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Empress of Australia/De Grasse plans Canadian Pacific Railway Company; The French Line 1952

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 EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA
20,000 tons
PLAN   OF   ACCOMMODATION
904 rw-j- »u„
JJfijom 8292  Bedroom of a
Suite
The Smoking Room
Private Dining
Room
Sitting Room of a
Suite
The Writing Room
First Class
Veranda Cafe
You do more than cross the Atlantic when you travel in the Empress
of Australia—you enjoy the most restful and luxurious of holidays.   Take your ease in the
fine public rooms, relax or walk as you will on the promenade decks, return to
your own pleasant bedroom—at every turn you find supreme comfort. First Class
Double Bedroom
First Class
Single Bedroom
The Dining Room
First Class
Single Bedroom
First Class
Double Bedroom
The Lounge
Tourist Cabin
Tourist
Writing Room
Tourist
Smoking Room
Tourist Cabin
Tourist
Dining Room
Tourist Lounge
The dining room, with its splendid views, is most attractive; the
chairs are of crimson leather, and the flooring is in dark green.   The cocktail
bar is particularly chic and gay: the lounge has a friendly welcoming
atmosphere enhanced by the quiet elegant decor.
Tourist travel provides every comfort with a welcome economy
of price. The cabins are agreeably situated and are compact and attractive.   The public
rooms are particularly luxurious, with a very large smoking room and
adjoining lounge and a glass-enclosed promenade deck. BOAT DECK
CtmJia*. Guifac
EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA
LENGTH   —   572 FEET       ■       BREADTH   —    71 FEET
19,600 TONS GROSS
Lower Berths
A.C.E.
lq|
Washbasin
Upper Berths
B.D.
*
Shower
Dressing Table
in
pro
Bath
Wardrobe
d
(§5
Toilet
PROMENADE DECK
^Mr-
DECK A
DECK B
DECK C CROSS THE ATLANTIC */
9
in an Zt
EMPRESS
Latest addition to the world-famous
fleet of White Empresses is the " Empress
of Australia." She was British built by
Cammell Laird at Birkenhead and first
saw Atlantic service with the French Line,
when she was known as the " De Grasse"
after the famous French admiral of that
name.
The spacious comfort and good looks
are everything you would expect from an
Empress. There are two promenade
decks, one open, one entirely enclosed
with glass, lined with deep chairs looking
out on the panorama of sea and sky.
The lounge is decorated in silvery
maple and pale sycamore, a room full
of comfort and welcome. There are
plenty of wide restful chairs yet, thanks
to the cleverly-designed proportions of
the room, there is always a sense of light
and space. The smoking-room is perfectly laid out for bridge parties or any
other card games. A particular feature
of  the   Empress   of  Australia   is   the
veranda cafe with its gay continental
atmosphere, where you can have tea,
coffee or what you will, looking out onto
the fascinating ever-changing sea. But
wherever you go in the ship you will find
the service the same : thoughtful, friendly
and quietly efficient. The dining-room
is lit by wide windows, decorated with
unobtrusive elegance : the superb cuisine
and magnificent wine-list are of international renown.
Children are looked after with their
own playrooms equipped with everything a child can need.
There is a wide choice of bedrooms to
suit your personal taste, but all are light
and airy, delightfully furnished and
decorated, with plenty of wardrobe space,
and a limited number with private bathrooms.
Wherever you go on board you will
find comfort, interested, considerate
service, all the amenities you expect
when you travel Canadian Pacific.
Printed in England, 1953.  LIFE ABOARD
THE S.S.DE GRASSE
Deck Tennis
Romance
! 1 S 64   Tzr  1948
'
A BRIEF HISTORY
Of the proud roster of French Line Ships which plied the North Atlantic sealanes before the war,
DE GRASSE, LAFAYETTE, CHAMPLAIN, PARIS, ILE DE FRANCE, and NORMANDIE, the DE GRASSE
carries on for the moment alone.
For eight decades the French Line has linked the Old World to the New with an ever growing fleet of passenger
and cargo vessels. From the paddle wheels and sails of the first mail steamer WASHINGTON in 1864, to the
NORMANDIE, each ship has signified a step forward in technical innovations and artistic refinements.
This great maritime enterprise was founded upon a lather-to-son tradition of hardy Breton and Norman seamen,
wise in the ways of the sea, a tradition carried on and supplemented by the Company's training schools for officers,
seamen, and steward personnel.
Like a great family, the French Line has handed down from ship to ship through the years, despite wars and
constantly changing conditions, the proud heritage of fine service and dependable performance.
WAR SERVICE
In September 1939, at the outbreak of World War II, a large part of the half million tons of French
Line shipping immediately entered war service, many of its ships continuing to serve the Allied cause after the Franco-
German Armistice in June 1940. Among them was the ILE DE FRANCE, which stripped of its luxurious appointments,
served for six years, carrying over 600,000 troops.
Subsequent to the Allied landings in North Africa in November 1942, over 100,000 more tons of French Line
ships were placed in service. The American offices of the French Line offered their services to the War Shipping Administration, and were honored by an appointment as Geneial Agents for the operation of all French shipping under
American control.
In the course of the war, the French Line lost 62% cf its 1939 tonnage, including the majority of the Line's most
modern passenger vessels. Greatest of these was the NORMANDIE, renamed U.S.S. LAFAYETTE, which burned and
capsized in the Port of New York while in the course of conversion by the United States Navy into a troopship.
FUTURE PLANS
Reconstruction plans of the French Line's once proud fleet include the reconditioning of the ships
which remain, an extensive program of shipbuilding comprising 25 cargo ships, and the acquisition of 32 Liberty ships
now in operation, totaling 565,000 tons.
The 43,450 ton ILE DE FRANCE, now being refitted at St. Nazaire, will accommodate 1,353 passengers when
she re-enters service. She will feature a large motion-picture theatre, and a luxurious swimming pool.
The 49,746 ton LIBERTE, which as the EUROPA won the Atlantic Blue Ribbon, was awarded to France by
the Allied Commission of War Reparations. Now undergoing complete refitting and redecoration in St. Nazaire, she
will join the French Line's North Atlantic service when completed. WORLD-WIDE SERVICES
The French Line—most popularly known for its passenger service to England and France-
has been for nearly a century an essential factor in the economic life of its homeland. On the eve of
World War II, it was the commercial link . . . the maritime contact with a hundred ports-of-call.
It ensured the mother country's commerce with the Caribbean islands and the coast of North Africa;
its ships fetched and transported cargoes from the East and West coasts of South America and the great
ports of the Gulf and Pacific coasts. Through affiliation with other steamship lines, it offered both
passenger and freight service to and from the Eastern Mediterranean, the Near and Far East, and
East Africa.
Again the houseflag of the Line is seen in its main fields of transportation—the North Atlantic,
the Gulf, the North and South Pacific, the West Indies, and the Mediterranean. Through agreement
with the Messageries Maritimes which the French Line represents in North America, once more, the
scope of operations of the French Line is world-wide.
Every Meal is an Event, every evening a memorable occasion, an experience in good living in the French manner. Foreign flavor, yes . . . but service
so attentive that you will know yourself to be a welcome guest. English speaking stewards and alert
little pageboys anticipate your every need.
Upon your arrival in France after the leisure and fun of a crossing on "France Afloat," you
will feel refreshed, physically and mentally, ready for the delights and thrills ahead ... all your
baggage right with you, and your car, if you brought it along, ready and waiting at the pier.
A vacation in itself, your French Line trip will give a foretaste of France.
WEST   INDIES
PACIFIC    COAST
MEDITERRANEAN
Regular passenger and cargo service from French
Channel ports to the Panama Canal via the French West
Indies,  Barbados,   Trinidad,   and  the   Spanish  Main.
Regular *cargo service from French Atlantic
ports to North and South American Pacific
coast  ports,  via  the  Panama  Canal.
* Limited number of passengers accepted.
Frequent passenger and freight service from Marseilles
to Algeria and Tunisia via the French Line, and to
the Eastern Mediterranean via Messageries Maritimes.
OPEN PROMENADE DECK
DINING ROOM
DECK SPORTS
LOUNGE AND DANCE FLOOR Gross Tonnage: 19,918-Length: 572 Ft.-Beam: 12 Ft.
PONT PROMENADE    PROMENADE DECK
PONT PRINCIPAL
MAIN  DECK
INDEX
j-—I Lavabo
-12L-      Washstand
*
0
D
AC E
BD
Baignoire
Bath  Tub
Douche
Shower
W. C.
Toilet
Armoire
Wardrobe
Designent les couchettes
inferieures
Indicate lower berths
Designent les couchettes
superieures
Indicate upper berths
I,
PROMENADE DECOUVERTF
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Compagnie  Generale Transatlantique
COMPANY'S  EUROPEAN   HEAD  OFFICE
6  rue  Auber,   PARIS
!
:
LE  HAVRE
89 Boulevard de Strasbourg
LONDON
20 Cockspur St., S.W.  1
SOUTHAMPTON
Havelock  Chambers Queen's Terrace
Passenger Offices
in the United States and Canada
NEW YORK,  610  Fifth  Avenue
BOSTON
415  Boylston Street
CHICAGO
327 North Michigan Ave.
NEW  ORLEANS
526 Whitney Bank Bldg.
PHILADELPHIA
1700 Walnut St.
SAN  FRANCISCO
310 Sansome Street
CLEVELAND
1   Guardian  Bldg.
MONTREAL
1196 Phillips Place
HALIFAX
Furness  Building
Complete information may also be had from
any  Authorized  Travel  Agent
Printed in U. S. A.

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