BC Sessional Papers

Services for People Annual Report 1979 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1980]

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Full Text

 Province of
British Columbia
Services for People
Annual Report
1979
Honourable Grace M. McCarthy
With Fiscal Addendum
April 1, 1978 to March 31, 1979
Ministry of
Human Resources
 Victoria, B.C., March, 1980
To His Honour the Honourable Henry Bell-Irving,
D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D., Lieutenant-Governor of
the Province of British Columbia.
MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR:
The Annual Report of the Ministry of Human
Resources for the calendar year 1979, with fiscal
and statistical addendum April 1, 1978 to March 31,
1979, is herewith respectfully submitted.
grace m. McCarthy
Minister of Human Resources
Office of the Minister of Human Resources
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
 Ministry of Human Resources
Victoria, B.C., March, 1980
The Honourable Grace M. McCarthy,
Ministry of Human Resources,
Victoria, B.C.
Madam:
I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of
the Ministry of Human Resources for the calendar
year 1979, with fiscal and statistical addendum
April 1, 1978 to March 31, 1979.
JOHN NOBLE
Deputy Minister of Human Resources
  SERVICES
FOR PEOPLE
  REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1979
Foreword
On the following pages the reader will find a
summary of the Ministry of Human Resources
programs and services for people during the calendar
year, 1979.
Formal accounting in the Ministry is on a fiscal
year basis ending March 31, and therefore calendar
year figures are estimates in a few instances. A fiscal
and statistical addendum in section VIII of this Report
provides additional tables for the 1978/79 fiscal year
period.
The Annual Report is divided into the following
sections:
I Administration and Organization
II Family and Children's Services
III Income Maintenance Services
IV Health Care Services
V Community Services
VI Residential Care for the Handicapped
VII Legislation Administered
VIII Fiscal and Statistical Addendum, 1978/79
  TABLE OF
CONTENTS
Highlights of 1979 - Deputy Minister's Report  11
Summary of Expenditures 12
Federal and Municipal Cost-Sharing 13
SECTION I ■ ADMINISTRATION AND
ORGANIZATION
Regional Map 17
Ministry Organization and Administration 19
Organizational Chart 21
The Service Delivery System 23
Ministry Comptroller's Office 24
Management Services  24
Audit Team  24
Office Administration 24
Personnel and Staff Training  25
Information Services 26
Lower Mainland Special Services 26
Inspectors Program 28
Research and Statistics Division 28
Federal-Provincial Agreements 29
Community Human Resources and
Health Centres 30
SECTION II - FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S
SERVICES
Introduction 33
Preventive and Protective Services for
Children and their Families 34
Repatriation of Children 36
Child in Care Services 36
Foster Home Program 37
Group Homes for Children 38
 Therapeutic Homes for Children 38
Specialized Resources  38
Adoptions 39
Post Adoption Services 40
Family Support Homemakers 41
Special Services to Children 41
Infant Development Program   42
Child Day Care Services 42
Children's Rehabilitation Resources 43
Rehabilitation Resources for
Handicapped Children  44
Program Evaluation and Planning
Support Unit 44
Year of the Child and the Family 46
British Columbia Council for the Family 48
SECTION III - INCOME ASSISTANCE
Rental Assistance Programs 50
GAIN Income Assistance Program 51
GAIN for the Handicapped 53
GAIN for Seniors Aged 60 to 64 53
GAIN Supplementary Benefits to
OAS/GIS/SPA Recipients 54
Provincial Rehabilitation and
Employment Program (PREP) 54
Incentive Allowance Program 55
Community Involvement Program  55
Training and Education Program 55
Repatriation 56
Indigent Burials 56
Transition Houses and Hostels 56
SECTION IV - HEALTH CARE SERVICES
Basic Health Care Services 59
Pharmacare 60
SECTION V - COMMUNITY SERVICES
Community Grants 63
Work Activity Program 72
Achievement Centres Program 73
Handicapped Industries Guild  76
Community Living Society 76
Senior Citizens Counsellors  76
Seniors Day Centres Program  77
Bus Passes  78
SECTION VI - RESIDENTIAL CARE FOR
THE HANDICAPPED
Residential Services for the Handicapped  81
Woodlands 82
Tranquille 83
Glendale 84
SECTION VII - LEGISLATION   85
SECTION VIII - FISCAL AND
STATISTICAL ADDENDUM 1978-79
89
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
11
HIGHLIGHTS OF 1979
Report of the Deputy Minister,
John Noble
1979 was observed as "The Year of the Child and
the Family in British Columbia" and the Ministry
continued developing its support services to families
and children while implementing some special
initiatives in this area of service. The Helpline for
Children, a Zenith telephone line to receive reports
on situations of child abuse or neglect, was
introduced in August. Already, the Helpline has
proven to be of great value in identifying and
dealing with family crisis situations. Staff training
programs were developed to assist Ministry staff in
dealing with reported cases of abuse and neglect and
the "Child Abuse/Neglect Policy Handbook" was
distributed. The handbook, jointly developed by the
Ministries of Health, Education, Attorney-General and
/ Human Resources, provides information to
' professionals on their responsibilities and on
/ resources available to deal with this sensitive issue.
Life planning for children in care was also
a priority this year. Improved tracking systems were
devised to ensure that an individualized long-term
life plan was developed for each child in the care of
the Ministry.
It seems fitting that the Committee on Children's
Legislation completed its report in this Year of the
/ Child and the Family. Over 1200 submissions from
individuals and community organizations were
received by the Committee. This input was valuable
in formulating the proposed Family and Child
Services Act which will be introduced to the
Legislature in 1980.
Other highlights of 1979 included an improved
system for the administration of income assistance
payments. Steps were taken to reduce the
complexity of administering GAIN benefits to our
clients. As well, the GAIN for Handicapped allowance
was adjusted to provide handicapped clients with
quarterly increases in their benefits.
The emphasis on efficient administration of
programs continued this year and I am pleased to
advise that the costs of administration have been
kept relatively low. Field operations involving direct
services to clients consumed 10.9 percent of the
budget and the true administration costs would not
include these direct services. Actual administration
costs amounted to only 1.7 percent of ministerial
expenditures.
Improved accountability is another ongoing priority
of the Ministry and 1979 saw the beginning of a joint
project, undertaken with the provincial Auditor
General, to perform a comprehensive audit of the
Ministry. Besides examining the accounting format,
this audit will look at the effectiveness of our
expenditures for the provision of services. This is the
first time such a project has been undertaken in a
provincial ministry and the results may have far-
reaching implications for our provision of services to
people in British Columbia.
Although Ministry staff often work under
extremely difficult conditions, they bring a great deal
of dedication and commitment to their work. I would
like to point out that staff have chosen this work, not
because it is easy or free of controversy, but because
of the satisfactions inherent in offering service and
assistance to those in need. The Ministry recognizes
the value of staff training and in 1979 undertook
a series of training programs for supervisors,
designed to enhance the quality of supervision and
support for line staff. Programs like this yield positive
results in improved services to clients.
One of the challenges that face a large ministry
such as Human Resources is the development and
implementation of programs and policies which
respond to societal needs. The past decade has seen
an increasing incidence of family breakdown and
social change with far-reaching effects on all our
lives and on the role of the Ministry of Human
Resources. A rather startling figure which points this
out is the 66 percent increase in the number of
single-parent families during the period from 1966 to
1976. It is apparent that agencies providing social
services must be adaptable in meeting the needs of
the community in this era of social change.
Looking ahead to the 1980s, I see an increasing
need for co-operation and partnership between
ministries of government and community agencies.
Emphasis must be placed on working toward
a greater community awareness and support for the
services of the Ministry and on a clarification of the
role of government in the community. In this way,
the services and programs of the Ministry will
provide the most benefit to those in need.
 12
HUMAN RESOURCES
Figure 1 Ministerial Expenditures, 1979
($628.2 million)
SUMMARY OF MINISTERIAL
EXPENDITURES, 1979
Income Assistance         \
37.7%
$237.0
/  GAIN              \
/    for Seniors
/     and Handicapped
16.6%
$104.2    ^^_—
Field Operations j
N.     10.9%                 /
\"    Health
\$68.4                  /
\        Services       /
\     8.9%      /
\   $56.1    /   /
Rental    /V/
Assistance           T   ■>
—   /       J
3.3%                 /
$20.8     Community
1
\           Family and
Programs
Programs
Admini-    Children's
4%
for the
stration     Services
$24.9
Retarded
1.7%         10%
6.9%
$10.5        $63.1
$43.2
Table 1 Gross Expenditures -
Comparison of Fiscal Years 1974-75 to
1978-79 and Calendar Year 1979
$ (millions)
1979   628.2
1978-79 558.5
1977-78 544.5
1976-77 481.0
1975-76 474.8
1974-75 382.6
(Millions)
1. Administration 10.5
(Headquarters operations;
administrative and support
services; computer charges)
2. Field Operations 68.4
(Field personnel; building
occupancy charges)
3. Services for Families and
Children 63.1
(Group, receiving and foster
homes; treatment resources; day
care; special services to children;
adoption services)
4. Income Assistance 237.0
(Basic assistance; rehabilitation
and independence programs;
special allowances; adult
residential resources)
5. Services for Seniors and
Handicapped   104.2
(GAIN for Seniors; GAIN for
Handicapped)
6. Health Services 56.1
(Drugs; dental; optical; medical;
medical transportation;
emergency health aid)
7. Programs for the Retarded 43.2
(Residential programs at
Woodlands, Tranquille, Glendale
& other institutions)
8. Community Programs 24.9
(Grants to community-based
non-profit societies; work
activity projects)
9. Rental Assistance 20.8
(Renters' Tax Credit and
Shelter Aid for Elderly Renters)   	
628.2
Per
Cent
1.7
10.9
10.0
37.7
16.6
8.9
6.9
4.0
3.3
100
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
13
FEDERAL AND MUNICIPAL PROGRAM
COST-SHARING
The Ministry of Human Resources provides a wide
range of services to families and children, and those
disadvantaged because of age, handicap, or unemployment. Expenditures for the calendar year 1979
totalled $628.2 million. Table 1 illustrates a comparison from 1974-75 through 1979.
The Federal Government continued to contribute
a significant proportion of Ministry operating and
program costs under an agreement with the
provinces provided for in the Canada Assistance Plan
(CAP) Act of 1967.
According to the terms of the Canada Assistance
Plan, and within specified limits, the Province may
claim from the Federal Government up to 50 per
cent of the Provincial expenditures on income
assistance and social service benefits, provided they
are administered according to Provincial legislation
that is within the limits prescribed in the Federal
Canada Assistance Plan Act.
The Province continues to negotiate toward
optimum sharing and, because the Federal legislation
sets no ceiling on the gross amount to be shared, the
Federal share of costs has been increasing. However,
only some programs are shareable under the Canada
Assistance Plan Act. For instance, income assistance
and child welfare services are shareable, but the
Guaranteed Available Income for Need payments
to persons 60 years and over are only partially
shareable, and the Pharmacare expenditures to
persons 65 years and over are not yet shareable.
Municipalities also cost-share income assistance
programs, day care subsidies, health care programs,
maintenance of dependent children, homemaker
service, and adult care. In 1979, municipalities were
charged $25,181,161. Throughout this Report
reference is made to cost-sharing between the
Federal and Provincial Governments, but for the
programs described in this Report, municipal sharing
is included as part of the Provincial contribution.
iXAi.
  Section I
ADMINISTRATION
AND ORGANIZATION
CONTENTS
Regional Map 17
Ministry Organization and Administration 19
Organizational Chart 21
The Service Delivery System 23
Ministry Comptroller's Office 24
Management Services  24
Audit Team  24
Office Administration 24
Personnel and Staff Training 25
Information Services  26
Lower Mainland Special Services 26
Inspectors Program 28
Research and Statistics Division 28
Federal-Provincial Agreements 29
Community Human Resources and
Health Centres 30
  BRITISH COLUMBIA
HUMAN RESOURCES REGIONS
December, 1978
1. Vancouver City, East area
2. Vancouver City, Burrard area
3. Okanagan
4. Kootenays
5. Prince George/Cariboo
6. Fraser Valley
7. Prince Rupert/Bulkley Valley
8. North and South Peace River
Kamloops Mainline
Vancouver Island North of Malahat
11. Victoria and Area
12. Fraser South
13. Fraser North, Burnaby area
Burrard South Coast
15. Vancouver City, Downtown area
16. Vancouver City, South area
17. Vancouver City, West area
18. Surrey
19. Fraser North, Coquitlam area
9
10
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
19
MINISTRY ORGANIZATION
AND ADMINISTRATION
The Ministry of Human Resources delivers a broad
range of social services and income security
programs, including income assistance, assistance to
the handicapped and the elderly, child welfare
services, Pharmacare, services to the retarded,
subsidies for day care and homemakers and a variety
of other programs. Policy priorities and program
content for these services and programs are
determined by Government through legislation,
Orders-in-Council, and Ministerial direction.
The nature of the programs and functions of the
Ministry requires a regionalized structure with
supporting program divisions at headquarters.
Overall direction and control of the organization is
provided by the office of the Deputy Minister, and
the Executive Committee.
In recent years the Ministry has evolved a flexible,
functional reporting system to enable this large
and complex organization to respond quickly and
efficiently to changing policies, programs and
conditions. This reporting system, involves
delegation, assignment of accountabilities, direction
and control, so that power to act and responsibility
for monitoring are assigned to the appropriate staff
in an integrated structure.
CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION
The Deputy Minister and Assistant Deputy Minister
are responsible for ensuring that the Ministry's
policies, priorities, and program content, as
determined by the Government, are administered
appropriately. Eleven senior and middle
management positions report directly to the office of
the Deputy. The Assistant Deputy Minister carries, by
delegation, organizational responsibilities assigned to
the Deputy Minister, and any of these eleven
positions may report, on assignment, to the Assistant
Deputy Minister. In addition to the Deputy and
Assistant Deputy, the Office of the Deputy Minister
consists of a Co-ordinator of Executive Staff and
seven administrative support staff.
Executive Committee members advise the Deputy
Minister on matters relating to policy and
administration and assume overall responsibility for
assigned programs and the delivery of all services in
designated geographic areas of the Province. The
members include the Deputy and Assistant Deputy
Ministers, five Executive Directors, and the Ministry
Comptroller. Program and regional assignments to
Executive Committee members may change from
time to time in response to shifting workload
demands and priorities. Current assignments to
Executive Committee members are depicted on the
attached organization chart.
 20
HUMAN RESOURCES
INSTITUTIONS
There are three institutions established for
residential care of the mentally retarded: Glendale
Lodge in Victoria, Tranquille near Kamloops, and
Woodlands in New Westminster. Through these
institutions the Ministry provides comprehensive
assessment, planning, training and residential
services for mentally retarded adults and children.
HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT &
PROGRAM SERVICES
Four program divisions provide support to regional
and district staff. These are Family & Children's
Services, Income Assistance, Community Services
and Health Care Division. The major responsibilities
of these divisions include program planning coordination and monitoring, policy development and
documentation plus consultative services for regional
and district staff on policy, practice and procedural
questions.
A division of Special Support Services has been
established to provide specific centralized services to
regions in the Vancouver and Lower Mainland areas.
These services include after-hours emergency
services, court services, emergency homemakers, coordination of volunteers, nutritional consultation, and
a Child Abuse Team.
The Office of the Comptroller is responsible for the
provision of support services to the organization in
areas related to accounting and office administration.
Specific responsibilities include payment of accounts
and payroll, auditing to ensure payments and
practices correspond to policy, assisting in budget
preparation, provision of financial management
reports, distribution of office supplies and equipment,
managing the physical plant of the Ministry, and the
preparation of statistics and research.
The Personnel and Staff Training Division provides
support services in the areas of organization and
classification studies, labour relations, safety, and in
the recruitment, orientation, work performance
evaluation, and training of staff. This division also
has responsibility for the delivery of library services
to the Ministry's staff.
Other central support divisions
include: Management Services, which is responsible
for co-ordinating the development, design,
implementation and maintenance of management
information and operating systems; Information
Services, which provides public relations and
communication services; and the Federal/Provincial
Agreements Section, which is responsible for
consultation and evaluation of Ministry programs
with respect to cost-sharing, preparation and coordination of Ministry proposals for federal-provincial
and inter-provincial meetings, negotiations with
federal ministries with respect to cost-sharing and
related federal-provincial concerns.
Programs such as SAFER (Shelter Aid for Elderly
Renters), Pharmacare, and the Bus Pass Program are
also operated centrally.
 MINISTRY OF HUMAN RESOURCES
ORGANIZATION CHART,
DECEMBER 31, 1979
MINISTER OF HUMAN RESOURCES
Honourable Grace M. McCarthy
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER
John Noble - Deputy Minister
E.L. Northup - Assistant Deputy Minister
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
D. Bingham
REGIONS 5, 7 & 8
Family & Children's
Services
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
S. Travers
REGIONS 10 & 11
Glendale
Income Assistance
PREP
Inspectors
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
R.K. Butler
REGIONS 3, 4 & 9
Tranquille
Personnel and
Staff Training
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
R.F. Cronin
Superintendent of
Child Welfare
Pharmacare
Management Services
Information Services
Federal/Provincial
Agreements
I, „;v: : , r.Lj ,X„.^^.„.
REGIONS 1, 2, 15
16 & 17
Woodlands
Lower Mainland
Special Services
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
H. Saville
REGIONS 6, 12,
13, 14, 18 & 19
Community Projects
Health Care
MINISTRY COMPTROLLER
M. Cook
S& 1:      .
mgvmmmm •
Financial Services
Accounting Services
GAIN for Seniors &
Handicapped
SAFER Program
Audit Services
Research
Office Administration
LIAISON WITH:
Corrections
Inter-Ministry
Children's Committee
LIAISON WITH:
Labour
Housing
Employment &
Immigration
LIAISON WITH:
Universities &
Colleges
LIAISON WITH:
Education
LIAISON WITH:
Legislation Counsel
Health
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
23
THE SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEM
The Ministry's basic delivery unit for the numerous
social welfare programs is the local district office,
under the direction of a district supervisor. District
offices are located in all larger communities and
within relatively easy commuting distance of the
smaller communities, except along the British
Columbia coast and in the northwest extremities of
the Province. By design and policy, the size of the
offices is limited and an effort is made to identify the
office with a particular neighbourhood or area.
The Province has been divided into management
regions, each under the direction of a regional
manager. The Regional Manager, who reports to an
Executive Director, is accountable for delivery of
social services and income assistance programs
within his region. His responsibility is to ensure that
delivery takes place according to established policy,
and to the level of quality defined by the Ministry.
Within these constraints, the Regional Manager has
significant autonomy in managing staff, deployment
of resources, reviewing and approving contractual
services, recommending grants to community
agencies, and approving services in exceptional
situations. His responsibilities also include monitoring
services and expenditures, co-ordinating regional
personnel and staff training activities, budget
formulation, and handling public complaints and
appeals.
In 1979, three new regions were established in
the Vancouver Lower Mainland area. They were
created by re-defining the boundaries of existing
regions—a change that reflects the increase in
population in the past few years in these areas and
subsequent demand for services. Similarly, there
were several district offices that had grown beyond
optimum proportions. This growth resulted in the
establishment of additional district supervisors for
Kelowna, Langley, Vernon, Surrey/Guildford, Maple
Ridge, 100 Mile House/Williams Lake, Kamloops,
North Vancouver/Lonsdale, Abbotsford, Penticton
and Nanaimo.
Reporting to the Regional Manager are the District
Supervisors of each office within the region. District
Supervisors are responsible for operation of their
district offices and also participate in regional
planning activities.
The Ministry's 19 regions, as of December 1979,
are:
Region 1: Vancouver City, East area (6 offices);
Region 2: Vancouver City, Burrard area (9 offices);
Region 3: Okanagan (headquarters at Vernon,
offices at Grand Forks, Kelowna, Oliver, Penticton
and Vernon);
Region 4: Kootenays (headquarters at Nelson,
offices at Castlegar, Cranbrook, Creston, Fernie,
Invermere, Kimberley, Nelson, New Denver and
Trail);
Region 5: Prince George/Cariboo (headquarters at
Prince George, offices at Prince George (5 offices),
Fort St. James, Mackenzie, 100 Mile House,
Quesnel, Vanderhoof and Williams Lake);
Region 6:  Fraser Valley (headquarters at
Abbotsford, offices at Langley, Aldergrove,
Abbotsford, Clearbrook, Chilliwack and Hope);
Region 7: Prince Rupert/Bulkley Valley
(headquarters at Terrace, offices at Burns Lake,
Houston, Kitimat, Prince Rupert, Queen Charlotte
City, Smithers, Terrace and Granisle);
Region 8: North and South Peace River
(headquarters at Dawson Creek, offices at Dawson
Creek, Fort St. John, Fort Nelson, Chetwynd and
Cassiar);
Region 9: Kamloops Mainline (headquarters at
Kamloops, offices at Cache Creek, Golden,
Kamloops (2 offices), Lillooet, Merritt, Revelstoke,
Salmon Arm, Clearwater and Princeton);
Region 10: Vancouver Island North of Malahat
(headquarters at Duncan, offices at Campbell
River, Courtenay, Duncan, Nanaimo, Wellington,
Parksville, Port Alberni, Port Hardy and Alert
Bay);
Region 11:  Victoria and area (Capital Regional
District) (13 offices);
Region 12: Fraser South (headquarters at Delta,
offices at Delta (2 offices) Richmond (2 offices) and
White Rock);
Region 13: Fraser North (headquarters at New
Westminster, offices at Burnaby (3 offices) and
New Westminster (2 offices);
Region 14: Burrard South Coast (offices at
Sechelt, North Vancouver, West Vancouver,
Squamish, Bella Coola and Powell River);
Region 15: Vancouver City, Downtown area
(4 offices);
Region 16: Vancouver City, south area (9 offices);
Region 17: Vancouver City, West area (9 offices);
Region 18: Surrey area (offices at Newton,
Guildford, Whalley, Cloverdale and Bridgview);
Region 19: Fraser North (headquarters at
Coquitlam, offices at Port Moody, Port Coquitlam
(3 offices), Maple Ridge (2 offices) and Mission.
 24
HUMAN RESOURCES
MINISTRY COMPTROLLER'S OFFICE
The Ministry Comptroller is responsible for all
matters pertaining to financial accounting and fiscal
control within the Ministry.
The Ministry's main accounting office is located in
Victoria. A branch office serves the Vancouver area.
Reporting to the Comptroller are the support groups
of Research, Office Administration and Internal
Audit. The activities of each group are reported
separately.
The Accounting Division processes all Ministry
expenditures and revenue. It distributes monthly
financial statements reflecting the current financial
position of all areas of the Ministry and Institutions.
Considerable effort is directed towards improving
accounting policies and standards; analyzing and
evaluating administration and operating procedures.
The Division also provides consultation to senior
management throughout the budget process and
prepares financial reports.
During 1979, the budget process was further
developed to improve the financial decision-making
process and to increase field management
accountability.
MANAGEMENT SERVICES
The objective of Management Services Division is
to provide the Ministry with effective management
information and operating systems. It supports line
management and staff in identifying and formulating
their needs, and co-ordinates activities with British
Columbia Systems Corporation, which provides
equipment and specialized technical expertise.
During 1979 the GAIN Processing and Payment
System was introduced beyond the Lower Mainland
and Metropolitan Victoria. All Ministry offices are
now using this procedure. New systems for the
Zenith Helpline for Children and the Bus Pass
Program were completed and installed.
A new Universal Pharmacare and Province-wide
on-line inquiry and data entry system was completed
and will be installed during 1980.
Requirement definitions for a major Family and
Children's Services and a Woodland's Management
Information and Service Support System were
completed. This will form the basis for new
development work during 1980.
AUDIT TEAM
The objective of the Ministry's Audit Team is to
audit and evaluate standards and administration of
Ministry's Programs. During 1979, the Audit Team
consisted of nine auditors, a supervisor and a
stenographer.
The Audit Team's first priority during 1979 was to
perform internal audits of Ministry offices and
programs, concentrating on determining the standard
of compliance with policies and accuracy of
recording of information, and on evaluating
operational efficiency and control.
The second priority was to perform financial
reviews and operational audits of institutions where
Ministry funds or services are provided, and in
organizations operated by societies receiving Ministry
grants and/or funding to administer social services.
During 1979, the Audit Team completed the
following audits:
Ministry District Offices    97
Ministry PREP Offices       5
Society-operated Organizations and
Institutions    10
Ministry Central Payroll Offices     2
Ministry Central Office Divisions       1
Ministry-Operated Institutions' Payroll
Offices    3
On the basis of audit recommendations,
improvements have been made to individual office
procedures, and corrective action has been taken
concerning specific client cases. Also,
recommendations have resulted in policy changes
and clarifications having general application to
Ministry Programs.
The cost of the Audit Team is shared equally with
the Federal Government.
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION
The Division of Office Administration provides
a range of administrative services to the Ministry.
These include analyzing and consulting on
administrative requirements in various program
areas; co-ordinating the purchase of supplies and
equipment; planning and co-ordinating office space
and buildings; and printing and distributing program
policy and procedures, forms, and administrative
information.
The Division is also responsible for Headquarters
mail services and for the issuing of bus passes to
senior citizens.
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
25
PERSONNEL AND STAFF TRAINING
The objective of the Division of Personnel and Staff
Training is to provide support services to the
Ministry's management in the areas of organization
and classification; labour relations; safety; and in the
recruitment, orientation, work-performance
evaluation and training of staff. The Division also has
responsibility for the delivery of library services to
Ministry staff. As of December 31, 1979 the Ministry
had 4,806 full-time permanent positions.
Personnel Services
The services of the Personnel Section include
providing technical advice and consultation to line
management in areas of discipline and grievances,
participating in and co-ordinating the recruitment
activities of the Ministry, preparing classification
reports and organizational studies, representing the
Ministry in negotiations with unions, co-ordinating
the Ministry's safety program and providing contract
interpretations.
These services are provided to the Vancouver
regions by an office in Vancouver, to Woodlands and
Tranquille by personnel staff assigned to those
institutions and to the rest of the Province by the
Headquarters office in Victoria. The system of
delivering services by assigning full responsibilities
in a geographic area to personnel officers was
established to provide a more integrated approach to
personnel activities in regions, divisions and
institutions.
During 1979 the Personnel Section placed emphasis
upon the skills and techniques necessary to good
recruitment and selection. A pilot project to
streamline and further decentralize the recruitment
of auxiliary staff was introduced.
Emphasis has also been placed on the performance-
enhancement process. Representing the Ministry in
B.C.G.E.U. contract negotiations was an additional
priority in 1979.
Staff Training
The majority of staff training services are
organized by staff training co-ordinators located in
regions and institutions who report to the regional or
institutional manager. The Staff Training Section at
Headquarters in Victoria provides the necessary coordination and leadership for Ministry-wide projects.
In 1979 the Staff Training Section collaborated with
the universities of Victoria and British Columbia in
establishing a decentralized B.S.W. program offering
formal academic training in the Interior and the
North. A supervisory training program was
sponsored for Ministry supervisors and programs
were also administered to sponsor Ministry staff in
courses in Public Administration and Welfare Aid
Services.
The Staff Training Section also provided support to
the field in assessing staff training needs; supplied
materials for training staff to work in the areas of
child abuse and neglect, as well as materials for
training rural social workers.
Other projects included the development of a
training package for coping with hostile and
aggressive clients.
Library
The library continues to support the programs of
the Ministry with an increased collection on family
therapy, child abuse counselling, foster parent
training, and research on the handicapped.
In May, to acquire more physical space and further
integrate services, the entire library collection plus
two staff members moved from Victoria to Vancouver.
In August, the audio-visual equipment of the former
Media Resources was integrated with the Library.
The circulation of books, films, video tapes and
periodical reprints continues to grow to support
training programs such as child abuse and volunteer
foster care. To support this, heavily-used films have
been duplicated and aging 16mm and playback
equipment replaced.
Table 2 Personnel Activities
1978
1979
Vacancies Filled
922
826
Promotions
122
136
Reclassifications
79
247
Resignations
577
624
Transfers (non-promotional
movement of staff)
176
206
 26
HUMAN RESOURCES
INFORMATION SERVICES
The Information Services division, formed in 1978,
clarified its role and responsibilities during 1979 and
handled a variety of projects arising from the
Ministry's increased emphasis on informing the public
about its services.
Many of the division's activities during the year
were centred around The Year of the Child and the
Family. The division developed advertising programs
and communications support for the two major
media advertising campaigns held in conjunction
with The Year of the Child and the Family—the
Helpline for Children and Special Needs Adoption.
The division designed the Year of the Child and
Family logo, assisted in setting up the Achievement
Award program and assisted in arrangements for the
production of Year of the Child and Family material
for the opening of the Legislature in March. With the
opening of the YCF Project Unit Office in July,
responsibility for the administration of the Awards
program and other public relations support activities
for Year of the Child and the Family were
transferred to that office.
Information Services activities encompassed three
areas—producing information materials for the use of
staff in informing clients and the public about
Ministry activities, providing public relations support
to a number of Ministry program initiatives, and
assisting the Minister, Executive and staff in media
relations.
In 1979, the division produced six issues of the
newsletter PEOPLE, focusing on family and
children's services. PEOPLE was distributed to staff,
clients, interest groups, community leaders and the
general public as a way to keep the public informed
about ongoing Ministry activities.
A series of brochures on Family and Children's
services and a poster on new income assistance
benefits were prepared to inform clients or potential
clients about programs. The division also supplied
district offices with the Welfare Rights and GAIN
booklet produced by the Vancouver Peoples Law
School and with the Information Guide for Senior
Citizens produced by the Social Planning and Review
Council of B.C.
Press releases issued by the division included a
series of feature stories on community grants, family
support workers, community volunteers, family and
children's services, and families who have adopted
special needs children. The division also assisted the
YCF Project Unit in identifying newsworthy activities
in the Ministries of Human Resources, Health,
Education and the Attorney-General for a series of
television public service features.
LOWER MAINLAND SPECIAL SERVICES
Lower Mainland Special Services provides a variety
of specialized services, primarily to the Vancouver
and Lower Mainland areas. Staff of the eleven
Special Services Teams are trained experts, with
specialties in their own fields. They act as
consultants, offering information, advice and are an
expansion to the services already available through
staff in the Ministry's district offices.
The largest section of Lower Mainland Special
Services is Emergency Services, operating from two
locations—Vancouver and Coquitlam. More than
sixty crisis intervention workers respond to calls
relating to child welfare, child abuse, family
counselling and disputes, juvenile repatriation,
emergency income assistance and personal crisis. In
conjunction with the Metropolitan Board of Health,
the Police Department, the Corrections Branch and
other organizations, emergency social and health
services are made available to the public twenty-four
hours each day, seven days a week.
A major addition to the Emergency Services
Complex is the Helpline for Children—a twenty-four-
hour child abuse hotline which began operation in
August of this year. Staff specializing in child abuse
procedures man the Province-wide Zenith telephone
line and respond to over 2300 calls a month. Some
calls relate to possible child abuse and neglect while
others involve telephone counselling.
The Ministry's two Child Abuse Teams are also
based in Vancouver and Coquitlam. Social workers
on these teams are specialized consultants in child
abuse and neglect with expertise in recognition,
intervention, reporting and followup procedures. The
teams offer advice, information, and support to social
workers and other professionals in Vancouver and
the Lower Mainland regions. They also provide staff
training to district offices throughout the Province.
Associated with the Child Abuse Team is the Post
Partum Counselling Service, providing assistance to
new parents who are experiencing difficulty in
coping with changes following the birth of a child.
This program responds to more than 500 women
and their families each year.
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
27
The Medical Clinic offers a comprehensive health
service to children in the care of the Ministry. Staff
doctors examine children coming into care and
monitor their routine health care. Staff maintain
close liaison with responsible social workers and
offer advice and information on health care, services
for handicapped children and adolescent counselling.
Working closely with the Medical Clinic are the
psychiatrists and psychologists in Clinical Services,
who offer consultative services and treatment. This
team also provides support to Ministry staff involved
in apprehension, custody and adoption court cases.
Court Service Workers provide liaison between
Vancouver regions and the Family Court system on
legal actions under the Protection of Children Act,
Juvenile Delinquents Act or the Children of
Unmarried Parents Act. These workers assist Ministry
social workers in representing the Superintendent of
Child Welfare and the individual client.
The focus of the In-Home Services Section is to
help income assistance and low income families in
improving or maintaining the quality of home life.
In-Home Services workers provide homemaking and
handyman services to clients in emergency
circumstances where such assistance will preserve
the family unit. The most important contribution is
made in situations where apprehension of children
may be the other alternative. In 1979, 14,040 families
received such services.
Transition House is a Ministry-operated resource
for Vancouver area women and children in transition
from situations of family violence, abuse or domestic
breakdown. Staff assist residents to obtain housing
and medical and legal information, and in making
preparations to alter or improve their circumstances.
633 women and children depended on this facility in
1979.
In 1979, Volunteer Services co-ordinated the work
of 300 volunteers to provide a variety of services to
families, children, the elderly and the handicapped.
The work of these volunteers is invaluable, and at
least 4,000 people benefit from their services each
month.
Table 3 Lower Mainland Special Services,
Court Services Division, Vancouver
Statistics: Protection of Children Act, 1979
Families
Apprehensions  506
Supervision Orders   112
Temporary Orders  372
Permanent Orders  149
Other Appearances
(Adjournments
Reports, Orders for
Substitutional
services, etc.)   1,644
Children
584
164
426
176
2,174
Table 4 Statistics: Children of Unmarried
Parents Act, 1979
Active Cases   239
Brief Service   16
New Referrals  49
Transferred Cases  6
Closed Cases   30
Interim Lump Settlements  2
Lump Sum Settlements  2
Three-party Agreements  14
Court Action   250
(a) Laying Complaint (new cases)  30
(b) Affiliation/Maintenance Order  16
(c) Show Cause  26
(d) Application to Vary  15
(e) Application to Rescind    3
(f) Garnishee Order   2
(g) Application for Security
for Performance Order  0
(h) Provision/Reciprocal Enforcement
of Maintenance Order (REMO)  3
(i) CUPA & FRA applications combined    5
(j) Appeal in County Court  2
(k) Adjournments  106
(1) Other (Report to Court, Struck off
list, Application dismissed,
Complaint withdrawn, Committal/Bench
Warrant Order for Substitute
service  42
 28
HUMAN RESOURCES
INSPECTORS' PROGRAM
This program was initiated in mid 1976 to
investigate suspected or alleged abuse by clients of
welfare programs administered by the Ministry of
Human Resources. In addition to conducting
investigations, the Inspectors make recommendations
for policy and procedures which will serve to
prevent potential fraud. They recover, where
possible, any client-initiated over-payments of
benefits and prepare and submit appropriate cases to
Crown Counsel for prosecution.
The Provincial Co-ordinator administers the work
of 29 Inspectors, located at regional offices
throughout the Province, including one Inspector
working full time on Pharmacare abuses. It is their
responsibility to receive complaints and information
concerning alleged fraudulent practises by people
applying for, or in receipt of benefits.
The Inspectors concentrate their efforts towards
identifying weaknesses in application and
administrative procedures which could allow for
fraud by those so inclined. They attend workshops,
lectures and study groups to advise field workers on
ways of preventing fraud, or detecting an attempt.
Close liaison is maintained with case workers who
are kept informed of the progress of investigations.
Prosecution is resorted to in the more flagrant cases,
and consideration is also given to rehabilitation and
the effect of prosecution on the dependents, as well
as to other recourse such as repayment. GAIN
benefits are immediately terminated to those found
to be ineligible as a result of investigation.
Costs of the Inspectors' Program are shared equally
with the Federal Government.
Table 5 Monthly Reports of cases
referred to Inspectors for
Investigation (1979)
January 460 July 275
February 305 August 321
March   381 September  386
April   306 October 338
May 320 November 351
June 394 December 272
Table 6 Statistics for all Regions-
January 1-December 1, 1979
Total number of cases reported for investigation 3,852
Charges laid 207
Cases still before the Courts 232
Cases still under investigation  1,873
Unfounded complaints, or insufficient conclusive
evidence to proceed 982
Settlements otherwise (than Court) negotiated 523
Values of recoveries made, ordered or agreed to $ 459,770.67
Total amount of monthly assistance terminated   $ 275,802.54
(The above figure represents only the amount of monthly
assistance being granted at the time of termination. It does not
attempt to estimate an accumulation of the amount which
may have been received in the months ahead, had it not been
terminated, nor does it reflect the preventive effects of the
Inspectors Program.)
RESEARCH AND STATISTICS DIVISION
The Research and Statistics Division is responsible
for development and maintenance of Income
Assistance statistics, and for special research projects
on Income Assistance. During 1979, major advances
in statistical reports and information were achieved;
one of the Division's on-going research projects was
completed, and a new project was undertaken.
The Division has continued to develop the use of
computer produced statistics for Income Assistance.
A compendium of Income Assistance statistics is now
produced monthly for senior staff and support
divisions. Development of new reports using findings
from the Division's research efforts are added
periodically. The Division has also assumed
responsibility for developing a pilot compendium of
statistics for the Family and Children's Services
programs.
The Divisions' computer data systems have
continued to be expanded with additional
information on the Income Assistance programs. For
the first time, the Division's staff provided training
for representatives from other support divisions
(Accounting Division, Federal-Provincial Agreements
Section, Income Assistance Division and Management
Services) in the use of our computer data systems.
The Division has assumed the responsibility to
maintain these data systems and to provide
consultation and support to the new users.
A major research project to assess the process for
determining eligibility for the GAIN Supplement to
the Federal Old Age Security/Guaranteed Income
Supplement/Spouse's Allowance Program was
completed and submitted to the Ministry and the
Federal Government. The report was accepted and
its findings were applied to the cost-sharing
arrangements between the Federal and Provincial
Governments.
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
29
Development of the Predictive Model for GAIN
Caseloads and Costs continued. The Basic Income
Assistance Predictive Model and the Model for GAIN
for Seniors and Handicapped will be integrated in
1980. These models were used to determine 1980-81
budget estimates for GAIN programs. The Basic
Income Assistance Model was also used to evaluate
the effects on the Ministry's caseload of the 1979
changes to the Unemployment Insurance program.
The first reports using the Income Assistance
Survey Data were completed in 1979. Coding and
editing of the data were completed in early 1979 and
the data has become a major information resource.
Analysis of the survey data will continue during the
next year. This analysis will focus on policy options
available to improve the Ministry's delivery of
services.
In 1979 the Division was assigned responsibility for
evaluating the Victoria Earnings Exemption Pilot
Project. This project was due to run from July 1,
1979 to December 31, 1979, and The Division's
responsibility includes ongoing monitoring and the
completion of a final project report.
FEDERAL-PROVINCIAL AGREEMENTS
The objectives of the Federal-Provincial
Agreements Section are to ensure that, within
Ministry policy, maximum revenues are obtained
through federal cost-sharing agreements; that the
Ministry's position, as it relates to federal programs,
is presented in federal-provincial, inter-provincial,
and inter-ministry meetings; and that in the
preparation of Ministry program policy, the impact of
federal cost-sharing agreements and other
government and Ministry programs are taken into
account.
The section is responsible for consultation and
evaluation of Ministry programs with respect to cost-
sharing; negotiation and consultation with federal
officials on cost-sharing legislation, and on federal
programs such as Unemployment Insurance and
Family Allowance programs which affect Ministry
programs; and negotiation with federal officials on
income assistance, and family and children's services
to native people. Responsibilities also include
preparation and co-ordination of Ministry proposals
for federal-provincial and inter-provincial meetings of
ministers and officials; organization of inter-provincial
meetings of ministers and officials of Social Services
when held in British Columbia; and consultation with
appropriate Ministry divisions and other Ministries
regarding program proposals developed by the
Ministry of Human Resources.
Negotiations and consultations with the federal
government during 1979 were highlighted by
discussions on recent and proposed changes to the
Unemployment Insurance Program and their impact
on Ministry programs; the Canada Assistance Plan
cost-sharing implications of the GAIN for Seniors
Supplement, and the definition of likelihood of need
income levels; and the implications for cost-sharing
resulting from the Canada Assistance Plan/
Established Program Financing interface.
Negotiations with the Department of Indian Affairs
on the responsibility for providing social services to
status Indians in British Columbia were slowed by
the federal election and appointment of a new
Federal Minister of Indian and Northern Affairs.
These negotiations are expected to continue in 1980.
In the meantime, the Section reviewed existing
agreements with the Department of Indian Affairs to
clarify policy regarding the amounts charged to the
federal government for providing child welfare
services on Reserves as well as services to retarded
adults living off Reserves.
The Section participated in the Interprovincial Task
Force Conference of Ministers of Social Services
through the production of a report. The Section
participated fully in the work of the Task Force,
providing extensive inventories of all British
Columbia income security programs including those
of other Ministries; preparing a document on the
jurisdictional history of war veterans' income security
programs in Canada; and assisting in the overall
preparation of the Task Force Report. The Section
also had a key role in preparation of a report by
provincial Deputy Ministers, "Issues in the Income
Security System", which was presented to the
Ministers.
The interministerial liaison functions of the Section
included discussions with the Ministry of Labour on
the impact of recent and proposed changes to the
Unemployment Insurance Program. Liaison with the
Ministry of Health involved cost-sharing for the Long
Term Care Homemakers Program, and adult day
care under the Canada Assistance Plan, as well as
cost-sharing under the Vocational Rehabilitation of
Disabled Persons Act.
 30
HUMAN RESOURCES
COMMUNITY HUMAN RESOURCES AND
HEALTH CENTRES
There are four Community Human Resources and
Health Centres in British Columbia: three in the
north—Queen Charlotte Islands, Houston and
Granisle; the fourth in James Bay, Victoria. The
centres are jointly funded by the Ministries of Human
Resources and Health. Elected citizen boards are
responsible for the administration and delivery of
social services, health care services and community
programs. In November, 1979, the communities
served by the four centres elected Boards to
continue the provision of services in co-ordination
with the Ministry of Human Resources and the
Ministry of Health.
James Bay's centre delivers health care services,
social services and community programs. During the
last year the centre saw a growth in community
support and education programs. There are no
longer Probation Services attached to James Bay;
this can be attributed, in part, to the success of other
support services. The volunteer program has over
160 volunteers with their bureau while another 200
volunteers participate in community programs. The
Ministry of Human Resources has funded a family
program that reaches out to many children and
families. The centre, in the past year, hired a
nutritionist to work with the Hot Meal for Seniors
Program housed in the community centre. The
alternate school program has seen a high percentage
of its students return to local schools and/or join the
job market. With supportive, educative and
preventative programs, many at-risk families and
children are requiring less costly services.
Granisle's Centre continues to expand to meet
growing community social and health needs of a
mining town on the shore of Babine Lake. The two
mines, Granisle and Noranda, have worked closely
with the centre on an Employee Assistance Program.
Services for families are provided by an early
intervention program which helps reduce the effects
of family conflict and violence. Granisle's new
building to house health, social and community
services should be completed in early 1980.
Houston has added health care staff to its centre in
the past year to keep abreast of growth. The
population has almost doubled since 1976 with mine
and forestry expansion. Houston's services include
primary health care, social services and community
programs. This last year has seen an increase in
community education and life styling programs
which have involved citizens in their own health and
social responsibilities. An active community outreach
program has facilitated other community self-help
programs. Houston, in the next year, will be affected
considerably by an increase in the demand for
services as a result of mill and mine expansion.
The Queen Charlotte Islands' centre delivers
primary health care and provincial services to 5,600
residents. About one-quarter of the Charlotte's
population is Haida Indian, living in two native
villages Haida and Skidegate. There are five Human
Resource and Health Centre clinics on the Islands
located at Haida, Masset, Port Clements, Queen
Charlotte City and Sandspit. Staff from these centres
serve over fifteen settlements— some so remote that
access is only possible by seaplane. The Board
represents all of the Islands' communities. The new
Board, elected in 1979, will provide, in co-operation
with the Ministries of Health and Human Resources,
acute health care services with an emphasis on
prevention, and will continue its delivery of statutory
services complemented by a new thrust of
community development.
 Section D
FAMILY AND
CHILDREN'S
SERVICES
CONTENTS
Introduction 33
Preventive and Protective Services for
Children and their Families 34
Repatriation of Children 36
Child In Care Services  36
Foster Home Program 37
Group Homes for Children 38
Therapeutic Homes for Children 38
Specialized Resources  38
Adoptions 39
Post Adoption Services 40
Family Support Homemakers 41
Special Services to Children 41
Infant Development Program   42
Child Day Care Services 42
Children's Rehabilitation Resources 43
Rehabilitation Resources for
Handicapped Children  44
Program Evaluation and Planning Support Unit  ... 44
Year of the Child and the Family 46
British Columbia Council for the Family 48
  Report of the Ministry, 1979
33
INTRODUCTION
The Year of the Child and the Family in British
Columbia, 1979, has been a year of activity for
Family and Children's Services programs, with
expanded emphasis on those programs providing
support to families, enabling them to care for their
children within their own homes and communities.
Use of family support programs such as the
Emergency Homemaker Service, Infant Development
Program, and Day Care Program, is increasing.
Family Support Workers, introduced to the Ministry's
staffing component in 1978, are proving to be an
important and effective resource in assisting families
during crisis.
During the year, a temporary Special Project Unit
was established to co-ordinate a wide range of Year
of the Child and the Family activities for a number of
Ministries within Government. This Unit worked
closely with the Provincial and Regional Inter-
Ministry Children's Committees, and was instrumental
in organizing the presentation of more than 450
achievement awards, and funding for 31 special
projects throughout the Province.
In conjunction with the Ministry of Education, an
expanded Rehabilitation Resources Program was
introduced in September, providing severely
handicapped children with a chance to obtain an
education in a normal school setting. Personal
attendants were made available to provide the
necessary physical and personal support needed for
these children to remain in the classroom.
For those children in the care of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare, there have been a
number of initiatives designed to strengthen the
service they receive. A 'tracking system', to ensure
regular review of the planning for every child in
care, is being formalized. Children's needs do not
wait, and every effort must be made to offer stability
and security to each child as early as possible.
Ideally, this should be with the child's own family.
Where this is not possible, an adopting or permanent
foster home is sought.
In conjunction with the B.C. Federation of Foster
Parents, a "Life Book" was developed, and given to
each child in care. Each of these children will now
be able to retain a personal record of those
important mementos and facts which might
otherwise be lost.
An increase in foster home rates was granted on
November 1, 1979, to reflect the increasing costs of
providing for basic maintenance requirements.
British Columbia's foster parents play the major role
in our services to children in care.
Through the media, and with the very able
assistance of the Adopting Parents Association, a
special public appeal was undertaken during the Fall
to locate adoptive homes for children with special
needs.
While the number of approved adopting families
awaiting placement of a healthy young infant
remains very high in relation to the number of
children available, there are still many children who,
for a variety of reasons, require a home that can
provide extra support. The response thus far has
been gratifying.
Of major impact during the Year of the Child and
the Family, has been the introduction of the Zenith
Helpline for Children. This 24-hour service is
designed to provide ready access to trained
professionals by anyone wishing to report situations
involving child abuse or neglect. Parents and
children who themselves are facing a crisis requiring
assistance, may also call the Helpline. The need for
this service has been demonstrated by more than
2300 calls being received each month.
In co-operation with the Ministries of Education,
Health, and the Attorney-General, a Child Abuse
Manual for use by professionals dealing with child
abuse situations, was completed and distributed. As
well, a Ministry training program designed to assist
staff in dealing with child abuse problems, was
developed and implemented, it is anticipated that in
co-operation with the Provincial Inter-Ministry
Children's Committee, additional training can also be
extended to other professionals during 1980.
A review of the public response to the White
Paper outlining proposals for new Child Welfare
Legislation has been completed. More than 1200
written submissions were received, many with
constructive suggestions that will undoubtedly be of
assistance in preparing new legislation.
Although the 70's have been years of much
activity and achievement, there remains much to be
done if we are to effectively meet the needs of those
families and children we will be serving in the 80's.
 34
HUMAN RESOURCES
PREVENTIVE AND PROTECTIVE
SERVICES FOR CHILDREN AND THEIR
FAMILIES
Protective and preventive services to families and
children operate under the mandate of the Protection
of Children Act, a provincial statute providing legal
authority for the Superintendent of Child Welfare to
intervene in the affairs of a family. Where necessary,
the Superintendent may involve the Provincial Court
when care of a child falls below the acceptable
standards of the community or when a child's life or
health may be endangered by the action, or lack of
action of the parents.
Only a small portion of cases result in court action.
The Superintendent's representatives seek
alternatives to assist families in resolving their
problems and improving the standard of child care
so the family may remain together. The alternative is
court action which may result in the removal of a
child or children from the home.
In all matters involving the protection of children
and services to families, the most successful planning
has been developed with community understanding
and participation.
Services to maintain children in their families have
been greatly enhanced by the Ministry's Family
Support Worker program, introduced in 1978. Under
this program, family support workers have been
assigned to each district office of the Ministry to
provide direct and intensive service to families in
resolving problems which might otherwise lead to
the removal of the children from the home. These
workers also provide assistance when a child is being
returned to the family after a period of separation.
In 1979, the Ministry developed new initiatives to
improve the standard of practice of Ministry staff,
and to involve other disciplines in the shared
responsibility for assessment and treatment in child
abuse cases.
The Helpline for Children was established to
provide a toll-free, Province-wide telephone line for
reporting of concerns involving child protection.
Parents who are facing a crisis which might result in
the mistreatment of their children, and children
themselves may call the Helpline. A twenty-four hour
emergency service is available to respond to all calls.
The Inter-Ministerial Child Abuse/Neglect Policy
Handbook was also released in 1979. This manual
contains information about the identification of child
abuse and neglect and establishes guidelines for
reporting and follow-up procedures for staff of the
Ministries of Human Resources, Education, Health,
and the Attorney-General. In addition, a Province-
wide training program was developed for Ministry
staff in dealing with child abuse and neglect.
In response to public concern about this problem,
the Ministry, under its mandate for the protection of
children, continues its commitment to improving
procedures and maintains a close involvement with
other professionals to develop a multi-disciplinary
approach. The two child-abuse teams in Vancouver
and Coquitlam continue to offer a consultative
service to Ministry staff and to liaise with community
groups.
1979 saw the expansion of Parents in Crisis groups.
These volunteer self-help groups provide a service to
parents who have harmed their children or who feel
they are capable of doing so.
With the development of knowledge and skills on
the part of professionals in the area of child abuse
and neglect, plus the steady increase of community-
based support services for families, children who
would have been separated from their families are
being safely maintained in their own homes.
Since the release in 1978 of the White Paper
proposing new legislation for families and children,
more than 1200 written submissions have been
received from interested groups and individuals
throughout the Province. The comments and
recommendations have been studied with
representatives from the Ministries of Human
Resources and the Attorney-General through a
Committee on Children's Legislation. It is expected
that the proposed new Family and Child Services Act
will be introduced in the Legislature in 1980.
The Ministry's role in providing assistance to the
Supreme Court in matters relating to custody and
access of children under the Divorce Act has
continued through the current year. A small increase
was shown in the number of custody reports being
requested.
The Ministry of the Attorney-General has
responsibility for reports on custody matters arising
out of the Family Relations Act, which was
proclaimed March 31st, 1979, and which replaced the
Equal Guardianship of Infants Act. In all issues
involving the future of children, the Courts consider
the best interests of the child and frequently place
emphasis on reconciliation counselling to assist
parents in resolving their conflicts. As the need for
these services increases, the Ministry of Human
Resources is reviewing its responsibility and
programs in this area.
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
35
Table 7 Cases* Receiving Services Related to Protection of Children by Type of Service
for Fiscal Years 1977/78 and 1978/79
Type of Service
Custody
Repatriation**
Immigration
TOTAL
Opened during
Year
1977/78 1978/79
171 186
461 469
5 9
637 664
Carried during
Year
1977/78 1978/79
273 276
588 558
13 13
874 847
Incomplete at
end of year
1977/78   1978/79
90
107
4
201
164
211
6
381
* Cases are the number of family units receiving services on behalf of their children.
** These figures do not include all of Regions 1, 2, 15, 16, and 17; an additional 273 repatriations during the year 1977/78
and 216 repatriations during the year 1978/79 were handled by the Gastown office.
Table 8 Children in Care by Age and Legal Status as of December 31, 1979
Non-Wards
B.C. & PCA Wards (before the
Court and temporary)
PCA Wards (Others)
All Other Court Wards
Under 3
63
315
272
36
686
3-5
64
248
288
79
679
Age Groups in
6- 11
218
432
1048
201
Years
12- 15
452
477
1522
376
2827
16- 18
381
232
1536
481
2630
Totals
1178
1704
4666
1173
TOTAL
1899
8721
 36
HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 9 Admissions and Discharges
Welfare for Fiscal Year 1978-79 *
of Children to Care of Superintendent of Child
By Agreement
2213
WM
By apprehension * (Protection of Children Act)
2017
By Committal**
372
■
By Adoption
ADMISSIONS TOTAL      4602
412
:
By Age or Similar Terminations
923
■'.     -•"•'-/-'.".
Returned to Parents (i.e. Legal Guardian)
3536
DISCHARGES TOTAL      4871
*77ie detail formerly reported regarding exact legal Acts involved and the methods of discharge is available on Tables 53 to
54 in the Appendix.
* *Admission for Protection of Children Act cases occurs as soon as the child is apprehended. For other Acts (Juvenile
Delinquents, Equal Guardianship of Infants Act [now Family Relations Act], Other Province wards, etc.) committal is
automatic or admission does not occur until court procedure is completed.
REPATRIATION OF CHILDREN
Family and Children's Services Division is
responsible for the repatriation of children to their
province or state of residence. Children under
seventeen years of age who are temporarily stranded
in British Columbia, and children from this province
stranded in other provinces or states are looked after
by this program.
Staff contact the parents of the children and liaise
with child welfare authorities as well as arrange for
transportation, stop-over supervision and escorts,
where required. From March 31st, 1978 to April 1st,
1979, 774 children were repatriated. This figure
includes movements in and out of the province only.
There is also substantial activity in returning children
to their own homes within the province.
CHILD IN CARE SERVICES
The objective of this program is to provide services
to children admitted to the care and custody of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare consistent with the
most appropriate life plan for the child. The goals of
the program may include return to the natural
family; adoption; substitute family living; specialized
care or independent living arrangements.
Services provided on behalf of a child in care
include life planning; placement; basic maintenance,
clothing, medical, dental, ancillary, educational and
other services.
This year the Ministry placed special emphasis on
the process of life planning and tracking for children
in care to ensure the best possible plan is developed
and maintained for each child.
To assist in planning for children the Ministry
provided each permanent ward with a Life Book.
The purpose of the book is to provide a child who is
permanently separated from his natural family with a
way of keeping personal, health and academic
records and collecting momentos and personal
memorabilia.
Table 8 indicates the number of children in the
care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare on
December 31, 1979, by age and by legal status. It is
noted that over 62% of children currently in care are
between 12 and 18 years of age.
Table 9 indicates those children admitted and
discharged from the Ministry's care.
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
37
FOSTER HOME PROGRAM
The objective of the Foster Home Program is to
provide substitute parenting for children in care that
will best meet the child's physical, social and
emotional needs.
The Foster Home Program continues to serve the
placement needs of the majority of children in care.
Statistics as of December 31st, 1979 show that 64%,
or 5,579 of the 8,721 children in care of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare are maintained in
foster homes.
Placement in a foster home is one of a number of
alternatives considered by a social worker in
planning for a child in care of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare. The social worker attempts to find a
family that is most suited to the child's individual
needs.
Foster parents may have a child for a short, or
long period. During a short stay with foster parents,
the social worker's goal is to reunite the child with
the natural family as soon as possible.
If it is demonstrated that it is not possible to
reunite a child with the natural family, the social
worker provides an alternative permanent plan at
the earliest possible date. Alternative plans may
include placement,  with relatives, adoption, group
home placement, a foster home, or independent
living, if the child is sufficiently mature.
Fostering a child is a personal and sometimes
difficult task, particularly with teenagers. It takes a
person with special understanding and a desire to
help others to be a foster parent.
Varying maintenance rates are provided according
to the age of the child. These rates cover clothing,
and basic maintenance such as food, the child's share
of household equipment and operation,
transportation, recreation, gifts and spending
allowances. Special Family Allowances are included
in these rates. In addition, a fee for service may be
paid if the foster parent must spend an unusual
amount of time supervising the child.
In November, the Minister approved an increase in
the basic maintenance foster home rates and the
Special Family Allowance increase of $2.31 was
passed on to foster parents effective January 1, 1979.
The schedule of rates is outlined in Table 10.
Recruitment of foster homes continues as an
ongoing project with the combined efforts of Ministry
staff and the B.C. Federation of Foster Parents
Association.
This year a grant of $108,725 was provided to the
B.C. Federation of Foster Parents Association. This is
an increase from the previous year, designed to
enable the development of further local associations.
With today's children in care presenting special
emotional and physical needs, the Federation is
assuming a vital and active role in foster parent
education and training. A task force with
representatives from the Federation and the Ministry
was convened this year to establish a core
curriculum for foster parents.
Table 10 Basic Foster Care Rates for
Children Placed in Foster Homes *
Age of Child
Maintenance
Clothing
Total
Birth to 5 years
$113.65
$21.23
$134.88
6-9 years
138.06
25.42
163.48
10-11 years
155.88
30.08
185.96
12-13years
179.10
30.08
209.18
14-19years
196.76
36.00
232.76
* Effective January 1, 1980
Table 11 Foster Home Care, Ministerial
Expenditures, Calendar Year 1979 and
Fiscal Years 1973-74 to 1978-79
$
Million
1979 15.3
1978-79 14.9
1977-78 15.1
1976-77 12.0
$
Million
1975-76 13.3
1974-75 14.6
1973-74 11.6
—isSi
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b
 38
HUMAN RESOURCES
GROUP HOMES FOR CHILDREN
The objective of the Group Home Program is to
provide skilled, effective parenting or child care
service to children who cannot remain in their own
or foster homes but who are able to function within
the community.
Group homes are staffed by resident houseparents.
These homes have a capacity from three to eight
children and are primarily planned for adolescents.
The minimum capacity of a group home was
reduced from five to three during 1979 in order to
have smaller groupings, which are more similar to
family living arrangements. Group homes may have
specialized functions such as receiving, assessment,
short-term treatment, or long-term care of difficult
children, or they may provide a combination of
services.
The Ministry contracts for group homes with
private individuals or with community non-profit
societies. Contracts are negotiated locally and may
be effective for up to a year.
Where the need for a receiving home fluctuates, or
where there is no suitable resource potential for
group homes, the Ministry may contract for a Bed
Subsidy Home on a yearly renewable basis. Under
the bed subsidy arrangement, the Ministry pays a
fee-for-service of $50 to $170 per month per bed for
up to six beds. Regular foster home rates are also
paid for each child placed. The bed subsidy home
may be used for short or long-term placements.
In December, 1979, there were 172 group homes
operating with a potential capacity for 837 children.
The program cost $8.5 million dollars in 1979.
Table 12 Group Homes (Including Receiving
Homes), Ministerial Expenditures, Calendar
Year 1979 and Fiscal Years 1973-74 to
1978-79
$ Millions
1979 8.53
1978-79 8.44
1977-78 8.38
1976-77 7.45
$ Millions
1975-76 4.42
1974-75 3.73
1973-74 3.54
THERAPEUTIC HOMES FOR CHILDREN
The Therapeutic Home Program provides
contracted treatment services on a short-term basis
to help emotionally disturbed children, or children
with severe behavioural disorders to control their
behaviour. The goal is to return a child to his home
or to a less intensive community resource within the
year.
A therapeutic home is usually for one child, and is
operated by a person with child care worker skills in
his or her own home. The resource is selected when
a child requires intensive treatment, and will benefit
from receiving this in a family setting, rather than at
a treatment institution. Therapeutic homes are
frequently used in communities where no treatment
institutions exist and the child would otherwise have
to move from the community.
A contract is made between the Ministry and the
therapeutic parent for three months and, where
necessary, for further three-month periods up to a
maximum of one year. The contract outlines
treatment goals, methods to be used, and dates when
progress will be reviewed.
There were 99 homes providing this service in
1979.
SPECIALIZED RESOURCES
The Specialized Resources Program provides
specialized residential and non-residential care for
children needing such a service because of emotional
or behavioural difficulties, or because of physical or
mental handicaps. The goal of the program is to
restore the child to as normal a life-style as possible.
The Ministry has concentrated on reducing the
number of children placed in institutions, wherever
possible.
Services under this program include day/outreach,
wilderness/ranch, receiving/assessment/planning
and residential group programs. Residential
placements for children with emotional and
behavioural difficulties are generally used when the
problems are sufficiently severe that they require a
greater level of care on a 24 hour basis than can be
provided in foster or group homes. At any given
time there are approximately 750 children in British
Columbia placed in 75 specialized treatment
resource programs, not including children in
residential care at Woodlands, Glendale or
Tranquille.
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
39
The majority of programs are operated through
non-profit societies where objectives and treatment
methods may vary. The Ministry continues to
emphasize shorter-term residential treatment and
greater community involvement and family support.
The goal of this kind of residential placement is to
help the child adjust to living in his community with
the minimum possible support. A number of the
societies are developing shorter-term assessment
capacities and have initiated non-residential day
programs.
Most specialized resources are highly staffed with
resident ratios of one-to-one or higher.
Table 13 Specialized Residential Treatment
Programs, Ministerial Expenditures,
Calendar Year 1979 and Fiscal Years
1973-74 to 1978-79
ADOPTIONS
$ Million
1979 14.5
1978-79 13.6
1977-78 12.7
1976-77 12.3
$ Million
1975-76 13.3
1974-75    8.4
1973-74    8.8
NOTE: Costs exclude operating costs for Woodlands, Glendale
and Tranquille, with the exception of 1973-74 when Glendale's
operating costs were included.
The Adoption program places children of all ages
for adoption when a child's immediate family and
relatives are no longer able or willing to provide
care. The Ministry ensures that the social and legal
requirements of the Adoption Act have been fulfilled,
in Ministry sponsored as well as non-Ministry
adoptions.
Ministry Adoptions
In these adoptions the placement of children is
planned, arranged and completed by Ministry of
Human Resources staff. Records of a child considered
in need of adoption are referred by local Ministry
personnel to the Adoption Section in Victoria. Studies
of families who have applied to adopt a child are
also prepared by local Ministry staff and forwarded
to the Adoption Section in Victoria where a Central
Registry of all approved homes in the Province is
kept. Adoption Section staff pre-select the best home
for the child considering his needs and the wishes of
the relinquishing parent. The two local offices that
have prepared reports on the child and the adopting
family put the selection and placement plan into
effect.
Table 14 Children Placed for Adoption,
in 1979
Total children placed for adoption 677
Total children placed with special needs 301
Total children placed from other provinces     17
Total children placed from outside Canada      6
Non-Ministry Adoptions
This refers to children who have been placed for
adoption by people other than Ministry staff, and
includes step-parent, relative and private adoptions.
Until August 24, 1979, the Superintendent conducted
an inquiry into all non-Ministry adoptions and filed a
report with a recommendation for, or against
granting of an adoption order to the Supreme Court.
Table 15 Adoption reports submitted to
the Supreme Court:
Type of Adoption
■P   Step-parent	
Number of Children
for Whom Reports
Were Filed
1978           1979
       746            563
Relative	
Private 	
         82              85
         58              62
 40
HUMAN RESOURCES
An amendment to the Adoption Act, proclaimed
on August 24, 1979, no longer requires the
Superintendent to carry out an inquiry and report to
the Court about adoptions involving step-parents and
blood relatives, unless directed by the Court. The
majority of non-Ministry adoptions have the consent
of all parties, and the involvement of the
Superintendent no longer serves a useful purpose in
these situations. Up to the end of October, 1979, 40
adoption orders had been granted by the Courts
without a report from the Superintendent. It is
anticipated that the Superintendent's involvement in
non-Ministry adoptions will be drastically reduced
over the next several months as the full impact of
the amendment takes effect.
There is a continuing need for homes for children
with medical problems, physical handicaps,
emotional or behavioural problems, or mental
limitations. Many of these children are of school age,
and belong to a sibling group.
A public information campaign to encourage the
adoption of children with special needs commenced
in August, 1979 with television as the primary
publicity method. The response has been good, and
it is anticipated that many children with special
needs will find homes as a result of the campaign.
The number of approved homes awaiting adoption
placement remains at about 1000. Most of these
homes are requesting a newborn infant. Each month,
30 to 35 infants under 1 year are placed, a slight
decrease over last year. A slight increase has been
noticed in referrals of children with special needs.
Table 16 Approved Homes as of
December 31, 1979
High Demand (0-2 years)
(healthy, Caucasian, either sex)     649
High Demand/Special Needs
(high demand and/or some degree of
special need)    251
Special Needs only     177
POST-ADOPTION SERVICES
The Post-Adoption Services Section was established
in Victoria, in September 1978 in response to a
steadily mounting tide of requests for services related
to the records of completed adoptions. These records
go back to 1920 when the B.C. Adoption Act came
into existence. Until recently, requests for
information were minimal but in the 1970's the
question of the right of the adoptee to know details
of background, and the identity of the relinquishing
parents became the subject of much discussion and
debate. At the same time, people who had
relinquished children for adoption were expressing
the need to hear about the child's progress, and in
some cases meet the child.
Identifying information from adoption records is
not disclosed. There is much controversy about
whether there should be a mechanism whereby
blood relatives separated by adoption could meet if,
as adults, they wish to do so. It is not Ministry policy
to assist in such meetings. Adoptees who request it
are given non-identifying background information
about their biological parents, and the reasons why
they were placed for adoption. Biological parents
who relinquished children for adoption can, on
request, be given a non-identifying description of the
home where their child was placed and information
about his progress up to completion of the adoption.
During the partial fiscal year period September 1,
1978 to March 31, 1979, 229 inquiries were received
and responded to. In the calendar year period
January 1-December 31, 1979, 730 inquiries were
received and responded to. The largest single
number of inquiries came from adoptees, but
a significant number also came from relinquishing
parents.
The number of homes awaiting adoption
placement for children under two years continues to
increase, while the number of available children
remains constant. Consequently, in December, 1979,
the Ministry introduced a policy limiting the number
of approved homes to approximately 300 at any
given time. Applicants for high-demand children may
still apply to adopt, but their home will not be
studied until the supply drops below 300.
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
41
FAMILY SUPPORT HOMEMAKERS
The Family Support Homemaker Program provides
temporary support and relief to families under
physical, mental or emotional stress to help maintain
or restore independent functioning. During 1979 the
objective of this service was expanded to serve the
retarded adult living at home or independently in the
community.
To prevent family breakdown, homemakers are
placed with families to support the normal family
routine while the parents are unable to do so. A
homemaker may also be placed to provide relief to
parents of handicapped children or to teach child
care and household management skills. A
homemaker's duties may include household cleaning,
laundry, shopping, meal preparation and care of
children. Homemaking services are now also
purchased to provide home management and other
life skill training for retarded adults. Homemakers
work under supervision of the homemaker society or
agency, and function as part of a service team in the
care and support of a family.
The Ministry purchases homemaker services on a
fee-for-service basis from non-profit and, in some
cases, proprietary agencies on behalf of eligible
persons. Client contribution to the cost of service is
based on an income test administered by Ministry
field staff.
In January, 1978, responsibility for long-term
homemaker services was transferred to the Long
Term Care Program of the Ministry of Health. Long
Term Care has assumed the responsibility for
negotiating rates with individual homemaker
agencies, staff training, developing services, and
establishing and monitoring standards.
The Ministry of Human Resources continues to be
represented on the provincial Homemaker Training
Committee in conjunction with the Ministries of
Health and Education, and Canada Employment
Centres. The Provincial Homemaker Training
Committee assists in developing upgrading courses
for homemakers through local Community Colleges.
Table 17 Family Support Homemaker
Ministerial Expenditures, Calendar Year
1979 and Fiscal Years 1972-73 to 1978-79
1979  $4,328,733
1978-79  $3,715,111
1977-78  $ 7,710,403
1976-77  $ 7,428,522
1975-76  $7,000,155
1974-75  $ 4,258,384
1973-74  $ 2,812,704
1972-73  $ 1,394,221
SPECIAL SERVICES TO CHILDREN
The Special Services to Children program assists
children to grow up successfully in their own homes
or communities. Child care workers provide support
to children and families where there is a definite risk
that, without intervention, a child may have to be
removed from the family or community.
Special services are provided to children and their
families on a time-limited, goal-oriented basis, and
are purchased from non-profit community societies.
Prior to initiating service, the Ministry negotiates
contracts with the society and the family, outlining
the specific nature, intensity and duration of service.
Services under this program are income tested.
During 1979, about 700 children and families per
month received services which varied in nature from
short-term support for families in crisis, to group
activities with delinquent adolescents, to one-to-one
involvement with mentally and physically
handicapped children.
Table 18 Special Services to Children,
Ministerial Expenditures, Calendar Years
1976-1979
1979 $31,565,933
1978 $3,820,207
1977 $2,797,974
1976 $1,836,477
flt« Cafrtin*
s J»"3*hop
fetadQ
 42
HUMAN RESOURCES
INFANT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
The Infant Development Program provides services
to infants from birth to age three years
exhibiting significant developmental delays. Goals of
the program are to optimize each infant's
development and to assist families in responding to
these children in a positive supportive manner.
In 1979, the Program operated in 16 areas of the
Province. Previously established at Burnaby,
Castlegar, Duncan, Kamloops, Kelowna, New
Westminister, North Vancouver, Surrey/Delta, Upper
Fraser Valley, Port Alberni, Vernon, Courtenay/
Comox, Prince George, Vancouver/Richmond and
Victoria, service was also extended to the East
Kootenays.
Each program has one or more Infant Workers
with professional training in a field related to early
childhood development. Infant Workers are
responsible to an advisory committee of the
sponsoring society; committee membership includes
parents of developmentally delayed children,
community professionals and representatives of the
Society's Board of Directors.
Program grants are made to the sponsoring
Societies by the Ministry. A Provincial Steering
Committee, appointed by the Minister of Human
Resources, and a Program Advisor funded through a
sponsoring Society provide consultation to the Infant
Development Program and assist in the development
of new programs and provincial guidelines.
Referrals to the Infant Development Program may
come from any source, and services are provided
primarily in the infant's home. During home visits or
group sessions, the Infant Worker works with the
infant and its family on activities to encourage his or
her development. Regular reports on an infant's
progress are sent to the family physician and other
consultants such as physiotherapists or public health
nurses who may be involved. The Infant Worker also
assists the family to use community resources which
may help them meet their child's physical, mental or
social needs.
Toy and book libraries and other resource
materials are made available to the parents as well
as opportunities to meet other parents and to attend
workshops on child development.
Table 19 Ministry Expenditures for Infant
Development, Calendar Year 1979, and
Fiscal Years 1977-78 and 1978-79
CHILD DAY CARE SERVICES
Child Day Care Services were established to assist
eligible families in meeting the day care needs of
children up to 12 years of age, and to enable
children with designated handicaps to receive
specialized day care services.
Child Day Care is a preventive family support
service designed to enrich children's experiences and
supply emotional and physical support while
enabling parents to prepare for, or maintain
employment and financial independence. Day care
can also provide support to families during prolonged
illness or other family crisis.
The Ministry assists in the provision of day care
services in the following ways:
Interviewing applicants for day care services to
establish eligibility for subsidy by means of
income testing and social needs criteria as
established by the Federal Government;
Assessing unlicensed family day care homes and
caregivers providing day care for children whose
parents are subsidized by the Ministry;
Completing the social assessment reports required
by the Provincial Child Care Facilities Licensing
Board for licensed child care facilities.
(Approximately 950 reports were completed in
1979);
Providing staff to serve on the Provincial Child Care
Facilities Licensing Board;
Determining and documenting eligibility for special
needs services and establishing appropriate rates;
and
Providing information about day care policies,
subsidies and resources.
Day care is provided by non-profit societies,
private operators, and individuals in six different
types of programs to meet individual family needs.
Family Day Care—provided in a home other than
the child's own. May be licensed or unlicensed.
Licensing by the Community Care Facilities
Licensing Board is required if more than two
children unrelated to the caregiver are receiving
day care. The majority of children requiring care
receive it from family day care homes. By the
end of 1979, there were 391 licensed family day
care homes in British Columbia. As of March 31,
1979, an average of 3,682 children were being
subsidized each month in licensed and unlicensed
family day care homes.
1979  595,225
1978-79 433,396
1977-78 331,103
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
43
Group Day Care—provided in a day care centre for
up to 25 children for a period of time not to
exceed ten hours per day, five days per week. As
of March 31, 1979, approximately 47 per cent of
the total number of licensed group day care
spaces were filled by children subsidized by the
Ministry. There are 307 centres, licensed to
provide 6,896 group day care spaces. In 1978, 298
centres were licensed; in 1975, 286 centres were
licensed; and in 1971, 61.
In-Home Care—a service designed to enable
subsidization of shift-working parents who must
hire someone to come into their homes to care
for their children.
Out-of-School Care—provided in family and group
centres to accommodate children up to 12 years
of age who need care and supervision before and
after school or when school is not in session. As
of December, 1979, there were 240 licensed out-
of-school facilities providing service to 2,163
children.
Nursery School Care—a part-time service offering
care, extra stimulation and preparation for school
for children from three to five years of age. There
are 366 licensed nursery schools in the Province
approved to provide service for 7480 children. An
average of 427 children were subsidized each
month.
Special Needs Day Care—designed to enable
children with physical, mental and/or emotional
problems to receive assistance through available
day care programs in both regular and specialized
centres. In keeping with more recent research,
integrated programs designed to meet the needs
of both normal and handicapped children have
been developed and, wherever possible, this is the
program of choice. Special needs children
enrolled in integrated centres on a half-day basis
are fully subsidized by the Ministry. Parents are
expected to pay half the regular fee for children
enrolled in a full-day care program and the
Ministry accepts responsibility for additional costs
incurred as a result of the special needs of the
children. Special needs children enrolled in
specialized day care centres are fully subsidized
by the Ministry. There are now 55 specialized day
care centres Serving 1,101 children.
Table 20 Day Care Statistics, Children
Receiving Subsidized Day Care as of
March 31, 1979
Program                               Half Day     Full Day Total
Group Day Care          130         3,096 3,226
Family Day Care        230         3,452 3,682
Nursery School        422                3 425
Out-of-School       1,740            161 1,901
Special Need Care        319            501 820
In-Home Day Care          101            640 741
TOTAL     2,942         7,853 10,795
CHILDREN'S REHABILITATION
RESOURCES
Rehabilitation Resources combine the elements of
teaching and child care through co-operation
between the Ministry and local schools. Youths are
assisted to remain in the school system who
otherwise would be at risk of dropping out.
Children's Rehabilitation Resources programs are
jointly funded by the Ministries of Human Resources
and Education, and local school districts. There is no
federal cost sharing. Financial input from Ministry of
Human Resources purchases child care services and
covers some program expenses.
Most of the programs show a fairly high rate of
reintegration into the community as indicated by
participants return to regular school, and
participation in vocational training, or employment.
In many cases this change can be attributed to
intervention by the child care worker who is able to
bring about some modification of behaviour which
may have led to the child's exclusion from school. In
addition, there are definite steps taken to deal with
family difficulties, to help participants acquire
acceptable social skills, and to develop an orientation
to the working world.
In 1979, the Ministry's expenditure on these
programs was $2,399,835 with a capacity to serve up
to 2,300 children at a time.
 44
HUMAN RESOURCES
REHABILITATION RESOURCES FOR
HANDICAPPED CHILDREN
Rehabilitation Resources for Handicapped Children
provides support services in a school setting to
children with exceptional physical and/or mental
needs who would otherwise be excluded from
education in a school setting.
This program responds to a need identified by the
Inter-Ministry Children's Committee at the local,
regional and provincial levels. It results from
combined efforts of the Ministries of Human
Resources, Education and Health.
The Ministry of Human Resources contracts with
local school districts to provide personal attendants
to work in the classroom. A personal attendant
works with groups of children providing assistance
with personal care and management. A screening
committee with representatives from the Ministry,
the school district and the local community reviews
all referrals and develops an educational program
with provision for support services for each child
accepted. Families are encouraged to participate in
all planning for their children and are not required to
contribute towards the costs of service.
It is estimated that 600 children will be served by
this new program, which was established in August,
1979, with an allocation of 2.4 million dollars.
PROGRAM EVALUATION AND
PLANNING SUPPORT UNIT
The Program Evaluation and Planning Support
Unit provides a consultative, training and operational
service to the Family and Children's Services
Division in the collection, collation, interpretation
and utilization of data for decision making. The
services of the Unit are available to local, regional
and central office personnel.
The Unit is made up of three components: the
evaluation team; inter-Ministry research; and
computer research. The unit is staffed with a
supervisor, a co-ordinator, a research officer, two
social workers, a child care worker and three
administrative support staff.
Since amalgamation of the three components in
September, 1979, the unit identified its major
functions as follows:
Provide consultation and training to Ministry staff
on evaluation and systems analysis, as well as the
implementation of evaluation projects.
Develop and implement a system of monitoring
Family and Children's Services objectives.
Assess divisional staff training needs and
co-ordinate training opportunities to meet these
needs.
Co-ordinate and review Family and Children's
Services program annual reports.
Investigate and prepare confidential reports on
family and children situations at the request
of the Minister or Deputy Minister.
Review and recommend improvements to the
present Family and Children's Services computer
system, respond to field and divisional personnel's
requests for computer data outputs, and to
analyze Protection Complaints Registry
information.
To be familiar with, and to monitor research projects
in Canada, and be responsible for their
distribution to Ministry staff.
Co-ordinate research activities for the Inter-Ministry
Children's Committee.
Activities completed by the Unit in 1979 included
79 individual consultations, 39 group consultations
and 24 workshop/training sessions. In addition, the
Unit completed several major evaluations, namely:
The Provincial Family Support Study; Regional Day
Care Evaluation; and the regional evaluation of
Rehabilitation Resources Program. Co-ordination of
the Year of the Child and the Family Awards Program
and inter-ministerial research projects by the
Research Co-ordinator reflects the increased
emphasis on children's services this year.
Present activities undertaken by the unit include
evaluation of the Zenith Helpline, systems analysis of
Central Records, situational investigations, Divisional
staff training needs assessment, review of Family and
Children's Services program budget and data,
evaluation design for Infant Development program
and Community Projects Division, Annual Report coordination, report on 1979 Divisional objectives and
proposed 1980 objectives, Regional evaluation of
Special Services program and regional evaluation of
children in care decisions.
 7tMfttltf
 46
HUMAN RESOURCES
YEAR OF THE CHILD AND
THE FAMILY
During the year, a temporary Special Project Unit
was established to handle the wide range of Year of
the Child and the Family activities undertaken by the
Ministry. The Unit also acted as a "clearing house" of
information about the participation of various other
Ministries in Year of the Child and the Family events.
Staff was seconded by the Ministry of Human
Resources and one position was donated by the
Ministry of Education, Science & Technology.
The Year of the Child and the Family office was
responsible for co-ordinating the distribution of
Lottery Funds set aside for special projects
undertaken by individuals, groups or Ministries
during the year. In total, 31 projects were funded
including participation from eight Ministries.
A number of projects were undertaken by the
Ministry which reflect the spirit of the Year of the
Child and the Family in British Columbia.
The Helpline for Children began operation in July
with a special Zenith telephone service designed to
put people in touch with the help they need during
times of family crisis.
A Child Abuse/Neglect Policy Handbook,
developed through the joint participation of the
Ministries of Human Resources, Attorney-General,
Health and Education Science & Technology, was
published and distributed in 1979. It covers the
identification, reporting systems and procedures for
professional co-operation in cases of suspected child
abuse/neglect.
In addition, a Special Needs Adoption Campaign
aimed at finding adoptive homes for special needs
children, and the introduction of "Life Books" for
foster children were undertaken by the Ministry.
The Year of the Child and the Family unit also
took responsibility for co-ordinating an Achievement
Awards program to honour individuals and groups
making outstanding contributions to the lives of
children and families in B.C. Approximately 450
Awards were presented, many of them by the
Honourable Grace M. McCarthy, during a provincial tour
organized by the Unit.
Commemorative materials were also distributed to
many groups and individuals throughout the
province and the Unit assisted the Ministry's
Information Services Division with publicity and coordination of special events to honour the Year of
the Child and the Family in British Columbia.
/
Fun Wii.th
I My Faktl
 Report of the Ministry, 1979 47
Year of the Child and the Family Special
Projects Receiving Funding in 1979
NAME MINISTRY AMOUNT
KidsinKitimat  Education  $ 500
I.O.U  Consumer* Corporate Affairs $ 35,000
Vancouver City Police
Counselling Program  Attorney General $ 1,000
Outdoor Education Games   Education $ 500
Victoria City Police Wheels-
Summer Enrichment Program   Attorney General $ 1,500
Project 79: Prince George Regional
Correctional Centre :  Attorney General $ 1,000
Provincial 4H Demonstration Contest  Agriculture $ 1,846
Traffic Safety Survey  Education  $ 10,000
Child Abuse/Neglect Policy Handbook  Education/Human Resources/ $ 100,000
Health & Attorney General
The Mysterious Child  Attorney General $ 8,965
Recreational Library Materials for
the Visually Impaired   Education  $ 20,000
Children's Centre of Arts and
Sciences Demonstration Exhibition  Education  $ 35,000
Achievement Awards  Human Resources $ 15,000
Children's Fair  Health $ 5,000
Zenith Helpline for Children  Human Resources $ 470,276
Smithers International Year of the Child   Attorney General $ 1,000
Creative Play Program for Handicapped Children  Human Resources $ 480
Health Passports  Health $ 27,000
Preschooler's Health Circus  Health $ 225
Children's Shopping Game   Consumer & Corporate Affairs $ 15,000
Children's Day in Burnaby  Education  $ 3,000
Community Outreach  Health $ 52,500
Houston International Year of the Child  Human Resources $ 2,500
The Child and the Family  Education  $ 1,000
Celebration of Children  Education  $ 3,500
Look, Listen and Learn  Education   $ 17,000
Conference on Family Fitness  Education  $ 3,500
Forest Awareness Camp and Trail Ride  Forestry $ 1,500
Adapted Skiing  Provincial Secretary   $ 4,000
Teaching—Specialized Aquatics  Provincial Secretary  $ 4,500
Law and the Teenager  Attorney General $ 10,000
Total            $ 852,292
 48
HUMAN RESOURCES
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA COUNCIL
FOR THE FAMILY
The British Columbia Council for the Family acts as
a forum for responsible representatives of
communities to communicate with each other and
with government and voluntary agencies their
concerns about the needs of the family, and to
receive help in preparing plans and projects to meet
such needs.
In association with appropriate local, provincial, or
national groups, the Council works to further public
knowledge of, and to promote public support for the
well-being of the family, and to stimulate self-help
projects to strengthen families in B.C.
The Council is a registered non-profit society with
representatives from religious bodies, ethnic groups,
community agencies and political parties. The
Council is represented in over 60 communities
throughout the Province by local organizations-
some formally organized as branches, others, as
more informal committees or affiliated agencies. It
maintains liaison with other Ministries and
organizations having family related programs.
The following Province-wide programs were part
of the Council's activities in 1979:
International Year of the Child—The Provincial
Government appointed the Council's Executive
Director to represent the Province on the
Canadian International Year of the Child
Commission, and subsequently proclaimed 1979
as the Year of the Child and the Family in British
Columbia. The Council office handled enquiries
and distributed information, while members
initiated or participated in IYC activities
throughout the Province.
Family Month—Initiated in 1976, Family Month
has become an established program in the
Province. It has the support of many local and
provincial bodies who organize special
educational, recreational and religious activities
with the goal of raising public awareness of the
importance of the family in our society.
Family Time—provides communication aids for
families. Over 10,000 brochures have been
distributed to congregations and community
groups. The Canadian Life Insurance Association
(B.C. Division) publicly endorsed this program as
their Family Month undertaking and provided
"Family Time" booklets free of charge.
Marriage Preparation—in order to prepare couples
to deal more constructively with the stresses
which they will inevitably face, a Marriage
Preparation Packet has been prepared for those
providing marriage preparation courses. A
correspondence course is also being developed, as
well as an outline for a Community College
Course. Regional workshops for leadership
training are now being organized, with financial
support from the Anglican Foundation of Canada.
Information Exchange—a unique service to
voluntary organizations that provides information
about family support programs, parenting courses,
single-parent groups, mothers groups, foster
grandparents, family life education and babysitting. It also puts people searching for program
material in touch with people who are operating
successful programs.
Private Agency Committee—a standing committee
with representatives from private agencies which
provide programs for families and children. The
Committee will develop a provincial network for
the agencies and a vehicle for sharing program
ideas and information. A major objective is to
establish standards and ethics for lay counsellors.
The British Columbia Council for the Family is
funded by the Ministry of Human Resources to
approximately $46,000. Through donations and
membership fees, the Council raised $17,102 in 1979
to cover the cost of program development and
promotion, to assist in the organization of local
branches, and to meet Board and Committee
expenses.
Month/'"
 Section III
INCOME ASSISTANCE
CONTENTS
Rental Assistance Programs 50
GAIN Income Assistance Program 51
GAIN for the Handicapped 53
GAIN for Seniors Aged 60 to 64 53
GAIN Supplementary Benefits to
OAS/GIS/SPA Recipients 54
Provincial Rehabilitation and
Employment Program (PREP) 54
Incentive Allowance Program 55
Community Involvement Program   55
Training and Education Program 55
Repatriation 56
Indigent Burials 56
Transition Houses and Hostels 56
 50
HUMAN RESOURCES
RENTAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS
RentAid (Renter's Tax Credit Program)
RentAid is a tax credit program to help offset high
rents, especially for those with low or moderate
income. Although it is a provincial government
program, RentAid is administered through the
federal government's income tax system. Applicants
complete a schedule included with their income tax
return.
RentAid is available to anyone who pays rent for
a principal residence in British Columbia. The
maximum annual benefit is $100, less 1% of the
applicant's taxable income. Benefits cannot exceed
10% of the total rent paid by the applicant during
the year.
In 1979 the Ministry's expenditure on RentAid was
$15 million.
SAFER (Shelter Aid for Elderly Renters)
The SAFER program provides direct cash
assistance to senior citizen renters to ensure they do
not have to spend an unreasonable portion of their
income on rent.
Monthly SAFER benefits are based on the
applicant's income level and the amount of rent paid.
SAFER pays 75% of the amount by which the rent
exceeds 30% of the applicant's total income. In 1979
the maximum monthly rent that could be considered
in calculating benefits was $205 for a single person
and $225 for a couple.
The Ministry's expenditure for SAFER in 1979 was
$5.5 million.
Administration costs for the two programs were
$170,000. Prior to April 1, 1979, both RentAid and
SAFER program expenditures were reported by the
Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing.
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
51
GUARANTEED AVAILABLE INCOME FOR
NEED (GAIN)
The GAIN Income Assistance Program provides a
substitute income sufficient to maintain a basic
standard of living for those persons under age 60
years, or age 60 and over with dependents, who are
unable to provide for themselves through
employment or other resources.
Income assistance recipients comprise:
Single-parent families—the largest group of
recipients, made up mainly of mothers and their
children. The intent of the program is to provide
security to the parent should he or she have to
remain in the family home to care for the
children.
Persons unable to be employed for physical or
mental health reasons—many income
assistance recipients are unemployed due to
physical or mental health reasons. Often the
disability is of a temporary nature and the
program attempts to provide the necessary
financial and social supports during the period of
convalescence. It is hoped that the recipient will
eventually be able to return to full-time, or at
least part-time employment. People in this group
are under extra psychological stress because they
no longer participate in the work force or the
social life of their community.
Children living with relatives—although the
Ministry's goal is to keep parents and children
together, in some instances of parental illness,
desertion, or other situations, children must be
placed in another home. Placing them with
relatives is usually a positive step in that some
continuity of surroundings is provided, and the
child is less upset by the move. The program
provides the relatives with financial assistance at
the same rates as those paid for foster children.
Persons who are employable but out of work-
provides help to those without means to support
themselves. Many of these recipients are only
marginally employable as they may lack the
necessary skills to compete for more permanent
jobs. The duration of aid for this group is brief, as
many require help for only a short period.
Table 21 Monthly Average Number of
Income Assistance Recipients
1978-79 114,622
1977-78 113,939
1976-77  112,938
1975-76 127,551
1974-75 111,693
1973-74 108,500
Note - Averaging statistical data January to December 1979,
the number of basic assistance recipients by category was
as follows: 30,595 heads of families (approximately
two-thirds of which were single parents); 59,632 dependents,
mainly children; 24,869 single persons.
Applying for Income Assistance
Eligibility for income assistance is determined
according to criteria legislated in the GAIN Act and
regulations. An examination of need is based on an
individual's, or a family's financial assets, income,
housing costs, and family size. Certain assets and
income are excluded from consideration. For
example, the family home and car and Federal
family allowances are exempt.
Crisis Grants
Often, income assistance recipients need urgent
help but lack assets, family, or credit sources. Under
GAIN, such help may be provided. Such crisis grants
may cover repairs to furnaces, septic tanks or other
home facilities essential to a recipient's health, the
lack of which could result in removal of children
from the home.
Other forms of help given by the Ministry include
purchase of tools or clothing to help a recipient
secure employment, provision of transportation and
moving costs when relocating to a confirmed job in
another community, and, to help families provide
their children with extras at the beginning of the
school year, a school start-up allowance. In 1978, the
start-up fee was increased to $20 per year for
children under 12 and to $30 for children over 12. At
Christmas, the Ministry provides an additional $20
per single recipient or $50 per family.
 52
HUMAN RESOURCES
Earnings Exemption
A supportive policy for recipients, the earnings
exemption, allows a client to engage in part-time
work without losing all financial gain through
deduction from his income assistance.
Policy allows exemptions on earnings of $50 per
month for a single person and $100 per month for a
person with dependents, or a single handicapped
person. This policy also encourages part-time
employment which will help the recipient to gain or
retain job skills that may eventually lead to full-time
employment and independence. (See also description
of the Incentive Opportunities Program.)
Supplementation of Low Income Earners
Persons who have part-time or full-time
employment at low wages may have their income
supplemented up to the appropriate income
assistance level, as determined by family size.
Rate Schedule Tables
Effective April 1979, the GAIN Regulations were
changed to allow for increased basic income
assistance benefits to eligible persons as follows:
Table 22 Expenditures for basic income
assistance ($ million)
1979          $212.94
1978-79   $158.07
1977-78   $157.48
1976-77   $157.77
1975-76   $171.98
1974-75   $187.5
1973-74   $117
Table 23 Income Assistance Rate as of
December 1979 (applicable during first four
months of eligibility)
Unit
Support
Maximum Shelter
Total
1
110
130
240
2
175
260
435
3
235
325
560
4
275
365
640
5
315
385
700
6
355
405
760
7*
395
425
820
Table 24 Basic Income Assistance Rate
Schedule as of December 1979 (for persons
on assistance after four consecutive months)
Unit
Support
Maximum Shelter
Total
1 under 31 years
110
130
240
1 31-59 years
165
130
295
2 under 31 years
175
260
435
2 31-59 years
230
260
490
2 parent/child
230
260
490
3
270
325
595
4
310
365
675
5
350
385
735
6
390
405
795
7*
430
425
855
* Add $40.00 per month SUPPORT and up to $20.00 per month
SHELTER for each family member in excess of Unit 7.
 GAIN HANDICAPPED BENEFITS
GAIN Handicapped Benefits provide a guaranteed
minimum income to residents of British Columbia
designated as handicapped.
Eligibility for Handicapped Benefits is determined
after an examination is made of the individual's or
family's financial assets, income and family size. The
applicant must have a medical examination to
determine if they may be designated as handicapped
under the GAIN Act. The applicant must be over 18,
have a monthly income less than the guaranteed
level, and assets not exceeding $2,500 for a single
person, or $5,000 for a person with dependents.
Certain items and income are excluded from
consideration; for example, the family home and car
and Family Allowance payments.
If eligible, the client can receive (as of October 1,
1979) a maximum of $364.97 per month for a single
person, and up to $1,299.02 per month for a family
of 10 where both parents are handicapped. These
maximum rates are based, within limits, on a
person's actual shelter costs and as of April 1979
increase quarterly.
Where the family unit size exceeds 10 people the
monthly support allowance may be increased by $40
for each additional person, and the maximum shelter
allowance may be increased by $20 for each
additional person.
In August 1979, there were 12,935 recipients of
Handicapped benefits. (Non-handicapped dependents
of handicapped recipients would be shown
statistically in the GAIN Basic Income Assistance
Program.)
Table 25 Proportion of Total Expenditures,
GAIN for Seniors and Handicapped,
December 1979
Millions
Handicapped  4,135,008
Age 60 and older, not receiving
OAS/GIS/SPA     2,354,589
Age 60 and older, receiving
OAS/GIS/SPA     2,262,923
TOTAL    8,752,520
Per Cent
47.2
26.9
25.9
100.0
GAIN FOR SENIORS: BENEFITS FOR
THOSE FROM 60 to 64
GAIN for Seniors for those 60 to 64 years old
provides a guaranteed minimum monthly income to
senior residents of British Columbia who are not in
receipt of Old Age Security or Federal Spouses
Allowances. However, a person applying for GAIN
for Seniors must meet the following:
Have a monthly income less than the maximum
income they are eligible for. Effective April 1,
1979, this maximum is calculated according to the
amount a person pays for his shelter;
Have five consecutive years' residence in Canada, or
be a Canadian citizen;
Be residing in British Columbia; and
Have assets below $2,500 if single or $5,000 if
married.
The GAIN for Seniors age 60-64 maximum income
effective October 1, 1979 can vary between $250 and
$305 per month for a single person and $470 and
$580 per month for a couple. The amount paid is
dependent on shelter costs.
Most applicants are retired from employment, are
dependents of retired individuals, or are widowed. As
of December 1979 there were 6,193 recipients.
(Grants to dependent family members are shown
under the GAIN Basic Income Assistance Program
statistics.) There has been a continuing decrease in
the number of recipients under this program
resulting from the Federal Government's Spouse
Allowance Program, the asset test (effective April
1976), the increase in private and Federal pensions,
and the number of people moving to the Old Age
Security Program. Also in 1979, persons in this age
group were allowed to apply for Handicapped
Benefits for the first time. Since this policy change,
the number of GAIN Handicapped recipients in the
60-64 age group has increased by 455.
The number of GAIN for Seniors recipients over 60
years and not in receipt of Federal benefits totaled
11,852 in December, 1978, and 8,829 in
December 1979.
Table 26 Expenditures for GAIN for
Seniors and Handicapped
Calendar Year $
1979  104,244,128
1978  105,578,802
1977  109,039,198
1976  114,220,370
1975  106,990,000
1974  100,042,000
1973  54,479,000
1972*   4,624,000
'Program commenced December 1972
 54
HUMAN RESOURCES
GAIN SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS TO
OAS/GIS/SPA RECIPIENTS
To ensure a guaranteed minimum income this
program applies to persons age 65 and over with
dependent spouses age 60 and over, resident in
British Columbia, who are receiving full Federal Old
Age Security pension with sufficient Guaranteed
Income Supplement and related Spouse's Allowance
payments. These people are automatically granted a
supplementary payment by the Province to raise
their total income level from all sources to a monthly
average of $364.87 for a single person and $351.05
each for a married couple (December 1979 rates).
The guaranteed income level has continued to
increase each quarter year as the Federal
OAS/GIS/SPA increases.
Those eligible for the supplement are paid
automatically on the basis of information received
from the Federal Old Age Security Division. As of
December 1979, a total of 75,253 British Columbians
received benefits from this program.
Table 27 Number of people in receipt
of GAIN for Seniors and
Handicapped payments
December 1979  97,351
December 1978  106,008
December 1977  117,698
December 1976  124,000
December 1975  122,000
December 1974  128,000
December 1973  118,000
The Federal Government's Spouse's Allowance Program, the inclusion
of qualifying asset levels, and increased Federal pensions have
accounted for a downward trend.
Table 28 GAIN recipients as of
December 1979
Handicapped 13,269
Age 60 and older, not receiving
OAS/GIS/SPA    8,829
Age 60 and older, receiving
OAS/GIS/SPA 75,253
PROVINCIAL REHABILITATION AND
EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM (PREP)
The objective of the Provincial Rehabilitation and
Employment Program (PREP) is to find employment
and job-training opportunities for income-assistance
applicants and recipients.
PREP staff, consisting of rehabilitation officers and
clerk stenographers, are located in 30 offices in
major centres of the Province. All but two PREP
offices are located in Canada Employment and
Immigration Centres. PREP staff contact employers
to locate job opportunities, and refer GAIN Benefit
recipients to them. At the same time, they co-operate
closely with Canada Employment Centres to use
Federal training programs for clients who require job
skills or Federal mobility and relocation grants to
help them move to job opportunities. PREP staff and
Canada Employment staff share information on job
opportunities when either party is unable to fill a job
vacancy with its own clients.
PREP staff also work closely with Ministry of
Labour staff in the jointly-operated Provincial Youth
Employment Program.
To maintain the flow of job opportunities, PREP
staff visit potential employers, and develop job
opportunities by telephone and mail. They also use a
variety of indirect approaches to create and enhance
awareness of PREP services. Informational services
are supplied to trades organizations, employer
groups, chambers of commerce, and other job-
generating resources. PREP personnel undertake
speaking engagements, furnish program brochures,
and present the program at conferences and
conventions.
PREP staff continue to use programs for client
training sponsored by Canada Employment and
Immigration Centres, but there is a noteworthy trend
toward initiation of work preparation and work
activity projects by PREP with the co-operation of
private enterprise, other provincial ministries, and
administrations within the Ministry of Human
Resources.
The Incentive Allowance Program of the Ministry
is used extensively by PREP as a training resource
for clients interested in clerical careers. Field offices
report good placement results in private business and
industry following a period of incentive training
within the program.
In spite of a sharp rise in unemployment, PREP
maintained a positive success rate in assisting its
clients to gain or regain a useful place in the work
force. PREP Rehabilitation Officers have applied the
experience gained with this relatively new program
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
55
to improving their job-finding techniques and
adapting their services to the particular features of
local employment markets. Increasing familiarity
with opportunities offered by pre-employment and
vocational training programs also contributed to the
program's success.
INCENTIVE ALLOWANCE PROGRAM
The Incentive Allowance Program provides GAIN
recipients with work experience in preparation for
employment.
A special allowance of up to $50 per month can be
paid to a single recipient, and up to $100 per month
to a family head for participation in a local
community service program. This is a rehabilitative
measure designed to give the individual an
opportunity to gain experience and confidence
working with others, while also making
a contribution to the community. The payment
provides incentive and assists with costs of clothing
and transportation.
Incentive allowance is paid to recipients who have
been away from the labour force for a long period of
time. Many are parents who have either never
worked, or have not worked for a long period of
time due to family responsibilities. The program can
continue for up to six months.
Eligible people are selected on the basis of
availability of opportunities and the potential for
rehabilitation. There are approximately 600 people
participating in the program at any one time.
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT PROGRAM
The Community Involvement Program provides an
opportunity for handicapped or otherwise
unemployable persons to participate with others in
community service endeavours, thereby benefiting
both themselves and their community.
The program was introduced in June, 1976 and,
like the Incentive Allowance Program, it is carried
out in communities with GAIN recipients performing
useful community work through volunteer activities
in non-profit agencies.
The Ministry provides a grant of $50 a month to
program participants to cover transportation,
clothing, and miscellaneous expenses.
Unlike the Incentive Allowance Program, there are
no minimum number of hours for participants, nor is
the duration of the contract time-limited. These
factors are determined by the needs of the individual
and local opportunities.
TRAINING AND EDUCATION PROGRAM
The purpose of training and education is to put
income assistance recipients in a position where they
will have the necessary qualifications to look for
work. The Ministry uses schools, work training or
any other training facility to ensure that income
assistance recipients receive all the help possible,
within policy guidelines, to become independent and
self-maintaining. Canada Employment and
Immigration, Provincial Ministries of Education and
Health, Aid to the Handicapped, and many
community resources are all checked as to what
assistance they can give income assistance recipients.
The Ministry works in conjunction with any of these
departments or agencies to accomplish a training,
retraining or rehabilitation goal on behalf of an
applicant.
Income Assistance can be paid at scheduled
Ministry rates to those who are training to become
job ready. In addition, where all other possible
sources have been checked out, the Ministry can pay
all or part of the cost of the training itself. The latter
cost can include a $30 grant for married students
and a $20 grant for single students to assist with
transportation costs, school supplies and
miscellaneous needs.
Table 29 Costs for training income
assistance recipients
1979   $360,403
1978   $302,126
1977   $372,514
1976   $303,566
1975   $290,000
1974   $185,000
1973   $ 80,000
 56
HUMAN RESOURCES
Repatriation
When a person applies for, or is in receipt of
income assistance in British Columbia, and has not
resided in this Province for one year, then they may
consider repatriation to the Province or country of
origin. There must be a good social or health reason
for the person's return.
There can be many reasons for an income
assistance recipient to return to their province of
origin. Among the most common are having a family
in another province or having employment or
employment possibilities there. It is usually to the
person's advantage to be repatriated. Repatriations
are planned in advance with authorities in the other
province and the circumstances which the person is
returning to are checked to see that they are as
presented, and are acceptable.
Table 30 Repatriation expenditures
1979     $ 88,880
1978-79   $ 93,342
1977-78   $ 75,511
1976-77   $ 57,105
1975-76   $ 32,482
1974-75   $ 30,325
1973-74   $ 11,951
1972-73   $ 9,224
INDIGENT BURIALS
The purpose of the Indigent Burial program is to
permit payment of burial or cremation costs where
no other means of payment exists.
Burial services, including provision of a burial plot,
cremation, casket, and basic dignified burial, are
provided when the deceased has neither an estate,
nor relatives or others able or prepared to take this
responsibility. Services are provided in accordance
with arrangements established with the Funeral
Directors Association of British Columbia.
Referrals for assistance with burial costs can be
made by city officials, police, a relative, official
administrator, the Public Trustee, or other interested
persons.
Table 31 Indigent Burials Expenditures
1979     $259,756
1978-79    $235,229
1977-78   $191,922
1976-77   $332,573
1975-76   $220,654
1974-75   $187,027
1973-74   $158,109
TRANSITION HOUSES AND HOSTELS
Transition homes, emergency shelters, and hostels
provide temporary room and board to people who
may require income assistance and who are in
transition. This includes families in crisis, people
recently released from hospitals, prison, or other
treatment centres, drug and alcohol dependent
persons, or women separated from their husbands
and homes.
Approximately fifty facilities administered by nonprofit societies and private businesses provide shelter
on a time-limited basis. Residents who require
financial aid may apply to the nearest Ministry office,
where their needs may be met in the form of direct
income assistance or the facility operators may be
authorized to bill the Ministry directly on a per diem
basis at a pre-determined rate.
Hostels are licensed through the Community Care
Facilities Licensing Board of the Ministry of Health,
and hotels, which are sometimes used as hostel
resources, are approved locally for this purpose by
the Ministry of Human Resources. The budget for
these facilities is part of the Income Assistance
budget, administered through the Income Assistance
Division. However, grants for operating cost to meet
the needs of specific groups are provided by the
Ministry concerned. For example, facilities for drug
addicts and alcoholics receive grants directly from
the Provincial Alcohol and Drug Commission. By
year end, the bed capacity available to the Ministry
of Human Resources in these programs was
approximately 1,100.
'#    &
 Section IV
HEALTHCARE
SERVICES
CONTENTS
Basic Health Care Services 59
Pharmacare 60
  Report of the Ministry, 1979
59
BASIC HEALTH CARE SERVICES
The Health Care Services Program arranges for
quality health care to eligible persons at a reasonable
cost through subscription to B.C. Medical Services Plan
and augmentation of it in special cases.
Health Care Division offers consultation to District
Office staff. To ensure the best possible service,
consultant specialists in any field may also be
retained.
The following groups are eligible for health care
coverage through the Ministry:
Persons under 60 years of age, classed as
"unemployable" who receive GAIN payments.
Children in the care of the Superintendent of Child
Welfare, or in the home of a relative who
receives income assistance on their behalf.
GAIN recipients over 60 years of age who qualify
through a needs test.
Accounts from medical practitioners are paid by
the Medical Services Plan of British Columbia.
Accounts for hospital services are paid by the
Hospital Programs Branch of the Ministry of Health.
Health Care Division processes accounts for the
following additional services:
Medical Services
□ Payment for examinations required by the
Ministry of Human Resources in connection with
the GAIN Program.
□ Payment on behalf of eligible persons requiring
medical clearance for camp attendance, sports,
and post-stroke programs.
□ When the yearly Medical Services Plan
physiotherapy limit has been exhausted, and
when the physiotherapist has received prior
approval, payment for additional treatments may
be authorized. (This is particularly helpful where
there is no outpatient service, or where the
patient is too disabled to leave home.)
Dental Services
□ Basic dental care for all eligible persons with
approval of the Division and its consultant staff,
special dental care, such as root canal treatments
or partial dentures, may be provided.
□ By arrangement with dentists and dental
mechanics, the Ministry is billed at 90% of current
fee schedules.
Optical Services
D Standard single vision or bifocal glasses are
provided when prescribed by an ophthalmologist
or optometrist. Unusual needs such as plastic
lenses, trifocals, inter-ocular or contact lenses may
also be provided with Division approval.
□ Optical suppliers are paid the wholesale costs
of materials, plus a fee for service, which was
increased in 1979.
Ancillary Services
□ The Division provides prescribed non-transferable
medical needs such as braces and surgical
supports when client's income and assets do not
permit private purchase.
□ Prescribed wheelchairs may also be provided.
In such cases the client's needs may be assessed
by the Canadian Paraplegic Association or other
specialized agency, at the Division's request and
expense, for the best advice in ordering the
specific chair or other equipment to meet the
client's physical needs and circumstances.
Purchasing is arranged through the B.C.
Purchasing Commission.
□ There has been a growing demand for electric
wheelchairs for clients with tragic physical
problems such as quadriplegics or children with
cerebral palsy. This has resulted in a 64 per cent
increase in costs compared to last year.
Transportation for Medical Reasons
□ Transportation to and from clinics, nursing homes,
rehabilitation centres, and hospitals can be
provided for clients unable to use public
transportation. Local transportation may be
authorized by the district office, but transportation
out of the Province requires prior Division
approval, and is subject to MSA authorization of
the subsequent medical treatment.
Special Health Needs Program
□ The Division may provide any of the services
listed above to persons on marginal income,
following a budget review by local Ministry staff.
Experimental Programs
□ Although the program budget is limited, the
Division is able to consider the provision of
extraordinary items or treatments which may be
prescribed for eligible clients.
 60
HUMAN RESOURCES
□ Funding continues to be available for children
receiving sensory motor development services
through two Lower Mainland centres. As well,
acupuncture, orthodontic, and myofunctional
therapy for speech problems may be authorized
for eligible clients.
Applications for Handicapped Benefits
D With the assistance of consultant medical
specialists, the Division decides on eligibility of
applicants for GAIN for Handicapped benefits.
Approximately 4,350 applications were processed
in 1979, an increase of 25% over 1978.
□ In April the age limit for GAIN for Handicapped
applicants was raised from 60 to 65. The age
group 60-64 accounted for 720 applicants during
1979. As well, 175 handicapped status only
applications for the Long Term Care program
were processed this year.
Program Cost Sharing
□ Most Health Care Division programs are equally
cost shared with the Federal Government under
Canada Assistance Plan funding.
PHARMACARE
The Pharmacare program provides full or partial
assistance in the major share of expenses associated
with the purchase of designated prescription drugs,
ostomy supplies and designated prosthetic appliances.
Pharmacare administers four programs, each
benefiting a different group of people. While benefits
are identical within the four plans, eligibility and
degrees of assistance vary.
Pharmacare is of particular benefit to the 291,000
senior citizens in the Province, more than half of
whom have no taxable income. Approximately 30
per cent of the elderly suffer from one or more
chronic diseases or conditions, many of which can be
controlled or alleviated by the proper use of drugs.
Before establishment of this program in 1974, the
expense of proper medication represented a heavy
burden for the elderly. Accounting for approximately
10 per cent of our population, the elderly receive 22
per cent of all prescriptions and account for over 28
per cent of all drug expenditures. Following the lead
of British Columbia most other Provinces have
instituted free drug programs for the elderly and 90
per cent of Canada's senior citizens are now covered
by a Provincial drug plan.
Normal professional services of pharmacists are
extended to Pharmacare recipients in an identical
manner to that enjoyed by all citizens.
A higher number of prescriptions are being filled
for the elderly citizens than was the case prior to
Pharmacare. This, however, was a prime
consideration in establishing the program, as many
elderly citizens avoided having a prescription filled
due to the cost. Failure to obtain necessary
medication meant incomplete therapy and possible
waste of the medical and/or hospital care already
provided. In 1979, 274,000 people were eligible for
these benefits, and the value of drugs, and other
Pharmacare eligible supplies paid on their behalf by
government totalled $28 million.
Pharmacare also provides fully-paid assistance to
all citizens declared eligible for medical benefits by
the Ministry of Human Resources (generally income
assistance recipients and children in care), as well as
to all citizens receiving attention in long-term care
facilities. In 1979, 100,000 persons were eligible for
medical benefits by the Ministry, for a total cost of
$7 million, and 17,000 persons were eligible under
the long-term care program, at a cost of $5 million.
Universal Pharmacare, introduced in June 1977,
provides partial protection against major drug and
other expenses for all citizens not receiving benefits
on a fully paid basis. Universal Pharmacare will
provide 80 per cent reimbursment for all eligible
expenses exceeding $100 in a calendar year. In
1979, a total of 2.2 million people were eligible for
this benefit, for a total cost of $4 million on 200,000
claims.
In total, 2.585 million people were eligible for
Pharmacare benefits in 1979, costing $43 million.
 Section V
COMMUNITY
SERVICES
CONTENTS
Community Grants Program 63
Family Service Projects 64
Transportation 66
Services to Handicapped 67
Multi-Service Agencies  67
Low Income Groups   68
Miscellaneous Grants 68
Crisis Centres 69
Youth Programs 70
Volunteer Services 71
Work Activity Program 72
Achievement Centres Program 73
Handicapped Industries Guild  76
Community Living Society 76
Senior Citizen Counsellors 76
Seniors Day Centres Program   77
Bus Passes  78
  COMMUNITY GRANTS PROGRAM
Community Grants provide funds for services in
the community for those in need or likely to be in
need, through non-profit societies, where such
services are not within the scope of statutory
services. These services are complementary to and
supportive of statutory programs and a large number
of volunteers are involved in service delivery.
Community grants are intended to support time-
limited projects and longer-term projects through the
purchase of services.
Regional offices of the Ministry are responsible for
the initial screening of new applications for these
programs as well as for monitoring the progress of
established projects. The Community Projects
Division links the Regional office to senior
administration, providing consultation and advice as
required:
In 1979 a total of 223 grants to community projects
helped harness the immense potential of volunteer
service for community improvement.
Table 32 Expenditures on Community
Grants, 1979, and Fiscal Years 1971-72
to 1978-79
1979 $ 6,634,377
1978-79 $5,919,600
1977-78 $6,813,113
1976-77 $ 5,856,612
1975-76 $ 8,092,303
1974-75 $9,313,165
1973-74 $2,871,707
1972-73 $ 737,850
1971-72 $ 242,678
 64
FAMILY SERVICE
PROJECTS ANNUAL 1979
ABBOTSFORD
Matsqui-Abbotsford Community Services
Services    $ 19,299.50
ARMSTRONG
Armstrong-Spallumcheen Community Service
Centre Association -
Community Service Centre      9,600.00
BURNABY
Burnaby Family Life Institute - Burnaby
Family Life    47,679.75
Citizens Development Fund - Cedar Place
Project      9,450.00
The Life Line Society      6,825.00
CAMPBELL RIVER
Campbell River Counselling and Crisis Line
Services Society - Counselling and Crisis
Line       14.459.50
CHILLIWACK
Chilliwack Community Services   29,419.20
COQUITLAM
Coquitlam Share Society -
Family Centre   9,341.25
COURTENAY
Crossroads Crisis and Family Services Society -
Crossroads Crisis and
Family Services Centre    14,701.37
CRANBROOK
East Kootenay Mental Health Society -
Community Action Centre, Crisis Line and
Volunteer Bureau    10,332.41
DELTA
Deltassist      9,830.00
DUNCAN
Cowichan Family Life Association -
Counselling    16,308.00
Cowichan Valley Regional District Activity
Centre    537.50
FERNIE
Fernie and District Homemakers Service Society-
Elk Valley Preventative Services    8,893.24
FORT ST. JOHN
North Peace Community Resource Society -
Community Learning Centre      7,500.00
FRASER LAKE
Nechako Valley Community Services Society-
Crisis Line and Drop-In Centre   8,621.62
GANGES
Salt Spring Island Community Society - Social
Service Support Worker and Family
Centre    18,838.14
HUMAN RESOURCES
GRAND FORKS
Boundary Family and Individual Services
Society     5,330.00
KAMLOOPS
Kamloops Family Life Association     5,913.90
LANGLEY
Langley Family Services Association -
Counselling and Family Support
Groups      26,847.50
MAPLE RIDGE
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community Services
Council    18,520.50
MISSION
Mission Community Services
Association   21,671.75
NANAIMO
Nanaimo Family Life Association - Family
Life     18,561.25
NELSON
Nelson Community Services Centre     15,380.00
NORTH VANCOUVER
Family Services of Greater Vancouver - North
Vancouver Community Family Worker
Project      24,367.75
North Shore Neighbourhood
House    21,800.69
PARKSVILLE
District 69 Society of Organized Services -
Family Guidance Counselling    10,363.78
PENTICTON
Penticton and District Social Planning Society
- Special Action Groups   19,229.25
PORT ALBERNI
Port Alberni Family Guidance Association -
Family Guidance      7,224.00
PORT COQUITLAM
Port Coquitlam Area Women's
Centre   3,443.04
PRINCE GEORGE
Prince George Mom's and Kid's Drop-In
Centre Society       12,015.56
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
65
PROVINCE WIDE
Catholic Community Services - Family Service
Project      57,062.50
Coalition of B.C. Rape Centres Society -
Rape Relief     18,749.97
John Howard Society of B.C. - Family Service
Project      46,189.50
Lower Mainland Parents in Crisis
Society     62,539.00
REVELSTOKE
Revelstoke Receiving Home Society     188.45
RICHMOND
Family Services of Greater Vancouver -
Richmond Family Services   5,625.00
Richmond Family Place Society - Richmond
Family Place    18,462.75
SMITHERS
Smithers Community Services Association -
Mother's Time Off   21,853.00
SURREY
Family Services of Greater Vancouver -
Surrey Family Counselling Services     9,718.72
Guildford Recreation Society      25,746.00
Surrey-White Rock Family Development
Association    34,973.50
TERRACE
Terrace and District Community Services
Society - Mother's Time Off   20,190.18
VANCOUVER
Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention
Centre for Greater Vancouver - Parental
Stress Line      5,443.50
D.L. Divorce Lifeline of
Vancouver     5,456.25
Downtown Eastside Women's Centre
Association - Drop-In Centre    11,250.00
Eastside Family Place Society - East Side
Family Place    18,000.00
Family Services of Greater Vancouver -
Renfrew/Collingwood Family
Project      9,940.25
Fraserview Area Society South Vancouver
Neighbourhood House - Family Outreach
Worker Orchard Park   4,618.50
Kitsilano Neighbourhood House - Kitsilano
Neighbourhood Family Focus      6,239.50
Marpole Oakridge Area Council Society -
Marpole Oakridge Neighbourhood
Place   1,534.85
Metropolitan Council of the First United
Church of Canada - Pre-natal
Project   765.00
Mt. Pleasant Family Centre Society - Mt.
Pleasant Family Centre   36,702.25
Mt. Pleasant Neighbourhood House - Family
& Children's Worker    18,038.22
Native Women's Honor Society - Thunderbird
Drop-In Centre     44,153.25
Native Women's Honor Society - Thunderbird
Drop-In Cente Outreach
Program    22,500.00
Neighbourhood Services Association (South
Vancouver Neighbourhood House) - South
Vancouver Housing Development Outreach
and Youth Workers      26,421.00
Riley Park Community Association -
Branching Out      7,656.00
Skeena Terrace Tenants Association -
Skeena Terrace Family
Place   10,215.00
Unitarian Family Life Centre of
Vancouver      4,301.75
Vancouver Indian Centre Society -
Counsellors   3,733.00
Vancouver Indian Centre Society-
Native Family Counsellor     14,577.25
Vancouver Life Skills Society - South
Vancouver Family Place    19,873.90
Vancouver-Richmond Association for the
Mentally Retarded - Infant Development
Program -Slide and Tape Show    500.00
Volunteer Grandparents Society   41,626.50
West End Community Centre Association -
West End Single Parents Group      3,410.29
West Side Family Place Society - Family
Place   30,877.50
VICTORIA
Downtown/Blanshard Advisory Committee -
Social Service Support Worker    16,411.25
Esquimalt/Victoria West/View Royal
Advisory Society      21,324.00
Greater Victoria Citizens Counselling
Centre   28,690.00
Peninsula Community Association - Social
Service Support Worker    3,750.00
Saanich Peninsula Guidance
Association     15,656.48
TOTAL $ 1,207,269.51
 66
HUMAN RESOURCES
TRANSPORTATION                 ANNUAL 1979
QUESNEL
Quesnel and District Community Aid Society -
Transportation for the
Handicapped      43,817.25
RICHMOND
Richmond Volunteer Transportation Society -
Volunteer Transportation Service      20,110.00
SECHELT
Sunshine Coast Community Services Society -
Community Services Centre      34,446.70
ABBOTSFORD
Matsqui-Abbotsford Transportation
Service   $ 34,672.25
COQUITLAM
Coquitlam Share Society - Share Services and
Lifeline Crisis Centre    11,409.68
CRANBROOK
Cranbrook Homemaker Service - Cranbrook
Transportation Project     8,371.31
SUMMERLAND
Parkdale Place Housing Society - Lions Easter
Seal Bus      9,858.25
DELTA
Deltassist    108,697.60
KAMLOOPS
Kami Senior Citizens and Handicapped
Transportation Society     10,000.00
SURREY
Surrey Community Resource Society -
Transportation for Seniors and
Handicapped      86,325.00
VANCOUVER
Hastings Sunrise Grandview Woodlands Senior
Citizens Outreach Society   63,801.00
KELOWNA
Multiple Sclerosis Society - Kelowna Chapter -
Multiple Sclerosis Taxi-Bus   7,191.25
KIMBERLEY
Kimberley and District
Homemakers Service Society     11,382.12
Kitsilano Inter-Neighbourhood Development
Society - Mount Pleasant
Transportation     44,612.50
Neighbourhood Services Association (South
Vancouver Neighbourhood House) - South
Vancouver Transportation Service .......  27,995.90
VERNON
Multiple Sclerosis Society - Vernon Branch -
Transportation for the Handicapped       12,251.25
VICTORIA
Garth Homer Centre for the Handicapped -
Arbutus Transportation      8,532.38
NELSON
Nelson and District Homemaker
Service      11,605.53
NEW WESTMINSTER
The Western Society for Senior Citizens
Services - Senior Citizens Service
Bureau       123,758.78
NORTH VANCOUVER
United North Shore Transportation Society -
North Shore Transportation
Service      108,276.75
Multiple Sclerosis Society of Vancouver
Island - M.S. Transportation       18,188.75
PENTICTON
Penticton and District Social Planning
Society - Multiple Sclerosis Wheelchair
Bus      11,779.75
PORT ALBERNI
Port Alberni Wheels for the Handicapped
Society      10,936.25
PRINCE GEORGE
Carefree Society - Transportation
Service     94,308.75
PRINCETON
Princeton and District Services Society -
Princeton and District Community Services
(Transportation)     27,318.34
PROVINCE WIDE
The British Columbia Lions Society for
Crippled Children    92,441.25
WHITE ROCK
White Rock Community Aid Society - White
Rock Transportation   60,591.00
TOTAL                                                 $ 1,102,679.59
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
67
SERVICES
TO HANDICAPPED
ANNUAL 1979
DUNCAN
Cowichan Valley Regional District Activity
Centre   $ 537.50
GOLDEN
Golden Community Resources Society -
Handicapped Coordinator      9,860.00
NANAIMO
Nanaimo Association for the Mentally Retarded
- Citizen Advocacy Nanaimo       16,529.75
NEW WESTMINSTER
Western Society for Senior Citizens' Services -
Senior Citizens'Service Bureau       17,130.22
NORTH VANCOUVER
North Shore Projects Society for the Low
Income and Handicapped - North Shore
Projects   6,936.88
PORT ALBERNI
Alberni Valley Citizen Advocacy Society -
Citizen Advocacy      19,531.25
PROVINCE WIDE
British Columbia Association for the
Mentally Retarded      35,010.00
B.C. Mental Retardation Institute     6,250.00
Canadian Paraplegic Association -
Rehabilitation Counselling      163,685.00
Canadian Wheelchair Sports Association-
B.C. Division - Community
Reintegration       11,660.00
Pacific Association for Autistic Citizens -
Autism Dissemination, Family Aid and
Support Program    34,658.00
Western Institute for the Deaf    15,120.00
SECHELT
Sunshine Coast Community Services Society -
Community Services Centre   9,628.34
SURREY
Surrey Access for all Committee Society -
Action Access    6,187.50
VANCOUVER
Coast Foundation Society - Resocialization
Team       117,609.75
Douglas Park Community Centre Association -
Douglas Park Outreach Program
Coordinator       10,361.83
Handicrafts for the Homebound Handicapped
Society       10,000.00
Kiwassa Neighbourhood Services Association -
Hear Hear Project   22,625.00
Metropolitan Council of the United Church of
Canada - Downtown Eastside Handicapped
Program       11,478.75
Optimist Club of Vancouver (Downtown) -
Optimist Club Skating Program   600.00
Vancouver Mental Patients Association Society -
M.P.A. Drop-In Centre      81,519.00
VICTORIA
Garth Homer Centre for the Handicapped -
Administration and Individual Program
Plan      91,487.50
Greater Victoria Citizens Advocacy Society -
Citizen Advocacy Victoria      27,238.75
Physically Handicapped Action Committee
Society      8,580.12
TOTAL $ 798,352.39
MULTI-SERVICE AGENCIES    ANNUAL 1979
ABBOTSFORD
Matsqui-Abbotsford Community
Services    $ 19,299.50
CHILLIWACK
Chilliwack Community Services   6,220.60
CRANBROOK
East Kootenay Mental Health Society -
Community Action Centre, Crisis Line and
Volunteer Bureau     10,332.41
DELTA
Deltassist      36,255.75
DUNCAN
Cowichan Lake District Community Activity
and Resource Centre - Integranted Drop-In
Centre    16,505.50
FERNIE
Fernie and District Homemakers Service Society -
Elk Valley Preventative
Services Project      8,893.24
MAPLE RIDGE
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community Services
Society       10,075.62
NELSON
Nelson Community Services Centre      15,380.00
NORTH VANCOUVER
Capilano Community Services - Community
Service Centre      8,199.25
PENTICTON
Penticton and District Social Planning Society -
Co-operative Community Services      14,236.40
VANCOUVER
St. James Social Service Society     92,458.25
TOTAL $ 237,856.52
 68
HUMAN RESOURCES
LOW INCOME GROUPS
ANNUAL 1979    MISCELLANEOUS GRANTS    ANNUAL 1979
COQUITLAM
Coquitlam Share Society - Share Services and
Lifeline Crisis Centre     $ 80,733.95
COURTENAY
Upper Island Low Income Society -Rehabilitation
Project       10,102.50
KELOWNA
Central Okanagan Social Planning Society -
S.H.A.R.E    16,608.00
NANAIMO
Nanaimo Community Employment Advisory Board -
Employment Liaison Officer    16,198.50
NEW WESTMINSTER
Self Aid Never Ends Society - S.A.N.E. Community
Centre   32,535.00
NORTH VANCOUVER
North Shore Projects Society for the Low Income
and Handicapped - North Shore
Projects   6,936.87
PENTICTON
Penticton and District Social Planning Society -
Employability Preparation Project     32,135.06
VANCOUVER
Grandview Free Store Society      2,657.50
Red Door Rental Aid Society - Rental Housing
Relocation Services      42,394.75
St. James Social Services Society - New Hope
Drop-In Centre     6,847.50
Vancouver Community Workshop
Society     43,627.00
TOTAL $ 290,776.63
BURNS LAKE
Burns Lake Community Development
Association    $ 53,475.00
DAWSON CREEK
South Peace Senior Citizens Branch No. 74-
Community Effort for Senior
Citizens      31,815.63
PRINCE GEORGE
Prince George Community Resources
Society      221.00
Prince George Elder Citizens Recreation Society -
Dew Drop In       10,374.00
PROVINCE WIDE
Board of Registration for Social Workers of the
Province of British Columbia      24,552.00
Pacific Association of Communication in Friendship
Indian Centres    46,147.00
Social Planning and Review Council of
B.C   42,568.50
QUESNEL
Quesnel Community Resources Advisory
Committee      500.00
SURREY
S.C.A.M.P. 76   32,000.00
VANCOUVER
Gordon House Neighbourhood Services -
People Place      22,487.00
Greater Vancouver Information and Referral
Service Society - Directory of Services and
Referral Program   31,350.00
Little Mountain Neighbourhood House Society -
Operation Swaptalk - Phase II -
Facilitation    10,782.00
Multilingual Orientation Service Association
for Immigrant Communities
(M.O.S.A.I.C.)    108,171.00
Strathcona Property Owners and Tenants Association
- Neighbour to Neighbour     22,462.75
United Chinese Community Enrichment Services
Society (Success) - Volunteer Development
Project      15,562.50
TOTAL $ 452,468.38
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
CRISIS CENTRES ANNUAL 1979
CAMPBELL RIVER
Campbell River Counselling and Crisis Line Services
Society -
Counselling and Crisis Line      $ 14,459.50
CHILLIWACK
Chilliwack Community Services      14,644.60
COQUITLAM
Coquitlam Share Society - Share Services and
Lifeline Crisis Centre  •   50,456.37
COURTENAY
Crossroads Crisis and Family Services Society -
Crossroads Crisis and Family
Services Centre      14,701.38
CRANBROOK
East Kootenay Mental Health Society - Community
Action Centre, Crisis Line and Volunteer
Bureau     10,332.42
FERNIE
Fernie and District Homemakers Service Society - Elk
Valley Preventative Services Project      8,893.24
FRASER LAKE
Nechako Valley Community Services Society - Crisis
Line and Drop In Centre    8,621.63
KAMLOOPS
Kamloops Family Life Association      47,311.20
KELOWNA
Central Okanagan Social Planning Society - Advice
Service Kelowna     22,984.00
MAPLE RIDGE
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community Services
Society  36,115.63
NANAIMO
Nanaimo Association for Intervention and
Development - Crisis Centre     24,976.25
NELSON
Nelson Community Services Centre      15,380.00
PRINCE GEORGE
Prince George Crisis Intervention Society -
Crisis Centre      37,597.73
QUESNEL
Quesnel Contact Line and Centre - Crisis
Line     30,712.50
RICHMOND
Chimo Personal Distress Intervention Services
in Richmond     59,115.00
SURREY
Surrey Community Resources Society - Emergency
Shelter Support Service/Crisis
Centre      21,337.50
Surrey Inter-Section Society      6,250.00
VANCOUVER
Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention Centre
for Greater Vancouver      24,591.00
VERNON
Vernon and District Volunteer Society - People
In Need (P.I.N.) Crisis Line   23,763.18
VICTORIA
Crisis Intervention and Public Information
Society of Greater Victoria (Need)
Victoria Crisis Line      36,500.00
WILLIAMS LAKE
Canadian Mental Health Association - Williams Lake
Crisis and Counselling Centre   29,050.00
TOTAL $537,793.13
 70
HUMAN RESOURCES
YOUTH PROGRAMMES ANNUAL 1979
ABBOTSFORD
Matsqui-Abbotsford Community
Services      $ 19,299.50
ARMSTRONG
Armstrong-Spallumcheen Community Service Centre
Association - Community
Service Centre     14,400.00
BURNABY
Big Brothers of Burnaby - Project
Intercept      9,337.50
Citizens Development Fund - Project
Backdoor    73,048.50
Fraser Correctional Resources Society -
P.U.R.P.O.S.E   52,680.75
Lochdale Area Community School Association -
Community Youth Worker      12,709.48
BURNS LAKE
Burns Lake Bridge the Gap Society   9,930.57
CAMPBELL RIVER
Campbell River Youth Centre Society - Youth
Centre      25,782.24
COURTENAY
Comox-Strathcona Youth Chance Society -
Youth Outreach   24,906.99
CRANBROOK
Cranbrook Boys' and Girls' Club - Youth Development
Project     24,537.50
DAWSON CREEK
Nawican Friendship Centre -
Streetworkers      26,672.00
DUNCAN
Cowichan Valley Regional District Activity Centre -
Youth Program       7,409.75
Cowichan Lake District Activity and Resource
Centre - Youth Program       15,396.00
FALKLAND
Falkland and District Community Association -
Falkland Youth Centre       13,928.06
FERNIE
Fernie and District Homemakers Service Society - Elk
Valley Preventative
Services Project    8,893.23
FORT NELSON
Fort Nelson-Liard Native Friendship Society - Youth
Drop-In Incentive Program     12,450.00
FORT ST. JOHN
Fort St. John Friendship Society -
Streetworkers       18,250.00
HAZELTON
Hazelton's Wil Luu Sa'yd Goot Society - Hazelton
Drop-In Centre   23,340.66
KAMLOOPS
Kamloops Community YM-YWCA - Youth Involvement
Program   30,913.23
Boys' and Girls' Club of Kamloops -
Help-a-Kid     25,938.99
KITIMAT
Kitimat Community Services Society - Youth Worker
Project     3,080.00
NANAIMO
Boys' and Girls' Club of Nanaimo - Youth in
Need  29,061.57
Nanaimo Association for Intervention and
Development - Youth Work Program ....   16,117.75
NELSON
Nelson Youth Activities Society - Nelson Youth
Services     18,975.00
NORTH VANCOUVER
YMCA of Greater Vancouver - North Shore
Unit   625.00
NEW WESTMINSTER
YM/YWCA of New Westminster and District -
Detached Youth Program    30,476.50
PENTICTON
Penticton Boys' and Girls' Club     1,766.66
PORT ALBERNI
Port Alberni Family Guidance Association -
Youth Worker      13,253.25
POWELL RIVER
Powell River Community Services Association -
Streetworker Project     12,580.00
PRINCE RUPERT
Prince Rupert Friendship House
Association       14,361.06
RICHMOND
Community Contact Society - Project
Contact      26,915.78
Richmond Youth Service Agency - Detached
Youth Work Project    19,725.00
SALMON ARM
Shuswap Youth Centre Association - Shuswap Youth
Centre      49,157.73
SMITHERS
Smithers Community Services Association - Smithers
Youth Centre   40,686.00
SURREY
Mayfair Family Program Society - Surrey Apartment
Complex      25,416.75
Surrey Y-Riders    6,000.00
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
71
VANCOUVER
Big Brothers of Greater Vancouver - One-to-One-
Program   20,000.00
Big Sisters of Greater Vancouver      22,990.00
Boys' and Girls' Club of Greater Vancouver -
South Vancouver Native Indian
Worker      4,001.50
Britannia Community Services Centre Society-
Britannia Child Care Worker    16,539.75
Dunbar Community Association - Project for Youth
with Special Needs    7,904.75
False Creek Community Association - False Creek
School Child Care Worker    16,311.75
Franklin Community School Association - Franklin
Youth Project    17,345.00
Frog Hollow Neighbourhood House - Frog Hollow
Youth Project    13,868.00
Gordon House Neighbourhood Services - Davie Street
Project      13,848.40
Gordon House Neighbourhood Services - Youth
Worker      3,937.50
Immigrant Services Society of B.C. - Walter Moberly
Elementary School Child Care
Worker       17,384.41
Killarney Community Centre Society - Carleton
Elementary School Child Care
Worker       16,956.20
Kitsilano Neighbourhood House (Neighbourhood
Services Association) - Bayview Child Care
Worker Project       16,823.75
Kiwassa Neighbourhood Services Association -
McDonald School Project    7,001.50
Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood House - Teen
Centre       16,827.22
Neighbourhood Services Association - Cedar
Cottage/Kensington Youth Project    4,251.75
Raycam Cooperative Association - Native Youth
Worker      2,712.00
Strathcona Community Centre Association -
Chinatown Streetworker    13,487.50
Vancouver YWCA - Vancouver South Group
Worker      4,078.50
VICTORIA
Peninsula Community Association - Teen Activities
of the Saanich Peninsula
(S.T.A.G.)    21,427.00
Victoria West Community Development
Association       18,300.00
Victoria YM-YWCA - Detached Youth Work
Project     80,442.50
Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Greater
Victoria      4,666.68
TOTAL $1,119,128.66
VOLUNTEER SERVICES ANNUAL 1979
ABBOTSFORD
Matsqui-Abbotsford Community
Services       $ 19,299.50
AGASSIZ
Agassiz Community Services - Volunteer Coordination
Bureau     14,345.00
ARMSTRONG
Armstrong-Spallumcheen Community Service Centre
Association - Community Service
Centre      8,000.00
CASTLEGAR
Kootenay Columbia Child Care Society - Castlegar
Volunteer Exchange     9,721.36
CHILLIWACK
Chilliwack Community Services      14,515.60
COQUITLAM
Greater Coquitlam Volunteer Bureau   9,299.25
CRANBROOK
East Kootenay Mental Health Society - Community
Action Centre, Crisis Line and
Volunteer Bureau       10,332.41
CRESCENT BEACH
Crescent Beach Community Services - Volunteer
Coordination      14,172.25
DELTA
Deltassist      14,828.40
DUNCAN
Cowichan Valley Volunteer Society - Volunteer
Centre       11,250.00
FORT ST. JOHN
North Peace Community Resources Society -
Direct Services   25,576.00
GOLDEN
Golden Community Resources Society - Volunteer
Bureau    2,568.64
KAMLOOPS
Kamloops Family Life
Association      5,913.90
KELOWNA
Central Okanagan Social Planning Society - Advice
Service Kelowna      11,492.00
KITIMAT
Kitimat Community Services Society - Volunteer
Coordinator    9,824.32
LANGLEY
Langley Community Services - Volunteer
Bureau    17,138.00
MISSION
Mission Community Services
Society   21,671.75
 72
HUMAN RESOURCES
NANAIMO
Nanaimo Volunteer Centre Society    11,250.00
NELSON
Nelson Community Services Centre       15,380.00
NORTH VANCOUVER
North Shore Association of Volunteers for
Seniors    12,360.00
North Shore Living and Learning Centre -
Volunteer Program      15,380.00
PENTICTON
Penticton and District Social Planning Society-
Cooperative Community Services    21,551.25
PORT ALBERNI
Port Alberni and Area Volunteer Society-
Volunteer Bureau      25,762.50
RICHMOND
Richmond Volunteer Center Society   2,175.00
SECHELT
Sunshine Coast Community Services Society-
Community Service Centre     14,444.45
SMITHERS
Smithers Community Services Association -
Volunteer Bureau      9,812.41
SURREY
Surrey Coordinating Centre       12,168.75
TRAIL
Kootenay Society for the Handicapped (Trail Branch)-
Trail Community Volunteer      4,400.00
VANCOUVER
Vancouver Volunteer Society - Voluntary Action
Resource Centre (VARC)    32,992.50
VICTORIA
Greater Victoria Volunteer Society - Victoria
Volunteer Bureau      37,012.50
Oak Bay Community Association - Oak Bay
Volunteer Services      7,200.00
Peninsula Community Association -
Volunteer Services      9,372.00
TOTAL $ 452,762.24
WORK ACTIVITY PROGRAM
Work Activity Programs provide work preparation
for people who have unusual difficulty in obtaining
and maintaining employment, or benefiting from
other training programs.
Groups of carefully-selected trainees go through a
training program which may last six or more
months. Components of the programs include life
skills training designed to help an individual with
such things as money management, job interview
preparation, the skills necessary to hold on to a job,
counselling and education. This is provided within
work settings such as forestry projects or workshops
for light industry.
Programs may be adapted for special groups such
as the handicapped, or for people in receipt of
income assistance who are considered likely to be in
need under terms of the Canada Assistance Plan.
At year end, there were seven work activity
programs underway: Fraser Valley, Victoria Boys'
and Girls' Club, Surrey Rehabilitation Workshop,
Vancouver Youth, Arbutus Work Incentive Society,
Vancouver Island, and Canadian Mental Health
Association.
Table 33 Work Activity Projects, Ministerial
Expenditures, Calendar Year 1979, and
Fiscal Years 1973-74 to 1978-79
$
$
1979
1,014,854
1975-76
399,604
1978-79
939,872
1974-75
313,117
1977-78
357,631
1973-74
366,710
1976-77
340,288
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
73
ACHIEVEMENT CENTRES PROGRAM
The Achievement Centres Program assists
financially with the operating costs of achievement
centres for handicapped people.
An achievement centre is a place which provides
organized programs for handicapped or other
disabled people over school-leaving age. Programs
help these people to improve their social and work
skills to enhance the quality of their lives and to
increase their independence. The centres are
autonomous, with their own direction, priorities, and
financial management, and are operated by
registered non-profit societies.
The centres offer diverse programs to teach and
practise personal life and social skills. Some provide
a workshop setting aimed at developing basic work
skills and work practices. This most often is
accomplished by the manufacture or refurbishing of
items for sale, or through contract work for other
organizations.
To be eligible for financial support from the
Ministry, Centres must meet the following conditions:
□ Be a registered non-profit society or under the
auspices of such a society;
□ Provide services in accord with the Ministry
policies for the Achievement Centres program for
handicapped persons;
□ Ensure that premises in which programs or
activities take place conform to fire, health and
safety standards of federal, provincial and civic
authorities;
□ Maintain financial accounts for the Centre, and
statistical records of persons who receive service.
Once approved, Centres submit monthly billing
forms to the Ministry and payment is based on the
number of user hours per month. (The current rate is
73 cents per user hour). These funds do not
constitute an allowance or wage to the participating
clients. Centres which are unable to accrue many
user hours because of a small handicapped
population may receive a fixed sum of $930 a
month. Such grants are to assist first, with salary
costs, and second, with other operating expenses.
A transportation allowance of up to $20 a month
may be paid to help eligible people attend the
Centres.
At year end, 75 Centres were in receipt of grants.
Approximately 5,000 persons attend these Centres
each month.
The Achievement Centres Program has undergone
an administrative change during 1979, and is now
administered by Ministry regional staff as opposed to
being a centralized Headquarters program. This
reflects a closer working relationship between local
Ministry staff and community-based associations.
PROJECT
LOCATION
AMOUNT GRANTED 1979
ABBOTSFORD
MSA Community Services      $ 41,240.11*
MSA Association for the Retarded-
Wildwood Training Centre   64,164.81*
ARMSTRONG
Armstrong-Enderby Association for
the Mentally Retarded-
Kindale Training Centre    29,140.87*
BURNABY
Burnaby Association for the Mentally Retarded-
Burnaby Activity Workshop   69,717.55*
Canadian Mental Health Association-
Burnaby Achievement Centre      51,294.61*
CAMPBELL RIVER
Campbell River District Assocation for the
Mentally Retarded-"Our Place"
Activity Centre    34,769.68*
CASTLEGAR
Kootenay Society for the Handicapped-
Silver Birch Activity Centre       18,050.19*
CHILLIWACK
Chilliwack and District Opportunity
Workshop   29,808.09*
COURTENAY
Bevan Lodge Association-Special Opportunity
Centre   83,220.00*
CRANBROOK
Kootenay Society for Handicapped Children
The Achievement Centre    47,949.32*
CRESTON
Kootenay Society for Handicapped Children-
Cresteramics    30,227.84
DAWSON CREEK
Dawson Creek Society for Retarded Children,
"The Place"   24,054.96*
DUNCAN
Duncan and District Association for the Mentally
Retarded-Cowichan Opportunity Centre ..  62,154.39*
GANGES
Salt Spring Island Community Society-
Salt Spring Island Achievement Centre ...   11,160.00
GRAND FORKS
Grand Forks and District Society for the
Handicapped-Broadacres Achievement
Centre   25,433.60*
GIBSONS
Sechelt and District Assocation for the
Mentally Retarded-Sunshine Achievement
Centre   6,510.00
HOPE
Hope Association for the Retarded-
Tillicum Workshop    15,079.01*
 74
HUMAN RESOURCES
INVERMERE
Windermere and District Social Service
Society-Lake Windermere
Workshop    17,520.00
KAMLOOPS
Kamloops Society for the Retarded-
Pleasant Services       103,556.80*
KELOWNA
Canadian Mental Health Association-
The Discovery Clubs   66,576.00*
Kelowna and District Society for the Mentally
Retarded-Sunnyvale Workshop     67,503.83*
KITIMAT
Kitimat Association for the Mentally Retarded-
Kitimat Workshop       11,160.00
LANGLEY
Langley Association for the Handicapped-
Langley Achievement Centre   30,203.20*
MAPLE RIDGE
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community Services
Council-Haney Activity Centre    33,994.64*
Maple Ridge Association for the Mentally Retarded-
Harold E. Johnson Centre   30,411.80*
MERRITT
Nicola Valley Association for the Mentally
Retarded-Ska-Lu-La Training
Centre    11,284.16*
MISSION
Mission Workshop Association   46,165.28*
NANAIMO
Canadian Mental Health Association-
Contact House       11,160.00
Nanaimo Association for the Mentally Retarded-
Narco Centre      56,307.09*
NELSON
Kootenay Society for the Handicapped-
Silver King Workshop   35,165.56*
NEW WESTMINSTER
New Westminster-Coquitlam Society for the
Retarded-Beacon Services
(governing agency)   79,994.13*
SANE Society-Sha Sha Club      70,080.00*
NORTH VANCOUVER
Canadian Mental Health Association-
The Corner House       19,269.08*
North Shore Association for the Mentally
Retarded-ARC Services Workshop and Cooinda
Progress Services     68,328.00*
PARKSVILLE
Parksville-Qualicum Beach Association for
the Handicapped-TECH Achievement
Centre    14,604.28
PENTICTON
Penticton and District Society for the
Mentally Retarded-Penticton Training
Centre   90,848.50
PORT ALBERNI
Alberni District Association for the
Mentally Retarded-Arrowsmith
Workshop   37,044.57*
PORT COQUITLAM
New View Society   29,938.11*
PORT MOODY
New Westminster-Coquitlam Society for the
Retarded-Beacon Services (Port
Moody Division      38,917.56*
POWELL RIVER
Powell River Association for the Mentally
Handicapped-Artaban Services      54,453.61*
PRINCE GEORGE
Prince George and District Association for
the Retarded-The Aurora Activity
Centre   35,436.39*
PRINCE RUPERT
Prince Rupert Association for the
Mentally Retarded-Prince Rupert
Achievement Centre      4,650.00
PRINCETON
Princeton and District Community
Services-Princeton Handicapped Action
and Training Centre     11,160.00
QUESNEL
Quesnel and District Association for the
Mentally Retarded-Borealis Occupational
Centre    12,450.88*
REVELSTOKE
Revelstoke and District Association for
the Mentally Retarded-HUB Achievement
Centre    11,160.00
RICHMOND
Vancouver-Richmond Association for the
Mentally Retarded-Richmond
Sheltered Workshop   60,305.30*
SALMON ARM
Salmon Arm Association for the Mentally
Retarded-Shuswap Sheltered
Workshop   34,220.20
SARDIS
Upper Fraser Valley Society for the Retarded-
Sunshine Drive Occupational Centre ....  22,705.84
SURREY
Surrey Association for the Mentally Retarded-
Clover Valley Industries     71,848.07*
Surrey Rehabilitation Society-Surrey
Achievement Centre for Handicapped
Persons   46,408.65*
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
75
TERRACE
Terrace Association for the Mentally
Handicapped-Three River
Workshop    15,744.64*
TRAIL
Kootenay Society for the Handicapped-
Trail Rehabilitation Industries   20,461.03*
VANCOUVER
St. James' Social Services Society-
Gastown Workshop       17,520.00*
Vancouver Central Lions Club CARSCRAFT
Bluebird Shop    12,551.23*
Canadian Mental Health Association-
Vancouver Branch Activity
Centre   49,585.25*
Vancouver Mental Patients Association
Society      48,180.00*
Arbutus Work Incentive Society-Kitsilano
Workshop    11,160.00
Arbutus Work Incentive Society-Mt.
Pleasant Workshop    11,160.00
The Kettle Friendship Centre     26,280.00*
Vancouver-Richmond Association for the Mentally
Retarded-Marine Drive and Clark Drive
Centres    253,641.42*
Coast Foundation Society   68,721.47*
Berwick Memorial Centre    11,160.00
VERNON
Vernon and District Association for the
Mentally Retarded Venture Training
Centre   84,871.26*
Canadian Mental Health Association-
Vernon Activity Centre      28,904.35*
VICTORIA
Capital Region Association for the Mentally
Handicapped-Langwood Branch      21,580.26*
Capital Region Association for the Mentally
Handicapped-Sentinel
Centre   91,131.16*
The Island White Cross Rehabilitation Centre
Society-Community Explorations    11,160.00
The Island White Cross Rehabilitation
Centre Society-Cornerstone    20,399.39*
The Island White Cross Rehabilitation Centre
Society-White Cross Centre      49,104.12*
 76
HUMAN RESOURCES
HANDICAPPED INDUSTRIES GUILD
The Handicapped Industries Guild provides
consultation and financial assistance to non-profit
agencies which operate workshop programs designed
to improve vocational opportunities for handicapped
adults.
The Guild provides the following services to
operators of Achievement Centres:
□ Management support services to assist in
determining appropriate manufacturing products
and services, improving production and
marketing, and in developing manufacturing
systems and procedures;
□ Financial aid based on documented business plans
to permit operators to obtain essential renovations
and equipment required for manufacturing goods;
□ Co-ordination of services to assist in
dissemination and exchange of relevant
vocational information and liaison with the
business community to promote the
manufacturing and working capabilities of the
handicapped.
COMMUNITY LIVING SOCIETY
The Community Living Society was established to
assist with the orderly planning and community
placement of developmentally disabled persons who
are, or were residents of Woodlands; to encourage
present community programs to serve these persons
and to stimulate development at appropriate new
resources, if required.
The Society works with an individual and his
family to identify needs, to develop a plan and to coordinate the services required to ensure the well-
being and continued growth of the handicapped
person in the community.
The Ministry provides administrative and program
funds to help the society place developmentally
disabled persons in the community.
Former residents of Woodlands, with a variety of
handicapping conditions, have the potential to live
independently and can be successfully
accommodated in the community.
Funding for 1979 was $292,817.
SENIOR CITIZENS COUNSELLORS
Senior Citizen Counsellors provide a counselling
and information service. The counsellors are
themselves senior citizens and work as volunteers.
The program began in 1968 with 30 senior citizen
counsellors appointed by the Ministry. In 1979, there
were 166. The counsellors involve themselves in a
wide variety of activities—driving elderly people for
medical appointments; visiting the lonely; providing
information, counselling, and referral services;
advising on Government programs; assisting with the
completion of forms; and aiding in the development
of programs in the community to meet the special
needs of senior citizens.
The Counsellors work closely with their local
Ministry office. They maintain and update their
knowledge of services, and changes in Federal/
Provincial programs (O.A.S., G.I.S., GAIN, SAFER,
etc.) by attending workshops and seminars.
Counsellors are appointed upon recommendation
from Regional Managers. They are respected
members of their communities, involved in some
community work prior to retirement.
Counsellors submit monthly reports for out-of-
pocket expenses and may be reimbursed up to a
maximum of $75 per month.
Table 34 Expenditures for the Senior
Citizen Counsellor Service
1979  $ 108,453
1978-79 $ 85,782
1977-78 $ 56,208
1976-77 $ 58,117
1975-76 $ 54,874
1974-75 $ 48,763
1973-74 $ 38,074
1972-73 $ 25,000
1971-72 $ 21,100
Table 35 Estimated numbers of people
served by Senior Citizen Counsellors
1979   102,600
1978-79  85,500
1977-78  73,500
1976-77  70,000
1975-76  66,750
1974-75  57,000
1973-74  49,000
1972-73  44,200
1971-72  37,600
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
Reporl
SENIOl
The Seniors Day Centres Program provides
community-based drop-in centres for the elderly. The
centres may provide counselling and information,
recreational activities, arts and crafts, together with
an opportunity for socialization. The intent is to
enable a senior citizen to remain in his own
community and avoid becoming shut-in and possibly
a candidate for some type of long-term care.
Grants are provided to non-profit societies who
operate such centres. The grants assist with building
upkeep, utilities, staff costs, and program expenses.
The centres are usually open to all persons of
senior age. In some cases a modest membership fee
is charged.
77
SENIORS DAY CENTRES PROGRAM
PROJECT LOCATION
ANNUAL 1979
ABBOTSFORD
Matsqui-Abbotsford Community Services-
Seniors Day Centre Services      $ 22,082.25
CAMPBELL RIVER
O.A.P. Branch *52 Activity Centre-
Seniors Activity Centre    6,995.75
COOMBS
Coombs Hobby Pensioners
Association   6,476.00
DUNCAN
Cowichan Lake District Activity & Resource
Centre-Seniors Program   3,885.00
Cowichan Valley Regional District
Activity Centre-Seniors
Program    7,302.00
FALKLAND
Senior Citizens Branch*95-Falkland
Seniors Recreation Centre   630.00
NORTH VANCOUVER
Silver Harbour Manor Society      84,514.75
North Shore Adult Day Care Services
Society      29,450.00
PENTICTON
Penticton and District Retirement
Service     25,937.50
VANCOUVER
Arbutus/Shaughnessy/Kerrisdale Friendship
Society for Seniors-ASK
Seniors Project      19,437.50
Chown Adult Day Care Centre
Society     33,012.21
Crossreach Project of Vancouver-
Seniors Program   66,240.00
Downtown Eastside Residents Association-
DERA Senior Citizens Club    11,606.25
411 Seniors Centre Society   65,746.50
Hastings Sunrise Drop-In Centre    1,200.00
Japanese Community Volunteer Association-
Japanese Seniors Drop-In Centre      15,406.25
Kitsilano Senior Citizens Recreation and
Social Club     1,500.00
Marpole Oakridge Area Council-Seniors
Program   52,902.50
Neighbourhood Services Association (Cedar
Cottage Neighbourhood House)-Cedar
Cottage/Kensington Services to
Seniors     69,178.52
Neighbourhood Services Association (South
Vancouver Neighbourhood House)-South
Vancouver Adult Care Day
Program    41,348.73
Renfrew/Collingwood Seniors
Society     46,687.50
Strathcona Community Centre Association-
Seniors Coordinator     9,996.00
West End Adult Day Care Centre Society-
West End Hi-Steppers Adult Care
Centre   32,059.26
VICTORIA
Silver Threads Service    114,125.00
TOTAL 767,719.47
 78
HUMAN RESOURCES
BUS PASSES
The Bus Pass Program aids and encourages
mobility among low-income senior citizens and
handicapped persons.
Bus passes are issued semi-annually for the period
December 1 to May 31 and June 1 to November 30.
The cost is $5 for all or part of each six-month
period and permits travel without payment of fares
on all B.C. Hydro urban service vehicles in Victoria
and Greater Vancouver.
Bus passes are issued to:
□ Residents of British Columbia, 65 years or over,
who are in receipt of the Federal Guaranteed
Income Supplement and/or GAIN for Seniors;
□ Residents of British Columbia, 60 to 64 years of
age, who are in receipt of GAIN Age Benefits;
□ Residents of British Columbia under 60 years of
age who are in receipt of GAIN for Handicapped
benefits.
The number of passes issued between June 1, 1979
and December 31, 1979, was 31,930.
Approximately 3,000 first-time applicants are
processed each issue. It is anticipated that the
program will continue to grow at its present steady
rate.
Administrative costs of this program are borne by
the Ministry. All revenue occurring as a result of the
$5 charge is remitted to B.C. Hydro. The Federal
Government does not participate in this program.
Table 36 Number of B.C. Hydro Bus Passes
Issued
December 1979 31,930
June  1979 33,131
December 1978 32,100
June  1978 31,828
December 1977 29,765
June  1977 30,443
December 1976 29,543
June  1976 28,718
December 1975 27,970
June  1975 26,685
 Section VI
RESIDENTIAL CARE
FOR THE
HANDICAPPED
CONTENTS
Residential Services for the Handicapped  81
Woodlands 82
Tranquille 83
Glendale 84
  Report of the Ministry, 1979
81
RESIDENTIAL SERVICES FOR
THE MENTALLY RETARDED
The aim of this program is to enable mentally
retarded people to live in their communities, where
possible, in the least restrictive environment that will
most fully meet their specific needs and enhance
their independent functioning.
The program provides a number of residential
options to meet the needs of this segment of the
Province's population.
Family Homes (one and two bed, unlicensed)
These small private homes for adults more closely
resemble foster homes for children. 112 such homes
have now been developed throughout the Province,
providing 177 beds.
Group Homes
Group homes are operated by non-profit societies
to provide accommodation for 6 to 12 mentally-
retarded adults in a group setting. The Ministry is
funding a total of 30 such homes, an increase of four
during the past year. New homes of this type were
developed in Quesnel, Williams Lake, Victoria, and
Kamloops, bringing the number of Group Home beds
to 325.
Short Stay Hostels
Many parents who can keep their handicapped
children at home still need respite from time to time.
The period of high demand for this service is the
summer holiday months. The Ministry has funded
local associations for the mentally retarded who
operate hostels for July and August only. In a
number of cases, group homes are maintained with
one or two beds used for emergencies or parent
relief. Five short-stay hostels with a total of 45 beds
are in regular demand on a year round basis.
Training Centres
The four community-based training centres assist
residents in developing their abilities to handle
independent or semi-independent living situations.
Some residents are able to move out of the training
centre to live on their own. The Ministry funds
community workers to provide a graduated system
of in-home support for those persons able to live on
their own.
The four training centres are:
Endicott Centre, Creston (capacity 62)
Northern Training Centre, Smithers (capacity 29)
Beaver Lodge, Oliver (capacity 30)
Variety Farm, Ladner (capacity 44)
Apartment Training Homes
This type of home is sometimes called an
Independent Living Home. Non-profit societies have
developed three such homes in Creston, Penticton
and Vancouver. Each home has a staff and program
to prepare mildly and moderately retarded adults to
live independently in apartments in groups of two
and three. When people are being assisted to
develop a compatible group to share an apartment,
they also pool their abilities in order to maximize
their shared responsibilities.
Boarding Home Care
When the Ministry of Health's Long Term Care
program came into being on January 1st, 1978, the
Ministry of Human Resources continued to fund
those homes caring for mentally retarded adults.
Supervision of these homes is undertaken jointly with
the Mental Health Boarding Home Staff. There are
approximately 160 boarding homes in the Province,
ranging in capacity from 3 to 75, where residents
have been assessed as mentally retarded, requiring
either personal care or intermediate care.
This part of the total program serves some 3,600
retarded persons.
Monitoring
During the year the Ministry played a lead role in
developing an instrument to enable teams to do an
in-depth review of the quality of the care being
provided in all types of residential facilities serving
the mentally retarded. These teams will have
representation also from the Ministry of Health, the
B.C. Association for the Mentally Retarded, and the
B.C. Association of Private Care Facilities.
The Ministry plans to complete these reviews in all
250 homes by the end of the summer of 1980.
 82
HUMAN RESOURCES
WOODLANDS
The Woodlands program provides assessment and
planning for mentally retarded individuals whose
needs cannot be met by resources in the community.
Woodlands offers a residential service with a wide
spectrum of care, educational, vocational,
recreational and therapeutic programs. The basic
philosophy of Woodlands is to help the retarded
person become as independent as possible.
In 1979 the organizational structure at Woodlands
was changed from five to four program units. The
major change came about in the Outreach Unit to
reflect the Ministry's emphasis on co-ordinated
services to the retarded. Realignment of some wards
also took place to reflect changes in the resident
population. The four units are as follows:
Unit 1—Outreach
This unit was established to co-ordinate and
develop services to retarded children and adults who
are not in residence. Services include:
□ Direct service by a follow-up team to those who
were previously residing at Woodlands but who
now live independently in the neighbourhood.
□ A home management program through the
Psychology Department to assist parents and
teachers in maintaining retarded children in their
own homes.
□ The Assessment and Resource Centre which
provides evaluation and planning services to
retarded persons, their families and appropriate
agencies.
□ The Provincial Inservice Resource Team, which
provides assistance in developing services for
autistic children in their own communities on a
Province-wide basis.
□ Alder Lodge, a fifty-bed residential program
in Coquitlam.
Unit 2—Health Care (293 residents)
Residents have multiple physical handicaps as well
as mental retardation. Each resident's needs are
assessed and programs planned by inter-disciplinary
teams, which include medical professionals,
psychologists, social workers, and teachers. Input
from parents is encouraged.
Unit 3—Life Preparation (334 residents)
The primary focus with younger children is the
team approach. A wide range of developmental
programs are offered including early childhood
training, self-help skills, kindergarten, pre-school
co-operative play, and training in motor skills and
visual and auditory perception. Opportunities are
provided for children to attend some special classes
in community schools. For adolescents, additional
programs are offered in the areas of community
orientation, pre-vocational training, behaviour
management and community living preparation.
Individual needs are met through non-verbal
communications training in sign language and
blissymbolics and through a specialized program for
blind and multiply handicapped people. It is hoped
that many of the participants in this Life Preparation
Program will eventually be able to live in small
community facilities.
Unit 4—Life Education (181 residents)
This unit provides programs for adolescents and
adults who have the intellectual and social potential
to return to the community for work, recreation, and
social activities. Programs are designed to help these
residents return to the community and include self-
care in grooming, behaviour modification, academic
schooling, vocational training, and bachelor survival.
Community jobs and social and recreational
experiences are also arranged for these residents.
Volunteers are an important part of Woodlands'
program. In 1979 over 300 volunteers provided
13,780 hours of service. This valuable contribution
was recognized at a banquet this year at which 32
special awards were presented.
A major move towards the use of computer
services was made this year, both for business
purposes and for monitoring of resident programs.
Table 37 Woodlands Resident Population
1969
1978
1979
Population as of
December 31st
1,261
880
856
Admissions, 12 months
178
46
35
Discharges
240
81
42
Deaths
14
8
8
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
r
Tl
The residential program at Tranquille provides
care for mentally retarded people from the interior
of the Province who cannot be cared for in their
own homes or communities.
Tranquille makes available various levels and types
of care for residents, including a pediatrics program
for retarded children plus care, training in life skills
and, where possible, rehabilitation services for
moderately, severely and profoundly retarded adults.
A major focus has been on the development of an
individual approach in resident care and training,
and on the use of a multi-disciplinary approach
involving psychologists, doctors, and social workers.
A number of developments have been initiated in
1979 to provide expanded service to both residents
and the local community.
The Psychology Department has been re-instituted
at Tranquille and has made significant contributions
in the areas of resident assessment, diagnosis and
follow-up. As well, an Outreach Resource Team has
been created to provide assessment services to the
communities served by Tranquille.
The establishment of the Volunteer Services
Department offers increased interface between the
community and Tranquille, and emphasis has been
placed on developing communications between staff
and volunteers. In addition, a new staff training
committee provides for employee participation in
program development, and in the identification of
staff training needs.
Considerable progress has also been made in the
integration of residents into a school program in the
area and involving them in an extensive range of
recreational activities in the community. A pre-
vocational training program has been initiated for
youths, and is being considered for expansion to the
rest of the institution. The Social Work Department,
in conjunction with other departments has been able
to increase community boarding home placements.
Eleven individuals were placed in the community
and three more are scheduled for placement.
83
TRANQUILLE
Table 38 Tranquille Resident Population
Resident population as at
December 31
Admissions, 12 months
Separations
1979
367
38
51
1978
380
39
32
 84
HUMAN RESOURCES
GLENDALE
Table 39 Glendale Resident Population
The Glendale Lodge society provides residential,
assessment, and training services to the handicapped
and mentally retarded from the Vancouver Island
and Gulf Islands area.
Glendale Lodge Society was established to provide:
□ 300 beds for the care and development of
severely and profoundly retarded persons on a
long-term basis;
□ 20 beds for the retarded on a short-term
basis i.e., (one week to three months), to provide
parent relief, parent vacation, parent respite in
family illness or emergency, behaviour shaping to
facilitate individual accommodation in own home
or a community resource;
□ Short-term training for the severely
handicapped person;
□ Comprehensive assessment service for
handicapped individuals where there is an
indication of retardation or of severe
communication problems. This service also
includes a travelling clinical team which covers
the major centres in the geographical area served,
quarterly, or more often if requested by
professional people in the area. This team operates
in conjunction with Health, Human Resources, and
Education and also provides training programs for
teachers in schools, parent counselling in general,
and advice and guidance to parents who wish to
keep the child in his own home;
□ A screening assessment for those with
impaired hearing (in conjunction with the Ministry
of Health and other professional groups interested
in hearing programs);
□ A 9 to 5 day-care program, five days per
week, for the physically handicapped and
mentally retarded of the Greater Victoria area
who are residing at home;
D Dental services for retarded persons in the
Greater Victoria area.
The Society continues to operate three group
homes on property owned by the Ministry on
Blenkinsop Road. Some 25 severely retarded
residents are accommodated there to receive further
training in preparation for return to more normal
placement in the community.
The Glendale Lodge Society is operated under the
Societies Act by a Board of Directors appointed by
Order in Council.
1978
1979
Resident population as of
December 31
325
315
Admissions, 12 months
(short & long term)
169
141
Discharges
(short & long term)
155
146
Waiting list
17
30
Staff-Dec. 31/79
(primarily due to the
purchase of Oak Bay
Lodge on Oct. 15/79)
498
618
 r
Section VII
LEGISLATION
  Report of the Ministry, 1979
87
The Ministry of Human Resources administers the
following legislation:
Ministry of Human Resources Act (R.S.B.C. 1960,
chapter III, as amended) - This Act establishes the
Ministry of Human Resources as having
jurisdiction over all matters relating to social and
public welfare and income assistance.
Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act
(R.S.B.C. 1976, chapter 19) and Guaranteed
Available Income for Need Regulations (B.C. Reg.
479/76, and amendments) - This Act and
regulations provide a guaranteed minimum
income to the handicapped, all residents 60 years
of age and over, and financial assistance and
several social services that are essential for
individuals and families. The social services
include day care, homemaker services, residential
care, counselling and rehabilitation services.
Adoption Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chapter 4, as
amended) - The purpose of this Act is to provide
the same rights and privileges for adopted
children as those of children born to both parents
in a family.
n
Children of Unmarried Parents Act (R.S.B.C.
1960, chapter 52, as amended) - This Act is to
ensure that the interests of the mother and her
child born out of wedlock are protected.
Protection of Children Act (R.S.B.C. 1960,
chapter 303, as amended) - The purpose of this
Act is to provide protection and care for children
who are neglected, abused, abandoned, or
without proper supervision or guardianship.
Human Resources Facilities Development Act
(S.B.C. 1974, chapter 39) and Human Resources
Facilities Development Act Regulations (B.C. Reg.
586/76) - The purpose of this Act and regulations
is to authorize Provincial grants to non-profit
organizations for the development of residential
facilities or centres for children, disabled persons,
and senior citizens.
Community Resource Boards Act (S.B.C. 1974,
chapter 18) - This Act permits the Government to
establish Human Resource and Health Centres
where'the Provincial income assistance programs,
social services, and health services may be
administered by boards composed of local
citizens.
Social Workers (Registration) Act (S.B.C. 1968,
chapter 51) - This Act permits the Government to
establish a Board of Registration for social
workers.
i.yg_ rare   famil/
  Section Vffl
FISCAL AND
STATISTICAL
ADDENDUM, 1978-79
  Report of the Ministry, 1979
91
Table 40 Proportion of Total Gross Welfare Expenditures
Administration and Community Services	
Services for Families and Children 	
Services for Seniors and Handicapped	
Health Services 	
Community Programs	
Income Assistance	
Special Programs for the Retarded
(includes Woodlands, Tranquille and Glendale)
Totals :....
Municipal Share of Costs	
Federal Provincial Cost-Sharing:
Canada Assistance Plan	
Department of Indian Affairs	
1977-78
1978-79
Value
t
Per Cent
Value
Per Cent
43,535,744
8.0
74,885,601
13.4
54,983,131
10.1
59,819,061
10.7
155,251,563
28.5
104,940,145
18.8
39,705,844
7.3
48,915,786
8.8
23,551,955
4.3
23,301,383
4.1
190,732,889
35.0
206,013,263
36.9
36,698,759
6.8
40,637,205
558,512,444
7.3
544,459,885
100.0
100.0
31,486,499
5.8
23,481,114
4.2
198,563,006
36.5
204,111,652
36.5
3,331,635
0.6
1,699,903
0.3
Table 41 Number of Cases by Category of Income Assistance1, as at March 31, 1978
and 1979
REGION 1
VANCOUVER
EAST
Income Assistance 1978 1979
Single person  4895 5281
Couple   303 309
Two-parent family  231 241
One-parent family   1002 1027
Child with relative  70 61
Total  6501 6919
REGION 2
REGION 5
VANCOUVER
REGION 3
REGION 4
PRINCE GEORGE
BURRARD
OKANAGAN
KOOTENAYS
CARIBOO
1978
1979
1978
1979
1978
1979
1978
1979
3611
4051
1457
1229
1170
1108
1707
1477
256
289
242
258
92
110
208
193
190
198
442
447
271
297
535
532
1095
1125
1593
1624
1013
953
1784
1703
39
49
162
130
137
107
175
198
5191
5712
3896
3688
2683
2575
4409
4103
REGION 7
REGION 10
PRINCE RUPERT/
REGION 8
REGION 9
VANCOUVER
BULKLEY
NORTH & SOUTH
KAMLOOPS
ISL. N. OF
VALLEY
PEACE RIVER
MAINLINE
MALAHAT
1978
1979
19TS
1979
1978
1979
1978
1979
REGION 6
FRASER
VALLEY
Income Assistance 1978 1979
Single person  2343 2263 466 492 428 398 1199 1009 2342 2459
Couple   229 229 68 61 56 37 153 148 279 303
Two-parent family  663 640 171 165 171 122 348 361 613 710
One-parent family   2041 2125 519 492 396 388 1263 1267 2032 2210
Child with relative  143 156 227 223 92 81 133 111 240 226
Total  5419 5413 1451 1433 1143 1026 3096 2896 5506 5908
REGION 11                                                                                                 REGION 14 REGION 16
CAPITAL REGION 12 REGION 13                    BURRARD VANCOUVER
REGION DISTRICT FRASER SOUTH FRASER NORTH SOUTH COAST SOUTH
Income Assistance                                1978         1979 1978         1979 1978         1979 1978         1979 1978         1979
Single person       3463       3488 1190       1483 1569       1739 1614       1598 1462       1486
Couple          250         275 147         170 207         189 164         204 122         137
Two-parent family         440         507 392         419 277         254 293         363 252         255
One-parent family        2082       2179 2110       2409 1636       1606 1786       1914 1436       1295
Child with relative         117         134 115         131 81           72 102         110 74           70
Total       6352       6583 3954       4612 3770       3860 3959       4189 3346       3243
Income Assistance
Single person ....
Couple 	
Two-parent family
One-parent family
Child with relative
Total	
REGION 17
VANCOUVER
WEST
1978 1979
850
60
84
560
36
1590
861
58
90
527
39
1575
TOTALS
1978 1979
29766 30422
2836 2970
5373 5601
22348 22844
1943 1898
62266 63735
 92
HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 42 Average Monthly Number Receiving Income Assistance During 1977
and 1978/79
CATEGORY
Heads of Families	
Single Persons	
Total Caseload (Average).
Dependents	
Average Monthly Total . .
AVERAGE CASELOAD AND
RECIPIENTS PER MONTH
1977/78 1978/79
29,536 30,129
24,592 24,744
54,128
59,811
113,939
54,873
59,749
114,622
Table 43 Number of Family Service Cases Not in Receipt of Financial Assistance From
The Ministry of Human Resources (by regions)
Region
1	
2	
3	
4	
5	
6	
7	
8	
9	
10	
11	
12	
13	
14	
15	
16	
17	
18	
Vancouver
TOTAL. . .
Mar. 31, 1977
Mar. 31, 1978
Mar. 31, 1979
—
1223
1393
_
1412
1776
441
408
401
299
392
426
350
378
404
235
270
300
308
373
386
91
112
138
184
230
327
397
421
423
765
716
767
882
729
713
589
609
592
903
808
1093
	
1010
1162
—
887
1043
—
187
238
2769
—
—
8213
10165
11582
Table 44 Gross Costs of Health Services for Fiscal Years 1968-69 to 1978-79
Year
$
1978-79.
1977-78.
1976-77 .
1975-76.
1974-75 .
1973-74.
1972-73 .
1971-72 .
1970-71 .
1969-70.
1968-69.
Transpor
Medical
Drugs1
Dental
Oplical
tation
Other
Total
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,204,134
37,321,647
7,905,683
1,096,989
767,564
619,769
48,915,786
1,378,781
30,129,270
6,033,887
790,638
588,942
784,326
39,705,844
1,008,073
26,716,886
5,487,320
644,315
438,963
524,832
34,820,389
1,099,479
23,642,347
4,209,007
486,080
374,850
310,623
30,122,386
754,422
17,303,892
2,380,266
409,213
387,554
257,808
21,493,154
634,136
6,461,400
2,655,573
322,489
419,451
328,510
10,821,559
677,194
3,626,268
2,429,538
304,695
367,888
264,700
7,670,283
614,365
3,334,159
2,403,257
290,116
342,712
165,980
7,150,589
591,206
3,102,874
2,491,589
282,272
326,166
121,892
6,915,999
465,738
2,444,968
1,611,115
219,858
252,999
72,862
5,067,540
1,403,378
2,423,798
792,475
140,591
212,550
53,571
5,026,363
■Included under Drugs are drug costs incurred under the Pharmacare Program which commenced January 1, 1974.
 n
Report of the Ministry, 1979
93
Table 45 Cost of Children's Programs 1978/79
The cost to Provincial Government of maintaining children's programs for the fiscal year was as follows:
Gross cost of maintenance of children in Family & Children's Services Division:
Foster Homes $ 14,319,465
Other Residential Resources $ 22,514,079
Receiving Special Services $   5,936,833   $ 42,770,377
Gross cost of transportation of children
in care of Superintendent   $     639,359
Gross cost of hospitalization of new-born infants being
permanently planned for by Superintendent  $       68,213
Gross Expenditures $ 43,477,949
Less: Collections , $ 11,212,513
Net Cost to Provincial Government as per
Public Accounts  $ 32,265,436
Table 46 Number of Children in Care and Legal Responsibility of Superintendent of
Child Welfare, by Legal Status, by Regions, as at March 31, 1979
Region Permanent
Region 1*   102
Region 2*   114
Region 3   209
Region 4  120
Region 5   264
Region 6  274
Region 7   144
Region 8  109
Region 9   250
Region 10   355
Region 11    378
Region 12   313
Region 13   150
Region 14   214
Region 16*   175
Region 17*  92
Other Supervising
Offices  2
Wards Supervised by
Another Province  139
TOTAL of
Superintendent of
Child Welfare  3,404
Other
88
141
156
104
146
211
83
70
174
226
182
222
115
162
148
68
90
2,386
Before
Court
27
41
27
18
66
31
27
26
27
46
23
60
22
44
40
16
5
4
550
J.D.A.
Wards
17
7
46
28
21
16
17
30
12
17
11
19
4
6
267
E.G.I.A.
F.R.A. &
Similar
Wards
11
8
16
17
87
36
95
22
51
88
36
33
14
57
17
44
640
Other
Province
Wards
5
6
49
18
14
21
3
7
19
23
23
38
2
11
3
8
Non
Wards
37
42
109
68
118
121
45
13
150
106
87
92
58
122
71
86
252
1,332
TOTAL
274
360
583
352
741
722
418
263
688
874
741
775
372
629
458
284
15
282
8,831
'Effective January 1, 1978, the Vancouver City Area was divided into these four Regions.
 94
HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 47 Number of Children in Care and
Legal Responsibility of Superintendent of
Child Welfare, by Type of Care as at
March 31, 1979
Type of Care No. of Children
Paid foster-home care   5,728
Boarding home, Child maintains self    164
Free home and free relatives'
(or parents') home   804
Run Aways    194
therefore own homes, or relatives'
homes, & independent living    1,162
Adoption Home      404
Resources*    1,537
TOTAL   8,831
'This covers a wide variety of placements ranging from subsidized
receiving homes to Federal institutions.
Table 48 Children in Care and Legal
Responsibility of Superintendent of Child
Welfare by Age Group at March 31, 1979
Age Group No. of Children
Under 3 years   650
3-5 years inclusive  616
6-11 years inclusive  1,994
12-15 years inclusive  2,887
16-17 years inclusive  1,927
18 years  757
TOTAL  8,831
 Report of the Ministry, 1979
95
The following tables are available, on request,
from Information Services, Ministry of Human
Resources, Victoria:
Table 49—Number of Family Services Cases (Not
in Receipt of Financial Assistance from the
Ministry of Human Resources) Served by the
Ministry of Human Resources During Fiscal Year
1978/79.
Table 50—Number of Children Born Out of
Wedlock in British Columbia, by Age-group of
Mother, During Fiscal Years 1977/78 and
1978/79.
Table 51 — Number of Children in Care of
Superintendent of Child Welfare During and at
End of Fiscal Year 1978/79.
Table 52—Number of Children Admitted to Care
of Superintendent of Child Welfare, by Legal
Status, During Fiscal Year 1978/79.
Table 53—Reasons for New Admissions of
Children to Care of Superintendent of Child
Welfare During Fiscal Year 1978/79.
Table 54—Number of Children Discharged From
Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare, by Legal
Status During Fiscal Year 1978/79.
Table 55 —Reasons for Discharge of Children in
Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare for Fiscal
Year 1978/79.
Table 56—Children Who Are Legal
Responsibility of Superintendent of Child Welfare
Receiving Institutional Care as at March 31, 1979.
Table 57 —Number of Adoption Placements Made
by Ministry of Human Resources, by Type of
Placement, for Fiscal Year 1978/79.
Table 58—Number of Adoption Homes Awaiting
Placement, in Which Placement Made, and
Homes Closed for Fiscal Year 1978/79.
Table 59—Number of Adoption Placements Made
by Ministry of Human Resources, by Religion of
Adopting Parents, for Fiscal Year 1978/79.
Table 60—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption
by Ministry of Human Resources During Fiscal
Year 1978/79.
Table 61 — Number of Children With Special
Needs Placed for Adoption by Ministry of Human
Resources During Fiscal Year 1978/79.
Table 62—Number of Legally Completed
Adoptions, by Type of Placement, During Fiscal
Year 1978/79.
Table 63 —Number of Children Placed for
Adoption by the Ministry of Human Resources for
Fiscal Years 1977/78 and 1978/79.
Table 64—Total Number of Persons Eligible for
Health Care as at December 31, 1968 to 1979.
Table 65 —Payments to British Columbia Medical
Plan and Doctors (Gross Costs), 1968/69 to
1978/79.
Table 66-Dental Expenses, 1968/69 to 1978/79.
 

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