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Annual report of Immigration Agents, British Columbia British Columbia 1884

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Array REPORTS
OF
IMMIGRATION   AGENTS
AT
VICTORIA   AND   NEW   WESTMINSTER,
BRITISH   COLUMBIA,
FOR   THE
YEAR   1883.
VICTORIA: Printed by Richard Wolfenden, Government Printer,
at the Government Printing Offioe. James' B>>v
1884.
r«
V The University of British Columbia Library
THE
CHUNG
COLLECTION
WM
ft
I
I REPORTS
•F
IMMIGRATION  AGENTS
AS
VICTORIA  AND  NEW  WESTMINSTER,
BRITISH  COLUMBIA,
NX  THE
YEAR  1883.
VICTORIA: Printed by Richard Wolfesdbs, Government Printer,
at th* Government Printing Office, Jamas' Bay.
1684.
SI
M
.•. -_'-    **'■> . _  ■" i" ' !'■,_':i.-   .        -^  47 Vic.
IMMIGRA3!I0N REPORTS.
295
To the Honou/rable Clement Francis Cornwall,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia:
May it please Your Honour:
The   undersigned has the  honour to present the Pirst Annual Reports of the Immigration Agents at Victoria and New "Westminster, British Columbia, for the year, 1883.
I have the honour to be,"
Sir,
Your obedient servant
JNO ROBSON
Minister of Agriculture
Victoria, 21st January, 1883. I 47 Vic. Immigration Reports. 297
REPORT
Immigration Office, Victoria,
29th December, 1883.
Sir:
In my report to your Department of 31st July last (Appendix A), a concise account
was given of work done in the immigration Office during the three months ending 30th June;
also, the approximate number of immigrants that arrived in the Province from 1st January to
that date.
Continuing that report, I beg to state that up to September 25th, ■when I was instructed to
examine a portion of Vancouver Island from the Sooke settlement along the railway reserve,
•there were 185 visits to the office, the ratio of trades and professions being nearly in the
same proportion as that enumerated in the above-mentioned report. The same may be said of
the nationalities of these new arrivals. In November and December visits again increased
considerably.
As the summer advanced there was a slight falling off in the number of immigrants arriving in the Province. A very decided change also took place in the line of route as the Northern
Pacific railroad approached completion. After this event took place, the daily boat from ports
on the Sound did a large proportion of the passenger traffic, whieh earlier in the year was performed by the San Francisco steamers. fcl|tf
After making due allowance for general travel, the v immigration from 1st July to 20th
instant, was—Whites, 3,350 ; Chinese, 1,335. Those, added to the figures for first half-year
(2,500), make a total of 5,850 whites. Arrivals from 20th to'end of year, certainly number
over a hundred, so that 6,000 whites have been added to the population of the Province during
1883. Of Chinese, there were approximately 1,325,'who arrived from 1st July to 20th December. These, added to 1,622 for former half-year, make 2,957. As there have been a few
arrivals since 20th instant, the increase of the Chinese element during the year has been in
round numbers 3,000. From all sources, therefore, immigration foots up about 9,000 for the
year just expired.    The value of settlers' effects entered at the Custom House is $35,424.
Inquiries for information by letter are still numerous from Provinces east of the mountains, many of the States, Great Britain, Northern Europe, Australia, New Zealand, China,
Japan and South Africa. Those indicate very strongly that next Spring and Summer will
witness a large influx of population of a desirable character to this Province.
Neaily the whole edition of the hand-book published last Spring has been distributed. Also,
about 2,000 copies of "West.Shore," published two and-a-half years ago, devoted exclusively
to British Columbia and profusely illustrated. Besides the above, several hundred copies of the
essay on Vancouver Island, by Dr. Forbes, It. N., and printed twenty years ago, have been
put in circulation. Descriptions, of the physical features of the Island, which of course remain
unaltered, are very excellent in this pamphlet, as well as those of forest trees, shrubs, animals,
birds, &c, &c. To parties seeking information about the Island exclusively, this has been of
considerable value. Maps of New Westminster, Nicola and Thompson River, part of
Osoyoos district and the south-eastern districts of Vancouver Island have also been supplied to
those seeking lands in these localities. In the Spring and early Summer a number of Mr. A.
C. Anderson's appendices to Directory, and Chittenden's " Guide to British Columbia " were
likewise supplied to parties abroad seeking information about this Province. From month to
month, the "Resources," an excellent magazine published in this City, has been mailed to
where they would likely be of service. These and all other publications have been forwarded,
in considerable numbers, to the Agent for the Province in London, as well as the . High Commissioner in that City, and Agencies in Paris, Liverpool and elsewhere. Last month 430
copies of new edition of British Columbia Directory were mailed to Mechanics' Institutes,
Young Men's Christian Associations and Reading Rooms in Ontario, Y. M. C. A.'s in Quebec,
New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Manitoba. Also, to over fifty Y. M. C. A.'s
in the States. Fifty copies were forwarded to Mr. Beeton, the Agent in London, and ten to
Mr. deKnevctt, in Paris. Universities, Colleges, Normal Schools and other seats of learning
in the Dominion were also supplied with this book. As it was made much more attractive
than the original edition, and interspersed with excellent wood-cuts, it cannot but be of great
service to the Province, and supplies, in part at least, a want that has long been felt in many
places from, which immigrants are likely to be drawn.
More than five hundred letters have been written in reply to correspondents during the
nine months that have elapsed since the establishment of this agency,   As a Government 298-
Immigration Reports.
1883
Labour Exchange, the office has been doing considerable business. A large number of people
have been put in the way of obtaining employment. Parties wishing to sell their farms have
also been enabled to do so to persons coming to the country and seeking improved homesteads.
Domestic Servants.
The demand for female domestic servants is very pressing, the supply having been and
still remaining almost nil. At one time during the Summer there were about fifty applications
at wages varying from $1-2 to $25 per month. Some fifteen residents of this City expressed
their willingness to contribute $100 each for the purpose of bringing good domestic servants
from the country villages and districts of Ontario, and running all risks of obtaining a refund,
by monthly instalments, after their arrival. This question of importing good servant girls,
with or without Government aid, is one well worthy of favourable consideration, and might be
carried out with mutual benefit to housekeepers and servants.
Immigrant Sheds.
The question of immigrant sheds was touched upon in my report of 30th June, and I beg
again to call attention to the pressing necessity for the immediate erection of suitable buildings
in this City. Last Spring and Summer the want of accommodation for new arrivals was
severely felt, and very early next season this want is certain to be of tenfold greater magnitude. Hotels and boarding houses for nearly twelve months past have been taxed to the
utmost in making provision for the wants of immigrants and the travelling public. Nor is it
at all likely that this pressure will be relieved in the future, notwithstanding that hotel accommodation has nearly doubled within the. past few months. Everything indicates a heavy tide
of immigration next Spring and Summer. Representatives of numerous families as well as
neighbourhoods in various parts of the Eastern Provinces, several of the States and from the
Old Country, are already in British Columbia, and have located Government lands in New
Westminster District, the Upper Country and Vancouver Island, and are only waiting for the
incoming season for their families and friends to join them. When these people arrive, even
if the outlay could be afforded, the chances are that the hotels will not be able to accommodate
them. Hence the imperative necessity for immigrant sheds, so that families can be sheltered
for a few days after landing. Several communications have reached this office expressing the
hope that such accommodation will be provided here, so that slender means may be husbanded
in order to make a fresh start in life in a new country. In view of these facts, I would
respectfully suggest that the Local Government, as well as the City Council, do all they possibly
can to strengthen the hands of our representatives at Ottawa in securing a suitable grant for
this purpose, and thus place Victoria on the same footing as Halifax, St. John, Quebec,
Toronto, Winnipeg and other Cities east of the Rocky mountains.
DWELLING-HOUSES.
The scarcity of dwelling-houses has also been severely felt. Several families rave been
obliged to go to New Westminster and Nanaimo, and not a few to Seattle, Portland and e^e-
where from sheer inability to secure houses of any description in Victoria. Unless prorerty
holders bestir themselves and erect a large number of medium sized tenements with as little
delay as possible, this loss to the City will be much intensified next Spring and Summer. The
demand for residences is sure to increase as Spring advances, and as house property is paying
largely, and will continue to do so for some years to come, it is to be hoped that the supply
will keep pace with the requirements of a fast and steadily increasing population.
Office Accommodation.
Perhaps it is not necessary, in view of the early transfer of the immigration biTea'i in this
City to the Dominion, to again refer to the want of better office accommodation. Rooms
should be provided large enough to exhibit properly and to advantage, specimens cf farm and
ether produce from various parts of the Province. The advantages accruing from such
exhibits cannot be over-estimated. A small sack of wheat of last year's growth, which was
kindly forwarded to the Immigration Office by Mr. J. F. Hawks, of Soda Creek, has been
admired and favourably commented on by several hundred people since April last, and has
done a great deal in creating good impressions of the agricultural capabilities of the vast
interior of the Province. fjii|?$ 47 Vic. Immigration Reports. 299
Dominion Immigration Agency.
That arrangements for establishing a Dominion Agency here are made none too soon is
evidenced by the number of bonus certificates already in. the Province, issued by the London,
Liverpool and Belfast Agencies. Parties holding these certificates are constantly arriving.
Some of them have been here for several months and are clamoring for payment. They can
scarcely be made to understand why the money should not be forthcoming on demand, as they
were promised it would be at the Agencies from which the certificates were issued.
Agriculture.
During the month of July 1,600 circulars and forms (see Appendix B) were mailed to
farmers' addresses throughout the Province, as found in the Directory and Voters' List of 1883.
Farmers were thus solicited to forward samples of produce for exhibition here and at Ottawa;
and also to give such information respecting the agricultural capabilities of their several districts as would enable the Department to formulate a report on the agricultural and grazing
resources of the Province for presentation to the Legislature. J The response to this appeal was
so limited as to prevent" much being done in this direction. But in justice to those who did
comply with the request, the- following list is appended:—
Victoria Districia—Robert F. John, M. P. P., G. A. Knight.
Esquimalt District—Nil.
Cowichan District—Nil.
Nanaimo District—Alex. Kennedy, Alex. Shaw.
Comox District—Nil.
New Westminster District-1—Thos. Turner, S. Miller, Wm. Scratchley, W. J. Gossett,
McMyn Bros., John Maxwell, S. Brighouse, Cory S. Ryder, S. Greer.
Yale District—C. M. Beak, J. B. Greaves, Wm. McLeod, Thos. M. Hamilton, Thos.
Schawtz, H. D. Green-Armytage, Fred'k Brent, A. Lamie, Marcellen Michaud, R. M. Woodward, W. H. Clarke, Henry Nicholson.
Lillooet District—Nil.
Cariboo District—Heniry Yates, A. Isnardy, R. A. Collins, Charles B. Eagle.
Kootenay District—Rev. Father Fouquet.
Cassiar District—Nil.
Considerable valuable information has been supplied by several of the above-named gentlemen, a synopsis of which will be found in Appendix C, together with Mr. Henry Nicholson's'
letter from Osoyoos in full, and that of Mr. John McMyn of North Arm of Fraser River.
While it is to be regretted that statistical information, agricultural and grazing, has been so ]
meagre, yet returns that have come to hand show that both farming and stock-raising in this
Province pay uncommonly well. The value of produce represented by the twenty-eight gentlemen who responded to the circular last Autumn, for three forms contained only explanatory
matter without returns, is $36,798, an average of a fraction over $1,314. In stock they
represent $173,169. It must be remarked, however, in this connection, that one firm of stock-
raisers who reported from the Mainland represents $125,000 in cattle and horses.
It would have been interesting, and of great value statistically, if an approximation could
nave been made of the value and acreage of each crop raised last season in the Province, as
well as the number of head and value of stock. Data, however, is not sufficient this year as
only about one in fifty of the farmers and stock-raisers sent in returns. It is to be hoped that
next season's returns will prove ample for such a purpose. The fact cannot be too widely
known among settlers in all parts of the Province that these statistics are indispensably
necessary in order to note the progress made from year to year. It is a mistaken notion to
suppose that these returns are of an inquisitorial nature. The aggregate under each head
only is required annually, so that the people may ascertain from time to time what substantial
improvement has been made. This most desirable information can only be secured by furnishing the Government with returns similar to those asked for in July last.
•4)
Island Lands.
Although the ^neral character of Vancouver Island is rocky and mountainous, yet there
are numerous val S- o of greater or lesser extent admirably adapted for agricultural purposes.
These, as a rule, are covered with timber of various descriptions, which of itself is becoming r
300
Immigration Reports.
1883
valuable Numerous grassy swamps and meadows, however, are found here and there, which,
when drained and brought, under cultivation will make excellent farms. Alder and maplebot-
toms are also met with, and in some localities fern patches, from a few roods to many acres in
extent.
From a personal examination of Sooke, Cowichan and Alberni Districts in September and
October last, under instructions from your Department, and report thereon, I beg to make the
following summary:—
Back of the Sooke settlement there are several thousand acres well worth looking
after, both for farming purposes and lumbering. In the vicinity of Sooke Lake a few good
pre-emption claims may also be found. A large portion of the wide-spreading district of
Cowichan is yet available for settlement. At the head of Alberni Canal there is a valley
about six miles in length from east to west, and nearly four from nprth to south, a large proportion of which will make excellent farms. Between Englishman's River and Qualicum,
twenty miles, there are a number of swamps and valleys that might easily be brought under
cultivation; the same remark applies to the country from Qualicum to Comox. Extensive
areas of desirable land are known to exist north of Comox, in the Salmon and Campbell River
Districts, and towards the northern part of the island, as well as in many other localities.
Inducements for settling on the East Coast lands are now immeasureably greater than
ever before. ■ Not only is the railway reserve virtually taken off, but the land is available to
actual settlers at the nominal price of one dollar per acre—an important concession secured
by the Local Government under the Settlement Act. In addition to this, the construction of
the railroad from Victoria to Nanaimo, with the probability of an early extension to the Comox
coal fields, will remove all isolation from every settlement now existing, or likely to be made,
for many miles west of the line of route, besides creating an exceptionally good market for all
kinds of farm produce. The demand for labour, skilled and unskilled, which the prosecution of
this work will bring about, will give hundreds of intending settlers a chance of earning money,
while at the same time they will have an opportunity of selecting locations for themselves and
friends,
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
JOHN JESSOP,
Immigration Agent at Victoria.
Hon. John Robson, Minister of Agriculture,
<&c, &c, <Scc.
APPENDIX A.
Immigration Office, Victoria,
31st July, 1883.
Sir:
I have the honour to forward, for your information, a synopsis of work done in this office
and the visits made during the first three months of its establishment, ending 30th June:
together with the approximate number of Immigrants that have arrived in the Province for
six months to that date:— 47 Vio.
Immigration Reports.
801
Passengers arrived at Port of Victoria from 1st January to 30th June, 1883.
FtTGET
30T7ND.
,«->^   San Francisco.
Portland.
Whites.
Chinese.
Cabin.
Steerage
Total
Whites.
Chinese.
Cabin.
Steerage
Total
Whites.
240
229
581
625
729
540
25
24 .
22
15
33
41
81
73
138
206
206
154
42
34
359
427
' 134
130
1,126
123
107
497
633
340
284
399
712
351
2
1
6
35
14
2
1
80
69
13
8
3
1
86
104
May	
27
10
2,944
160
858
1,984
1,462
60
171
231
Taking
20
Total—Whites, 5,159; Chinese, 1,622.
per cent, of Puget Sound passengers to this city; 50 per cent, of cabin
passengers from San Francisco and Portland, and 90 per cent, steerage passengers as new i
arrivals, the increase of white population from immigration for six months ending 30th June,
is 2,031. Add to this a probable 500 railroad carpenters, labourers, and others shipped direct
from San Francisco to New Westminster by steamship " Victoria"; and at least 2,500 white
immigrants have arrived in the Province during the first half of the year. A considerable
percentage of these have left, after a short stay, from various causes, chiefly through
inability to obtain Dominion lands in New Westminster District; but, nevertheless, the
permanent accession to our population must have been fully 2,000.
Visits to Immigration Office from April 1st to June 30th, 1883:—April, 152; May, 145;
June, 81; Total, 378.
Of these 129 were from Ontario; 36 from Manitoba; 34 from Eastern States; 27 from
England; 27 from California; 22 from Quebec; 15 from Scotland; 13 from New Brunswick;
12 from Nova Scotia; 10 from Germany; 9 from Sweden and Norway; 9 from Oregon and
Washington Territory; 6 from Prince Edward Island; 3 from Ireland; and 2 from Italy.
The rest, 24 in number, are from various other places.
An analysis of the above as to trade and profession, shows that 159 were farmers enquiring
after lands; 55 of the mechanics were also seeking land; 8 were looking for stock ranges; the
remainder were in search of employment, and in most cases were directed to where it could
be obtained. The classification is as follows:—21, labourers; 12, axemen; 8, machinists; 15,
clerks, or accustomed to mercantile life; 6, millwrights; 5, masons; 4, coal miners; 3 in each
of the following trades: fishermen, millers, teachers, engineers, and painters; 1 in each of the
following: plasterers, tinsmiths, blacksmiths, waggon-makers, harness-makers, and telegraph
operators.
Many of the new arrivals were representative men with considerable money at their
command. They were not only heads of families, but deputed to ascertain the prospect for
farmers in the Province, the facilities for obtaining land, and the price and quality of it, with
a view of others following them from their respective neighbourhoods. The reports of several
have gone east, as I am informed, with very favourable representations as to the climate,
resources, and soil of such districts as they visited; particularly those of New Westminster
and East Coast. But the discouraging fact of the lands not being in the market and the uncertainty as to when and on what terms they would be available, prevented many from
immediately settling down. Some of these, instead of recommending their friends to come
out and bring their families, deterred them from so doing while the public domain, or at
least such a desirable portion of it as is contained in the railroad .belt, remains locked up. To
this fact may be attributed the comparative falling off of immigration as the summer advanced, 802 Immigration Reports. 1883
Notwithstanding these drawbacks, and the natural antipathy of the best classes to
squatting, many have done so, and have forwarded applications to purchase both to the
Dominion Agent and the Provincial Land Office.
During the three months 256 letters, chiefly of enquiry respecting farming lands, resources,
and many other particulars, were received and answered. About 4,000 copies of Provincial
Government pamphlet, as well as other pamphlets and papers, were distributed.
The very excellent hand-book recently issued from your department has been widely
circulated, and much attention is being attracted to this Province in consequence.
Unfortunately the edition of 5,000 is altogether inadequate to meet the demand for information
which it is so well calculated to convey. I have the assurance, however, from the Secrptary
of Department of Agriculture, in Ottawa, in a letter dated 10th instant, that the British
Columbia hand-book, now being published by that department, " will be ready in a few days."
This will probably be to hand before our own supply is entirely exhausted, and will tide us
over till another edition of the provincial work can be issued from the Government Printing
Office.
I would respectfully call attention to the necessity that exists for better office accommo ■
dation, and more especially for the erection of sheds or some other means of providing for
temporary housing of immigrants. On several occasions during the earlier part of the season,
the want of such accommodation was seriously felt, and exerted a very discouraging influence
on many who met with great difficulty in procuring shelter of any description in the overcrowded hotels and boarding-houses in this city.
I need scarcely say, in conclusion, that every effort has been made to give all new arrivals
the fullest and most accurate information respecting any and every portion of the Province.
Many of the visits are very protracted and numerous questions are asked, to which, of course,
full replies are given. Applications are constantly being made for labourers and mechanics of
various trades, from almost every part of the country, and, as far as practicable, those wants
are supplied.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
JOHN JESSOP,
Immigration Agent.
The Hon. Jno. Robson, Minister of Agriculture,
&c, &c, &c.
APPENDIX B.
Department of Agriculture,
Victoria, B.C., July 12th, 1883.
Sir,—A Bureau of Immigration and Agriculture having been established, the Government are anxious to procure, from each locality in the Province, samples of cereals (such as
wheat, barley, oats, peas, &c.,) to place on exhibition, both here and at Ottawa. I have therefore to request you will forward to this Department, not later than 15th October, samples of,
say, 10 pounds each, of the above-mentioned grains, or as many of them as you have successfully
raised. You will please accompany each sample with a brief description of the, kind of soil
from which it was grown, the approximate yield per acre, and any other information you may
deem useful.
Observations respecting the agricultural interests, or capabilities of your district, .will be
thankfully received, as the Government are very desirous of obtaining as full and reliable
information as possible regarding the agricultural resources and products of the Province, in
order that they may be in a posit'on to report upon the same to the Legislature, at its next
session, and to make the capabilities of the country better known abroad. With this object
in. view, I have further to ask you to fill in the enclosed blank Form, or as much of it as you
can, and forward the same to this Department on or before the 15th of October next.
I have, &c,
Jno. Robson,
To Minister of Agriculture, 47 Vic.
Immigration Reports.
303
District
Agriculture.
Range Section
Township
Name.
111    ol
a o
S2"S   *►
Bo.
S5
Number or Acres or Each.
3
o
Ba
Yield per acre, in lbs., value per lb.,
(place the value under the lbs.)
Stock—No. or Each and
Value i-kr Head.
a
8
OmuL
Remarks.
APPENDIX C.
To the Hon.
The Minister of Agriculture,
Victoria.
Osoyoos, B.C., October 6th, 1883.
Sir.—I have the honour to send you a sample or two of wheat and corn raised in this
section. Owing to the absence of most of the settlers, no proper collection could be made, and
therefore a very poor idea formed of the agricultural capabilities of the Similkameen, Okanagan
and Kettle Rivers.
The soil is sandy loam, and where there is water there is scarcely anything which cannot
be raised and brought to fair perfection. The farming is principally confined to the bench
lands, the bottom lands being reserved for hay and winter pasture for the cattle. Stock-raising
being the principal industry, farming has been much neglected, or only carried on in a small
way, settlers raising just sufficient for their own consumption.
The average yield per acre is—wheat, 25 bushels, and oats, 40 bushels. Potatoes and all
kinds of vegetables yield abundantly. The melon and tomato come to great size and perfection.
Fruit trees also do well. At Mr. Ellis's ranch, at Penticton on the Okanagan River, is a very
fine orchard. At Osoyoos Lake, where the heat in summer is almost tropical, Mr. Haynes has
an orchard, and also raises the finest kind of vegetables. On the Similkameen River, the
Indians raise quite a large quantity of wheat, and as Mr. Price has a very good fiouring-mill
there, quite a business is carried on.
But, as mentioned above, stock-raising is the great feature; and when it is considered that
the cash value of the stock in this district will foot up in the neighbourhood of a quarter of a
million of dollars, it will be seen that the interests are large, and absorb the attention of the
majority of the settlers.
Mining is also likely to form a very important feature in this district. The quartz mines
of Mr. Allison, on Similkameen (B.C.C. Mng. Co.), are prospecting most favourably, and the
best kind of results may be anticipated. The mountains of the Similkameen, it is well-known,
are rich in minerals, and it only requires the success of one mine to cause the whole country
to be thoroughly prospected, and consequently a large influx of men and capital.
Though this section is apparently not so favourably known as other portions of the
Province, ow'ng greatly to its inaccessibility, the recent rise in the price of stock and the
very hopeful quartz prospects, are not only likely to bring it to the front, but place it scco-d
to no other district.
Trusting another year to be able to send you a greater variety of samples and earlier,
I have, <fec,
(Signed) Henry Nicholsox. 304
Immigration Reports.
1883
Fraser River, North Arm,
September 24th, 1883.
Sir:—As requested, I have sent you a sample of "Surprise Oats," grown on our farm of
Balcarry. They were grown from a rich clay loam, and sown on the 24th April, harvested in
the middle of August, and yielded forty bushels per acre, twenty bushels per acre below the.
average yield of this land owing to the dry season. The same oats grown from the same land,
but under a more favourable season last year, produced ninety bushels per acre. It is quite
common for this land to produce one hundred bushels per acre.   .
Yours most truly,
(Signed) John McMyn.
Mr. Thos. M. Hamilton, of Bridge Creek, 100 miles above Clinton, remarks that the
altitude of that section of country is too great to raise grain, with the exception perhaps of
rye, on account of Summer frosts ; vegetables also suffer from this cause. "The soil" he says
"is of the very best description if the climate would admit of farming." Within eight or ten
miles of his ranch there are many places where all kinds of grain and hardy vegetables can be
raised. "For dairy and stock-raising purposes it (Bridge Creek) cannot be surpassed (with the
exception that fodder must be provided for winter). The country is intersected with small
lakes and streams. There are also innumerable large meadows cr swamps of wild grass which,
when cured, makes much better winter feed for horned cattle than timothy hay. If desired,
however, the fiaest timothy I have ever seen can be raised on the high land."
Mr. C. B. Eagle, of Williams Lake, sent down fine samples of wheat, barley, oats, peas and
potatoes raised on his farm in the Cariboo District.
From the same locality Mr. Isnardy writes that he cculd easily put five hundred acres of
choice land under crop if ,the market would warrant the expenditure. He also forwarded a
sample of excellent wheat.
-Mr. Michaud, of Lone farm in the Yale District, complains of hired help being so scarce
and dear that only the richest soil will pay. for cultivation. He also says that drainage is very
necessary for successful farming.
Mr. W. H. Clarke's wheat crop, consisting of eighteen acres in Okanagan, yielded
1,700 pounds"or nearly thirty bushels to the acre. He says "the soil is a rich sandy loam.
Melons, tomatoes and all half hardy vegetables, fruits and plants do exceedingly well. Water
melons last year weighed twenty-five pounds each. The locality being high table land is not
liable to early or late frosts."
Mr. John Maxwell, of Langley, describes the soil in his neighbourhood as loamy with clay
bottom, very rich when put under good cultivation and the soil well mixed. His fruit crop last
season was remarkably good.
Mr. R. F. John, M. P. P., of South Saanich, reports crops in his district as being only
about one-half the usual average, in consequence of the dry season.
From far-off Kootenay, Rev. Father Fouquet, of St. Eugene R. C. Mission, says that not
one head of stock has died in consequence of severe weather in nine years. During the winter
wheat straw is chiefly used for fodder.    Bunch grass is abundant.
Mr. F. Brent, of Okanagan Mission, sent down fifteen pounds of choice wheat as a sample
of his crop of twenty-five acres.
APPENDIX D.
The Government Agent at Kamloops, Mr. Tunstall, has, with considerable care and trouble)
compiled a tabulated statement of agriculture and stock statistics, in that Polling Division that
came to hand too late to be included in appendix B., of which the following is a brief summary.
This does not include Cache Creek, ISicola, Okanagan or other contiguous divisions. Only
two farmers and stock raisers are included in the general summary :—
Value of grain raised, $18,932; horses 1378, value $41,340; cattle 11,449, value $263,327;
sheep and hogs 1256 ; value $7,536. Total value of stock $312,203. Mr. NicLolson, of Osoyoos,
is of opinion that the value of stock in his district is $250,000. Grand total, therefore, of
grain returns from these localities is $55,7b0, and of stock $735,373. 47 Vio.
Immigration Reports,
SOS
REPORT,
Ppovincial Government Immigration Office,
New Westminster, B. O, January 2nd, 1884,
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report, with tabular statements annexed,
for the period of seven months (during which this office has been open) ending the 31st
December, 1883.
The total number arriving at this Agency during the above period, was 1,095 souls. There
are, as is always the case, a large number of arrivals on the Mainland who enter without
coming Tinder my notice, and this is more especially the case with those possessed of considerable
means, and I have no doubt that fully one-third more than those reported enter in this way.
The immigrants arrived in good health, and were generally well fitted for settlers, the
larger portion of them being farmers and mechanics, and just the class adapted for the wants
and works of this country, and as a general rule strong, active, vigorous, men and women. It
is a truism that only the most energetic and self-reliant men have pluck enough to leave their
homes and seek to better their condition in an unknown land. The very faet that they have
the courage to face the trials and difficulties necessary to be encountered in a new land, is
sufficient index of their strength of character, and to such we should give all the inducement
and encouragement possible.
There has been no difficulty in locating the immigrants on arrival, and the demand for,
labour throughout the country, and this district in particular, was greatly in excess of the
supply. Not only has this been the case with farmers and general labourers, but mechanics
and artisans of all descriptions have met with ready employment at good wages.
It will be seen, from the accompanying tabulated statement, that a large proportion of the
immigration for 1883, came from the Mother Country, the Eastern Provinces of the Dominion,
and particularly from the Western States of America, Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, and Washington
Territory. This influx, in a large measure, is due to the efforts made by the Department of
Agriculture to have the wealth and resources of our Province made better known abroad.
Both farmers and others have naturally sought with eagerness to better their condition in a
land where there is room for all, and where, with proper efforts, the soil yields so bountifully.
Consequently, no sooner have means been taken to spread a knowledge of the fertility, and the
many other natural advantages enjoyed by this favoured region, than the stream of immigration
was turned this way, and we are now reaping the benefits.
Another and very important move is the active measures taken by the Government in
opening roads for the settlers just locating, thus affording ready means to reach a market with
their produce, making each and all of them feel that the Government has their interests at
heart, and that they are appreciated.
If this liberal policy be continued, and if vigorous measures be taken to advertise the
advantages aflbrded to the capitalist, farmer, mechanic, and labourer in British Columbia,
there can be no doubt that in a few years the country will have a teeming and thriving
population.
The immigration we have received this year, in consequence of these efforts to make known
the advantages of the Province, is only an earnest of what may be expected in coming years,
when the knowledge of these resources is more widely spread. This is foreshadowed in the
great number of letters received at this Agency from the Mother Country, the Eastern
Provinces of the Dominion, Manitoba, the United States, Queensland, and New Zealand, and
I feel safe in estimating that not less than ten thousand will be added to our population next
spring, and nearly all possessing considerable means.
It will be proper here to advert to the important concession secured to the Province under
the " Settlement Bill," whereby the agricultural lands within the Railway Belt are available
for settlement at the nominal price of one dollar an acre, an arrangement which cannot fail to
prove a powerful factor in attracting settlers to these lands.
I am also pleased to state that during the past seven months, forty-two have taken the
.Aliens' declaration oath, principally Americans, and of a superior class.
It is desirable for all intending emigrants to leave early in the spring, and this cannot be
too strongly impressed upon all parties intending to settle in this country, for by so doing they
will be able to take advantage of the most favourable season to explore for locations. 308
Immigration Reports.
1888
The Provincial Exhibition held here in October last, was largely attended, and the exhibits
showed a marked improvement over previous ones. The samples of grain, fruit, and dairy
products, were the best ever exhibited here; and must have left a favourable impression upon
the minds of those who were there.
During the past year there has been a great improvement throughout the Mainland in all
branches of business. Real estate has advanced, both in city and country, far beyond the
expectations of the most sanguine; public confidence has been restored, and there has been
developed a general feeling of activity in all branches of industry; works that were closed
have been re-opened; capital has been furnished by joint stock companies, private individuals,
and firms; new manufactories have been built, and old ones enlarged; new houses have been
established in various branches of tiade, to meet the growing demands; and failures have been
very few.
In this city more buildings have been erected than in any previous year, and still the
population is so rapidly increasing that there is not an empty house in the city.
The construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway west of the Rockies in 1884, will
speedily turn that vast and largely unoccupied and fertile region into cultivated farms and
thrifty homes.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
WILLIAM ROSS,
To the Hon. John Robson, Immigration Agent at New Westminster.
Minister of Agriculture, Victoria, B. C,
P. S.— Since closing my tabular statements A and B, and during the last three days,
thirty-five persons have arrived from abroad, among them one family, from California, numbering
ten souls, and all intending actual settlers.
I shall forward, per next mail, Statement C, which will show the actual location or quarter
section taken up by each individual settler in this district.
William Ross.
A.
RETURN showing number, occupation, sex, <kc, of Immigrants recorded at the Provincial
Immigration Office, New Westminster, during seven months ending 31st December, 1883 and
their ultimate destinations.
Sexes.
n
3
0
03
*s
O
a
a
fc
3
i
1095
Nationalities.
Trades and
Occupations.
General Destination.
S
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.9
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43
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8
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1X6 4T Vic.
Immtqbation Rettonb.
807
B.
Aliens who have taken Declaration Oath.
United States  33
Germany  1
Denmark    1
Sweden  3
Japan  1
HoUand    1
Norway     2
Total  42
0.
STATEMENT showing the actual number of locations taken up and settled upon in the
several townships, groups, blocks, and ranges, and unsurveyed lands in the New Westminster
District.
No. of | Section.
Township 1   27
2  8
4  10
7  19
8  8
9  1
10  4
11  25
12  18
13  12
14  27
15  7
17  8
21  1
23  8
40  7
Group       1 |  25
2  10
Blocks and Ranges t... 13
Unsurveyed Lands  92
Total  330=52,800acres
WiLLLIM BOSS,
'   Immigration Agent, New Westminster, B. C, rcisolW' sf Afr
Ig   jig 7*^*   YfcsC -4
* 

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