Historical Children's Literature Collection

Juvenile pastimes; or girls' and boys' book of sports [unknown] 1849

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 I
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.^JUVENILE PASTIMES
OR
GIRLS' AND BOYS'
BOOK OF SPORTS.
There's a time to be merry and a time to be wise,
Their sunshine and shadow presenting ;
But if, in our sports, we should learning despise,
We shall soon find a time for repenting.
 <£
THE LITTLE BOAT.
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GIRLS' AND BOYS'
BOOK OF SPORTS.
Exercise, my little readers, is as
necessary to health as food and clothing. I like to see a group of merry
little ones at play, if they are not too
boisterous and rude. It makes me
feel young again, and reminds me of
the days when I was a child, and had
my playthings and my pets, and made
kites, and balls, and little boats, and
windmills, and a hundred other toys.
Even now I look back upon my
childhood as the " holiday of life ;"
and so will you too, if you live to
be as old as I am.
Let me remind you, that in all
your sports good-humor should ever
prevail, or the most pleasant game
will be spoiled :
Let love through all your actions run,
And all your words be mild.
1
 <£
p>
BOOK OF SPORTS.
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MARBLES.
This is a favorite
game, and one which
usually renders the
play-ground an animated scene. Many
different games are
played with these
toys, which I have not room to describe in a little book like this. But
boys soon learn the various games of
their playmates. There is one thing
I dislike about Marbles : I dislike to
see children trying to win them from
one another, for this is a kind of
gambling, and is apt to lead to gambling habits.
SOAP BUBBLES.
Blowing Bubbles is fine sport for
little folks. A basin of strong soapsuds, and a tobacco-pipe, will keep
them delighted for a long time. It
is pleasant to see them thus employed, and to hear their merry shouts as
the bright bubbles float in the air.
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PLAYING WITH MARBLES.
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 <£
BOOK OF SPORTS.
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SKIPPING THE ROPE,
Is a healthy recreation, and one that is
suitable for boys, as
well as for girls.—
For exercising and
giving strength to
the limbs, this game
is preferable to many others, and it
it always pleasant and amusing.
TOUCH, OR TAG,
Is a sport for boys, rather than
girls, and can be played by any
number. One is called Tag, who
runs after the others till he comes
up with, and touches one. This one
then becomes Tag, and pursues the
others in the same way. Sometimes
this game is played another way :
the one called Tag being pursued by
all the rest; the one who touches him
first then becomes Tag, and is in his
turn pursued by the others; and so
on till all are tired. This is excellent
sport in frosty weather.
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PLAYING TAG.
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 <£
8
BOOK OF SPORTS.
FLYING KITES.
These interesting
toys are made in various shapes; some
square, some six-
sided, or with six
corners, and in some
parts of world, in the shape of men,
birds, stars, ships, &c. But the most
common kind is the bow-kite.
Some little boys, like the one in
the picture on the opposite page,
buy their kites at the toy shops.
Others exercise their
patience and ingenuity in making them.
This is much the best
way, and to assist my
little readers in doing
this, I here show them
the frame of a bow-
kite, by which they
can see how it is made. When the
frame is completed, cover one side
with paper, neatly pasting it over the
edges, and the kite is finished.
^
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THE NEW KITE.
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 10
fct <V
BOOK OF SPORTS.
GRACES.
An elegant and
suitable amusement
for young people,
especially if stormy
weather prevents all
out-door games. As
it exercises the arms and chest, this
sport is as healthy as it is pleasant
and amusing.
)-
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LEAPING WITH A POLE.
This is a sport for boys. The
Long Leap is made by taking hold
of the pole with the right hand, about
as high as the head, and with the left
hand about as high as the hips. Putting the end of the pole on the ground
in front of you, spring as far as you
can, alighting on the balls of the feet.
The High Leap is made in the same
way, only the spring is made upwards, instead of a great distance.
These sports afford good exercise
for the limbs and chest, and impart
health and strength to the system.
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LEAPING WITH A POLE.
Ill
11
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12
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BOOK OF SPOBTS.
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PLAYING BALL
Is a favorite sport
with boys of all
ages, and affords innocent and healthy
amusement. There
hre a great number
of games played with Balls, of which
Base-Ball, Trap-Ball, Cricket, Up-
Ball, Catch-Ball, and Drive Ball,
are the most common. Such of my
little readers as have never played
these different games, must learn
them of their companions.
PUSS IN THE CORNER.
A simple but lively and amusing
game for five little folks,—girls or
boys. At each of the four corners
of a room stands a player; the fifth,
who is called Fuss, stands in the
middle. The players in the corners
then exchange places, while Puss
tries to secure one of the corners before the others reach it. If Puss
succeeds, the player who is left with-
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A PARTY OF BALL PLAYERS.      13
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14
BOOK OF SPORTS.
out a corner then becomes the Puss.
That is, if Mary and John attempt
to exchange places, and Mary gets
to John's corner, but John fails to
get to Mary's corner before Puss
gets there, then John has to become
the Puss.
BOWS AND ARROWS.
The Bow
is now a fa-*
vorite plaything, but it
was formerly used for
hunting and
in war. E-
ven now it
is a weapon
of some lull dian tribes.
Be careful
 ^^^^^^^^^ not to shoot
your arrows in a public place, where
people are passing, as many sad accidents have happened by so doing.
■<£
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BOOK OF SPORTS.
1,5
THE SWING.
In a warm day,
andi in the shade of
a fine large tree, it
is delightful sport to
swing to and fro, in
the cool breeze. I
would advise my little readers, however, to be always careful that the
rope is properly fastened, and that'
they do not swing too high, lest they
get a tumble and break some of their
bones.
SEE-SAW.
A plank is placed across a barrel,
or log, or something of the kind, and
one player sits on one end of it and
another on the other end. By a very
little exertion they can go up and
down quite pleasantly, if the plank
is properly balanced. When one of
the players is heavier than the other,
his or her end of the plank must be
shortened, to give the lighter one the
proper weight.
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$
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3>
16
BOOK OF SPORTS.
life '■■■'
■<£=
SHUTTLECOCK.
This is an excellent game for girls,
and for boys too. It
affords fine exercise,
and is a healthy and
invigorating sport.—-
The game is played
by two persons, each of whom has a
battledore, with which they knock
the shuttlecock back and forth between them. • The one who misses
first, of couise loses the game.
TKOTDLING HOOP.
This is fine sport.
When I was young,
^lioops were trundled
by boys only. But
how, fashion, I am
to see, allows
a share in the
sport. Some boys, trundling their
hoops on the pavement, drive against
passep-by ; a rudeness which I hope
my readers will never be guilty of.
glad
girls
$

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