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Ministry of Municipal Affairs Report for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1979 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1980]

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 Province of British Columbia
Ministry of
Municipal Affairs
Report for the
year ended
December 31,1979
Honourable William N.VanderZalm, Minister
  the Honourable Henry P. Bell-Irving, D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D.
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit
herewith the Annual Report of the
Ministry of Municipal Affairs
for the year ended December 31,1979.
William N. Vander Zalm,
Minister of Municipal Affairs
toria, British Columbia
  The Honourable William N. Vander Zalm,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir:
I have the honour to submit the Annual Report
of the Ministry of Municipal Affairs for the year
ended December 31,1979.
R. W. LONG,
Deputy Minister
  c
CONTENTS
Publications Page   9
Activities Page 10
Legislation Page 12
Administrative Services Page 14
Financial Management Page 22
Planning Services Page 32
Islands Trust Page 40
 Municipal Affairs
The Honourable William N. Vander Zalm
Minister of Municipal Affairs
R. W. Long, F.C.I.S., Deputy Minister
and Inspector of Municipalities
C. H. L. Woodward, F.C.I.S., Assistant
Deputy Minister and Deputy Inspector of
Municipalities
J. P. Taylor, Assistant Deputy Minister and
Deputy Inspector of Municipalities
G. E. Whelen, F.C.I.S., Executive Officer
L.J. Seminiuk, C.G.A., Comptroller
D. A. Swallow, Director of Personnel
Research Branch
K. MacLeod, Director
B. Walisser, Research Officer
R. T. Cubbon, Research Officer
B. Sikstrom, Research Officer
Administrative Services
T. F. Moore, F.C.I.S., Executive Director
A. R. Clarke, Senior Administrative Officer
J. G. Callan, A.C.I.S., Senior Administrative
Officer
W.J. Larter, B.Comm., Administrative
Officer
N. A. McCrimmon, B.A., A.C.I.S.,
Administrative Officer
D. Conway, Administrative Officer
L. C. Strachan, B.Comm., M.B.A.,
Administrative Officer
A. O. Ferguson, Administrative Officer
B. Tabor, Administrative Officer
Financial Management
H. G. Topham, C.A., Executive Director
W.J. Sommerville, Senior Financial Officer
F.J. Thompson, C.G.A., Senior Financial
Officer
W. E. Ballard, Financial Officer
W. H. Boyce, C.A., Financial Officer
H. L. Clarkson, C.G.A., Financial Officer
W. E. Eurchuk, B.Comm., Financial Officer
N. D. Goldie, C.G.A., Financial Officer
K. C. Jolley, C.A., Financial Officer
A.J. Tamblin, C.A., Financial Officer
M. E. Thomas, Administrative Officer
 Planning Services
G. C. Harkness, M.C.I.P., Executive Director
B. S. Jawanda, M.C.I.P., Director
W.J. Tassie, M.C.I.P., Director
E. Cull, Senior Planning Co-ordinator
(Prince George)
L. V. Luchin, M.C.I.P., Senior Planning
Co-ordinator
T. Maftechuk, M.C.I.P., Senior Planning
Co-ordinator
R. Addison, Planning Co-ordinator
M. Fumalle, Planning Co-ordinator
R. Ghosh, M.R.A.I.C, Planning
Co-ordinator
B. Martin, M.C.I.P., Planning Co-ordinator
G. Paget, M.C.I.P., Planning Co-ordinator
A. L. Quin, Planning Co-ordinator
C. Gibson, Senior Planning Assistant
R. Lee, Senior Planning Assistant
Publications
Annual Report
Municipal Statistics
Statistics Relating to Regional and Municipal
Governments
Regional Districts in British Columbia
A Guide to Municipal Management
A Guide to Regional District Management
Acts Administered by
Municipal Affairs
Municipal Act
Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act
Local Services Act
Municipal Finance Authority of British
Columbia Act
Mobile Home Tax Act
Urban Transit Authority Act
Sewerage Facilities Assistance Act
Resort Municipality of Whistler Act
Revenue Sharing Act
Provincial Transit Service Act
Islands Trust Act
 Ministry Activities
The provision of high quality local
government services continues to be the
main function of British Columbia's
municipalities and Regional Districts. Most
provincial guidance and assistance directed
to the benefit of local government is
provided or co-ordinated by the Ministry of
Municipal affairs.
Basic physical services, such as roads, water
works and sewerage systems, are essential to
the formation and survival of modern
communities. The necessity for a wide range
of social, recreational and protective services
is likewise firmly established. Many local and
government services represent substantial
and increasingly costly capital investments.
The rising cost of capital development and
the accompanying increases in operating and
other costs are reflected in the expansion of
municipal revenue requirements. Readers
are referred to the Financial Management
Division's segment of this report, as well as to
the ministry's statistical publications, for
detailed information about local government
budgets, borrowing and taxation.
Although property taxes have increased, the
level of tax collection has for the past several
years remained stable at the point where
approximately 96% of current taxes are
collected during the year in which they are
levied. The matters of assessment and
taxation are dealt with more fully in that
part of the report relating to financial
management.
One of the principal statutory duties of
the Ministry of Municipal Affairs is the
supervision of municipal and regional
district long-term borrowing for capital
programmes. This responsibility rests with
the Inspector of Municipalities and during
the year under review the total borrowing
authorized for a variety of projects
amounted to in excess of 138 million dollars.
The Minister attended the annual meeting
of Provincial Ministers or Municipal Affairs
held in Whitehorse, the Yukon, in mid-
August. The Minister was accompanied by
several senior Ministry officials.
The Ministry of Municipal Affairs maintains
regular contact with several Government of
Canada departments and agencies, including
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation.
The Ministry is represented as often as
possible at inter-ministry or inter-governmental meetings affecting municipalities.
Various senior staff members were involved
in national conferences such as the
Municipal Finance Officers and the
Provincial Planning Officers. The initiative
taken last year to establish a federal-
provincial Community Services Programme
resulted in its implementation in 1979. The
Ministry staff also participated in the annual
conference of the Municipal Officers
Association of British Columbia.
The Union of British Columbia Municipalities held its convention in Vancouver, and
senior staff members attended to provide an
opportunity for those interested to discuss
local problems. The Minister addressed the
convention and met with representatives of
the Executive of the Union of British
Columbia Municipalities on several other
occasions.
Since the annual edition of municipal
statistics is an important source of
information to investment houses, financial
institutions and others, distribution of the
publication is made as early as possible in the
year. Municipal statistics include some 47
different schedules. Prior to publication, the
financial and statistical returns of the
municipalities and regions are closely edited
to ensure conformity and adherence to
statutory and other requirements.
In 1979, the Minister and his senior staff
conducted a series of regional meetings on
regional district and planning isssues.
The annual shield award presented by the
Minister as an incentive to increase turn-out
at municipal elections was bestowed on the
following municipalities in 1978:
Voter Turn-
Category Recipient Out (Percent)
Cities and towns             Revelstoke    66.39
District municipalities   Stewart 67
Village municipalities    Lions Bay      84
Second place recipients were Merritt (cities
and towns) with 65.39%, Port Hardy (district
municipalities) with 61.60%, and Clinton
(village municipalities) with 77.5%.
 Revenue Sharing
When it came into effect in the fiscal year
beginning on April 1st, 1978 the Revenue
Sharing Act replaced the existing $34.00 per
capita grant under the Municipalities Aid
Act as well as the interim revenue sharing
programme. Under the revenue sharing
formula the annual combined dollar yield of
1 personal income tax point, 1 corporate tax
point, 6% of renewable resource,
non-renewable resource and sales tax
revenue will be distributed in the form of
municipal and regional district grants.
Under the authority of regulations 7 grants
are funded by revenue sharing as follows:
1. Water Facilities grants are provided
under a formula which determines the
provincial contribution by reference to
municipal debt servicing costs and
assessment.
2. The basic municipal grant is a flat
$30,000 to each municipality regardless
of its size or fiscal capacity.
3. The Housing Growth Grant, introduced
in 1979, distributed $10,000,000 in
proportion to the number of housing
starts in each municipality and regional
district.
4. The Municipal Major Road Grants
Programme will provide $15 million
dollars annually. The 1978 total was
approximately $4 million.
5. Municipal Planning Grants are available
on an approved cost sharing basis.
6. Administration, Planning and Basic
Grants are available to regional districts.
The basic grant is $30,000 per regional
district. The administration grant was
$10,000 per regional district. Geography,
population, development and planning
needs will determine the approval of cost
shared planning grants.
7. The unconditional municipal formula
distributes assistance according to
population, expenditure and tax base.
The Revenue Sharing budget for 1979-80
was approximately $141,700,000. This
amount compares to a 1978-79 estimate of
approximately $138,300,000. Total 1979
unconditional grants were approximately
$110,000,000 compared to a 1978 total of
approximately $106,100,000.
Sewerage Facilities Assistance Act
The Sewerage Facilities Assistance Act this
year provided assistance totalling
$24,774,344 to 114 Municipalities and
Regional Districts in the Province.
Twenty-Eight Cities received grants
amounting to $6,225,693.87, thirty-one
Districts received $15,078,048.02, eleven
Towns received $863,207.95, thirty-six
Villages received $2,172,594.21, and eight
Regional Districts received $434,800.19. The
total value of 1979 grants under the Act
exceeded last year's total of $20,788,056 by
more than 20%.
Municipal Commercial Vehicle Licence
Programming
A total of 130 municipalities participated in
the Municipal Commercial Licence
Programming during the 1979/80 licence
year. Sales of vehicle plates under this
programme, which is administered by the
Ministry on behalf of the municipalities,
generated $808,246 in revenue during the
year. After payment of incidental expenses,
these funds were distributed to participants
on a per capita basis. The municipalities
issued 60,025 licence plates during the year
under review.
Special Courses
During 1979 the Board of Examiners, on
which the Ministry is represented, granted
four certificates of proficiency. The
following table shows the classifications of
these certificates together with the total
number which have been issued.
Certificates 1979        To date
Junior 1 116
Senior Administration 1 136
Senior Finance 2 126
Property Appraisal 0 82
Totals ~T        460
The Board encourages applicants for
certification to avail themselves of the
opportunities to enroll in local government
related courses offered by the Chartered
Institute of Secretaries, the Certified General
Accountants Association, and various
post-secondary educational institutions. The
successful completion of such programmes
of study is a major consideration, together
with the appropriate experience and offices
 held when the Board is evaluating
applications for certificates.
Continuing Education
The Ministry is involved, through its
participation in the Municipal
Administration Education Council of the
B.C. Municipal Officers Association in
developing and appraising appropriate levels
of education for municipal officials. The
Ministry also holds or participates in
seminars or meetings from time to time to
assist local government personnel in dealing
with new legislation and new or revised
programmes.
Scholarship Programme
The scholarship programme had its
beginnings in 1978 at the convention of the
Union of British Columbia Municipalities.
The new programme of scholarships and
fellowships was announced to commemorate
that organization's 75th anniversary.
Twenty-five thousand dollars funded the
programme.
The awards comprise scholarships, each with
a maximum value of $5,000, and one
fellowship with a maximum of $10,000.
Recipients are able to use the funds for such
purposes as attendance at extended seminars
or enrolment in post-secondary educational
institutions in or outside of British
Columbia. The purpose of the programme is
to foster the development of administrative
skills in local government in British
Columbia.
The scholarship and fellowship programme
is administered by the Board of Examiners.
To assist the Board in the performance of its
various duties, an Advisory Council has been
established to include representation from
the Municipal Officers Association and the
Municipal Administration Education
Council.
For the year ended December 31, 1979,
nineteen scholarships were awarded, ranging
in value from $81.00 to $4,000.
Research Branch
As a central ministry service, the Research
Branch provides policy support and research
services to the ministry's executive branch
and three divisions. This function requires
the development of briefs, working papers,
and reports to assist the ministry in adjusting
its policies and programmes to suit changing
needs and circumstances. Branch staff at
year end consisted of the Director, 3
research officers, and a secretary. In
addition, a graduate student from the
University of Victoria's Cooperative
Education Programme was on staff.
During 1979, the Research Branch
contributed to policy development in a
number of fields. Early in the year, two
topics were prominent among Branch
activities: resource communities and
Canadian planning appeal boards. In
connection with appeal boards, a brief
entitled Canadian Planning Appeal Boards:
Summary and Legislation was completed
Subsequently, issues associated with the
appeal process were examined.
Research reports were prepared in the early
part of the year on county government and
resource management structures in Canada
and the United States. The county
government report emphasized the extreme
diversity found among county government
systems. The resource management report
concentrated on a special kind of resource,
namely areas having unique scenic,
recreational, natural, historic, and economic
value. The Branch also participated in
programme evaluations and examinations of
local government structures.
Legislation
A number of technical and substantive
amendments to the Municipal Act and the
Provincial Home-Owner Grant Act were
made during the 1979 session of the
Legislative Assembly. A summary of the
more significant legislative developments
follows by Act.
Municipal Act
Four areas of the Municipal Act were
amended. Churches were made exempt
from development cost charges, but the
exemption previously afforded to residential
developments containing three or fewer
units was removed. The exemption of
government enterprises from municipal
 business taxation was codified. The
requirement of approval by the Inspector of
Municipalities was applied to municipal
borrowing for property acquisition
commitments, such commitments being
treated as debt. The notice requirements
forming part of the zoning process were
clarified to entitle owners as well as occupiers
of property to notice.
Provincial Home-Owner Grant Act
The Provincial Home-Owner Grant Act was
amended to increase the amount of the
grant for seniors, the handicapped and
certain veterans by $100 to a maximum of
$580.
 Administrative
Services
New Incorporation and Changes
in Structure
In 1979, pursuant to a directive of the
Minister of Municipal Affairs under Section
10 of the Municipal Act, a poll was held on
the question of the incorporation of the
Belcarra/Bedwell Bay area as a village
municipality. The result of the poll was in
the affirmative and by Letters Patent issued
August 22, 1979 the Village of Belcarra was
incorporated.
The Minister of Municipal Affairs also
directed that a poll be held on the question
of the amalgamation of The City of
Chilliwack and The Corporation of the
Township of Chilliwhack. This poll was also
in the affirmative and by Letters Patent
issued September 21, 1979, the District of
Chilliwack was incorporated, effective
January 1, 1980.
As a result of a review of local government
structure in Quesnel the status of The
Corporation of the Town of Quesnel was
changed to a city municipality under Letters
Patent issued and effective on July 12, 1979.
Because of interest generated locally, a
review of local government structure was
continued in Fort Nelson, Westside and in
Williams Lake during 1979 and studies were
initiated in Creston and in New Hazelton —
South Hazelton.
Local Communities
In July, 1979, the Fort Fraser Local
Community was established by the Regional
District of Bulkley-Nechako, and becomes
the second local community to be established
under section 766E of the Municipal Act. In
1978 the Bear Lake Local Community,
formerly known as the Crooked River Local
Community, was the first local community to
be established.
The Regional District of Bulkley-Nechako
has, by by-law, authorized the Fort Fraser
Local Community to exercise the powers and
duties of an Advisory Planning Commission
and to undertake the day-to-day
administration of water and sewer systems
within the boundaries of the local
community.
Each local community is administered by a
four-member community commission, three
members of which are elected for a 2-year
term of office; and the director of the
electoral area in which the local community
is situated who is ex-officio a member of the
commission.
The local community commission has the
powers and duties of an Advisory Planning
Commission and, as determined by the
Regional Board the day-to-day
administration duties associated with those
services provided by the regional district at
the expense of the taxpayers in that local
community. Such services may include not
more than three of the following: sewer
systems, water systems, street lighting,
garbage collection, garbage disposal, fire
protection and acquisition and operation of
recreational facilities.
Municipal and Improvement District
Boundary Revisions
Supplementary Letters Patent were issued
during 1979 authorizing extensions and/or
revisions in boundaries for eighteen
municipalities and three improvement
districts. The municipalities affected,
together with the resulting adjustments in
area and changes in population are indicated
in Table 1. A local census is taken in the
extended area and added to the original
population established under the 1976
census in order to arrive at the new
municipal population following extension.
Letters Patent were also issued which
provided for the dissolution of 6
improvement districts.
By-laws Approvals
All village and improvement district by-laws
must be submitted to the Ministry for
registration in the office of the Inspector of
Municipalities. One thousand six hundred
and eighty-six by-laws were examined and
subsequently registered, including eight
hundred and forty-one village by-laws, thirty
regional district by-laws and seven hundred
eighty-nine improvement district by-laws.
Included in the total of one thousand six
hundred eighty-six by-laws are the by-laws of
the Resort Municipality of Whistler which
are subject to approval by the Inspector of
 Municipalities prior to adoption.
Twenty-six by-laws from this municipality
were reviewed and recommended for such
approval in 1979. All by-laws, together with
supporting background material, are fully
reviewed before any suggestions or
recommendations are made for registration
or before being advanced to the approval
authority. While many of the initial
submissions may be found to be satisfactory,
others require the exchange of considerable
correspondence.
Ministerial Approvals
During 1979, one thousand two hundred
and fifty-five by-laws were advanced to the
Minister of Municipal Affairs for his
consideration and subsequent approval. Of
the one thousand two hundred and fifty-five
approvals made by the Minister, five
hundred and eighty were approved on
behalf of the municipalities; seventy-four
authorized the abandonment and vesting of
highways; ninety-seven approved municipal
rates by-laws for water, sewer and electricity;
fifteen provided for the appointment of
members of municipal Boards of Variance;
one hundred and fifty-five authorized flood
plain approvals under Section 187 of the
Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act
and two hundred and thirty-nine were for
other municipal requirements. Of the six
hundred and thirty-nine approvals relating
to regional districts, five hundred and nine
were to approve subdivision, zoning and
land use by-laws; ten authorized
appointment of members of the Regional
Boards of Variance; twenty-five were for
building by-laws from various regional
districts and the balance of ninety-five met
other legislative requirements.
In addition, a total of thirty-six by-laws were
reviewed and recommended for approval
under the Island Trust Act.
Land use contracts ceased to be a recognized
means of controlling development on
January 16, 1979. Amendments to the
Municipal Act in 1977 provided for the
phasing out of land use contracts and as a
result there was a last minute surge in the
numbers of these by-laws submitted for the
approval of the Minister during the first half
of January. Twenty-seven land use contract
by-laws were approved by the Minister
under the Municipalities Enabling and
Validating Act while twenty-two land use
contract by-laws were approved by the
Minister for regional districts under the
Municipal Act.
Orders in Council
For a variety of purposes one hundred and
thirty-nine Minutes of Council were
prepared and subsequently approved by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council. Of this
total ninety related to regional districts,
twenty-four related to municipal boundary
extensions, seven related to transit services
and fifteen related to miscellaneous
purposes. Also included in this total were
three Minutes of Council which provided for
the incorporation of the Village of Belcarra,
a change in status from The Corporation of
the Town of Quesnel to the City of Quesnel
and the amalgamation of The Corporation
of the Township of Chilliwhack and The City
of Chilliwack now known as the District of
Chilliwack.
Debenture Approvals
Certification by the Inspector of
Municipalities of debenture issues of
municipalities and regional districts may be
completed on request. Before such
certification can be completed, certificates of
approval to the by-laws or resolutions are
issued authorizing the issuance of
debentures. Three hundred and eighty-eight
certificates of approval to the by-laws or
resolutions were issued authorizing the
issuance of debentures. Three hundred and
seventy-seven certificates of approval were
issued in 1978. In 1979, debenture issues
were processed with a total par value of
$88,653,894 through the Municipal Finance
Authority and $15,496,654 on behalf of
individual municipalities and regional
districts. More information on debenture
approval and related capital expenditure
matters may be found under "Financial
Management".
 TABLE I — MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY REVISIONS 1979
AREA
POPULATION
Municipality
Before
Added
After
Before
Added
After
Cities
Fernie
851.80
84.45
936.25
4,612
5
4,617
Fort St. John
1,513.26
42.55
1,555.81
8,947
NIL
8,947
Fort St. John
1,555.81
64.71
1,620.52
8,947
6
8,953
Fort St. John
1,620.52
60.81
1,681.33
8,953
NIL
8,953
Nanaimo1
12,586.65
14.98
12,571.67
Prince George
32,048.29
196.19
32,244.48
59,929
NIL
59,929
Prince George
32,244.48
3.89
32,248.37
59,929
NIL
59,929
Revelstoke
554.96
22.13
577.09
4,639
NIL
4,639
Revelstoke
577.09
8.26
585.35
4,639
5
4,644
Districts
Chilliwhack
26,071.56
40.47
26,112.03
28,421
NIL
28,421
Port Hardy
4,334.49
388.50
4,722.99
3,653
NIL
3,653
Sparwood
5,099.98
238.93
5,338.91
4,050
NIL
4,050
Towns
Parksville
710.24
7.68
717.92
3,187
2
3,189
Parksville
717.92
283.27
1,001.19
3,189
214
3,403
Parksville
1,001.19
12.99
1,014.18
3,403
13
3,416
Williams Lake
1,955.81
8.74
1,964.55
6,249
2
6,251
Williams Lake
1,964.55
14.39
1,978.94
6,251
5
6,256
Villages
Belcarra (New
Incorporation)
561.06
414
Chetwynd
419.87
831.05
1,250.92
1,487
30
1,517
Invermere
345.18
8.37
353.55
1,205
NIL
1,205
Keremeos
222.18
4.12
226.30
702
NIL
702
Montrose
102.10
.38
102.48
1,197
NIL
1,197
100 Mile House                         280.56
12.13
292.69
1,344
NIL
1,344
Osoyoos
306.83
427.52
734.35
2,107
202
2,309
Sayward
169.38
426.54
595.92
383
51
434
Vanderhoof
916.50
337.62
1,254.12
1,990
92
2,082
1.  Boundary Reduction
Regional District Activities
During 1979 the role of regional
government continued to receive
considerable attention which was culminated
in the fall by the holding of nine regional
district workshops in various geographic
locations throughout the Province to allow
participation and input by all local
governments.
The workshops were attended by members
of the Regional Boards, members of Council
of the municipalities within the respective
regional districts and senior members of the
Ministry. Three alternatives for the future
role of regional districts were presented to
serve as a basis for discussion purposes.
The contributions made at the workshops
will be of assistance in determining the
Provincial interest relative to the direction of
local government within the Province in the
1980's.
Forty-two new functions were granted the
twenty-eight regional districts in 1979. Table
2 summarizes those assigned, while Table 3
sets out all functions undertaken to date.
Supplementary Letters Patent were issued in
several instances to authorize the granting of
functions. Revision of the internal and
external boundaries is continuing and
amendments have been made to cost-sharing
formulas and other changes in corporate
structure.
 _
Specified Areas
Thirty-nine specified areas were established
by by-law in 1979. Of these areas eighteen
were established by petition method and
twenty-one after the property owners voted
favourably on the proposal. In addition,
amendments in boundaries to eighteen
specified areas already established were
completed. Table 4 summarizes the specified
areas established and altered in 1979. Before
regional government was introduced,
community services administered locally in
non-municipal areas were provided through
the incorporation of improvement districts.
New local service needs for non-municipal
areas with the exception of water, irrigation
and dykes are almost all provided and
financed through the facilities of regional
districts.
Many of the specified areas have been
established adjacent to municipal
boundaries. As a demand for further
services develops, the trend will be toward
the incorporation of these areas within
present municipal boundaries. Those
specified areas in more isolated situations
will probably retain their non-municipal
status.
TABLE 2
FUNCTIONS ASSIGNED TO REGIONAL DISTRICTS DURING 1979
(Unless Otherwise Indicated, All Member Areas of the Regional
District Participate in The Function).
Alberni-Clayoquot -
Replotting (all Electoral Areas)
Garbage Disposal (Torino, Ucluelet and Electoral
Area C)
Bulkley-Nechako -
Economic Development Commission (Burns Lake,
Fort St. James, Fraser Lake, Granisle, Houston,
Smithers, Vanderhoof and Electoral Areas A, B, C,
D, E, F and G)
Weed Control (Electoral Areas A, D, E, F and G)
Capital -
Animal Control (all electoral areas)
Urban Transit
Economic Development Commission
Cariboo -
Fire Hall Complex (100 Mile House and defined
portion of Electoral Area G)
Weed Control (Electoral Areas B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I,
J and K)
Swimming Pool Complex (Williams Lake and defined
portions of Electoral Areas D, E and F)
Joint Community Use of School Facilities (100 Mile
House, Williams Lake, Quesnel and all electoral
areas)
Central Coast -
Swimming Pool (Electoral Areas C, D and E)
Economic Development Commission
Central Kootenay -
Public Library Service (Nakusp and defined portion
of Electoral Area K)
Water Supply and Distribution System (Nakusp and
defined portion of Electoral Area K)
Columbia-Shuswap -
Economic Development Commission (Salmon Arm,
Revelstoke, Golden and Electoral Areas A, B, C, D
and E)
Noxious Insect Control (Golden and Electoral Areas
A, B, C, Dand E)
Comox-Strathcona -
Sewage Interception, Treatment and Disposal
(Courtenay and Comox)
Cemetery Facilities (Courtenay, Comox and Electoral
Area B)
Cowichan Valley -
Incinerator and Garbage Disposal Facilities (Duncan,
North Cowichan, Ladysmith and Electoral Areas A,
B, C, D, E, Gand H)
Parks and Recreation Commission (all electoral areas)
Dewdney-Alouette -
Economic Development Commission (Pitt Meadows,
Maple Ridge, Mission and Electoral Areas A, B, C,
D and E)
East Kootenay —
Economic Development Commission (Cranbrook,
Elkford, Fernie, Invermere, Kimberley and
Electoral Areas A, B, C, E, F and G)
Fraser-Fort George —
Television Rebroadcasting System (McBride,
Valemount and defined portion of Electoral Area
H)
Greater Vancouver -
Fire Regulation (Electoral Areas B and C)
Dog Control (Electoral Areas B and C)
Kilimat-Stikine -
Weed Control (Electoral Areas A, B, C, D and E)
Economic Development Commission
Kootenay Boundary -
Urban Transit (Rossland, Montrose, Warfield,
Fruitvale and Electoral Areas A and B)
Economic Development Commission (Trail,
Greenwood, Grand Forks, Rossland, Warfield,
Montrose, Fruitvale and Electoral Areas A, B, C, D
and E)
 Nanaimo -
Economic Development Commission (Nanaimo,
Parksville, Qualicum Beach and Electoral Areas E,
G and H)
North Okanagan -
Chamber of Commerce Grant (Vernon, Coldstream
and Electoral Areas A, B and C)
Okanagan-Similkameen -
Theatre Addition (Osoyoos and Electoral Area A)
Urban Transit (Electoral Areas D, E and F)
Untidy and Unsightly Premises (Electoral Areas A, B,
C, E and F)
Peace River-Liard -
Multi-purpose Recreational Facility (Taylor and
defined portion of Electoral Area E)
Golf Course (Fort Nelson and defined portion of
Electoral Area A)
Solid Waste Disposal (Fort Nelson and Electoral Area
A)
Powell River -
Economic Development Commission
Skeena-Queen Charlotte —
Recreational Programmes
Thompson-Nicola -
Regional Parks (Kamloops, Merritt, Ashcroft, Cache
Creek, Logan Lake, Lytton and Electoral Areas A,
B, C, D, L, M and N)
Television Rebroadcasting System (Electoral Areas A,
B, C and D)
Improvement Districts
The Ministry presently administers three
hundred and seven improvement districts
incorporated under the Water Act. Two
hundred and seventy-six of the districts have
waterworks as their main function but may
also provide such services as fire protection,
street lighting, parks and playgrounds,
community halls, sewers, garbage collection
and cemeteries. A further thirty-one districts
provide fire protection as their main object,
with a further object of street lighting in
some instances.
Twelve new improvement districts were
incorporated in 1979 for waterworks or
related purposes and eleven improvement
districts were dissolved; two of these became
specified areas of regional districts, while
nine, having no assets or liabilities and being
inactive for a number of years, were
dissolved outright. Supplementary Letters
Patent were issued during 1979 authorizing
extensions and/or revisions in boundaries
for forty-one improvement districts plus six
amendments authorizing additional objects.
The Inspector of Municipalities registered
seven hundred and eighty-nine by-laws on
behalf of improvement districts and
administrative staff made twenty-six field
trips to attend both public meetings and
meetings of improvement district trustees,
dealing with administration, finance and
regulatory matters.
Engineering Support
Under agreement the Ministry of
Environment continues to provide
engineering support in the administration of
improvement districts. This takes two basic
forms: advice and recommendations to the
Ministry, and technical support and
guidance to improvement districts as
requested by the Ministry.
In 1979, the technical aspects of one
hundred and seven by-laws were examined,
recommendations were made on forty-four
requests for release of special trust funds,
and the viability and technical implications of
twenty-seven proposed incorporations and
boundary adjustments were examined. Also
in this category, ninety-seven miscellaneous
investigations and reports were made on
such things as complaints and enquiries
regarding service, subdivision, system
extension proposals, supply agreements,
system capacity appraisals and well tests.
In the second category, proposals for major
projects were appraised, or engineering
studies undertaken for twenty-two
improvement districts. These included a
feasibility study of a major system extension
for Sion Improvement District, and a review
of proposals for major works for Westbank
and Winfield Okanagan Centre Irrigation
Districts.
This engineering support service was also
extended to include the review of eight
 projects submitted, by municipalities and
regional districts, for assistance under the
Sewerage Facilities Assistance Act and under
the Revenue Sharing Act waterworks
program. In addition, two preliminary
community water supply feasibility studies
were completed for the Regional Districts of
Central Coast and Kitimat-Stikine.
Building Code
During the year, the following regulations
were approved which amended the British
Columbia Building Code.
B.C. Reg. 184/79 — adopted amendments
made by the Associate Committee on the
National Building Code. These included
mandatory requirements for the
installation of smoke detectors in certain
buildings and occupancies.
B.C. Reg. 233/79 — removed restrictions
on the use of plastic pipe in buildings
other than houses. The amendment brings
the British Columbia Plumbing Code into
conformance with the National Building
Code in this regard.
B.C. Reg. 236/79 — brought into effect
the Building Requirements for the
Physically Handicapped as Part 10 of the
British Columbia Building Code. This
document was published and distributed
in July, 1979 after three years of work by
the Building Standards Branch. Part 10
applies to the design and construction
requirements to make certain buildings
and occupancies accessible to and useable
by physically handicapped persons.
A review of the Canadian Plumbing Code
for the purpose of adoption with minimum
amendment appropriate for Provincial needs
was completed by the special Plumbing Code
Committee. A new British Columbia
Plumbing Code has been written as the
result of recommendations of the committee
and is now ready for printing and adoption.
The draft of the proposed 1980 edition of
the National Building Code has been
reviewed in preparation for adoption in
British Columbia when printed and available
for distribution.
The Building Code Appeal Board received
79 appeals regarding questions of the
application and interpretation of the
Building Code and 13 applications for
approval of alternate materials for use in
plumbing during the year. These appeals
with the decisions of the Board were
distributed in two resumes to municipalities,
Regional Districts and numerous
organizations concerned with construction.
Publications sold to the public during this
period were Plumbing Codes, quantity 2835;
Handbook of Plumbing Sketches, quantity
2627; and Building Requirements for the
Handicapped, quantity 1206.
Senior officials of this Ministry and the
Ministry of Labour held discussions on the
problem of eliminating conflicts and
duplications in legislation of various
Ministries related to building construction.
This resulted in the formation of the
Consultative Committee on Building Safety
Standards Legislation with the purpose of
recommending appropriate contents of a
new legislation.
LGE NINETEEN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 TABLE 3
REGIONAL DISTRICT FUNCTIONS
x — indicates function
p — indicates application of function
— in part of Regional District only
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Activity Centre
p
Ambulance
X
p
p
p
p
P
X
p
P
p
X
Animal Control
P
P
Airport Facilities
p
p
Air Pollution
X
X
X
Cemetery Operation
p
p
p
p
P
X
p
Chamber of Commerce Grant
p
Community Health Services
X
Community Parks
p
P
p
p
X
p
p
Community Recreational Programmes
X
Community Recycling Grant
p
Community Services
p
X
Control of Gatherings
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
*
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Curfew Regulation
p
Development of Subdivisions and Housing
p
p
p
p
p
p
P
p
p
p
p
p
1'
p
p
P
p
Dog Control
p
p
p
p
p
Economic Development Commission
p
X
X
p
p
P
X
X
p
X
p
p
X
Elderly Citizens' Housing
p
X
X
X
p
P
Emergency Programmes
X
X
X
X
P
Firearms
p
X
p
p
p
p
p
p
P
X
P
X
Fire Protection
p
p
p
Fire Regulation
p
Fireworks
X
p
X
X
X
p
p
p
X
P
X
Flood Control
p
P
Grants-in-aid
p
p
Health Regulation and Centre
p
X
p
Home Nursing
p
House Numbering
p
p
p
p
p
p
Industrial Development Commission
X
X
1'
p
P
p
p
p
Intermediate Care Home
p
Joint Community Use of School Facilities
p
p
p
p
p
P
P
Labour Negotiations
p
Land Assembly, Housing and Land Banking
X
p
Library Study
p
p
X
Marina Operation and Development
p
Noise
p
p
p
p
Nuisance Control
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
X
P
p
Okanagan Basin Water Board
X
X
X
Operation of Wharves
p
Parks and Recreation Commissions
1'
p
Park and Green Belt Land Acquisition
p
p
p
Pest Control
X
p
X
p
>;
p
p
l>
p
X
p
p
Public Library Service
p
p
p
X
p
p
P
X
Public Use Area Lighting
P
Recreation Facilities
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
1'
p
p
p
1'
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
Recreation Programmes
p
p
X
p
X
p
p
p
p
p
X
X
X
X
X
X
P
P
X
Refuse Disposal
X
X
X
p
p
X
p
p
p
p
P
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
X
X
X
p
Regional Parks
X
p
X
X
X
X
p
X
X
X
p
X
X
X
X
X
P
p
Replotting
p
Resident Identification Cards
p
Septage Disposal
X
Septic Tank Effluent Disposal
X
p
p
Sewage Treatment and Disposal
p
p
p
Sewers
X
p
p
X
Sign Regulation
p
Soil Fill Regulation
P
Soil Removal
X
p
p
p
p
p
p
P
p
p
Solid Waste Disposal
p
Street Lighting
P
p
p
p
Sub-Regional Airports
p
Television Rebroadcasting
p
p
p
p
X
p
p
p
Theatre
p
Tourist Association Grant
p
Untidy and Unsightly Premises
p
p
P
p
p
Urban Renewal
p
Urban Transit
X
p
P
p
Water
p
p
p
p
p
Water Supply Study
p
 TABLE 4
REGIONAL DISTRICT SPECIFIED SERVICE AREA ESTABLISHED DURING 1979
Alberni-Clayoquot
Water System (Bamfield)
Capital
Trunk Sewers (View Royal North West)
Volunteer Fire Department (Otter Point)
Sewage Collection and Disposal (Maliview Estates)
Central Kootenay
Water Supply and Distribution System (Sanca Park)
Water Supply and Distribution System (Ymir)
Fire Protection (Electoral Area G)
Fire Protection (Lister, Canyon, Huscroft and
Riverview)
Fire Protection (Electoral Area D)
Central Okanagan -
Fire Protection (Ellison)
Columbia-Shuswap
Street Lighting (Crestwood Subdivision)
Street Lighting (Electoral Area B)
East Kootenay
Fire Protection (Hosmer)
Fraser-Cheam
Street Lighting (Coquihalla View Estates)
Collector Sewer System (Cultus Lake Park)
Fraser-Fort George
Road Paving (Miworth)
Kitimat-Stikine
Water System (Thornhill)
Library (Electoral Areas C and E)
Dog Control (Thornhill)
Mount Waddington
Sewer System (Coal Harbour)
Water System (Coal Harbour)
Nanaimo
Water Supply and Distribution System (Eagle Heights)
Sewers (French Creek)
Sewer Treatment and Disposal (Columbia Beach)
Okanagan-Similkameen
Community Centre (Electoral Area F Grant-in-Aid)
Peace River-Liard
Sewers (Hamlet of Rolla)
Squamish-Lillooet
Refuse Disposal Service Unit (Electoral Area A)
Refuse Disposal Service Unit (East Lillooet Riley
Creek)
Street Lighting (Bralorne)
Refuse Disposal Service Unit (Garibaldi)
Sunshine Coast
Swimming Pool (Pender Harbour)
Community Hall (Roberts Creek)
Thompson-Nicola
Fire Protection (Black Pool)
Street Lighting (Vavenby)
Fire Protection (Vavenby)
Fire Protection (Electoral Area I)
Television Rebroadcasting (Electoral Area J
Grant-in-Aid)
Street Lighting (Whitecroft Village)
Waterworks (Louis Creek)
Amendments to Established Specified Service Areas
During 1979
Capital
Sewer System (View Royal Electoral Area) and
extension of boundaries
Cariboo
Sewage Collection and Disposal (Pine Valley)
redefinition of boundaries
Central Okanagan
Street Lighting (Pritchard Drive) and extension of
boundaries
Comox-Strathcona
Fire Protection (Black Creek) and reduction of
boundaries
Fire Protection (Black Creek — Oyster Bay) and
extension of boundaries
Waterworks (Little River) and reduction of
boundaries
Cowichan Valley
Fire Protection (Lake Cowichan District) and extension
of boundaries
Fire Protection (Eagle Heights and District) and
extension of boundaries
Fire Protection (Sahtlam) and extension of boundaries
Fraser-Cheam
Sewer System (Coquihalla) and reduction of boundaries
Street Lighting (Silver Creek) and extension of
boundaries
Fraser-Fort George
Street Lighting (Crooked River) and extension of
boundaries
Nanaimo
Fire Protection (Errington) and extension of boundaries
Fire Protection (French Creek) and reduction of
boundaries
Okanagan-Similkameen
Fire Protection (D2 and F2) redefinition of boundaries
Sewer System (D6) and extension of boundaries
Fire Protection (Bl and Gl) and extension of
boundaries
Powell River
Fire Protection (Malaspina) and extension of boundaries
 Financial Management
Financial Management Division discharges
significant responsibilities under the
Municipal Act and other legislation. The
division administers certain grant
programmes, approves financial by-laws and
provides financial advice.
To the extent possible Financial
Management makes a point of trying to visit
Municipalities to review their financial
procedures in addition to providing
invaluable assistance that can only be
achieved by personal contact. This also
permits our staff to better appreciate the
problems experienced by the municipal
administration staff in both responding to
our requests and dealing with internal
matters that are better understood with a
visit to the municipal office.
During 1979 Financial Management and
Administrative Services made 232 field visits
not including those undertaken for a specific
purpose.
Assessment and Tax Collection
The major single revenue source for
municipalities in British Columbia continues
to be the real property tax. The growth in
assessed values of real property and revenue
from taxation of these properties over the
past 15 years is illustrated in the following
table. It will be noted that revenue from this
source of taxation in 1978 totalled
$949,416,885. Of this total $451,918,578
represented taxation for general municipal
purposes, and $497,498,307 represented
taxation for school purposes.
TABLE 5
GROWTH IN COMBINED ASSESSED VALUES AND TAXES
IN MUNICPALITIES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ASSESSED VALUES ACTUALLY
GROSS ASSESSED VALUES
TAXED
All
'Taxable
Tax
Year
Properties
Properties
School
Municipal
Revenue
(Millions)
(Millions)
(Millions)
(Millions)
(Thousands)
1964
4,118
3,534
2,878
2,295
154,074
1975
11,987'
16,5722
10,007'
11,4472
8,206
11,021
679,281
1976
12,782'
17,6802
10,642'
12,0622
8,691
11,542
792,536
1977
13,345'
18,1262
11,087'
12,4742
9,030
11,895
853,847
1978
12,020'
18,2322
9,890'
14,9782
9,890
14,379
949,417
1979
13,127'
19,6002
10,731'
16,0062
10,731
15,353
1,050,0003
'School values               ''
; Municipal values
3Estii
nated
The following table (Table 6) provides a
further analysis of the assessed value of real
property and indicates the distribution of
1979 assessed values by class of municipality,
with the percentage increase over 1978.
 TABLE 6
ASSESSED VALUES BY CLASS OF MUNICIPALITIES
GENERAL MUNICIPAL GROSS.
ASSESSED VALUES
ASSESSED VALUES ACTUALLY
TAXED
All
Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
(Millions)
$
%
(Millions)
$
%
(Millions)
$
%
(Millions)
$
%
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
7,659
8,596
209
435
7.90
8.41
(8.73)
20.50
6,273
7,038
174
350
8.38
6.56
(7.45)
19.45
2,866
4,978
203
357
9.06
10.84
(14.35)
13.69
6,119
6,712
163
331
8.36
6.40
(7.39)
19.49
Subtotals
Vancouver
16,899
2,701
8.21
3.29
13,835
2,171
7.46
3.18
8,404
2,327
9.57
4.82
13,325
2,028
7.39
2.89
Totals
19,600
7.50
16,006
6.86
10,731
8.50
15,353
6.77
As a result of the continuing rapid growth in
the urban communities, it is anticipated that
proceeds from real property taxation for
school and general municipal purposes in
1979 will reach $1,050,000,000. This would
represent an increase of approximately 91
per cent over the revenue of five years ago.
The total assessed values actually taxed for
school purposes in the Province in 1979
amounted to $13,589,594,202, an increase of
approximately $1,307,000,000 over 1978. Of
this amount $10,731,409,175 or
approximately 79 per cent, represented
assessed values in the City, District, Town
and Village municipalities.
Tax Collection
The tax collection picture in municipalities is
considered to be the primary indicator, not
only of the efficiency of the administration,
but also of the ability of the taxpayer to meet
the municipal tax levy promptly. In the year
under review, tax collections have shown a
slight increase over the collections of 1977
and continue to maintain a very high level.
During 1978, collections in all classes of
municipalities exceeded 96 per cent of the
levy. We have established a practice of
communicating with any municipality where
the arrears of taxes are in excess of 10 per
cent of the current levy in an effort to
determine the cause and what steps may be
taken to improve the position.
The collection of current taxes in British
Columbia continues to be the highest among
the provinces in Canada publishing statistics
of a comparable nature, while the
percentage of arrears is the lowest. Economic
factors may have contributed substantially to
the favourable position indicated in the
property taxation field; however, municipal
treasurers and collectors are to be
congratulated for their continued efforts in
maintaining this high rate of tax collection.
Tables 7 and 8 reveal information relative to
tax collection by class of municipality for the
years shown.
 TABLE 7
PERCENTAGE TAX COLLECTIONS
Percentage of
Current Levy
Collected
Total Collections
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Outstanding Taxes
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Cities (Except Vancouver)
1939
81.10
99.10
40.16
1971
96.79
100.41
4.34
1972
97.05
100.62
3.88
1973
97.36
100.69
3.39
1974
96.71
99.38
3.95
1975
96.28
99.03
4.68
1976
96.50
100.04
4.49
1977
96.26
99.99
4.89
1978
96.25
100.41
4.65
Vancouver
1939
91.00
103.10
30.06
1971
96.29
100.17
5.28
1972
96.20
99.79
5.19
1973
97.03
100.82
3.51
1974
96.15
98.68
4.78
1975
96.02
98.99
5.08
1976
96.13
99.26
5.18
1977
96.45
99.78
5.08
1978
96.68
100.04
4.78
Districts
1939
77.60
95.80
34.81
1971
96.80
100.54
4.15
1972
96.88
100.39
3.96
1973
97.51
100.82
3.21
1974
96.62
98.88
4.03
1975
96.68
99.42
4.23
1976
96.40
99.53
4.51
1977
96.80
100.23
4.24
1978
96.63
99.65
4.36
Towns
1958
89.55
97.06
13.62
1971
94.59
101.03
7.96
1972
96.25
102.05
5.37
1973
96.75
100.69
4.48
1974
95.44
98.78
5.65
1975
95.73
99.30
5.14
1976
95.88
100.03
5.19
1977
96.77
100.30
4.42
1978
96.64
100.26
4.31
 r
TABLE 7  (continued)
PERCENTAGE TAX COLLECTIONS
Percentage of
Current Levy
Collected
Total Collections
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Outstanding Taxes
as a Percentage
of Current Levy
Villages
1939
76.50
98.30
38.71
1971
96.08
101.21
5.53
1972
97.11
101.01
4.09
1973
97.02
100.41
3.95
1974
95.94
98.85
4.96
1975
96.02
99.52
4.88
1976
96.01
99.36
5.00
1977
96.07
100.09
5.23
1978
96.19
100.15
5.06
TABLE 8
COLLECTIONS, 1978 (WITH COMPARATIVE FIGURES FOR 1977)
Percentage of
Current Taxes
Collected
Arrears as a
Percentage of
Adjusted Levy
1978
1977
1978
1977
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
96.25
96.63
96.64
96.19
96.26
96.80
96.77
96.07
4.65
4.36
4.31
5.06
4.89
4.24
4.42
5.23
Total
Vancouver
96.48
96.68
96.58
96.45
4.48
4.78
4.51
5.08
Grand Total
96.52
96.55
4.55
4.64
It is interesting to note that, notwithstanding
the fact that property taxes are increasing,
the level of tax collections remains high.
School Assessment and
General Municipal Assessment
(1978 Assessments)
It should be noted that the difference
between the school assessment and the
general municipal assessment is the result of
a number of municipalities using assessed
values determined on the basis set out in
Section 24 (17)(d) of the Assessment Act, i.e.,
general municipal assessments are based on
100 percent of actual market value, while the
school assessments are at the percentage of
actual market value fixed by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
 The following municipalities apply Section
24(17)(d)-
Kamloops
Langley (City)
Nelson
North Vancouver (City)
Penticton
Port Coquitlam
Prince George
North Vancouver (District) Lytton
Stewart Tahsis
Use of Section 24 (17) (d) resulted in a
difference of $6,336,000,000 between School
Assessment and General Municipal
Assessment as follows:
Millions
Summerland
West Vancouver
Whistler
Cache Creek
Clinton
Cumberland
Granisle
General municipal
assessment
Less: Adjusted
school assessment
School assessment
Deduct: Commercial
and industrial
machinery
Utility values
including
B.C. Hydro
114,379
,890
$1,136
711     1,847     8,043
$ 6,336
Revenues and Expenditures
The 1978 audited financial statements
indicate that British Columbia municipalities
continued to maintain a favourable financial
position. Gross revenues from all sources
during 1978 exceeded $1,426,000,000, which
represents an increase of $150,000,000 over
the previous year.
The major revenue sources, with comparative figures for 1977, were as follows:
1978 1977      Increase
(Millions) (Millions) (Millions)
General munici
pal
taxation
452
423
29
School taxation
497
431
66
Transfers from
other
governments
171
145
26
Revenue from
own sources
306
277
29
1,426
1,276
150
The home-owner grant payments increased
by $9,000,000 in 1978 to a total of
$148,000,000. When this is offset against the
school tax levy of $497,000,000, a balance of
$349,000,000 remains of this levy to be
borne by the property owner.
The major expenditure items incurred
during 1978 with comparative figures for
1977, were:
1978
1977
Increase
(Millions) (Millions) (Millions)
$
$
$
General government
71
64
7
Fire protection
71
65
6
Administration
of justice
93
83
10
Public Works
104
93
11
Sanitation and
waste removal
44
42
2
Social Welfare
27
36
(9)
Education
498
432
66
Debt charges
120
103
17
Capital expenditure
from revenue
75
80
(5)
Other*
323
278
45
1,426
1,276
150
*Includes recreation, public health, environmental
development, utilities, and contributions to reserves
and other funds.
 TABLE 9
TRENDS IN FINANCIAL ASPECTS OF MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT
COMPARED TO POPULATION AND INCOME EXPRESSED AS INDEXES
Total Revenue
Maximum
Total B.C.
(Excluding
Building
Debenture
Values
Personal
Year
Population
Utilities)
Permits
Debt
Taxable
Income
1961
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
1970
138.35
266.95
291.26
132.10
192.06
239.33
1971
136.55
306.45
384.97
137.00
209.69
270.56
1972
143.60
337.75
414.34
145.75
252.93
303.03
1973
153.30
390.48
602.31
157.18
286.97
353.18
1974
160.06
446.36
614.20
175.76
345.80
412.32
1975
173.25
545.53
794.96
217.07
364.06
497.00
1976
156.88
640.80
571.87
254.04
375.33
588.21
1977
163.10
690.83
843.64
306.37
396.89
677.82
1978
167.05
774.75
802.21
328.21
476.57
740.06
Reserves and Surpluses
The total statutory reserves and operating
reserves and surpluses held in all accounts of
the municipalities was $384,367,053. This
represents 36.92 percent of the total
revenue, excluding school taxes, of the
municipalities. Of this total, $358,793,892 is
held in liquid form or in investments
authorized by statute, and a portion of the
surplus is represented in arrears of taxes and
other receivables.
Statutory reserve funds of various
municipalities have again shown an increase
over the previous year. At the end of 1978
these funds, held for a variety of purposes,
amounted to $127,042,365, an increase of
$17,399,245 over the previous year, after
giving effect to the fact that approximately
$43,000,000 was expended on capital works
from reserve funds during the year 1978.
Over the last seven years the amount held in
these reserve funds has increased from
$54,000,000 to the current figure of
$127,000,000, an increase of 135 percent.
The following table provides an analysis of
these reserves and surpluses by class of
municipality:
RESERVES AND SURPLUSES /1978
Reserves
Surpluses
Total
Total'
Revenue
$
$
$
%
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Regional Districts
91,457,444
139,454,392
1,817,749
4,071,495
2,463,487
28,667,785
53,541,413
4,446,462
6,162,998
5,557,020
120,125,229
192,995,805
6,264,211
10,234,493
8,020,507
41.71
48.41
27.43
31.33
7.01
Subtotal
Vancouver
239,264,567
32,930,710
98,375,678
13,796,098
337,640,245
46,726,808
39.42
25.34
Total
272,195,277
112,171,776
384,367,053
36.92
'Excluding School Taxation
 Capital Programmes
The value of capital projects undertaken
during 1978 by municipalities amounted to
$535,000,000. Of this total programme,
$401,000,000 was completed during the fiscal
year, leaving a balance of works in progress
of $134,000,000 at year-end. In the total
capital programme, municipalities were able
to provide $76,000,000 from current general
revenue, sewer and utility revenue funds,
$46,000,000 from reserve funds, and
approximately $37,000,000 from
grants-in-aid from the Provincial and
Federal Governments. The balance of the
amount expended was financed by
debenture loans, temporary bank loans, and
other methods of financing. The activity in
this area over the past five years is indicated
in Table 10 following.
TABLE 10
CAPITAL PROGRAMMES
SOURCE OF FUNDS
Projects
Works
Works in
Revenue
Reserve
Year
Undertaken
Completed
Progress
Funds
Funds
Grants
$
$
$
$
$
$
1974
360
295
165
66
18
17
1975
424
329
95
71
33
25
1976
500
388
112
78
23
40
1977
603
488
115
81
27
42
1978
535
401
134
76
46
37
Figures shown above are millions.
Five-Year Capital Expenditure Programmes
Summary
The programmes submitted by
municipalities and regional districts during
1979 and covering the five-year period
ending 1983 continued to provide
meaningful information and guidance, not
only to the local government bodies
involved, but also to the Ministry, other
levels and Ministries of government, and
various financial institutions. Reviewing each
of these submissions and offering
constructive criticism, where necessary, has
achieved maximum consistency in the format
of these programmes and has proved
beneficial to all concerned.
A summary of the Capital Expenditure
Programmes by year is provided in Table 11.
Included in the "General" heading under
"Classification of Expenditures" are all
capital expenditures for roads,sidewalks,
public buildings, recreational facilities, land,
and other capital projects not related to
either water or sewerage systems. As in the
past, municipal councils are attempting to
finance a large portion of their capital works
out of current revenue and reserves,
although the availability of
Federal-Provincial loans and the infusion of
capital funds via specific purpose grants have
had a direct effect on this policy.
 TABLE 11
FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL EXPENDITURE PROGRAMMES SUMMARY
BY YEAR FOR ALL MUNICIPALITIES (INCLUDING VANCOUVER)
CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES
Year
Water
Sewer
General                      Total
$
$
$                               $
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
78,337,588
56,959,629
46,419,189
31,927,122
30,992,520
78,407,445
73,946,220
57,291,697
27,891,368
28,776,648
335,656,614    492,401,647
251,716,917    382,622,766
228,502,349    332,213,235
205,780,712    265,599,202
200,847,677    260,616,845
Totals
244,636,048
266,313,378 1,222,504,269 1,733,453,695
PROPOSED SOURCE OF FUNDS
Year
General
Reserve
Grants
Reserve
Funds
Prior Years'
Surplus
Debenture
Sales
Total
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
140,958,380  43,804,392  71,243,729
96,131,849
89,694,757
82,240,565
84,674,297
41,443,711
23,995,077
11,485,559
15,804,134
44,583,264
43,173,441
38,840,719
35,551,455
6,245,839
882,042
360,000
330,000
369,000
230,149,307
199,581,900
174,989,960
132,702,359
124,217,959
492,401,647
382,622,766
332,213,235
265,599,202
260,616,845
Totals   493,699,848 136,532,873 233,392,608   8,186,881 861,641,485 1,733,453,695
Borrowing
During 1979, Councils and Regional Boards
continued to meet a substantial demand for
municipal services,and 189 term-borrowing
by-laws were approved by the Inspector of
Municipalities and subsequently adopted by
the local governing body that provided the
service.
A greater portion of this authorized
borrowing consisted of financing for sewers,
waterworks, parks and recreation, and civic
buildings.
Borrowing of $138,538,626 as summarized
in Table 12, is slightly more than was
authorized in 1978. Completion of the
various projects authorized will be phased
over a number of years, and the demand for
funds will follow the pace of construction.
Included in the authorized borrowing is
$4,375,215 in short-term loans which, under
the Municipal Act, are subject to a per capita
limitation.
The Inspector of Municipalities is not
required to approve the borrowing of the
City of Vancouver or the Metropolitan Water
and Sewer Boards. Such borrowing is,
therefore, not included in Table 12.
Preliminary borrowing of an estimated
amount of $ 10,729,302 was approved for
local improvement works. A number of
municipalities have established special
improvement funds to finance local works;
these have not been included in the figure
for preliminary borrowing approval.
 TABLE 12
BORROWING AUTHORIZATION,
1979
Purpose
Regional
Districts
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Total
Waterworks
Sewers
Parks and Recreation
Civil Buildings
Equipment (including
fire protection)
Other Tangible
Assets*
6,929,591 6,620,000 29,531,137 3,985,000 7,245,365 54,311,093
23,134,318 2,245,400 8,376,673 675,000 1,950,667 36,382,058
1,883,500 6,245,000 3,627,500 545,000 241,000 12,542,000
218,500 394,000 2,520,000 300,000 65,000 3,497,500
1,079,000 793,450  228,400 186,265 13,000 2,300,115
1,278,000 9,634,533 17,135,421 273,200 1,184,706 29,505,860
Totals
34,522,909 25,932,383 61,419,131 5,964,465 10,699,738 138,538,626
*Other tangible assets include land assembly, road improvement and sidewalks, and storm drainage.
Debentures
Details of debenture issues and other
securities that have been approved in
principle at the time of adoption of loan
authorization by-laws are specified in
security-issuing by-laws; 206 security-issuing
by-laws authorizing the issue of debentures
and other terms of indebtedness in the total
amount of $96,092,095 were approved.
In 1979, no municipal debenture issues were
guaranteed by the Province under the
Municipal Assistance Act. Details of the
issues guaranteed as at December 31, 1979,
are shown below in Table 13.
TABLE 13
OUTSTANDING DEBENTURES GUARANTEED,
1979
Improvement
Districts
Assistance
Loan Act*
Municipalities
Assistance Act
Total
$
$
Cities (Excluding Vancouver)
Districts
Towns
Villages
3,834,400
763,500
11,000
830,000
3,811,500
4,758,305
379,000
2,071,085
7,645,900
5,521,805
390,000
2,901,085
Subtotal
Vancouver
Greater Victoria Water District
Greater Nanaimo Sewer District
Greater Vancouver Water District
5,438,900
11,019,890
5,630,000
210,000
732,000
12,094,000
16,458,790
5,630,000
210,000
732,000
12,094,000
5,438,900
29,685,890
35,124,790
*Debt from Improvement Districts assumed by Municipalities
In addition to the totals shown in Table 13 of
$35,124,790 as debenture debts guaranteed
by the Province, a total amount at the end of
the year of $19,944,000 was guaranteed
under the Greater Vancouver Sewerage and
Drainage District Act.
Total debenture debt as at December 31,
1978, of all municipalities, including the City
of Vancouver, is shown in Table 14
following. The debenture debt of the
Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage
District and the Greater Vancouver Water
District is not included.
 TABLE 14
TOTAL DEBENTURE DEBT, DECEMBER 31,
1978
Sold
Unissued
and Unsold
Total
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Regional Districts
185,295,682
332,611,977
18,877,765
38,888,912
96,710,544
91,378,437
113,171,061
5,921,878
14,891,165
59,024,274
276,674,119
445,783,038
24,799,643
53,780,077
155,734,818
Subtotals
Vancouver
672,384,880
175,435,505
284,386,815
956,771,695
175,435,505
Total
847,820,385
284,386,815
1,132,207,200
Debentures sales for all municipalities
amounted to $100,195,581 for the year 1978.
This resulted in an increase of $97,065,368
in the total outstanding debenture debt of all
municipalities for 1978, after giving effect to
the retirement of debentures maturing
during the year.
The percentage of current revenue
expended to service debenture debt
(excluding water utilities) increased in 1978
in Cities, Villages and the City of Vancouver,
and decreased in Districts and Towns. These
figures for 1978 are shown on the following
page, with the 1977 comparative figures.
Per Cent
1978 1977
Cities
Vancouver
Districts
Towns
Villages
The debenture debt of water utilities is
serviced almost entirely by revenue derived
by consumer charges and frontage taxes.
6.03
5.89
8.66
7.91
7.40
7.52
6.67
6.68
8.36
6.22
 Planning Services
Division
Role and Structure
The Planning Services Division is responsible
for supporting and advancing the
community and regional planning process as
it relates to local government as well as to
Provincial planning responsibilities. The
Division is also responsible for co-ordinating
the development and implementation of
Provincial settlement policies and
programmes.
The Division was organized into two
principal staff groups: Plans Co-ordination
and Policy and Programme Planning. In
addition, the Division is supported by a
Technical Services group providing
mapping, cartographic and statistical
compilation services, as well as assistance in
defining and meeting local government
mapping needs. The Division's staff
organization at the end of 1979 consisted of
the Executive Director, 11 professional
Planners, 5 Technical Assistants, and 3
Secretarial staff. The division has a regional
office in Prince George managed by a Senior
Planning Co-ordinator.
Policy and Programme Planning Activities
1. Settlement Planning Policy and Research
The Division completed preparation of A
Framework for Evaluating Settlement
Options — an analytical and evaluative
tool for assisting the Ministry in
evaluating settlement implications of large
scale resource development projects. The
Framework is intended for application to
a range of situations in the Province
where proposed resource developments
would create settlement impacts including
new or expanded communities as well as
related rural residential development.
The Division has continued to examine
the organizational and financial
requirements for the planning and
development of either new communities
or radical expansion of existing
communities. The objective is to ensure
that the Ministry is in a position to
respond quickly and effectively to a wide
range of development situations.
Research has continued on a range of
policy issues related to resource
community development including:
• municipal finance problems and policies
• rural residential development
• social needs and requirements related to
radical expansion of small communities.
2. Settlement Impact Assessment
The Division serves as the lead agency for
comprehensive reviews of proposed
development projects in terms of their
implications for existing community and
regional settlement pattern and for
proposed new communities. Development
proposals that were under continuing
review during 1979 included:
i) Coal development projects under the
Provincial Guidelines for Coal
Development, including:
— B.P. — Sukunka Northeast
— Petrocan — Monkman Northeast
— Denison — Quintette Northeast
— Elco — Elk River Southeast
— Kaiser — Greenhills Southeast
— Crows Nest Resources —
Line Creek Southeast
— Rio Algom — Sage Creek Southeast
— Luscar-Sterco — Quinsam Vancouver
Island
ii) Metal Mine projects under the
Provincial Guidelines for Metal Mine
Development, including:
— Coldstream (Revelstoke)
— Caroline (Hope)
— Adanac (Atlin)
— Kitsault (Alice Arm)
— Kutcho (Kutcho Lake)
3. Special Programmes
Upon request of the Coal Guidelines
Steering Committee, the Division initiated
and successfully carried out a settlement
planning programme in the Elk River
Valley. The programme was initiated in
response to a mine development proposal
by Elco Mining Ltd. The mine proposal
involved a decision as to whether to
develop a new community to house the
workforce as opposed to commuting the
workers from the existing Village of
Elkford. The comprehensive planning
programme examined the physical, social,
 L
financial and organizational implications
of the two options and involved a wide
range of Provincial agencies. As a
consequence of this work the
Environment and Land Use Committee of
Cabinet issued an interim policy statement
indicating its preference that Elkford be
expanded subject to further discussions
with the mining company, the Village of
Elkford and other local governments in
the region.
Also related to the Village of Elkford, the
Ministry initiated the establishment of a
Project Co-ordinating Committee
comprised of the Village, the Ministry of
Municipal Affairs and the Ministry of
Lands, Parks and Housing to assist
Elkford in planning for expected coal
developments. A number of community
development programmes have been
initiated under the direction of the
Committee including an off-site services
programme, residential land
development, town centre development,
industrial park development, and various
environmental management measures.
During 1979, Division staff participated
on steering and working committees
overseeing the preparation of a regional
settlement and tourism development
strategy for the Columbia-Windermere
Lakes area of the East Kootenays and
co-ordinating the technical review of the
proposed Panorama Mountain ski resort.
Staff also participated as members of a
number of inter-ministry task groups on
policy development, including such policy
areas as resource roads, guidelines for
compensation and mitigation related to
development projects and guidelines for
assessing the environmental and
socio-economic implications of major
projects.
Other continuing task forces or
committees on which staff participated
during 1979 included the Cowichan
Estuary Task Force, the Okanagan Basin
Septic Tank Regulations Committee and
the Green Zone Committee for
developing standards related to intensive
farm operations.
Division staff continued to work with the
four Lower Mainland regional districts in
updating the Official Regional Plan for
the lower mainland. The revised work
programme and schedule for this project
calls for the revised Plan to be adopted in
the Fall of 1980.
4. Legislation
During 1979, work commenced on the
preparation of a Planning Act which
would encompass all key land use and
planning legislation presently found in a
number of statutes. The proposed Act
would also establish clear planning roles
for Provincial agencies and local
government authorities and would
provide for more efficient and equitable
procedures to deal with development
proposals at both the Provincial and local
government level.
Plans Co-ordination Activities
1. Planning Grants Programme
General
In 1979 the Ministry continued the
annual planning grants programme
initiated in 1978. Municipalities and
regional districts were encouraged to
prepare official plans as well as
implementing bylaws following adoption
of those plans. The programme,
established under the Revenue Sharing
Act, provided $1 million for grants to
municipalities and $ 1 million for grants to
regional districts. The individual grants
were determined on a cost-sharing basis
with the maximum amount available to a
particular local government determined
by the 1976 census population of the area.
Municipalities
Shareable planning grants were available
to municipalities for the preparation of
official community plans and related
planning programmes. These shareable
grants paid for two-thirds of the costs
incurred in the preparation of those
Ministry-approved portions of the total
planning programme for the
municipality. Grants were made on the
basis of $1.00 per capita with a minimum
grant available of $ 15,000 and a
maximum of $75,000 depending on the
municipality's 1976 population.
Municipalities submitted applications to
 the Ministry to receive approval of their
planning programmes that were eligible
for a grant.
Regional Districts
Under the planning grants programme
each regional district was eligible for a
portion of the $1 million fund available to
regional districts provided there was an
undertaking to prepare Official Regional
Plans, Official Settlement Plans or
implementing bylaws. These grants paid
for two-thirds of the costs incurred in the
preparation of those Ministry-approved
portions of the total planning programme
of the regional district. The amount each
regional district was eligible to receive is as
follows:
$1.00 per capita for the first 10,000
population;
$  .50 per capita for the next 20,000
population;
$ .25 per capita for the next 30,000
population
$  .10 per capita for the remaining
population
In addition to the planning grants
programme, annual unconditional grants
were paid to regional districts for general
planning purposes. These were calculated
on the basis of population — $.20 pet-
capita — with a minimum of $7,000 and a
maximum of $10,000.
Approved 1979 Grants
Following are tables showing those
municipalities and regional districts which
had planning programmes approved in
1979 for the purpose of receiving a
planning grant. In 1979, 87 municipalities
undertook approved planning
programmes. Regional districts were
involved in 62 Official Regional and
Settlement Plan programmes.
APPROVED* MUNICIPAL PLANNING GRANTS, 1979
Municipality
Planning
Grant
Municipality
Planning
Grant
Cities:
Castlegar
Courtenay
Cranbrook
Dawson Creek
Enderby
Fernie
Fort St. John
Grand Forks
Kelowna
Langley
Nanaimo
Nelson
New Westminster
North Vancouver
Penticton
Port Moody
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Rossland
Trail
Vancouver
Vernon
Victoria
White Rock
Villages:
$10,000 Ashcroft
3,948 Burns Lake
15,000 Chase
15,000 Chetwynd
2,000 Clinton
10.666 Elkford
13,334 Fort Nelson
7,500 Fort St. James
21,000 Fraser Lake
5,334 Gibsons
23.333 Invermere
13,466 Kaslo
13.334 Keremeos
10,333 Lillooet
2,134 Logan Lake
15,000 Masset
20,000 Midway
12.667 Oliver
15,000 100 Mile House
15,000 Osoyoos
40,000 Pemberton
3,334 Port Edward
12,000 Sechelt
15,000 Silverton
Taylor
15,000
9,668
4,000
8,600
3,333
13,990
15,000
15,000
15,000
14,000
15,000
13,000
702
15,000
10,778
13,333
6,665
246
3,666
8,334
15,000
5,213
3,334
10,712
15,000
 List of Trustees
Bowen Island
Richard Greenwood, John Rich
Denman Island
Harlene Holm, Glen Snook
Gabriola Island
Nelder Boulton, Jim Tyhurst
Galiano Island
William Duncan, Ron Thompson
Gambier Island
Elspeth Armstrong, Beverly Baxter
Hornby Island
Carol Martin, Betty Smith
Lasqueti Island
Laurence Fisher, Mike Humphries
Mayne Island
Isabel Geehan (until Sept. 79)
Joan Sprague (started Nov. '79),
John Mundie
North Pender Island
Emile LeBlanc, Gordon Wallace
Salt Spring Island
Leonard Kreissl, David Lott
Saturna Island
John Gaines, Jim Money
South Pender Island
Joan Noble, Bill Norton
Thetis Island
Bill Dickie, Dick Nixon
 Activity-Statistics
1978
1979
Public Hearings Held
20
17
Board of Variance
Applications
21
8
Development Permit
Applications Received
N/A
8
General Policy Formulation
Policy is developed by the General Trust
with the advice of all Local Trustees,
primarily through Council and its
Committees. The main source of Trust Area
policy will be the Regional Plan which is
required under the Municipal Act. The
process of preparing the plan commenced
early in 1979 and involves a Committee of
Trustees, staff and technical liaison with
other Ministries. The following Committees
of Council provide an indication of the
subjects which are of general concern to the
Trust:
Taxation, Environmental Impact
Assessment, Oil Spills, Wildlife, Energy
and Utilities, Coastal Zone Management
and Transportation.
Other subjects considered by the Trust
include marinas, tourism and tree
preservation, the latter being the subject of a
request for an expanded Trust jurisdiction.
In the field of environmental protection,
resolutions have been passed on such
subjects as use of chemical pesticides, oil
tanker port locations and effects of utility
corridors.
The Trust receives technical cooperation
from other Ministries, an example of which
is the preparation of and assistance with
water studies provided by the Water
Investigations Branch of the Ministry of
Environment.
Community Planning
The community planning process is largely
based on the preparation of Community
Plans and implementing subdivision and
zoning bydaws. All 13 main islands have
operating Official Community Plans and
Zoning and Subdivision By-laws exist for all
main islands. Most work has been related to
revisions and amendments in 1979.
Examples of major amendments are By-law
No. 15 for Salt Spring Island which plans the
future for Ganges and By-law No. 12 for
Gambier which provides zoning for that
island.
Finance
The 1979-80 Budget for the Trust is
approximately $394,000.00. This is partly
financed by a 0.75 mill levy in the Trust Area
which raised $69,157.39. The remainder is
provided directly by the Province. The Trust
shares with the other sections of the Ministry
of Municipal Affairs some accounting and
personnel services.
Public Involvement
The Trust has encouraged public
involvement in the process of planning for
the islands. In addition to the 100 Islanders
directly involved in committees and
commissions, the general public participate
at meetings held on the islands and obtain
information from newsletters, publications,
notices on island notice boards and
newspaper advertisements. The Trust's
Zenith number is used extensively. An
example of a publication is "A Guide to
Planning, Zoning and Subdivision Control in
the Islands Trust Area" issued early in 1978
and revised in 1979.
 Islands Trust
Chairman
Vice-Chairman
Vice-Chairman
Manager
Chief Planner
Planner
Planner
Technical Assistant
Technical Assistant
Research Officer
Administrative
Officer
Clerk Steno 3
Office Assistant
Officers and Staff
John Rich
John Gaines
Gordon Wallace
Tony Roberts
David Morris
Chris Foord
Gerry Tonn
Edward Pickard
Rixon Briggs
Lorna Barr
Mary Lee
Carmen Thiel
Janet Chu
Introduction
The Islands Trust is an Agency established
in 1974 by an Act of the British Columbia
Legislature. The Islands Trust Act gives the
Trust the responsibility of preserving and
protecting the unique amenities and
environment of the Trust Area for the
benefit of the people of the Islands and the
Province generally.
In 1977 the British Columbia Legislature
amended the Islands Trust Act to transfer
authority for all land planning matters on
the islands to the Islands Trust from the
Regional Districts.
Organization
General Trust — There is a General Trust
Committee for the entire Islands Trust Area.
The General Trust Committee oversees the
operation of the Trust office, and considers
and decides on land planning matters which
affect more than one designated group of
islands. Three General Trustees make up the
General Trust Committee and they are also
members of each Local Trust Committee.
The General Trustees are elected from
among the Local Trustees.
Local Trust Committee — There is a Local
Trust Committee for each of 13 groups of
designated islands. The main island in each
of the 13 groups is listed below with the
bracketed number indicating the number of
associated islands.
Bowen (5)
Denman (5)
Gabriola (22)
Galiano(lO)
Gambier (24)
Saturna(12)
Thetis (15)
Hornby (2)
Lasqueti (24)
Mayne (2)
North Pender (26)
Salt Spring (28)
South Pender (2)
Each designated island group elects two
Local Trustees, who serve a two year term.
They serve as two members of a five member
Local Trust Committee for that island
group. It is responsible for all local planning
eg. zoning, community plans and local
policy.
There are approximately 40 non-designated
islands, not under the jurisdiction of Local
Trust Committees. They are under the
jurisdiction of the General Trust.
Sub-Agencies
Advisory Planning Commissions: 13 have
been appointed mostly after local elections.
These Commissions involve 65 residents or
owners in addition to the Local Trustees.
They advise the Local Trust Committees on
planning matters referred to them.
Board of Variance: 13 Boards of Variance
have been set up based on 3 groups of three
persons.
Council: This is an informal quarterly
meeting of two days at which all 26 Trustees
meet to discuss a wide range of subjects of
more than local importance.
Activity-Statistics
Local Trust Committee
Meetings Held
General Trust Meetings Held
Council Meetings Held
By-laws Passed
By-laws in Process at
year end
Subdivision Applications
reviewed
Rezoning Applications
received
Crown Lease Applications
received
Siting Permits for Hornby
and Denman
Land Use Contracts completed
Agricultural Land Reserve
Applications
1978
1979
68
78
47
26
4
4
70
35
17
23
148
157
34
24
50
74
51
53
9
N/A
26       34
 2. Official Plan and Bylaw Review
The Division continued to perform its
statutory responsibility of reviewing land
use bylaws and official plan bylaws
submitted by local governments for
approval of the Minister. The review of
official settlement plans was facilitated
through the distribution of the Division's
Technical Guidelines for the Preparation
of Official Settlement Plans.
Technical Services
The Division's Technical Services group
maintained an ambitious programme during
1979, including the provision of:
• new composite base maps at standard
metric scales and air photo mosaics for
municipalities;
• new or revised composite base maps at
standard metric scales for selected
Improvement Districts, Specified Areas
and Local Communities;
• maps and graphics for various
reports/publications of the Division and
the Ministry for a variety of planning
projects initiated or co-ordinated by the
Division's planners;
• legal descriptions for extensions or
amendments to the boundaries of
municipalities; electoral areas, specified
areas and improvement districts; and
• co-ordinated Provincial response to a wide
variety of requests for Provincial mapping
and air photo material initiated by
municipal and regional district planning
offices.
Publications
The following reports prepared by the
Division or under its direction were
published during 1979:
— The Use of Ecological Information in
Settlement Planning — A Case Example
— Socially Responsive Community Planning:
Applied Social Impact Assessment
— A Framework for Choosing Settlement
Options
— Resource Community Planning:
Evaluation of the Upper Elk Valley
Business Section
— Technical Guide for the Preparation of
Official Settlement Plans.
 Regional District
Planning
Grant
Regional Plan or
Settlement Plan Programme
North Okanagan
Okanagan - Similkameen
Peace River - Liard
Powell River
Skeena-Queen Charlotte
Squamish - Lillooet
Sunshine Coast
Thompson - Nicola
Total:
*Actual payment of grant is
subject to work being the
regional district's planning
programme for 1979 being
carried out.
11,000
16,095
22,810
14,500
15,420
11,928
10,963
31,800
$687,196
Official Settlement Plan for:
Electoral Areas "A", "B" and "C"
Middleton Mountain Study
Official Settlement Plans for:
Okanagan Falls
Naramata
Official Settlement Plans for:
Fort St. John
Chetwynd
Dawson Creek
Fort Nelson fringe areas
Official Settlement Plans for:
Electoral Areas "A", "B", "C" and "D"
Zoning Bylaws to implement Official
Settlement Plans
Official Settlement Plan for
Queen Charlotte - Skidegate Landing
Squamish - Whistler Corridor Plan
Official Regional Plan and
Official Settlement Plans for:
Pender Harbour
Halfmoon Bay - West Sechelt
Sub-Regional Settlement Strategy Study
 Regional District
Planning
Grant
Regional Plan or
Settlement Plan Programme
Comox - Strathcona
23,700
Official Regional Plan — review
Official Settlement Plans for:
Comox Valley
Cortes Island
Quadra Island
Cowichan Valley
Dewdney - Alouette
East Kootenay
Fraser-Cheam
Fraser - Fort George
Greater Vancouver
Kitimat-Stikine
Plan implementing bylaws for
Cortes Island
Base Mapping for Campbell River
22,998 Official Settlement Plans for:
Electoral Area "B"
Electoral Area "H"
24,427 Completion of Official Regional Plan
Current Zoning Bylaw — update
23,200 Official Settlement Plan for
Cranbrook Fringe Area
24,000 Official Regional Plan — review
29,908 Official Regional Plans for:
Greater Prince George - MacKenzie
Electoral Area "H"
Official Settlement Plans for:
Electoral Area "A" — Summit Lake and
Valemount Fringe Area
Electoral Areas "C" and "G"
132,360 Official Regional Plan — review
Fraser River Estuary Study Programme
20,658 Official Regional Plan
Official Settlement Plan for Thornhill
Kootenay Boundary
9,396
Official Regional Plan for
Electoral Area "E"
Mount Waddington
10,638
Official Settlement Plans for:
Quatsino
Hyde Creek
Implementing bylaws for:
Malcolm Island
Coal Harbour
Nanaimo
26,273
Official Settlement Plans for:
Cedar - Cranberry - Bright
French Creek
Nanoose Bay
 APPROVED REGIONAL* DISTRICT PLANNING GRANTS
AND PLANNING PROGRAMMES — 1979
Regional District
Planning
Grant
Programme
Alberni - Clayoquot
Bulkley - Nechako
Capital
Cariboo
Central Coast
Central Fraser Valley
Central Kootenay
Central Okanagan
Columbia - Shuswap
$ 20,208 Official Settlement Plans for:
Beaver Creek
Beaufort
East Sproat Lake
20,000 Official Settlement Plans for:
Houston - Topely
Burns Lake
Fraser Lake and a
Regional District Subdivision Bylaw
47,059 Review of Official Regional Plan
for Metro Area
Consolidation of Official Regional Plan
booklet
Traffic Assignment Model Project
Travel Demand Forecasting Study
Analysis of Regional Shoreland Demand
9,820 Official Settlement Plans for:
Bridge Lake
Sheridan Lake
Deka Lake
Sulphurous Lake
Hathaway Lake, and a
Zoning Bylaw for 100 Mile House
Settlement Plan area
3,586 Official Settlement Plan and a
Zoning Bylaw for Bella Coola Valley
31,550 Official Regional Plan — update
23,779 Official Regional Plan for Arrow Lakes
Sub-Region
28,149 Regional Plan — review
Adoption of overall Zoning Bylaw
Adoption      of      Lakeview      Official
Settlement Plan
Adoption     of     Westbank     Official
Settlement Plan
Adoption of Westbank Business District
Plan
20,971 Shuswap Official Regional Plan
Official Settlement Plans for:
Sicamous
Revelstoke
Deep Creek- Ranchero
 APPROVED* MUNICIPAL PLANNING GRANTS, 1979 (continued)
Planning
Planning
Municipality                                                                   Grant
Municipality
Grant
Towns:
Valemount
15,000
Creston                                                   3,334
Vanderhoof
10,468
Golden                                                  15,000
Merritt                                                    3,166
Districts:
Princeton                                                   470
Abbotsford
8,667
Sidney                                                     9,503
Burnaby
16,677
Smithers                                                   15,000
Campbell River
5,120
Williams Lake                                        6,667
Central Saanich
10,000
Chilliwhack
18,000
Total number of Municipalities: 88
Coldstream
10,000
Total Municipal Planning
Coquitlam
13,334
Grant:                                       $1,059,575.00
Delta
18,000
Houston
15,000
Hudson's Hope
15,000
Kent
14,000
Kitimat
15,000
Mackenzie
6,000
Maple Ridge
29,462
Matsqui
31,178
Mission
13,000
North Saanich
7,000
North Vancouver
14,000
Oak Bay
17,500
Peachland
12,085
Pitt Meadows
15,000
Powell River
15,000
Richmond
20,000
Spallumcheen
5,000
Sparwood
13,466
Summerland
2,521
Surrey
22,000
Terrace
15,000
West Vancouver
13,333
Whistler
6,667

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