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MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY One Hundred and Eighth Annual Report JULY 1, 1979, TO JUNE… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1980

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 ministry of
Education, science
and technology
One Hundred and Eighth Annual Report
JULY 1, 1978, TO JUNE 30, 1979
Province of British Columbia
  o the Honourable Henry Bell-Irving
Lieutenant-Governor for
the Province of British Columbia
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the one hundred and eighth annual
Report on Education, which covers the activities of the education
ministry during the 1978/79 academic year (July 1,1978, to June 30,1979).
In December, 1978, the Premier of British Columbia, the Hon. W. R.
Bennett, announced that the Ministry of Education was to be given a
broader mandate and renamed the Ministry of Education, Science and
Technology. The Hon. Dr. Patrick L. McGeer, Minister of Education
during the previous three years, was requested to continue as minister of
the expanded ministry.
Some months following the 1978/79 academic year — in November,
1979 — Mr. Bennett announced a further reorganization of the British
Columbia government, in which a new Ministry of Universities, Science
■ nd Communications was formed with Dr. McGeer as minister. I had the
)nour of being appointed Minister of Education at that time, and as
ch assume responsibility for submittal of this report to Your Honour.
However, as the many initiatives and achievements of the ministry
during 1978/79 occurred under the strong and dedicated leadership
of Dr.McGeer as minister, I have requested that he provide an
introductory passage to this report.
#0      Jy^-.TA
Brian R. D. Smith
Minister of Education
i
 ipmmi
Blllllilllllli
Drawings and paintings in this report are the work of public school
students in School District No. 71 - Courtenay.
i
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
PERSONNEL
INTRODUCTION
SCHOOLS DEPARTMENT
DIVISION OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Basic School Programs
Curriculum Development
Learning Assessment
Examinations
Program Implementation Services
Consultative Services
Career Education
French Programs
Special Education Programs
Special Programs
Indian Education
DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
Provincial Educational Media Centre
Correspondence Education
Publication Services
Print Services
DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL PERSONNEL
Accreditation/School Evaluation
Field Services
Teacher Services
INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
POST-SECONDARY DEPARTMENT
DIVISION OF PROGRAM SERVICES
DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION
DIVISION OF MANAGEMENT SERVICES
Student Services
COLLEGES AND INSTITUTES
ACADEMIC COUNCIL
OCCUPATIONAL TRAINING COUNCIL
MANAGEMENT ADVISORY COUNCIL
UNIVERSITIES
UNIVERSITIES COUNCIL OF B.C.
JOINT BOARD OF TEACHER EDUCATION
DEPARTMENT OF MINISTRY SERVICES
DIVISION OF FINANCIAL SERVICES
Ministerial Finance
Schools Finance
Post-Secondary Finance
DIVISION OF FACILITIES SERVICES
Schools Facilities
Post-Secondary Facilities
DIVISION OF INFORMATION AND DATA SERVICES
Educational Data Services
Information Services
Ministerial Library
DIVISION OF POLICY DEVELOPMENT
METRIC CONVERSION DIVISION
DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
SCIENCE COUNCIL
Research Secretariat
ORGANIZATION CHART
STATISTICAL TABLES
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  PERSONNEL 1978/79
MINISTER'S OFFICE
Minister of Education, Science and
Technology
The   Honourable   Patrick   L.   McGeer   B.A.,
Ph.D., M.D.
DEPUTY MINISTER'S OFFICE
Deputy Minister of Education, Science
and Technology
W.G. Hardwick, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Assistant Deputy Minister - Schools
Department
R.J. Carter, B.A., M. Ed.
Assistant Deputy Minister - Post-Secondary
Department
A.E. Soles, B.A., M. Ed.
Assistant Deputy Minister - Department of
Ministry Services
J.R. Fleming, B.A.
SCHOOLS DEPARTMENT
Division of Public Instruction
Senior Superintendent of Public Instruction
J.R. Meredith, B.A., M. Ed.
Program Superintendent, Basic Programs
D.L. Hartwig, B.A.
Director, Curriculum Development
J.J. Mussio, B. Sc, M.A., Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Curriculum Development
W.D. Oliver, B.A.
Director, Learning Assessment
R.N. Greer, B.A., M.A., Ed.D.
Co-ordinator, Learning Assessment
R.J. Wilson, B.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Examinations
W.J. Zoellner, B.A., B.Ed.
Program Superintendent, Program
Implementation
B. Buchanan, B. Ed., M. Ed.
Director, French Programs
N. Ardanaz, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Co-ordinator, French Language Programs
C. Fournier, B.A.
Co-ordinator, Career Education
J- Jupp
Home Economics Consultants
J. Campbell, B.Sc, M.A., Dip. Ed.
H. Krueger, B.Sc.
Program Superintendent, Special Programs
B.G. Webber, B.A., M.A.
Director, Special Education
J.A.G. Gittins, B.Ed , M.Ed., Ph.D.
Director, Indian Education
S.E. Arbess, B.A., M.Ed., M.A., Ph.D.
Co-ordinator, Hearing Impaired
J. L. Anderson, B.Ed., B.A., M.A.
Co-ordinator, Visually Impaired
D.M. Corrigan, Dip. Teaching, M. Ed.
Principal, Jericho Hill School for the Deaf
H. Minto, B. Ed., M. Ed.
Division of
Administrative Services
Senior Superintendent,
Administrative Services
J.L. Canty, B.A., M. Ed.
Director, Publication Services
D.W.CHuggins, C.G.A.
Director, Correspondence Education
W.B. Naylor, B.A., M.Ed.
Director, Provincial Educational Media
Centre
B.A. Black, B.Ed.
Division of
Educational Personnel
Senior Superintendent, Educational Personnel
R.J. Leskiw, B.Ed., M.Ed., D. Ed.
Acting Director, Field Services
D.H. MacKirdy, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed.
Director, Teacher Services
B.A. Andrews, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
 Assistant Director, Teacher Services
E.D. Cherrington, B.A., Dip. Ed., Dip. Public
Admin.
INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
Inspector of Independent Schools
J. Phillipson, B.A., B. Ed.
Assistant Inspector of Independent Schools
C. Cuthbert, B.Acc, B.Ed., M.Ed.
POST-SECONDARY
DEPARTMENT
Division of Program Services
Executive Director, Program Services
B.E.C. Fraser, B.Sc, Ph.D.
Director, College and Institute Programs
D. MacRae, B.Sc.
Director, Program Research and
Development
E.M. Mohan, B.A., Dip. Teaching, M.A., Ph.D.
Division of
Management Services
Executive Director, Management Services
J.F. Newberry, B.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Director, Trades Training and
Journeyman Upgrading
J.D. Meredith
Director, Career Programs
D. Goard, B.Ed., M.A.
Co-ordinator, Student Services
D.L. Clarke, B.A., M.Sc.
Division of Continuing
Education
Executive Director, Continuing
Education
R. L. Faris, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D
Director, Continuing Education
N. Rubidge, B.Sc, M.Sc, Ed.D.
Co-ordinator, Adult Basic Education
D. Haughey, B.A., Dip.Ed., M.Ed.
10
DEPARTMENT  OF MINISTRY
SERVICES
Division of Financial Services
Superintendent, Financial Services
G.E. Wilcox, C.G.A.
Director, Schools Finance
G. Gamble, R.I.A.
Director, Post-Secondary Finance
W.G. Stewart, F.C.I.B., C.G.A.
Director, Ministerial Finance
N. Aleksenko, R.I.A.
Division of
Facilities Services
Superintendent, Facilities Services
W.L.B. Hawker, B.A., B.Ed.
Senior Architect - Schools
N.O. Jackson, Dip. Arch.
Senior Architect - Planning
W.G. Argyle, Dip. Arch. R.I.B.A., A.I.B.C.,
R.A.K.C.
Project Control Manager
A. Paul, B.A.Sc, Dip. Public Admin.
Executive Director, Special Capital Projects
H. Mclntyre, B.Arch., F.R.I.B.A.
Senior Architect - Post-Secondary
D.S. McLelland, M.R.A.I.C.
Division of Policy
Development
Superintendent, Educational Policy
Development
J. Walsh, B.Sc, M.Ed.
Division of Information
and Data Services
Director, Educational Data Services
K. Plant, B. Comm., M.B.A.
Director, Information Services
J.C. Ewing, B. Journ.
Librarian
A. Armstrong, B.A.
 Division of Metric Conversion
Executive Director, Metric
Conversion Services
E. Gosh, CD., B.Sc.
Personnel Services
Director, Personnel Services
J.A. Holmes, Dip. Public Admin.
DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENTS
OF SCHOOLS
G.S. Armstrong, BEd., Southern Okanagan
W.W. Baldry, B.A., M.Ed., Grand Forks/Kettle
Valley
O.E. Bedard, B.Ed., M.A., Vernon
L.B. Beduz, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Creston/Kaslo
A.D. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., North Thompson
E.M. Carlin, B.Ed., M.Ed., West Vancouver
E.L.    Coffin,    B.Sc,    Ed.    Dip.,    M.A.T.,
Keremeos/Princeton
J.R. Denley, B.Ed., M.Ed., Sunshine Coast
J.L. Doyle, B.A., M.Ed., Alberni
D.E. Eldred, B.Ed., M.Ed., Campbell River
T.G. Ellwood, B.Ed., M.Ed., Courtenay
D.L. Fiddick, B.Ed., M.Ed., Kitimat
W.F.T. Fisher, B.Ed., M.Ed., Chilliwack
D.N. Glass, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Peace River
North
K.S. Granger, B.Ed., M.Ed.,
Windermere/Golden
F.M. Hamilton, B.Ed., M.Ed., Terrace
N.B. Hoadley, B.Ed., M.Ed., Nanaimo
J. Holden, B.A., M.Ed., Castlegar
C. Holob, B.S.A., M.Ed., Richmond
C.    Hopper,   B.Ed.,   M.Ed.,   Hope/Agassiz-
Harrison
R.W.    Huestis,    B.Com.,    B.Ed.,   Gulf
Islands/Lake Cowichan
R.S. Johnstone, B.A., M.Ed., Kimberley
W.B. Johnston, B.Ed., M.Ed., Sooke
N.   Keis,   B.S.A.,   M.Ed.,   Queen   Charlotte
Islands and Nisgha
E.A. Killough, B.Ed., M.A., Maple Ridge
J. G. Leaman, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Qualicum
G.C. Lind, B.A., M.Ed., Trail
J.M. Lowe, B.Ed., M.Ed., Prince Rupert
R.G. Lyon, B.Ed., M.Ed., Kamloops
D.A. Lynn, B.Ed., M.A., Fort Nelson/Stikine
N. W. McDonald, B.A., M.Ed., Shuswap
D.E. McFee, B.A., M.A. Merritt
A.P. McKay, B.Comm., M.Ed., Penticton
A.V. MacMillen, B.A., M.Ed., Smithers
P.G.    McLoughlin,   B.A.,    Dip. Ed.,    B.Ed.,
Mission
E.A. Maglio, B. Cornm., B.Ed., Howe Sound
W.F. Marshall, B.A., M.Ed., Cowichan
W. Maslechko, B.P.E., M.Ed., Nelson
CR. Moss, B.Ed., M.Ed., Nechako
G.W. Moulds, B.Ed., M.Ed., Delta
A.J.H. Newberry, B.A., M.Ed., Ed. D., Peace
River South
R. J. Patrick, B.A., B.Ed., Quesnel
M.G. Pendharkar, B.Sc, B.T., B.Ed., Kelowna
M.   Roscoe,   B.A.,  M.A., Vancouver  Island
North
L.P.   Sampson,   B.A.,   B.Ed.,   M.Ed.,   Ph.D.,
Langley
H. Sayers, M.A., M.Ed., Abbotsford
D.R. Smyth, B.P.E., Saanich
V.J. Storey, B.Ed., M.Ed., Ed. D., Fernie
P.F. Strettan, B.A., M.Ed., Burns Lake
D.R.   Sutherland,   B.Ed.,   Dip.   Ed.   Admin.,
M.Ed., Armstrong-Spallumcheen/
Summerland
O.W. Taylor, B.A., M.A., M.Ed., Revelstoke
R.B. Taylor, B.Ed., M.Ed., Cranbrook
M.V. Thorsell, B.A., M.Ed., Powell River
D.N.    Weicker,    B.A.,    B.Ed.,    M.Ed.,    New
Westminster
PROMOTIONS &
APPOINTMENTS
Headquarters
J.J. Mussio, Director, Curriculum
Development
W.B. Naylor, Director, Correspondence
Education
R.N. Greer, Director, Learning Assessment
N.O.   Jackson,   Senior   Architect   Schools,
Facilities Services
D.L. Hartwig, Program Superintendent, Basic
Programs
R.J. Wilson,Co-ordinator, Learning
Assessment
W.J. Zoellner, Assistant Director,
Examinations
11
 Field
P.F. Strettan,
District Superintendent
LONG SERVICE
25-Year Continuous Service
Certificate
O.M.A.R. Bowes
J.R. Hind
F.E.J. Magowan
E.J. Nye
CJ. Pedersen
Executive Development
Training Plan Graduate
D. Harris
Public   Administration   Course
Graduates
A.V. Lacharity
P. Westmacott
M.E. Wainwright
RETIREMENTS
M.M. Donald, Teacher, Jericho Hill School,
33 years
R.I.    Krowchenko,    Teacher,    Jericho    Hill
School, 28 years
N.H.   Hamilton,   Housekeeper,  Jericho   Hill
School, 27 years
CJ.  Pedersen,  Correspondence  Instructor,
Correspondence Education, 26 years
J.R.   Hind,   Director   Correspondence
Education, 25 years
F.E.J.    Magowan,    Building   Maintenance
Worker, Jericho Hill School, 25 years
N.I.   McClelland,   Clerk,   Correspondence
Branch, 23 years
E.H.  Bleakney, Clerk, Teacher Services, 22
years
J.M. Phillips, Secretary, Independent Schools,
22 years
12
N.E. Grady, Teacher, Jericho Hill School, 21
years
P.M. Stephen, Clerk, Publication Services, 20
years
K.P. Campbell, Teacher, Jericho Hill School,
18 years
E.E. Lewis, District Superintendent of Schools,
17 years
FT.  Middleton,  District Superintendent of
Schools, 17 years
E.R.   Sinclair,   Office   Assistant,   Correspondence Education, 17 years
G.E.    Godfrey,    Office    Assistant,    Teacher
Services, 13 years
H.C.D.    Chalmers,    Assistant    Director,
Examinations, 12 years
J.M.   Whipple,  Clerk, Teacher Services, 11
years
C. Tizya, Cook, Jericho Hill School, 6 years
F.L.    Fleming,    Program    Superintendent,
Special Programs, 5 years
   INTRODUCTION
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Significant achievements were made in the last 12 months towards
accomplishing the ministry's objectives in developing and strengthening
the programs and services of thepublicschools,thecommunity colleges
and provincial institutesand the universities, with particular emphasison
the developments in the fields of science and technology.
The ministry's overall educational objectives have been to sharpen the
educational focusof ourschoolsand to improve financial accountability.
Thus improvements to the core curriculum, advances in the provincial
learning assessment program, and new budgeting and accounting
procedures have been important activities of the ministry. Budgetary
incentive grants for school districts were introduced in the form of
reductions in local mill rates for those school districts demonstrating
superior budget control. Nine school districts qualified in this fiscal
period.
The English placement examination and the standardized
mathematics examination for grade 12 students are further examples of
the government's desire to strengthen fundamental skills in our young
people. The value of grade 12 scholarships was doubled to $1,000during
the year, another indication of the government's commitment to
academic excellence. For the first time, a program for academically
gifted children has been developed by the ministry. The first stages of the
program were introduced in 40 school districts on a pilot basis in
September, 1979. This program, when fully developed, will do much to
reduce intellectual under-development in the school system.
The International Year of the Child was 1979. The ministry marked the
occasion through a variety of activities and programs, the most important
of which was a new approach to the education of handicapped children.
In co-operation with the Ministry of Human Resources, a system was
introduced whereby each youngster with a handicap can be evaluated
by an interministerial team to determine what the child's needs are and
the best way of meeting them.
15
 Considerable effort was expended during the year in the preparation
of an administrative handbook for elementary and secondary schools.
Initial drafts have been examined in the field and during the next few
months the final version, containing many suggestions from teachers
and school officials, should become available to every teacher. It is
anticipated that improved procedures for reporting student progress,
advancing students through the system, and general administration of
schools will result.
Most superintendents of schools are now employed by local school
districts. This new approach, which allows district's with a student
population of 4,000 or greater to have a more direct role in school
supervision, will result in a wider range of applicants and keener
competition for posts.
The introduction of the French core curriculum attheelementary
level has been successfully achieved. While this is not a large program in
numbers of students, it is British Columbia's commitment to see thatthe
children of the province, wherever numbers warrant, can receive their
education in either official language. French immersion programs
continue to grow in popularity. These programs, which vary
considerably according to the demand in individual school districts, are
intended to develop working skills in French as a second language.
The program for the funding of independent schools continued to
operate smoothly. For the first time, independent schools are being
inspected on a province-wide basis, providing an assurance that these
schools, while operating independently of the public school system, are
maintaining appropriate academic levels in fundamental subject areas.
At the post-secondary level, emphasis has been directed towards
improving both the quality and the quantity of services. Educational
institutions have been givenstrong encouragement to expand programs
where the requirements for skilled manpower are being met by
in-migration, thus displacing career opportunities for young British
Columbians. Medicine is a particular example where less than a quarter
of the new medical registrants in the province are graduates of our own
medical school. In the trades and vocations, corrective action also needs
to be taken to ensure that young British Columbians have full
educational opportunities.
The Colleges and Provincial Institutes Act has been in operation for
over a year. The newly-formed institutes —the Open Learning Institute,
the Pacific Marine Training Institute, the Justice lnstitute,the Pacific
Vocational Institute, and the Emily Carr College of Art — are all
functioning well. The Open Learning Institute, in particular, has been
able to reach a segment of our population that has previously not been
able to take advantage of post-secondary education.
Full provincial funding of the college system and the commencement
of programs at the David Thompson University Centre in Nelson are two
important achievements of the ministry during the past year.
Secondary/post-secondary articulation programs will do much to
streamline the progress of students toward graduation at the post-
secondary level.
Organization of the science portfolio was completed during the year.
The Internal Research Advisory Committee of government is now setting
16
 standards for the support of research projects funded by the various
ministries of government. The Science Council identified a number of
areas for priority attention of government and made its first grants in
support of scientific projects. It recommended the awarding of a number
of Industrial Post-Doctoral Fellowships and GREAT (Graduate Research
Engineering and Technology) Awards during the year. Its activities
included a highly successful executive seminar on the province's future
in science and research.
The Discovery Foundation was established during this year to
stimulate research and development in the private sector in conjunction
with the high technology department of our universities.
Education Today, the ministry's publication, earned a further award
from NASEDIO (National Association of State Education Department
Information Officers). This is the third award received by Education
Today in as many years.
Long-time officials of the ministry who retired in 1979 include: John R.
Meredith, Senior Superintendent of Public Instruction, who — after 32
outstanding years as a public servant in the education field —will receive
an honourary degree from Simon Fraser University; and Harry Chalmers,
the pioneer of general educational development testing in B.C., who was
head of the Examinations Branch.
Honourable Patrick L. McGeer
Minister of Universities,
Science and Communications
(Minister of Education,
Science and Technology
to November, 1979)
17
 18
 SCHOOLS DEPARTMENT
The schools department of the education ministry is responsible for
the overall direction and administration of the public school system
under the terms of the Public Schools Act. The department works closely
with the province's 75 locally-elected boards of school trustees, to which
the act and its regulations assign many specific functions and
responsibilities with respect to the delivery of educational programs to
517,786 pupils in British Columbia public schools.
The schools department in 1978/79 comprised three divisions —
public instruction, administrative services and educational personnel —
and was directed by a policy and planning committee under the
chairmanship of the assistant deputy minister — schools.
DIVISION OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Basic School Programs
The 1978/79 academic year saw a marked widening in the scope of the
division of public instruction. To cope with this increased activity, a long-
range plan has been drafted that will lead to a much closer relationship
between curriculum development and several other branches and
divisions of the education ministry. This planning will also assist the
ministry in monitoring the effectiveness of these new directions and help
to ensure that quality educational programs are available to all school
children throughout the province.
The end of the school year marked the end of an era in the schools
department, when John R. Meredith retired as senior superintendent of
public instruction and was succeeded by Carl Daneliuk. Throughout his
long and distinguished career as educator and administrator, Mr.
Meredith was a tower of strength to all his colleagues. He was
responsible for a broad range of initiatives now considered integral to
the division's mandate.
In 1978/79 the division of public instruction was engaged in six major
projects:
•Completion of a new secondary school accreditation manual and its
introduction throughout the province.
•Completion   of  the  elementary  self-assessment  pilot  project  and
circulation of the final document to the school system.
•Creation of a learning materials development fund to assist educators in
the field to develop unique and innovative ideas and materials for
possible use by other teachers throughout B.C.
• Revision of the elementary and secondary schools administrative
bulletins into one combined volume.
•An increase in the number of secondary/post-secondary articulation
projects being undertaken by secondary schools and initiation of a
19
 complete examination of the existing program as it relates to pre-
employment and training for students within the secondary schools.
•Establishment of formal ties with other ministries with regard to the
development of curriculum-related materials for use in the school
system.
The secondary school accreditation book was revised in order to make
all aspects of the document as relevant as possible to programming
within schools today. The expectation that schools will participate in the
program is not expected to change, although the length of time for
which schools will be accredited will quite likely become more flexible.
The learning materials development fund was created because, over
the past few years, many teachers have developed strategies, ideas and
materials to improve classroom activities and many of these have never
come to fruition because of development costs. Thefund will financially
assist these teachers and perhaps enable the entire school system to
profit from their expertise.
Revision of elementary and secondary administrative handbooks was
undertaken to bring them up to date and together in one complete
book. Intended to be a valuable source of information for school
administrators, the new version will contain as much practical
information as possible.
These projects — together with the continuing work in curriculum
development, learning assessment and program implementation —are
helping the ministry provide programs that ensure that all students have
access to a sound basic education.
Curriculum Development
A number of major projects involving elementary and secondary
curricula were completed by the curriculum development branch
during the 1978/79 academic year.
A curriculum guide outlining the revised elementary language arts
program, Elementary Language Arts, was distributed in the fall of 1978.
Some of the materials to support this new program were listed for use in
September, 1979. Prescribed materials for reading and spelling were also
listed for use beginning in 1979. The rest of the prescribed and
authorized materials, such as language tests, dictionaries and novels, will
be available in 1980. During the implementation period of the revised
program, the former language arts program and its support materials
will continue to be available. However, in September, 1981, the 'old'
program and materials will be withdrawn.
Beginning in September, 1979, the publication Secondary Guide
English 8-12 (Revised 1978) becomes the prescribed guide for secondary
English. This guide retains the program goals and learning outcomes
which appear in the former guide, published in 1976. The principal
change in the new guide is the addition of a province-wide sequence,
assigned by grade, of instructional emphases. The sequence also
incorporates the learnings identified in the ministry's Guide to the Core
Curriculum (1977). Additional support materials for English 11 are being
made available in September, 1979. As well as certain authorized texts,
prescribed materials which focus on the mastery of effective English skills
20
 SECONDARY GRADE COURSE ENROLMENTS
as a percentageof pupil enrolment of 215,856
September 30,1978
*Not offered at all secondary grade levels. Source:  Organization of Secondary Schools
Form K 1978/79
Educational Data Services
B.C. Ministry of Education
and the uses of language have been listed.
In 1977 the first of the revised secondary drama courses was
introduced with the publication and distribution of the Drama 8 guide.
The revision of the entire junior secondary program was completed in
1978 and prescribed and authorized books for the new Drama 9 and 10
courses have been listed.
Over the past several years a major revision of the complete business
education program has been underway. Certain revised courses were
introduced in 1977 and 1978. The remaining courses in the new program
are being introduced in September, 1979.
The publication of the revised home economics curriculum guide
marks the completion of another major project. This document includes
all courses in the new program and is available for implementation in
September, 1979.
In addition to the foregoing changes which will take effect in the
1979/80 school year, the ministry continued to review and revise a
number of other subject areas. One of these areas is secondary social
21
 studies, which will remain a major task for the next two years. This
revision and identification of new support materials at the secondary
level will be accompanied by an evaluation of and possible adjustment to
the elementary social studies program.
Development began on a provincial program for gifted students, with
pilot introduction in selected school districts in 1979/80.
The staff of the curriculum branch has also devoted considerabletime
to the preparation of two major curriculum documents to be issued in
the fall of 1979. The first, entitled Curriculum P/ann/ng,outlines a series of
long-range curriculum plans for the ministry. The second, Curriculum
Update, 1979, describes the work of more than 35 provincial curriculum
committees.
Learning Assessment
As a continuation of the effort begun by the learning assessment
branch in 1976 to monitor the effectiveness of major curriculum
programs, province-wide assessments of science and written expression
were completed in the 1978/79 school year. Reports of a provincial
assessment of physical education are being issued in the fall of 1979, and
the second provincial assessment of reading will be completed in 1980.
This reading assessment, marking the beginning of the second cycle of
provincial assessments, will examine major changes in overall pupil
achievement since the first assessment four years ago.
In keeping with the main principle underlying the assessment
program — that effective planning for the improvement of education
requires up-to-date, reliable data on what and how students are
currently learning — these assessments have been designed to survey
overall pupil achievement and instructional practices in major areas of
the curriculum.
The 1978 science assessment reported science achievement of
elementary school pupils to be very encouraging, and concluded that
students enter secondary school with well-developed skills and a
satisfactory understanding of science concepts. The major
recommendation called for a review of the junior secondary science
program. Changes were also recommended in science offerings at the
senior secondary level in order to meet the needs of more students.
The provincial assessment of written expression measured students'
general writing ability and their mastery of specific writing skills. The
overall achievement of students at the end of the primary grades was
found to be generally satisfactory; however, the writing produced by
grade 8 and grade 12 students caused serious concern.
The report recommended that university faculties of education
examine their English methodology courses to ensure adequate
attention is being given to preparing graduates to teach the many
specific skill areas of written expression. Teachers of English were
encouraged to emphasize specific writing skills and to help students
develop competence in a wide variety of writing tasks and forms.
Teachers of all subjects were urged to ensure that acceptable writing
skills are taught and reinforced in their classrooms.
Constructive steps have been taken to launch follow-up programs to
this assessment. A revised Secondary English guide was prepared and
22
 circulated; it contains specific directions to teachers as to what is to be
taught at each grade level. Also teachers'resource kits containing writing
exercises and suggestions for teaching each skill tested in the assessment
were prepared and distributed to all schools.
In addition to publishing province-wide reports, the assessment
branch, through the B.C. Research Council, continued to issue
individual summaries of local achievement in science to each B.C. school
district. Committees were then established in each district to examine
local results and to plan appropriate follow-ups. Following receipt of
district assessment results in mathematics, reading and science, district
reports to the ministry indicate that a variety of recommendations to
improve local programs have been initiated.
In the fall of 1978 a document providing policy guidelines for district
assessment practices was prepared and circulated to all districts and
schools. It specified what the ministry views as the roles and
responsibilities of schools, districts and the ministry itself in the
evaluation of individual pupils and educational programs. Districts are
expected to have policies governing local assessment approved and
ready for implementation by September, 1980.
A number of activities were launched by the learning assessment
branch to help districts and schools fulfill their assessment
responsibilities:
•To clarify ministry expectations, a series of regional meetings with
district representatives was held following the publication of thepolicy
guidelines.
•A resource book entitled Construction and Use of Classroom Tests was
published and distributed to all schools. Two others -Selection and Use
of Standardized Tests and Grading Practices: Issues and Alternatives -
were prepared for distribution in the fall 1979.
•Eleven achievement tests in mathematics, designed to help teachers
measure individual pupil achievement on specific curriculum
objectives, were developed and made available to all schools in 1979.
(Overwhelming support for these tests was indicated by the fact that
over 300,000 copies were requested by schools.)
Development of achievement tests for grades 11 and 12 in chemistry
and algebra was initiated; they will be added to the list of available
achievement tests in 1980. A full range of classroom achievement tests for
all major subjects and grades is now being planned.
Examinations
The examinations branch is responsible for administering the Grade 12
Scholarship Program and the General Education Development (GED)
testing program, and issuing transcripts for those who obtained
secondary school graduation in British Columbia between 1890and 1973.
Grade 12 scholarship examinations are administered in January and June
of each year (German 12, Latin 12, Spanish 12 and geology 12 are given in
June only). In 1978/79 a total of 4,889 candidates applied to write the
examinations, including the compulsory qualifying examination in
English. Of these candidates, 936 earned scholarships of $1,000 each and
an additional 389 earned district scholarship awards, also of $1,000 each.
23
 This totalled 245 more than in 1978.
During the school year the examinations branch issued 3,76^
secondary school transcripts, and 207 secondary school transcripts from
outside the province were evaluated in terms of B.C. equivalency.
British Columbia continues to lead the rest of Canada in candidates
who apply for and successfully complete the GED testing program.
During 1978/79 some 5,436 candidates applied to write the battery of five
standardized tests;   3,558 qualified — 170 more than in 1978.
In February an international GED conference was held in Victoria. GED
officials from Washington, D.C, presented statistical data on revised
tests, effective September, 1979. Of particular interest was the
information that, commencing in September, 1979, the social studies test
is to have a truly Canadian bias.
Program Implementation Services
The office of program implementation services was opened on
October 1, 1978, in the Richmond facilities of the education ministry.
The ministry has the major responsibility for developing programs;
school districts have the major responsibility for delivering programs,
and the schools have the major responsibility for implementing
programs. The role of program implementation services is to provide
information and resources to support the work of school
superintendents in administering the delivery and implementation of
programs developed by the curriculum development and learning
assessment branches of the ministry.
During the year seven regional program orientation meetings were
held for superintendents and senior educational leaders from each
school district. Topics discussed included:
•Authority and responsibility for curriculum, tests and assessment at
provincial and local levels.
• New regulations and ministerial orders pertaining to curriculum and
selection of learning resources.
•Future plans for curriculum change and learning assessments.
•Overview of newly revised courses.
•Correspondence education.
•Credit allocation plan for distribution of learning resources.
Regular communication with superintendents of schools is maintained
at provincial and regional meetings throughout the year.
Program implementation services also provides liaison with the
faculties in education of the three universities to keep them informed of
forthcoming changes in the provincially prescribed curricula and of
recommendations for teacher education as these arise out of the
provincial learning assessment program.
The branch began work on the development of models for the
dissemination of information about ministry changes in school
programs. A publication about factors to be considered in the
implementation of new or revised policies and programs is in
preparation.
24
 ,, major task of program implementation services is to facilitate and
co-ordinate programs of action as follow-ups to specific findings arising
>ut of provincial learning assessment programs.
Consultative Services
Career Education
While the total secondary school enrolment decreased in 1978/79, the
number of students enrolled in industrial education (IE) courses
increased to 161,076, with a new curriculum guide allowing greater
flexibility in directing students into IE programs.
The pre-apprentice/pre-career pilot courses of the secondary/post-
secondary articulation program have been completed. Twenty schools
participated, with 200 students involved. Several students successfully
completed the requirements for the pre-apprentice credential in
addition to the grade 12 Dogwood certificate graduation program.
The new industrial education curriculum guide is now in effect and
supporting equipment lists have been developed as the basis for
equipping new shops. A seconded specialist was appointed for six
months to assess equipment and identify essential items. As a result,
school district capital budgets for 1979 included $5,000 for each school
offering grade 12 electronics.
The career education branch recruits 50 tradesmen each year to enter
the ministry-sponsored IE teacher training program at the University of
B.C. In addition, each year 25 third-year students of the five-year
university program enter teacher training (B.Ed., IE major). In cooperation with the division of educational personnel, the branch also
recruited 18 academically qualified teachers to take summer school in
industrial education subjects in order to qualify as IE teachers.
A total of 1,250 teachers were employed in industrial education
classrooms in 1978/79.
The branch continued to assume responsibility for metric conversion
within the ministry. All industrial education courses are now being
taught in metric except at senior levels, where imperial measure is
introduced because IE students must still be able to function in the
traditional work force. Under the ministry's fixed capital asset
replacement program, 47 metal working lathes and 54 milling machines
in the schools were replaced with new machines calibrated metrically.
The 1978/79 decline in secondary school pupil enrolment was
reflected in a home economics enrolment of 105,212 — a decrease of
4,127 (3.8 per cent) from that in 1977/78. Although the number of home
economics departments in B.C. secondary schools increased by six to
336, the number of home economics teachers employed decreased by 17
to 902.
Highlights of 1978/79 included completion of the new home
economics curriculum guide, selection of new textbooks, preparation of
the new advisory equipment list and publication of the new home
25
 economics branch library list. In regard to these changes, technical
information and consultative field services were provided by the home
economics advisors.
French Programs
Following development of a core curriculum in French (programme -
cadre de francais), the major thrust during 1978/79 was familiarization of
educators and parents with this important B.C. initiative. The
programme-cadre, commencing in September, 1979, is being offered in
school districts where 10 or more children register who comprehend
French well enough to undertake a complete elementary school
curriculum with it as the language of instruction. During the year,
meetings were held throughout the province to improve knowledge and
understanding of the programme-cadre. Also, planning took place for a
ministry-sponsored summer teacher-training institute at Pearson
College to be attended by all teachers working in the programme-cadre.
Projections anticipated an initial programme-cadre enrolment of
approximately 500 students in 10 to 14 school districts.
Interest in learning French as a second language in British Columbia's
schools continued to rise dramatically in 1978/79. In elementary French
immersion programs, for example, participation rose in one year from
1,256 pupils in 13 schools to 1,978 in 22 schools (see chart at right).
During the past year two committees took up the task of revising
elementary and secondary curricula for French as a second language,
with work to be completed in 1980. A third committee developed an
interim version of an early immersion curriculum for kindergarten to
grade 7; it was projected that consultations would take place with school
districts offering early immersion and, following adjustments prior to
June, 1980, final curriculum guides would be distributed provincially as
an authorized program.
Also, under the director of French programs, an ad hoc committee was
mandated to draft a policy statement on multiculturalism in education.
The committee submitted its report in June for study by the ministry.
With several programs continuing under the Federal-Provincial
Agreement for Bilingualism in Education, 72 of British Columbia's 75
school districts received a total of $1,247,310 in French language support
grants during the year. A further $259,003 was distributed under the
French teachers' bursary program, which included workshops and in-
service training.
Through other programs 29 B.C. students were employed as monitors
while full-time students in other provinces, and 103 francophone
students were monitors in 10 B.C. school districts, two colleges and an
independent school. Some 710 B.C. students received bursary assistance
for summer immersion programs, while 550 students from British
Columbia and other provinces studied at four institutions here. Also,
$201,447 was shared by 109 B.C. post-secondary students for study during
the regular academic year at francophone and bilingual institutions.
26
 In the first pilot year of the full-time monitor program, 14
francophones worked in 13 districts away from the greater Vancouver
and Victoria areas.
Funds totalling $1,732,816 were advanced to 42 special projects
involving school districts and two colleges, and approximately $187,600
helped fund 62 non-credit adult education projects. A further $100,000
was made available for development of a language training centre atthe
University of British Columbia.
The French programs co-ordinator participated in several national
meetings regarding program administration and others concerning renegotiation of the Federal-Provincial Agreement for Bilingualism in
Education   (which expired in March, 1979.)
1977/78
1978/79
1976/ 77
1975/76
1974/75
1973/74
1972/73
1971/72
Number of
Elementary School
Students in
FRENCH
IMMERSION
PROGRAMS
Ref: Minority Language Survey
Educational Data Services
B.C. Ministry of Education
27
 Special Education Programs
Educational support services are provided by the education ministry to
assist in the establishment and maintenance of services which
supplement normal services, including a variety of special programs for
exceptional children.
Special Programs
The special programs branch is responsible for developing policies and
procedures on matters relating to the education of exceptional children.
Under authority of section 180 of the Public Schools Act, the branch
issues special approvals. This funding device allows the ministry to
contribute to the shareable cost of school districts' special programs for
the education of mentally and physically handicapped children as well as
for native Indian education, English as a second language, education of
the visually and hearing impaired, learning assistance, and educational
services in related areas of need.
Under the approval system the special programs branch supported
over 2,700 local programs in the 75 school districts during 1978/79. Of
these, 1,440 were learning assistance approvals issued on a formula basis
to all school districts to make additional resources available for children
with learning disabilities or for those not  adept at learning.
In summary, financial assistance was given to programs in the
following areas:
Program Area
Elementary K-7
Senior-secondary 8-11
Total learning assistance
Moderately and
severely retarded
Hospital
Homebound
Shared - hospital and homebound
Physically handicapped
Residential programs
Visual impairment
Hearing impairment
Shared - visual and hearing impairment
Autistic
Rehabilitation
Specialized programs
Climate and distance
Job training for moderately and
severely handicapped
English as a second language
Indian education
Others
Number of
Special approvals
896.0
544.0
1,440.0
204.0
58.5
64.5
4.5
58.5
8.5
37.0
95.5
3.0
30.0
173.0
33.5
20.0
22.5
237.5
149.5
155.0
2,755.0
28
 Wherever it was in the interest of their learning needs, moderately and
severely handicapped children attended public schools and resources
were provided to support them, sometimes through inter-ministerial cooperation and the efforts of the branch and its participation in the
provincial Inter-Ministry Children's Committee. In other cases, teachers
provided education in the hospital or home.
Also during the year 66 school districts with a total of 15,675 children
(including one class from Jericho Hill School forthe Deaf) were involved
with work study/work experience programs sponsored jointly by the
education ministry and the Ministry of Labour.
The branch is aided by advisory councils in its various areas of activity.
Also, a number of committes have been struck to develop curriculum
and curriculum guides. Among them are:
• Hearing Impaired Curriculum Guide (K-12)
• Visually Impaired Curriculum Guide (K-12)
• Learning Assistance Resource Guide
• Educable Mentally Retarded Curriculum Guide (K-12)
• Moderately and Severely Retarded Curriculum Guide (K-12)
• Autistic Children Resource Guide (K-12)
• Social Studies Review Guide - Indian Education
Provincial programs for the communicatively impaired enable many
students to be assisted by local itinerant programs, in district classes, or at
Jericho Hill School for the Deaf. In addition, in 1978/79 the ministry
established a provincial resource centre for the visually impaired to
provide school districts with specialized materials and equipment.
Regular inter-ministry discussions and co-operation continued in the
areas of speech pathology, the provision of auditory training equipment,
school health services, and programs for pre-school handicapped
children. With the assistance of the division of speech and hearing of the
Ministry of Health, the branch continued to underwrite the costs to
school districts of auditory training equipment and speech therapy
programs.
The branch also arranged government financing for six deaf-and-blind
children to attend the Ross McDonald School in Brantford, Ontario.
Extensive in-service activities undertaken and sponsored by the
branch included workshops for supervisors of special education and for
teachers of hospitalized and home-bound, autistic children, the
communicatively impaired and native Indian children and teachers of
English as a second language.
Indian Education
To meet the special needs of native Indian children, programs have
been designed not only to develop basic skills but also to reflect the
cultural, linguistic and social background of the children.
Programs were implemented in co-operation with the Indian
communities to provide native paraprofessional workers such as home-
school co-ordinators and teacher aides and to provide native Indian
language, cultural, and alternative education programs.
29
 DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE
SERVICES
The division of administrative services is responsible for a wide range
of administrative, regulatory and logistic functions within the B.C.
education system. The central office of the division co-ordinates the flow
of information between the ministry and school districts and issues the
ministry's circulars. It also acted in 1978/79 as the executive arm of the
schools department management committee.
A section of the central office has responsibilities in the area of pupil
conveyance. Through this section school boards receive authorization to
include in their basic educational programs the amounts necessary for
the provision of conveyance of pupils to and from schools and to defer
the cost of transportation by parents. In addition, the office is
responsible for authorizing the inclusion in capital expense proposals of
additional or replacement vehicles.
In 1978/79 the division also continued responsibility for the Provincial
Educational Media Centre, the correspondence education branch, and
the publication services and print services branches.
Provincial Educational Media Centre
During the past year acquisition patterns of the Provincial Educational
Media Centre reflected the provincial emphasis on the core curriculum.
Films, videotapes, and audiotapes directly related to all basic subject
areas were purchased, with special attention given to new courses in
junior secondary science, English and physical education. In cooperation with the curriculum development branch, a media resource
guide for English 8, 9 and 10 was developed. This guide provides an
annotated cross reference between materials in the PEMC media library
and specific items in the English curriculum.
Special projects during the year included the development and
distribution of SALUTI, a television series designed to support the
teaching of French to elementary school pupils, and a pilot project in
economics education using the videotape series Trade-Offs. Both of
these projects have been expanded and carried into the new year. The
success of SALUTI in British Columbia has resulted in requests from
other ministries of education to distribute the programs in their
provinces.
In the interest of improving access to all audio-visual materials, a
computer catalogue program developed by PEMC was adopted for use
by school district resource centres. Districts using the system enjoyed
cost savings by printing their catalogues with the aid of the computer
program.
Correspondence Education
The correspondence education branch provides distance education
services for school-age students who, because of distance, health or
30
 other reasons, are unable to attend regular schools; for students
enrolled in secondary schools who for a variety of reasons, including
availability of certain courses or timetable conflicts, are unable to take
particular courses in their schools, and for adults wishing to upgrade
school standing or take particular courses for vocational or general
interest purposes. The size of the operation can be illustrated by noting
that during the 1978/79 academic year a total of 14,478 registrations for
new or continuing students were processed. This figure has been fairly
constant over the past four or five years.
The branch continues to supply course materials for the satellite
elementary correspondence centre operating out of Dawson Creek. In
addition, educational services were provided until December, 1978, to a
school in Iran established for the children of Canadian workers. A similar
arrangement has been made for children of Canadian workers in
Czechoslovakia.
The development of correspondence courses equivalent to courses
offered in regular public schools is a major task of the branch. During the
year revised elementary school science (years 1 to 5) and art (years 4 and
5) were developed. New secondary school courses prepared for the
1979/80 school year included Mathematics 10 (Industrial), Geometry 12,
Spanish 11, Beginners' German 11, Consumer Fundamentals 10, Home
Economics 8 and Agriculture 9. The correspondence education
catalogue lists 36 elementary, 106 secondary and 27 special vocational
courses available through the branch.
Over the year the branch has given particular attention to providing
greater assistance toward expanding the number of courses available to
students in small secondary schools. As a result, particular emphasis has
been given to the development of senior secondary school science
courses and to the preparation of a comprehensive program of business
education correspondence courses. In addition, and in co-operation
with the Provincial Educational Media Centre, ways and means of
providing correspondence students with educational media materials
have been studied and feasibility projects launched.
Members of the branch have worked closely with officials of the Open
Learning Institute in the initial development of their adult basic
education programs. Such projects as co-operative program design and
joint course development have been launched to ensure that services
offered by the two institutions are complementary.
Publication Services
The publication services branch is responsible for the purchase and
inventory of all learning resource materials and for their distribution to
approximately 1,792 public and independent schools in the province.
Almost 4 million pounds of material were shipped during the year, and
invoices for learning materials in excess of $10 million were processed.
The year saw the implementation of the credit allocation plan, where
each school district was given a credit of approximately $16 per student
for the purchase of learning materials. Districts were also given more
responsibility in the selection and development of local priorities. The
credit allocation plan, based on enrolment, seems already to have
resulted in a more equitable distriction of textbooks to schools.
31
 The book repair program, conducted with bindery agencies located in
Vancouver and the B.C. Interior, continued to prove its value. In 1978/79,
approximately 200,000 repairs were made at a significant saving over the
cost of purchasing replacement textbooks.
The branch continued as the distributor for ministry publications and
also administered the new school library book purchase plan which
provides for the purchase of one copy per school of appropriate titles
accepted by a panel of teacher-reviewers. The plan indirectly supports
B.C. authors and publishers and has received an enthusiastic response
from schools.
Print Services
The print services branch continued to provide the education ministry
with a comprehensive range of educational publishing capabilities,
focusing on the development, design and printing of new learning
materials. These include new and revised curriculum guides, classroom
manuals, course outlines, instructional packages, and resource books.
Because of recent increased demands for more diverse and higher
quality educational materials, print services has established a wider and
more professionally viable base of integrated publishing activities. To
improve quality and efficiency, the branch is defining and implementing
new manuscript development procedures. These include greater
collaboration between design and editorial staff; professional assistance
to writers and writing committees in the early stages of text
development, and more extensive developmental and copy editing. A
significant increase in textual quality, as well as in the volume of material
handled by the branch, is already apparent.
DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL
PERSONNEL
The division of educational personnel is responsible for the
recruitment, selection, assignment and supervision of provincially
appointed school superintendents and liaison with all schoo
superintendents. It carries out ministry responsibility for teacher
certification and document evaluation; co-ordinates in-service
programs and international teacher exchange programs; maintains
liaison with the faculties of education at the universities, and organizes
accreditation of secondary schools. In addition to the superintendent's
office, these functions are carried out by three branches:
accreditation/school evaluation, field services, and teacher services.
Accreditation/School Evaluation
School accreditation and evaluation  provides a vehicle by which
32
 British Columbia's public schools may be monitored and upgraded.
Each secondary school in the province must regularly undergo an
intensive internal/external evaluation following a format approved by
the accreditation/school evaluation branch. Upon completion, a school
may be granted a full five-year accreditation, provisional accreditation,
or non-accreditation. All schools are required to submit supplementary
reports to the branch, which follows up to insure all recommendations
are met. During the 1978/79 school term, 44 schools reported to the
branch with the following results:
• 29 received complete accreditation.
• nine received provisional accreditation.
• two received non-accreditation.
• two were required to resubmit the internal evaluation document.
• two decisions were deferred.
The branch has also developed and tested a self-evaluation process for
elementary schools to be implemented in the 1979/80 school term. By
1981 all school districts are to have developed and have in place a policy
for elementary self-assessment.
Currently, the secondary school accreditation procedure is under
revision and the resulting recommendations will be implemented
during the 1979/80 school term.
Field Services
The field services branch assists school boards in the selection and
assignment of able career educators for the position of district
superintendent of schools. In 1978/79 the Public Schools Act Regulations
were revised to set more rigorous qualifications for eligibility for
appointment to this senior administrative position. Also, school boards
enrolling in excess of 4,000 students were given the option of hiring their
own superintendent from an eligibility list established by the ministry,
and the right to negotiate a contract of employment.
As the philosophy of co-management of the B.C. education system by
school districts and the ministry was further articulated in 1978/79, liaison
with superintendents and school boards continued as an important
branch function. Also, in the year the field services advisory committee
established a comprehensive evaluation process which will provide for
systematic analysis of school superintendent performance.
Professional development programs for school and district
administrators, provided during the year at regional and provincial
levels, involved superintendents, supervisors, directors of instruction,
and school principals. Theoretical and practical issues involved in school
management were addressed. For example, at a summer workshop in
Victoria, 130 persons examined themes of interest to experienced
principals, themes such as supervision of instruction and leadership in
curriculum development.
Teacher Services
The teacher services branch has two primary responsibilities: teacher
certification and teacher exchange.
33
 MEDIAN SALARIES (in$)
of all Full-time
Elementary and Secondary
Teachers
2,510
2,510
1952
1978
1952
1978   1952
1978   1952
1978
1953
1979
1953
1979   1953
o
1979   1953
1979
2,510
QUEBEC
not available
1978 1952
1979 1953
1978 1952
1979 1953
1978
1979
34
 The number of teaching certificates issued declined during the
1978/79 academic year, in reflecting a slight decrease in enrolment in
provincial faculties of education and a reduction in interprovincial and
international teacher mobility. A larger precentage of those qualifying
received professional certificates, indicating a trend to degree
completion before initial entry into the profession. Over 75 per cent of
the active teaching force now holds undergraduate degrees.
With the addition of formal agreements with the Federal Republic of
Germany and the province of Quebec during the year, the branch now
administers nine international and interprovincial exchange programs.
Seventeen B.C. teachers received exchange fellowships to Great Britain;
another 17 were placed in Australia, and two in the United States. Seven
teachers, including two principals, exchanged with colleagues from
Ontario and four B.C. teachers of German as a second language
accepted exchange assignments in West Germany, commencing August,
1979.
The shortage of opportunities for inter-district mobility, a condition
aggravated by slowly growing, static or declining pupil enrolments, has
renewed interest in teacher exchange as a professional development
activity. An intra-provincial exchange program is proposed for 1979/80.
ource:  Salaries to Qualifications of Teachers in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools
Statistics Canada: Catologue 81-202 Annual 1970/71 to 1978/79
35
 6.43
5.43
INDEPENDENT SCHOOL
ENROLMENTS
as a percentage of Public School
Enrolments (Grades K-12)
Funding
by Ministry
Si£(Dr<»C0a>OT-fN(.     ^      -.      _
<o    <5    to    <p    <b    r-    r>-    f-SrS-i^     s    t    .
0)0)0)0>0)G)0)0>      G>     G)    O)     Cft      o>     C>     CJ>
^   w    iP   n   a)
Shows % of independent school enrolments receiving funding assistance
36
Source:  Statistics Canada, Principals' September Report and
EDS Publication"B.C. Public and Independent School
Enrolment Information, September 1978"
 INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
Academic 1978/79 marked the second year of education ministry
activities under the authority of the Independent Schools Support Act,
with further development and refinement of the program by the
inspector of independent schools and staff. In all, 107schools with 17,820
pupils and 1,334 teachers qualified for support under terms of the act —
an increase of six schools from 1977/78.
The 1977 act established two grant levels. In the past year, 105
independent schools qualified for maximum grants of 30 per cent of the
average per-pupil operating cost of the public school districts in which
they are located. This again averaged approximately $500 per pupil. Two
other schools qualified for the lower grant level, which in 1978/79
continued at 9 per cent and averaged approximately $150 per pupil.
Grants for the year totalled $9,490,721, payable in 1979/80.
To obtain the lower grant level, a non-public school must satisfy the
inspector of independent schools that it does not foster doctrines of
racial or ethical superiority, religious intolerance, or social change
through violent action. Facilities must beadequateand the independent
school must have been in operation for at least five school years.
For the higher grants, an independent school must also provide
minimum instructional time on core curriculum subjects; have a
satisfactory pupil testing program; meet standards of school operation
and administration approved by an external evaluation team; participate
in the provincial learning assessment program, and act to ensure
certification of all teachers within five years.
Grants for the higher level of funding may be used to pay any
operating expenses of a school, while those for the lower level may be
used for any operating expenses except teacher salaries.
37
 38
 POST-SECONDARY DEPARTMENT
The post-secondary department is responsible for the role of the
education ministry in a comprehensive range of academic, technical,
vocational and continuing education programs offered at 14 regional
colleges and six specialized institutes in the province. The department
has three divisions — program services, continuing education and
management services — each with special responsibilities. In addition,
the department provides services to the three advisory and coordinating councils created under the Colleges and Provincial Institutes
Act of 1977 — the Academic Council, the Occupational Training Council
and the Management Advisory Council.
DIVISION OF PROGRAM SERVICES
Activities of the program services division during the 1978/79
academic year included program co-ordination and review, program
research and curriculum development
During the year the division worked toward the establishment of a
process of institutional review to be utilized by the 20 colleges and
institutes, and it provided assistance toward the development and
publication of educational plans by Northwest College and the College
of New Caledonia. Continued developments in visual, applied,
performing and other arts programs received encouragement, and
program planning and assistance was provided to the David Thompson
University Centre in Nelson.
The division established major training approaches in salmonid
enhancement and aquaculture, long-term health care, underground
and open-pit mining, and in the hospitality industry. A major
classification of college and institute programs was prepared with a view
to improving career information available to students, as well as access to
training programs. In addition, work on a system of student follow-up
was undertaken with Malaspina College.
Major reviews of vocational and trades training programs were
undertaken; and major reviews of business programs were initiated, as
well as research in the hospitality industry.
Significant activities in professional development included basic
instructor training and a training scheme for college administrators, as
well as one for college and institute board members in co-operation with
the B.C. Association of Colleges.
The division continued a wide range of program development
activities in 1978/79, including early childhood education, diamond
drilling, heavy duty mechanics, plumbing, and travel consulting, and a
supervisory   training   program   for   industry   was   developed   in   co-
39
 operation with the Employers' Council, Selkirk College and Northwest
College.
At Camosun College and the Vancouver Vocational Institute, the use
of external curriculum development teams was initiated. The division
also launched major community needs analyses in co-operation with
Fraser Valley College, Capilano College in Sechelt, and Northern Lights
College in Fort St. John.
Long-term health care
Training for underground mining at
B.C. Mining School in Rossland
40
 Salmonid enhancement program at Malaspina College
in co-operation with other colleges and the federal
government
Fish culture technology at Malaspina College
DIVISION OF CONTINUING   EDUCATION
The continuing education program offerings of school boards,
colleges and institutes throughout British Columbia attracted over
300,000 adults in 1978/79 — 10 per cent more than in the previous year.
More significant, however, were some of the qualitative advances in
adult education.
The special project system introduced two years ago enabled
institutions to penetrate into areas of community need never before
possible. For example, support was given to Okanagan College for a
needs assessment of handicapped people in the Revelstoke area; the
result was a centre for the handicapped, built with the volunteer
assistance of a variety of community groups.
In 1978/79 more than 15,000 adults were enroled in community
education programs or activities.
Successful basic literacy projects of the past year included the
development and staging in the Northern Lights College region of an
original play portraying the problems of the under-educated adult, and
the development of a tutor-training manual for the use of volunteers
working with under-educated adults at Douglas College. The play
toured extensively in the north and succeeded both in attracting large
audiences and in identifying potential learners, while the manual proved
useful for many agencies providing tutorial opportunities for adult basic
education (ABE) students.
In 1978/79 some 4,280 students enrolled in the basic literacy programs
offered by school districts and colleges.
There was significant growth in the number of vocational part-time
classes offered this past year and a number of innovative approaches
were tried. For example:
41
 •In Burnaby school district, re-entry into the labour force by middle-
aged  women  has  been  made a reality through a clerical studies
program.
•A   program  designed  to  integrate  the  visually-impaired  and  the
mentally-handicapped into the working community is also proving
successful in Burnaby.
•East Kootenay Community College has developed a program whereby
the college acts in co-operation with industry to train employees in
such specialist fields as heavy duty mechanics, coal mining and welding.
In  vocational  upgrading  — the  largest  program  growth area —
enrolments at institutes (4,083), colleges (43,067) and school districts
(24,236) rose approximately 20 per cent over 1977/78.
The education ministry, in co-operation with Vancouver Community
College, sponsored an adult basic education project to develop
curriculum and courses for mildly mentally retarded adults. A key
feature was the promotion of independent living skills and the
development of materials to assist parents of these young adults to adjust
to their independence.
Grade 12 completion programs continued to grow, with over 10,647
part-time adult students enrolled in the adult secondary school
completion program; 1,764 in the college preparation program; 883 in
basic training for skills development, level 4 (grade 12 equivalency);
2,650 in correspondence courses and 621 in regular day school. In
addition, 3,567 students successfully passed the General Education
Development testing program, thereby achieving a grade 12
equivalency.
With the addition of a consultant to the continuing education division
staff, English as a second language (ESL) and citizenship programs began
to receive more systematic development. Priority was given to the
professional development of ESL instructors, with a total of 21 days of
workshops in non-metropolitan regions. Some 706 ESL classes were
offered under the auspices of school districts and colleges during
1978/79.
DIVISION OF MANAGEMENT
SERVICES
During the past academic year, the major roles of management
services remained those of allocating college and institute budgets,
monitoring the efficiency of the total post-secondary system, coordinating the development of manpower plans, and providing
administrative services to the post-secondary department.
Major developments during the year included the implementation of
the Post-Secondary Activities Classification Structure (PACS) - a
sophisticated budgeting, cost-reporting and activity-reporting system to
meet the demands for more detailed information for the use of the
provincial post-secondary councils.
42
 As well, the division examined allocation methods for the capital
support grants to the colleges and institutes, and provided general
support to the Management Advisory Council.
Student Services
Approximately 30 per cent of all post-secondary students applied for
student aid under the British Columbia student assistance program
during 1978/79. In all, 17,928 loans and 12,184 grants to students were
authorized. The average loan and grant were $1,240 and $754
respectively.
The work-study program experienced continued growth. A total of
925 formula positions were authorized for on-campus jobs for 1979/80 as
compared to 652 in 1978/79. The special assistance program assisted
individuals who either enrolled on a part-time basis or enrolled in full-
time programs of a short duration.
43
 44
 COLLEGES AND INSTITUTES
Three councils are established under provisions of the Colleges and
Provincial Institutes Act to guide the management of these institutions
and advise the ministry on the governance of post-secondary education
in British Columbia.
ACADEMIC COUNCIL
Established in February, 1978, under the authority of the Colleges and
Provincial Institutes Act,the Academic Council completed its first year of
operation in 1978/79. The council is composed of five members; those
who served during 1978 were drawn from Trail, Kelowna, Vancouver and
Victoria, with Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan as chairman and Jean Turnbull as
vice-chairman. A staff of three worked out of offices in Victoria.
The responsibilities assigned to the council include all the academic
transfer programs, the majority of the career-technical programs and
some vocational programs in British Columbia's 14 community colleges
and in five of the six provincial institutes. In these areas of instruction the
council has three major concerns: institutional budgets, programs of
instruction, and building relationships within the system of post-
secondary institutions which permit students to attain their educational
objectives effectively.
In carrying out its responsibilities, the council seeks to build an
understanding of the particular circumstances within which each
institution operates, its educational objectives, the limitations imposed
by geography and demography, and its plans for the future. It does this,
in part, by holding many of its regular meetings on the college and
institute campuses.
OCCUPATIONAL TRAINING COUNCIL
During the past year, members of the Occupational Training Council
participated fully in the first review of the budgets for its assigned
programs in colleges and provincial institutes. A more detailed analysis
in further reviews was indicated. Experience gained during 15 regular
and five extraordinary meetings of the council resulted in the
establishment of criteria and procedures for addressing college and
institute budgets more expertly.
The four council committees were also active. These included the
industry advisory, counselling and budget committees. The latter works
very closely with the colleges and institutes and the ministry in analyzing
the information received from both the program services and
management services divisions. The introduction of the Post-Secondary
Activities Classification Structure was also studied by council members;
information   from   this   system   has   proved   valuable   in   council
45
 COMMUNITY COLLEGE ENROLMENT
by Faculty
I CAREER/ TECH -1 or 2 year programs
I Oct.78
[VOCATIONAL   short duration programs
I July 78-June 79
100   395 675
209 680
612  84    159   96    1,353 58
135
Source:  B.C. Post-Secondary Statistics,
1978 Enrolment Data
Educational Data Services
B.C. Ministry ol Education
ACADEMIC  not available
deliberations.
Through its counselling committee, the council established that its
major contribution will be to assist existing counselling services to
become better informed in regard to career information, job
opportunities and industry requirements, particularly those related to
vocational training. The committee considered means to improve
counselling skills where weaknesses were indicated. Consideration was
also given to the encouragement of career advisory centres.
The council maintained close liaison with other bodies engaged in
activities relating to its mandate, one such being the ministry's task force
on counselling whose membership included a council member. Also,
four industry consultative committees were established to advise the
council.
The OTC maintains contacts with representatives of inter-relating
vocational agencies such as the ministries of education and labour and
46
 the Canadian Employment and Immigration Commission. In addition,
co-operative processes were established between education ministry
personnel, who have the responsibility for dealing directly with colleges
and institutes, and the council, whose responsibility is for financing
programs proposed by colleges and institutes.
MANAGEMENT ADVISORY COUNCIL
The Management Advisory Council held a first ad hoc meeting in
November, 1977; began official meetings in February, 1978, and acquired
full status during 1978 as colleges and provincial institutes were
designated as corporations under the legislation of 1977. The year was
one of transition for the council: members became familiar with
legislation; procedures were developed for injecting the "council layer"
into the long-standing direct relationship between institutions and the
education ministry, and the provisions of the British Columbia
Educational Institutions Capital Financing Authority Act came to apply in
succession to institutes and to colleges.
Twelve council meetings were held — two in the 1977/78 fiscal year
and 10 in 1978/79. The following activities were among the most
significant undertaken during the period under review:
•Development of budget procedures to meet the needs of the three
councils and the ministry, based on the new Post-Secondary Activities
Classification Structure.
•Examination of the role of continuing education and its place in the
organizational structure of the institutions and the ministry.
•Survey   of  the   draft  bylaws  of  institutions,  consultation  with  the
education minister on requirements under sections 13 and 17 of the act,
and subsequent advice to the institutions.
•Preparation of a five-year budget forecast for the period 1979-1984.
•Study of guidelines for compensation of principals of institutions based
on the Hay method of evaluation.
•Approval   of   $45,959,904   in   capital   projects,   confirming   projects
previously committed under former legislation and procedures.
•Consideration of criteria for setting priorities on future capital projects.
•Assumption of responsibility for policy on the management of cooperative library projects, including the B.C. union catalogue project.
•Adoption of criteria for distribution of the 1979/80 operating budgets
to institutions.
•Establishment   of   liaison   with   the   Academic   Council   and   the
Occupational Training Council on matters of common concern.
•Advice and assistance to ministry officials on successive drafts of a
statement of goals for post-secondary education.
The council remained flexible during this early stage of its life;
committees were set up in response to perceived needs and were
occasionally disbanded or reorganized as needs changed. The large size
of the council invited reliance on committee work, both because plenary
sessions were expensive and because there were enough council
members for committee appointments.
47
 Enrolment in Colleges and Universities
7368 1st ye
66011
UNIVERSITY
2nd year
j6262
-6188
16024
1725
3221
1967/68
COLLEGE 1st year
Univ. Transfer
Program only
COLLEGE  2nd year
11194
1978/79
COLLEGE
University Transfer
3441
2047   IIIIIJ   IV;
1394 I   |   j   Id
I
1967/68
UNIVERSITY
Undergraduate
28149
244I8
18711
11493
3731
PART
i i i i i
1978/79        1967/68
38076
27665
10411
I
1978/79
48
 UNIVERSITIES
The Universities Act provides for the operation of the three public
universities and the degree programs of the Open Learning Institute
and the David Thompson University Centre.
Ref:   B.C. Post-Secondary Statistics
1977/78 Enrolment Data (pg. 39-49, 81 & 82)
Educational Data Services
Ministry of Education
Trend Analysis of Enrolments
Report #25, Table 5E and #31, Table 6E and 11 A and 26-A
B.C. Post-Secondary Enrolment Forecasting Committee
Ref:   B.C. Post-Secondary Statistics
1977-78 Enrolment Data (pg. 7, 11, 20-36)
and 1978-79 Enrolment Data
Educational Data Services
Ministry of Education
Ref:  B.C. Post-Secondary Statistics
1977-78 Enrolment Data (pg. 39-49)
Educational Data Services
Ministry of Education
Trend Analysis of Enrolments,
Report #25, Tables 5A and 5B,
#31 Tables 6A and 6B and 11A and 26A
B.C. Post-Secondary Enrolment Forecasting Committee
UNIVERSITY
Graduate
4710
2388
1942
446 ■
1967/68
111!     .
Ill      III
COLLEGE
Full and
55562
25060
21102
onal
9400
7156
3468
2942
1978/79
49
 UNIVERSITY ENROLMENTS
by Faculty ( Full & Part-time) Fall 1978
I
GRADUATE
UNDERGRADUATE
50
Source:  B.C. Post-Secondary Statistics
1978 Enrolment Data
Educational Data Services
B.C. Ministry of Education
 UNIVERSITIES COUNCIL OF B.C.
The Universities Council of British Columbia was formed in 1974,
subsequent to the proclamation of the Universities Act (1974). Its
purpose is to encourage the systematic development of public
accountability for university expenditures. The council serves as an
intermediary body between British Columbia's three universities and the
provincial government.
The council, under the chairmanship of Dr. W. C. Gibson, undertook
and completed several tasks during the fiscal year. Among the most
significant activities were:
• Introduction  of an  agreed  methodology by which the provincial
operating grant was allocated among the universities.
•Completion   of   the   B.C.   university   global   space   inventory   and
entitlement project.
•Allocation   for   three   years   of   funds   specifically   designated   for
"programs of distinction".
•Initiation of British Columbia's first "outlook conference" on post-
secondary education.
•Recognition by the B.C. government of the council as an autonomous
organization, advisory to government.
•Appointment of an advisory committee to the program co-ordinating
committee with representatives exclusively from the non-metropolitan
regions of the province.
•Establishment of a methodology to ensure appropriate annual funding
to assist in the expansion of the University of British Columbia medical
faculty.
Following the council's fourth annual submission to the minister, the
provincial government granted $217,225,797 for the universities'
operating expenses, which represented an 8.3 per cent increase over the
grant for 1978/79. The council subsequently allocated the government's
grant to the public universities. As well, the council requested and
received two supplementary government operating grants: $2,000,000 to
support the expansion of the 1979/80 medical undergraduate program at
the University of British Columbia, and $3,000,000 to fund 1979/80 non-
metropolitan university programs.
JOINT BOARD OF TEACHER EDUCATION
During the 1978/79 academic year, the Joint Board of Teacher
Education met on four occasions. Its primary task during the period was
to consider the recommendations of a sub-committee established to
review the education and training of teachers in British Columbia. By
June 30,1979, the board submitted its findings and recommendations to
the education minister. The board then adjourned to await the outcome
of the minister's review of its report.
51
  DEPARTMENT OF MINISTRY
SERVICES
The department of ministry services is responsible for many of the
activities of the ministry which, though not strictly educational, form the
infrastructure that makes the delivery of educational programs possible,
including finance, facilities services (through which buildings and
equipment are provided) and various ancillary services. In the past year
the division of educational policy development joined the ministry
services department, and a fourth division was formed by bringing
together project planning and control from the joint educational
management (JEM) projects with data project development and the
ministry's established information and data services branches and the
ministerial library. The new division of information and data services is
expected to become fully operational early in 1979/80.
During the past year the department continued to concentrate on the
improvement of ministry management systems. Development
continued of long-range planning systems for the ministry and its field
agencies. Five-year forecasts were analyzed in a number of sectors.
The department of ministry services is the focal point for the central
agencies of government and the conduit through which they are
involved in long-range fiscal and physical plans. These agencies include
the Treasury Board, the Government Employee Relations Bureau, the
Public Service Commission, the B.C. Systems Corporation, and the B.C.
Buildings Corporation.
DIVISION OF FINANCIAL SERVICES
The division of financial services is organized into three branches —
ministerial finance, schools finance and post-secondary finance.
Ministerial Finance
The ministerial finance branch is the service section of the division,
responsible for internal finance,compilation of theannual estimatesand
the development and maintenance of effective internal financial control
systems and procedures.
The branch maintains liaison with the Ministry of Finance, the
Comptroller-General's Office and other provincial ministries regarding
financial matters. The branch is also responsible for ministerial accounts
and, in addition, for monitoring and maintaining records of all
expenditures. It provides a monthly update of expenditures as compared
to the estimates for the assistant deputy minister - ministry services, who
is responsible for administration and finance.
The ministry budget for the 1978/79 fiscal year was $1,032,846,805 —
more than 24 per cent of the entire provincial budget.
53
 Source:  Report on Education
1971-1972 to 1978-1979
Ministry of Education
Statistics Canada (for CPI data)
260 28
PUBLIC SCHOOL
OPERATING COSTS
Cost Per Pupil Index
111.0*
114.37
265.74
$$$$
iiii
ssss
ssss
ssss
ssss
ssss
ss$s
ssfs
S$Sii
160.8
125.70
CONSUMER PRICE INDEX
100.00
1971       1972      1973      1974     1975      1976      1977     1978
Schools Finance
The main function of the schools finance branch is to monitor the
expenditures of capital and operating funds in all school districts. The
branch analyzes the budgetary requirements of the districts, calculates
the value of the instructional unit (the basison which operating grantsto
districts are determined), advises the government on the effects of
various levels of funding, recommends the mill rates which should be
established on property taxes for school purposes (the basic levy) and
calculates the educational grants payable to each district.
For the 1978 calendar year, school district expenditures exceeded $1
billion (see tables 3.1 and 3.2 for details). Prior to the 1978 budgets being
finalized, budget reviews were conducted in selected school districts by
senior staff of the division.
Between July 1,1978, and June 30,1979, 77 capital expense proposals,
amounting to $108 million in borrowing authority, were processed. This
amount is a decrease from 1977 of 20.29 per cent. Capital expense
proposals provide borrowing authority to the school districts for the
acquisition of capital assets in the form of land, buildings and equipment.
54
 The actual cost is met by the sale of debentures through the British
Columbia School Districts Capital Financing Authority.
During the year the branch provided assistace and information to the
joint education management project team, which is engaged in the
investigation of processes designed to develop comprehensive
reporting and management systems for the benefit of both the school
districts and the ministry.
In addition, the branch was deeply involved in processing the school
districts' five-year budget projections as well as establishing a system of
key management indicators. These indicators will provide both ministry
and school district officials with measures of management efficiency not
previously available.
Post-Secondary Finance
The post-secondary finance branch, while a functional part of the
ministry services department, also performs a staff role to the post-
secondary department in the area of financial performance and
forecasting relating to post-secondary institutions in British Columbia.
In the past year, the branch played an effective role in the
implementation of the Post-Secondary Activity Classification Structure,
the budgetary system devised following the implementation of the
Colleges and Provincial Institutes Act and the establishment of the
Academic, Occupational Training and Management Advisory Councils.
With this new budgetary system there will be a new cost reporting
system, and the monitoring, analyzing and forecasting of the financial
operations of the institutions will be a major function of the branch.
Capital support financial forecasting and related administration of this
activity for the universities, colleges and institutes continued, as did the
branchs' involvement in the cost-sharing arrangements between the
provincial and federal governments related to post-secondary
education.
DIVISION OF FACILITIES SERVICES
The facilities services division of the ministry services department
develops and controls the capital projects required to provide adequate
facilities in which to offer educational programs to British Columbians.
The division separates naturally into two sections — schools and post-
secondary institutions.
The schools section has six regional teams, each consisting of a coordinator and a technician who offer full capital projects service to the
school districts in their regions. The six teams are co-ordinated by a
project control manager to ensure that the selection of building
programs is equitable and the monitoring and control of capital projects
is consistent across the province. The colleges and universities section
has two project managers and an executive director to provide direct
and consistent contact with each institution, with overall co-ordination
provided by the executive director.
55
 U.B.C. School of Home Economics
Marine Training Centre, North Vancouver ™°
a        ! >  &
i do
Schools Facilities
In order to offer planning assistance to school districts, the senior
architect — planning continued to encourage districts to showthe long-
term growth or shrinkage characteristics of school enrolment in their
areas. To facilitate this work the division produced a booklet, entitled A
Planning Guide to the Development of a Capital Expense Budget, and
sent it to all districts to ensure that a consistent approach to planning
school facilities is taken by all districts across the province.
To aid in the determination of what the building response should be to
a proposed change in enrolment or in educational program offerings,
the division provides a building manual which gives requirements and
guidance in the design of school space. This manual is due for revision
(the last issue was 1967), and this work is being spearheaded bythesenior
architect — schools with the assistance of the full staff. The facilities
services advisory committee has investigated problems faced by field
personnel and will ensure that any major changes from present
requirements are appropriate in both the field and the ministry. In order
to ensure that building proposals reflect needs, the division is
encouraging greater integration of the roles of its regional staff and of
56
 the specialists in the schools programming branch.
The schools capital inventory system has now been established
through a joint educational management project; methods must still be
established to check, correct and update the information to ensure it is
maintained accurately.
The system (new in 1977) of determining an annual capital budget has
brought greater control over capital spending. Since enrolment across
the province for the most part is either leveling or declining, it is
expected that government spending for the near future should stabilize
at the present level of about $100 million. Also, a shift in emphasis from
new space to renovations has been made in recent years.
Expenditures for the 1978 Calendar Year
Sites
Buildings
Equipment
Transportation equipment
Other
TOTAL
$ 8,110,906
62,357,126
13,636,482
2,540,217
7,522,716
$94,167,447
Douglas College, New Westminster Campus
Camosun College, Victoria
57
 Post-Secondary Facilities
During the past year, the facilities services division expanded its role,
becoming responsible for all capital programs of the colleges and
institutes following their designation under the Colleges and Provincial
Institutes Act of 1977. This designation allows institutions to own
property, and a program of conveying title on their land and buildings to
them was well underway in 1978/79.
A complete inventory of all space in the institutions was completed
and is now accessible by computer. This allows true comparisons to be
made between institutions' use of space and ensures that requests for
additional space are equitably evaluated. A study of the use of space by
the institutions was almost completed and this too will help the division
evaluate the need for additional space.
Approval was given during the year to 14 capital projects totalling $52
million.
The universities' five-year capital plan moved into its second year, and
a total of $31 million was approved in capital projects, renovations and
public works. The medical teaching expansion project, with the new
acute care hospital at the University of British Columbia and projects at
five Vancouver-area hospitals, moved into the construction phase at all
locations and is proceeding on schedule.
Source:  Educational Data Services
Ministry of Education
CHANGE IN AGE DISTRIBUTION of Public School Enrolments
tn
T3
c
03
(A
3
o
c
LU
bU
45
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
"1 I
§i
40
"£30
■o
c
CO
en
3
o
£   20
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*-    15
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Age  4
Age  4
58
 DIVISION OF INFORMATION
AND DATA SERVICES
Formed at the end of the 1978/79 school year, the division of
nformation and data services brought under one roof three branchesof
the department of ministry services — educational data services,
nformation services, and the ministerial library. The division is also to
ncorporate data development and the project planning and control
:entre, previously operated by joint educational management (JEM)
Drojects consultants.
Educational Data Services
Continued improvement in the statistical reports and publications of
he educational data services (EDS) branch was maintained in 1978/79,
with new methods of preparation based on word processing and
computer graphics improving the layout, comprehensiveness and, most
mportant, timeliness of the branch's publications. EDS statistical
booklets — summarizations of the more than 50,000 documents
processed annually by the branch — now cover many varied aspects of
education in British Columbia, including teacher supply and demand,
enrolment patterns and faculty workloads.
CHANGE IN AGE DISTRIBUTION of Public School Enrolments
50
25
■m     15
C
CD
J    10
UJ
Age   4
50
45
40
35
"J30
■o
c
re 2s
to a
3
o
£   20
c
*-   15
c
d)
£10
0
c
"J    5
8      10      12      14      16      18      20+     Age  4
10 12 14 16 18 20+
59
 The branch accomplished much during the year in its effort toward
improving the flow of data to other divisions of the ministry in both the
schools and post-secondary departments. Working closely with the B.C
Research Council and the B.C. Systems Corporation, a number of
innovative and valuable new data programs were established, with the
major goal being to promote accessibility to the considerable data that
already exists rather than to collect more. This will help contain the
growth of forms that is frequently associated with management
information.
In the public schools section of the branch, methods of using family
allowance data coded by school district were used to improve the school
district enrolment projection model. This now allows school districts to
identify the number of 1- to 4-year-olds who will be entering the school
system. Also, a program is being developed which will allow the
recording of migration between school districts, as well as in and out of
the province, for the school-aged population.
Work is also continuing on theelementary catchmentareaforecasting
model that is being developed in two school districts to project
enrolments and to study the effects of boundary changes on elementary
schools.
Editing procedures, both manual and computerized, for the schools
area were streamlined to give more emphasis to areas of incomplete or
incorrect reporting on Forms I (Principal's Report on Enrolment), K
(Principal's Report on Organization of Secondary Schools) and J
(Teacher's Report on Qualifications, Salary, Experience and Class Size).
The schedules for the return, processing and reporting of information
were revised to provide data more quickly.
Also, in the public schools section the table formats for presenting
statistical data were standardized, and new tables were added to the
Public School Enrolment Information and the Public School Teacher
Information booklets.
In the post-secondary section of the branch, significant development
occurred in the area of data systems. The college staff and faculty
workload system was modified to simplify data collection and
processing. Course and staff list documents have been developed and
will be implemented in the fall of 1979. This annual staff and faculty
workload survey provides detailed class, staff and course registration
data for all colleges and institutes.
The vocational data system has been extended to include part-time
enrolment data; as a result, detailed enrolment information is now
available for all vocational programs in the province.
The college enrolment survey was also expanded during this past year
from one fall "snapshot" report to three reporting periods, providing a
much more complete college picture. The survey covers all university
transfer, career/technical and college preparatory programs.
Information Services
Ministry   information   services   during   1978/79   headlined   the
continuing advancement of science and high-technology industry; fiscal
60
 responsibility and effective management in the B.C. education system;
the province's leadership role in learning assessment and curriculum
development; the relevance of education to society's needs, and the
maturation of colleges and provincial institutes in the new post-
secondary system.
The ministry's monthly tabloid newspaper, Education Today, with a
redesigned format, featured these continuing stories and innumerable
special reports during the year. Also, close to 60 news releases were
produced by the information services branch and distributed to the mass
media across the province.
A public service announcement, designed to promote adult
education, with the theme of "Help Yourself", was produced under the
direction of information services for the continuing education division.
It was distributed province-wide for use on radio by colleges, institutes
and school districts, and won a U.S. award of excellence for educational
communications.
To explain the concept and value of distance education and to
promote the Open Learning Institute, a multi-panel, portable exhibit
was designed. It was displayed to a wide audience at the Pacific National
Exhibition in Vancouver, at several educational conferences, and at
colleges and shopping malls in such centres as Nanaimo, Prince George
and Kamloops.
A comprehensive guidebook to post-secondary education in British
Columbia was produced and distributed to school counsellors and all
graduating secondary students as well as to the staff of the institutions.
An on-going series of discussion papers on educational topics was
inaugurated, with nine papers published during the year on behalf of
various sections of the ministry.
As part of the efforts toward enhancing internal communications, the
staff newsletter Bonus was redesigned. Also, a fortnightly bulletin for
ministry managers was launched.
The ministry's annual Report on Education received major attention
during 1978/79. For a clearer and more comprehensive survey of the
state of education in B.C.during the the 1977/78 academic year, content
of the annual report was expanded, format improved, graphic
illustrations added and statistical tables expanded.
Ministerial Library
Investigations proceeded in 1978/79 on the feasibility of membership
in the B.C. union catalogue project and access through the University of
Toronto Library Automation Service to computerized cataloguing.
As well as serving the ministry's head office and field staff, the library
helped researchers from several institutions and organizations find
current and historical information.
The librarian also participated in the work of the school library bulk
purchase plan and the output of schools department circulars.
61
 DIVISION OF POLICY DEVELOPMENT
The ministry's division of policy development, which became fully
established as part of the department of ministry services during the
1978/79 school year, continued to assist all other sections of the ministry
in the development of policies. The division evaluates existing policies
for effectiveness, assesses the needs which must be met, carries out
research into the feasibility of proposed policies, and undertakes pilot
projects to test their validity.
The year under review saw the launching of the United Nations Year of
the Child (1979). The division promoted and monitored ministry
activities in a number of projects, totalling $94,000. Included was the
distribution to all schools of teaching kits amplifying UNICEF/Red Cross
programs in cross-cultural understanding. Other special projects for the
Year of the Child involved the hearing-impaired and the visually-
impaired. The Children's Centre of Arts and Sciences sponsored a
demonstration exhibit, and the B.C. Home and School Federation held a
conference on family fitness.
Division initiatives in other areas included a study indicating how the
ministry, the school districts and other organizations can co-operate in
handling declining enrolment. The B.C. Teachers' Federation, the B.C.
School Trustees Association, the universities and district
superintendents were represented in the study group.
A widely representative task force undertook a study of school
counselling services. It will suggest which services should be available in
the secondary schools, who should provide them, and how school
services can be articulated with those of other agencies.
The ministry's secondary/post-secondary articulation project was
evaluated by the division, and recommendations were made to the
assistant deputy minister - schools. Policies were developed for regional
diagnostic centres and kindergarten/grade 1 screening, which have
been handed over for implementation by the special programs branch.
Another major initiative in 1978/79 was a program designed to curtail
drinking-and-driving by secondary school students. Called Counter-
Attack, the project was a response to concern expressed by the Ministry
of the Attorney-General. It is administered from the offices of the
Insurance Corporation of British Columbia.
The year's activities also included several small research studies such as
analysis of administrators' salaries in the B.C. school system, a survey of
designated schools, an investigation of temporary appointments of
teachers, and an investigation of the suspension practices followed by
schools.
62
 METRIC CONVERSION   DIVISION
In 1978/79 the B.C. Metric Office continued to assist government
ministries and agencies, municipalities, businesses, industries and trade,
labour and consumer associations with their metric conversion
programs and with problems arising out of such a major technological
change.
The office's training co-ordinator conducted 87 seminars for 2,460
attendants from many different fields. The seminars included six sessions
for college staffs and five for public school teaching staffs.
The technical co-ordinator and information staff responded to
approximately 4,000 requests for information and advice, while the
information staff prepared and distributed 11,225 training and
information kits.
63
 64
 DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE
AND TECHNOLOGY
For several years the education ministry has been assuming an
increasing responsibility for science and the advancement of high-
technology industry in British Columbia. As the 1977/78 academic year
came to a close, the Science Council of British Columbia Act was
approved by the legislature and a few days later the Science Council itself
held its inaugural meeting under ministry auspices.
In December of 1978, with a reorganization of the B.C. government,
the ministry was officially renamed the Ministry of Education, Science
and Technology and given the dual responsibility of providing
educational opportunities for all British Columbians and promoting the
development of science and technology within the province.
During the year, in tandem with the B.C. Development Corporation,
the ministry continued to work toward the establishment of Discovery
Parks — industrial research centres to be located in park-like settings at
the three universities, the British Columbia Institute of Technology, and
the Institute of Ocean Sciences near Victoria.
In June the ministry sponsored an executive seminar on the topic of
British Columbia's future in science and research which was attended by
nearly 100 key representatives of industry, the universities and
government. This was the third in a series of conferences that explored
the roles of the three sectors in the development of science, research
and technology in the province and aimed at raising the level of
collaboration between them.
Six basic themes emerged as dominant concerns of the seminar
speakers:
•The unparalleled opportunity today for the general public to share in
an exciting age of scientific discovery.
•The   concomitant   economic   benefits   to   the   province   of   such
participation.
•The associated need to foster thedevelopmentof science,engineering
and education generally at all levels.
•The  consequent  priority which   must  be placed on  developing a
coherent, integrated science policy with rational funding and other
support.
•The lack of communications and collaboration between the various
interest   groups   involved   in   endeavors   related   to   science   and
technology and the need to develop co-ordination.
•The importance of stressing resource-based technology (including
energy), given provincial, national and international priorities.
At the general level, a need was felt for the clarification of
developmental directions for science and technology and a
corresponding improvement in the associated communications
network. Additionally, it was felt that the system must be more flexible
65
 and adaptable in face of rapid change and must not become separated
from its commitment to social progress.
It was also felt that there must be a continuing concern for the
promotion of excellence in research and educational programs.
Specifically, it was suggested that more co-operative effort is necessary in
planning and funding research and development endeavors. To do this,
there is a need for identification of and adherence to clearly defined
roles among the various sectors involved in research and development.
Soon after the executive seminar the ministry moved a further step
ahead with the appointment of its first assistant deputy minister for
science and technology, Dr. R. W. Stewart.
SCIENCE COUNCIL OF B.C.
The Science Council of British Columbia and the Secretariat on
Science, Research and Development were formally established by the
legislature in June, 1978, although the council had operated under the
name of External Research Advisory Committee for several months
previously. When legislation was approved, nine members of the
advisory committee were appointed to the council by the Minister of
Education for terms of one to three years, and since then four additional
members have been nominated by the council itself.
In considering its first steps, the council noted that there were many
measures which could be taken which, in British Columbia, would
encourage ideas leading directly to major technological development
and, in turn, greater prosperity. The steps chosen were intended to help
generate ideas with rather immediate application, and much of the initial
effort was devoted to establishing the machinery for finding these ideas
and funding their development.
Seriously concerned about the low level of research and development
activity in British Columbia, the Science Council set out its objectives in a
policy document. These objectives are:
•To consolidate and expand employment and output of existing
industries by establishing, maintaining and improving their
competitive position, especially in export markets. Particular attention
will be given to the maintenance of long-term productivity of the
province's forests, mines, agricultural lands and waters and to the
further development of fossil fuel resources.
•To stimulate new industrial opportunities in the province through the
establishment of technology-based manufacturing and service
industries.
•To improve the quality of life in British Columbia by providingthrough
health-care research the finest medical services at the most reasonable
cost, by reducing industrial and urban pollution and by protecting the
natural environment from lasting damage.
•To facilitate, in all recognized disciplines, the accumulation of scientific
and technological excellence in the region and, in so doing, provide
66
 opportunities for the young people who are receiving advanced
training in our educational system to become involved in the social and
economic development in the province.
The council defined the provincial research and development
priorities as forests and forest products, ocean engineering and
mariculture, mineral extraction, electronics and communications, the
environment, health care, energy, and transportation.
To encourage applied research and development in B.C. universities
and to retain highly trained manpower in the province, two research
fellowship programs were established by the advisory committee.
Fifteen industrial post-doctoral fellowships of $6,000 per year were
awarded in 1978/79, as well as 18 graduate engineering and technology
(GREAT) awards of $12,000 per year.
RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT (inSmiiiions)
FEDERAL
GOVERNMENT
Intramural1 35.32
B.C.
UNIVERSITIES3    16.32
INDUSTRY' 1403
B.C. GOVERNMENT
Intramural1 3.11
B.C.RESEARCH 2      125P
72/73       73/74        74/75       75/76       76/77       77/78      78/79
Source:   'Statistics Canada
'Statistics Canada and Annual Reports
'UCBC Figures
The primary responsibility of the Secretariat for Science, Research and
Development is to provide administrative backup services to the Science
Council. The secretariat carries out the procedures established by the
council for the evaluation and funding of research projects. It also
provides similar services for the B.C. Health Care Research Foundation,
has established the procedures for the distribution of approximately $2.7
million per year from the B.C. Lottery Fund in support of research in
health care.
The secretariat is also responsible for the preparation and
maintenance of a complete inventory of all research activities and
funding in British Columbia, including that by provincial government
67
 departments, universities, federal laboratories and B.C. industries. Many
gaps and some anomalies still exist but accuracy is improving. The
secretariat also serves the B.C. government's Internal Research Advisory
Committee which reviews the research programs of the provincial
ministries.
The executive director of the secretariat served on a task force to
recommend the structure and terms of reference of a forest research
council. He represents British Columbia on the Canadian Committee for
the Funding of University Research and is also a member of the executive
committee of the board of management of B.C. Research.
Overall, the secretariat attempts to act as a co-ordinating body in the
developing research activities of British Columbia.
Deputy Minister's
Office
Independent Schools
Schools Department
Basic Programs
Curriculum
Development
Learning
Assessment
Public Instruction
Division
Administrative
Services   Division
I ■
Program
Special Programs Implementation
Services
■
Special Education
I
Indian Education
Correspondence
Education
Publication
Services
Print Services
Educational
Personnel
Field Personnel
Teacher Services
Inservice Education
Accreditation and
Program Evaluation
Career |   jericho Hill School
Education
French Program
Services
Examinations
Hearing Impaired
Visually Impaired
Provincial Education
Media Centre
 II,,, ill
Home Economics Resource Centre for
1  Visually Impaired
■7f-''<-
68
 ORGANIZATION CHART
-
Ministry of Education,
Science and Technology  as of June 30,1979
Academic
Council
nntinuing
ucation
ntinuing
cation
Management Advisory
Council
Occupational Training
Council
Universities Council
Science Council
Research Secretariat
■;::;:---!3-;G;;tt-;f :Mftf-:;|- W
Post Secondary
Department
*
Management
Services
I        I
Operations and
Planning
Trades Training
and
Journeyman
upgrading
Student
Services
1
Program
Services
I
College and
Institute
Programs
(Voc.)
College and
Institute
Programs
(Acad.,
Career/Tech.'
Program
Research  &
Development
Ministry Services
Department
*
Policy Data & Info
Development Services
I
Personnel
Services
Data
Development
Metric
Conversion
Educational Data
Services
mmmmmJA
Information
Services
Library
Services
Planning &
Control Centre
Financial
Services
School Finance
Post Secondary
Finance
Ministerial
Finance
Science and
Technology
Department
Facility
Services
I
Schools
Colleges and
Universities
  STATISTICAL TABLES
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
1. Pupils  73
2. Teachers  131
3. Finance  155
4. Schools  163
INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
5. General    172
POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
6. General   173
7. Universities    177
8. College and institutes    183
CONTINUING EDUCATION
9. Course registrants    199
71
  1.   PUPILS
TABLE
1.1 Actual enrolment by type of school  74
1.2 Distribution of pupils by grade and sex  75
1.3 Average daily attendance by type of school  75
1.4 B.C. public school teacher and enrolment data — September 30,1978  76
1.5 Recapitulation of actual enrolment by type of school, grade, and
sex of pupils September 30,1978    129
1.6 Changes in enrolment during the school-year, from September to September,
and from June to June    130
73
 TABLE 1.1   ACTUAL ENROLMENT BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
Enrolment in public schools dropped from 527,771 in September 1977 to 517,786 in
September 1978. Elementary decreased by 4,923 and secondary decreased by 5,062.
Actual Enrolment,1 September 1978
Type of School
Number
Per Cent
of
Male
Female
Total
of
Schools
Total
23
11,366
11,395
22,761
4.4
150
57,604
57,141
114,745
22.1
123
35,056
33,142
68,198
13.2
19
3,759
3,560
7,319
1.4
66
6,780
6,145
12,925
2.5
1,234
150,416
141,422
291,838
56.4
Senior secondary	
Secondary	
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary	
Elementary-junior secondary	
Elementary	
TOTALS        1,615
264,981
Source: September 1978 Form I.
'Actual enrolment is defined as the number of pupils actually enrolled for whom an attendance record is
required to be kept as of the reporting date.
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:
Secondary school correspondence classes, regular students
(exclusive of the 3,250 officially registered in other schools) 	
In the elementary school correspondence classes, regular students	
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, pupils receiving instruction.
863
1,121
32
2,016
74
 TABLE 1.2                DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY
GRADE ANDSEX
The following table provides a distribution of pupils by grade and sex for
September 1978 and a comparison of the totals with September 1977.
Grade
Male
Female
Total
Sept. 1978
Total
Sept. 197'
Ratio
1978:1977
Secondary
Grade Xll	
              17,998
18,620
20,665
36,618
41,110
36,954
40,599
0.991
1.013
Grade XI	
             20,445
Totals, senior secondary grades	
             38,443
39,285
77,728
77,553
1.002
Grade X	
             22,473
21,883
22,351
20,896
44,356
45,315
43,017
44,544
46,489
46,474
0.996
0.975
0.926
Grade IX	
             22,964
Grade VIII	
             22,121
Totals, grade VIII to X	
             67,558
65,130
132,688
137,507
0.965
Secondary special	
               3,262
2,178
5,440
5,858
0.929
Totals, secondary grades	
            109,263
106,593
215,856
220,918
0.977
Elementary
Grade VII	
              19,272
18,336
18,045
18,118
18,778
37,608
36,886
37,206
38,496
40,487
37,650
36,622
37,253
0.929
0.980
1.016
1.033
Grade VI	
              18,841
Grade V	
              19,088
Grade IV	
              19,718
Totals, grade IV to VII	
             76,919
73,277
150,196
152,012
0.988
Grade III	
             20,318
19,216
17,856
17,827
16,251
39,534
37,062
36,819
33,520
38,541
39,604
37,762
34,257
1.026
0.936
0.975
0.978
Grade II	
              19,206
Grade I	
              18,992
              17,269
             75,785
71,150
146,935
150,164
0.978
Elementary special	
                3,014
1,785
4,799
4,677
1,026
             155,718
146,212
301,930
306,853
0.984
GRAND TOTALS    	
           264,981
252,805
517,786
527,771
0.981
Source: September 1977 Form B.
September 1978 Form I.
Note: Occupational has not been reported separately as it is now included with secon
TABLE 1.3         AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE BY
TYPE OF SCHOOL FOR 1978-79 SCHOOL YEAR
dary special.
Type of School
Average Actual
Daily Attendance
Average Possible
Daily Attendant
Actual as
Percent
of Possible
Attendance
Senior secondary	
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary	
                  18,876.1
                110,700.6
                  62,619.7
                    5,772.3
                 12,183.8
20,529.2
120,917.8
68,304.2
6,334.3
13,278.4
283,300.9
91.95
91.55
91.68
91.13
91.76
94.24
Elementary	
                266,992.2
TOTAL 	
                 477,144.7
512,664.7
93.07
Source: June 1979 Form I.
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130
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
2.  Teachers
TABLE
2.1 Distribution of full and part-time professional staff by type of school 132
2.2 Teachers' certificates 133
2.3 Teachers and principals with and without university degrees 134
2.4 Highest degree by faculty and level 135
2.5 New inquiries and sources of full-time and part-time teaching force 136
2.6 British Columbia public school full-time and part-time teacher flow,
September 1977 to September 1978 137
2.7 Changes in numbers of full-time equivalent (FTE) teachers during
the school year 138
2.8 Sources of teachers beginning in British Columbia, September 1978 (those
with less than one year of British Columbia experience) 139
2.9 Numbers of trainees completing certification programs at British Columbia
universities in 1977/78 and teaching/not teaching in September 1978 140
2.10 Certificates issued during the 1978/79 school year (July 1,1978 to June 30,
1979)  141
2.11 Number of full-time and part-time teachers by type of certificate and
average years of British Columbia experience 141
2.12 Certificates and degrees of full-time and part-time teachers, principals and
supervisors, September 1977 and September 1978 142
2.13 Certification of full-time and part-time British Columbia teachers
according to location of initial teacher training,
September 1977 and September 1978 143
2.14 Statistical summary of British Columbia exchange teachers and their
geographic distribution 144
Teachers' Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Salaries by Type of School:
2.15 Supervising principals and vice-principals 145
2.16 School attached teachers (including teaching principals and vice-principals) .. 146
2.17 District-wide supervisory and instructional staff 147
2.18 Total district-wide supervisory and school attached teachers 148
2.19 Full-time equivalent district-employed — administrative and instructional
staff (not assigned to specific schools) 149
2.20 B.C. public school pupil/teacher ratios by school district 150
2.21 Age distribution of full and part-time B.C. public school teachers by sex in
September 1978 expressed as a percentage 151
2.22 Source of initial teacher training of B.C. public school teachers by year initial
teacher training completed for all B.C. public school teachers 152
PROVINCIAL EDUCATIONAL MEDIA CENTRE
2.23 School broadcasts 153
2.24 (1) Distribution of audio-visual materials 153
(2) Distribution services circulation report 154
131
 TABLE 2.1     DISTRIBUTION OF FULL AND PART-TIME
PROFESSIONAL STAFF BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Administrative
Instructional
Staffi
Staff1
53
1,177
307
6,118
225
3,690
24
433
54
742
860
14,180
—
592
Total
Professional
Staff
Senior secondary	
Secondary	
J unior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary ...
Elementary-junior secondary ...
Elementary	
District-wide instructional staff..
23
150
123
18
66
1,235
1,230
6,425
3,915
457
796
15,040
592
—
411
—
411
TOTALS	
1,615
1,934
26,932
28,866
Source: September 1978 Forms I and J.
'Administrative staff includes principals and vice-principals who spend 51% or more of their time in
administration.
'Instructional staff includes principals and vice-principals who teach at least 50% of their time.
132
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133
 TABLE 2.3 TEACHERS AND PRINCIPALS
WITH AND WITHOUT UNIVERSITY DEGREES
SEPTEMBER 1978
Highest Degrees
No Degree
Total Teachers
Type of School
Bachelors
Masters or
Doctorate
Percent
of teachers
n school type
Number
Percent
of teachers
in school type
Number
Percent
of all teachers
Senior secondary	
Secondary	
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior seconc
Elementary-junior seconc
Elementary	
District-wide instructors
ary...
ary . ..
883
4,830
3,114
340
533
8,748
332
249
1,118
484
39
64
885
161
92.0
92.6
91.9
82.9
75.0
64.0
83.3
98
477
317
78
199
5,407
99
8.0
7.4
8.1
17.1
25.0
36.0
16.7
1,230
6,425
3,915
457
796
15,040
592
4.3
22.2
13.6
1.6
2.8
52.1
2.0
18,780
3,000
76.5
6,675
23.5
28,455
98 6
staff..
District-wide supervisory
170
213
93.2
28
6.8
411
1.4
18,950
3,213
76.8
6,703
23.2
28,866
100
Source: September 1978 Form J.
Note: Part-time teachers are included.
134
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I I I
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ll I I- I
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I I I I
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,2 I
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135
 TABLE 2.5 NEW INQUIRIES AND SOURCE OF
FULL-TIME AND PART-TIME TEACHING FORCE
First Certificate
Teaching in
Issued in
Sept. 1978 but
Source of
School-year
not Teaching
Total
Initial Teacher
School-year
1978/79
1978/79
in B.C.
Sept. 1978
Training
to Persons
Public School
Teachers
Initially
System in
Inquiring
Sept. 1977
British Columbia:
Number	
Per Cent	
Prairie Provinces:
Number	
PerCent	
Ontario:
Number	
PerCent	
Quebec:
Number	
Per Cent	
Atlantic Provinces:
Number	
PerCent	
Total Canada:
Number	
Per Cent	
United Kingdom:
Number	
Per Cent	
Other Europe:
Number	
Per Cent	
United States:
Number	
Per Cent	
Australia, New Zealand:
Number	
Per Cent	
Other Non-Canadian and Not Reported:
Number	
Per Cent	
Total Non-Canadian and Not Reported:
985
40.6
390
16.1
406
16.8
133
5.4
182
7.5
2,096
86.3
54
2.2
18
0.7
175
7.2
47
2.0
38
1.6
1,749
92.1
67
3.5
41
2.2
17
0.9
6
0.3
99.0
3
0.2
1
0.1
6
0.3
0.4
2
0.1
2,155
74.5
214
7.4
156
5.4
45
1.6
41
1.4
2,611
90.3
76
2.6
31
1.1
106
3.7
36
1.2
32
1.1
21,572
74.7
2,595
9.0
3.1
243
0.8
349
1.2
25,642
1,032
3.6
414
1.4
1,128
3.9
374
1.3
276
1.0
332
20
1.1
281
9.7
3,224
11.2
Per Cent	
                   13-.7
GRAND TOTAL:
                2,428
1,900
100
2,892
100
28,866
100
PerCent	
                     100
Source: Teacher Services Branch records and September 1978 Form J.
136
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138
 TABLE 2.8 SOURCE OF TEACHERS1
BEGINNING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 1978
(THOSE WITH LESS THAN ONE YEAR OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPERIENCE)
Location of Initial
Teacher Education
Elementary Beginners
Secondary Beginners
Per Cent
of Elementary
Beginners
Per Cent
of Al!
Beginners
Per Cent
of Secondary
Beginners      Banners
Per Cent
of All
British Columbia —
UBC	
U.Vic	
SFU	
NDU	
B.C. Normal School, other and not
reported	
TOTALS, PROVINCIAL	
Alberta 	
Saskatchewan	
Manitoba	
Ontario	
Quebec	
Atlantic Provinces	
Yukon	
TOTAL,OTHER PROVINCES	
United Kingdom and Europe	
United States	
Africa	
Asia	
Australia	
New Zealand	
Other North America	
South America	
TOTAL, NON-CANADIAN	
Not Reported	
TOTAL, BEGINNERS	
273
128
170
47
20
12
26
1
36.0
16.9
22.4
4.1
2.3
1.1
6.2
2.6
1.1
1.6
3.4
0.1
0.4
21.2
10.0
13.2
2.4
1.4
0.6
3.7
1.6
0.6
1.0
2.0
0.1
240
68
65
45.7
12.9
12.4
21
4.0
6
1.1
5
1.0
48
9.1
9
1.7
9
1.7
18.6
2.6
4.2
18.7
5.3
5.0
0.2
513
196
235
11
1.4
0.9
6
1.1
0.5
17
582
76.7
45.3
379
72.1
29.5
961
1.6
52
0.5
24
0.4
13
3.7
95
0.7
29
0.7
17
24
48
1
—
—
2
1
0.4
0.2
0.2
0.1
2
1
42
5.5
3.3
41
7.8
3.2
83
3
0.4
0.2
8
1.5
0.6
11
Source: September 1978 Form J.
'Includes school-attached and district-wide full-time and part-time public school teachers.
139
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MBERS
BIAUN
Professioi
Certi fica
M      F
149   295
66     74
1 3
23      12
2 4
38     3?
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1978 c
1978 cl
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140
 TABLE 2.10
CERTIFICATES ISSUED DURING
THE 1978 119 SCHOOL YEAR
(JULY 1,1978 TO JUNE 30,1979)
Te
L
idling
cence
Standard
Professional
Instructor's
Diploma
Other
Total
17
125
849
641
2,380
44
11
-
827
Non-expiring	
3,240
TOTALS	
17
974
3,021
55
—
4,067
In addition, 183 Letters of Permission were issued for the 1978/79 school year.
Source: Teacher Services Branch records.
TABLE 2.1 1 NUMBER OF FULL-TIME AND
PART-TIME TEACHERS BY TYPE OF CERTIFICATE AND AVERAGE
YEARS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPERIENCE
Certificate
Teaching
Licence
Instructor's
Diploma
Letter of
Permission
Number of teachers ....
Average years of British
Columbia experience .
9.4
4,742
7.5
1,189
65
8.7
168
2.4
Source: September 1978 Form J.
141
 TABLE 2.1 2        CERTIFICATES AND DEGREES OF
TEACHERS, PRINCIPALS AND SUPERVISORS
SEPTEMBER 1977 AND SEPTEMBER 1978
September 1977 September 1978 Cha"Bf '" Qualifications
of Staff, Sept.-Sept.
Percentage Percentage
Number ...     . Number ...     , Number Per Cent
Total Total
Teachers Teachers
Certificate —
Professional1  22,454 77.9 22,702 78.7 248                    1.1
Standard-  4,903 17.0 4,742 16.4 -161 -    3.3
Teaching licence'  1,154 4.0 1,189 4.1 35                   3.0
Elementary C  6 — — — -    6 -100.0
Vocational Instructor's  23 0.1 — — -23 -100.0
Instructor's Diploma  33 0.1 65 0.2 32                    97.0
Letter c
TALS .
Degree —
Doctorate  72 0.3 69 0.2 -    3 -   4.2
Master's  2,920 10.1 3,144 10.9 224 7.7
Bachelor's  18,650 64.7 18,950 65.7 300 1.6
None.  7,178 24.9 6.703 23.2 -475 -   6.6
TOTALS  28,820 100 28,866 100 46 0.2
Source: September 1978 Form J.
Note: One teacher has been excluded from the September 1977 certificate figures because of missing
information.
'Including Professional Advanced, Professional Basic, Professional C.
including Elementary A.
'Including Elementary B.
246
0.9
168
0.6
-78
- 31.7
TOTALS
28,819
100
28,866
100
47
02
142
 TABLE 2.13     CERTIFICATION OF FULL-TIME AND
PART-TIME BRITISH COLUMBIA TEACHERS ACCORDING TO
LOCATION OF INITIAL TEACHER TRAINING,
SEPTEMBER 1977 AND SEPTEMBER 1978
Source of Initial Teacher Training
Current
Other
British Columbia
Canadian
Other
Not
Certificate
Provinces
Countries
Reported
Sept. 1977 Sept. 1978 Sept. 1977 Sept. 1978 Sept. 1977Sept. 1978 Sept. 1977 Sept. 1978 Sept. 1977 Sept. 1978
Professional1
N  16,806 17,085 3,155 3,140
A  78.8 79.2 75.9 77.2
B  74.8 75.3 14.1 13.8
C  58.3 59.2 10.9 10.9
Standard2
N....:  3,441 3,410 771 702
A  16.1 15.8 18.6 17.2
B...  70.2 71.9 15.7 14.8
C  11.9 11.8 2.7 2.4
Teaching Licence3
N  913 930 184 191
A  4.3 4.3 4.4 4.7
B  79.1 78.2 15.9 16.1
C  3.2 3.2 0.6 0.7
Instructor's Diploma
N  24 51 5 7
A  0.1 0.2 0.1 0.2
B  72.7 78.4 15.2 10.8
C  0.1 0.2 — —
Letter of Permission
N  132 96 40 30
A  0.6 0.5 1.0 0.7
B  53.7 57.1 16.3 17.9
C  0.5 0.3 0.1 0.1
TOTALS
N  21,322* 21,572 4,155 4,070
A  100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
B  — — — —
C  74.0 74.7 14.4 14.1
2,486
2,471
7
6
22,454
22,702
75.9
77.4
16.3
20.0
—
—
11.1
10.9
—
—
100.0
100.0
8.6
8.6
—
—
77.9
78.7
687
628
4
2
4,903
4,742
21.0
19.7
9.3
6.7
—
—
14.0
13.2
0.1
0.1
100.0
100.0
2.4
2.2
—
—
17.0
16.4
57
67
	
1
1,154
1,189
1.7
2.1
—
3.3
—
—
4.9
5.6
—
0.1
100.0
100.0
0.2
0.2
—
—
4.0
4.1
4
7
	
	
33
65
1.2
0.2
—
—
—
—
12.1
10.8
—
—
100.0
100.0
—
—
—
—
0.1
0.2
42
21
32
21
246
168
1.3
0.6
74.4
70.0
—
—
17.1
12.5
13.0
12.5
100.0
100.0
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.9
0.6
3,276
3,194
43
30
28,819s
28,866
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
—
—
—
100.0
100.0
11.4
11.1
0.1
0.1
100.0
100.0
Source: September 1978 Form J.
N = Number of teachers from that jurisdiction who hold the type of certificate shown expressed as a
percentage of:
A = Percentage of teachers from that jurisdiction holding all types of certificates.
B = Percentage of teachers from all jurisdictions holding that type of certificate.
C = Percentage of teachers from all jurisdictions holding all types of certificates.
'Including Professional Advanced, Professional Basic and Professional C certificates.
'Including Elementary A certificates.
'Including Elementary B certificates.
■•Includes 6 Elementary C certificates,
includes 6 Elementary C certificates.
Note: One teacher has been excluded from September 1977 figures because of missing information.
Total number of teachers = 28,820.
143
 TABLE 2.14
STATISTICAL SUMMARY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA EXCHANGE
TEACHERS AND THEIR GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION
School
Year
U.K.
Interprovincial
Quebec     Saskatchewan Nova Scotia    Australia
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
I927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1947
1948/49
1949/50
1950/51
1951/52
1952/53
1953/54
1954/55
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
1970/71
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
1975/76
1976/77
5
9
17
18
21
14
16
13
17
12
21
23
26
26
26
23
23
20
24
25
16
13
17
16
15
21
10
10
10
11
3
3
5
9
17
18
21
14
16
24
35
22
28
26
26
26
29
30
25
29
28
30
25
23
23
23
22
26
36
27
19
21
17
15
23
18
19
20
1977/78
1978/79
12
17
2
2
9
7
-
-
14
8*
—
37
34*
TOTALS
766
49
66
36
4
7
43
2
973
'Figures are incomplete.
144
 TABLE 2.15 SCHOOL-ATTACHED FULL-TIME
EQUIVALENT (FTE) SUPERVISING PRINCIPALS
AND VICE-PRINCIPALS
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Elem.-
Junior
Senior
Sec.
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Cumulative
Percent
FTE
Salaries
$
45,000—45,499  —
44,500—44,999  —
44,000 — 44,499  —
43,500 — 43,999  —
43,000—43,499  —
42,500—42,999  —
42,000 — 42,499  —
41,500 — 41,999  —
41,000 — 41,499  —
40,500—40,999  3.0
40,000 — 40,499  —
39,500 — 39,999  —
39,000 — 39,499  —
38,500 — 38,999  50.0
38,000 — 38,499  —
37,500 — 37,999  14.0
37,000 — 37,499  4.0
36,500 — 36,999  4.0
36,000 — 36,499  18.0
35,500 — 35,999  24.0
35,000 — 35,499  15.0
34,500 — 34,999  47.0
34,000 — 34,499  30.0
33,500 — 33,999  42.0
33,000 — 33,499  35.0
32,500 — 32,999  62.0
32,000 — 32,499  52.0
31,500 — 31,999  42.0
31,000 — 31,499  28.0
30,500 — 30,999  55.0
30,000 — 30,499  60.0
29,500 — 29,999  32.0
29,000 — 29,499  33.0
28,500—28,999  29.0
28,000 — 28,499  29.0
27,500 — 27,999  19.0
27,000 — 27,499  27.0
26,500 — 26,999  20.0
26,000 — 26,499  22.0
25,500 — 25,999  17.0
25,000 — 25,499  5.0
24,500 — 24,999  2.0
24,000 — 24,499  6.0
23,500 — 23,999  10.0
23,000 — 23,499  6.0
22,500 — 22,999  5.0
22,000 — 22,499  6.0
21,500 — 21,999  2.0
21,000 — 21,499  1.0
20,500 — 20,999  1.0
20,000 — 20,499  —
19,500 — 19,999  2.0
19,000—19,499  1.0
Not Reported  —
TOTALS  860.0
MEDIANS   $31,642
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
4.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
4.0
8.0
7.0
11.0
5.0
13.0
11.0
13.0
8.0
3.0
18.0
7.0
8.0
11.0
8.0
9.0
8.0
4.0
9.0
14.0
2.0
9.0
8.0
5.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
2.(1
6.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
9.0
1.0
9,0
4.0
8.0
3.0
8.0
7.0
14.0
13.0
12.0
17.0
8.0
7.0
14.0
9.0
7.0
16.0
15.0
14.0
10.0
9.0
4.0
12.0
18.0
8.0
7.0
5.0
9.0
4.0
5.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
4.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
4.0
4.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
4.0
2.0
1.0
6.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
14.0
6.0
14.0
7.0
13.0
8.0
70.0
18.0
43.0
23.0
33.0
52.0
49.0
33.0
67.0
66.0
59.0
64.0
96.0
79.0
66.0
49.0
67.0
86.0
68.0
44.0
48.0
46.0
36.0
34.0
30.0
27.0
20.0
9.0
8.0
11.0
13.0
7.0
7.0
7.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
loo.o
99.6
99.4
99.2
99.0
98.1
97.7
96.8
96.3
95.5
94.9
90.3
89.2
86.3
84.8
82.7
79.3
76.0
73.9
69.5
65.1
61.3
57.1
50.8
45.6
41.2
38.0
33.6
28.0
23.5
20.6
17.5
14.4
12.1
9.8
7.9
6.1
4.8
4.2
3.7
3.0
2.1
1.6
1.2
0.7
0.5
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.1
54.0
$29,500
24.0
$33,000
225.0
S33.821
307.0
$34,138
53.0
$36,187
1,523.0
$32,427
Median Salary = $32,427; Mean Salary = $32,434.
Source: September 1978 Form J.
145
 TABLE 2.16       school-attached full-time
EQUIVALENT (FTE) TEACHERS (INCLUDING TEACHING
PRINCIPALS AND VICE-PRINCIPALS)
Salary
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
dary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
Percent
FTE
Salaries
$
36,500 — 36,999	
36,000 — 36,499  1.0
35,500 — 35,999	
35,000 — 35,499	
34,500 — 34,999  5.0
34,000 — 34,499  2.5
33,500 — 33,999  4.0
33,000 — 33,499  11.0
32,500 — 32,999  15.0
32,000 — 32,499  20.0
31,500 — 31,999  11.0
31,000 — 31,499  8.0
30,500 — 30,999  26.5
30,000 — 30,499  11.0
29,500 — 29,999  31.0
29,000 — 29,499  36.5
28,500 — 28,999  31.6
28,000 — 28,499  23.9
27,500 — 27,999  80.8
27,000 — 27,499  117.6
26,500 — 26,999  107.0
26,000—26,499  91.5
25,500 — 25,999  65.4
25,000 — 25,499  61.6
24,500 — 24,999  401.4
24,000 — 24,499  611.6
23,500 — 23,999  133.7
23,000 — 23,499  154.1
22,500 — 22,999  126.1
22,000 — 22,499  224.9
21,500 — 21,999  724.1
21,000 — 21,499  844.8
20,500 — 20,999  334.1
20,000 — 20,499  359.9
19,500—19,999  385.9
19,000—19,499  591.7
18,500—18,999  826.9
18,000—18,499  1,146.0
17,500—17,999  694.4
17,000 — 17,499  872.4
16,500 — 16,999  899.8
16,000 — 16,499  688.1
15,500 — 15,999  596.3
15,000—15,499  490.8
14,500—14,999  391.7
14,000 — 14,499  420.3
13,500—13,999  312.0
13,000—13,499  176.0
12,500 — 12,999  164.2
12,000—12,499  47.6
11,500—11,999  29,9
11,000—11,499  6.2
10,500—10,999  —
10,000—10,499  1.0
Not Reported  —
TOTALS  13,418.0
MEDIANS  S18.400
—
—
—
1.0
—
1.0
100.0
—
—
—
—
—
1.0
100.0
—
1.0
—
—
—
1.0
100.0
—
1.0
—
—
—
1.0
100.0
—
—
—
—
_
5.0
100.0
—
—
—
1.0
—
3.5
100.0
—
_
1.0
1.0
1.0
7.0
100.0
1.0
—
—
—
—
12.0
99.9
—
—
_
—
4.0
19.0
99.9
—
_
2.0
—
1.0
23.0
99.8
1.0
—
1.0
1.0
—
14.0
99.7
—
—
—
—
—
8.0
99.7
—
—
—
3.5
_
30.0
99.6
—
—
2.0
6.0
—
19.0
99.5
1.2
—
1.0
1.0
1.0
35.2
99.4
3.0
2.0
14.0
76.5
4.0
136.0
99.3
3.0
2.0
5.0
52.0
4.0
97.6
98.8
2.0
5.0
19.0
47.0
15.0
111.9
98.4
—
3.0
31.0
194.0
24.0
332.8
97.9
9.0
6.0
53.5
289.2
50.0
525.3
96.6
10.2
5.0
97.5
180.0
73.0
472.2
94.6
10.0
12.0
82.4
173.0
69.0
437.9
92.7
8.0
1.0
42.5
129.0
25.0
270.9
91.0
15.5
8.0
69.0
115.6
31.0
300.7
89.9
19.8
20.0
171.5
556.2
69.0
1,237.9
88.7
36.0
9.4
535.9
607.7
239.0
2,039.6
83.9
19.7
9.0
68.5
198.4
12.0
441.3
75.8
15.7
17.0
75.1
148.5
28.0
438.4
74.1
13.5
9.2
77.5
133.1
35.5
394.9
72.4
21.6
15.0
85.0
164.0
25.0
535.5
70.8
16.0
13.0
153.6
240.8
42.0
1,189.5
68.7
40.8
20.5
186.0
246.2
49.0
1,387.3
64.0
10.4
13.0
120.0
162.5
35.0
675.1
58.6
26.9
16.7
160.0
170.6
43.0
777.1
55.9
21.5
25.3
99.1
192.1
24.5
748.4
52.9
30.9
15.5
183.5
265.7
32.5
1,119.8
49.9
27.9
27.5
164.5
224.1
21.5
1,292.3
45.5
40.0
22.5
163.3
274.8
33.0
1,679.1
40.4
31.4
17.5
187.9
176.2
41.0
1,148.4
33.8
40.9
19.7
153.9
254.5
36.5
1,377.9
29.3
34.5
10.2
124.1
185.4
36.0
1,290.0
23.9
44.0
24.0
169.1
194.5
16.0
1,135.7
18.8
32.0
26.0
131.0
161.1
20.3
966.6
14.4
26.5
10.0
82.5
83.0
15.5
708.3
10.6
24.0
9.5
53.6
73.8
4.0
556.7
7.8
27.0
6.0
36.3
33.2
3.0
525.9
5.6
15.5
6.0
25.7
24.6
2.5
386.3
3.5
11.0
6.0
9.0
1.0
2.0
205.0
2.0
9.0
5.0
8.5
6.0
1.5
194.2
1.2
8.7
—
1.0
2.3
—
59.6
0.4
—
2.0
3.0
1.0
—
35.9
0.2
3.2
1.0
2.0
0.3
—
12.7
0.1
712.3
$18,652
422.5
$19,556
3,652.1
$20,783
6,052.6
$22,160
1,169.3
S24.053
25,426.7
$19,511
Median Salary = $19,511; Mean Salary ■■
Source: September 1978 Form J.
$20,126.
146
 TABLE 2.17 district-wide full-time
EQUIVALENT(FTE) SUPERVISORY AND INSTRUCTIONAL
STAFF (NOT ATTACHED TO SPECIFIC SCHOOLS)
Salary Range
Cumulative
Salary
Number of
Percent
Mid-Point
FTE Persons
FTE
Salaries
$
42,750
4.0
100.0
42,250
5.0
99.6
41,750
1.0
99.1
41,250
2.0
99.0
40,750
4.0
98.8
40,250
3.0
98.3
39,750
4.0
98.0
39,250
7.0
97.6
38,750
13.0
96.9
38,250
6.0
95.5
37,750
4.0
94.9
37,250
7.0
94.5
36,750
13.0
93.8
36,250
13.0
92.4
35,750
7.0
91.1
35,250
5.0
90.4
34,750
14.0
89.8
34,250
23.6
88.4
33,750
21.0
85.9
33,250
8.0
83.8
32,750
11.0
82.9
32,250
23.0
81.8
31,750
16.0
79.4
31,250
13.0
77.7
30,750
8.0
76.4
30,250
15.5
75.6
29,750
16.0
74.0
29,250
14.0
72.3
28,750
21.0
70.8
28,250
15.0
68.7
27,750
16.0
67.1
27,250
26.0
65.4
26,750
33.2
62.7
26,250
30.0
59.3
25,750
15.0
56.2
25,250
22.6
54.6
24,750
25.4
52.3
24,250
45.9
49.7
23,750
19.0
44.9
23,250
26.0
42.9
22,750
17.0
40.2
22,250
16.0
38.5
21,750
25.4
36.8
21,250
31.6
34.2
20,750
24.1
30.9
20,250
21.2
28.4
19,750
20.0
26.2
19,250
26.9
24.1
18,750
25.0
21.3
18,250
30.2
18.7
17,750
29.4
15.6
17,250
17.5
12.5
16,750
22.7
10.7
16,250
13.0
8.4
15,750
22.7
7.0
15,250
8.5
4.7
14,750
12.5
3.8
14,250
7.3
2.5
13,750
4.8
1.7
13,250
1.6
1.2
12,750
5.5
1.1
12,250
0.9
0.5
11,750
2.0
0.4
11,250
2.0
0.2
$
42,500—42,999.
42,000 — 42,499.
41,500 — 41,999.
41,000—41,499.
40,500 — 40,999.
40,000—40,499.
39,500 — 39,999.
39,000 — 39,499.
38,500 — 38,999.
38,000 — 38,499.
37,500 — 37,999.
37,000 — 37,499.
36,500 — 36,999.
36,000 — 36,499.
35,500 — 35,999.
35,000 — 35,499.
34,500 — 34,999.
34,000 — 34,499.
33,500 — 33,999.
33,000 — 33,499.
32,500 — 32,999.
32,000 — 32,499.
31,500 — 31,999.
31,000 — 31,499.
30,500 — 30,999.
30,000 — 30,499.
29,500 — 29,999.
29,000 — 29,499.
28,500 — 28,999.
28,000 — 28,499.
27,500—27,999.
27,000 — 27,499.
26,500 — 26,999.
26,000 — 26,499.
25,500 — 25,999.
25,000 — 25,499.
24,500 — 24,999.
24,000 — 24,499,
23,500 — 23,999.
23,000 — 23,499.
22,500 — 22,999.
22,000 — 22,499.
21,500 — 21,999.
21,000 — 21,499.
20,500 — 20,999.
20,000 — 20,499.
19,500 — 19,999.
19,000 — 19,499.
18,500—18,999.
18,000—18,499.
17,500 — 17,999.
17,000 — 17,499.
16,500—16,999.
16,000—16,499.
15,500 — 15,999.
15,000—15,499.
14,500—14,999.
14,000 — 14,499.
13,500 — 13,999.
13,000 — 13,499.
12,500 — 12,999.
12,000 — 12,499.
11,500—11,999.
11,000—11,499.
Not Reported.. .
TOTAL 	
MEDIAN	
24,565
Median Salary = $24,565; Mean Salary = $25,397.
Source: September 1978 Form J.
147
 TABLE 2.1 8 TOTAL FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT
(FTE) DISTRICT-WIDE AND SCHOOL-ATTACHED TEACHERS
Salary Range
Cumulative
Salary
Number of
Percent
Mid-Point
FTE Persons
FTE
Salaries
$
45,250
6.0
100.0
44,750
—
—
44,250
3.0
100.0
43,750
—
—
43,250
—
—
42,750
7.0
100.0
42,250
8.0
99.9
41.750
15.0
99.9
41,250
8.0
99.9
40,750
18.0
99.8
40,250
10.0
99.8
39,750
17.0
99.7
39,250
15.0
99.7
38,750
83.0
99.6
38,250
24.0
99.3
37,750
47.0
99.2
37,250
30.0
99.1
36,750
47.0
99.0
36,250
66.0
98.8
35,750
57.0
98.6
35,250
39.0
98.3
34,750
86.0
98.2
34,250
93.1
97.9
33,750
87.0
97.6
33,250
84.0
97.3
32,750
126.0
97.0
32,250
125.0
96.5
31,750
96.0
96.1
31,250
70.0
95.7
30,750
105.0
95.5
30,250
120.5
95.1
29,750
119.2
94.7
29,250
194.0
94.2
28,750
166.6
93.5
28,250
172.9
92.9
27,750
384.8
92,3
27,250
585.3
90.9
26,750
535.9
88.8
26,250
494.9
86.9
25,750
305.9
85.1
25,250
332.3
84.1
24,750
1,271.3
82.9
24.250
2,096.5
78.3
23,750
473.3
70.8
23,250
471.4
69.1
22,750
418.9
67.4
22,250
558.5
65.9
21,750
1.217.9
63.9
21,250
1,419.9
59.5
20,750
700.2
54.5
20,250
799.3
52.0
19,750
771.4
49.1
19,250
1,148.7
46.3
18,750
1,317.3
42.2
18,250
1,709.7
37.5
17,750
1,177.8
31.4
17,250
1,395.4
27.1
16,750
1,312.7
22.1
16,250
1,148.7
17.4
15,750
989.3
13.3
15,250
716.8
9.8
14,750
569.2
7.2
14,250
533.2
5.2
13,750
391.1
3.3
13,250
206.6
1.9
12.750
199.7
1.1
12,250
60.5
0.4
11,750
37.9
0.2
11,250
14.7
0.1
10,750
—
—
10,250
1.0
—
$
45,000 — 45,499.
44,500—44.999.
44,000 — 44,499.
43,500 — 43,999.
43,000—43,499.
42,500 — 42,999.
42,000 — 42,499.
41,500 — 41,999.
41,000 — 41,499.
40,500 — 40,999.
40,000 — 40,499.
39,500 — 39,999.
39,000 — 39,499.
38,500 — 38,999.
38.000 — 38,499.
37,500 — 37,999.
37,000 — 37,499.
36,500 — 36,999.
36,000 — 36,499.
35,500 — 35,999.
35,000 — 35,499.
34,500 — 34,999.
34,000 — 34,499.
33,500 — 33,999.
33,000 — 33,499.
32,500 — 32,999.
32,000 — 32,499.
31,500 — 31,999.
31,000 — 31,499.
30,500 — 30,999.
30,000 — 30,499.
29,500 — 29,999.
29,000 — 29,499.
28,500 — 28,999.
28,000 — 28,499.
27,500 — 27,999.
27,000 — 27,499.
26,500 — 26,999.
26,000 — 26,499.
25,500 — 25,999.
25,000 — 25,499.
24,500 — 24,999.
24.000 — 24,499.
23,500 — 23,999.
23,000 — 23,499.
22,500 — 22,999.
22,000 — 22,499.
21,500 — 21,999.
21,000 — 21,499.
20,500 — 20,999.
20,000 — 20,499.
19,500—19,999.
19,000—19,499.
18,500—18,999.
18,000—18,499.
17,500—17,999.
17,000—17,499.
16,500—16,999.
16,000—16,499.
15,500—15,999.
15,000—15,499.
14,500—14,999.
14,000—14,499.
13,500—13,999.
13,000—13,499.
12,500 — 12,999.
12,000—12,499.
11,500—11,999,
11,000—11,499.
10,500 — 10,999.
10.000—10,499.
Not Reported..
TOTAL 	
MEDIAN	
27,913.6
20.159
148
Median Salary = $20,159; Mean Salary = $20,966.
Source: September 1978 Form J.
 TABLE 2.19
FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT
DISTRICT-EMPLOYED ADMINISTRATIVE AND
INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF
(NOT ASSIGNED TO SPECIFIC SCHOOLS)
School District Number and Name
District-Wide
Administrative Staff
District-Wide
Instructional Staff
Total
District-Wide Staff
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7. Nelson	
9. Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen.
22. Vernon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. South Cariboo	
31. Merritt	
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Central Coast	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52, Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Nechako	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz-Harrison	
77. Summerland	
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
84. Vancouver Island West...
85. Vancouver Island North . .
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
92. Nisgha	
TOTAL 	
2.0
2.0
4.0
3.0
0.5
3.5
—
8.3
8.3
—
2.8
2.8
3.0
2.5
5.5
1.0
3.5
4.5
4.0
2.0
6.0
—
2.5
2.5
4.0
—
4.0
1.0
	
1.0
—
1.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
5.0
1.0
—
1.0
6.0
10.5
16.5
12.0
7.2
19.2
14.0
8.0
22.0
2.0
—
2.0
8.0
11.5
19.5
5.0
8.6
13.6
2.0
—
2.0
3.0
1.0
4,0
—
3.0
3.0
9.0
8.5
17.5
7.0
13.3
20.3
10.0
17.5
27.5
15.0
83.6
98.6
12.0
12.0
24.0
8.0
17.0
25.0
32.5
37.0
69.5
5.0
10.9
15.9
13.0
23.0
36.0
5.5
14.0
19.5
7.0
14.0
21.0
14.0
14.5
28.5
6.0
9.1
15.1
2.0
2.0
4.0
4.0
6.7
10.7
2.0
2.0
4.0
—
2.0
2.0
1.0
—
1.0
1.0
13.6
14.6
1.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.4
3.4
4.0
6.0
10.0
25.5
11.9
37.4
6.0
17.0
23.0
4.0
1.0
5.0
8.0
54.3
62.3
10.0
11.8
21.8
4.0
4.0
8.0
1.0
0.6
1.6
9.0
2.0
11.0
1.5
2.6
4.1
8.0
49.2
57.2
2.0
—
2.0
6.0
10.5
16.5
3.0
12.0
15.0
5.0
13.2
18.2
3.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
	
1.0
3.0
2.6
6.6
2.0
1.5
3.5
—
1.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
5.0
3.0
1.0
4.0
0.8
1.0
1.8
6.0
5.0
11.0
5.0
15.0
20.0
2.0
—
2.0
354.8
609.2
9,640.0
Source: September 1978 Form J.
149
 TABLE 2.20    B.C. PUBLIC SCHOOL PUPIL/TEACHER
RATIOS BY SCHOOL DISTRICT
OCTOBER 31,1977 TO OCTOBER 31,1978
School District
FTE
Pupils
October 31, 1977
FTE
Teachers
Pupil/
Teacher
Ratio
FTE
Pupils
October 31, 1978
FTE
Teachers
Pupil/
Teacher
Ratio
Fernie  3,551
Cranbrook  4,663
Kimberley  2,027
Windermere  1,404
Nelson  4,149
Castlegar  2,902
Arrow Lakes  1,042
Trail  4,674
Grand Forks  1,461
Kettle Valley  740
Southern Okanagan  2,399
Penticton  4,984
Keremeos  640
Princeton  1,003
Golden  1,559
Revelstoke  2,148
Armstrong-Spallumcheen ... 1,385
Vernon  8,591
Central Okanagan  16,040
Kamloops  17,919
North Thompson  1,333
Cariboo-Chilcotin  8,329
Quesnel  5,571
Lillooet  1,029
South Cariboo  2,041
Merritt  2,592
Hope  1,659
Chilliwack  8,545
Abbotsford  8,861
Langley  11,701
Surrey  27,754
Delta  17,504
Richmond  18,110
Vancouver  59,949
New Westminster  4,645
Burnaby  22,252
Maple Ridge  7,535
Coquitlam  22,912
North Vancouver  18,918
West Vancouver  6,612
Sechelt  2,472
Powell River  4,380
Howe Sound  2,837
Central Coast  824
Queen Charlotte  1,291
Prince Rupert  4,096
Smithers  2,765
Burns Lake  1,938
Nechako  3,334
Prince George  20,655
Peace River South  5,396
Peace River North   5,594
Greater Victoria  24,876
Sooke  7,677
Saanich  5,916
Gulflslands  1,003
Cowichan  7,771
Lake Cowichan  1,370
Nanaimo  11,971
Qualicum  2,410
Alberni  7,868
Courtenay  7,334
Campbell River  5,763
Mission  4,403
Agassiz-Harrison  838
Summerland  1,421
Kitimat  3,183
Fort Nelson  1,090
Vancouver Island West  1,010
Vancouver Island North .... 2,947
Creston-Kaslo  2,530
Stikine  516
Terrace  5,665
Shuswap  5,599
Nisgha  543
GRAND TOTAL  510,419
193.00
242.10
116.52
82.60
231.60
155.80
64.10
251.32
81.30
43.50
134.25
256.10
39.00
58.50
89.20
127.50
78.50
464.00
868.00
1,011.91
85.40
466.80
315.66
59.40
120.40
138.00
94.00
455.76
476.30
644.55
1,522,60
956.40
975.62
3,189.50
263.50
1,238.55
406.50
1,215.20
1,089.10
357.15
146.30
258.10
158.33
56.70
85.00
236.00
153.34
122.20
194.00
1,139.20
309.25
300.40
1,338.64
431.80
336.24
63.30
435.00
88.48
691.65
134.00
439.75
380.39
309.70
235.60
49.00
76.60
177.80
66.00
63.50
191.60
147.80
39.72
308.60
319.55
38.50
18.40
19.26
17.40
17.00
17.91
18.63
16.26
18.60
17.97
17.01
17.87
19.46
16.41
17.15
17.48
16.85
17.64
18.52
18.48
17.71
15.61
17.84
17.6S
17.32
16.95
18.78
17.65
18.75
18.60
18.15
18.23
18.30
18.56
18.80
17.63
17.97
18.54
18.85
17.37
18.51
16.90
16.97
17.92
14.53
15.19
17.36
18.03
15.86
17.19
18.13
17.45
18.62
18.58
17.78
17.59
15.85
17.86
15.48
17.31
17.99
17.89
19.28
18.61
18.69
17.10
18.55
17.90
16.52
15.91
15.38
17.12
12.99
18.36
17.52
14.10
3,434
4,644
1,920
1,381
4,097
2,797
1,051
4,490
1,433
726
2,342
4,861
625
998
1,581
2,080
1,391
8,323
15,775
17,554
1,290
8,207
5,418
1,033
1,933
2,547
1,603
8,023
8,944
12,199
27,876
17,529
17,966
57,453
4,348
21,260
7,510
22,085
18,115
6,311
2,496
4,238
2,811
802
1,271
4,155
2,817
1,920
3,251
20,664
5,291
5,690
23,940
7,604
5,970
1,013
7,605
1,295
11,755
2,473
7,641
7,288
5,781
4,388
820
1,369
3,058
1,135
1,058
3,010
2,393
505
5,465
5,548
525
197.00
248.70
117.32
84.40
233.60
155.68
66.44
248.11
80.80
45.90
132.65
254.10
38.00
58.50
87.60
130.50
79.50
451.40
873.20
983.80
75.15
470.80
315.36
64.30
119.90
144.30
95.50
443.55
482.30
659.75
1,532.50
964.80
985.30
3,140.50
252.00
1,203.83
430.08
1,230.60
1,039.60
342.73
146.85
241.80
160.60
58.70
83.50
245.60
160.40
118.60
195.00
1,156.21
308.75
314.96
1,287.46
425.70
341.50
67.20
439.90
84.18
681.82
134.00
438.10
377.11
323.20
245.90
50.00
74.60
181.70
68.00
64.00
196.00
145.50
39.16
311.10
316.00
43.00
17.43
18.67
16.37
16.36
17.54
17.97
15.82
18.10
17.74
15.82
17.66
19.13
16.45
17.06
18.05
15.94
17.50
18.44
18.07
17.84
17.17
17.43
17.18
16.07
16.12
17.65
16.79
18.09
18.54
18.49
18.19
18.17
18.23
18.29
17.25
17.66
17.46
17.95
17.42
18.41
17.00
17.53
17.50
13.66
15.22
16.92
17.56
16.19
16.67
17.87
17.14
18.07
18.59
17.86
17.48
15.07
17.29
15.38
17.24
18.46
17.44
19.33
17.89
17.84
16.40
18.35
16.83
16.69
16.53
15.36
16.45
12.90
17.57
17.56
12.21
500,198
150
Source: Form AD — 78-10-31, Division of Financial Services.
Note: Calculation of F.T.E. pupils — each Grade I through XII pupil is counted as 1.0; each
Kindergarten pupil is counted as 0.5.
Calculation of F.T.E. teachers — part-time as well as full-time teachers are counted. Each part-time
teacher is counted according to the appropriate decimal fraction of full-time (i.e., a half-time teacher is
counted as 0.5). All district-wide (i.e., directors of instruction, supervisors, teacher consultants,
coordinators, district librarians, district counsellors, relieving teachers, etc.) as well as school-attached
teachers (i.e., principals, vice-principals, department heads, librarians, counsellors, regular classroom
teachers, etc.) are counted.
 TABLE 2.21        AGE DISTRIBUTION OF FULL AND
PART-TIME B.C. PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS BY
SEX IN SEPTEMBER 1978 EXPRESSED AS A PERCENTAGE
Age
Male
<20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
654
0.2
0.5
1.3
1.8
2.5
3.4
4.1
4.4
4.8
5.6
4.8
4.5
4.6
4.6
4.3
4.3
3.8
3.6
3.0
2.6
2.5
2.2
2.1
1.9
2.1
2.1
2.0
1.9
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.2
1.4
1.1
1.0
1.0
1.0
0.6
0.6
0.4
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.4
1.4
2.9
3.6
4.3
5.0
5.9
5.7
5.4
5.3
5.0
4.2
3.0
3.3
3.3
2.8
2.6
2.5
2.2
1.9
1.9
1.8
1.9
1.6
1.6
1.8
1.8
1.6
1.6
1.5
1.3
1.2
1.1
1.2
1.1
1.0
1.0
0.9
0.8
0.6
0.5
0.5
0.4
0.4
0.1
0.2
0.8
1.8
2.5
3.1
3.8
4.7
4.9
4.9
5.1
5.3
4.5
3.7
4.0
3.9
3.5
3.4
3.1
2.9
2.5
1.7
1.9
1.9
1.8
1.7
1.6
1.5
1.4
1.2
1.3
1.1
1.0
1.0
0.9
0.7
0.6
0.4
0.4
0.3
0.3
0.1
Source: September 1978 Form J.
Note: 4 teachers did not report their birth date.
151
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152
 TABLE 2.23 PROVINCIAL EDUCATIONAL
MEDIA CENTRE SCHOOL BROADCASTS
Television
Programs broadcast 203
Schools reporting use 640
Radio
Programs broadcast 163
Schools reporting use 512
TABLE 2.24 (1 ) DISTRIBUTION OF
AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS
Total films supplied  42,246
Media catalogues  8,000
School broadcast tabloids  51,000
Sing-out booklets  80,000
Let's Sing Together booklets  60,000
Listen to Music booklets  60,000
School broadcast poster-calendars  17,000
French booklets — Chantez, First French, A Propos, Faites Vos Jeux  58,000
Salut! program guides  5,000
Salut! interim teaching handbook  2,000
Videotape programs  15,696
Audiotape programs  4,748
153
 TABLE 2.24 (2)
DISTRIBUTION SERVICES
CIRCULATION REPORT
District No.
and Name
Motion Pictures
No.
Supplied
1. Fernie  710
2. Cranbrook  698
3. Kimberley  233
4. Windermere  723
7.          Nelson  397
9.          Castlegar  56
10. Arrow Lakes  124
11. Trail  439
12. Grand Forks  347
13. Kettle Valley  190
14. Southern Okanagan   38
15. Penticton  943
16. Keremeos  297
17. Princeton  289
18. Golden  342
19. Revelstoke  738
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen  171
22. Vernon  1,375
23. Central Okanagan  454
24. Kamloops  239
26. North Thompson  443
27. Cariboo-Chilcolin  2,872
28. Quesnel  543
29. Lillooet  56
30. South Cariboo  347
31. Merritt  511
32. Hope  327
33. Chilliwack  2,074
34. Abbotsford  62
35. Langley  61
36. Surrey  1,955
37. Delta  487
38. Richmond  109
39. Vancouver  109
40. New Westminster  92
41. Burnaby  393
42. Maple Ridge  229
43. Coquitlam  179
44. North Vancouver  154
45. West Vancouver  115
46. Sechelt  291
47. Powell River  603
48. Howe Sound  674
49. Central Coast  440
50. Queen Charlotte  929
52.          Prince Rupert  711
54. Smithers  576
55. Burns Lake  592
56. Nechako  664
57. Prince George  64
59. Peace RiverSouth  994
60. Peace River North  928
61. Greater Victoria  18
62. Sooke  598
63. Saanich  630
64. Gulflslands  281
65. Cowichan  401
66. Cowichan Lake  81
68. Nanaimo  1,107
69. Qualicum  386
70. Alberni  647
71. Courtenay  706
72. Campbell River  732
75. Mission  315
76. Agassiz-Harrison  217
77. Summerland  31
80. Kitimat  777
81. Fort Nelson  316
84. Vancouver Island, West  479
85. Vancouver Island, North  878
86. Creston-Kaslo  158
87. Stikine  225
88. Terrace  1,200
89. Shuswap  1,374
92.          Nisgha  '  —
Provincial Colleges  360
Independent Schools  2,881
Miscellaneous  61
TOTAL  42,246
154
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
3.     Finance
TABLE
3.1 Comparison of enrolment and expenditure for public education
at June 30 156
3.2 Expenditure for education, calendar year 1978 157
3.3 Cost per pupil, calendar year 1978 157
3.4 Expenditure by school district for the calendar year 1978 158
3.5 Revenue by school district for the calendar year 1978 160
3.6 Transportation costs 162
3.7 Summary of school dormitory data, 1978/79 162
155
 TABLE 3.1 COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND
EXPENDITURE FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION AT JUNE 30
Number Number June Average Percentage
of                  of                Net                Daily of
School-year                Teachers School Enrol- Atten- Atten-
Employed Districts ment               dance dance1
Total
Operating
Expenditures
for
Education
Total
Expenditure
for
Education
1882/83.
1887/88.
1892/93.
1897/98.
1902/03.
1907/08.
1912/13.
1913/14.
1917/18.
1922/23.
1927/28.
1928/29.
1929/30.
1930/31.
1931/32.
1932/33.
1933/34.
1934/35.
1935/36.
1936/37.
1937/38.
1938/39.
1939/40.
1940/41.
1941/42.
1942/43.
1943/44.
1944/45.
1945/46.
1946/47.
1947/48.
1948/49.
1949/50.
1950/51.
1951/52.
1952/53.
1953/54.
1954/55.
1955/56.
1956/57.
1957/58.
1958/59.
1959/60.
1960/61.
1961/62.
1962/63.
1963/64.
1964/65.
1965/66.
1966/67.
1967/68.
1968/69.
1969/70.
1970/71.
1971/72.
1972/73.
1973/74.
1974/75.
1975/76.
1976/77.
1977/78.
1978/79.
69
128
267
429
607
816
.597
,859
246
118
668
,784
,854
,948
,959
,912
873
,942
,956
,025
,092
,194
220
248
224
,055
,162
,354
,512
,833
,116
,496
,873
,272
,598
,105
,574
,185
,690
,474
.171
839
513
137
772
,571
,415
,327
173
742'
.191
,481
,828
,678
224
365
,585'
,877
,870
390
181
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
98
101
100
104
104
102
103
102
101
98
97
99
100
100
93
93
87
85
85
85
80
75
74
74
75
75
75
75
75
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
210,174
223,840
240,674
260,069
277,070
291,223
305,837
321,760
340,290
358,905
378,641
400,080
420,790
445,228
467,486
489,596
513,079
527,106
534,523
537,106
548,999
553,991
555,238
547,994
539,198.0
528,752.0
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
176,138
191,061
204,239
218,303
235,396
252,490
267,052
281,513
298,175
312,173
332,585
348,472
367,718
379,045
408,452
425,514
447,643
466,264
476,643
481,353
481,686
489,303
494,877
495,715
484,226
478,792.4
477,144.7
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
86.08
87.91
88.36
88.81
89.67
90.26
89.19
89.58
90.62
91.25
91.63
91.12
90.98
91.71
92.32
92.61
93.23
92.69
93.76
93.23
93.25
91.50
93.28
92.64
93.87
93.74
93.41
93.38
93.20
92.86
93.13
92.95
93.13
92.89
93.07
60,758.75'
113,689.36'
174,775.43
290,255.26
473,802.29
544,671.60
1,663,003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653,796.60
3,176,686.28*
3,532,518.95
3,765,920.69
3,743,317.08
3,834,727.19
4,015,074.37
2,849,972.02
2,611,937.80
2,835,040.74
2,972,385.04
3,277,660.23
3,524,962.69
3,630,670.78
3,585,769.00
3,963,848.24
4,028,397.88
3,924,243.53
4,244,898.82
5,022,534.59
5,765,205.50
9,398,473.46
12,468,653.18
17,363,430.94
22,809,631.23
25,830,076.88
26,885,980.43
26,555,080,24
24,060,233.15
34,279,302.27
41,067,740.34
43,989,524.32
50,861,473.63
53,288,028.94
59,472,055.06
70,174,999.84
77,632,903,48
83,782,121.79
95,497,375.16
105,017,594.75
119,871,278.31
144,702,607.40
181,854,578.21
251,827,287.92
292,556,398.29
354,470,298.48
382,221,877.00
425,505,748.00
481,823,740.00
551,647,880.00
704,839,307.00
822,600,150.00
923,735,364
939,872,187
215,056.22'
425,555.10
604,357.86
1,220,509.85
4,658,894,97
4,634,877.56
3,519,014.61
7,630,009.54*
9,261,094.98
11,149,996.27
10,008,255.66
10,061,387.99
9,719,333.81
8,941,497.34
8,213,369.04
8,458,156.00
8,775,353.78
9,593,562.64
10,193,367,08
10,640,740.47
10,521,684.92
10,982,364.49
11,120,801.94
11,502,291.35
12,231,029.35
13,683,538.18
14,818,625.81
20,176,930.53
25,768,392.09
35,538,079.88
47,726,750.37
54,195,133.95
57,881,559.48
58,401,121.15
70,791,844.25
80,823,263.71*
69,314,181.24s
77,653,192,32
90,483,765.63
101,351,107.94
115,941,018.06
133,401,622.84
145,535,715.48
157,614,783.79
177,539,584.16
199,114,313.75
227,937,392.31
269,217,969.40
332,702,367.21
384,336,617.68
437,743,656.54
516,309,118.90
557,875,205.00
612,808,108.00
694,357,161.00
832,876,042.00'
1,068,408,139.00
1,223,758,028.00
1,374,983,287.00
1,514,050,579
'Average daily attendance as a percentage of FTE net enrolment. Since 1968/69 percentage of
attendance is total actual attendance as a percentage of total possible attendance.
2The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
Excluding unknown expenditure made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
4Since 1922/23 this amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the provincial
universities and since 1963/64 to school district and regional colleges.
sSince 1955/56 this amount is exclusive of capital expenditures from by-law funds.
6The numbers of teachers reported from 1966/67 on include district-wide teachers with supervisory and
administrative duties. These district-wide teachers were excluded from this table prior to 1966/67.
'Since 1973/74 the number of teachers is reported as of September 30 rather than June 30.
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161
 TABLE 3.6
TRANSPORTATION COSTS
Calendar Year
Conveyance
Total District
Conveyance
Costs as a
Expenditures
Costs
Percentage of
District Expenditures
$
118,269,991
$
2,477,202
2.1
127,616,486
2,611,370
2.0
136,432,687
2,721,510
2.0
150,790,702
2,886,696
1.9
165,814,555
3,125,447
1.9
185,566,119
3,475,895
1.9
214,156,353
4,009,393
1.9
248,031,667
4,610,089
1.9
285,686,761
5,355,378
1.87
323,153,465
5,891,894
1.82
361,429,563
6,556,422
1.81
401,033,384
7,216,520
1.89
438,901,005
8,072,883
1.84
502,596,294
9,688,206
1.93
599,460,473
12,548,230
2.09
748,419,484
16,363,823
2.19
863,163,406
19,298,273
2.24
972,529,889
21,930,833
2.25
1,051,344,671
24,253,143
2.31
1960..
1961..
1962..
1963..
1964..
1965..
1966.
1967.
1968.
19691
1970'
1971'
1972'
1973'.
1974'.
1975'.
1976'.
1977'.
1978'
'Excluding college expenditures.
TABLE 3.7
SUMMARY OF SCHOOL
DORMITORY DATA, 1978-79
Capac
ty
Occupancy
Staff
Grade Limits
School District
No.                       Name
Male
Female
Male
Female
Full
Time
Part
Time
From           To
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
29. Lillooel	
60. Peace River North	
66
30
68
25
66
30
58
25
47
52
30
24
23
47
52
30
20
22
47
7
4
6
3
12
1
1
1
4
8              12
8               12
8               12
8               12
92. Nisgha	
47
8               12
TOTALS	
236
226
176
171
32
7
—               —
162
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
4.     Schools
TABLE
4.1 Number of public schools in operation by type, September 1973 to 1978 . . . 164
4.2 Senior secondary schools 164
4.3 Secondary schools 165
4.4 Junior secondary schools 166
4.5 Elementary-senior secondary schools 166
4.6 Elementary-junior secondary schools 167
4.7 Elementary schools 168
4.8 Summary of all schools 169
4.9 School organization for schools enrolling secondary students, (September
1976 to 1978) 170
4.10 School organization for schools enrolling secondary students by type of
school and by size of school 171
163
 TABLE 4.1 NUMBER OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN
OPERATION BY TYPE, SEPTEMBER 1973-78
Type
Numbers Open in September
1973       1974       1975       1976       1977
Change
1973-78
Senior secondary	
Secondary	
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary .
Elementary-junior secondary .
6 24
5 115
4 126
3 14
2 44
23 21
123 135
122 122
17 16
55 56
23
141
126
16
67
23
147
124
19
64
23
150
123
18
66
- 1
-35
■   3
- 4
-22
Elementary	
1          1,221
1,234
1,232
1,229
1,234
1,235
+ 14
TOTAL SCHOOLS	
— 1,544
— 536
1,574
542
1,582
543
1,602
536
1,611
527
1,615
517
+ 71
TOTAL ENROLMENT IN THOUSANDS	
- 19
Source: September Form B and I.
TABLE 4.2
SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
Number of
FTE1
Schools
Teachers
1
58.00
2
115.00
1
35.00
1
36.00
1
55.00
1
50.50
5
205.00
1
59.50
2
93.00
1
63.00
3
196.00
1
80.00
1
42.00
1
52.25
1
82.00
September 30
Enrolment
22.   Vernon	
24.   Kamloops	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin .
28. Quesnel	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
41.   Burnaby	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver .
47.   Powell River	
61. Greater Victoria ..
68.  Nanaimo	
TOTAL 	
1,143
2,108
668
690
990
972
3,672
1,020
1,856
1,116
3,725
1,453
731
1,031
1,586
1,222.25
'In tables 4.2 through 4.8 data on teachers are expressed in full-time equivalents and apply to school-
attached personnel only, i.e., the totals do not include district-wide professional staff.
Source: September 1978 Form I.
164
 TABLE 4.3
SECONDARY SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
Number of
Number of
FTE
September 30
Schools
Teachers
Enrolment
2
70.00
1,170
1
49.00
887
1
29.00
481
1
29.00
510
2
49.00
849
1
47.00
859
1
20.00
309
2
76.63
1,376
1
39.00
645
1
20.00
316
1
47.52
869
1
65.00
1,183
1
19.00
301
1
26.00
379
1
34.50
622
1
50.00
838
1
16.50
222
1
29.00
518
8
324.50
5,831
4
113.60
1,803
1
29.50
494
1
24.00
460
1
22.60
370
2
45.75
694
1
58.00
1,040
1
27.00
490
2
106.00
1,911
1
33.00
587
2
79.50
1,467
3
122.00
2,333
2
139.00
2,415
1
66.50
1,274
19
1,376.07
26,672
1
121.50
2,201
4
234.25
4,348
3
153.50
2,589
5
262.70
4,791
3
174.56
3,208
2
41.75
728
1
1.60
8
2
51.00
858
2
21.70
260
1
21.00
290
1
35.00
655
2
51.00
838
1
30.00
483
1
36.00
641
7
292.37
5,143
1
43.00
780
1
42.00
789
6
295.61
5,665
6
134.00
2,398
3
112.40
2,026
1
21.00
363
2
95.40
1,679
1
30.50
418
1
31.00
541
1
43.00
762
2
84.50
1,481
2
83.00
1,628
2
88.40
1,602
1
40.00
749
1
36.00
662
1
71.00
1,294
1
21.00
274
2
14.00
205
2
53.80
806
1
52.00
851
3
73.93
1,146
3
83.00
1,410
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7.   Nelson	
9.  Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
22. Vernon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
29. Lillooet	
30. South Cariboo	
31. Merritt	
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey 	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge	
44. North Vancouver	
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Central Coast	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52.   Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Nechako	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75.   Mission	
77.  Summerland	
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
84. Vancouver Island West ...
85. Vancouver Island North ..
86. Creston-Kaslo	
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
TOTAL 	
6,359.64
114,745
Source: September 1978 Form B.
165
 TABLE 4.4
JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
2.
7.
9.
11.
15.
21.
22.
23.
24.
27.
28.
30.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
41.
42.
43.
44.
46.
47.
48.
52.
54.
57.
59.
60.
61.
62.
65.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
75.
Cranbrook 	
Nelson	
Castlegar	
Trail	
Penticton	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
Vernon	
Central Okanagan	
Kamloops	
Cariboo-Chilcotin	
Quesnel	
South Cariboo	
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey 	
Delta	
Richmond	
Burnaby 	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Prince George	
Peace River South	
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Cowichan	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Campbell River	
Mission	
Kitimat	
Terrace 	
Shuswap	
TOTAL 	
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
3
5
3
4
1
4
4
4
8
3
6
6
1
11
3
1
2
1
1
1
3
2
2
8
1
3
5
1
3
5
1
2
1
2
2
62.00
37.00
22.00
28.00
56.00
21.00
88.00
78.00
220.50
104.50
93.00
8.00
105.50
104.20
129.60
293.40
127.00
249.50
218.25
26.00
342.40
124.00
17.50
65.10
14.00
50.00
23.00
91.80
58.00
67.00
235.83
34.60
101.50
165.50
1.00
100.50
98.50
38.60
59.30
2.00
56.50
59.00
1,066
668
403
461
962
373
1,600
1,362
3,673
1,936
1,453
93
1,829
1,929
2,222
5,406
2,252
4,789
3,730
423
6,014
2,058
238
1,153
260
864
354
1,675
988
1,187
4,426
652
1,719
2,898
14
1,673
1,727
667
918
27
1,031
1,025
Source: September 1978 Form I.
TABLE 4.5
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR
SECONDARY SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
Number of
FTE
September 30
Schools
Teachers
Enrolment
17,00
243
15.00
256
89.40
1,524
2.00
58
22.00
348
26.00
426
74.00
1,163
37.38
679
25.50
462
17.00
239
28.00
418
19.50
356
27.20
443
18.50
286
28.00
399
7.   Nelson	
10.   Arrow Lakes	
37.   Delta	
39.  Vancouver	
50.  Queen Charlotte	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Nechako	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
76.   Agassiz-Harrison	
84. Vancouver Island West .
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
92.   Nisgha	
TOTAL 	
166
Source: September 1978 Form I.
 TABLE 4.6
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR
SECONDARY SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
1. Fernie	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7. Nelson	
11. Trail	
14. Southern Okanagan	
19. Revelstoke	
22. Vernon	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
32. Hope	
41. Burnaby	
47. Powell River	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52. Prince Rupert	
55. Burns Lake	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
66. Lake Cowichan	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
72. Campbell River	
81. Fort Nelson	
84. Vancouver Island West ..
85, Vancouver Island North .
87. Stikine	
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
TOTAL 	
18.50
296
30.60
475
10.00
131
7.00
79
17.50
314
28.00
474
4.50
46
29.00
508
16.00
327
5.50
94
9
40.30
764
2
8.16
99
1
6.50
97
2
28.00
444
2
53.20
953
2
9.50
152
2
9.50
175
3
35.00
428
1
13.00
170
1
28.00
448
1
7.00
138
4
39.73
717
2
33.50
567
1
4.00
19
4
85.40
1,560
2
11.20
140
1
15.00
259
2
32.00
597
2
22.50
399
2
21.00
342
1
7.00
135
1
4.50
74
4
62.51
989
2
7.96
126
1
7.00
114
1
8.20
157
Source: September 1978 Form I.
167
 TABLE 4.7
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
1.
2.
3.
4.
7.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
21.
22.
23.
24.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
75.
76.
77.
80.
81.
84.
85.
86.
87.
88.
89.
92.
Fernie	
Cranbrook 	
Kimberley	
Windermere	
Nelson	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan	
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
Vernon	
Central Okanagan	
Kamloops	
North Thompson	
Cariboo-Chilcotin	
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo	
Merritt	
Hope	
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey 	
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster	
Burnaby 	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver	
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Central Coast	
Queen Charlotte	
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Nechako	
Prince George	
Peace River South	
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich 	
Gulflslands	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Campbell River	
Mission	
Agassiz-Harrison	
Summerland	
Kitimat	
Fort Nelson	
Vancouver Island West . . .
Vancouver Island North ..
Creston-Kaslo	
Stikine	
Terrace	
Shuswap	
Nisgha	
TOTAL 	
9
9
7
7
16
13
5
11
3
6
5
12
3
5
7
9
2
15
40
40
6
30
17
5
4
24
32
31
64
26
36
93
9
42
21
46
35
14
11
11
10
5
4
7
8
7
10
59
17
16
38
19
13
4
26
6
35
7
20
16
13
18
3
3
5
2
4
12
9
3
16
21
2
105.00
134.70
48.45
42.60
118.10
82.10
29.68
119.25
41.80
25.90
54.15
128.10
18.00
31.50
51.50
70.00
41.00
231.90
446.80
488.04
37.95
242.80
166.60
33.20
65.85
82.30
37.50
215.35
269.00
368.95
802.50
518.90
545.30
1,649.36
125.00
598.50
226.28
663.70
545.54
152.40
82.60
112.90
91.40
33.00
29.00
111.00
84.40
46.20
72.50
652.50
149.20
139.60
597.28
227.30
128.60
30.40
233.00
35.10
342.42
56.00
212.60
179.15
155.60
142.30
22.00
37.00
98.10
36.00
24.50
70.20
62.00
8.00
162.90
145.80
12.00
2,153
2,864
1,041
790
2,394
1,625
528
2,470
834
436
1,088
2,840
340
662
917
1,296
833
4,839
9,115
10,179
752
4,647
3,343
606
1,207
1,584
743
4,595
5,810
7,984
17.705
10,970
10,717
32,781
2,382
11,873
4,754
13,097
10,423
3,243
1,620
2,304
1,831
556
513
2,402
1,742
880
1,544
13,593
3,095
2,934
12,986
4,786
2,545
538
4,416
640
7,120
1,196
4,371
4,107
3,350
2,908
423
741
1,864
756
457
1,330
1,182
126
3,341
3,158
160
1,235
14,278.10
291,975
168
Source: September 1978 Form I.
 TABLE 4.8
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7. Nelson	
9. Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan 	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
22. Vernon.	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. South Cariboo	
31. Merritt	
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby 	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Central Coast	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52. Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Nechako	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke 	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulflslands	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz-Harrison	
77. Summerland	
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
84. Vancouver Island West ...
85. Vancouver Island North ..
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
12
12
9
9
21
15
7
15
4
7
7
15
4
6
8
11
4
20
51
52
8
44
24
7
11
9
7
30
38
38
81)
34
45
113
10
55
25
60
44
17
14
17
13
7
8
12
11
10
13
71
22
24
55
27
20
7
31
8
42
11
27
23
18
21
4
4
7
4
12
6
22
27
193.50
245.70
108.05
81.60
228.10
151.10
64.68
241.38
80.80
45.90
129.67
249.10
37.00
57.50
86.00
124.50
78.50
435.90
849.30
953.14
72.95
446.60
303.76
62.30
119.60
140.30
92.50
426.85
461.20
628.55
1,422.90
933.80
954.30
3,027.43
246.50
1,167.20
405.78
1,202.10
1,012.24
326.96
141.85
231.10
156.40
54.70
81.50
231.00
158.40
115.20
182.50
1,102.05
282.70
305.33
1,214.47
399.90
326.40
62.60
429.90
80.60
620.92
132.00
420.10
360.65
303.60
241.60
50.00
73.00
171.10
64.00
62.50
186.51
141.20
34.46
300.33
296.00
3,619
4,817
1,997
1,431
4,233
2,887
1,093
4,621
1,479
752
2,431
4,985
641
1,041
1,539
2,180
1,428
8,608
16,308
18,090
1,340
8,475
5,585
1,073
1,994
2,624
1,677
8,335
9,316
12,645
29,116
18,181
18,636
59,511
4,583
22,020
7,766
22,836
18,725
6,451
2,586
4,348
2,949
816
1,326
4,349
2,934
1,959
3,348
21,538
5,463
5,866
24,675
7,855
6,131
1,041
7,814
1,317
12,145
2,569
7,924
7,462
5,961
4,575
841
1,403
3,185
1,165
1,092
3,125
2,476
538
5,632
5,750
92.   Nisgha	
                    3
40.00
559
TOTAL 	
              1,615
26,949.81
517,786
169
Source: September 1978 Form I.
 TABLE 4.9 SCHOOL ORGANIZATION
FOR SCHOOLS ENROLLING SECONDARY STUDENTS,
SEPTEMBER 1976 TO 1978
Partial
School Year
10-Month
Two
Semester
Three
Semester
Four
Semester
Semester
and Partial
10-Month
Other
Total
1976/77
123
58
4
20
119
324
1977/78
139
63
4
18
116
12
352
1978/79
145
48
3
12
136
24
368
Source: September 1976,1977 and 1978 Form K,
170
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171
 INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
TABLE 5.1 GENERAL INFORMATION, 1978/79
1. PUPILS
Number of qualifying pupils
(group 1 and 2 schools) 17,820.5
2. TEACHERS
Number of teachers
(group 2 schools) 1,347
3. FINANCE
Percentage of average operating costs in the public schools of the
school district in which the independent school is located applicable to
grant.
Group 1 schools 9 percent
Group 2 schools 30 percent
4. SCHOOLS
Number of schools applying for grants 108
Number of schools receiving grants 107
Classification of group 1 and 2 schools
Elementary (K-VII) 73
Elementary-junior secondary (K-X) 7
Elementary-senior secondary (K-XII) 11
Junior secondary (VIII-X) 2
Secondary (VIII-XII) _\A
107
172
 POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
6.   GENERAL
TABLE
6.1 Summary of credit enrolments at B.C. post-secondary institutions, by
institution type, major program area, and enrolment status, 1968/69 to 1978/79
(Fall Report)  174
6.2 Total (full-time plus part-time) Academic and Career/Technical enrolment at
British Columbia universities, British Columbia community colleges and
provincial institutes, 1968/69 to 1978/79 (Fall Report)  175
6.3 Number of faculty at B.C. post-secondary institutions, by institution type,
major program area, and employment status, 1972/1973 to 1978/79
(Fall Report)  176
173
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176
 POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
7.   UNIVERSITIES DATA
TABLE
7.1 Degree enrolment in British Columbia universities, 1978/79 178
7.2 Undergraduate students, (full-time plus part-time) enrolled for credit at
British Columbia universities, by faculty for Fall 1978 179
7.3 Graduate students, (full-time plus part-time) enrolled for credit at British
Columbia universities, by faculty for Fall 1978 180
7.4 University regular teaching faculty by rank, Fall 1978 181
7.5 University regular teaching faculty by faculty, Fall 1978 182
177
 TABLE 7.1 DEGREE ENROLMENT'IN
BRITISH COLUMBIA UNIVERSITIES, 1978/79
British
Columbia
University
Simon
Fraser
Total
FULL-TIME
Undergraduate  17,254
Graduate  2,067
Subtotal   19,321
PART-TIME'
Undergraduate  11,006
Graduate  1,568
Subtotal   12,574
GRAND TOTAL  31,895
4,908
337
5,245
3,717
317
4,034
6,187
646
6,833
4,355
345
4,700
28,349
3,050
31,399
19,078
2,230
21,308
1,533
52,707
Source:    Universities Council of B.C. Data are for fiscal year 1978-79.
Note:     ! Academic year equivalent enrolments are computed as follows:
— UBC and U.Vic: the sum of the enrolments of the summer session and inter-session
added to the part-time enrolments of December 1.
— SFU: for undergraduates, it is the sum of the enrolments of summer, fall and spring
enrolments and of the summer session and inter-session, divided by two (summer and
inter-session enrolments are part-time only). For graduates, it is the sum of the enrolments
of the summer, fall and spring semesters, divided by three.
'Part-time enrolments include on and off-campus part-time enrolments as well as the
enrolments of summer and inter-session. In addition, it includes correspondence enrolments
at UBC.
178
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180
 TABLE 7.4 UNIVERSITY REGULAR TEACHING
FACULTY BY RANK, FALL 1978
Number of Regular, Full-time Teaching Faculty
Associate
Professors
Assistant        Instructors
Professors     and Lecturers
Number of
Regular Part-
time Teaching
Faculty
University of British
Columbia	
University of Victoria.
571
96
576
220
541)
126
134
3
1,821
445
2,280
447
Simon Fraser University1....
109
176
121
31
437
8
445
TOTAL 	
776
972
787
168
2,703
469
3,172
Source: Universities Council of B.C.
Note: 'All faculty figures exclude the President, Vice-presidents, Deans and those on medical leave.
181
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182
 POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
8.   COLLEGES AND INSTITUTES
TABLE
8.1 Enrolment in B.C. community colleges and provincial institutes, October 31,
1978  184
8.2 Full-time Career/Technical enrolment in B.C. community colleges and
institutes, by institution, by discipline cluster, October 31,1978  185
8.3 Part-time Career/Technical enrolment in B.C. community colleges and
institutes, by institution, by discipline cluster, October 31,1978  186
8.4 Full-time vocational enrolments in B.C. community colleges and provincial
institutes by program and by institution, July 1978 to June 1979  187
8.5 Number of course registrations in university transfer courses at B.C.
community colleges, and provincial institutes, by discipline cluster, and by
institution, October 31,1978   192
8.6 Number of course registrations in career/technical courses at B.C. community
colleges and provincial institutes, by discipline cluster and by institution,
October 31,1978   193
8.7 Professional and instructional staff at B.C. community colleges and provincial
institutes, by major program area, by employment status and by institution,
October 31,1978  194
8.8 Total faculty at B.C. community colleges and provincial institutes, by
discipline cluster and by institution, October 31,1978  195
8.9 University transfer faculty at B.C. community colleges and provincial
institutes, by discipline cluster and by institution, October 31,1978  196
8.10 Career/Technical faculty at B.C. community colleges and provincial institutes,
by discipline cluster and by institution, October 31,1978  197
8.11 Vocational faculty at B.C. community colleges and provincial institutes, by
discipline cluster and by institution, October 31,1978  198
183
 TABLE 8.1
ENROLMENT1
IN B. C. COMMUNITY
COLLEGES AND PROVINCIAL INSTITUTES,
OCTOBER 31,1978
Institution
University
Transfer
Career/
Technical
College
Preparatory
Vocational
Total
INSTITUTES
BCIT	
Full-time
—
3,754
—
—
3,754
Part-time
—
10,269
—
—
10,269
Total
—
14,023
—
—
14,023
B.C. Mining School	
Full-time
—
—
—
55
55
Part-time
—
—
—
—
—
Total
—
—
—
55
55
Emily Carr College of Art .
Full-time
—
432
—
—
432
Part-time
—
1
—
—
1
Total
—
433
—
—
433
Full-time
Part-time
—
—
—
57
57
Total
—
—
—
57
57
Pacific Marine Training
Full-time
—
—
—
123
123
Institute	
Part-time
Total
—
_
—
123
123
Pacific Vocational Institute
Full-time
—
—
—
1,999
1,999
Part-time
—
—
—
1,813
1,813
Total
—
—
—
3,812
3,812
Sub-total	
Full-time
	
4,186
	
2,234
6,420
Part-time
—
10,270
—
1,813
12,083
Total
—
14,456
—
4,047
18,503
COLLEGES
Camosun	
Full-time
362
574
122
1,246
2,304
Part-time
936
198
419
1,417
2,970
Total
1,298
772
541
2,663
5,274
Full-time
746
652
	
381
1,779
Part-time
1,026
707
—
178
1,911
Total
1,772
1,359
—
559
3,690
Cariboo	
Full-time
432
314
19
775
1,540
Part-time
646
402
117
1,049
2,214
Total
1,078
716
136
1,824
3,754
Douglas	
Full-time
1,455
634
—
611
2,700
Part-time
2,729
475
—
619
3,823
Total
4,184
1,109
—
1,230
6,523
East Kootenay	
Full-time
43
7
1
187
238
Part-time
147
156
61
445
809
Total
190
163
62
632
1,047
Full-time
299
184
—
399
882
Part-time
556
294
45
1,048
1,943
Total
855
478
45
1,447
2,825
Malaspina	
Full-time
499
302
27
794
1,622
Part-time
767
676
18
778
2,239
Total
1,266
978
45
1,572
3,861
New Caledonia	
Full-time
295
222
—
717
1,234
Part-time
521
268
—
558
1,347
Total
816
490
—
1,275
2,581
Northern Lights	
Full-time
29
17
4
396
446
Part-time
228
244
7
213
692
Total
257
261
11
609
1,138
North Island	
Full-time
138
10
3
199
350
Part-time
1,019
177
82
763
2,041
Total
1,157
187
85
962
2,391
Northwest	
Full-time
50
15
—
532
597
Part-time
328
25
46
486
885
Total
378
40
46
1,018
1,482
Okanagan	
Full-time
775
484
107
583
1,949
Part-time
524
373
50
1,331
2,278
Total
1,299
857
157
1,914
4,227
Selkirk           	
Full-time
237
302
20
452
1,011
Part-time
289
130
24
214
657
Total
526
432
44
666
1,668
Full-time
1,729
1,042
291
2,303
5,365
Part-time
1,939
516
895
6,386
9,736
Total
3,668
1,558
1,186
8,689
15,101
Sub-total    	
Full-time
7,089
4,759
594
9,575
22,017
Part-time
11,655
4,641
1,764
15,485
33,545
Total
18,744
9,400
2,358
25,060
55,562
TOTAL 	
Full-time
7,089
8,945
594
11,809
28,437
Part-time
11,655
14,911
1,764
17,298
45,628
GRAND
TOTAL
18,744
23,856
2,358
29,107
74,065
184
Source:    Academic/Technical data
College Statistical Reports. Data reported
is at October
31,1978.
Vocational Data: Form TV-27 and Form TV-27A.
Note:     ' Continuing
Education enrolments are excluded from th
is table. General Studies enrolments
are included with University Transfer
and Career/Tech
nical enrolments.
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 CONTINUING EDUCATION
9.   COURSE REGISTRANTS
TABLE
9.1 University Continuing Education non-credit course registrations, 1975/76 to
1978/79   200
9.2 Continuing Education course registrations for provincial institutes, 1978/79 ..  201
9.3 Continuing Education course registrations for B.C. community colleges,
1978/79   202
9.4 Continuing Education course registrations for B.C. school districts, 1978/79 ..  202
199
 TABLE 9.1 UNIVERSITY CONTINUING
EDUCATION NON-CREDIT COURSE
REGISTRATIONS, 1975/76 TO 1978/79
1975/76 1976/77 1977/78
52,813 53,011 57,874
6,098 8,822 13,285
3,242 4,080 5,397
62,153 65,913 76,556
Source: Continuing Education Annual Reports, 1975/76 and 1976/77; Statistics Canada, 1977/78;
Universities Council, 1978/79.
Note:     ' Reporting year September 1 to August 31 for UBC and SFU; April 1 to March 31 for UVic.
Year1
University
1975/76
1976/77
1977/78
1978/79
University of British Columbia...
Simon Fraser University	
52,813
6,098
3,242
53,011
8,822
4,080
57,874
13,285
5,397
61,513
10,283
15,079
TOTAL 	
62,153
65,913
76,556
86,875
200
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Victoria, 1980

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