Historical Children's Literature Collection

The peacock "at home" : a sequel to the Butterfly's ball [Dorset, Catherine Ann Turner, 1750?-1817?] 1807-09-01

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1CGCK " AT HOME:"'
RIFT
SEQUEL
TO   THE
TERJFJLY'S   BALL,
WRITTEN BY A I. AD Y.
AND
ILLCSTEATEB WITH   ELEGANT  ENGRAVINGS.
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LONDON:
anted for J. HARRIS, Successor to 1. NEWBERY,
at the Original Juvenile .Library, the Corner
of St. Pawl's Churcb -Yard.
1807. W
 I
I
-
/
 /
THE
PEACOCK "AT HOME:'
SEQUEL
TO   THE
BUTTERFLY'S BALL.
WRITTEN
BY A LADY.
fm
AND
ILLUSTRATED WITH ELEGANT ENGRAVINGS.
LONDON:
raiNTED   FOR   J. HARRIS,   SUCCESSOR   TO   E.  NEWBERY,   AT  THE
ORIGINAL   JUVENILE   LIBRARY,  THE  CORHIR   OF
5 P. tAVL*S   CHURCH-YARD.
1807,
M <
 /r
H. Bryer, Printer, Bridge-Street^ Blacklr
nars.
i.
•,
THE
PEACOCK   "AT HOME."
1 HE Butterfly's Ball, and the Grasshopper's Feastt,
Excited the spleen of the Birds and the Beasts:
For their mirth and good cheer—of the Bee was the theme,
And the Gnat blew his horn, as he danc'd in the beam.
'Twas humm'd by the Beetle, 'twas buzz'd by the Fly,
And sung by the myriads that sport 'neath the sky.
AS
 6
But alas ! they returned not j and she had no taste
To appear in a costume of vine-leaves or paste.
The Woodcock prefer'd his lone haunt on the moor;
And the Traveller, Swallow, was still on his toun
The Cuckoo, who should have been one of the guestt,
Was rambling on visits to other Bird's Nests.
But the rest, all accepted the kind invitation,
And much bustle it caus'd in the plumed creation:
Such ruffling of feathers, such pruning of coats
Such chirping, such whistling, such clearing of throats.
Such polishing bills, and such oiling of pinions I
Had nerer been known in the biped dominions.
 \
The Taylor Bird offer'd to makeup new clothes ;
For all the young Birdlings, who wished to be Beaux:
He made for the Robin a doublet of red,
And a new velvet cap for the Goldfinch's head ;
He added a plume to the Wren's golden crest,
And spangled with silver the Gu i n ea-Fow l' s breast j
While the Halcyon bent over the streamlet to view,
How pretty she look'd in her boddice of blue !
Thus adorned, they set off for the Peacock's abode,
With the Guide Indicator*, who shew'd them the road i
* Cuculus Indicator, a Bird of Cuckowkind, found in the interior
parts of Africa; it has a shrill note, which the Natives answer by a
soft whistle j and the Birds repeating the note, the Natives are
fck^teby conducted to the wild Bee-hives, which this Bird frequents.
i
■  ■■"'■■
 9
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From all points of the compass, came Birds of all feather;
And the Parrot can tell who and who were together.
There came Lord Cassowary and General Flamingo,
And Don Peroqueto, escaped from Domingo ;
From hiaiiigh rock-built eyrie the Eagle came forth,
And the Duchess of Ptarmigan flew from the North.
The Grebe and the Eider Duck came up by water,
With the Swan, who brought out the young Cygnet,  her
daughter.
From his woodland abode came the Pheasant, to meet
Two kindred, arriv'dbythe last India fleet:
The one, like a Nabob, in habit most splendid,
Where gold with each hue of the Rainbow was blended :
In silver and black, like a fair pensive Maid,
Who mourns for her love ! was the other array'd.
The Chough came from Cornwall, and brought up his Wife j
The Grouse travell'd south, from his Lairdship in Fife 5
The Bunting forsook her soft nest in the reeds ;
And the Widow-bird came, though she still wore her weeds}
Sir John Heron, of the Lakes, strutted in a grand fias>
But no card had been sent to the pilfering Daw,
As the Peacock kept up his progenitors' quarrel*
Which JEsop relates, about cast-off apparel ;
For Birds are like Men in their contests together,
And, in questions of right, can dispute for a feather.
 J
-
1®
The Peacock, Imperial, the pride of his race,
Received all his guests with an infinite grace,
Wav'd high his blue neck, and his train he displayed,
Embroider'd with gold, and with em'ralds inlaid.
Then with all the gay troop to the shrubb'ry repaired,
Where the musical Birds had a concert prepar'd j
A holly bush form'd the Orchestra, and in it
Sat the Black-bird, the Thrush, the Lark, and the Linnet j
A Bull-finch, a captive ! almost from the nest,
Now escaped from his cage, and, with liberty blest,
In a sweet mellow tone, join'd the lessons of art
With the accents of nature, which flowed from his heart.
. t
'■'»> i    ■—■	
 11
The Canary, a much-admir'd foreign musician
Condescended to sing to the Fowls of condition.
While the Nightingale warbled, and quaver'd so fine,
That they all clapp'd their wings, and pronounc'd it divine !
The Sky Lark, inextacy, sang from a cloud,
And Chanticleer crow'd, and the Yaffil laugh'd loud.
The dancing began,, when the singing was over ;
ADotterell first open'd the ball with the Plover ;
Baron Stork, in a waltz, was allow'd to excel,
With his beautiful partner, the fair Demoiselle*
*The Numidian Crane, or Demoiselle, from the elegance of its
appearance, and its singular carriage, is called the Demoiselle, which
means the young Lady; for this Bird walks very gracefully, and
sometimes skips and leaps, as though it were trying to dance.
 *
\          i
12
And a newly-fledg'd Gosling, so spruce and genteel,
A minuet swam with young Mr. Teal-
A London-bred Sparrow—a pert forward Cit!
Danc'd a reel with Miss Wagtail, and little Tom Tit.
And the Sieur Guillemot next performed afias seuU
Whi!e the elderly Bipeds were playing a Pool.
The Dowager Lady Toucan first cut in,
With old Doctor Buzzard, and Adm'ral Penguin,
From Ivy-bush Tow'r came Dame Owlet the Wise,
And Counsellor Crossbill sat by to advise.
The Birds  past their prime, o'er v hose heads it was fated,
Should pass many St. Valentines—yet be unirated,
13
.ook'd on, and remark'd, that the prudent and sage*
rere quite overlooked in this frivolous age,
rhen Birds, scarce pen-feather*d, were brought to a rout,
rorward Chits ! from the egg-she] 1 but newly come out;
[That in their youthful days, they ne'er witness'd such frisking,
[And how wrong! in the Greenfinch to flirt with the Siskin.
So thought Lady Mackaw, and her Friend Cockatoo,
And the Raven foretold that " no good could ensue V
They censur'd the Bantam for strutting and crowing,
In those vile pantaloons, which he fancied look'd knowing
And a want of decorum caus'd many demurs,
Against the Game Chicken, for coming in spurs%
i
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14
Old Alderman Cor m'rant, for supper impatient,
At the Eating-room door, for an hour had been station'd,
Till a Magpie, at length, the banquet announcing,
Gave the signal,long wish'd for,of clamouringand pouning j
At the well-furnish'd board all were eager to perch
But the little Miss Creepers were left in the lurch.
Description must fail; and the pen is unable
To describe all the luxuries which cover'd the table*
Each delicate viand that taste could denote,
Wasps a la sauce piquante, and Flies en compote ;
Worms and Frogs enfriture, for the web-footed Fowl,
And abarebecued Mouse was prepared for the Owl |
\
 15
Nuts, grains, fruit, and fish, to regale ev'ry palate,
And groundsel and chick-weed serv'd up In a sallad*
The Razor-Bill carv'd for the famishing group,
And the Spoon-Bill obligingly ladled the soup }
So they filPd all their crops with the dainties before 'em3
And the tables were clear'd with the utmost decorum.
When they gaily hadcarolPd till peep of the dawn,
The Lark gently hinted, 'twas time to be gone;
And his clarion, so shrill, gave the company warning*
That Chanticleer scented the gales of the morning.
So they chirp'd, in full chorus, a friendly adieu j
And, with hearts quite as light as the plumage that grew
On their merry-thought bosoms, away they all flew..*..
/
 '(/,
16
Then long live the Peacock, in splendour unmatch'd,
Whose Ball shall be talk'd of, by Birds yet unhatch' d
His praise let the Trumpeter* loudly proclaim,
\nd the Goose lend her quill to transmit it to Fame.
* The Agami, or Trumpeter, a native of America, remarkable for
a singular noise, resembling the instrument from which it takes ifee
name.
THE END.
H. Bryer, Printer, Bridge-Street, Blackfriars«
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May also be had\ just fiuh IkJie
T H E"  B U T TE R F L Y'S   3 AL
■AjSD   THE '
GRASSHOPPEES FEAST,
IL L U ST R ATED   W ITU
FIFTEEN ENGRAVINGS.
price One Shilling plain; and Eigkieen-pence colour*
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LANY  HUKBFJ2DS 07 OTHER WOEKS,
B O T K  INSTRUC T1- V E   A K .D.   K N T E R'T A IK I K G,
ARE   AL W A Y 3   G N   SAL T ♦
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