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Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs Annual Report for the year ending March 31, 1979 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1980]

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 To the Honourable
Henry P. Bell-Irving, D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the
Province of British Columbia
May It Please Your Honour:
I have the honour, Sir, to submit respectfully herewith the Annual
Report of the Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs Act for
the year ended March 31, 1979.
cCJ&l&JU-
James A. Nielsen
Minister of Consumer and
Corporate Affairs
 11
M
,<■►
The Honourable James A. Nielsen
Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs
Parliament Buildings
Victoria, B.C.
Sir: I have the honour to submit for your consideration the
Annual Report of the Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs
under the Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs Act
for the year ended March 31,1979.
S/
Peter Bazowski
Deputy Minister
Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs
 Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs
Annual Report
for the year ending March 31,1979
Province of British Columbia
Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction
Legislation 6
The Year in Review 7
Consumer Affairs
Operations Branch 10
Enforcement Branch 11
Consumer Credit and Debtor
Assistance Branch 12
Education and Information Branch 13
Policy and Planning Branch 14
Special Projects 14
Corporate Affairs
Companies Office and Central Registry 16
Superintendent of Brokers, Real Estate
and Insurance 17
Superintendent of Credit Unions,
Co-operatives and Trust Companies 18
Rent
Rentalsman 21
Rent Review Commission 21
Liquor
Liquor Control and Licensing Branch 24
Liquor Distribution Branch 25
Boards and Commissions
Corporate and Financial Services
Commission 28
Auditor Certification Board 28
Travel Assurance Board 28
Rent Review Commission 28
Support Services
Administrative Services Branch 30
Legal Services Branch 30
Personnel Services Branch 30
Senior Staff 32
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 LEGISLATION ADMINISTERED BY
CONSUMER AND CORPORATE
AFFAIRS
CONSUMER AFFAIRS
Bankruptcy Act (Federal-Part X only)
Blind Persons'Rights Act
Cemeteries Act
Cemetery Companies Act
Closing-out Sales Act
Consumer Protection Act, 1967
Consumer Protection Act, 1977 (not entirely
proclaimed)
Cremation Act
Debt Collection Act
Debtor Assistance Act
Motor Dealers Licensing Act
Municipal Cemeteries Act
Pawnbrokers Act
Personal Information Reporting Act
Pyramid Distributors Act
Trade Practices Act
Trading Stamp Act
Travel Agents Registration Act
CORPORATE AFFAIRS
Assignment of Book Accounts Act
Bills of Sale Act
Commodity Contracts Trading Act (not yet
proclaimed)
Companies Act
Companies Clauses Act
Conditional Sales Act
Co-operative Associations Act
Credit Unions Act
Insurance Act
Investment Contracts Act
Marine Insurance Act
Mortgage Brokers Act
Mutual Fire Insurance Companies Act
Partnership Act
Pre-arranged Funeral Services Act
Real Estate Act
Savings and Loan Associations Act
Securities Act (excluding Section 140)
Societies Act
Strata Titles Act
Trust Companies Act (excluding Section 77)
LIQUOR CONTROL AND LICENSING
BRANCH
Liquor Control and Licensing Act
LIQUOR DISTRIBUTION BRANCH
Liquor Distribution Act
RENTALSMAN & RENT REVIEW
COMMISSION
Residential Tenancy Act
OTHER
Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs Act
 The year in review
11978-79
During its formative years, the Ministry of
Consumer and Corporate Affairs' mandate was
clearly to introduce and update laws that would
protect the public in the marketplaces of British
Columbia. When those laws were in place, the
Ministry's new challenge was to improve its
internal administrative structures in order to
provide better service to the public. Accordingly,
initial steps were taken to ensure that the
consumer, corporate, rentalsman, and liquor
functions no longer depended on small,
inadequate internal services. These
administrative improvements will be reflected in
the Ministry's report for the period ending March
31,1980, by which date reorganization will be
complete.
On the consumer side of the Ministry in 1978-79,
mediation officers assisted consumers in
recovering more than $682,695 in refunds; debt
counsellors helped debtors arrange almost $2
million in payments to their creditors, which would
not otherwise have been repaid.
 Canada's most advanced Motor Dealer Licensing
Act was proclaimed January 1,1979, and
approximately 1,600 motor dealers were
subsequently registered. This new legislation
was based on the belief that full disclosure makes
for a fair market environment.
Consumer Affairs received many complaints
regarding General Motors engine switches on
certain 1977 automobiles. As a result, the
Ministry entered into negotiations with General
Motors. Those negotiations, still underway at
fiscal year end, were later concluded with
agreement by General Motors to compensate
qualified consumers.
Tax rebating was another major area of
consumer complaint. An investigation of rebating
services resulted in prosecution of a Vancouver
tax discounter, and nearly $50,000 was returned
to taxpayers who received less than the full 85
per cent of their anticipated refund. The Ministry
was also successful in encouraging two
conventional lenders to operate tax rebate
services during the tax season.
Grants totalling nearly $140,000 to consumer
groups for consumer protection services such as
complaint handling and debtor assistance were
awarded to eleven organizations, plus an
additional $17,500 to an organization (the Pacific
Association of Communications in Friendship
Indian Centres— P.A.C.I.F.I.C) representing
native people.
On the Corporate Affairs side of the Ministry,
growth of business activity in the province over
the past few years continued again last year,
resulting in an overall increase in filings,
incorporations, assets, etc., of 11.8 per cent.
The Ministry continued to review its legislative
base in order to update irrelevant corporate
legislation and to reflect current activities and
practices. Two proposed bills were circulated as
discussion papers: The Personal Property
Security Act and The Commodity Contracts
Trading Act. The latter was passed in 1978, but
not proclaimed.
One of the Ministry's major corporate projects
was to study the province's capital markets and
the methods by which capital is raised, with a
view to restructuring securities regulation in B.C.
Two offices — the Superintendent of Credit
Unions, Co-operatives and Trust Companies,
and the Superintendent of Brokers, Real Estate
and Insurance, moved to new accommodation in
Vancouver's financial core. As expected, this
move resulted in improved access by the public.
Under the guidance of Mr. Jim Patterson
(appointed Rentalsman in April 1978) the Office
of the Rentalsman and the Rent Review
Commission were merged. Of 37 appeals to rent
increases since the gradual removal of rent
controls (announced in April 1978) in only one
case was it necessary for the Rent Review
Commission to take action to reduce the
increase. Approximately 9,000 units have been
decontrolled to date.
The Liquor Control and Licensing Branch
reviewed existing licensing policies, with a view
to incorporating unofficial procedures into
regulations. This codification of branch policy will
clarify the standards that licensees and
applicants are expected to meet.
R.A. Wallace was appointed General Manager of
the Liquor Distribution Branch. The L.D.B.
continued to improve its management and
administration procedures in an effort to provide
the public with the best possible selection of
alcohol products. One major change was the
introduction of an agent stocking program, which
has produced significant warehouse efficiencies,
reduced stock outages, and placed the onus on
agents to warehouse their product, allowing the
branch to use its facilities for distribution
purposes only. This will continue to allow growth
in volume without increasing existing L.D.B.
warehouse facilities and avoiding large capital
expenditures.
The challenge for Consumer and Corporate
Affairs in the months ahead will be to strive for
uniform excellency in the provision of services to
consumers, renters, borrowers, investors, and
the business community. As part of this process,
policy, research, finance, personnel and
administrative services will be strengthened;
administrative efficiency and accountability will
be enhanced; and computer applications will be
introduced to cope with accelerating growth in the
marketplace.
  DESCRIPTION
The Consumer Affairs Program promotes
fairness and knowledgeability in the marketplace.
Its responsibilites include:
1. Developing, administering and enforcing
consumer legislation, including the Trade
Practices Act and the Consumer Protection
Act.
2. Mediating problems between consumers and
suppliers.
3. Assisting over-committed debtors by means of
counselling services and debt-pooling
arrangements.
4. Educating consumers and businesses
regarding their rights and responsibilities.
5. Regulating specific industries, including:
cemeteries, motor dealers, and travel agents
and wholesalers.
6. Conducting research on a wide variety of
consumer related issues.
7. Providing funds to groups that provide
consumer assistance in areas not serviced by
a Consumer Centre.
BRANCHES
Operations
Enforcement
Consumer Credit and Debtor Assistance
Education and Information
Policy and Planning
Special Projects (Funded Groups)
OPERATIONS BRANCH
DESCRIPTION
The responsibilities of the Operations Branch
include the provision of consumer
complaint-handling and mediation services in
four Consumer Centres, and the regulation of
certain industries affecting consumers.
In Kamloops, Prince George, Vancouver and
Victoria, consumer workers in the Consumer
Centres look into complaints and enquiries
received from the public regarding consumer
matters. In cases where the consumer has tried
unsuccessfully to seek satisfaction from a
supplier or trader, Ministry staff will attempt to
resolve the dispute. Most consumers are given
advice about their particular problem and deal
with the matter themselves.
The Registrar of Motor Dealers is responsible for
the administration of the Motor Dealers Licensing
Act, which came into force in January, 1979. This
Act licenses motor dealers and requires them to
meet certain standards and to disclose certain
information to consumers. Compliance with the
Act is monitored by the Registrar and three
Inspectors, based in Vancouver and Kamloops.
The Registrar of Travel Agents is responsible for
the administration of the Travel Agents
Registration Act, which came into force in
February, 1978. He registers travel agents in
British Columbia, and monitors the activities of
registered travel agents to ensure their
compliance with travel legislation. In addition the
Act provides for compensation for travel services
paid for but not delivered.
The Cemeteries Division exercises a regulatory
function over all cemeteries, mausolea,
columbaria, and crematoria in British Columbia.
In addition to inspections and audits, the Division
investigates all consumer complaints forwarded
to it pertaining to the funeral and cemetery
industries.
The Operations Branch administers the Blind
Persons' Rights Act, which protects the rights of
blind people accompanied by registered guide
dogs. This program is administered in close
cooperation with the Canadian National Institute
for the Blind.
Also administered by this Branch is the Personal
Information Reporting Act, which licenses and
regulates the activities of credit bureaus and
other agencies that collect personal information.
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
• In 1978-79, the Consumer Centres received
over 100,000 telephone enquiries, and were
visited by over 18,000 people. There were
7,376 consumer complaints, which required
detailed enquiries and mediation. (These
complaints have shown a steady increase in
 recent years, and there has been a
corresponding increase in the complexity and
significance of consumer transactions
mediated by the Ministry.) As a result of the
involvement of Ministry consumer staff, rebates
amounting to $682,695.00 were returned to
consumers dissatisfied with products or
services they had purchased.
• The Motor Dealers Licensing Act was
proclaimed in January 1979.
• All motor dealers were required to re-register by
April 1, 1979. At the end of the 1978-79 fiscal
year, there were 1,612 registered motor dealers
in British Columbia.
• During 1978-79,11 registrants under the Travel
Agents Registration Act went out of business,
either through bankruptcy, a voluntary
surrender of their registration, or revocation of
their licence by the Registrar.
• There were 621 registered travel agents and
wholesalers in British Columbia as of March 31,
1979. During the year, 159 claims resulted in
payments of more than $78,000.00 under the
Travel Assurance Fund, which held
$252,260.05 at March 31,1979.
• Stewart Goodings was appointed Director in
October 1978. *
• The first Travel Assurance Board was
appointed. Appointees were as follows:
Gustav Kroll (Chairman)
Jean Douglas
Malcolm Nicholson
David Hardouin
Gerrard Manning
Bruce McCulloch*
Allan Gould**
(*Replaced in January by Stewart Goodings;
"replaced in July by David Edgar)
• Inspections of Cemeteries, Mausolea,
Columbaria, Crematoria 148
Audits/Passings of Perpetual Care Funds 37
Cemetery, Mausolea, Columbaria By-law
Amendments and Rules Approved 103
Cemetery, Mausolea, Crematoria Rate
Increase Approvals 37
Provincial Cemetery Board Appointments 9
Cemetery Closures 8
Cemetery, Mausolea Burial Areas Approved 5
Certificate of Public Interest for Crematoria 1
Certificate of Public Interest for Mausolea 1
Crematoria Licensed 11
Under the Blind Persons' Rights Act, 13
certificates were issued in 1978-79 to eligible
guide dog owners.
Under the Personal Information Reporting Act,
34 licences were issued in 1978-79, and during
this fiscal year 9,858 consumers examined their
files at credit bureaus as permitted by the Act.
Consumer Rebates by Month
April, 1978
May
June
July
August
September
October
84,188
62,547
42,482
71,088
57,067
54,098
63,325
November
December
January, 1979
February
March
Total
52,077
67,274
39,600
53,482
35,467
$682,695
ENFORCEMENT
DESCRIPTION
The Enforcement Branch takes formal
enforcement proceedings (civil or
"quasi-criminal") when consumer laws such as
the Trade Practices Act or the Consumer
Protection Act have been violated.
Under the Trade Practices Act, the Director of
Trade Practices is empowered to substitute
himself for a consumer or consumers in
situations where a principle of law requires
clarification in the public interest.
Investigators are located in each of the Ministry's
Consumer Centres (Victoria, Vancouver,
Kamloops and Prince George).
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
• The courts awarded a total of $15,600 in fines
under the Trade Practices Act and Consumer
Protection Act. Prosecution was emphasized
as an enforcement option; larger fines were
imposed towards the end of the year, including
one fine of $2,000 for a violation of the Trade
Practices Act.
 • Test shopping of suppliers by the Ministry
continued, and the first prosecution resulting
from this program was dismissed. Other
prosecutions are underway.
• In civil proceedings, awards and settlements
totalled $75,962.
• The provision of the Consumer Protection Act
which regulates tax discounters gave rise to a
constitutional challenge. The court upheld the
legislation, and subsequently the principals of a
Vancouver business were found in contempt of
an order which required that they comply with
the legislation. Both were fined.
• The following enforcement activities were
completed during the 1978/79 fiscal year:
Prosecutions 13
Substitute Actions 8
Assurances of Voluntary
Compliance (AVCs) 2
Declarations 2
Applications for Receiver  1
Total 26
CONSUMER CREDIT AND DEBTOR
ASSISTANCE
DESCRIPTION
The Consumer Credit and Debtor Assistance
Branch counsels over-committed debtors and, if
necessary, assists them in arriving at suitable
arrangements with their creditors for repayment
of their debts.
A total of 8 Debt Counsellors are located in
Vancouver, Victoria, Kamloops, Prince George
and Nanaimo.
The Branch maintains contact with the credit
industry at large, and licenses debt collectors
under the Debt Collection Act.
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
• Debtor Assistance:
(a) Total counselling sessions 4,432
(b) Orderly Payment of Debt1 orders granted
bytheBranch  496
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
*Debt
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(9)
Orderly Payment of Debt orders paid in
full, settled or defaulted 440
Net increase in case load 56
Total ongoing case load
March31,1979 1,211
(i) Orderly Payment of Debts  1,103
(ii) Debtor Assistance Pool Plan2 198
Funds receipted Orderly Payment of
Debts Program $1,487,694.01
Funds receipted Debtor Assistance
Program  362,833.98
Total Funds receipted $1,850,527.99
Funds disbursed to credit grantors
Orderly Payment of
Debts $1,575,813.12
Debtor Assistance
Pool Plan 339,329.25
Total funds disbursed $1,915,142.37
Settlements, funds saved by negotiating
settlements for debtors consistent with
their ability $161,065.99
Collection:
Number of licences issued
to agencies 110
Number of licences
issued to collectors 335
Number of written complaints
handled (April, 1978-
March31, 1979)  134
Number of telephone
complaints/enquiries 1,500
Number of licences suspended  1
Number of licences reinstated 1
Number of prosecutions under way 1
1 The "Orderly Payment of Debt" provision of
the federal Bankruptcy Act provides that a court
order may be issued, binding the debtor and
creditor to a realistic plan of repayment.
2 The"Debtor Assistance Pool Plan" is a
voluntary method of repayment acceptable to
both debtor and creditor. It may be
administered by either the Consumer Credit
and Debtor Assistance Branch, or by the
debtor.
 EDUCATION AND INFORMATION
BRANCH
DESCRIPTION
The Branch is responsible for explaining laws
and policy, and providing advice to the public by
means of public speaking engagements, news
releases, enforcement reports, radio and
television appearances, newspaper interviews,
etc. Information officers also look after
advertising and general public relations programs
for the Ministry as a whole.
Resource centres, located in the Ministry's
storefront offices, provide books, magazines,
clipping files, and consumer product reports, to
help consumers make more informed decisions
in the marketplace. Also, consumer education
kits are provided for teachers to use in
classrooms across the province.
The Trade Liaison Division keeps the business
community up to date with guidelines and
bulletins on consumer legislation.
A special Trade Liaison team monitors
newspaper, radio and television advertising;
questionable ads are followed up by telephone
and letters.
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
• The following publications were printed and
distributed:
1. "The Personal Information Reporting Act
and You"
2. "Trade Practices Act and You" (revised)
3. "Money Marketplace"
4. Court referral program materials ("Small
Claims Court Referral Program" and
"Family Court Referral Program")
5. "Travel Agents Registration Act" (trade
bulletin)
6. Travel Agents Registration Act
(pamphlet)
7. Consumer Assistance Directory 1978/79
8. Credit Advertising Guidelines
9. "No Down Payment — No Payment Till"
(trade bulletin)
10. Motor Dealer Directory Supplement
11. Motor Dealers Licensing Act and
Regulations (consolidated and printed in
booklet form for dealers and R.C.M.P.)
40 news stories were released
• "Consumer Action", a syndicated newspaper
column providing advice to consumers, was
approved for distribution 1979/80, and a
sample column was prepared for use by
community newspapers throughout the
province.
Banners were prepared for Ministry use in fairs
and exhibitions.
• Two enforcement reports (#20 and #21) were
issued.
i Radio advertisements were produced,
informing the public of new rights under the
Travel Agents Registration Act.
John Usher was appointed Director of
Consumer Education and Information.
9 A campaign to discourage alcohol abuse was
launched in October 1978, and was
subsequently discontinued in March, 1979, at
the conclusion of phase 1. The program was
taken over by the Ministry of Health.
• A ministry slide/tape show was produced,
describing Ministry activities.
• Trade Liaison seminars were conducted at
Parksville and Victoria, to explain Ministry
policies to the media and the advertising
community; Trade Liaison staff also interviewed
employees of all major department store
advertising departments in Victoria, with a
similar objective.
Distribution statistics were as follows:
(a) Letters/Requests: 1,884
(b) Acts:  22,580
(c) Brochures: 126,864
(d) Teachers'Kits: 1,237
(e) Education materials: 2,823
(f) Advertising Guidelines: 1,470
(g) Motor Dealers Guidelines: 737
Total  157,595
 POLICY AND
PLANNING BRANCH
DESCRIPTION
The Policy and Planning Branch was formed on
April 1,1978, from an expanded Research
Division which had been part of the Community
Programs Branch. Its mandate was extended to
provide a central resource of policy, research and
planning services to all parts of the Consumer
Affairs Program. Its functions are to coordinate
the development of policy within the Consumer
Affairs Program; to assist other Branches to
develop programs, policies and legislation; and to
conduct research on problems and questions
referred to it by other branches.
In the coming year (1979-80) it is planned to
amalgamate the Policy and Planning Branch with
the Corporate Staff Group (presently part of the
Corporate Affairs Program) to form a single
Policy, Legislation and Program Planning
Branch, reporting directly to the Deputy Minister
and responsible for coordinating all policy,
research and program planing functions within
the Ministry.
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
& Research was conducted in the following
areas: franchising; sequential dialling
machines; coupons; warranty and product
liability legislation; regulatory systems for
mail-order companies; mortgage foreclosures;
moving and storage industries; wine tariffs in
the European Economic Community; federal
proposals to change Bank Act legislation;
Sunday shopping; reverse annuity mortgages;
direct mail marketing ethics; car mileage
claims; liquor price index; motor vehicle rusting
complaints.
• The Food Price Monitoring program, which had
monitored food price trends in B.C. since
January, 1976, was transferred to the Markets
Branch of the Ministry of Agriculture.
SPECIAL PROJECTS
(FUNDED GROUPS)
DESCRIPTION
A special projects officer provides administrative
assistance and briefing material for the Assistant
Deputy Minister (Consumer Affairs) and for
inter-provincial task forces. She also co-ordinates
the Ministry's funded group program, which
provides consumer assistance in areas not
serviced by a Consumer Centre.
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
• Grants totalling $140,000 were awarded to
eleven consumer organizations for the
provision of consumer services (such as
complaint handling and debtor assistance) in
areas not easily serviced by a Consumer
Centre.
Grants were awarded as follows:
Consumers' Association
of Canada $ 35,000
Matsqui Abbotsford Community
Services 20,000
Vernon Social Planning Council  6,500
Smithers Community Law Centre 7,500
Surrey Intersection Society 20,000
South Okanagan Civil
Liberties Society (Penticton)  14,000
Legal Information Services,
Maple Ridge 5,000
Powell River Civil Liberties Society .... 13,000
Terrace Community Services 5,000
Quesnel Human Rights and Civil
Liberties Association 7,000
Williams Lake Community
Law Centre  7,000
Total  $140,000
• The Ministry also provided assistance to native
people by means of a grant to the Pacific
Association of Communications in Friendship
Indian Centres (P.A.C.I.F.I.C.), to improve
native peoples' access to consumer services.
The grant totalled $17,500.
 sfe^»
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ompanies Office
itendent of Brokers,
Superintendent
hMHfcliIH:
Unions,
mpanies
""'?
 DESCRIPTION
The Corporate Affairs Division of the Ministry
regulates financial, commercial and investment
activities undertaken in the province, for the
benefit of market participants and British
Columbians in general.
The division is oriented toward the protection and
preservation of a free market, the promotion of
sound business and investment practices, and
the development of policies to balance investor
protection and economic growth.
Specific goals of the division include:
1. Protecting the investing public.
2. Ensuring the operating efficiency of capital
markets and business institutions.
3. Maintaining public confidence in business and
financial institutions.
4. Encouraging individual ownership of business,
securities, real estate and other forms of
investment.
5. Maximizing returns to the economy as a
whole.
BRANCHES
Companies Office and Central Registry
Superintendent of Brokers, Real Estate
and Insurance
Superintendent of Credit Unions,
Co-operatives and Trust Companies
COMPANIES OFFICE AND CENTRAL
REGISTRY
DESCRIPTION
The Registrar-General is responsible for all
documents filed in the Central Registry, and for
the administration of all matters relating to the
filing of corporate documents under the B.C.
Companies Act, Societies Act and other related
statutes.
The office maintains complete corporate files on
all B.C. companies, extra-provincial companies,
co-operatives, partnerships, societies and trust
companies. It also maintains specialized files on
library commissions, cemeteries, railroads and
savings and loan associations.
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
• On April 1,1978, the Companies Office and
the Central Registry were integrated as one
office under the Registrar-General. This was a
major step toward simplifying the filing of all
corporate and personal property registrations
by everyone in the province.
• There was a general increase of 11.8% over
last year in new incorporations and also a total
revenue increase of 11.8%; there was no
increase in the fee structure (indicating an
increase in workload of about the same
percentage).
• Preliminary work connected with placing basic
corporation records on an active on-line
computer system was completed.
• Amendments to the Partnership Act were
proclaimed in November, 1978, to provide for
the registration of extra-provincial limited
partnerships.
• At March 31,1979 there were approximately
1,800,000 encumbrances on the Central
Registry data base.
• The "Personal Property Security Act" was
circulated to the private sector as a discussion
paper. This statute will codify legislation
dealing with the registration of chattel
mortgages and other security interests in
personal property.
• Companies Office:
1.     Incorporations & Registrations 1978-79
(a)
B.C. Companies
15,755
(b)
Extra-Provincial Companies
1,181
(c)
Trust Companies
3
(d)
Partnerships
2,784
(e)
Co-operatives
42
(f)
Societies
786
(g)
Changes of Name
(Companies)
2,372
(h)
Changes of Name
(Societies)
72
 (i)   Amalgamations 262
(j)   Continuations - 37 A
(into the Province) 104
(k)   Continuations - 37 B
(out of Province) 106
(I)   Roll-Overs 1,412
2. Dissolutions & Restorations
(a) Companies 5,139
(b) Societies 678
(c) Partnerships 114
(d) Company Restorations 167
3. Encumbrances 63,457
4. General Filings 146,357
5. Miscellaneous
(a) Certificates of Good Standing   4,462
(b) Certified Copies 7,436
(c) Change of Objects - Societies      107
(d) Partnership Changes 92
6. Searches 147,945
7. Total Revenue $4,491,827
(Increase -11.8%)
• Central Registry:
1. Documents Registered
Under: 1978-79
(a) Conditional Sales Act 70,719
(b) Bills of Sale Act 261,894
(c) Mechanics' Lien Act 39,440
(d) Assignment of Book
Accounts Act 2,125
(e) Companies Act 943
(f) Provincial Home Acquisition
Act 103
(g) Late Order Registrations for
Conditional Sales Act 7,350
(h)   Late Order Registrations for
Bills of Sale Act 29,379
(i)   Late Order Registrations for
Assignment of Book
Accounts Act 103
2. Documents Discharged Under:
(a) Conditional Sales Act 4,140
(b) Bills of Sale Act 15,151
(c) Mechanics'Lien Act 4,510
(d) Assignment of Book
Accounts Act 111
(e) Companies Act 420
(f) Provincial Home Acquisition Act   787
Total Number of Documents
Filed 437,175
3.     Revenue:
(a) Document
Registration Fees $3,351,794.00
(b) Search Fees 551,333.80
(c) Photocopy Fees 11,843.15
Total Revenue $3,914,970.95
SUPERINTENDENT OF BROKERS,
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
DESCRIPTION
The Superintendent regulates the investment,
insurance and real estate industries for the
protection of investors. He also contributes to the
optimization of the economy of British Columbia
by encouraging operating efficiency in the capital
markets, stimulating individual investment in
securities, and monitoring the marketplace in real
estate and insurance transactions.
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
• The "Commodity Contracts Trading Act" was
introduced as a bill in June 1978 to regulate
trading in commodity futures contracts,
commodity futures options, and traders in those
commodities.
• A provision was enacted under the "Ministry of
Consumer Affairs Statutes Amendment Act",
requiring real estate agents to keep records of
every transaction involving the receipt of
money; in addition, the Superintendent of Real
Estate was empowered to accept a prospectus
for filing before a strata plan is deposited in the
land registry.
• A voluntary "residential disclosure statement"
was circulated to real estate agents and
salespeople, to provide purchasers of older
homes with information about problems not
easily discernable on inspection (e.g. drainage,
insulation, etc.).
 • Registrations
(a) Securities Act
(b) Mortgage Brokers Act
(c) Investment Contracts Act
1,562
1,126
4
• Licences Issued
(a) Insurance Act
(b) Real Estate Act
(c) Debt Collection Act (April-June)
8,570
15,492
97
• Vettings and Filings
(a)   Securities Act
1. Prospectuses accepted
2. Statements of Material
Facts accepted
(b)   Real Estate/Strate Titles Act
461
199
1. Subdivisions accepted
2. Strata Plans approved
824
477
• Hearings
(a) Before the Superintendent
(b) Before the Corporate and Financial
Services Commission
11
14
• Rulings and Orders
(a) Securities Act
(b) Real Estate Act
(c) Societies Act
1,050
2
8
• Suspensions/Cancellations
(a) Securities Act
(b) Mortgage Brokers Act
5
47
• Investigation Orders/Investigations
(a) Completed
(b) Underway
244
90
• Prosecutions
Total (Securities Act, Mortgage
Brokers Act, Criminal Code)
9
• Revenue
(a) Securities Act/
Mortgage Brokers Act
(b) Real Estate Act
(c) Insurance Act
(d) Debt Collection Act
(April-June)
(e) Miscellaneous
$148,932.50
$231,988.00
$525,524.31
$    3,250.00
$ 10,683.94
SUPERINTENDENT OF CREDIT
UNIONS, CO-OPERATIVES AND
TRUST COMPANIES
DESCRIPTION
The office of the Superintendent of Credit Unions,
Co-operatives and Trust Companies is
responsible for: regulating credit unions and
examining their finances regularly; registering
co-operatives; and regulating and inspecting all
trust companies operating in the province.
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
1.   Credit Unions
• Total credit union assets continued to grow in
1978, reaching $3.8 billion as at March 31,
1979 — an increase of 29.5 per cent over
1977/78.
• Membership in credit unions reached 896,921
by the end of March.
• Liquidity reserves as at March 31,1979 were
12.05 per cent of the net share capital and
deposits, an excess of $73,538,117 over the
statutory requirement.
The number of credit unions in the province
dropped to 166 from 173 as a result of several
amalgamations and the dissolution of OMREB
credit union.
• The office's six inspectors inspected a total of
129 credit unions.
Senior staff attended two meetings of the
National Association of Administrators of
Co-operative Legislation during 1978. B.C.
hosted the western regional meeting of
NAACL in January, and the annual convention
was held in Edmonton in June.
» The Ministry met with B.C. Central Credit
Union on several occasions to discuss
proposed changes to the Credit Unions Act,
including expansion of investment powers for
credit unions,and the provision of clear
guidelines for credit unions seeking to set up
branches.
 Assets of the Provincial Share and Deposit
Guarantee Fund (which provides an unlimited
guarantee on the shares and deposits of credit
union members) totalled $30.4 million at March
31,1979.
Co-operatives:
Comments received from the co-operative
system regarding "A Proposed Bill to Regulate
Co-operative Associations" (which was
circulated for input in November 1977)
indicated that the proposed legislation is too
cumbersome for the needs of smaller
co-operatives. Accordingly, the bill has not yet
been introduced in the Legislature, and is
under review.
42 new co-operatives were incorporated,
including 14 housing co-ops, 16 consumer
co-ops, 9 producer co-ops, 1 service co-op,
and 2 others of a general nature.
3.   Trust Companies
As of March 31, there were 110 trust company
branch offices, an increase of 64 per cent
since 1975.
• 16 of a total of 29 main offices were inspected
during the fiscal year, as well as 23 of a total of
81 branch offices.
• The initial Conference of Administrators of
Trust Companies Legislation was sponsored
by the Ministry in November 1978. It was
attended by delegates from the federal and
provincial governments and the Yukon.
• Assets under administration by trust
companies in B.C. totalled $4,244,142,267,
including: demand deposits and certificates;
term deposits and certificates; other special
deposits; and estates, trusts and agency
funds.
® Demand deposits from the public totalled
$244,102,691.
• Guaranteed investment certificates and term
deposits totalled $1,035,022,525.
• Overall total of deposits and certificates was
$1,259,125,216.
• Mortgage lendings totalled $2,531,737,730.
 V
m   ■••'■
:
sion
HI \     w"-'. ■
 RENTALSMAN
DESCRIPTION
The Rentalsman has exclusive jurisdiction over
most matters involving rented residential
premises throughout the Province of British
Columbia including:
1. Termination of tenancies
2. Right to possession of residential premises
3. Disposition of security deposits
4. Disposition of abandoned chattels
4. Contractual rights and obligations
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
» Mr. J. Patterson was appointed Rentalsman,
effective May 1,1978, while retaining his
position as Commissioner on the Rent Review
Commission.
• The Rentalsman and the Rent Review
commission completed arrangements for
merger.
• The head office in Vancouver and regional
office in Victoria recorded a 45% increase in
workload.
• Regional offices were approved for Kelowna,
Kamloops, Prince George and Cranbrook.
• Proposed amendments to the Residential
Tenancy Act were submitted.
«  17,200 case files were opened.
• 242,304 telephone inquiries were received.
• 13,428 members of the public visited
Rentalsman offices.
• 2,886 inspections were conducted.
RENT REVIEW COMMISSION
DESCRIPTION
All matters concerning rent rates and increases,
as outlined in the Residential Tenancy Act, are
the responsibility of the Rent Review
Commission.
The Commission is empowered to conduct
research and inquire into any aspect of rent
payments in general and to determine specific
rent payments.
In addition, inquiry officers appointed by the
Commission may investigate complaints by
either tenants or landlords, and mediate or confer
with the parties and hold hearings. The decisions
or orders of the inquiry officers, subject to appeal
to the Commission, are binding on the landlord
and tenant.
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
• The rental housing situation during the year
was quiet because of the relatively high
vacancy rates in most communities in the
Province, and because many landlords
declined to take those increases to which they
were entitled.
'   During the year the first steps towards rent
de-control were taken. The first step was
announced in April (effective August 1)
lowering the general exemption level from
$500 to $400. The second step, announced in
October effective February 1, introduced rent
de-control by the size of apartment as
measured by the number of bedrooms. This
step exempted 1-bedroom and studio units
renting over $300, 2-bedroom units renting
over $350, and 3 or more bedroom units
renting over $400.
• The implementation of de-control provisions
brought into play for the first time the appeal
system embodied in Section 70 of the
Residential Tenancy Act for tenants of
de-controlled units. These tenants, if they find
a rent increase excessive, may appeal to the
Commission for an adjudication. During the
year only 37 appeals were made, indicating
that most landlords were taking only moderate
increases. (Of those 37 appeals, only one
resulted in a lowered increase.)
The first court challenge to the constitutionality
of the Rent Review Commission's function was
made in a case entitled Cohen et al vs. Dhillon
et al, which remained unresolved at the end of
the year.
 • The budget for the fiscal year 1978-79 for the
Commission was $542,806, which was
underspent by about $80,000. The normal staff
complement during this period was 24
persons.
• Notices of Rent Increase Received      127,048
Applications for Additional rent Increases   402
- approved 289
- denied 49
- withdrawn or pending 64
- number of units involved 2,476
Section 70 Applications Received
- resolved in favour of landlord
- resolved in favour of tenant
- withdrawn or pending
- refused
59
29
2
27
1
Files Opened
3,395
Files Closed
3,137
Letters Sent
22,287
Letters Received
20,486
Telephone Calls Received
26,089
Formal Hearings
117
 '■■:'::;
"     *
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ir^jpaMJj
 LIQUOR CONTROL & LICENSING
BRANCH
DESCRIPTION
The Liquor Control and Licensing Branch,
pursuant to the provisions of the Liquor Control &
Licensing Act and Regulations, is engaged in the
following activities:
1. Issuing and transferring license for the sale of
liquor.
2. Licensing breweries, distilleries and wineries.
3. Licensing the agents of breweries, distilleries
and wineries.
4. Monitoring and controlling liquor advertising
in the province.
5. Inspecting licensed premises to ensure they
comply with the law.
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
• A major overhaul of B.C. liquor regulations was
initiated. The Ministry contracted the
province's 5000 liquor licensees asking them
to recommend changes to the regulations, with
a view to simplifying and clarifying liquor laws.
Subsequently, the Minister hosted an all day
session with senior branch officials,
representatives of the major licensee
associations, and municipal and police
authorities, to discuss common problems and
potential solutions.
• A "marine pub" licensing category was
created, in response to the unique
requirements of geographical areas that focus
on a body of water as a source of recreation,
transportation, and/or livelihood.
• Draft beer servings in public houses and
neighbourhood pubs were converted to metric
(1/4 litre glasses, and Vfe litre steins). Wine was
made available in 1/4, Vz and 1 litre carafes.
• Changes were made to the Liquor Control and
Licensing Act to provide for a cottage wine
industry in British Columbia.
Allan Gould was appointed Deputy General
Manager.
• Distillery licence fees were reduced to $1000
per annum (as opposed to four cents per
gallon of proof alcohol).
• Licence categories:
A Licences:   Hotels, resorts, clubs,
recreational centres, aircraft,
trains, motor vessels,
international airports, municipally
and provincially owned cultural
centres, universities, military
messes.
B Licences:   Dining establishments primarily
engaged in the service of food,
and Department of Transport
airports with meal facilites.
C Licences:   Cabarets primarily engaged in
providing entertainment.
D Licences:   Neighborhood Public Houses.
E Licences:   Sports stadiums or concert halls.
F Licences:   Establishments oriented to
marine activities (Marine Public
Houses).
• Licences issued, transferred, suspended or
surrendered or cancelled:
Licences
Licences
Issued
Transferred
A Licences
1,213
87
B Licences
2,490
304
C Licences
289
42
D Licences
126
22
E Licences
—
—
Distillers Licences
6
—
Winery Licences
6
-
Brewers Licences
4
—
Totals
4,134
455
Licences    Surrendered
Suspended or Cancelled
A Licences
47
62
B Licences
30
48
C Licences
29
7
D Licences
8
1
Totals
114
118
 » Liquor Control and Licensing Revenue for the
Year Ended March 31,1979:
Annual Licence Issuance Fees $418,900.00
Distillers Licence Fees 238,033.73
Winery Licence Fees 9,250.00
Brewers Licence Fees 411,633.13
Liquor Purchase Assessment
Fees 7,397,533.64
Transfer Fees 22,750.00
Transfer of Shares & Sundry
Receipts 12,699.00
Special Occasion Licences 87,510.50
$8,598,310.00
LIQUOR DISTRIBUTION BRANCH
DESCRIPTION
The Liquor Distribution Branch (LDB) is
responsible for all physical operations connected
with liquor distribution in British Columbia. Its
goal is to provide liquor to the people of British
Columbia in an efficient manner while bearing in
mind all the social and legal responsibilities
connected with liquor.
The advantages of this single distribution system
to consumers are several:
1. It provides equitable service, at the least
cost, to all residents in the province, while
returning maximum revenue to government.
2. It assures consumers of being charged the
same price everywhere in the province.
3. It is the most economical, with savings
arrived at through bulk purchasing, and a
centralized distribution centre.
4. It provides consumers with a complete
choice of listings throughout the province.
Service is provided in remote areas for public
convenience.
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
• At year end, the LDB was selling
approximately 1500 different product listings
(wines, beer and spirits).
• The Branch's Agent Stocking program,
initiated in mid-1978, transferred the
responsibilities of importing and inventory
control from the government to the private
sector. At present, more than 95 per cent of all
imported products are purchased through local
agents participating in this program.
• Robert A. Wallace was appointed General
Manager in July, 1978.
• Re-pricing policy for liquor on shelves in
government liquor stores was changed in
March 1979, to be effective May, 1979. Under
the new policy, when a price is increased price
tags on shelf stock will not be changed;
however, products subject to a price decrease
will be re-tagged at the lower price.
• Effective March 1, 1979 retail price changes in
liquor stores were instituted on a monthly
basis, as required, rather than tri-annually.
• Domestic beer was unavailable for the
summer months as a result of a labour dispute
at B.C. breweries. In response, the Liquor
Distribution Branch imported approximately 8
million cases of American beer, which were
sold at a discount when the dispute ended.
Total sales of American beer exceeded
$40,000,000, producing a net profit of
approximately $14,000,000.
• Liquor bottled in B.C. with locally
manufactured bottles and labels was made
available in 40 ounce bottles.
• Six replacement stores were completed, three
new stores opened, and major upgrading and
conversion to self-serve occurred in four
stores, bringing the total to 207 liquor stores.
Twenty new Agency stores were appointed
during this period bringing the total to 41.
• A new "wine and specialty shoppe" was
opened in Vancouver at 1120 Alberni Street,
bringing the total number of specialty stores to
nine.
 • Financial Statement: April 1,1978 -
March 31,1979
1. Summary of Balance Sheet as at March 31,
1979
Assets
Current Assets $31,618,843.
Fixed Assets (at cost, less
accumulated depreciation) 2,365,902.
Total Assets $33,984,745
Liabilities
Current Liabilities $27,183,136.
Working Capital Advance 6,801,609.
Total Liabilities $33,984,745.
2. Summary of Statement of Income, year
ended March 31,1979
Sales $526,198,275.
Cost of merchandise sold      $277,022,895.
$249,175,380.
$ 19,955,196.
$269,130,576.
$ 64,750,372.
$204,380,204.
$    2,628,715
$207,008,919.
Provincial Malt Levy
Operating Expenses
Other Income
Net Income
26
 BOAR
COMMIS
Corporate
Servic
Auditor Cer
Travel A
fiMfi
mission
loard
|;5lY:
 CORPORATE AND FINANCIAL
SERVICES COMMISSION
DESCRIPTION
The Commission acts as an appellant body to
hear and review rulings under certain sections of
the following statutes: The Securities Act,
Mortgage Brokers Act, Companies Act, Credit
Union Act, The Liquor Control and Licensing Act,
Liquor Distribution Act, the Travel Agents
Registration Act, and the Motor Dealers
Licensing Act.
Generally any person, or company primarily
affected by any administrative direction, decision,
order, or ruling under any of the above Acts, or by
a stock exchange, has a right of appeal to this
Commission. (There are specific exceptions).
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
• The Commission heard 14 appeals, requiring
20 days of hearing and review. The appeals
were made under the following statutes:
8 under the Liquor Control and
Licensing Act
4 under the Securities Act
1 under the Companies Act
1 under the Credit Unions Act
• During the fiscal year there were several
changes in the membership of the
Commission. Mr. Leon Getz resigned as
chairman on June 30,1978; his successor, Dr.
G.F. Curtis, Q.C, was appointed August 31,
1978. Mr. K.G. Russell was appointed a
member May 4,1978. Toward the end of that
same month, David A.L. Tait's untimely death
robbed the Commission of a valuable member,
On August31,1978 member J.M. McEwen
was appointed. Other ongoing members were
vice-chairman H.F. Herbert and Prof. W.A.W.
Neilson.
AUDITOR CERTIFICATION BOARD
DESCRIPTION
The Board examines and certifies individuals,
who are not chartered accountants or certified
general accountants, as auditors of reporting
companies.
A reporting company is generally one which
comes under one of the following specific areas.
(a) a company with securities listed on any
stock exchange.
(b) a company ordered by the Superintendent
of Brokers to be a reporting company;
(c) a company deemed to be a public company
prior to the 1973 Companies Act;
(d) any corporation by or under an act of the
Legislature.
TRAVEL ASSURANCE BOARD
(See page 11 under "Operations Branch")
RENT REVIEW COMMISSION
(See Page 21)
 • Administrative Services Bra
• Legal Servicfilgpnch
• Personnel Services Branch
V   i
4
 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
BRANCH
DESCRIPTION
The Administrative Services Branch provides
central services to all programs of the Ministry.
These central services are as follows:
1. Co-ordination of Ministry budget, budget
control, accounting for revenues and
expenditures, and processing accounts
payable.
2. In co-operation with the Purchasing
Commission and the office of the Queen's
Printer, acquisition of office supplies and
office furniture and equipment.
3. In co-operation with the Buildings
Corporation of British Columbia, provision of
adequate office space for all Ministry
programs.
4. Provision of other services of a
miscellaneous nature that may be required
from time to time.
Note: The above does not include the provision
of Personnel Services.
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
• All Victoria Consumer and Corporate Affairs
personnel moved into Provincial Government
Office Building #2 (940 Blanshard Street).
• The following table indicates administrative
expenditures during the fiscal year ended
March 31,1979.
Salaries                approximately
$ 7,490,000
Office Expenses    approximately
509,000
Office Furniture
and Equipment  approximately
166,000
Materials and
Supplies            approximately
55,000
Acquisition of
Motor Vehicles   approximately
29,000
Building
Occupancy
Charges            approximately
1,490,000
Total Expenditures,
including miscellaneous
expenditures not itemized above
$11,608,595
LEGAL SERVICES BRANCH
DESCRIPTION
The Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs
administers 43 pieces of legislation and
countless regulations.
The Legal Services Branch provides legal
services to the rest of the Ministry. The need for
new legislation or for changes to existing
legislation are summarized, and in many cases
made the subject of legislative bills or
amendments to be introduced by the Ministry.
Invariably, many problems brought to the
attention of the Ministry by consumers are of a
legal nature and require legal advice. In addition,
the debtor assistance role performed by the
Ministry means that individuals with debt
problems seek advice and assistance. Again,
many debt problems also involve legal problems.
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
• J. David Edgar was appointed Director of
Legal Services on January 18,1979. He
succeeded Allan Gould.
• Law students were retained on a part-time
basis throughout the year to assist in legal
research and advisory work.
PERSONNEL SERVICES BRANCH
DESCRIPTION
The Personnel Services Branch oversees all
personnel functions, including recruitment of all
new employees, job evaluation and organization
analysis, labour relations, staff training and
development, and employee relations. A major
role of this office is to provide assistance and
advice to senior managers on the evaluation of
their organizations's structures, as they relate to
the goals and objectives of their particular
branch.
ACTIVITIES 1978/79
• At the end of the fiscal year, there were 473
regular employees in the Ministry, an increase
of 57 over 1977/78. (Note: these figures
exclude Liquor Distribution. See the LDB
Annual Report.)
 A total of 81 competitions for positions were
held, and 182 regular positions were filled.
Forty-three students were hired under the
Work in Government program.
There were two deaths and nine retirements;
84 employees resigned or transferred out of
the Ministry.
The following management positions were
filled: Director of Operations; Director of
Education and Information; General Manager
of Liquor Distribution; and Deputy General
Manager of Liquor Control and Licensing.
• Central Registry was transferred from the
Ministry of Energy, Transport and
Communications to Consumer and Corporate
Affairs.
• The Rentalsman and the Rent Review
Commission were merged.
 Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs
SENIOR STAFF
As At February 1,1980
Minister
Hon. James A. Nielsen
Director of Licensing
D. Andersen
Deputy Minister
P. Bazowski
Director of Enforcement
D.D. Cliffe
Executive Director of
Director of Policy,
Finance and
Administration
W. Stewart
Research and
Administration
K.G. Stewart
Director, Legal
Manager, Administration
N. Fielding
Services Branch
D. Edgar
Liquor Distribution Branch
Director, Policy,
Legislation and
General Manager,
R.A. Wallace
Program Planning
Director, Finance
L.N. Dyer
(acting)
J.C. Lovelace
Director, Management
Rentalsman
J.D. Patterson
Services
S.P. Dubas
Deputy Rentalsman
F. Fenn
Director, Personnel
Department
A.I. Allen
Deputy Rentalsman
L.W. McArthur
Director, Purchasing
Deputy Rentalsman
P.B. Smith
(acting)
C. Ruddick
Deputy Rentalsman
D.A. Tant
Director, Store
Deputy Rentalsman
L.R. Tubman
Operations
A.V. Branham
Consumer Affairs Program
Director, Distribution
Consumer Affairs,
(acting)
R. Kyle
Assistant Deputy
Security Manager
J.R. Bowcott
Minister (acting)
S. Goodings
Communications
Director of Enforcement
M. Hanson
Manager
CJ. Courtney
Director of Education
and Information
J. Usher
Director of Consumer
BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS
Credit and Debtor
Assistance
H. Atkinson
TRAVEL ASSURANCE BOARD
Director of Operations
S. Goodings
Chairman
G. Kroll
Member
J. Douglas
Corporate Affairs Program
Member
M. Nicholson
Corporate Affairs,
Member
D. Hardouin
Assistant Deputy
Member
G. Manning
Minister
ET. Cantell
Member
D. Edgar
Superintendent of
Member
S. Goodings
Brokers, Real Estate
and Insurance
R.L. Bullock
CORPORATE AND FINANCIAL
SERVICES COMMISSION
Deputy Superintendent
of Brokers
E.T. Jewitt
Chairman
W.H.K. Edmonds
Deputy Superintendent of
Vice-Chairman
C.F. Long
Real Estate and Insurance
T.D. Hammill
Member
J.H. Carter
Superintendent of
Member
J.M. McEwen
Credit Unions,
Member
K.G. Russel
Co-operatives and
AUDITORS' CERTIFICATION BOARD
Trust Companies
J.H. Thomas
Chairman
R. Campion
Registrar of Companies
M.A. JorredeSt. Jorre
Member
W.S. Irwin
Deputy Registrar
L.G. Huck
Member
F.B.Adams
Liquor Control
Member
W.J. Fedorak
and Licensing Branch
Member
G.C. Gray
General Manager
V.C. Woodland
RENT REVIEW COMMISION
Deputy
A. Gould
Manager
J.D. Patterson

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