
About forty during the season.
&*.£#£ Y   |
How long does the run last?
From May until Jul}'
J»*iiri«fflH*(HBItlP»A^)
All the fish are caught by Indians.
»;&#*.3£§&.»»  f
Are you looking for work?
$t*ai»fcflMMRi J    |
I want a job in the tannery.
%w&m*mi&wkn
You may begin at once.
Take thi< knife and sharpen it.
fcfMt.um&m Have you a grindstone or a whetstone.
You will find one out in the shed.
I will show you how to clean the fish.
mmitfoMWtWftm
Slit the fish open and take out the insides.
mL$k#i$WK*m®&n*nmm
Where shall I put the refuse?
*n.#s&».#*M"#*
Into that large boy.
i*&B.*i£?&tf±
•ML^
m
Put the fish into the cleaning vat>
*J*#*.ii*y*£«l.?t
ft^"TW?f7KM      M
Shall I get some clean water?
Turn on that cold water tap.
mBA^mm^An
They must be thoroughly cleaned.
^»*4.*iafH.^a f6o
c
Bring in a case of empty cans.
a:
#<frB.tt*mMff*flMMR
Where do you keep them.
&MB ;   .   ;
In the store room.
$jfttt#Y
How shall I carry them?
ft<mAm$m%
smnBm^Mtt        f
Take the truck from the shipping roonws
J^*ft*M*i£»aHMI
M4iA^Y
What is that large boiler?
&mj3®mM®
That is used for cooking the salmon.
Do you cook the fish in the cans?
W.%WftMk%%.
They are first cut up and put in the tins.
Then placed in the boiler and steamed an hour.
%J&Wi1&U®M.m'%£kM$k Y i6i
a^Am-ttY
What is that man doing?
BX.\
He is soldering the cans.
Must they be air-tight?
The contents would spoil if not sealed.
nmm ±,mmmMw\mm
That floor is very dirty
BSI1^*».»
■x^mmmBtii
The foreman wants it scrubbed out.
■&#xj9mA$-t:im9k
*mmit*mm   «
Shall I use the hose?
*»-&**;».#*
&MffjftHi*fc* I   m
You had better turn on the water.
Where will I find the broom?
Look behind the back door.
*#*.*wt
*& l62
itBw^mmw       M
This room must be cleaned every morning.
&V«.«*4kfeH.*»1IKW
*ifc
Hand me the paste pot.1
JfoH.^Bi*^
It is nearly empty.
nBJ$*.&f1f!«i I
&mnm&i*Mftiit%z&.m.
You must make more to finish labeling this lot.,
^*HWkffl»&*^#'fr.ifc1|i«
tk%m%.®iiE®^ m
Where do you keep the labels?
imxz& 1
On a shelf up-stairs.
£tt#tf.«*3*
There are only a few lying there.
&%Bmm^*m        § *
Get a new case from the store room and open it.
Fetch them down the hoist.
-~^kw&.mmm
The box is too heavy to handle alone.
mn±jmmAmmM^ l£>3
»I^k®tk
Get a man to help you.
^mxjmtt
Are .all the cans labeled?
I have only a few to finish.
&*fc.55tf!l#.ffl»8c*
Qet a packing case and fill it.
*li.fiatn*.«Jii.#.
i=i
:4Si£ \\] m ->
Nail on the cover and have it marked.
*?»A,2m£to2foMS,
The engineer wants more steam.
t$®m&MB±&
The wood is not dry enough.
Split up some dry kindling.
*Jfc^Jli.'fr&^.*SM
«c»£i»ttfc£#3E**.3!
How many pounds of steam do you require?
Md?"TA+#
Not less than 80 lbs.
»"V£*.^iW: ' 164
M.s*
The roof is leaking.
&4tt.«**.il« |
Have a carpenter repair
Rake out the furnace and opeitfthe damper. ^
am^BS9fc*.jg«.SM-K.«ie
Where shall I put the ashes?
*D-£&.M#*.e*     ;
.Throw them in a heap back of the shed
fcltlft.Btttt.ittttm*  W
Are they of any use?
They can be utilized for making lye.
tkWTMAtmMA\%      '  ■;!' \
ttmmmm^^^.      J      .'*:
Are these boxes ready for shipment?
S&*tf±.^ife:f.MES      J-
As soon as the shipping directions are put on. i65
flBtiftt.
Saw Mills.
When will the mill open?
They will be running the first ofgthe week.
%:mmAt%%.*M®^>Ami§®. &
Are they putting in any' new machinery?
®}£M%*Miknm%m ;li
Another gang is being fitted up.
Miffi^*.W*«i' &&■■:■■
E:*§A$itgI§ I
Are any sawyers wanted?
Sm&^fY.^^f
KgTsn&.MffiAS® i
No, we are in need of men to pile lumber.
M.m&mmAmix.mmup,,
M^B%nmk
Go over to the office and see the manager.
nrmvi&M:tm±*mmmM,xm
St
0Jff-ki&M.M§sm
Don't go too close to that circuited
m&Mvj^MBfcm
What is that saw used for.
««.B0f;£*.^
iiTa
m i66
It takes the slabs off the logs.
How do they put the log on the carriage?
It is lifted by those dogs.
#*fciHi«rJtt*a»»ttfc*
land me the kant-hook to turn that log..
Take the lever and pry on the other end.
That is a long stick of timber.
HT*,ttlB*jiM*#BB
W*4iJM' k
What will it be used for?
It will make a spar for the ship.
What is done with the slabs?
They are cut up into strips.
»itteJSffl.*JB* 167
Do they make laths out of them?
Yes, and also pickets for fences
**.«JMiifri?f.#«.:¥»*
±mAM^it^mn I
Stand clear of that gangway.
wm&Mtf<B#m
Bring a wrench from the engine room.
Is that bolt loose in the truck?
^*.B*i*i].lI±B^»
It looks as if it wanted tightening.
nB*±.ie*.rFtti«.*M
Turn the nut to the right when fastening it.
ttmuumi %
The thread is worn in the bolt.
^»^J.T*.ffiHT.li^J
Get another one the same size.
±g*mwatm
There is too much sawdust lying here.
t.TiP»te.m§r*.i 168
®&mmft&
What will I do with it?
i>r,6*3fc*4E± J
Get the horse and cart and draw it away.
^m±*mmm*ft.mm*m&
Wrhere do you want it put?
Over in the lumber yard near the dock.
WEMmxB&*iknn it
iknmm.-^nmit^mm
You can use that load to fill in the slip.
^i^c*. b &MmmMmm
All the rubbish must be dumped there.
Mmmm-ft.im^mm n
This large timber goes on board the ship.
ft*J*ftlSB.W35:*J*«
#¥*** 1
All hands push on this car.
JIM;.#iii.£&*-fc
^^..Mnrntam^m^
Steady!   or it will run oft the track.
'mmmMmfflmA5$m*Mm
W&fti&MtbM
!That is far enough, stop it here.
B«.fl;Bfttt.±«i 169
Lift up on your end.
Let us have more slack on the cable.
That is quite tight, hanl away.
BnmBAmMa
®i®7K$£.*t5#j4i3i
What has that tug in tow?
mm.Bm.mw-
A boom of logs for the mill.
M*M\mA?Knm
Where,were they brought from?
miftAmim       li..
Away up the coast from the Company's limits\
mm$,,nvj±Ammm&Mm
Don't walk on that log in the water.
«£.B&.&J*n¥i*r
ikMmftmr 2 t«
You have no spikes in your boots.
Take this pike-pole to balance yourself.
^kWMmmjm^^mn 170
Sbintgles are sawn from cedar.
&B Y .JSMMSfB
Why won't the pine do as well?
mMnftA%v$$Mm
It is not as light and durable.
ra»*,ns*iuiJiL a f w
Hurry up with the shingle bolts.
T?iJ«t.m±;5*)t&8&.li#l
Sort over these shingles.
^iWfM^     1.
Don't pack up any culls.
*BW.*Hfc*5»    J
#^pir^s^sff*f
Put another nail in that band.
m%*mkm*®B&
tMzmmm&*. ?
The belt has slipped off the pulley.
^^ij.ffi*.*S«#.^Wf'I
Get the step-ladder and put it on again
oi$.*ft0J*.|giliaW8£.ttJ£
tb%i%Zk1tn    f t*
That new man is smoking. 17*
p
Tell him to put away his pipe.
RwmMmma'm±m
Don't he see that notice?
mmmA3mmi$ J
itm^m-km .tolil
No smoking allowed on these premises.
»±&«,3£££.ifcHf£«£!*
m%AM.mm*m&AMitm
A spark may fall and set fire to the building.
mmmx<L f
Do they run this mill at night?
un^AmmmMft  f;
They work both night and day.
n®.m±A%mmM I
The night gang commences at 7 p. m.
^*.ffiH*.i#fr.2.1t :    f
i«i;ff&4lJttY
How is the place lighted?
ftmia,M&±Mm
mwx,tuknnwfat- 1
By electricity, there is the dynamo.
Incandescent lights are used m the mill.
H«*@H.3i^:*.B&J T72
Large arc lights are placed in the yards.
When do the workmen get paid?
On the 15th of every month.
Do all mills pay in that manner?
%tf}%m.nA&m u
Some have pay-day every Saturday
Who keeps our time?
Rfc.36±iiY*.
wa 'tZv'CAw9
The clerk at the office.
aufcaausKT        1    %
Don't let that plank fall.
mm&^mm
tkmmmmn •
This is the planing jnill.
aSAS&^J^fcSY'"        2
"What is that large notice postediap.
&n®fe*mm±M±^ *■-
-v.
;ita in
BLM&m it]
No admittance except on business.
MMmmMm%Atmk±
Will they allow us inside?
mm,n^%*vm®ffi
ikftW&m'ZBtSAtil
You must first get permission from the office.
^«*#*.^m#.4«#m»j$ ±
mmm^z^^mumx
What is done here besides planing lumber?
^mnm^mmfcAxE,'     m
^A
They manufacture sashes, doors and blinds.
$$xMtm*®i$>*&MmAv
m.xi%m^mm^
That work looks fine.
B'&M-
Is ft done by hand?
No, it is sawn with a scroll saw.
Stop that planer.
*^.BS«$
£4atiL»#Y m
What is the matter with it? J74
Don't you see that spike in the board?
»ra.B±s.Bi**   A
ittiili! W.
It would break the machine.
Don't you smell smoke?
ftfiHfc*Y *'
Where does it come from?
m®T&MB
Look down in the boiler-room.
&
Everything is all right there.
mmzmwik   1
The lumber-yard has caught fire.
fctfcBiMftHMKtfeY     1
i/tn
Don't you see the blaze?
Run and sound the alarm.
^.mmM.n^M
mmwtAng&msb
Telephone for more help.. 175
Here comes the firemen.
mi*m®&x
All hands get buckets and. carry water.
Don't stand with your hands in your pockets.
mkikkxmn *rr .
Help the firemen with the ladders.
m±AmixAt±mm t
MAY 3Hfc! HM
How did it take fire?
AJHffl*ftft&ilii& »:
It caught from a spark out of the chimney.
mmAmmitiffiMAmmA&ik    -it
ftft*$«*ttffPM  1
Do you think there is danger of the mill burning?
ttfiM&mmz &
The fire appears to be heading for it.
ibjai&HEMS . *     '&&
Which direction is the wind?
a*
UtilfcAMfailfcftP*
It is blowing the flames toward the mill.
mntt^MM.nxM a$mi&m& 17*
Throw water on these shuxings.
^
'A>
;m
Is there a*ny insurance?
»*».Hifc-HM«r±
The policy
ran out last week.
»ttf9Hf*»ii.#Tffa
$&I*
Railroad Work.
s»T*r-mASi»       . 1
X gang of men are wanted for gradim
What wages do you pay?
One dollar and a quarter per day.
Does that include board?
*r*B.Bte#* It
m&*iktttt!kit }
No, you find your own food.
What are the hours? 177
mzuBMAtimx
A day's work consists of 9 hours.
tt#«*«A1MM*i&JI3S    .
itWX%tilk3mmM&
The foreman will show you where to work.
m^XM^m^MWst
.*ttfMM5fl!«*
Bring a spade from the tool house.
**tt*&*#a&».,*u».$F±
Where do.I commence?
muMmm±       ■>• ■ &-,.■■
ttftm l     Mi
At the gravel bed.
How far is it from the bridge?
•V.
n
iT
ftimAtm$'m
About three miles.
M.&M&xm
They are now loading up the flat cars. <
»E«*#£tt*;&*fc-ft
What is that large machine used for?
tt&*,B*tefc*.^*|*
They load gravel with that steam shovel. 178
How many men does it require?
ftXikXAwm.mms.Wt
It takes at least three.
How do they remove the gravel from the train?
ft®.ftMMtt*nmmAm%jm
By using a large scraper.
»5fc*.tt#te.*»«E f      f§
tt-k^mmm-%
The engine drags it along the cars.
¥HR.S3Iie,ttJFF-fc |
tt-kmrnmi
This large chain is broken.
ifeftttteHLT*.*Ti*« * :f
Take it over to the blacksmith shop.
jffira«B.ffi»-tfW*«8      m
ffibtMiiA|     J
Can he repair it?
The blacksmith will weld the links.
t$m®pfim%imwm$±
m&mmi 13
Wait until it is finished.
?t#fls&m^*te*  f ll 179
**fcflHII)!ljftY
What if he is too busy?
S»#it&*jffljfcB
Tell him it is wanted at once.
EMMMmi$Mfc*mm± si)
&ff!lflUfc»4Jg$lBr*Y
Where will we dump this load of earth?
ffl.fflJ^.S^&*^.«#3£±
«&T«IH|*
Put it down in the hollow.
mmmMny®    $ i1  •
«.JfcM»*jB;jlti!J6       JW^
John, you had better drive this team.
•3fc£*iff.S*.ifr*l ^ '""*
And Ling take hold of the scraper.
Wfrfr.tfff*l.tttiv&*ftSR
Don't let it go in too deep.
a-tuA.*****!® .    ,t
Where is the other gang working?
«ift****iffi#ft.««
On the opposite hill.
%m$$$%Anm
ffcitAftMil    1
Let the horses rest a minute.
Kr
HS^ i8o
Is it hard work for them?
mitmLimmm
It is a heavy haul when using the scraper.
Bl^*.»I$fcfit£?&.*«J**MB
mwtmx^ *    #
Break up this hard clay.
•^ill.ifc*^^^
&mnft$. I       m
What will we use?
im^m^tt^mmu^       m
Try the pick on the hardest part.
«&B?.£;S*atY*.PA w
£*pgJWY
Why not use the plough?
«n^*.^w^i I
There is only one span of horses.
MWfNlY .f
What are the rest doing?
mz&ttzx
They are at work hauling timber.
&©©$!.SHH8B
Where are they taking it to? i8t
rwftzwim
Down to the creek for the bridge.
Why don't they build it of iron?
mmft%&mA$ttj&M
Trestle-work is very much cheaper.
^M&r#.#**.»«.tfcB T
»»•&*«■***£ y
What is that large machine on the bank?
That is a pile driver.
Bi&^Mmm.&mG  ,;      %
*ra***A»T   *
It drives those big timbers into the ground.
The bridge over the Targe river is of iron.
Why is that engine in the centre?
The drawbridge is swung by steam power.
Smaller ones are turned by hand.
±mm^xmAm   \ 182
timwimim* y
How do they handle those heavy stones?
ftu.nnkm^±mw^m S
mnm&zm f
By means of a derrick..
mmAmiM^-n   '   %
Swing the crane over to this rock.
*?1t#H>Ji M e#i.&*&
Give me more line. . y
ftt&MZW f ,,. , J       4;
All right, hoist away.
Jv*
1 pg
Who are those gentlemen inspecting the works4F
Those are the officials of the road.
%±A£%mm&A<mnA$ %
Who is the tallest one?
He is the President of the Company.
m#**.^M**@.iisr#^mm^c    ^
The man talking to him is the General Manager
Mx*mm,m*mm*imiv"' i«3
gmm'gM'&titm y §
Who superintends the construction of the road?
tt.^B^®.$m*ffifi#.«*m.; ;
The Chief Engineer of the division.
#**&#. ® mMAm^m&m
Will they give us any orders?
mm,nmimMmm t.
No, they will direct the foreman.
How can we get through that rock.
ttmrnfemn *.
Is there no room on the river bank?
&*ii!.iStS£^.$E$
Not enough to make the road bed.
What do you propose doing?
m,mtjm®itj<G
The only way is to tunnel the rock.
ttmmmzx
Is it dangerous work? L84
Not if great eare isltaken.v
5"\.^#^fij^p.^*k#
a.
'Look out below!
A large stone has broken away
m#-?i&.*mifl:*.#t#.ii©K
m.mm#ik I   I
That is a warning for the men.
BW.PgOT.^k
We must do some blasting.
X-
Ask the foreman for alfew dynamite cartridge^
)mAmx^w^mk^mm^^'J
Don't let it fall or it ■will/explode.
Bring a fuse with you.
Here is a deep cut.
How can the snow, be Kept off?
ft^tk^HA^-MAm ■    ■ i»5
It will require a snow shed.
mmmMm&M'finft.
itwmmx'X^m^   I
Here comes the construction train
m.i£m*M#.*^
All hands stand to one side.
Mmm^nmmm
»ft*7Miffl3i»    I
What are those timbers for?
They will be used for culverts?
nm®%k~fi'¥V}mm
2n AtK«« . &# *r^fr« P &£#
A new switch is wanted by the water-tank.
Where do we get the ties?
There is a pile near the semaphore.
ft«.«&.&;&.irAA       |f
W^*ff,£*-* ^
Take the lorry and get a load
mmvimm^m
Look out for the cars. i86
-AftM^Mtiim
Here is a man with his foot fast-
*fcRW,tt£$±lfi|f#./ffc*
He has caught it in the frog.
I      mi$mij x%®mtt
Clearing Land.
How much land is in this block?
ftMfemMikifr^& 3m
There is 160 acres of which 35 are cleared.
m$mWkAffi& I     m *|
Is there very heavy timber on it?
&±mMmz$k$i »'.;.■ m,
Up on the highland the trees are large.
&m$}%Lwmm
Have you any prairie land?
There are a few acres near the river.
ifiktt#ie!iufc»*B 4
That part can be easily slashed.
BH.tMm**'].iii*r* i87
Sfe#iJfc»2fi8§tJSI    I
Do you want this land put in shape?
®mpi&MJjmMmnw. % i,     |
I wish to have the whole place under cultivation.
^*.*L&&#*frS*.*i«P5i»*:fc#
Will you give me a trial on it?
That depends on the price you ask.
Btt»±.3c&W3&.^«*
I will contract to do the work at $100 per acre.
mi&/&®MAmn'&MmmttmM
I cannot spare the cash.
You can give me i cash and the balance in foO<&
3:mmA&ttn.MmA%%®<3
Can't we make some other bargain?
«HR»**a:I
Don't those terms suit you?
%3-x^m. I
I have no money in hand. iSff
Here is another offer which may <io.
Give me the use of each acre cleared for five years.
wmn^iftAmmfem&M^Am m
Will you agree to take out all stumps and stones?
mm^mB^AMLnA%mimMmA$:
I will make it ready for the plough.
gmmMm&m^mmg
mMMmA^m^m    i
That  low  part must be drained.
Bm.M*#.&«
Will you supply the tiles?
■fflm*3M^m*Mmm±
That would cost i:oo much.
B»»:fcjfiaB& #   ttt.
mm^mmj^MMimm^  m
Just dig an open vlrain along the fence.
OTW^*#s«t-ttiB*u&±
Shall we build a dyke down in the flats?
Ml
^
It had better "be done.
m&mwAzn m
The tide sometimes covers a part of it.
&£#»&*i*PB.ttH.#H'ifi
®it±m*M'{i& -
[What shall be done with the large trpes?
They can be cut up into fire-wood.
■JWNat-HffittYlF
'mt±fflm   h
Get the cross-cut saw.
m
What length shall we cut the wood?
im±,<k$&mmAm    m
fflR.SiJ£AM£itE
Four feet, which is the length of cord-wood.
^$.^^*.»±.#H-»
How many feet high is a cord of wood
»3Kifc»*-»*-tt«-Wttif
JbMKKARH
It must be four feet high and eight feet wide
H&AtWffltt Y
What makes the saw pull so hard?
mmwA^mAm
It must be very dull.
j8W*JMN*fll» 190
We had it filed the other day.
mzm*®m*nmm
land me the wedge and mallet
tikm.MWm.mmMW i
It will run easy now when the cut is wedged.
&ifflmA%%m^^KmA$itiMtt®i
Don't bear down on your end.
That makes it pull twice as hard.
B«AMBfr*#HUffiiWi
JfcS&tl4i1Sl-SI3£
What will this wood be worth a cord?
tgfflm*nwA£&±.mm m
It should bring $4 in the city.
mj%%-<frAmmAm%M^
mnntcmzmn^m
Will you give me the wood on the land?
mm^Akmm^-^
No, you can only have one-half.
ikt®to*&Wt~jc
You can then make |2 on every cord.
:* m '9'
mn$,&i$izm,mx&
iWho pays for teaming it to market?
mmMmmx*
jl will do that part of the work.
i£ffl&.«RBH.ffltt&a
m.-uxmAm^m^mi   \
There is a large part covered with ceda,
kmrnmnimftw,
Will we cut that, into shingle bolts?
pM^BH*kJ&ttS8v*8#J
[You can do so, but we want rails.
[What will you do with cedar rails?
&mm3zUM±mgm
Make fences for the ranch/
That wood is easily split.'
Bir.^*.^ra^.*f^l
It will last for years and not rot.
&}wmM~fi¥M±Mm^
llfcAP»^JzKtK    I
The men are asking for water to drink
&*3L ns*®.^ «W.*I&^ 192
That salt meat makes them thirsty.
BBtUtf&MUmitim, p
Where do you get the water?
Gver at the spring one-half a mile away.
«BW.^±^,li1&ttJg».Bfg
That is a long way to go for water.
BMWMmaAm^isW jL ;■
Why don't you dig a well?
mm^^mmm
You could have one near the cabin.
3zUmi*ikteM®.
How deep do you think we must dig?
*f*-IR^8ff.^«*W
You might strike water at 14 feet.
How will we throw out the dirt?
ftmmMm.&MA%&
Get a windlass and bucket.
^m^^^mmmm 193
Is there any danger of it caving in?
miftM'MtkftMAmMtom
&mft%&im& i   I i
You had better put in a prop.
vp
That will keep the sides^from falling in-
Bfflm*mnm±Mm®%M
m.tfim&&ft$.
That is good drinking water.
B«.#&*@.n*'*r
fc#»g,£#mA
Will you get a pump for the well?
mm,3?£mMA?%m$&   £,
No, a rope and bucket will do for awhile.
MMi&MfoWBMmwAsLmm
Mm®mm®itmA%¥.»i^mA&   I
When we get the farm cleared I will have a pump.
Pile all the brush in one heap.
^mA%mimMnMW^
When will we burn it?
i.wmM*#i
*A4EI£M
As soon as it gets dry.
^"fifM^*.^
Jfet ;*94
What is wrong with that man?
*8£*W,$±B£
ten&mMAteMM
He has cut his foot with an axe.
*Wft*.®£*#.£t±H*
mnM&fcft
Is it badly cuy
#**<$.*? m
He has nearly taken off his toe.
Pull off his boot and sock.
Bind it up so it won't bleed.
Go over to the doctor with him.
jtfcft/r «&*&+*£#
Here is 9 acres I want cleared.
Will we build a fence round it?
mm%m®®m
When the trees are all cut down '95
3BW8MB42JSY
What are those small trees for?
&&%±<±mm*%im*
mmmMUTimm
They are to be settout in the lot.
Plant them among the stumps.
They will grow there all right.
mmmAk&.MMM   §
iBuild a bridge across that creek.
»#l,ttJ*#Ji& JS*$£±, BM
mmmitmmmm
|We will want to drive a wagon across it.
mmmmAmmMmi^M^^±m
Get two long pieces of timber.,
(Then lay poles across them.
W tosses
Will that be strong enough?
»B^.±fflSB.Bfitt
mMJmmi
I Of course it wilL 196
Light a match and set fire to that brush.
SW4ii&.JBJft£ttY.fflB*#*
jfcffi ^ntcAmmm J      f
Can't you get this big root out?
m^£.&*ii#ji    *
mmmMw^&m    if
We have tried but it is still there.
mmm^Amn^^^mm
Let the oxen have a pull at it.
Back up a little more.
M*ttWU&&
l^jlfciil&.&jftA®
Hook the chain on the big end.
tkmft* Y .&£#    .1
Are you ready?   Haul away.
3&&mAmmM.
?ut a pry under the root.
mm
m^ftwi
Here is a bed of clay.
ffiK* PlWtt.:fe$
What use can. we make of it? '97
&<&%.m%ft\
;It would make good bricks.
mm®Afm±
We would need a machine to press them.
38SB««#JlflK3nMfe
After the bricks are pressed they are, dried.
Are they ready then for use?
'%%nmmft $    I m
They must be burned first in a kiln.
fe*^.#ra*.Hi&fefi£r
&«   XB&Vi .
Gold Mining.
Where did you get that ore?
±MAUl.**^®
Up in the mountains northeast of here-
Do you think there is any gold in it?
tt^fS.»*.»?l&. H"B
I cannot tell you, it looks like quartz. iq8
What had I better do?
ifc#fttW«»ifcJ«n*Y
Have you staked out the claim?
No, I have ngt done so   at.
ifc*isr^miiK*Y
Have you a miner's certificate?
a^»E**.*flfe#^ sfl
Where can it be got?
zfrnmuMffin
Apply at the registry officer
«lta^.Bl;^^*.ftm±
*£ »ra£« y
What will it cost?
You must pay $5.
How long will it last?
ftmmmMmiti
It will be good for one year. 199
ik%%m^$}& Y
How many acres have you taken up?
ftXikm&M^mvn,
40 acres, which is all the Government will allow.
®m^^m^^i^A%mn^±mMm^^
Do you want to locate a claim?
®m@MM    H m
I would like to do so.
tmmAm^ m
What length must the claim be?
100 feet wide, and not more than 300 deep.
mimnmMmAmzeMmm®^
mxm%-AMmwm&\m
Its surface boundary must be four straight lines.
ft-^MnW$A®      ,    ■ g  ,. J
How long ago is it since you located the claim?1
#!Bi«.;&*#j#*.^£*n$.*^
-<W3itA f
Not more than a month ago
*V»fe,tt«ttlF H *
jfc*»^jfc^*»ttM^yii^A
Have you filed your oath With the Land Agent? 200
I have not done so.
ttWMti&WW^^B
The oath must be filed within thirty days.
nm±*mifi%-®MAt±®MMM
tmnmmmw, i
Is there any fee to pay?
mM*i%rmitmm.$.%
There is an entry fee of $5.
Mn^®.mmmA^aAmm
itttmA*mm®Mmik
The agent will give you a receipt.
m^mntmnmmr
How long can I then hold the claim?
ftMA&i&ic^mift&m   i,
z&^mk&mtfg.
For five years, if you improve it.
How much must be spent every year?
Not less than $100 a year.
*WitiA%MimiT®MM
MMS-ffit+itS.*?-   -f
That will be ^00 for the five years.
Bwm^wmmmAf tm± &fik<&%nmtbm i
Alter that you may buy the land.
ikmrnfem®.
Who do you buy it from?
The Government, who holds the land.
What 'price do they ask?
£X-^^^.M+7CSSfe *
$5 per acre and $50 for -$he survey.
mwmmkMm*mmKMArm®&
Can you hold it for another five years?
®3&mtfiAf wem AM J
You may if $100 worth of work is done every year
BtfjfcffcaAg*»*?JRJM& 5S'
The agent's receipt must then be renewed.
Will any charge be made for the renewal?
ffl&JmxmAZw&nMnm
It will cost you five dollars for every receipt. 202
What do you swear to in the oath?
mt.3±mjmn*m±
tkmwna&wMMmffl*.   I!
You tell where the mine is and its size.
3:mMn*m.Mmm± f
*iM7m±zt& p .in mmmu
Do the same rules apply to placer mining?
m$>bMmAmmAM&&\*-%
Exactly the same fees are to be paid.
m*m&AmmK§z$iS
Washing gold is placer mining.
&®i&6&Mft$.
What will I do with this quartz?
«*D&i£tt.:ii:±&*.«S   * J
ti£lfc&81f'
Take it to an assayer.
{ggPfS&*n1it4ii
He will tell you what it is worth.
ikm^nm^^s. 1
What do you think it will pay?
mu^mMmm^
About f200 to the ton. 203
isW of ^ siorcm-
There is a lot of silver and lead in it.
»*.ra*W.&l&B.iWJ.HiKF
itm&t®i&ABmtk$a       m
The assayer will give yon a report.
af^&Mmf1SlMT^f:S
When are you going out prospecting?
E3g.^S^*.t^*ll^
Have no means to go out at present.
&S£lfA$At&*£ t        I
Can't you get some one to grub-stake you?
I didn't think of that.
i&W\MAmB fl   ©
»^^A.^3fc4.lcgl^^^a:^   II
Mr. Jones the grocer might supply you.
What terms could we work on?
ikvinmgAkwn-^Mfe
You could give him one-half of what you find.
jkmmM^ttAmM^
How much food will I want? 204
Enough to last sixty days.
®mnMm^^±mM
You may get many miles away from a settlement
^^wxaf*»«s.#aLtt^»i»
Shall I take a gun or rifle?
&mMmmM,mm
ttJkWVkBt i*   t     I  •
It would be a good scheme.
Wild animals might attack you.
Don't forget to take lots of matches.
ffi¥%M)m±MtfAti{i1fi
attSBfcHlttffcY *
What tools shall I take?
You will want a pick, shovel and axe.
3ffimMmiftMfflmMmM
&ft®^mm
Had I better take a tent?
££*«r.jfctt« m.   ■■
ikf&mmm#M®<&
You can build a shack that will do.
3M£mMWtA3ffi1&]& 205
®*mm®®it®ft
l can't carry all these things.
Buy a pack mule for $40.
nmmm^mmim
&ffi&^&M*nik-~X
It can live on grass and not cost you anything.
vmwM.£&$*MmM^^m&m
.JMi'RjKBffi'HSsPIfi ^
Where do you strike that claim?
mV&zJftfflLR&M    m
On lot 19 on the north side of the ridge.
%Mffi&'%%ffl±ffiAimmm
Have you cut a trail to it?
tt^lR.ttffi#SfiWfi«H
$t*#jA&|gili& .      * ~
I have some men working at it.
You must do at least $100 worth of work per year.
What will you do with the ore?
^mm^k^±nn
Haul it to the smelter
raw *at^*4is§nf
1 206
Do the mining laws of Canada.
&nx®mAm/&ikm
mftm^mm
Differ from those of the United States?
#ffc.tt^±.#H^^5.*$;
There is some difference.
*m*,**#£ *■  " ,«J
The U. S. laws require $100 worth of work a year.
*&3a8*f**Mtt®W«*r*|i« ±ffl#««lfr
When must the work be done if located in 1892?
Within twelve months of taking up claim.
*±H,**±«.fa#J$fcH.&* iti":
ffi%m¥*$.m#mM®mm
An}' buildings or trails cut are improvements.
m&*^Awmm®A$m^mm
Do you think this is a good mining district?
tt;£tt.&*;&*.II#*^.ife*& #
tcK±w? *mmm
The ore seems to pay well.
ifc#ttttlfcSftffi*i6
Have you had any assayed?
mzkmik.: 207
I sent down a few specimens.
&#a*JMtoir#*ra
What did they turn out?
Fifteen dollars to the ton.
mt&RMMSktt
m.ttiM-xmM^M®,
That is a high grade and should pay.
B»*.tt*ttWJB*Jfc2S.
4as«.*tj£&-*t3i
What is that heap of earth piled up?
tt»UfBIS**it3g±**BW6
That is the mouth of the shaft.
B«J*2S±,#f*.Mtt
£J£nttx£$ I
Is that mine in operation?.
^*B^.Hf,ita^#
Yes, it has been running for years.
WJiteflL*.^ £.¥3t±
mmmfkm   I
How many men do they employ?
*B&A.**+£.MA+^
From 65jfo 80 miners. 2o8
One foreman, two shift bosses and 25 shovelers.
How much ore can they take out in a day?
ftW&mA&n&H*®m®i
Two hundred tons in 24 hours.
mmttA%mmAj%&±
mmMmm
Do they use steam power?
Jtt^*.*M3£        2
No, it is done with water power.
mn-nxm.^.
What wages do they pay?
Miners get 'from $2.50 to |3 per day.
n®mk,mmA*~5tMmji       m
Engineers and blacksmiths get from $3, to $4.
®m lfc.M3fe«*$LWtt^&$.*M*T«l
jEff%PJWf£%P/Sl#fe»l3& *
jHow does placer differ from quartz mining.
B-ff^fe^P.ftSff^dl^r    ?
Placer mining is washing gold from gravel. 209
5&9SP Ak^m$$i<fi
In quartz mining you drill into the rocks.
HS§».5£1£«.I
ffimAV&nimmz^
Creek digging is mining in the bed of a river.
mm®AmmMm>&Mtt<m:!m M
It may also be in the bed of a creek or ravine.
Bar digging means a mine in the bar of a river.
&imM±A&*®mmAmAWgi3.
Dry diggings are where water never overflows.
mmmjum %% p ftmmzm
Bench diggings mean any mine on a bench.
Hill diggings must be on a hill by the creek.
^m&mA%w$UMmMtem
Must the hill front on the river?
JS§*.;!£g&f*!fi.£^e
It should front On the creek or river?
4l{&;i:fl$tfS3S
What is the meaning of "ditch"? 2IO
A flume, pipe, or race, for carrying water
fife^pI^K^i:
They must have the water to wash the gold.
^jn*.a^if*.ffi#*.^ns& Jiv
mmm&kAw&iiivi^-Wimmm
Free miner is one who has a certificate
»#^.^*if.ti:fil:*.E*&f4 «
*»fflAj»MiT>te«s w
Can anyone hold a miner's certificate?
«0ftiK.raB#*.**&ttfi!      M  -
*tMR1^»T+Aftft*&ir» iil
Any person over 18 years of age can hold one.
mmmMQwkMAimm&.mmm
ikffinmikn i        .m
Can you sell it to anyone?
®*:.<k$&$ffl.Mikm s ■&-
It cannot be given or sold to another party.
Mw\*®M%mMms^\m
What if you should lose it?
You can get a copy ircm the Recorder.
What must be paid for the copy? 211
ttw siik-jtMmim&m&vim
It will cost you a dollar and marked "substituted."
&}m$bM±3:mmMmm,u%.5M®:
ikffcm±M*wm&w,
Can you wash gold and not take out a certificate?
m^#*^m.m«i.n^m.E*it&#^
If you do so you may be fined |25 and costs.
m^m£*%m%-&MmimmMmM±
What would the costs amount to?
It might be $10 or more.'
&!*%-mtmAm
You would be put to a lot of trouble.
3:M%$tn*mmmA%$%!
^xikmmn&m
Can you wash gold in the winter?
m^»**«.B;&sPff
HMmij Ak®M'&
In some places you cam
aens*Ai«&
There is too mnch snow and ice.
!Hfe.jB&*
When is the best time to Work the bars?
k&*.;&#*^SW 212
At low water, as all the bars are bare.
-£J3.4lig^*SME
What makes the river so high iu July.
itkWiZmm
The snow which melts off the mountains.
&/^tt.^$£«P !
How do you stake out a mineral claim?
fftt^*J$*.«**I&.:fe*
You must have two posts four inches square.
5y«*.&.fflj&±**H?&.*»
They must be numbered one and two.
MM^^AMBMMmA^
ummm-m-m
Place them at either end of the lot.
%^to*w*i®mA%tfjm
How high must they be above the surface
Not less than four feet.
That will give them a chance to be seen. 213
You should write your name on post No. 1.
Also write the date and name of claim.
Mark it "Initial Post."
Mn.&*sy&±
$kmm}%r.&&&w&
You must state in what direction No. 2 lies.
It is north-west of No. 1.
HH^*. »±5fflHf^«#WB«
Then mark it down on No. 1.
S.*«5b5fc*B
•4v
It is unlawful to move that post.
tkmmm.%nm f
You should also make a statement.
3^JUMi-«tt***rair
That the claim lies to the right or left of posts/
Should that be written on the post? It must be marked on post No. 1.
ra*.j£M.£8&±.iii e«
&zi&nTm-mMfomm m
Your claim lies on one side of the line:
^&Ils.jiS±£ffi5M»ftt^
ikftM&Wtm Y t
What line do you mean?
A direct line between posts No. 1 and 2.
timmm,%-®mj&±m&M*mmAft
ikMMn&zunm   .        g
Do you want to buy my claim?
»&«r4HlY
What'will you take for it?
tt£ + M5©^   ft
Give me fifty dollars.
&m%mmim §
itnm%nm&¥
The transfer must be in writing.
tt&mib*mA®m%.
ikimmmmm
Will you give me a doed?
That is not necessary.
B;5**.m&**?i] 215
The writing must be signed by you.
«SJ!|*^lil.?^   $ p: j§
Can a miner hold a claim after certificate exnires?
No, he must get it renewed.
m®
Where can a miner look for gold?
ffl'imx^M^m    I
Upon any lands in the Province.
vmm&m*®mm.it
Except Government reserves for townsites.
mM*?fflr%M8im±A?LM%.
m^nm p a%® m kzm.mmm
Can a claim be located in an Indian Reserve?   No;
w^&mA$-%tmMwmmM
mk®Lmmm±s&uzmjf*mm%
Nor on land lawfully occupied for placer mining.
%mffi.*!&kA*fffi®nxmmzM
A free miner may cut timber on crown lands.
mk*®®zm&mm%M&t&
And on timber leases if for mining use.
^fi.^ne^ntf.^ft.^W.^* a 16
How large may a creek claim be?
ft®feA%m#iM,±M%-
ttPfMM^mn-'SKZ^
It must not measure more than 100 feet.
TOTMUS0rJK.£«fcl«#
m®wmtt±7mmmm£
And it shall follow the course of the stream.
mmm&mAtm&±Ami*m&m
mi-^hepy     |
How wide is the claim?
ftmmsAs&m
&-'Mli%i.£ji5l>MIl$il&
From the base of one hill to that of the other.
# m»ffiM&%* piife®.m6#mm p
A free miner may lease a placer claim.
For how many years?
TO£8dfc*. f-
Not more than ten years.
How much land can he lease?
M-«.mtfc$*
In dry diggings, ten acred. 2I7
ftpftmAiA^Km^
,In ereek diggings one-half mile in length.
fcihflUHIir.HtiL-tfW
On'bar worked before 1J miles.
gmnffiAMmMm^tf
ik£®MA$m®Mmitmn&
Where can you get a lease of these claims?
From the Gold Commissioner
First put a stake at each corner of the claim,
A*.^E*m.flB^ig;$.t5I#.^ikll #
SSMe.*Effi8d^«P^li-lf   »£-
Posting a notice on one nearest other claims.
*&*£.EfiW*.£ltft® IMMVfell
What must be written on the post?
M*«m.£*M:     it-
&v&M$tm&®& i
Your name and where the ground is situate.,
Also how much land and extent of lease.
M^AftrnfeWMmmmM^iti
A like notice must be put in the Recorder's office
«iMft*Tlfctt*4»H,*&S:»fl'.Wft±
^:& 2l8
Then you write to the Gold Commissioner.
%^mMwmAnmm^ ■#
Wk/l;&A%.fit£®.Z%WL
Give him your name and number of certificate
m&K&jmmm&Am'fift®. i
How much land and where it lies.;
ftmmmMmrn w*w&  #..
x®&M%M&&mmmmm
Also the rent to be paid and time you want it.
ikffi&mmkm    m
Can you lease it to another party?
Not without the consent of the Gold Commissioner.
1=1
Cutting Wood.
Good morning, madam-
^.#*6
Do you want any wood cut. this morning?
W:3MMikWsm*tkm%
m-mA%*MMM$lffl
There is a pile I want sawed and split.
ttftff*B9yEMJ&0ilfe.lgtt. *&« ai9
You may carry it into the shed.
*%AmWt}*®mn$:
Have you a saw-horse?
fl9^Bj»*Tsr±
There is one on the other side of the coal-bin.
^mm.%%mmAm*mvjm
Pile it up nicely in this corner.
What do you charge a cord?
-~x$J%JRft*WBAs.
$1.50 for cutting, splitting and pilinr.
Do you want these slabs cut up?
Yes, they will do for kindling.
Mi$A%fflmAft¥®m
Pile that up in the other corner.
a**«*?itoABftji.
Shall I carry some into the house?
$&Mwm>bMmnft± 220
Bring in a few armsfull.
&WMmm±i8m
Have 3rou another axe?
«b^Hiffi»ff.ie*
4H&«$®.&lllflIT£
What is the trouble, is yours broken?
The handle is broken.
#*».«.**&#
There is not another about the place.
*&*fS*B
Shall I try and borrow one?
&&'mm,mm,mm
Ask our neighbour, Mr. Smith.
■«*-HY$fcBiiJ£«lir.**
He may lend you his for a while.
mmMJtm^mfflm
I wish you would split that wood finer,
^1?:*.;£if*JWiJ.BIr.»
Those sticks won't go into the stove.
*±Hf«-«WE9«*»llfiltW 221
l>^
Are any of them too long?
smmmnMm
Some might be sawed again.
&-bmms&mx%
How many cords can you cut in a day?
ftXikm/^mMmifo
One cord.and a half if I work hard.
«c*JMFxfll     i
You should make good wages.
mk^itx^mm
I have finished the job, madam.
im.A$&itmmM$i   m.
Have you returned the axe?
I have just taken it back A
«*£»#£,* Y
Did you thank the gentleman?
m^mm.mmmx    it
,i31r3
Yes, I thanked him for the loan of his axe. wmm&MitmKv
What shall I do with these chips?
&#«Jtt.1p:±.&*tM:
Carry them to the house.
Can I do anything else for yon?
w^mMikmsm±>f^:
I am house-cleaning; you may help me
wtmBWt^
Tidy up the kitchen first
$tflffl!ttfcfc*fl*Y
Where shall I empty these ashes?
Throw them out into the lane.
Help the servant take down the stove.
«fe±^#^.^*^*Jtt#
$immfcmifc&itm&
Don't get any soot on the carpet.
The pipes must be taken down first.
«±J§*«f;,A* Take them apart at the elbow-
&mimMnA£mm H; .
UikmmAkmmw,
That stove is heavy, can you carry it?
a*tt.^*m«.m^H.fiie
M&9J33
We can manage it all right.
Don't let your end drop.
Rest a minute; it's getting heavy.
You may take off the lids.
On Board Ship.
Where are you bound for?
&£ftmm
I am going to America.
I ML J
rhen do you expect to get there? 224
It will be a three weeks' voyage.
Have you a second class ticket?
a^Mana**.**
No, I am going steerage.
I hope you will have fine weather.
What are those small boats on the deck?
,tt3^±,*KBH**$»tt
They are the life-boats.
They are used in case of danger.
&3i**.B*n*,*i#M
low do they put them in the sea?
#Jtfc«£.B;&0     |
*V .A. £*»•«??? >5ft»^E&£5K-feJ* tVt -&?
-BE.   |    rr Wffi-^rv'lV7u'r*U3/*i%. Ii— tb
They let them down with block and tackle.
nmi&b*x±*&Mm»&tkm
w>#}M±^Mmftmxm *
Those are the life lines hanging up.
±&1&MtfMAm 2*5
Heru are the life preservers in these boxes.
$mj*mttMn®, H&*.t«*±
JUgjfcftitf ££tt y %
What makes the boat roll so much?
^mm^m^mh J
•aetTAffijans-
There is a heavy gale blowing.
nniSMnmm^Mm
4ME*ttfiM«&Y
What are they setting the sails for?
To. help steady the ship.
Slfcft4i/.M&*ffi
What is that small craft coming?
«»*.b *»»*#* tirti
That is a pilot boat.
B;j**.ll^* J
They will put a pilot on board;
ift®/KA.3MfA*t
The pilot will steer the ship into port?
mnt&Mmi$mnmMmk
¥#*«§»*»toAfcii3s      1
Who are those men from the tug?
vm%±xAim,i&m      * 226
mjk&jLA&#zn {®mmmkzm&)
They are the quarantine officers.
AJ!Mitii*Jfc]IGr£
Why are they coming on board?
To inspect the passengers and crew
All on board will be examined
Mm%tinMm*MWWt       4
mm&mm¥$&
They will issue a clean bill of health.
»ffl*k;»*.B&*#tt**Wffcfc
ftfnggft&A.**±#3>
How long will we be kept in quarantine?
ftm*mmm%&M*?\
We may be here one day.
fJMMNMBt 1
JlfrlS&ftWAW*
Here is the Custom House Officer.
»*.»**fi#±.M«g>
He has been talking to the Captain.
He is coming this way.
8&***,m$i&*s # 227
Who is that officer with him?
a^£*±Ag
That is the purser.
B^*J*#0f
tLftk&tkMm
The gentleman is speaking to you.
nimxA%i5±w.mM3:    #
He wants to know if you had a good trip.
I enjoyed it very much.
Were you sea-sick at any time?
ffl3zm^*tm&^        fM
«JfOi*R H A%ffiffi%M£*$t
For the first two days I was very ill.
MxxAw®]kftM,   m     m
Were you well treated by the officers?
.,„_ m      ,	
They were all very kind to us.
mMM-m.&ttmm'®. m
What is that light on the shore? 228
That is the light house.
BMA%m?±
How far is it to the harbour?
0«*.#1»E
About an hour's sail.
»Hm.H#IY.£S&
We are in the Gulf nowf*
Are we sailing with the tide?
m>&&A%±immy
No, the tide is against us.
i».^*^*jI^*.i©*
We are passing through the Narrows.
m&M-fim&«mk®    i
There is a swift current against us.
»*.i©*ittt«.i®^*. «*
Shall we go up on dedk?
immift*-:
We can have a better view. 229
$«&&•&$ nil
Do we anchor out in the Inlet?
No, we lay alongside the dock.
JBttfcWlf*
Look after your baggage.
We have a tax to pay on landing.
To whom do we pay kit?
nmmn
To the Collector of Customs.
What is the amount?
Fifty dollars for each person.
mmiim^m&Avm
^mfr*xnw®!m
Do we pay a yearly tax besides^
WMM&££AP«»*
Only the regular polbtax. «tfo
ikM^mmmfkm^r      * .
Have you ever been in Canada before?
&3:nQ,mm/immAMA
SlJi.^-TAWA+S¥±mmn#
Yes, I go there in 1885.
^*.*£».Ht»«&
ikgmmnm&m       f
Do you require to pay the tax?
m^mm y jmn&±
No, I lived there before 1st July, 1886.
a5.&«(SA.^!!i**.^*
Any one arriving after that date pays the duty.
ttmmmAmimi&*ik
Here is the collector with your certificate.
***.;&»*r.m±^**stt&
tic&AMZB*M^Z%
It gives the late of entry and name of port.
Mmn$tAm®m.mMm&Mttm
Can yon return from China without a certificate?
ikwfc&mm*!kmm
You must first get a permit from the Collector.
He will ask you for your certificate.
ffl&.»E**.¥^:**&ttm 23*
Before sailing pay him $1.   .
ffiA%.&~mMM*m
issm&towmik       |
He will give you a certificate of leave.
mmm*M3MittmmAm&tt
That will allow you to come back.
Bm^Ai^Amm MS
WikZ®mJ3n&®tii:
Your entry fee will then be given back to you*
I fa*¥ZkW.
| ; About the City.
I  u&M&m
affU»*iRi»F»Y   -
Shall we take a walk?
Yes; let us go around the city.
m>*mimMmnAkm
mM%ff£mxm-fiftUik
Are there many grand sights?
mM%mmm*ftm
There are some fine parks:
The residences are all well built,
^*©.3&#y&.*n&##i «3«
What material is used?
ft-ttfl*,j**.^*
Brick, stone and wood.
%-MAVMMm*M
The Banks and Government buildings are stone.
Mkimzmmm®
Brick is used for building the stores.
«.;}**.5£*¥-£M.^*£
Most of the dwellings are of wood.
Coal is used for fuel.
^m^^mm
Which are the finest buildings in the country?
?t?&.3g^#5g**S*B^m*af!j    |
mmmzm      m
The Parliament buildings.
The Members of Parliament iassemble there.
MXQMwmr$A&mmA%
mm*.k%-*m
The Lieut. Governor has a grana residence.
imttmMAfjcfcmfiM&M*^ 233
%mijMkAixmnmft
The grounds are large and well kept.
f?n*!
What building is that?
M£4H»3S
hat building is
fiM*tt«flft)B
That is the new City Hall.
bj**.im^mum
mn'gzM&M       m
The Mayor has an office there.
J*#JHt*,Hfa*±,fc
n
Where is the Council chamber?
»*.#*i$W.f§e
AM&*±     I
The large room upstairs.
I*«ta.lt*i
i/M%
The Council meet there on business.
Who are in the Council?
ti:3SBTi§*&& -
^^mn^.mmmS
The Mayor and Aldermen of the city.
How often are they elected? »34
Once every year the elections are helclb
Can anyone vote?
&TW«£A.*Bgft#
SNo person but a property holder.
m^m.Aumm^m.ftm '
Can a man paying rent vote?
WmX^mm.m
He may if he pays f 60 a year rent.
&iA«im3i&z*m%. ■
Where do you pay your water bill?
At the water-works office.
MTmmAm±
m.&mmB%zn%Bm&
It is next door to the Treasurer's office.
*#mmzAn*a#mta   2
The City Engineer's offices are np-staiTS.
T£*.BlMir#±.&lt*££
The Health Officer is in the same building.' 235
4M2&.S.:!
What is that place with the high wall?
t*.bs$.^±^a;
mm&r-mzm
\m
That is the County Jail.
B=f i$A%mm%m
xmM.-±m&
The Penitentiary is a larger building
=fR&Mm*=FtiMMte*m        $®
mAM&MifcX
The prisoners must work there.
WLM-tLXR M
What do they teach them?
&«trJc.H¥B
AH kinds of work and trades.
JSHMMftf « JH« JfiW
The Government controls it.
Who is that man with a rifle?
vk^itiBx^mmm
He is one of the guards.
*f»/HEAg££.4EBPg|MM£ t
He will shoot any prisoner who tries, to escaped 236
ttm-^Ammm
Here is a gang of men grading the street.
*
A
They are the chain gang.
&3L*yi|* H
Why are they worfcing there?
The Magistrate has ordered them out.
n&mi&mM!fiAmfl£M*t
ikK%&M>m*&
Have yon been down to the wharf?
ffltE*5-*rt- «
They are building a new one.
It is for passengers and freight.
»*.¥ta#ILiiiife..*HI
Watch them unload the steamer.
tt^H^#*.»HfAY
toftfl**Y
Where did she come from?
-$mmnMffimm\t
The Orient and carries the mail.
\mAWtikm&
---r- 237
'4a
She has a large cargo of tea.
w
Do the steamers carry lumber?
»« y *mm&
®mA&mm®MMfi
No, they take flour and merchandise.
M,n&m% y Mm,-&mj&± #
The lumber is taken away by the sailing ships.
mmA%-ti>gmm^nn^M
There is a barque loading at the mill dock.
^»3t*mi&.ttiraj toy
What is that ship anchored out for?
*g|**BM.t&JI**it
m^mfeMmmz-
She is taking out her ballast.
:^*.®@H.Rt*S&*
Let us go on board the steamer.
fW*.^ ».I*M Y
mritMMxmxmnm
Look at this big steam barge.
fife§£4iii I
What is she loaded with?
^*.l*#^*± '■■    ■ 238
^A^^ttmmm^nm
Granite for the new post office.
&m&}A?mig±Am±
it&MBiTiriifcY
Where do they get it?
*±a^ui
From the quarry up the coast.
m&mmttk%.
How do they unload it?
fttmmM i       |
They use a steam derrick.
Have you been out to the museum?
m®*&imzm$.
No, what part of the city is it in?
MMmmA*9imA*$M*\
It is in one of the suburbs.
n@J$*.HIt#fci'J*Si>
mfo?\-zm&£&mm.m
The belt-line cars go near there.
«rB1A^^S.^4lS3g
What is that large glass house?
^*.B#&JW*.£F± *39
3EI6I&
Z,
That is the conservatory.
Bm*nim®mi
Is that a factory with, the tall chimney?
3Bft*
iJfc
«Jt*F
The chapel is up on the hill.
m&nn
1S.7E1
That is the power house.
B^*.l^te«f ± f
It supplies electric power for the tram cars.
mm$mMM&&Aftkim-*
Do they furnish the lights for the city?
They have many large lights on the streets.!
n®x&*®fem*£%:itiffl&i
%Mmi3ti®kMM  (WB**) m
Some parts are lighted by gas.
'W.SSilffc.Pfc&n*
The gas works are over in the east end.
^«f£.:£*fBB;&.;&*ta
'ik^mimMzm*®.
Have you passed the Custom House?
«^*««3ffi*«iff± 240
mnmx
It is over the post office.
*&HM»B*k#±#ftiJ±
The Bank is on the other corner.
^JS^*.^**!"^ **?
fk**mwmm
Do you want that cheque cashed ?
w&mBftjm HB
#&jfcfcMA
Hand it to the Teller.
fmAmEM
The cheque is not "marked."
»»*.nM
ikmmxmAZ'&u   i
Put it in the ledger-keeper's wicket.
Is that a schoof-house on the hill?
^*B.nff**B&?F±.^^«S&
That is the Public School.
B»Hr,*MflB;ttJlf**fr
The High School is on the next street.
;&±*£&.;&*3c&.«.*»iJ
The scholars are out at recess.
&**5«#.3S#i.iiBMm* *4i
flLg5G4l4&1il§3£
What games are they playing?
Foot-ball and lacrosse.
3®mMmMV5%±
The University is in the west end.
^^:&ffl*flfe.K*.H^fn*.i
Where is the asylum for lunatics?
&ms&ikkmu
It is over near the Hospital. g|j|
nHT TWTB,tfc»#±J&» *• **'
Do you see that house next the hotel?
W9fcH,H#±,*5*.;»»tt»
SI9£ftft f*
That is the theatre.
imMJumm
Here is a very large church.
Would you care to see the organ?
mmnBAkffimmm®
You can hear it played on Sunday. fp
M
Law.
•ttSIB»#3£
What is the meaning of a threat?
Tilling a person you will do him Some harm
You may say you are going to whip him,
fzm%.<3z$£MM®M® air
Ie might be in great fear of you.
Could he bring an action for a threat?
mm^^MM^Af\mm *r
n®%&&mfes%w&nkx    #
Yes; if you prevented him from working?^
tT&^DWA  I&WA*
Assault is laying hands on a person
ffi^.^*.$^^.^»e#        2j
Jfc!EA8H*Jl**S(««JRW)
This prisoner is on trial for burglary.
:.#**.£MK&.:¥L heft
:A3S#*f*
&*5$#
Are there any other charges against him?
&M'Mik*mxm*\
■£te"I 243
He is charged with carrying concealed weapons.
&mxmA%±mhi&wmm&
How was he captured?
ftWRMMM
-A»«Mffl»ffn %
A detective was^put on the case.
•*J^J*ff.»5fcSHb* S
The stolen goods were found in his possession.
Ie tried to pawn a gold watch.
<E#H»AJiINfc
Did he have an accomplice?
ftftikHJgnnEffli ♦»■"■ »     #i
The man who helped him cannot be found.
&#4lfESEAY fs
What witnesses have you?
H##*A1t»aE    j .      vW
The second-hand dealer will give evidence.
wkzfcffi^mm l      * '
The prisoner's counsel asks for a remand.
ft&m&MIGmAMAfmMX      H 244
Will the judge grant it?
That depends on circumstances.
B«m.3;^&*ft*
■MRfc*fiffi*£3»
Why are you not ready to proceed?
^nnuk^mmm%
An important witness cannot attend.
Hft»tt.»*1MRiriMa-$
*ri¥SBIB4E**ffi ii
Has he been served with a subpoena?
He cannot be served for a week.
«a»\JMRIL««
**•»«+h -;,
The case will be remanded for 10 days.
tswtiMmQMX&mifo
&imtiMA&&m  I
Will you let the prisoner out on bail?
No, the crime is too serious.
IMWfifcttlMffl*?!1±
JWWiftT***       .     i
The bookkeeper swindled his employer.
» h*B.*sS&.l^*.ffe®*T 245
He will be prosecuted.
Can you prove the fact?
A false entry is in the ledger.
di^8&** mm LmtMt&m
He is suspected of committing forgery.
mm>Mi$mMtfAJim%,*ikmm
JE^tfe* y I
Is he under arrest?
CT.J^ff.E^*
His employer has sworn out a warrant.
>*.«* Y*ft****m.mtt
ifc#li!5*J§ Y
What is the nature of this crime?
»*.Kffiis.*'#r&*M
fg&tUI: \S*& 4f|
A police officer was shot by this man.
Hffi».B**ifc.P8fr*£
Did he make a confession?
A confession was extorted from him.
mig»#.i$*.l«*iittii^ 246
S8rMflLD#ffiH
Was there any malice aforethought?
No, he was trying to escape arrest.
»5.mi**.ffl^.ffl*$L3&**
4EIPA*11A*^      I i
He will be tried for murder.
mmwmm%m   a
When was the post-mortem examination held?
zim*iftW±m*iiMWxmmmw
#BT*&imB     I
Yesterday afternoon at the police station.
it*%. w«. B@^.2^*.*^#
m^m&irn? m        4   k
Did they extract the bullet?
1ife:l®te5Efift&
They found it in the body.
n^MMnnkm 1
The assassin had a revolver.
The bullet was of the same calibre
He was sent up for trial.
mfA¥<feAffflMV& *4l
iknmmiTA
Hitting a man with your fist.
tk%.mXM±3zM1fl
Kicking him or spitting in his face is battery.
»ff».W*&£.Hjft*#*.;»*.ii»ir3W
mTimmMMAm^Tim
Cutting or stabbing with a knife is wounding.,
®%*m£MM±miJ5iiA&wMZ
tbkB%MkJtqm      Rl    m m
A man will be punished for wounding.
mmmmmMfk^^m^. ^       mm
8t#aEif«[(«llffl7lfllBE»fr^A«A«).
Except in self defence.
i«.H4P#.»*
A criminal action would be imprisonment.
5fiE«&&JS#.im.1£2$*I8l
miMAmmA-m        §
Wounding a person would be criminal.*
m%m®m*mmimkm
ff#fflffiiHS!H9!r$£
No action can be brought for assault.
immmffiikzg&wk
When in defence of your wife or child.
s B«*,#ft;£18ft.ffi»
WL^zytAnrnm    n    ■ .   /
But don't strike a blow after all danger is past.
AA%tiifflMM1fi&MttWA%mftM ***tfi* 248
ikmm-A&tikz
Can you kick a man out of your house?
Not if he comes in quietly;'
to^ffi^PJA^ifclNWBft
If he breaks in you may throw him out.
If he won't go you may use force.
1&n®M^3:m3z1tiM±
Did you win the suit?
ffiHRT
The case was dismissed.
&*nf***itr*Jft*Siir
Do you pay any costs?
WSQUBaMHt
The plaintiff must pay all costs.
*N^*WJ»*aiJUMf±
Have you heard about the murder?
-MAmmm&Amn      %
A womlari was raped and killed by a negro.
&XM1$>MMm&mA% UAZ 2.49
1tWiB*fl|jmS*a^M
Have they caught the fiend?
&mmnA%    4
The police caught him.
4EE&&&W     ilfs
He is in the cells.
A mob tried to lynch him.
mMMmmfeM
Did they get hold of him?
mk^%&Amm
The mob couldn't break into the cell.
nn, ®K\%MA$im&m±
itmwuM^m&MM,
The coroner will hold an inquest.
;&*5fir«.*[ii&#&.Birr
wmmwrntzB
The body is in the morgue.
miifeJ**&&M It
iB^!JA5a¥«A««^#m
The murderer was t&ed at the assizes.
Did you hear the evidence? 25°
I heard the Crown Attorney speak to the jury.
*»Ha»Y 1   Wm :
What was the verdict?
W*.;i*;gM.
The jury found him guilty of willful murder.
jwa?'i. umumm. Htt*mttmj¥-m>
mm^mmmit^A'to
The judge then spoke to the prisoner.
He asked him if he had anything to say.
The judge then passed the sentence.
»?^.«*&$®± mis
That he should be hanged.
BMW
The sheriff took him to the jail.
EmmRMstm-Mmzto
He will be executed in a few weeks.
mmv&%M±m±Mmm
Do you think he will get a reprieve?
B3:m,mmAkmM&ffl 851
»B*fifc*Mr«r
There is no chance of it.
atefrWttA^ffc P
It would be running counter to the popular feeling.
aWHRAi&&
There is a rase of manslaughter.
ffi&*.E*n**#ft£**pff
Will it be tried by the Supreme Court.
immzm&nfaxz*&ri ■ 4
The trial will come up at the fall assizes.
nm.MmA$mmm,mmmAm ±
What are the facts of the case?
«SSte#±,W#;»to* I
-A«*fc.SS^AB3»Sttf
One man shot another while gambling.
mm&ftm&m
Had they been good friends?
ftM®mm®itm *■        •    »* ■
Yes, gambling was the cause of the trouble.
^*.».&.i**Tlf±.#H-rF##S&
*MEAIBffi5&2:*£§
Will the prisoner be hanged?
ffli&Af&^At-n 252
4ESP#A»E£
He will get a long term in prison?
tmm^mMM,®^.
It may be for twenty years or for life.
mm^fmmM±An^mii
a^-UA«*ffl*Y
What is that man on trial for?
»*.B£.£ffl^S&.#
Arson, he set fire to a hotel.
S#4MtffcYJffi«»fft»
mmmxl
What will be done with him?
mm*ffiAt±m* ■£'•'■
4EfPg£&£91B: f.
He will be sent to prison for life.
mnm** %m.&mAf ma
»«-&** m y
What are those loud shrieks?
^te-^&k
That is one of the prisoners
BW.fl*iifft.3*S$#;
fflUF51HE4l3i     *
What are they doing to him?
mm® f
Whipping him with a lash. ■S3
What is the crime?
m&--t-mM&LTZ1z:
Seduced a girl under 14 years of age.
mmtmtmAivxm&MAmmfe
He will be in prison for life!
itmkm&m&&z& I
The prisoner attempted to commit rape.
tckm^M-vmmA^ y   .
Was the girl under 14 years of age?
She was not 14 years old-
»*.n"WJMi?.jyfr    £
te®n%m.mzmJ%&&mmik
He would be whipped and put in prison for life.
mmm$-mMMm%®&%.¥mtt
If the girl is over 14?
m*j*i&mmEA$®:
He would get seven years.
en
*&n±
A man can be hanged for committing rape. 2.S4
JtMfMlfc£4KftY
What is this blue paper?
^*.&**S.M
A subpoena from the High Court.
mgtf.4«5*.±«S
tt*mmAkmmm\&
You must attend Court this sitting.
^*l*.JB^fS.&*3:£
it®.~jtAmAP± ■  I,
Here is a dollar for witness fees
mmAmm*¥m&itiM
Be in the Court Room at ten oYlock
$t%MMzm-mk
It is the first case on the docket.
«»*.&5ft**n*.3c;&.ft«
No loud talking in the Court Koorn.
42*tSs*i^TifHfBn*3g(ftaf*i3iffliii«ifi
What cases are tried in the Court of Chancery?
Wn$A$ffl.m®nAmttMi$W
Suits concerning lands and estates.
jS±*m#*W*.BHL*»*tt
Can yon have your lawsuit appealed?
:) S5JJ
You can take it from one court to a higher orU^
%.&%mAtm.mnMm.± e€
From the County Court to the Supreme Court:
am.nmmm Amm&mm      J
&mmffiA$±.x*mL^z®       1,
From the Supreme Court to the Court of ^.pgeal.
The highest Court is the Privy Council.
**AE*if.«.;&2$*Q.&*&
&tt££ftjHft&Attft£ I
How can you make the defendant pay?
ft&3t®j*m®m&      |r
ttETJ&fllWSUHE 51
Serve him with a judgment summons.
You must make out an affidavit.
•gffiwmimm        ■?£
The Judge will order him to appear.
MB.feMmAmm*mm
He will be put under oath.
mmA%^vttm±    ?*
■T$A5&femmititt}®Lfi w
And asked if he is earning any money,
iit.i®*.mt.$^*.EII.Mft« *5<J
He will be ordered to pay a small sum each month.
mam^AmmM^m. mm~- .m^m
When will your case be tried?
5fl]&.3:tn*.-£M
It was adjourned from last Court.
W*JB*MHE4*tftt
What if you lose the suit?
I will appeal to the High Court.
m\t&Aii&mMn±m
ikmn^Mnmm^mm   J
Did you get judgment in the other suit?
Yes, and put the Sheriff in possession.
All executions are put into his hands-
m*m±mm^m®m,m®.
Where can I find a barrister?
&-jmmzmx
Over in one of the large buildings. 257
m-m^B&mx
Ho has an office upstairs.
^?ft*.H^B±.|El*
r$i&zn^A5%mm$i*.
Ask his clerk if he is engaged.
e*.#*ffit*,*M*.fcfc**Htf
ikffe%mfe^mmx        ic
You can see him in a minute.
Take a chair and wait.
MEMmm  I
I will call again in half an hour.
imm*vjmm%MikttM%.
ScM^iltAA
Will you have this man arrested?
*D&.^a&*£.3&«
ftESJirJsl
I will lay a complaint.
tmm^mA$%&
The Magistrate will issue a warrant.
^4ljl**iJ.».J**.EiJ*il
&&mmM&M~nkzm-M,
Can you swear that he stole your watch?
®3:**a. B*L*f^fr.5£»
®timMteitAv&
I can swear he is the man.
J&m**n.&»*.^3: 25«
m®ikmn&
Did he assault you?
No, he took it out of my poclftt.
Bj$mmnA£tfim     $ ,
It was in my coat hanging on the fence*
«**A£®mMA£]ft®±i
M&&m—kwm
There was no one else about.
®mitiwm&m±M&
Was the case tried this morning?
OT.tfHn*.ffl#.a:*«*
No, it was postponed until Saturday
aMMWf.*±***BJM!IEtt
HtlEA^iSH
The prisoner asked for a remand.
^s^t^.ie*.1? %mx
4E0S4Umi£        I
What does he want to prove?
tg*r*.iw#i.###
Mte%ft&ftZk       m
That he has a good character.
B$fft*.E#.*;frtT
fffiAOTifc
The Clerk of the Court is calling you.
m?mAmimAfcfiiA>3Jt3M 259
Walk up to the witness box.
m*j
-X
yds*
&tm
The clerk will sweat you.
Tell the truth and nothing but the truth.
i.s&.^*a#±.M«fe..iis.A^*i#±
m&^xmMAmMm
To tell a lie would be perjury.
i>m%mmA%mk&%. i
For that crime you would be sent to prison.*
tea M.MMB I
Always speak the truth.
Robbery can be punished by 14 years in prisom
«Ef iJ.m^l^C*.^^*«. H^*i
%®itMMnMM7%A
If the robber beats or wounds any person.
t$tf*MmB>&A%MMtkMm
Or is armed with a gun or weapon.
&®%.&&mikzm
He will get a life sentence;
mm^AM.mi*%M
lflJ«
I 200
•gffim®®fe*fmn %
The judge can also have him whipped.
tmfeA&9m%MmAt
£m-AS&J&ji:£.IE«S
If a man is with a gang of robbers?
B
They will all be sentenced alike.
Mm&Akm^mM
Seducing a girl under 21 years of age.
And over 14 years of age.
■*-#fBaJMMW«U&
JN£M¥££ffiHR I   f
Will be punished with, two years in prison.
wm%Mikiti^±imM&m
Procuring girls for houses of ill-fame.
%smte®mA?ft±mttAmi£
Or hiding them in such a place. 26i
Or making any threats to get them there.
Will be imprisonment for two years with labor.
m kmmis** ra Af im*%±A&&&
Into how many degrees are crimes divided?
®ffl.ftXikA&W£A£-tUA&mm
Into three degrees, first, second, and third.
mffij&^m&^mi&^&Mmm
4ntt^-*^®^5g        in
What is murder in the first degree?
i&wfimw Annuls a&w£       |
mtmmm-A
The unwarranted killing of a person with malices
^#n§
.&
$mmA%±M&±
The penalty is death for murder in the first degree
nn&mA)*:itim±A?m%s*®nMifim&^
Killing a person without any previous intent.
X 262
HA^'
Bl
Would be murder in the second degree.
4lft2H' _____
What is the third degree of the crime?
Wi-kM&lkWRyf-'Yib
Causing the death of a person through carelessness.
^A%m±Mttuwi%jmmm±
The penalty is imprisonment from 7 to 21 years.
%n&mA*i$AM&$itifflAtm*>i>imm9m
nutKAWnW^ZZrm
The jury must decide the degree of the crime.
*^0.«*.*i*fctt8*^*jtt,*HHlfi
%mmzMnmmAB%
The judge passes the sentence and states the term.
»a^.w*^*@±.wa.m^.^« *
In the TJ. S. the Governor may grant a pardon.
fywumsOTfe.", Mmm\ a «'■■
He can also grant a reprieve. 263
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Abuse
Accident
Accompany
According
Account
Acknowledge
Acquaintance
Act
Actior
Active
Adjourn
Admit
Admittance
Advance
Adventure
Advise
Afraid
After
Afterward
Again
Against
Age
Agreement
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Alphabet
Also
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Amount
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Appeal
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B.C.
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A
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Mr.
J.
B. Copp
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216 Carrall St.
Vancouver
B.C.
ft
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BE
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Mr. Lai Chong
Importers and Commission
Merchants
25 Government Street
Victoria
M
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Important
Messrs. Wan Chong & Co.
Wholesale Merchants
Seattle
Wash.
With a parcel
of Books
a
ft
5
Private
Chin
c,o Messrs
Chong Quie, Esq.
Flour Dealer
. Tun SungTong & Co.
25 Second Street
Portland
Oregon
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Per San Francisco
Mr. J. J. Tuogpuls
care Mr. A. Smith
Prom
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Victoria
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Yokohama
Japan
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Mr.
King
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242 Jorvoies St,
Hong Kong
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W, R. Thomas, Esq.
104 W. Street
By Kindness
Mr. Campbell
with $lco
Nanaimo
B.C.
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Vancouver, B. C.
April 25th, 189S.
Dear Madam,
I received your kind invitation to dinner, but I
am sorry to say that I will not be able to be present as
I have pressing business to attend, and returning
thanks for the same.
Yours truly,
J. B. Cook.
£ m
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Victoria, B. C.
August 15th, 1892.
Itear Mr. P.
Mr. Marshall a friend of mine has arrived to-day
from London, England, and is stopping with me.   I shall
be very glad if you will come and take dinner with us
to-morrow evening at half-past six o'clock, as I have no
doubt you would like to make his acquaintance.
Yours truly,
J. B. Jung.
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Vancouver, B. C.
October 7th, 1892.
Mr. B.
My Dear Sir,
Please accept my best thanks for your kind pres
ent which I appreciate very much.   I am very sorry that
you should incur Such expense on my account.    Hoping
you are getting well,
Tours respectfully,
J.P.G.
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125 Johnson St.
Victoria, B. C.
December, 5th, 1892.
Dear Joe,
I have not been able to see you for a long time
and regret that I could not do so, but really I have not
had a moment to spare, I hope, however, to see you here
on next Tuesday's boat. I beg you will accept as a
small token of my regard the two tins of Velong Tea
which Mr. Baily will give to you. Please give my compliments to Mrs. Grant.
Yours truly,
T. J. G.
**
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Victoria, B. €.
December 24th, 1892.
A. Esq.
M^ Dear Sfr,
Accept my warmest thanks   for  the   beautiful
present which you sent me at Christmas.
Yours sincerely,
F. K.
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Victoria, B. C,
December 23rd, 1892.
Mr.a ■:
My Dear Sir,
Please accept this small token from me.    Hoping
you may have a joyful Christmas Day,
Yours respectfully,"
B. O.
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Vancouver, B. C.
September 12th, 1892.
Dear Mr. G.,
On my return from Victoria this morning at
eleven o'clock, your letter was placed in my hands. I
will see Mr. T. this evening on the subject and will let
you know the particulars to-morrow morning.
Yours sincerely,
B. R.
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Victoria, B. C,
November 5th, 1892.
Mr. Franklin,
Dear Sir,
We have received your letter of the 2nd inst. enclosing the twenty dollars' rate which  we  have  forwarded to Tai Chong & Co. of this city.    We beg to say
receipt for the same was sent to you by yesterday
mail.
Yours truly,
E. Jervis.
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Pi 47 Front St.,
New Westminster, B. C,
October 5th, 1892.
Mr. Besip,
Purser of the Str. Yosemite.
I send you by the bearer, the opium tin, please
carry to Bow Yune & Co. Corner Government and Com
menent Sts., Victoria.
Yours respectfully,
F. K.
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Vancouver, B. C.
November 2nd, 1892.
Johnston,
Dear Friend,
I should like to have the Chinese and English
book of mine that you have. Hope you will oblige me
by returning it as soon as possible.
Yours truly,
H. Moody.
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Dear Sir,
It is now a long time since I have seen you, but I
have often thought of you, I hope you are enjoying excellent health. Everything is very dull just now and I
am much in need of money at present, I shall be much
obliged if you will return at your earliest convenience
the sum of $300 (three* hundred dollars) which you borrowed from me on the 15th of December last.
Yours truly, lot
Victoria, B. C,
December 29th, 18911.
Mr. Rethe,
Dear Sir.
I respectfully beg to apply to you for the loan ol
$50 as I want to buy a few presents for the New Year.
Hoping you will kindly pay my next month's wa^es ii
advance,
I remain,
Your obedient servant,
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10 Carrall Street,
Vancouver, B. C,
November 15th, 1892.
Mr. Brown,
Gen. Pas. Agent of C. P. R, Co.,
Dear Sir,
As yuur Company's Steamship Empress of Japan
will leave here for Hong Kong on Saturday next, I
wish to engage three first-class cabins for six passengers. I would like if possible to have the three to*
gether and oblige,
Yours truly,
Bowll.
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Portland, Oregon,
December 25th, 1892.
Messrs. U. P. S. S. Co.,
Gentlemen.
I beg to inform you that I have five thousand
sacks of flour which I intend to ship per your Comn
pany's Steamship for Hong Kong on next trip. Please
let me know what the freight is per ton. Hoping it
will be moderate,
'1£m I am, Gentlemen,
Yours truly,
Honcox.
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Victoria, B. C,
June 13th, 1892.
Mr. Hall,
Manager of London Insurance Co.
Sir," "
I beg you will please to effect a policy on 15 cases
or Groceries I am now shipping from here to Skeena
River on the steamer Louise to the amount of $750.00,
against all risk.   Bearer will hand you the charge.
I am, Sir,
Yours respectfully,
Bonson & Co.
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Vancouver, B. C,
Si- January 10th, 1892.
Mr. Carl, ^ii
Dear Sir,
I have the honor to inform you that I have
started in this port as an Importer and Wholesale
Grocer, under the name of Wilson & Company for the
purpose of dealing in the produce of the Province.
I shall be happy to communicate with you, aritf
any orders you may see fit to place with me will receive
my best attention.
Yours very truly,
A. Wilson.
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Victoria, B. C.,v
January 28th, 1892.
Dear Jcmn,
Allow me to introduce you to my friend Mr. Yow
Non of this city. He purposes remaining a week in
your town as he has some railway business to attend to,
and should he stand in need of any assistance or information you will greatly oblige me by attending to him
with your usual friendly ability.
Your affectionate friend,
James Deas.
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Vancouver, B. C,
f; November 29th, 1892.
Mr. Boyd,
Dear Sir,
A tradesman of your town whose name is written on the enclosed paper, has just forwarded to me a
large order for my goods. Not having had any tran-
saction with him and being naturally desirous of ascertaining if he is trustworthy, I should esteem it a great
favor if you would give such information as you are
able upon this point.
I must apologize for the trouble I am giving you,
wfcich, however, you will probably excuse on account of
the importance of the affair.
Yours truly,
m
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Victoria, B. C,
November 1st, 1892.
Gentlemen, Pf*
A notice appears in the Daily Times of last evening that your office is in want of an Interpreter and
Translater and I beg leave to apply for the situation.
You will see by the testimonials enclosed herewith that
I am quite able to fill the vacancy.
I remain,
%\ Yours truly,
T. H.
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Vancouver, B. C,
August 27th, 1893.
Mr. Banfoud,
j^Sir, ,,'. .... ,. :j .,     /
Your kind note to hand this morning. After a
minute investigation of the affairs of Joseph & Co^ 1
am sorry to inform you that not more than ten per cent
will be obtained, it is even doubtful if this small sum
will be realized.
I regret that you are so deeply concerned in his
failure, and any service that I can render you here, youj
may freely command.
Your obedient servant.
Steward,
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I Victoria, B. 0.,
|       November 14th, 1894.
Hon. Craft,
Police Magistrate,
Dear Sir,
I have been informed that you want a Chinese
Interpreter in the Court House, and I beg leave to
apply to you for the sitjuation.. For references 1 refer
you to Mr. B. the Superintendent of Police at New
Westminster.
I remain,
Your obedient servant,
A. W.
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HI 3^2
Portland, Oregon,
January 3rd, 1893.
Messrs. Bailey & Co.,
Gentlemen,
I beg that you will consider me as an applicant
ror the situation as second clerk now vacant in your
firm. For three years I have been third clerk in Mr.
Mable's office, my object in leaving their employ being
that of improving my position. I trust I shall g$ve you
every satisfaction should you favor me with the appointment.
I am, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. Howley.
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ES 313
Portland, Oregon,
November 14 th, 1893.
Hon Green,
Sir, :   .,_.   .   ..   .....  .....r  . .   ,.,, ...
As I am suffering from a severe cold I am unable
to attend to my duties to-day, but I hope I shall be able
to resume them again in a few days.
I am, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. Moore.
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Portland, Oregon,
March 3rd, 1893.
Mr. Thomas,
Dear Sir,
I beg to inform you that I have a prospect of
being employed in the firm of Messrs. Fanning & Co.
1 had an interview with these gentlemen this morning
and have been asked for a reference, I have taken the
liberty of giving them your name. The length of time
I had the honor of serving you and the general satisfaction which you expressed at my conduct and ability, led
me to hope that you will speak favorably ofi me and
I hat you will add this to the numerous obligations conferred upon,
Your obedient servant,
F. Davis.
£   B
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^DTifSan^rancisco, CaTa.,
MM£ tdt8g IttqJt February 1st, 1892.
Hon.  Boardman, |g^^8 '0S
Collector of Customs, $ii&
- DealPfSr, MB3J& JLftfJ~'       fcft-^ Sp^ I
I beg to offer myself for the situation oi! Inters
p*reter that is neftv vacant in your department. I have
been in business here for the last ten years and can
speak English fluently. I have not the least doubt btft
that I can give you entire satisfaction, huea
I am, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. Cowley.
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|p April 25tb, im.
Ifr. Someday,
Sir, J^- ■   >,-,•
I understand that you have a vacancy of Chinese
(agent in your establishment. I wish to obtain that
situation and would be glad to come on trial tor a mod'
erate salary and I believe that I will give you satisfaction.   Should you kindly answer my application I will
send you references.
I am, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. Thomas.
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Vancouver, B. C,
t October 29t6j 1892.
Mr. Bonter,
Sir,
I have sent this morning by drayman the artv
cles, of which a list is appended herewith, to be disposed of at your next sale by public auction to be held
in your sale room on the 12th of next month, the com*
mission to be the same as agreed upon, viz., ten per
cent.
I am,
Yours faithfully,
Wm. Munro.
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Vancouver, B. 0*f
t^$$M^ffeO June 5th, 1892.
Dear Mr. D.,
Enclosed find Twenty Dollars which I have addressed to you in care of Mr. Henry Grant, which I trust
will reach you safely. Please return me a receipt for
the same
Yours very truly,
H. B.
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Portland, Oregon,
jt | September 21st, 1892.)
Messrs. North Pacific SS. Co.,
Agent,
Sir,     - 'i4|   v ;     \< ■
I shall be much obliged if you will inform me
if your Company has a vessel bound for Vancouver, B.
G.1, or when you have any expectation of sending one
there.
I am, Sir,
|H Yours obediently,
Chas. Hanberley.
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JNew Westminster, B. C,
July 20th, 1892.
Mr. Fowler,
Dear Sir,
We shall feel greatly obliged by your settling
the account—$2,000, for the goods you have bought
during the last six months. We had hoped that our
necessities would not have compelled us to ask you for
this amount until you could have made the payment
convenient to yourself, but our engagements compel us
to call on you for an immediate payment. Trusting to
your goodness to attend to this account as soon as possible,
L. Henper.
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San
Franciscc
>, Cala.,
July 17th, 1892.
Messrs. C. & Co.,
Gentlemen,
Please pay
to my family cook,
Ah Tin,
the sum
of forty
dollars
(«40),
bein
g wages
for the i
nonth of
June, and please charge to
our account.
Yours
sincerely.
>
Mrs. B.
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Vancouver, B. C,
September 20th, 1892.
Mr. S. J. Pitts & Co., ,.oO * & .WwaM
Dear Sir,
I beg leave to introduce to your respectable firm
my particular friend, Mr. Wilkin, of this city, who is the
bearer.
He visits Victoria in the way if business and as
his credit is unquestionable and extensive I shall be
glad to see you open an account with him, fully assured
that it will be for your mutual interest.
Tours respectfully,
"S* Dawson.
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Victoria, B. C,
October 1st, 1892.
Mr. Morris,
Dear Sir,
Please deliver to the bearer two dozen ladies'
best handkerchiefs, the cost of which I do not want to
exceed $iine Dollars per dozen, and charge to my account, and oblige,
Yours sincerely,
Fewster.
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1
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Victoria, B. C,
February 9th, 1892.
Messrs. Garow & Co.,
Gentlemen,
Please send me the leathern ware as per note below, let it be of a good quality and tasteful pattern.
Ship the same in 20 bales, by the first train for Vancouver connecting with Victoria, securing its insurance
on the lowest terms possible, you will consign the
goods to my address, care of Messrs. Gibson & Co., Vancouver, to whom you will enclose the Duplicates and
Bill of Lading with Invoice to me.
Yours respectfully,
Mansell.
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Vancouver, B.
c,
July 6th
i, 1892:                 I
Messrs* 0. P. N. Co.,
Gentlemen1,
Referring to a shipment from   Hong  Kong  of
forty i
eases of Patna opium per Steamship Empress of
India,
which was short by two cases
when delivered
here on 22nd of April last.    I shall be much obli
iged if
you Will pay me as soon as possible the  cost  <
)f the
missing cases, valued $480.00 each.   I enclose the bffi'
of lading and receipt for 38 cases only.
I remain, Gentlemen,
Your obedient servant,
0. R.
J*
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Victoria, B; C,
[ |£ |f May 7th, 1892.1
Messrs. Hanneson & Co.,
Gentlemen,
You will please observe from the enclosed price
current that Rice is on the rise.    It will therefore be
for your interest to make us an early and as large a
consignment as possible, also send us samples of your
Green Teas, with the prices, and oblige,
Yours truly,
Kwong Hing & Co.
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Victoria,.B. C,
Je8£ j&#^   faie-- June 23rd, 1892.
Mr. Andrew,
Dear Sir,
The Bank of B. C. drafts mentioned in yours of
the 10th inst. I have presented and cashed, and on the
25th of this month paid to Lai Chong & Co. on your account the sum mentioned. Enclosed find receipt for
the same.
M Yours truly,
N. & C. Co.
£l§ *£
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to  m Victoria, B. 0.,
<5jf.,. December 27th, 1893.
Mr. H.,
Dear Sir,
The New Year being near, I wish to pay up all
my debts within this week.   And I ask you to kindly
pay me the balance of my account, amounting to $250
(two hundred and fifty dollars), and oblige,
Yours truly,
8. a
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15 Government St.,
Victoria, B. C,
October 1st, 1892.
Messrs. Hudson Bay Co.,
Gentlemen,
You will kindly deliver to the bearer the goods
mentioned below, and charge^o our account, viz.
1 Box Brandy
2 |   T. & B. Tobacco ♦
Please send the bill and oblige,
Yours truly.
K. C. W.
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Victoria, B. C>
|p|r -   ■ X-&W^     " Ma^ 6th>1892-
Mr. Baker,
Dear Sir, j. *£
Your favor of the 28th of April has received our
immediate attention and we are happy to say that we
have been able to execute your order in such a manner
as we think will give you perfect satisfaction. In order that there should be as little delay as possible we
have forwarded the goods per ra^ and yon will receive
them in about 10 days. jHoldiug ourselves a,t your further disposal and assuring you of our desire to attend
to your interest,
Yours very truly,
Kellev.
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Victoria, B. (X,
-&I     mQ November 25th, 1892.
Messrs. Connon & Co., iibo I
Gentlemen, 1 jj
I beg to inform you that I have returned to you
by the N. P. rail the 20 cases of Salt Ham which you
shipped to me on the 2nd of October last. The goods
appear to have suffered considerable damage, owing to
which I cannot expect to effect an advantageous sale.
Enclosed is Bill of Lading.
I am, Sir,
Yours truly,
W. Hall.
+ n
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Victoria, B. C,
:-f '' December 22nd, 1892.
Mr. Locke,
Dear Sir,
I send you to-day by Wells, Fargo & Co., 2,500
native cigars worth f 5.00 per thousand, to which I beg
your attention in disposing of at the highest possible
price. I do not wish to make a sacrifice of the goods,
and hope you will do your best for my interest.
I remain,
Yours respectfully,
J. Guater.
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T 333
Seattle, Wash.,
November 21st, 1892.
Messrs. Foster & Co.,
Gentlemen,
I read in the San Franc/wo Call of yesterday that
the Californian Orange can be purchased on favorable
terms in your market, and consequently something
might be done to advantage in this article. Would
vou, therefore, have the goodness to purchase on my
account say 200 cases of the best description and ship;
to my address by early rail from your pork Transmit
the Invoice and Bill of Lading as soon as possible.
Yours respectfully,
- . .. .   C. Lewis.
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San Francisco, Cala.,
%     U     WS>. December 22nd, 1892.
Messrs. Robson & Co.,
Gentlemen,
In reply to your letter of the 6th inst. The goods]
ordered have been shipped per steamship "Queens" and
left here to-day at 2 p.m., enclosed find the Bill of Lading and Bill of cost. Consign the amount, $227.00, to'
our address. As all the articles are of superior quality
we hope you will procure good prices for them. WaHP
tog your further orders,
ip We remain,
Yours respectfully,
E. McDonald.
£
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&   r Portland, Oregon,
$ irflti December 23rd. 1892.
My Dear James,
Enclosed find the sum of $500 with which I beg
Jftfa will purchase for me two dozen good; Silver IHunt-
ing Case Watches.   Hope you will select taseful patterns and ship to my address at an early opportunity?
for Christmas trade..
Yours faithfully,
H. Raywoodi
ft
B
\£s New Westminster, B. C,
^ November 10th, 1892.
Mr; C. I---'#* >y
Dear Sir,
I send you by my clerk, $100 (one hundred dollars), to pay the last bill, and will be much obliged if
you would deliver me by Joe, my drayman, the articles
according to the enclosed order.
Yours truly,
ll K. M. C.
»
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"Vancouver, B. C,
July 20th, 1892.
B. B. Esq.,
Dear Sir,
Your order dated 16th inst. was received this
morning. Please receive and sign for the articles
which I send by the boy Harry.
Yours truly,
C. W. & Co.
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^r»ooir ^Victoria, B. C,
3931 ,'t<jg vf|| May 18tb, 1892.
Messrs. T. W. Bros.,
>0&EL JI
Gentlemen,
The C. P. R. Steamship "Empress of Indil^' nas
arrived from Hong Kttng,c I beg to acknowledge the
receipt of your letter to^My saying that our goods are
now in bond at your warehouse, we shall be tfery much
obliged if you will ship them  to  us by  steamer "Is*
lander" to-morrow.
>! Yours truly,
W. C. If.
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,.D ..& jShoj'jiWictoria, B. C,
M&l \d$ dwK February 25th, 1892.
Mr. H. R. a .p
Dear Sir,
-gi TBave purchased? f6fc j^oii-one hundred cases of
wine -$h ^efiordance with your instructions, each case
containing eighteen botft^esv the cost of which is $7.20
pgr^aseP* Please let uS know3-When to ship them to you,
and oblige, ' :HJ1^
tTifMt z-iuQ*. Yours truly,
0  H K. W. K. & Co.
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Victoria, B. C,
March 9th7l892.
Mr. B.
Dear Sir,
Your favor received at 9 o'clock this meming.
You want 1,000 mats of Rice? I am very sorry to say
that I have not that much on hand, but I assure you I
will have five times as much by the next steamer, "Empress of China."
Yours truly,
k. o. a & Co.
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Clinton,
February 5th, 1892.
Messrs. H. W. Co.,
Gentlemen,
I beg to inform you that I have not received any
of the goods mentioned in your letter of 25th ult., the
Bill of Lading is to hand now, though the goods are ten
days overdue.
Yours truly,
T. K.
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*               1 Victoria, B. C,
J i :/!mmi- February 10th, 1892.
B. C. Esq., W^ ' SpS*   j*      &^
Dear Sir,
We enclose herewith the Invoice and Bill 6t Lading of 1500 mats of Rice, and 100 cases of merchandise,
total 600 packages. We are shipping these goods W-
:day by the Cf P. N. Co,'s steamer, "Islander" fir you,
care of Mr. Gladwin, Ashcroft, B. C. Please enquire
for them and write to us at once.
Yours truly,
K. O. * Co.
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Victoria,  B. C,
iL    &&-''    / March 15th, 1892.
Hane Esq.,
Dear Sir,
In conformity to your favor of 26th of Feb., per
Mr. Gladwin, Commission Agent, I have shipped to
your order, per steamer "Islander" via Vancouver,
goods amounting with charges and insurance to l$l,»
575.00. I enclose Bill of Lading and Invoice, and will
accept your draft at 6 months to cover the amount. I
have no doubt that you will find the goods satisfactory,
W&they are new and tasteful patterns.
Yours truly,
Hing Tai & Co,
5fc
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*n Cariboo, B. C,
April 18th, 1892.
Mr. Ilasell,
Dear Sir,
In reference to your letter of the 14th inst., I beg
to say that I am in receipt of your drafts on the Bank
of B. C. in favor of Messrs. the Hudson Bay Co. for
$1,000, and that of Mr. Turner for $5,000, the former at
30 days and the latter at 90 days, to which I desire to
draw your attention. I need scarcely add that further
consignments will depend on the result of transactions
already made with you.
Yours very truly,
Beid.
51  S.
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11©   Ftsoard   Street
Victoria, July 29th, 1892.
Miss Smith
BOUGHT OF    KING TAI    «fc    CO.
DEALERS   at
GENTS' AND LADIES' DRY GOODS
1892
June
25
«i
• 4
M
44
tt
i
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July
10
«(
15
1 Ladies' Silk Umbrella
1 Ddz. Gents' Silk Handkerchiefs
5 Yds. Plain Crape, per yd. 90
10 Yds. White Shirting, per yd. 19
4 Yds. Blue Velvet, per yd. $1.75
Cr
By Cash Received
By Mrs. J. Smith
Balance
34
15
19
80
00
80
0
mm
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JP1
16  Government  Street
|P       §§ Victoria, March 30th, 1892.
MRS. WILSON
j||—To Kwong Lee: Yen Dr.i^.T_
DKALEK    IN
FRUIT   AND   VEGJfiTABJLiJKS
April
i13
1892
4
4
5
5
1 Sack Potatoes, 90 lbs. $1.60
10 lbs. Tomatoes, 5c.
5 lbs. Turnips, 5c.
1 Doz. Cabbages, 60c.
2 Doz. Sweet Corn, 40c.
Received Payment
t  v * is
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1
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60
50
25
60
80
1
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31 34t
45 Placard   Street
Victoria, August 25th, 1892.
MR. JOHNSON.
Bo™,* o* -v^DSTG FTHSTG-
DEALER    IN
GROCERIES    AND    PROVISIONS.
July
1892
5 Cases Nut Oil each 72 lbs. $8.25
4 Chests y,s. Tea, each 40 lbs. 25c.
20 Mats Rice each 48 lbs. $78
Received Payment
120
00
&
it
w.
3£
m
£ 348
17   Dupont   Street
Vancouver, August 2nd, 1892.
MK, H. BELL
To TAI  SANG  &  CO. Dr
General Merchants
Aug.
1892
To Provision  Supplies  during  the
month of Jul}T
Received Payment
20
00
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IS   Commenent   Street
Victoria, B.C., July 29th, 1802.
MESSRS. C. P. S. S. CO.
To HONG WO & CO.. Dr.>
Importers and Merchants
April
For short delivery of Partia Opium
shipped from Hong Kong on
Steamship Empress of Japan arrival here being box weight 160
lbs. 40 bales each $12.
480
00
B
+    *
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* *35°
4   Johnson   Street
Vancouver, B.C , Januarv 11th, 1392.
MR. C. FUAK
Jan
To W A H   K E K Dr.
LAUNDRY.
1892
I
i
10
Washing 100 pieces Cloth, per doz. 25
2
04
13
5 White Shirts, per shirt 10
50
13
4 pair Cuffs, per pair;        10
40
14
8 Collars, per doz.              10
8
14
%l       5 Woolen Shirt, per shirt, 10
50
14
1 Night Shirt per shirt,    10
10
14
"     15 Pair Sock, per doz.         10
12
14
If    20 Handkerchiefs, per doz. 25
45
4
19
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NOTICE.
A meeting will be held in the hall of the Chinese
Consulate, Benevolent Association building, next Tuesday, the 5th, at seven p. m., to arrange for a celebration on the birthday of the Emperor of Kwong SuiC^,
Dated June 1st.
ft
This Store
pTO LET
Applyjto Lai Fung & Co.
IS
C. R.,
Secretary. »
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This side up with care.
Please don't lay anything on this parcel.
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Bronsville.
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mmm
±
P3
m
m
toit
^,m±it
SB±S  JPfRH# 3*5
North Arm
Nicomen Island
Natch Hill
♦150 Mile House
Okanagan Mission
Osoyoos Lake
Pavilion Mountain
Parksville
Pavilion
Penticton
Pender Island
Phoenix
Plumper Pass
Popcum
Port Essington
Port Hammond
Port Haney
Port Kells
Port Moody
Princeton
Prevost Island
Quesnell Forks
Quadra
Quamichon
Quilchenna
Revelstoke
Richmond
Riverside
Rock Creek
Rockford
Rogers Pass 1
Robson
Rossland
*vmm
ftm
m
mmm-
m±mm
mmm'
tataur
ikftmm
m.mmhn
nfc&m
mmvc
^Eurm
mmm
grjUfanr Sandon
SardiS
Saunders Harbor
Salmon River
Saanich
Salt Spring Island
Savanas
Sea Island
Semilkameen
Shuswap
Shapland
Sicamous
Sidney Island
Skeena
Skidegate
Snowshoe Creek
Somenos
Spallumacheen
Spalsum
Spences Bridge
Spuzzum
Stanley
Steveston
St. Mary's Mission
Stony Creek
Stump Lake
Sumas
Surrey Centre
Union Mine
Vancouver
Vanwinkle
Van-Anda
Vernon
Ul#±TE
&ffi$B
m&m
irlp^lf'J
mm?
JTrtfit
Tffw
±mm%
i5K±*m®
mm
mmm
MM
®mm
^ECSU^***)'
x&m Z 3^7
Vesuvius JBay
Victoria        ^\%
Warm Spring .Camp
Wellington
Whitf galley
Wharnock
Yale.^E2  °,
Ymir
Nicomen
Galena®
Guichon ^*
Norihfield
Hanceville
HuntiMgdori*
Laclahache
Mission City
Nikomekel  -
Sooke
Sea Island
Shortreed
Soda Creek
Upper Sumas
Westham Island
Windermere
®&m
Mm ip a
m
m±mm
jikmmm
fit
i=t
Tbvjmm
"PJlBflr:
WHflfc
Principal Town Names of Canada.
Alameda  Assi. 5^7^(C^^t   '
Alexander    Man. jg -j\ |i|l$f
Alexandria Ont.lg ^ Ulffi$C
Alg;oma.%   Ont.pg££;
Almonte..  Ont.|
Alton. ?%'. Ont.| Anthracite    Alb..Sp|^JJ^
Apple Hill °aHt$fl£g*fr
Arden    Man.lgifljj|
Arnaud   Man» jSiicflt
Arnprior Ont-Tj&f6jg Y
Arthur 0nt*35^
Athens Ontjljg^        Jfei
Austin Man.|^7ff 3J
Aylmer Ont.lJ[ig&n£
Ayr Ontlg^
Bagot Man.J|r
Balgonie  Assi.Jjlj^^!*^
Banff Alb.ijgfJ
Bantry Alb.i
Barclay. Ont. jfi^5
Barnsley  Man. SJ&lfff|J
Belleville  Ont.J|LfIJ5HJS&
Bowmanville Ont.$fg7ffl|£
Barrie OntE^
Brandon   Man. JjL^SjnUJ
Brockville Ont.^J^^Jj^
Brampton    Ont^JBtS
Berlin  Ont.El@
Brighton Ont.>(Si^@
Brantford. Ont.^JJ^^
Ba&eford   Bask-j^gg,^
Broadview  Assa.yfff}$^[]
Binscarth   Man.;g§lff-fc:fc
Bracebridge  Ont. J^^ljf Jf|^lJJ6
Boissevain  Man.^lftfJOJz;
Chatham Ont ^^     ^
Calgary  Albajg^fIj y^|:
Collingwood  Ont.X^SSF tf>9
Cornwall    Ont.^p5fJJgg-
Cayuga  Ont|nW«
Carleton Place Ont-^^fg^
Coe Hill.. || Ont.^||g£
Charlottetown...P. E. I-^^flJ^
Cooks Mills......... Ont. [Jjj^gf.
Carman..2,  Man.-{c^
Carbury ^  Man.-^^5f|J
Canmore    Alba.^j|^
Cochrane    Alba.f§#j!§i
Cobourg  Ont.I5 |*
Colborne. Ont.X5J§v>jC
Deloraine   Man.^^J^
Dominion City Man-^§S||3c:i&
Dundas  Ont-JFJ-j$[
Drumbo Ont.
Dunmore Assa.fl*^
Emerson   Man.fgg}
Exeter Ont.PHitflf
Edmonton   Alba.lQ]}Jtt§
Embro Ont.flE^
Elora.M  Ont.j&gffli
Fort William Ont.^^i^.
Fredericton N. B.^^fjflfj*
Farnham   Que.|5
Fort McLeod Alba.^J-
Glenboro  Man.fg
Gait Ontf
Guelph  OntJ
Georgetown , Ont. |5[j.?a
Goderich Ont.||:JJ*#?&
GTavenhurst.   .....  ^)T* jffiffijfc
C3
E^ 37°
Gleichen Ala.
Garden River... Ont. JnfS$G
Gull Lake  ..Man.
t&ranby   Que.Jp;
Hamilton Ont.^j^@
High Bluff*, Man.^cS^
Hull ^ue.^||&
Harriston.... Ont.T^lfr
Halifax jf N. S."fJ§»|^"f^
Huntsville   Ont.^fTJf$]gj|
Holland..  Man.^-gg-
Ingersoll Ont. B 31^88'
Kingston     OntEpjlfj ©
Kincardine....^..   Ont.^1^^^
Kemptville ^^^^^ii
Leamington  Ont.^i|v@
London.^  Ont.^^1     ^;
Lethbridge. Alba.^!j±^,J^
Montreal..I.   Que.^S®L:
Milton.... |f.   Ont.#j^j
Medicinejftftt..'.... Assa.^^fj^g^^
Moose-Jaws^..  Assa.^Bl
North Bay|§.V..... Ont.fl5±^|^
^agara..^    Ont^S^M^^
^Srillia. &   0nt-^^^fie^
Ottawa^. Ont.Mffffi    '!q
Oran^ille........  Ont.M#f&$]&
Owen Sound Ont.^PJlpL
Prescott.M....... Ont.M^flf^^
Port |g#ur........ Ont.5^35JF|^
Pe^ifmgh:^..  Ont^ff^4ft(^
J»r||£pfart.,,. ..Sask.21^1^?^ 37*
Portage La Prairie Man.Jj^y^^j
Port Hope.....  Ont.^gg
PerthK... - Ont lEi     ^|
Quebec  Que.^Ijf^
Sudbury   Ont. j^EfO
Stratford  Ont.-jffJJ^
Selkirk  Man.^^
Sarnia I Ont. Jj>j^
Smith's Falls Ont.^$gftg£
St. John N. B.^j'
St; Johns  |f...Nfd.f[I]|
St. John's... t Que.fjlj;
Sherbrooke.. ss   Que-^S^ffT5|i
Simcoe. g|s....   Ont.Hft
St. B^^ithe,...... Que. fll|>tcfllj^ 'h
St Thomas Ontf^i
Sandwich Ont$JS%
Saultlte. Marie Ont.#f^lJf^|j(]|f |J
Simcoe    Ont^^
Streetsville   Ont.*jffjffl?ljffl8t
Sharbat Lake Ont.^^21
Stonewall  Man.f|r|5[^nSS'
Shelburne Ont^8§^     '&
Iwift Current.... ..Assa.Tff^TO^fBB
Southampton... ^... Ont.^fi^tH.[.
Stanstead .'^'. Que.Tff SlTfT12J kg
St Catherines.?.. ..Ont. f[Iil^fl"i®
Starbrldge ?... Que.Tff^g^lJ fe
Rat Portage........ Ont. $\$fjfe
Renfrew  OntjH^'
RidgetownS   Ont. ^Ijffi
Riviere du Loupe—Que• 5§pf!lfij'UiK Regina Assa*?prjyfc
Richmond Que.^fJ
Red Deer Ala.®
Toronto °nt ffilBffi
Winnipeg  Man.j~ffi<
Woodstock Ont. jM* rf| j
Dawson .  J. T.;£ g
Hunker J. T.^^g
White-Horse      .   ..J. T.^pJ-fc
n m 1 £
Principal Cities and Towns in the United States.
Atlanta      IdaaonH^^
Austin Nev.^T^f^
Aubrey         .. Ara. tniijUf t|
Alma Ark.pg{g.^|
Arkadelphia Ark^^i^g}^
Augusta   Ark jg|g"ffj
Alamosa..    ^^SSS&^H
Aspen Col^fgr^
Amonito Col .jpjfljijfcjfi
Ashford Conn.jjjTfjjpjJI} _
Aberdeen  Dak.fjt'EJ^
Alexandria ^a^-®^-§fl"-
Ashton    Dak.jjgTff^f
Athol   Dak.n@^j^
Anacortes  Wash..||^|g
Anatone  Wash. j||^|!|
Asotin Wash. ?g 4j£g|
Albany    0re^8£*$C
Astoria     |    i^Ttfj^lJ
Airlie. 373
Alvord  Ore,
Ashland  u
Arlington  £
Acton  "
Albina  "
Auburn  ".
Aurora  "
Alameda  Cal.Jg^C^Jfe
Adin	
Alturas. *	
Anaheim  "
Antioch..  |
Arbuckle  1
Areata.............. "
Arroyo ,   •"
Aburn ,.*.... "
Azusa  I
Applachicola   *')>'-tt$!!Efr*5$l
Atlanta    Ga.pg^JtJi
Abingdon  ™-ll||^j<g
Albion  " ifiifcH
Alton   " P@£g.®
Astoria      " 1&1$&W
Atlanta  0 Ifj^ift
Attica   Ind.Pg^g^
Auburn      " J3^
Aurora       " M^afQ
Atoka Ind.  Terr. IgjigJg
Adel Iowa.
Atlantic     "
Abilene    Kas.
Atchison        ....-*.    I
a
u
m
-$mmk
m%m
_ » 374
Adair^lle  Ken.Jg^f|]f§gg.
As|land     j?   ^MJk
Mexandria La-fe>&Ul^f !)
Unburn   Me.^^K
^^ugusta,     |   jg$nfft|L
" Ayer   Mass. B|Si^
Attoi | w%m
Macron OhioJ^M"
"" Ashland  ?    ®&lfi1fc
.^gpUegheny Pa.i£®k#C
' i®*^  1 3Sfi8c
pentown....   |    5rl^f!l
Midenreid   g    J0C||#J
Austin   Texas-3g."rff$p
American Fork UtahRafe^plJ'f^ffiS
A^leton   wis||3>^@
Ahnapee  Wis. jj£ jji$|L
^?p||3pena;.,.:   MicLu^&j^^r
^| Ipftii Arbor   |    g| j£ E
Austin..,.    Minn.^j£"fjfg|
|||gHka   |    Jlffj j§t
^bert Lea |    ||JglJ$
jjl^p:...  |    pg^
Aberdeen    Miss-¥Jiii'Jfe
|Asfc|Grove  Mo.^fffgfcgfll
Ava.  (j    If^D
Amsworth. Neb.^^PJ^
Austin Nev.^Tff^
||iftury Park N. J. fl^^MS
Albuquerque ... N. Mex. P^^^^.
&S&P7 N-'Y-5SB'S8t
Alleghany N. Y.]g$§]j£$r Albion....
Auburn...
.... N. Y.gg^i
375
Bangor   Dak.J^
Bismarck I    JjLTfji
Brookings    *    M%%
Burdette    |   #MlWJ
Blackfoot   Idaho^ |J$jJ
Boise City  j    ^Tff^ifll
Belleville    111.
Belvidere |    $tf&\
Benton   |   i§lf
Bloomington   IH.^TtS^@
Braidwood   "    -^ijjlf
Bushnell  "    ^±$CS8'
Bedford   Ind.^J^
Bloomfield "   JfiJgi}ft%t
Bloomington "    ^TH^ig
Bluffton  "   JEWit f
Boonville  "   #Jffl&§
Brazil  g   J^g£*t
Bedford .   Iowai^^
Bloomfield "   ^HJffKr
B6one  |    #%£
Burlington   "    E^@^
Blaine  Wash.Jp$|$e
Baker City  Ore.||2g^ift
Brownsville   |   ^T^5fflK
Beaverton.   |   jfcBfg
Bakersville   Cal.a^^^g-
Benicia  §   ,^^j§t
Berkley....*„*>.-.. "   ^fcfj    Jfe
Bodic |  «    jfcgL
Bridgeport  ^gJ^J^^C 376
Bel Green   Ala.
Birmingham    "
Bisbee  Arza.
Batesville    Ark.
Benton ville	
Berry ville	
Bald Mountain Col
Boulder	
Bonanza	
u
a
It
a
Breckenridge
a.
a
&m*~i
mft&iif*
a
a
Buena Vista	
Bridgeport Conn
Brooklyn    "
Beliot  Kas.
Burlingame	
Burlington	
Bardstown    Ky.
Baton Rouge La.
Bellevue "
Bangor  Me.
Belfast |
Bath 	
Bristol 	
Biddeford |
Baltimore   Md.
Bel Air "
Barnstable     Mass.
Beverley "
Boston  "
Brighton |
Brocton    "
Bay City    "
Battle Creek Mich.
p
E^-l
%m
n
S*"
a
a
E±
*B5PJ
!&m-$M Big Rapids Mich.g|jg£j£
Blue Earth City .. Minn.^fj Jg3g±3^jfi,
Braincrd |   JJL)|l|||
Bay St Louis  Miss ^3fcSdt
Brookhaven |   ^tfiffcfc
Bethany Mo.^Jjfcf I]
Bolivar *   t*S&S5
Boonville,  *   #ffll&
Butler    "   jjft|p
Beatrice Mont tj&j^-^
Blair "    Jp.^
Belmont , Nev.^lj^USj
Bayonne' N. J. J^L^fe
Bridgetown     f   ^[JfellJ
Bernalillo N. Mex.^gg.=g>
Ballston N. Y. J^S§TflT@
Batavia    "   #fc_@.$|
Belmont    I   J^^^U
Binghampton     "    j^j^tllf
Brooklyn       «    -flfjjyf
Buffalo      "    $fc^]
Brockport       |    ^J&gfc
Belief ontaine O.   JfLgfr|j%£j
Bellaire " |!^K^
Bucyrus   |    ff jlpp^t
Bethlehem -... Pa.J&J^ft
Bradford   '"    ^^
Bloomsburgh "    ^fil^llfc h
Bristol R. TJ^.^Tp^ilS'
Bolivar Tenn.#|£fg
Box Elder UtaM#±i£!&flr
Bennington"  Vt.^inH]
Burlington      %    E^H
377 Black Riter Falls. \ Wi*^|(|$£l$SH&
Beloit ........ £  "   ^^
Bariboo t    EHH
Cheney .. v Wasll-Jl^fc,
^Wax       I   Wk^±
Colville .r,   "   *5&7HMfr
Coupeville      |    P^Effi^
Cascades .:    I   ffrfr)^
Canyon City ®™'W&M
Centerville     «    %^WBk
Corvalis     "   Hc?ffi$±
Cambria' Cal.fjjjj^jfc
Chico I    3fL?j
coiusa H jijjgjgf
Crescent City -    tt^JK^C*
Clayton    ^   Ala <tfs^f£f&
Camden "    |RfS
Clarendon  "   j5p$aSM
Conway "   Iff g
Canon City Co^fMk^M-
Central City  *    3fc*&»3cJ|&
Colorado Springe .... « -^^fgTjfJfc^
Castlewood * Dak. jjq |fj'J§J§!F
Canton   |    jggjg
Columbus "    ^^flf^
Challis Idaho^jjfcjfc
Cairo - ™#fc&
Centralia  "    jfcjp
Chester  "    J3jff JJ
Chicago 1    7ff-fc8fc
Clinton «    fj^gg
Columbus  Ind.J^^^i
Crawfordsville     «   ^llf&jlf 37*
Carroll  I°wa~|c5|iSfr
Council Bluffs «    ^TtfS^ii#
Cedar Rapids « | HffffiJSfl
Creston ............"    #^lf I§|
Clay Centre Kas^^1ll|fT
Concordia "    (ff Vjjfc
Calais Me.-jU^ljf
Cambridge      Md. ^JJJ^L^fJ^
Cumberland "    TllB*m?
Cambridge  Mass.jjjj£l^l
Cambridge Port .... "
Charlestown   "
Chelsea j    ^^|H
Cheboygan Mich.^j^^Ji
Coldwater   "    25&4P$T
Canton   Miss.^i
Columbus "
Carthage  Mo-J|£"?fl Jp
Chillicothe 1    $5&*5?l]
Columbia  §   X5^||i|L
Crete   1    Neb.^^
Carson     Nev.-j^ii:
Camden  N. J. fjjfff
Catskill    N. Y.^%^^
Coruing     "    fFfSft
Cortland |    V$$k
Canton ...   O'tH1®
Chillicothe |    ^gg^Jfl]
Cincinnati      "    1ll|fl5ifc=
Circleville "
Cleveland |    jjq:
Columbus |    Vjtf^M± —
i&O
Ohambersburgh Pa.lgQ]^ k
Carlisle «    ^ft-ftf)
Chester     "    Jg^TgfU"
Charlestown S. C.J^s^ff)j||J
Columbia  "    25ff|^i
Chattanooga ..... Tenn.R^JS
Corpus Christi  .... Tex.P^^"^f^"j^i
Colorado  "    Wj^£ffi
Cuero   v    f§»;jl£
Charlestown   W. Va. ^^Tfif^ill
Chippewa Falls.... wis-^25ffl5$|fr
Cheyenne  Ky -^jg^
Dayton   ^asn-j^lM
Dallas  Ore.^1^    f^
Downieville     Cal^&?ffil|
Dadeville  ... Cal.^gj^
Decatur     xla'S&tfMfT
Denver Col.^E
Del Norte ••••-  "    it&S&fft
Burango     "    ftggjift
Danbury  Conn. JU.m Jtf
Derby , "   fl"^
Deadwood  Dak.jEtj|£
Doyei ...  Del.ffiig
Danville  Vl-ftffifc
Decatur    "   jfcgff
Dixon | • " Jfi.#
Davenport  *owa*fl*B?p}C
Des Moines  *   J|7ftffi±
Dubuque   "    ffiJS®
Del Monte  Cal.^gg^J
Dodge City Kas ^&$gj$
BunvilW it.......... Ky.^7$$^ Dedham    Mass.|£^
Detroit   Micn-itfiffif§t
Duluth   Minn.^gg.-f.
Dover N. H.'gjJE
Durham N. C."JT^jt
Dayton   °-§M|[
Delaware   °-ifc^5ffl
Danville  Pa.^QjJg.
Dallas Tex.;J]^7ff
^nis°n i #&#
Ellinsburgh  Wash.^f^ [*
East Clallam     "    ^TfTjqj
Everett "    J^E^lJ
Eugene City   Ore.pgflg^jg
Empire City "    {g|g£ Y £S&
East Portland |    ^"iffSfc^
El Dorado     ^l^^^.MU
Eureka "    ^fljjg
Eureka Springs ... Ark.^f|]jg/jff &<$*
Elk Point  ,  Dak.^^J]
East St. Louis ini^^f3fc®±
Elgin       «    %$&ft
Englewo#      "    Pij&if
Elkhart      Ind|li]i§
Evansville     "    ^7b^P^^| >
Frederick "    #$1JTJS!
Fitchburg     Mass. tl$j^ [*
Fall River     "    7$S&?£E     '
Flint   Mieh.^^ ^;
Fergus Falls ....  Minn.^jg-J-.^j
Fulton  Mo-H3S&@
Fort Benton IMoiit.^^^g
Fremont ^eD-Jft^fi
38i jpasppsan
ffl^Wffl?!
Fayetteville N. C.^jft$Uft
Fremont . -  O.JJJj
Franklin      ^a,4fcl
Fort Worth Tex.^£|-f-
Fond du Lac Wis.^JJjlgg
Goldendale      Wash.jgU^jfg.
Gilroy  Cal.g^fc
Grafts Valley    " I Sfc^
Greenville      |    fifc^lfllSfr
Gadsden Ala. ^ rfl J^
Globe Ariz.#r;gf£.
Georgetown  Col.^^flJ
Gunnison     "   $^Jfe^
Grafton  Dak. g(^ft*gj
Grand Forks    c:    §jj$!£$§
C^ena     niJMEtifc
Galesburgh     «    j^frjtf J*
Greencastle   Indf|^^"fllKr
Goshen     *    ^"ffif^
Garnett  Kas.^^
Girard     "    J|]g|
Gloucester Mass-$^?pTflU
Greenfield      |   ftfcJI^gg.
Grand Haven .... Mich.gJr^^J^
Grand Rapids ..... | jjjj^|JJ?l]
Glendive ..-...,...  Mont j^^j&ljj
Grand Island &eb. gjr:
Genoa Nev.fij
Glen Falls N.'Y. $r$gftfy£§■
Gainesville   ,.  Tex.^f|f5fp^
Galveston     "   *I&$DflW§
Green Bay Wis. jj^jjljfc
(Jree^i River City... Ky.g£>§^E3^ife
mm Hippner     Ore.
Haywards       Cal ffajUf^fc
Hollister        |    #J&fjrJT
Healdsburg     I    fjfcj&lff £
Hoodsport      11|Jg^ffik
Humboldt     Nev$tlS#
Hawthorne       "    ^ifjjj,
Hailey    Idabo^;fl)
Houston Tex.Bf|7ff|g
Helena Mont .^^^r
Harrisburg    PaT^!]7|f h
Hartford     Conn.^^
Hot Springs  Ark-JUf'TfTpJ'^
Huron      Dak.^|0
Hyde Park m->MS
independence Cal. HSS[^T*t§
lone    "§i£ll
Ithaca    N. YjEflflg
Indianapolis   Ind.0^lg^ff|
Irwin  Cal. ]£;£;
Idaho City Idaho^^^^jft
Iowa City IowaJ^Uffl&ft
Jacksonville       0TeJ^^fflHk
Jackson Cal.j^^
Jefferson City Mo.^^^^flft
Jackson     Mich.jr^^lp
Jersey City N. J.^H^^
Jamestown   N. Y.^J*"jffj||]
Johnstown Pa -;&T|| jill
Kalama Wash. §£4^^
Kerby   0re'^5i^
Kansas City  M°|£&;Tff^illi
Kingston    N. YfcgTjf$jg
•  183 3?4
mm
3f&
DO
Linkville ...... Ore.5)
Lebanon        "
Lakeport Cal.
Los Angeles      |
Livermore      "
Leadville Col.^lJ^PSS-
Lincoln Neb.jUJPJjljl
Leavenworth      Kas.^pr^iiSi
Louisville   Ky.ffdbffiSS'
Lansing     Mich.j^^
Lafayette  Ind.^#^(J^
Lynn Mass.jjj|]g|
Lowell     «   %%S&
Long Branch .... N. Y.BB#K^&
Laredo   Tex.$jlf !]g£
Lexington   Ky.JM^II
La Crosse     Wis.2j£P;^iii
Little Rock   Ark.^lJS&Jg-
Laramie City Wy.flj^l]§|^Jft
Montaseno Wash.$[§
Mt Vernon        |    fgjgf^
Medford    Ore.^c^
Marysville     Cal.R^ijflJK'
Merced     "    jll^
Modesto ..    "    0J^3SL
Monterey      U   ItfJ^
Milton     |    /gE£fg
Montpelier •    Vt$?|3$j*
Mobile Ala.j5gfii|
Montgomery .......    "    ffi|®£|fl]
Muscatine IowaJSiS^
Marquette  Mich.jjg=§$J
U!tfneapolis * Minn,
3 3*5
pa
fa&H
Milwaukee  Wis
Madison Wis.^£^[j
Muskegan  ....... Mich.^^^
Morristown N. Y.^^|J"||fj||j
Maysville K*M1$fflm
Moscow ... i   IdahojjjH^iJj
New Dungeness .. Wash.^^^^j^
Napa City  Cal.^gC^^
Nevada City |   Cal.fRg]j&^Jfe
Norfolk  .  Neb.Sftjfg
Newport .......... Ark.'If'^K
New Albany   Ind.
Newton Kas.
Newport Ky.
New Orleans     La.
New Bedford .... Mass.
Newbury Port     "
New Ulm Minn.
Nebraska City .... Neb.^^^TtfJ&^ffi
New Haven ...... Conn. f^fttjQ
Norwich     "
New York ..... N. Y.
New Burgh-     "
Newark  N. J.
Norwalk O. ffjj
Norristown     Pa.^L^IJj|lJ
Newcastle      "   ^JpTtHSS
Nashville ........ Tenn.^"if|$]H
Norfolk .,  Va.fftil
Olympia ... ♦ Wash.-H^pJ^
Oregon City  OreMffiwffcM
Ontario  Cal. j||j^^
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Ozark  Ark.JjL^g
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Ottawa   In-J|IT$J
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Owatonna   Minn.J|^@^C*
Omaha Neb.^.Jglff
Oswego .
Oil City Pa. <g$I&3fcife
Ogden City Utah^fg
Oshkosh  Wis.Ji^f£5"uT
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Port Townsend .. Wash.#fc|| Ji[§
Port Angeles .... Wash.$K|3?£8S'
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Pendleton       |   >j*£§-f|
Petaluma   Cal.^^,^C||
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Pine Bluff Ark.#%4|H+
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Pierre Dak.ffif ||
Peoria   l»-!fe?lj
Princeton   Ind.^jjTjfifl
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Plymouth        f    ^M^±
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Palmyra Mo.^/^C^
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Pensacola Fla.# E3^f f Poughkeepsie .... N. Y.^ggjR
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Quincy Cal.ggg
Quincey .HLgBJ
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Searcy ...... Ark. ^"fjf
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Springfield  Hl.TO^Sfr
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Sioux City  Iowa-fH:^
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Schenectady   N. Y."j^{|j^$rj)||
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Vallejo     Cal.$]f|Jgl
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vifgillia I1L5ffl«ifc
Valparaiso Ind ffll£&W?!l#
Vinton Iowa^^
Virginia City Nev.^Jg^r^ifc
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Whatcom ....... Wash.:JgflJ
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Wichita      "   Sfel*.
Winfield     "    £^C^
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Wooster "    fflrfc-IT
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Winchester    "    ^JeL^X'
Wilkesbarre «   ^^^M
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Wheeling Va.ff^
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Wansan      1    ^9 Jf
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Yakima   «..  Wash.;
Yreka   Cal.^flJ^g
Yuba ....   «   ^B
Yankton    Dak.fffg
Yates Centre Kas. ^^flT
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Chinese Telegraphic Code.
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25 Dupont St. jH{£    Wt
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127  PENDER  ST.,  E.
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P. O. BOX 290
VANCOUVER, B. C.
LEE KEE,  MGR.
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