Historical Children's Literature Collection

Jacky Dandy's delight: or, the history of birds and beasts; in prose and verse [unknown] [1820?]

Item Metadata

Download

Media
childrenlit-1.0375983.pdf
Metadata
JSON: childrenlit-1.0375983.json
JSON-LD: childrenlit-1.0375983-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): childrenlit-1.0375983-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: childrenlit-1.0375983-rdf.json
Turtle: childrenlit-1.0375983-turtle.txt
N-Triples: childrenlit-1.0375983-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: childrenlit-1.0375983-source.json
Full Text
childrenlit-1.0375983-fulltext.txt
Citation
childrenlit-1.0375983.ris

Full Text

 rJACKY    DANMi
DELIGHT
OH,   THE
HISTORY    OF
:lftB3 aiB BBASTS;
IN
PROSE AND VERSE.
EMBELLISHED  WITH   WOOD-CUTS *
J. Keadrew,  Printer, York.
■k
 Roman Capital Letters.
ABODE FGHIJKIMNOPQRS
U VWXYS&iECE
Old English Capital and Small Letters.
% 33 € m e $ (&m '& 3 is % M 3
a ]) t H t i q fj i j k I van o n q r $ t u
to to r j) 5 &
Italic Capital and Small Letters.
ABC DE FGH I J K L M N O P Q
218 T U V W X Y ZM(E
a h c d efg h i j k I m n o p q r s t u v W & y
Z <£ CVfiJTfJiffl
JACKY    DANDY.
•ir«-. ;*«« <&&*&> r&rz?.
HANDY spandy, Jacky Dandy,
Loves plum-cake and sugar-candy,
He bought some at the Grocer's shop,
And pleas'd, away went hop, hop, hop.
 4
He was a nimble, active fellow,
Merry as any Punchinello,
And did the part of Harlequin ;
Here do but look, he's just  come in.
Good Mr. Harl, instruct me, pray,
How I may be a pretty boy,
Says Harlequin, ill grant your suit;
Learn to be good, and that will do't
For all good boys are very pretty,
Belov'd by Molly, sue, and Betty,
I thank you, Mr. Harlequin:
Then to be good I will begin.
The little good boy,
That will not tell a lie,
Shall have a plum-pudding,
Or hot apple-pie.
But he that is naughty,
and tells a false tale,
 (>
Will deserve nothing else
But the whip to His tail.
f Lying is a bad faculty, and ought
always to be discouraged as much as
possible ; and indeed it seldom goes
without its deserved punishment.
til tell you a story of a naughty
boy. One day little Billy Fro ward
went a bird-catching with Tommy
Telltruth, and they agreed,', at the
first setting out, to be partners in
there success. While Tommy's back
was turned Billy caught a fine linnet*
This bird he contrived to hide from
his companion, and when they parted
 8
what they had taken, Billy told a
great many lies about this bird ; in
which however, he was soon detected. His papa came to hear of it,
and was so angry with him as to send
him to bed without his supper, and
whipped  him in the bargain ;   for by
this single act, Billy was a liar and a
cheat, i\Tor was this all; there was
a collection of wild beasts in the
town, which Billv was not suffered
to see.    'I he first was the   Lion.
*c
9
This is the Lion
That never would yield,
Behold how he ranges,
The king of the field.
He is called the king of beasts;
and though he his so very powerful,
it is said he is of a generous nature,
which makes every one admire hh
character.    The next was the Wolf
 10
This is the Wolf
That prowls through the wood,
Who preys upon lambs,
And drinks of their blood.
11
The Monkey, mischievous,
Like a naughty boy looks,
Who plagues all his friends,
* And don't mind his books.
He is a savage beasf, and very different from the lion in disposition,
He comes down from the mountains
and forests, and devours every thing
that comes in his Way.
The monkey is a native of warm
countries, and an useless beast in this
part of the world, so I shall leave him
to speak of another that is more
bulky, and comes from cold climates.
I mean the Bear.
 12
This is the Bear,
In Greenland was bred.
And brought over here,
Through the streets to be led.
See his rough shaggy hair, and
observe his paws: they resemble the
hands and feet of a man. I have
nothing to object to his character.
We say, indeed, as rude as a Bear.—-
Now for the feathered race. The
first is Robin Redbreast.
13
He cocks up its tail,
While hopping along ,
And pays for his crumbs
With an innocent song.
He comes to see you more particu*
larly in cold frosty weather, and nobody will hurt poor Bobby, because
be puts confidence in   those   that   he
visits,   ,
 14
The little Robin
And the Wren,
Are Jack Dandy's
Cock and hen.
15
This is.the Kite,
When searching for food,
Kills Bob and his wife,
And all the young brood.
Though she is of an active disposition, I never heard that she was a
tale-bearer or a slanderer. And I
believe she has only one enemy ; in
short, her enemy is the common enemy of all little innocent birds.
His very figure is terrible. The
Kite is a cruel bird, and like a coward, attacks none but those who are
much weaker than himself.
 16
This is the Cock
Who crows (if you're, wise)
To tell you from bed
Tis time for to rise.
The Cock is of great use to his
master, who feeds him. And never
fails in the morning to tell him the
the day approaches, and that he must
rise to his lawful employment.
J. Kcndrew, Printer*, Collicrgatc
I

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.childrenlit.1-0375983/manifest

Comment

Related Items