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Report of the Ministry of Forests Year Ended December 31, 1979 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1980

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Report of the
Ministry of Forests
"
Year Ended December 31, 1979
Province of British Columbia
Ministry of Forests
Honourable T. M. Waterland, Minister
T. M. Apsey, Deputy Minister
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March 14,1980
The Honourable Henry P. Bell-Irving, d.s.o.,o.b.e.,e.d.
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR:
Herewith I respectfully submit the Annual Report
of the Ministry of Forests for the year ended
December 31,1979.
Yours truly,
T. M. Waterland,
Minister.
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March 14,1980
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The Honourable T.M. Waterland,
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Minister of Forests,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
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Sir:
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I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of
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the Ministry of Forests for the year ended
December 31,1979.
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Yours truly,
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T.M. Apsey,
Deputy Minister.
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 Directory
"1
Minister
Hon. T. M. Waterland, Victoria
Executive Committee
T. M. Apsey, Deputy Minister, Victoria
W. Young, Assistant Deputy Minister, Forestry Division,
Victoria
R. W. Robbins, Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations
Division, Victoria
W. G. Bishop, Assistant Deputy Minister, Timber, Range and
Recreation Division, Victoria
J. C.Johnston, Assistant Deputy Minister, Finance and
Administration Division, Victoria
Staff Consultant
J. A. K. Reid, Victoria
Branch Directors
J. R. Cox, Director, Information Services Branch, Victoria
E. Knight, Director, Strategic Studies Branch, Victoria
C.J. Highsted, Director, Planning Branch, Victoria
F. Hegyi, Director, Inventory Branch, Victoria
R. L. Schmidt, Director, Research Branch, Victoria
J. B. Bruce, Director, Silviculture Branch, Victoria
D. H. Owen, Director, Protection Branch, Victoria
J. Milroy, Director, Range Management Branch, Victoria
L. W. Lehrle, Director, Timber Management Branch, Victoria
H. N. Marshall, Director, Recreation Management Branch,
Victoria
R. D. Thomas, Director, Valuation Branch, Victoria
C. P. Williams, Director, Engineering Branch, Victoria
L. G. Underwood, Director, Personnel Services Branch,
Victoria
R. W. Long, Ministry Comptroller, Financial Services Branch,
Victoria
F. Towler, Director, Systems Services Branch, Victoria
J. Sheppard, Director, Legal and Administrative Services
Branch, Victoria
J. H. Taylor, Director, Technical Services Branch, Victoria
Regional Managers
J. A. D. McDonald, Cariboo Forest Region, Williams Lake
A. B. Robinson, Kamloops Forest Region, Kamloops
M. G. Isenor, Nelson Forest Region, Nelson
D. Grant, Prince George Forest Region, Prince George
J. A. Biickert, Prince Rupert Forest Region, Prince Rupert
A. C. MacPherson, Vancouver Forest Region, Vancouver
 Page
Deputy Minister's Message     6
I An Introduction 10
The Legislation 11
The Ministry of Forests Act 11
The Forest Act 12
The Range Act 12
The Structure of the Ministry 13
Headquarters Organization  13
Forest Region Organization  14
II Branch Reports  19
Information Services  20
Strategic Studies  21
Planning 22
Inventory  23
Research 24
Silviculture 25
Protection  26
Range Management 28
Timber Management 29
Recreation Management  30
Valuation  31
Engineering 32
Personnel Services  33
Systems Services 34
New Branches 35
Legal and Administrative Services  35
Technical Services  35
III Statistical Tables 37
Silviculture Activity 40
Nurseries Activity  43
Forest Protection  46
Timber Harvesting 50
Inventory Information  53
Range Management 58
Recreation Management 59
Forest Industry  60
Stumpage Prices and Ministry Financial Statements .... 61
 Deputy
Minister's
Message
Hgii
Deputy Minister's Message
The year 1979 was a memorable one not only for the province's forest industry but also for the Ministry of Forests. It
was a year when the province enjoyed a record timber harvest,
more than 76 million cubic metres (m^) — about one million
cubic metres more than the previous record set in 1978. It was a
year when forest and range revenues to the province exceeded
$450 million, more than the combined revenues of the previous
four years.
For many forest product companies, 1979 was also a year
of record sales and earnings from near record production of
the province's main forest products. Domestic and foreign demand for most of the province's forest products remained
strong throughout 1979. Because of the lower value of the
Canadian dollar, Canadian forest products were very competitive in world markets. While the performance of the forest industry in 1980 may not match that of 1979, it should still be
satisfactory. Demand for lumber is expected to decline due to
reduced residential construction activity in the United States,
but the demand for other products, such as pulp and newsprint, is expected to continue at present high levels. The
favourable longer term prospects for the provincial industry
are reflected in the more than $1 billion of capital and repair
expenditures made by the industry in 1979 to equip and modernize its plants.
Provincial revenues from range use also rose significantly
from $560,000 in 1978 to $780,000 in 1979. This increase is
due to a new system of assessing charges rather than real
growth in the ranching industry. However, with higher prices
for beef, range use did increase to more than 900 000 animal
unit months (AUM's).
For the Ministry of Forests, 1979 was an extremely busy
year. It was the year when new legislation, the Forest Act, the
Range Act and the Ministry of Forests Act, gave new directions
for managing the province's forest and range resources.
Under its new mandate, the ministry submitted to the provincial cabinet three reports, Forest and Range Resource Analysis
Report, Forest and Range Resource Analysis Technical Report, and Five-Year Forest and Range Resource Program,
which examine the province's forest and range resources and
set forth a program to maintain and enhance these resources.
These reports will be presented to the Legislative Assembly
in 1980.
The growing recognition of the importance of the forest
resource to the province is also apparent in the rapid increase
in provincial expenditures on silviculture over the past several
years. In addition, the federal government and the Province of
British Columbia signed an agreement in May 1979 to jointly
fund a $50 million, five year intensive forest management
program to be administered by the ministry.
In Victoria and in all six forest regions, 1979 was a year for
reorganizing the ministry. It was greatly streamlined and decentralized to permit a more efficient and effective working
structure to carry out its new mandate. A major part of the
ministry reorganization has already taken place. The remainder will be completed in 1980.
 The Ministry of Forests Act requires the Annual Report to
present a comprehensive review and assessment of the
ministry's forest and range programs. Since the first
five year resource program does not become operational until
April 1, 1980, such an evaluation is not possible in this year's
Annual Report. The format of the Annual Report will change
when the legislative requirements of the new Act can be met.
The ministry published several White Papers in 1979 to
promote discussion on a variety of forestry and forestry-
related subjects. The numerous responses to them indicated a
great deal of public interest in the ministry's programs. We will
continue to publish such discussion papers before major
ministry policies or programs are formalized, to allow all interested parties to participate in their formulation.
In closing, I am pleased to say that, with the new legislation and a revitalized working structure, I am looking forward
to 1980 and the years beyond when British Columbia and the
Ministry of Forests will continue their leadership roles in the
field of forest and range resource management.
T. M. Apsey,
Deputy Minister.
March, 1980
   An Introduction
The year 1979 will be remembered as a year of change. On
January 1, 1979, three new Acts — the Forest Act, Range Act
and Ministry of Forests Act — were proclaimed. They replaced the much-amended Forest Act of 1912 and Grazing Act
of 1919 with a new administrative system. The Ministry of
Forests Act elevated the Forest Service to a full ministry.
The new Acts are designed to provide incentives to those
companies or individuals who practise good forest management and to penalize those who
do not.
To fulfill its new role, the
ministry is restructuring both in
the field and headquarters.
These changes are intended to
decentralize decision-making
authority and to strengthen
central support services.
 The Ministry of Forests Act
This Act assigns all of the duties and powers relating to
forest and range resources to the Ministry of Forests except
those which are specifically assigned to other government
agencies. The purposes and functions of the ministry are
stated clearly in Section 5.
"The purposes and functions of the ministry are, under
the direction of the minister,
(a) to encourage the attainment of maximum productivity
of the forest and range resources in the Province,
(b) to manage, protect and conserve the forest and range
resources of the Crown, having regard to the immediate and long term economic and social benefits
they may confer on the Province,
(c) to plan the use of the forest and range resources of the
Crown, so that the production of timber and forage,
the harvesting of timber, the grazing of livestock and
the realization of fisheries, wildlife, water, outdoor recreation and other natural resource values are coordinated and integrated, in consultation and cooperation with other ministries and agencies of the
Crown and with the private sector,
(d) to encourage a vigorous, efficient and world-
competitive timber processing industry in the Province,
and
(e) to assert the financial interest of the Crown in its forest
and range resources in a systematic and equitable
manner."
In addition, the Act requires the ministry to review the
province's forest and range resources and to assess the effects
of current management practices. In September 1979, the first
Forest and Range Resource Analysis Report and Forest and
Range Resource Analysis Technical Report were submitted to
the provincial cabinet. These reports contain a description of
all forest and range resources in the province and their current condition.
In addition, they provide a summary of relevant economic
trends which affect these resources. Within this perspective,
the reports evaluate current ministry programs and their effects on the related industries and other government
programs.
At the same time the ministry also submitted to the provincial cabinet a Five-Year Forest and Range Resource Program.
This report outlines a management strategy for the provincial
forest, range and recreation resources.
The Act further requires the ministry's Annual Report to
present an assessment of the effectiveness of the ministry
programs.
 The Forest Act
Through a new system of licences and permits, the Act defines a partnership of public and private responsibility in
forest management. It enunciates the rights and obligations of
forest managers and encourages the full and balanced use of
British Columbia's timber resources. It reaffirms the policy of
multiple use of forest land. Some other specific items which the
Act provides for are:
• the creation of provincial forests to provide security for
investments in forest management;
• the consideration of social and economic factors as well
as biological ones in the calculation of the allowable
annual cut;
• the protection of small, independent businesses and
local manufacturers;
• the establishment of an appeal procedure.
The Range Act
The Range Act is designed to promote a cooperative
approach to range management. The rancher is offered long-
term licences in return for participation in multiple use programs on his private land and adjacent Crown lands.
Grazing leases which are presently administered by the
Land Management Branch of the Ministry of Lands, Parks and
Housing, are being phased over to licences and permits under
the Range Act.
 The Structure
of the Ministry
While the three Acts define the decision-making authority, the efficiency with which the decisions are reached depends upon the functional structure of the ministry. The
prime goal of the reorganization is to decentralize administrative authority while maintaining centralized support services.
The district, region and headquarters staffs are working together to decentralize all practical decision-making. The
ministry headquarters staff define policy and provide overall
guidance. They also advise the deputy minister and consequently the minister and cabinet on all matters relating to
forest and range policy.
Headquarters Organization
As shown in the organization chart on page 15, the
ministry headquarters staff is organized into the following
four divisions:
• Forestry
• Timber, Range and Recreation
• Finance and Administration
• Operations
Each of the four divisions is headed by an assistant deputy
minister who reports to the deputy minister. These four officials, together with the deputy minister, constitute the
ministry's executive. In addition to the four assistant deputy
ministers, the directors of the Information Services Branch
and the Strategic Studies Branch report directly to the deputy
minister.
The functions of each division are summarized below.
The Forestry Division ensures that all Crown forest and
range lands are managed to provide the greatest long-term
benefits for British Columbia. The assistant deputy minister of
this division is also the chief forester. The Forestry Division
maintains a comprehensive inventory of all the province's
forest and range resources and assesses the lands involved in
terms of their present and potential uses. The division comprises the following five branches:
• Planning
• Inventory
• Research
• Silviculture
• Protection
The Timber, Range and Recreation Division is responsible for formulating comprehensive range and resource management policies and regulations. It advises the executive on
all matters involving engineering and valuation activities,
along with the various programs conducted by its branches.
The division is composed of the following five branches:
• Range Management
• Timber Management
• Recreation Management
• Valuation
• Engineering
 "
The Finance and Administration Division is responsible
for advising the deputy minister and the executive in all administrative matters and developing policies and procedures
pertaining to general administration. The division is composed of the following five branches:
• Personnel Services
• Financial Services
• Systems Services
• Legal and Administrative Services
• Technical Services
The Operations Division is responsible for ensuring that
the ministry's policies, procedures and programs are promptly
and effectively implemented in the province's six forest regions and 46 districts. The Assistant Deputy Minister of Operations functions as the deputy minister's immediate assistant
in administering and coordinating all field operations. The six
forest regions are:
• Cariboo
• Kamloops
• Nelson
• Prince George
• Prince Rupert
• Vancouver
Forest Region Organization
For administrative purposes, the province has been
divided into six forest regions. Each is administered from its
own regional office. This office is under the direction of a regional manager, who is also responsible for the district managers who administer forest districts, subdivisions of the
regions.
The internal organization of each regional office, shown
on pages 16 and 17, is analogous to that of ministry headquarters. Three regional staff managers, like the assistant
deputy ministers, provide advice and services to the regional
manager and the various district managers and field personnel. Regional office personnel are responsible for servicing,
coordinating and monitoring the activities of all field personnel operating out of the various district offices throughout the
region.
The staff of each regional office has the dual task of ensuring that all policies, procedures and programs originating
from ministry headquarters are administered consistently and
effectively throughout the region and of developing regional
plans and programs.
 Headquarters Organization
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   Information
Services
Information Services Branch advises and assists the
deputy minister, the executive, branch directors and regional
managers in all communications matters, including public
relations, schools, press and other media. It also has the responsibility for facilitating effective internal communications
throughout the ministry itself.
In 1979, the branch disseminated information about the
new forest legislation and the ministry reorganization:
• The branch prepared Update bulletins and a
Reorganizaton Handbook for ministry employees to
keep them informed of the reorganization. Another
publication, Blueprint for Action, has been prepared and
will be distributed early in 1980.
• The information officers in all six forest region offices
made an extra effort to keep the public and ministry
field staff informed about the new legislation and the
ministry reorganization.
Other Branch activities in 1979 included:
• The preparation of two new teacher guides on forest topics for use in the province's school system. These were
prepared in cooperation with the Western Education
Group of the University of British Columbia.
• A study to evaluate forest education materials currently
in use in the province. This was a cooperative effort by
the ministry, the Council of
Forest Industries of British
Columbia, and the International Woodworkers of
America. Results of the
study are scheduled for release in 1980.
• The production of a new
film, "Chewers of Wood",
which is about the mountain
pine beetle problem in the
East Kootenay area. This film is scheduled for release
early 1980.
• A survey of reader reaction to the ministry's resource
magazine ForesTalk. Current editorial policy is endorsed but readers would like an increased intellectual
level in the articles.
• The development of a new library system which resulted in a major increase in borrowing.
• The provision of assistance to other branches and regions of the ministry in planning, editing, designing and
publishing a wide variety of print materials including
White Papers and technical publications.
 Strategic
Studies
The Strategic Studies Branch advises the deputy minister
on forest and range resource policies and programs, the
economics of the forest and ranching industries, issues affecting national and international trade negotiations and the interactions between ministry programs and those of other government agencies. In addition, responsibility for the forest and
range resource analysis and fiveiyear program reports required by the Ministry of Forests Act has been transferred to
the branch. Responsibility for the reports submitted to the provincial cabinet in September 1979 rested with the Planning
Branch but Strategic Studies Branch staff were involved in
their preparation.
As part of its continuing work in helping
to develop positive
forestry programs, the
branch published a dis-
■ A   * cussion paper, Incen-  ■
lives for Intensive Forest
Management to solicit
opinion from interested
parties regarding this
topic. The branch also
contributed to the drafting of other ministry
discussion papers.
The branch continued its role as ministry representative
on a number of inter-agency committees affecting resource
management. A notable achievement was the assistance given
in negotiating the federal/provincial agreement to fund a $50
million, five year intensive forest management program.
Another major part of the branch inter-agency responsibility is associated with Environment and Land Use Committee projects. This includes projects such as the study of the environmental impacts of log handling in estuaries, the conflicts
between caribou management and logging in the North
Thompson area and the environmental impacts of major development projects on forest lands.
 "
Planning
The Planning Branch is responsible for developing comprehensive provincial plans and planning systems for managing Crown forest and range lands in accordance with the
Ministry of Forests Act, the Forest Act and the Range Act and
for coordinating all ministry resource use programs with those
administered by other ministries.
In 1979, implementation of the new forest legislation continued to dominate the branch's activities. Major branch programs were: completion and presentation of the Forest and
Range Resource Analysis Report, Forest and Range Resource
Analysis Technical Report, and Five-Year Forest and Range
Resource Program to cabinet; determination of forest harvesting rates for Timber Supply Areas; review of Tree Farm
Licence inventory, planning and yield calculation procedures;
and implementation of a program to establish additional provincial forests.
The resource analyses and program reports were prepared under the leadership of the branch by a task force composed of representatives from a number of branches. The task
force consulted with ministry staff as well as with other
agencies to determine appropriate programs in forest and
range management. The reports were presented to the provincial cabinet on September 30, 1979.
The branch analyzes inventory data to determine short-
term and long-term timber supply targets for Timber Supply
Areas (TSA's). The boundaries for the TSA's were established
early in the year. Headquarters and forest region staff were
trained to use the new Production Forecast Method of yield
calculations and have assembled and processed data for individual Timber Supply Areas.
Analyses have been completed for
about one-third of the province
and much of the data has been assembled for the remainder.
In conjunction with this work,
the branch continued to improve
upon the ministry's capability to
predict future timber yields. The
computer programs that have been
developed are constantly being
refined.
In consultation with Tree Farm Licence foresters, the
branch initiated a review of allowable annual cut and forest inventory procedures. The objective is to ensure compatability
of allowable cut calculations and inventory estimates between
those made on Tree Farm Licences and those on other Crown
forest lands.
As part of the general reorganization of the ministry, the
branch has been restructured to achieve the objectives of the
new forest legislation. New positions have been established to
provide leadership in development of the ministry's multiple
resource use planning systems, yield analysis methods and
public involvement procedures.
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s
 The Inventory Branch provides the detailed forest and
range maps and statistics necessary for the management of the
forest resource and for the determination of the rate of timber
harvest in the province.
In 1979, the branch commenced major inventories of six
Timber Supply Areas: Quadra, North Coast, Prince George,
Williams Lake, Okanagan and Cranbrook. As with last year's
inventory, this year's work used the multi-phase sampling
technique. This procedure details more characteristics and enhances the analytical potential of inventory data.
Other specific activities in 1979 included:
• growth and yield measurement of natural stands, mostly
in the lower coast area;
• field studies to refine tree volume measurement
techniques;
• forest depletion measurement and history updating of
more than 400 logged-over areas throughout the
province;
• tree decay studies undertaken in all forest regions;
• tree measurements in the field to verify volume equations used for tree and stand growth calculations;
• establishment of more than 100 plots in all forest regions except the Vancouver Forest Region to measure
growth and yield of trees and stands under the special
conditions of the Intensive Forestry Program;
• the continued monitoring, on Vancouver Island, of
more than 250 plots specifically related to the Managed
Stand Yield Program.
All map related resource inventory data from 1979 field
work, together with the branch's entire map related data base,
consisting of over 7 000 forest cover maps and related statistics, are in the process of
being entered into the
Interactive Graphics
Design System (IGDS).
This computerized
mapping system has
been designed to facilitate inventory data retrieval and analysis.
IGDS was installed in
1978 and since then, the
branch has been entering data into the
system's data base. A
progress report of data
loading is shown in
Table E.5.
 r
Research
The Research Branch provides research and development services required to support the ministry's forest and
range programs. The reorganization of the ministry increasec
the number of professional staff positions in the branch. Current emphasis is on silviculture, tree physiology, tree improvement, ecology and earth sciences. In 1979, the branch initiated
additional investigations on forest resource problems associated with wildlife habitat, range fertilization and erosion
control. Major activities in 1979 included:
• on-site studies to assess the effectiveness of pre-
commercial thinning treatment and different fertilization regimes in stands of lodgepole pine;
• field studies to gather and verify data for the development of a computerized growth model for lodgepole
pine;
• tests in ministry nurseries to improve seed germination
and to enhance seedling growth, quality and survival;
• field sampling to classify vegetation and soils. The field
sampling in all forest regions is part of the branch's
Ecological Classification Program. The results of this
program will help forest managers predict the vegetative and soil responses to different management
regimes;
• soil erosion control programs to assess the effectiveness
of different grass-legume mixtures and shrub species
for soil stabilization;
• the development of land and propagation facilities at the
Cowichan Lake Research Station on Vancouver Island
to establish
master clone
banks and gene
archives.
Each year, the
branch publishes the results of its experiments
and field studies in the
Forest Research Review.
 Silviculture
The Silviculture Branch is responsible for establishing
and monitoring a province wide silvicultural program to ensure that all Crown forest lands are managed as productively as
possible. The ministry's silvicultural program consists of a variety of activities and, in 1979, considerable progress was made
in reaching new levels of achievement. Activities included:
• Tree plantings in 1979 by the ministry and licensees
amounted to more than 63 million trees and covered
about 58 500 hectares. The total forest area which received some form of stand tending, stand improvement,
or site preparation treatment also increased over that
completed in 1978. The details of these activities are
presented in Tables A. 1 to A.5.
• The fertilization program in the Vancouver Forest
Region merits special mention. In 1979, more than
9 000 hectares (7 200 by the ministry and 1 800 by
licensees) of forest land in this region were fertilized.
The ministry made significant progress towards its
target of fertilizing 20 000 hectares of forest land in the
region by 1980.
• The ministry's tree nursery program in 1979 achieved
its target of sowing 100 million seeds. An expansion
program was initiated in the forest regions to significantly increase cold storage capacities to accommodate
the increased seedling production.
• Seed production from cone collections expanded
sharply in 1979 as a result of a bumper cone crop in the
Interior and a good crop along the Coast. The volume of
cone collections far exceeded the processing capacity of
the plant at Duncan and contracts were awarded to three
commercial processors. Seed production from coastal
seed orchards also expanded significantly in the year.
Three new seed orchards were established in the Interior and, under the newly created government/industry Tree Improvement Council, 18 new seed orchards are being planned for the Coast. Some of the
details of the seed production programs are listed in
Table B. 1 to Table B.7.
• The ministry's commitment to an intensified reforestation program throughout the province brought about a
major change in ministry policy regarding tree seedling
production. Until now, ministry nurseries have been
almost the only source of seedlings for reforestation on
Crown forest lands. In the future, participation by
private nurseries, particularly licensees' nurseries, will
augment the supply of seedlings.
 Protection
The Protection Branch has the responsibility to minimize
timber losses from fire, insects and disease. It is also responsible for developing and applying new equipment and techniques for fire and pest control.
Fire Management
The 1979 fire season was the second worst in the province's history, with nearly 4 000 forest fires recorded. Forest
fire danger levels peaked in late July but, because of dry
weather conditions, the fire season was extended to the end of
October. Despite the near record number of forest fires, the
total area of forest cover burned, about 30 000 hectares, was
much less than previous annual losses. Details of causes of
forest fires, areas burned, fire-fighting costs and damages are
presented in Tables C. 1 to C. 10.
The branch's Aerial Tanker Organization is responsible
for much of the success of last year's forest fire control
progam. The branch,
however, is not content
with increasing its fire-
fighting effectiveness
simply by the experience of another season
of fighting fires. Computer simulation models are being used to
analyze the effectiveness of different fire-
fighting techniques.
Through such efforts,
the branch hopes to enhance its effectiveness in
forest fire control.
Fire prevention activities undertaken in 1979 included the
production and distribution of posters, information brochures
and bumper stickers for the public. The branch also placed
articles and advertisements on fire prevention in local newspapers and on radio and television.
The prescribed burning program was continued to reduce the risk of fire on areas containing dangerous amounts of
combustible material such as slash, snags and blowdowns, to
prepare sites for planting and to rehabilitate lands for forage
and browse production.
A booklet on forest protection is now under preparation
to inform the public of current practices and possible future
trends in both fire management and pest management.
 Pest Management
It has been estimated that damage to trees from insects
and disease in British Columbia results in a loss of more than
16 million cubic metres of timber each year. About half of this
loss is attributable to tree decay in mature and overmature
stands.
In 1979, the branch's attention was turned towards the
mountain pine beetle and the spruce beetle because of the
damage they were causing the province's forest resource. The
branch directed harvesting operations to remove threatened
and killed trees while the trees still contained merchantable
wood. An estimated 79 000 hectares of pine forest have already been killed and the area threatened is many times greater. Timber salvage operations in the Nelson and Cariboo
Forest Regions — the areas of the severest attack — are expected to increase in 1980.
The spruce beetle is present in the Prince George, Interior Prince Rupert, Nelson and Kamloops Forest Regions.
The threat of the beetle attacks has caused operators to change
harvesting plans. Through harvesting and the use of trap
trees, a vigorous effort is being made to contain the spruce
beetle.
The Protection Branch, in cooperation with the Forest Insect and Disease Survey Unit of the Canadian Forestry Service,
continues to monitor the presence of and the damage done by
forest insects and diseases.
Where possible, the branch undertakes remedial
measures to deal with some of them:
• Mistletoe: clauses to prevent the spread of mistletoe into
young stands are included in cutting permits where
applicable;
• Western budworm: the 1978 budworm trials were reexamined and plans made for futher work in 1980;
• Cone and seed insects: test work was carried out to control cone and seed insects;
• European pine shoot moth: survey and control
measures were taken to eliminate the European pine
shoot moth in the Okanagan.
v J
 Range
Management
The Range Management Branch is responsible for managing and conserving the province's rangelands. In 1979, the
first year of the Range Act, the branch implemented some of
the regulations and administrative procedures required by the
new Range Act. Among the branch's achievements in 1979
were:
• the establishment of new fee and rent charges for
grazing rights and hay production;
• the initiation of the changeover to the new grazing
licences in all forest regions;
• the assignment of range resource officers to district offices to provide closer industry contacts at the field level;
• the commencement of range inventory activity;
• the initiation of a program to convert expiring grazing
leases, presently under the administration of the
Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing, to grazing
licences under the administration of the Ministry of
Forests.
The branch, through its Coordinated Resource Management Program (CRMP) planned 37 new range units in addition to its annual review of approximately one hundred previously planned areas. These new plans cover more than 1.5 million hectares, mostly in the Cariboo, Kamloops and Nelson
Forest Regions. More than $3 million of Agriculture and Rural
Development Subsidiary Agreement (ARDSA) funds were
spent on approved developments within the planned areas.
Other branch achievements in 1979 include the continuation of the Knapweed Containment Program. Knapweed is
especially prevalent in     _•_—r
the Nelson, Kamloops
and Cariboo Forest
Regions. Other branch
activities are detailed in
Table F.l.
 Timber
Management
The Timber Management Branch develops policies and
administers programs concerning timber tenures, timber allocation, timber harvesting and the granting of rights to harvest
Crown timber. As a result of the
new Forest Act, the branch is developing new administration and
regulatory procedures and communicating them to the forest industry. Among the more prominent accomplishments of 1979
were:
• the development of the Tree
Farm Licence agreement
which has been in use since
May 1979 and the proposed wording of the other required forms of agreements;
• the establishment of policies and administrative procedures for the licensing of mills;
• the establishment of rentals based on allowable annual
cut or on area, if not regulated by allowable annual cut;
• the implementation of a Small Business Program Enterprise Program which allows small businesses to play a
more important role in the provincial forest industry;
• in conjunction with the Valuation and Systems Services
Branches, the development of the Harvest Data Base
System to store, sort and retrieve provincial scale data
efficiently.
In addition, the branch published several discussion
papers in 1979 to solicit public comment on specific aspects of
the Forest Act. The discussion papers included:
• Draft Regulation Governing the Contractor Clause
Requirement
Differences existed in the recommendations of the two
committees appointed to study ways in which contractors could be involved in the logging activities of
licensees. The branch wrote a discussion paper on what
it felt was the best compromise. The purpose of the
paper was to obtain additional views from concerned
parties before the regulations and policies were put into
practice.
• The Small Business Program
The paper was issued to obtain additional views of concerned parties before ministry policy and regulations affecting small businesses were established.
• Policies and Procedures Concerning the Issuance of
Woodlot Licences
The objective of the Woodlot Licence Program is to promote small scale forestry in the province. It makes provincial forest lands available to small enterprises and the
owners of small parcels of forest land who will manage
these lands and will engage in silviculture and forest
protection activities. The response to the discussion
paper has been good and the Woodlot Licence Program
will be instituted in 1980.
The 1979 provincial scale was more than 76 million cubic
metres, a year of record harvest in British Columbia. Details of
the provincial harvest are presented in Tables D. 1 to D.6.
 Recreation
Management
Since its inception in 1971, the Ministry of Forests recrea
tion program has grown steadily. In 1979, the program was
transferred from the Planning Branch to the newly established Recreation Management Branch. The branch plans
and provides a variety of forest recreation opportunities while
protecting the environmental and aesthetic values of the province's forest and range lands.
During the year the branch undertook a program to
familiarize ministry staff with changes in the recreation components of the Forest Act and the
Ministry of Forests Act. Another
important function was to provide
input to forest and range land use
plans, particularly those which affect recreation and landscape
values.
The branch helped to complete the first five year provincial
Recreation Analysis and Program.
It also distributed the new Recreation Manual which provides provincial guidelines for recreation management and commenced the preparation of a new
Forest Landscape Handbook. The branch carried out several
surveys, including preliminary attempts at user questionnaires to ascertain provincial recreation needs and demands.
Two new recreation map brochures were produced, bringing
the total now available to 36 brochures. A winter recreation
program emphasizing snowmobiling and cross-country skiing
was further developed.
Public use of ministry recreation sites continued at a high
level in 1979. Details are listed in Table G. 1.
 Valuation
The Valuation Branch is responsible for ensuring that the
Crown receives a fair and equitable financial return from the
sale of timber to industry. The branch is also responsible for
reviewing all applications for the export of unmanufactured
forest products from the province. The activities of the Valuation Branch in the past year were significantly affected by the
new Forest Act and several of the regulations issued under it.
• The scaling regulation which specifies that all timber
must be scaled in metric units became effective on
January 1,1979. The transition to the new system was
completed without disruption as the scalers adjusted
rapidly, following a period of intensive training in the
regions. During 1979, the ministry and industry also
started to cruise timber scheduled for harvesting in
metric units.
• The branch developed policies and guidelines for the
granting of credits against stumpage payable, as provided by Section 88 of the Forest Act.
• The branch prepared a discussion paper Log Salvage in
the Vancouver Log Salvage District, to solicit comment
from interested parties on the proposed new log salvage
regulations. This paper will be published in early 1980.
In cooperation with the Timber Management Branch
and Systems Services Branch, the Valuation Branch continued to participate in the development of the Billing and
Harvest Data Base System.
During 1979, the branch devoted considerable energy to
the processing of applications for the export of
unprocessed forest products from the province. Details of log exports are presented in
Hr -J   Table H.2.
:>""
 Engineering
The Engineering Branch is responsible for surveying, designing, constructing and maintaining forest roads and
structures. The branch also has the responsibility of negotiating the acquisition of road rights-of-way and other major
land purchases by the ministry for such purposes as nurseries
and seed orchards. In order to carry out many of these functions, the branch provides advice and assistance to staff in the
forest regions or in other headquarters branches.
Some of the significant engineering activities undertaken
by the ministry in 1979 include:
• the reconstruction of sections of the Morice River Forest
Road;
• the completion of a bridge across the Fraser River on the
Walker Creek Forest Road;
• a resource road survey in the Prince Rupert Region and
several other minor surveys;
• the clearing program in the Duncan and Revelstoke
Reservoirs;
• the completion of the acquisition of land for the seed
orchard in Vernon;
• the completion of acquisition of rights-of-way for 14
Ministry of Forests roads;
• the development of spot scarifier and hand planting
tools;
• the advising of the British Columbia Debris Board in the
construction and operation
of the Fraser River debris
catchment basin.
Under reorganization, a
number of former Engineering
Branch functions were transferred
to the newly created Technical
Services Branch.
 r
Personnel
Services
The Personnel Services Branch is responsible for the
establishment and administration of the ministry's personnel
policies and programs. These responsibilities include staff recruitment, job classification, labour relations, staff development, job safety programs and employee compensation and
benefit administration.
In 1979, the branch was instrumental in the transition of
the ministry into its new organizational working structure. The
branch prepared and submitted to the Treasury Board the details of staffing requirements of the new organization. After
receiving approval, the branch began to staff senior ministry
positions in the regions,
districts and Victoria
headquarters. At year
end, most of these positions were filled.
The branch continued classifying jobs
and staffing positions
throughout the newly
reorganized ministry. It
is expected that this process will be completed in
1980.
The branch successfully completed
contract negotiations with both the British Columbia Government Employees Union and the British Columbia Government Professional Employees Association. The BCGEU and
the BCGPA represent the majority of the ministry's more
than 3 000 employees.
r-■■:..■■■' :::. '
■■■:.: ■:■■'■..-.:
Forest Service Training School
The Forest Service Training School provides ministry
personnel with training and education services. These take the
form of staff development courses which are designed to keep
ministry personnel current on subject matters relevant to some
aspect of their work. In 1979, the school gave courses to nearly
600 ministry staff on a variety of subjects including safety management, principles of supervision and personal and human
relations skills.
The school also prepared a training program explaining
the ministry's new legislation and related regulations. In 1980,
the school will formally undertake its functions as part of the
Personnel Services Branch.
 1
Systems
Services
Branch
The Systems Services Branch is responsible for the policy,
procedures, standards and overall planning of the ministry's
information and data processing systems.
During 1979, the branch took significant steps towards
creating a productive systems development environment for
the ministry.
• As part of the ministry's decentralization, the branch is
responsible for providing all organizational units with
access to computer stored information or Distributed
Data Processing (DDP). The branch initiated a
long-range project to identify the ministry's informational needs with emphasis on satisfying regional requirements. Another factor for the long-range project is
the need for systems development projects to emphasize management information requirements and
basic operational requirements early in the conceptual
planning phase.
• The branch recruited personnel for the Data and
Systems Coordination functions to enable it to pool valuable expertise for the ministry's operational systems.
In addition, the branch has continued to provide operational support to the growing usage of electronic equipment
including computers, terminals, word processors and data
communications lines. In November, the Data Entry section
installed a second computer facility to provide increased processing
space and backup capability.
Terminal facilities were added to
all regional offices allowing them
access to headquarters computer
programs. f    a
In 1979, the branch also enhanced its cooperative working re-    \.,
lationship with the British Columbia Systems Corporation and with
other government ministries and
agencies.
I
fbiffiiail |
 Legal and Administrative Services Branch was created in
1979 to consolidate related administrative services which were
previously conducted by a number of different branches
within the ministry. The branch is responsible for:
• Legal Services which processes appeals and conducts
hearings for licence holders and applicants and coordinates the preparation and publication of legal documents, legislation and regulations;
• Reproduction, Draughting and Graphic Services
which provides cartographic, draughting, graphic, reproduction and printing services for the ministry; and
operates a map sales facility for industry;
• Administrative Services which coordinates the development and publication of ministry policy and procedure manuals and ministry forms; establishes and
monitors security standards; operates the central filing
and records management system, mail and courier
service, stationery and stock room and the word processing host centre;
• Management Services which provides an internal management consulting service and specialized financial
services and advice for the ministry.
The Technical Services Branch was created in 1979 to
provide accommodation, equipment, mechanical and related
technical services for the ministry's activities throughout the
province. Some of the branch's responsibilities were previously carried out by the Engineering Branch. The Technical
Services Branch is now responsible for:
• Building Services which maintains ministry buildings
and mobile accommodation facilities throughout the
province;
• Marine Services which maintains motor launches for
ministry inventory and scaling work along the coast;
• Electronic Services which maintains mobile and stationary electronic equipment for forestry operation
throughout the province;
• Mechanical Services which acquires vehicles and
mechanical equipment for the entire ministry;
• Maintenance Depot which maintains, prepares and repairs equipment, vehicles and other machinery used in
ministry operations.
   Contents
Metric Conversion Factors
1 acre = 0.404 686 hectares
1 hectare = 2.47 acres
1 cunit (100 cubic feet) =
2.83 168 cubic metres
1 cubic metre = 0.353 147
cunits
1 gram = 0.0352 740 ounces
1 ounce = 28.3 495 grams
I kilogram = 2.20 462 pounds
1 pound = 0.453 592 kilograms
1 tonne =1.10 262 tons
1 ton = 0.907 185 tonnes
Tables
Page
A. Silviculture Activity
1. Summary of Planting, 1970-1979  40
2. Planting by Forest Region, 1979  40
3. Area Clearcut and Area Planted in
Public Sustained Yield Units, by Forest
Region, 1975-1979 41
4. Site Preparation and Hazard Abatement, by
Ministry of Forests and by Licensees on all
Tenures, 1979 41
5. Stand Tending and Improvement, by
Ministry of Forests and by Licensees on all
Tenures, 1979 42
6. Surveys of Natural Regeneration, by Ministry
of Forests and by Licensees in PSYU's, 1979  42
7. Accelerated Reforestation Fund, Fiscal
Year 1978/79 42
B. Nurseries Activity
1. Cone Collection and Estimated Seed
Recovery, by Ministry of Forests and
Licensees, 1979  43
2. Seed Orchards Established, as of 1979  43
3. Inventory of Seed in Storage, by Forest
Region, 1979  44
4. Seed Withdrawals for Nursery Sowing and
Other Uses, 1979 44
5. Ministry of Forests Nurseries, Inventory of
Seedlings, by Nursery and Forest Region,
August 1979 44
6. Ministry of Forests Nurseries, Inventory
of Seedlings, by Species and Forest
Regions, August 1979  45
7. Ministry of Forests Nurseries, Summary
of Spring Sowing, 1979 45
C. Forest Protection
1. Fire Occurrences by Months, by Forest
Region, 1979  46
2. Number and Causes of Forest Fires, by Forest
Region, 1979  46
3. Number and Causes of Forest Fires, 1970-1979 46
4. Fires Classified by Size and Damage, by
Forest Region, 1979  47
5. Loss of Property Other than Forest, by
Forest Region, 1979  47
6. Loss of Forest Cover Caused by Forest Fire,
by Forest Region (Part I), 1979  47
7. Loss of Forest Cover Caused by Forest Fires,
by Forest Region (Part II), 1979  48
8. Fire Causes, Area Burned, Ministry of Forest
Fire-fighting Costs, and Total Damage, 1979 48
9. Comparison of Loss Caused by
Forest Fires, 1970-1979 48
10. Fire-fighting Costs per Fire, by Forest
Region, 1979  49
 ! Some of these figures are preliminary
and may be revised.
D. Timber Harvesting*
1. Total Amount of Timber Scale Billed in
British Columbia, 1978 and 1979  50
2. Total Volume of All Products Billed, by
Land Status and Forest Region, 1979  50
3. Species Cut, All Products, 1979  51
4. Timber Cut and Billed from Timber Sales
and Timber Sale Harvesting Licences, 1979 51
5. Area Logged, 1979  51
6. Christmas Trees Billed, by Land Status and
Forest Region, 1970-1979 52
E. Inventory Information
1. Summary of Basic Data for Certified
Tree Farms, 1979 53
2. Summary of Basic Data for Farm Woodlot
Licences, 1979 53
3. Summary of Basic Data for Tree Farm
Licences (Private Sustained Yield
Units), 1979 54
4. Summary of Basic Data for Public Sustained
Yield Units, 1979 55
5. Summary of Forest Cover Map
Production, 1979 57
F. Range Management
1. Use of Crown Range, 1979  58
G. Recreation Management
1. User Visits to Recreation Sites, 1979 59
2. Recreation Branch Projects, 1979  59
H. Forest Industry
1. Wood Processing Plants of the Province,
1979 60
2. Export of Logs, 1979  60
I. Stumpage Prices and Ministry Financial Statements
1. Average Stumpage Prices Received on
Timber Scaled from Tree Farm Licence
Cutting Permits, by Species and Forest
Region, 1979  61
2. Average Bid Stumpage Prices on Cutting
Permits of Timber Sale Harvesting Licences
and Timber Sales, by Species and Forest
Region, 1979  62
3. Forest and Range Revenue, Fiscal Year
1978/79  62
4. Forest and Range Revenue, 1975-1979  '..... 63
5. Amounts Charged Against Logging Operations,
Fiscal Year 1978/79 63
6. Amounts Charged Against Logging Operations,
1979 63
7. Forest Road Construction Credit
Against Stumpage Under Section 88 of the Forest
Act, by Forest Region, 1979  64
8. Ministry of Forests Expenditures, Fiscal
Year 1978/79 64
 A.
Silviculture Activity
Table A.l         Summary of Planting, 1970-1979
Forest Service
Forest Service on
Companies
Companies on
on
Crown Granted Land
on Tree
Timber Sale
Crown Land
Farm Licences
Harvesting Licences
Other Private
Totals
Trees
Trees
Trees
Trees
Trees
Trees
Year
(000's)
(ha)
(000's)
(ha)
(000's)
(ha)
(000's)           (ha)
(000's)
(ha)
(000's)
(ha)
Coast 1979
5 426.9
5 098.
—
—
10112.1
13 085.
3 634.4          3 746.
3 551.8
3 864.
22 725.2
25 793.
1978
5 922.7
5 202.
—
—
10 672.7
12801.
3 290.2         3 804.
2 857.9
3 425.
22 743.5
25 232.
1977
7 174.8
6 467.
—
—
13 159.0
15 646.
3 082.0         2 605.
4 772.7
5122.
28 188.5
29 840.
1976
6 549.3
5 973.
—
—
11 779.7
13 496.
2 937.8         2 610.
7 190.2
5 620.
28 457.0
27 699.
1975
8 725.9
7 243.
—
—
9 522.9
10 357.
1 768.2          1 527.
4 123.5
4142.
24 140.5
23 269.
1974
8 352.1
8147.
—
—
11 921.3
12 805.
1 374.2          1 223.
3 501.4
3 604.
25149.0
25 779.
1973
13 855.7
12614.
—
—
12 769.1
13 757.
1 550.3          1 393.
4 046.0
4 053.
32 221.1
31817.
1972
12 998.8
12 326.
—
—
12 176.0
13 760.
187.6             153.
4 872.6
4515.
30 235.0
30 754.
1971
9 627.0
9185.
55.
52.
11 603.8
12 843.
82.4               96.
4 756.0
4 601.
26 124.2
26 777.
1970
7 202.0
7171.
118.
109.
10616.5
12 348.
—                 —
7914.6
8120.
25 851.1
27 748.
Previous Planted
113 881.9
67 714.
15 295.9
11 093.
99 548.0
106 488.
—                 —
35 880.0
40 540.
264 605.8
225 835.
Totals to Date
199 717.1
147140.
15 468.9
11 254.
213881.1
237 386.
17 907.1        17157.
83 466.7
87 606.
530 440.9
500 543.
Interior 1979
13 266.2
10 530.
—
	
3 605.3
3138.
22 983.5        18 256.
753.0
552.
40 608.0
32 476.
1978
13 799.5
10515.
—
—
4192.4
3718.
18213.3       15683.
806.0
593.
37011.2
30 509.
1977
17 503.4
13 995.
—
—
3 697.9
3 012.
16156.9        13 107.
285.0
209.
37 643.2
30 323.
1976
23801.9
18 602.
—
—
3 526.0
2 947.
16 469.9       13 242.
566.4
502.
44 364.2
35 293.
1975
24 712.8
21 054.
21.
16.
3 129.7
2 751.
12 588.8        10 050.
355.0
344.
40 807.3
34 215.
1974
16 128.2
12 938.
—
—
3 076.8
3 199.
9 380.3         7 535.
82.8
36.
28 668.1
23 708.
1973
14371.1
10 954.
—
—
3551.1
3 034.
5 521.1          4 284.
541.6
362.
23 984.9
18 634.
1972
14 256.0
10 765.
—
—
1 692.0
1506.
2 066.0         1 674.
145.0
138.
18159.0
14 083.
1971
15 449.2
12 565.
—
—
1461.0
1340.
743.0           606.
69.0
67.
17 722.2
14 578.
1970
7 201.0
5 938.
—
—
753.0
847.
40.0               27.
166.0
149.
8 160.0
6 961.
Previous Planted
19 204.7
17 140.
-
-
4 341.3
5210.
-                 -
841.8
696.
24 387.8
23 046.
Totals to Date
179 694.0
44 996.
21.
16.
33 026.5
30 702.
104 162.8       84 464.
4611.6
3 648.
321 515.9
263 826.
All Planted to Date
379411.1     292 136.
15 489.9
11270.       246 907.6
268 088.
122069.9      101621.
88 078.3
91 254.
851 956.8
764 369.
All Planted This Year
18 693.1
15 628.
-
-
13717.4
16 223.
26 617.9       22 002.
4 304.8
4416.
63 333.2
58 269.
Table A.2
Planting by Forest Region, 1979
Thousands of trees (Hectares in Parentheses Below)
Companies
Companies on Tree Farm Licences                     Tree Farms
Companies
onTSHL's,
not Within
on Other
Forest Service
TSL'son
Crown
Crown Granted
Tree Farm
Private
Forest Region
on Crown Land       Crown Land
Land
Land
Total                Licences
Land
Regional Totals
Cariboo
2 225.2
4 156.0
222.0
—
222.0
—
152.0
6 755.2
(1 675.1)
(3 506.1)
(170.0)
—
(170.0)
—
(101.8)
(5 453.0)
Kamloops
3 344.9
3 709.1
1 120.5
—
1 120.5
_
—
8 174.5
(2 578.7)
(2 972.8)
(1 119.6)
—
(1 119.6)
—
—
(6671.1)
Nelson
3 328.0
1 966.0
1421.0
47.0
1 468.0
570.0
31.0
7 363.0
(2 602.0)
(1 460.0)
(1 057.5)
(40.5)
(1 098.0)
(420.0)
(30.0)
(5 610.0)
Prince George
4 083.5
9 552.0
794.8
—
794.8
—
—
14 430.3
(3 349.2)
(7 720.8)
(750.8)
—
(750.8)
—
—
(11
820.8)
Prince Rupert
595.1
4 138.1
672.0
60.4
732.4
—
	
5 465.6
(615.8)
(3 102.9)
(847.7)
(70.0)
(917.7)
—
—
(4 636.4)
Vancouver
5 116.4
3 096.7
8 430.5
949.2
9 379.7
1 913.1
1 638.7
21 144.6
(4 807.1)
(3 239.5)
(10 967.0)
(1 200.7)
(12 167.7)
2 001.8)
(1 862.5)
(24
078.6)
Totals
18 693.1
26 617.9
12 660.8
1 056.6
13717.4
2 483.1
1821.7
63 333.2
(15 627.9)
(22 002.1)
(14912.6)
(1 311.2)
(16 223.8)
(2 421.8)
(1 994.3)
(58 269.9)
 A. Silviculture Activity
Table A.3        Area Clearcut and Area Planted in Public Sustained Yield Units, by Forest Region, 1975-1979
Forest Region
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
Total
Five-year
Period
Cumulative
Total
Since 1971
Per Cent
Cutover
Planted
Since 1971
Cariboo
Hectares Clearcut
Hectares Planted
11869
7 457
14 570
5 382
15 529
5 612
17311
5 301
19 266
5 252
78 545
29 004
128 174
40 368
31.5
Kamloops
Hectares Clearcut
Hectares Planted
10 539
4 569
17 968
4 840
16 770
3 782
15 374
7 231
15516
5 361
76 167
25 783
130 191
34 965
26.9
Nelson
Hectares Clearcut
Hectares Planted
8 060
6 386
14 233
5 276
12 124
2 942
7613
3 861
8 755
3 962
50 785
22 427
101147
36 837
36.4
Prince George
Hectares Clearcut
Hectares Planted
26 855
8 955
30 267
12116
40 791
13 545
35 620
7 301
57 909
10617
191 442
52 534
315 834
66 234
21.0
Prince Rupert
Hectares Clearcut
Hectares Planted
7018
4 689
11 293
6 253
12 462
3 282
13 968
3 408
16 884
3719
61 625
21351
102 800
39 232
38.2
Vancouver
Hectares Clearcut
Hectares Planted
8 636
7 843
12414
6 581
12 977
7 753
14 793
8103
13 138
8 047
61958
38 327
110 836
78 257
70.6
Totals
Hectares Clearcut
Hectares Planted
72 977
39 899
100 745
40 448
110 653
36916
104 679
35 205
131 468
36 958
520 522
189 426
888 982
295 893
33.3
Table A.4        Site Preparation and Hazard Abatement, by Ministry of Forests
and by Licensees on All Tenures, 1979
Method of Treatment
Broadcast Burned
Bunched and Burned
Spot Burned
Landings Only Burned
Chemical Treatment and Burn
Drag Scarified
Blade Scarified
Bunched Only
Chemical Treatment Only
Residual Falling Only
(Including Snags)
Snag Falling Only
Other Treatment
No Treatment
Totals
Prime objective indicated in appropriate column.
Regeneration
Planting
Hazard
Preparation
Preparation
Abatement
Totals
Per Cer
(ha)
(ha)
(ha)
(ha)
189
16 498
3 169
19 856
16.6
4 254
5 88I
1 116
11 251
9.3
346
734
1 273
2 353
2.0
—
—
57 957
57 957
48.4
11901
797
5
12 703
10.6
1664
2 593
7
4 264
3.6
500
200
281
981
0.8
42
10
—
52
0.1
3 860
17
144
4 021
3.3
—
—
89
89
0.1
824
1 136
2 582
4 542
3.8
1426
73
200
1 699
1.4
25 006
27 939
119 768
 A. Silviculture Activity
Table A.5        Stand Tending and Improvement, by Ministry of Forests and by Licensees on All Tenures, 1979
(Hectares)
Stocking Control
Other
Forest
Coniter
Region
Release
Juvenile
Commercial
Sanitation
Mistletoe
(Pruning
(Brushing)
Spacing
Thinning
Spacing
Control
Site Rehab.
Fertilization
Seedlot)
Totals
Forest
Forest
Forest
Forest
Forest
Forest
Forest
Forest
Forest
Regional
Service Licencee
Service Licencee
Service Licencee
Service Licencee
Service Licencee
Service Licencee
Service Licencee
Service Licencee
Service Licencee
Totals
Cariboo
—
—
1 156.8
_
_
_
185.8
_
1 207.4   1 379.0
_          —
—           _
_          _
2 550.0 1 379.0
3 929.0
Kamloops
12.0
—
5323
36.0
—
—
61.0
—
—            —
113.9        —
23.0      —
—          —
742.2       36.0
778.2
Nelson
—
—
6700
—
—
—
19.7
—
270       —
—           —
—           —
—          —
716.7      —
716.7
Prince
George
57.0
—
409.1
330
—
—
2149
—
192.0       —
80.6        —
—           —
—          —
953.6      33.0
986.6
Prince
Rupert
68.8
49.4
8440
614.1
—
—
—
—
197       —
3.0       11.3
124.1        40.0
42.5          —
1 102.1     714.8
1816.9
Vancouver
956.8
1 323.4
6 680.0
3 598.9
—
46 0
—
^
—            83.2
415.0        —
7 036.0   1 794.0
-            —
15 087.8   6 845.5
21 933.3
Totals
1 094.6
1 372.8
10 292.2
4 282.0
-
460
481.4
-
1446.1   1462.2
612.5       11.3
7 183.1    1834.0
42.5          —
21 152.4 9 008.3
30 160.7
Grand Totals
2 4£
7.5
145
T4.2
4E
0
481.4
2 908.3
6238
9017.1
42.5
-
-
Table A.6       Surveys of Natural Regeneration, by Ministry of Forests and by Licensees in PSYU's1, 1979
(Hectares)
Not
Total                            Satisfactorily Satisfactorily PerCent
Forest Region Examined Stocked Stocked Stocked
Cariboo
Forest Service  52188 47843 4345 91.7
Licensee  3016 2077 939 68.9
Totals   55204 49920 5284 90.4
Kamloops
Forest Service  20396 12645 7751 62.0
Licensee  11101 6275 4826 56.5
Totals   31497 18920 12577 60.1
Nelson
Forest Service  45329 31628 13701 69.8
Licensee  15873 9135 6738 57.6
Totals   61202 40763 20439 66.6
Prince George
Forest Service  22909 14819 8090 64.7
Licensee  7963 4844 3119 60.8
Totals   30872 19663 11209 63.7
Prince Rupert
Forest Sen/ice  2379 1665 715 70.0
Licensee  2932 2014 918 68.7
Totals  5311 3679 1633 69.3
Vancouver
Forest Service   27082 18442 8640 68.1
Licensee  18541 9463 9078 51.0
Totals   45623 27905 17718 61.2
Totals
Forest Service  170283 127042 43242 74.6
Licensee  59426 33808 25618 56.9
Totals   229 709 160 850 68 860 70.0
; Note: Date of denudation varies considerably on areas examined, hence time for establishment of natural regeneration also varies. This is simply an indication of natural
stocking and no inference can be made between regions or agencies under stocking columns.
Table A.7        Accelerated Reforestation Fund,
Fiscal Year 1978/79
Surplus, April 1, 1978  $1 476.69
Expenditures, Fiscal Year 1978/79 Nil
Surplus, March 31, 1979  $1 476.69
 B.
Nurseries Activity
Table B. 1        Cone Collection and Estimated Seed Recovery, by Ministry of Forests and Licensees,
1979
Est. Seed
Recovery
Cone Collections (hi)
Forest Region
Species
Per
Species
Species
Cariboo
Kamloops
slelson       Prince George
Prince Rupert     Vancouver
Total (hi)
Cent
Totals (kg)
Alpine F
r
4.90
—
—
17.09
—                    —
21.99
0.2
51.24
Amabilis Fir
—
—
—
—
154.78             1 678.78
1 833.56
12.5
3 997.16
Birch
—
—
—
—
—                       —
—
—
—
Douglas
fir
163.47
23.22
3.82
109.70
170.67                90.04
560.92
3.8
364.60
Grand Fir
—
—
—
—
—                     —
—
—
—
Interior Spruce
2 175.27
1 566.30
123.20
3 698.10
2 384.29                127.19
10 074.35
68.7
6 649.07
Lodgepole Pine
66.0
140.00
36.93
203.60
452.22                   0.50
899.25
6.1
197.84
Mountain Hemlock
—
—
—
—
12.40                  18.67
31.07
0.2
23.92
Ponderosa Pine
—
—
—
—
—                       —
—
—
—
Sitka Spruce
—
—
—
—
902.84                   2.00
904.84
6.2
506.71
Western Hemlock
—
—
—
—
87.47               140.81
228.28
1.6
173.49
Western Larch
—
—
—
—
—                       —
—
—
—
Western Red Cedar
1.08
—
0.75
—
34.82                 55.50
92.15
0.6
120.72
Whitebark Pine
—
—
1.00
—
—                       —
1.00
negl.
2.26
White Pine
—
4.00
9.18
—
—                         3.00
16.18
0.1
9.71
Yellow Cedar
—
—
—
—
—                       —
—
—
—
Totals
2 410.72
1 733.52
174.88
4 028.49
4 199.49            2 116.49
14 663.59
100.0
12 096.72
Table B.2        Seed Orchards Established as
of 1979
Seed Orchard Seed
Utilization Area
Present
Seed Production (kg)
Seed
Date/s Est
Orchard
Planning             Elev.
Type of
Size
Accumulated
Orcharc
Agency
i.e. Planted
Location      Spec
es*        Zone
Band
Orchard
(ha)
1979
to Dec. 31/79
Coastal Region
101
BCFS-Quinsam +
1963
Campbell River
F
EVI
450-610
Clonal + Seedlings (O.P. +
C.P.)*'    7.8
54.292
70.657
102
Tahsis "A"
1962-69
Gold River
F
WVI
0-450
Clonal
2.2
.620
1.080
103
BCFP
1963-64
Caycuse
F
WVI, EVI
400-660
Clonal
1.8
.240
.240
104
Crown Zellerbach
1964-65
Courtenay
F
EVI, JS
0-450
Clonal
1.8
.182
.432
105
Crown Zellerbach
1964-65
Nanaimo Lakes
F
EVI
450+
Clonal
1.8
—
.905
106
ITT Ind. (Canada)
1964-65
Gordon River
F
WVI, EVI
450 +
Clonal
4.1
—
.233
107
Tahsis "B"
1964-68
Gold River
F
WVI
450+
Clonal
1.8
—
.254
108
Tahsis Local
1968-75
Gold River
F
WVI
0-910
Clonal
2.3
.047
.065
109
Pacific Logging
1964
Saanich
F
EVI
0-450
Clonal + Seedlings (O.P.)
1.8
+ +
1.981
110
Pacific Logging
1964
Saanich
F
EVI
550 +
Clonal
3.4
11.340
52.058
111
Tahsis "C" +
1968-75
Saanich
F
WVI
0-450
Clonal + Seedlings (O.P. +
D.P.)          3.5
5.740
65.275
112
ITT Ind. (Canada)
1968
Jordan River
F
WVI, EVI
—
Seedlings (O.P.)
0.4
—
—
113
ITT Ind. (Canada)
1969
PL McNeill
F
WVI, EVI
—
Seedlings (O.P.)
0.4
—
—
114
BCFS-Koksilah +
1970
Duncan
F
SCM, CIT
450-640
Seedlings (O.P.)
3.2
16.740
42.663
115
BCFS-Snowdon +
1971
Campbell River
F
JS
0-300
Seedlings (O.P.) + Clonal
4.0
10.544
10.969
116
CFP
1971
Sechelt
F
EVI, JS
450-610
Clonal
2.4
1.495
1.590
117
Tahsis
1969-70
Gold River
Hw
WVI
0-910
Clonal
0.9
—
—
1970-75
Gold River
Hw
WVI
0-910
Seedlings (O.P.)
118
Tahsis +
1973
Saanich
Ss
WVI
0-450
Clonal
0.9
.360
2.954
119
MB
1977
Yellow PL
F
—
High
Clonal
6.9
—
—
120
BCFS-Dewdney +
1975
Saanich
F
CIT
760-1070
Seedlings (O.P.) + Clonal
7.5
—
—
121
Pacific Logging
1976
Saanich
F
EVI
550 +
Seedlings (C.P.)
6.0
+ +
+ +
122
MB
1976-78
Harmac
F
Dry
Mid
Clonal
1.2
—
—
123
MB
1976-78
Harmac
F
Wet
Mid
Clonal
1.0
—
—
124
MB
1976
Harmac
F
Dry
Low
Clonal
0.5
—
—
125
MB
1976
Harmac
F
Wet
Low
Clonal
1.0
—
—
Totals - Coastal Region Orchards
68.6
101.600
251.356
Central Interior Reg
ion
201
BCFS
1974
Red Rock
PI
Omineca-
Dinchi     —
Clonal
4.4
-
-
202
BCFS
1978
Red Rock
PI
Dawson-Peace     —
Clonal
1.7
—
—
203
BCFS
1978
Red Rock
PI
Willow-Bowron      —
Clonal
3.2
—
—
204
BCFS
1979
Red Rock
PI
Smithers
—
Clonal
5.5
—
—
205
BCFS
1979
Skimikin
SI
Central Plateau    Low
Clonal
4.0
—
—
206
BCFS
1979
Skimikin
SI
Central Plateau   High
Clonal
3.2
—
—
Totals - Central Interior Region Orchards
22.0
-
-
Grand Totals
90.6
101.600
251.356
" F- Douglas-fir
Hw - Western Hemlock      PI
Lodgepole
** O.P. - seedlings resulting from open pollination             + + -1979 data unavailable
Ss - Sitka Spruce             SI
Interior Spruce           C.P. - seedlings resulting from controlled pollination     + - Cooperative orchard
Note: Pacific Logging Seed Orchards are for
reforestation in private lands.
 Table B.3
B. Nurseries Activity
Inventory of Seed in Storage, by Forest Region, 1979
(Grams)1
Forest Region
Prince Prince
Species                                                               Cariboo           Kamloops            Nelson                George Rupert Vancouver Totals
AlpineFir             6765              190135             513413                  64325 14085 2940 791663
Amabilis/Silver Fir            —                      —                      —                        — — 1415951 1145951
Douglas-fir        1008467            2236571            2414979                 100525 165744 5613956 11540 242
Engelmann Spruce            42765             681850             378902                   — 1054 132870 1237 441
Grand Fir            —                      —                   247 475                   — — 163246 410721
Lodgepole Pine         310751              917842           1128750                703309 637803 6280 3704735
Mountain Hemlock            -                      -                      -                        — 77120 25910 103030
Ponderosa (Yellow) Pine           12 600             543 525               99 826                   — — 2 190 658 141
Sitka Spruce              —                          -                          —                            — 783 291 213 704 996 995
Western Hemlock            —                       4943                 9005                   — 145562 446980 606490
Western Larch            —                     21205              113 481                   — — — 134 686
Western Red Cedar                960               78404               34813                      885 63350 164561 342973
WhiteSpruce              32251                    —                          —                      1040 186 935143 — 2007580
YellowCedar            —                      -                      —                        — — 14385 14385
Misc       1483443              498058            1051145              1305 773 726 722 6701 5071842
Totals       2898002            5 172533           5991789              3215003 3549874 7939674 28 766 875
1 Including seed collected by forest companies
Total seed native species (grams) 28 766 875
Total seed exotic species (grams) 183 450
Grand total seed in storage (grams)  28 950 325
Table B.4    Seed Withdrawals for Nursery Sowing and Other Uses, 1979
(Kilograms)
Forest Service Nurseries Other Nursery
Species Bareroot Containers Nurseries Trials
Balsam  387.970 45.985 — —
Douglas-fir, Coast   324.503 4.405 6.070 —
Douglas-fir, Interior   108.989 24.625 5.380 —
Interior Spruce   311.610 76.377 — —
Larch  1.880 6.394 — —
Lodgepole Pine  30.115 51.860 2.425 —
Mountain Hemlock  — 1.980 — —
SitkaSpruce  14.995 3.075 — —
Western Hemlock  — 49.297 1.750 —
Western Red Cedar  8.270 3.720 .305
YellowCedar  6.619 2.308 — —
YellowPine   53.104 36.650 — —
Misc. (other sp.)   0.095 — — —
Misc. (above sp.)  — — — 18.537
Totals  1248.150 306.676 15.930 18.537
Branch
Direct
Other
Totals
Use
Seeding
Uses
All Uses
—
—
—
433.955
—
—
—
334.978
—
—
—
138.994
—
—
—
387.987
—
—
—
8.274
—
—
—
84.400
—
—
—
1.980
—
—
—
18.070
—
—
—
51.047
	
—
—
12.295
—
—
—
8.927
—
—
—
89.754
—
—
—
0.095
18.682
51.720
6.674
95.613
18.682
51.720
6.674
1 666.369
Table B.5
Nursery
Campbell River .
Chilliwack	
Green Timbers .
Harrop	
Koksilah	
Red Rock	
Skimikin 	
Surrey	
Telkwa	
Vernon	
Forest Region
Cariboo	
Kamloops	
Nelson 	
Prince George..
Prince Rupert...
Vancouver 	
Misc	
Ministry of Forests Nurseries, Inventory of Seedlings,
by Nursery and Forest Region, August 1979
(Thousands of Trees)
Totals  69 351
1 Other containers include Spencer Lemaire trays, Walter's Bullets etc.
45 794
13 248
Stock Type
Bareroot
Container
1+0
2 + 0
Transplant
Styroblock
Other1
6 469
3 978
1 859
383
	
10 111
5 201
1 753
—
—
5 233
4 362
204
6 904
164
—
—
—
320
—
2 773
1838
1088
4 323
885
10619
7 367
4 283
453
—
7 733
4 599
1223
2 897
38
25 380
17 748
2 635
8817
—
1 033
701
203
—
—
—
—
—
3 254
—
8 170
4 626
1 153
2 879
75
7 886
2 221
1 219
5 199
89
4 158
1 700
597
5 634
94
24 967
25 489
4 867
3 981
13
7712
3 352
1 930
2 531
159
16 202
8 345
3 438
7 039
656
256
61
44
88
1
 B. Nurseries Activity
Table B.6
Ministry of Forests Nurseries, Inventory of Seedlings by Species and Forest Region,
August 1979
(Thousands of Trees)
Stock Type
Bareroot
Container
Species
1+0
2-0
Transplants
Styroblocks
Other |
Amabilis Fir   1 581
Douglas-fir, Coast   13 369
Douglas-fir, Interior  4 851
Grand Fir  272
Interior Spruce  41 679
Lodgepole Pine  3 710
Mountain Hemlock   —
Sitka Spruce  2 218
Spruce White	
Western Hemlock ....
Western Larch	
Western Red Cedar.
YellowCedar	
Yellow Pine 	
Other Species 	
  47
  76
  811
  82
  360
  295
Totals  69 351
189
7 563
1 793
191
30 336
2016
694
2 790
2
210
7
57
45 848
422
1 362
431
499
7 246
1928
554
92
263
408
14
17
12
13 248
265
93
835
31
10 994
7 484
68
529
5 940
570
56
314
87
27 266
89
37
76
885
84
1 171
Stock Type
Bareroot
Containers
1+0
2 + 0
Transplants
Styroblock                     Other
Table B.7        Ministry of Forests Nurseries, Summary of Spring Sowing, 1979
(Thousands of Trees)
Species
Amabilis Fir	
Douglas-fir, Coast ...
Douglas-fir, Interior .
Grand Fir	
Interior Spruce 	
Lodgepole Pine	
Mountain Hemlock ..
Sitka Spruce	
Western Hemlock....
Western Larch	
Western Red Cedar
YellowCedar	
Yellow Pine 	
Other Species	
Totals	
Totals
—
1 783
9
192
—
1 984
2.0
395
6 172
953
102
102
14 724
14.9
717
3 183
409
858
68
5 235
5.3
—
147
122
35
—
304
0.3
—
22 031
15 454
11 295
50
48 830
49.3
819
1 275
1 792
7 228
90
11 204
11.3
—
—
—
281
—
281
0.3
178
1 623
643
700
—
3 144
3.2
—
—
—
7 834
—
7 834
7.9
7
55
—
720
—
782
0.8
100
1 439
165
125
1 371
3 200
3.2
90
72
15
—
156
333
0.3
—
—
313
352
—
665
0.7
5
349
—
148
-
502
0.5
311
38 129
19 875
29 870
1837
99 022
100
 C. Forest Protection
Table C. 1 Fire Occurrences by Months, by Forest Region, 1979
Forest Region March
Cariboo  8
Kamloops  14
Nelson   5
Prince George  —
Prince Rupert  —
Vancouver   4
Totals  31
PerCent  0.8
Ten-year Average  13
PerCent  0.5
Per
April
May
June
July
August
Sept.
Oct.
Other
Totals
Cent
35
29
61
143
153
135
43
18
625
16.2
48
75
276
433
342
67
28
1
1 284
33.4
21
47
192
311
344
59
33
7
1 019
26.5
7
38
24
130
96
40
13
8
356
9.2
21
9
7
40
75
15
3
3
173
4.5
21
26
45
60
169
40
14
13
392
10.2
153
224
605
1 117
1 179
356
134
50
3 849
100.0
4.0
5.8
15.7
29.0
30.6
9.3
3.5
1.3
100.0
—
96
283
378
745
775
198
85
11
2 584
—
3.7
11.0
14.6
29.0
30.0
7.6
3.2
0.4
100.0
—
Table C.2        Number and Causes of Forest Fires by Forest Region, 1979
Cause of Forest Fires
Forest Region
Cariboo      207
Kamloops     717
Nelson     637
Prince George     202
Prince Rupert       74
Vancouver      106
Totals   1 943
PerCent       50.5
Ten-year average  1 045
PerCent       40.0
37
6
72
36
24
7
37
129
70
0
625
16.2
79
56
131
28
5
4
102
45
114
3
1 284
33.4
78
32
98
31
0
7
40
8
85
3
1 019
26.5
18
5
16
23
7
6
39
21
19
0
356
9.2
19
6
16
9
0
4
18
4
23
0
173
4.5
43
26
85
11
0
7
62
5
42
5
392
10.2
!74
131
418
138
36
35
298
212
353
11
3 849
100.0
7.1
3.4
10.9
3.6
0.9
0.9
7.7
5.5
9.2
0.3
100.0
—
!43
135
333
101
66
32
203
108
304
14
2 584
—
9.5
5.0
13.0
4.0
3.0
1.0
8.0
4.0
12.0
0.5
100.0
—
Table C.3 Number and Causes of Forest Fires, 1970-1979
Causes 1970
Lightning  1 803
Recreational (Campers, Hunters,
Fishermen, etc.)   302
Railroads   246
Smokers   501
Brush-burning (not Railway or
Right-of-way Clearing)   146
Range Burning  191
Road, Power, Telephone and
Pipeline Construction  30
Industrial Operations
(Logging, etc.)   255
Incendiary  70
Miscellaneous Known Causes  432
Unknown Causes  27
Totals  4 003
971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
Totals
327
583
810
716
1 417
159
551
1 141
1943
10 450
211
188
338
288
249
157
237
189
274
2 433
175
136
218
147
113
57
63
65
131
1351
309
267
431
407
289
130
302
277
418
3 331
129
70
145
102
83
24
83
93
138
1 013
105
59
78
34
42
56
34
27
36
662
27
32
322
205
189
224
319
133
116
154
136
298
2 029
70
77
99
133
94
59
128
138
212
1080
303
277
462
355
252
127
270
205
353
3 036
14
13
20
21
16
3
5
5
11
135
2 898
1903
2 863
2 558
2713
893
1 854
2 308
3 849
25 842
 C. Forest Protection
Table C.4       Fires Classified by Size and Damage, by Forest Region, 1979
Forest Region
Cariboo  625 16.2 367 58.7 13.7 196 31.4 23.0 59 9.4 20.0 3 0.5 12.0 567 36 22
Kamloops   1284 33.4 954 74.3 35.6 253 19.7 29.7 73 5.7 24.8 4 0.3 16.0 1218 25 41
Nelson   1019 26.5 747 73.3 27.9 216 21.2 25.3 52 5.1 17.6 4 0.4 16.0 965 16 38
PrinceGeorge  356 9.2 205 57.6 7.7 84 23.6 9.9 57 16.0 19.3 10 2.8 40.0 295 19 42
PrinceRupert   173 4.5 120 69.4 4.5 32 18.5 3.8 19 11.0 6.4 2 1.2 8.0 153 8 12
Vancouver  392 10.2 284 72.4 10.6 71 18.1 8.3 35 8.9 11.9 2 0.5 8.0 360 13 19
Totals   3 849 100.0 2 677 69.6 100.0 852 22.1 100.0 295 7.7 100.0 25 0.6 100.0 3 558 117 174
PerCent   100.0 — 69.6 — — 22.1 — — 7.7 — — 0.6 — — 92.4 3.1 4.5
Ten-year average  2584 — 1701 — — 667 — — 185 — — 31 — — 2304 154 126
PerCent   100.0 — 65.8 — — 26.0 — — 7.0 — — 1.2 — — 89.2 6.0 4,8
Table C.5        Loss of Property Other than Forests, by Forest Region, 1979
Types of Property Loss
Forest Region
Cariboo	
Kamloops	
Nelson 	
PrinceGeorge	
Prince Rupert	
Vancouver 	
Totals	
PerCent	
Ten-year Average .
PerCent	
Forest Products Cut,
Railway, Logging,
and
Per Cent of
Logs, Lumber, etc.
Buildings
Sawmill Equipment
Miscellaneous
Totals
Totals
$105 692
$10 600
$50 100
$13 283
$179 675
5.9
18 624
109 700
181000
32 490
341814
11.3
17 876
8 350
33 975
8 154
68 355
2.3
25 783
59 500
268 510
42 700
396 493
13.0
325 328
3 800
400
500
330 028
10.9
1 346 059
3 855
266 828
102 307
1 719049
56.6
1 839 362
195 805
800 813
199 434
3 035 414
100.0
61.0
6.0
26.4
6.6
100.0
—
$331 347
$148 333
$255 075
$72 081
$806 836
—
41.0
18.0
32.0
9.0
100.0
—
Table C.6       Loss of Forest Cover Caused by Forest Fires, by Forest Region (Part 1), 1979
Forest Region
Cariboo	
Kamloops	
Nelson 	
PrinceGeorge	
PrinceRupert	
Vancouver 	
Totals	
PerCent	
Ten-year average
PerCent	
Forest Cover
/
Merchantable Timber                /
/
Immature Timber
/ ^
/ /
/      «
/   /  /
/   **
/     /
/              £
f°
/         #&
/           #*?
/          ^/
/        £ ^
/                         f
/                         f
/                         ^
/               Z
/               «
/        ■?         /
/        'S,         /
/       J?        /
/       /        /
/       $        /
(ha)
(rrv<)
(m3)
($)
(ha)
($)
1 962
324 385
242 084
806 284
536
26 109
3 526
634 932
331 992
3 108 551
947
232 683
2 491
614802
231 794
3 705 556
118
9 344
2 368
114311
70 062
284 100
2 277
94 372
1986
217 534
54 929
1 380 007
—
—
1 804
129 662
61564
345 412
447
49 169
14 137
2 035 626
992 425
9 629 910
4 325
411677
48.0
100.0
48.8
94.6
15.0
4.0
14 802
682 778
318661
3 582 197
15 583
1316389
21.0
100.0
46.7
70.7
22.1
26.1
 C. Forest Protection
Table C.7        Loss of Forest Cover Caused by Forest Fires, by
Forest Region (Part II), 1979
Cariboo
Kamloopos
Nelson
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Vancouver
Totals
Per Cent
Ten-year Average
Per Cent
711
424
563
821
32
433
2 984
10.0
4 687
6.7
(ha)   (ha)
217
6
259
0.8
417
0.6
45
0.1
3 569
5.1
8 887
5 804
7 541
10 264
3 112
5 487
41095
0.4
60 801
1.2
49
263
388
760
427
1
1 888
6.4
12 878
18.3
617
3 285
4 853
9 495
5 339
13
23 602
0.3
41 548
0.8
292
321
24
540
26
1 203
4.0
2 562
3.6
3 651
4 009
297
6 744
326
15 027
0.2
16 795
0.3
105
886
773
1210
190
286
3450
11.7
15 329
21.8
1 309
11079
9 669
15130
2 374
3 579
43 140
0.4
40 167
0.8
239
366
283
119
47
102
1 156
4.0
536
0.8
2 820
4 250
3 277
1 410
552
1 186
13 495
0.1
6 502
0.1
3 894
6 774
4 680
8 095
2 925
3 079
29 447
100.0
70 363
100.0
82 301
302 940
383 008
44 249
162 605
68 098
1 043 201
51.2
364 117
53.3
849 677
3 369 661
3 740 537
421 515
1391 710
404 846
10177 946
100.0
5 064 339
100.0
The dollar value of losses in merchantable and immature timber represents only stumpage loss to the Crown.
Table C.8        Fire Causes, Area Burned, Ministry of Forest Fire-fighting Costs, and Total Damage, 1979
Causes
Lightning	
Recreational (Campers, Hunters, Fishermen, etc.)	
Railroads 	
Smokers 	
Brush-burning (not Railway or Right-of-way Clearing)
Range Burning	
Road, Power, Telephone, and Pipeline Construction ...
Industrial Operations (Logging, etc.)	
Incendiary	
Miscellaneous Known Causes	
Unknown Causes	
Totals	
Ministry of Forests
Number of Fires
Area Burned
Fire-fighting Costs
Est. Total
Damage
jmber
PerCent
(ha)
Per Cent
($)
Per Cent
($)
PerCent
1943
50.5
8 568
29.1
12 905 882
67.0
6 734 485
51.0
274
7.0
666
2.3
722 842
3.8
183 486
1.4
131
3.5
261
0.9
139 472
0.7
4 051
—
418
11.0
2 659
9.0
1 729 807
9.0
1 756 959
13.3
138
3.5
1 417
4.8
203 421
1.1
87 074
0.7
36
1.0
1515
5.0
48 567
0.3
19 356
0.1
35
1.0
264
0.9
39 289
0.2
17 168
0.1
298
7.7
9 362
31.8
1 690 674
8.8
3 479 566
26.3
212
5.5
3815
13.0
789 331
4.0
354 698
2.7
353
9.0
903
3.1
954 992
5.0
576 336
4.4
11
0.3
17
0.1
22 506
0.1
181
—
3 849
100.0
29 447
100.0
19 246 783
100.0
13 213 360
100.0
Table C.9        Comparison of Loss Caused by Forest Fires,1970-1979
1970
1973
1974
1975
1977
1978
Total
Ten years
Total Number of Fires
4 003
2 898
1 903
2 863
2 558
2713
893
1854
2 308
3 849
25 842
Area Burned (ha)
105 688
351 890
26 087
33 422
21 728
24 911
57 020
3 796
50 081
29 447
704 070
Standing Timber Destroyed
or Damaged (m3)
4 040 036
9 499 980
391 496
1 640 856
2 907 884
6 443 444
1318 398
203 252
4 783114
2 035 626
33 264 086
Amount Salvable (ms)
1 581 272
1 962 800
189 812
752 528
2 284 968
5 298 748
398 089
115 396
1009179
992 425
14585 217
Damage to Forests ($)
3 437 205
12 974 582
713 681
5 276 975
1 860 942
1264 407
2 528 465
369 508
11 435 928
10 177 946
50 039 639
Damage to Other Forms
of Property ($)
744 901
609 064
459 728
1 056 760
491 422
92 430
70135
173 537
1 334 974
3 035 414
8 068 365
Total Damage ($)
4 182 106
13 583 646
1 173 409
6 333 735
2 352 364
1 356 837
2 598 600
543 045
12 770 902
13 213 360
58 108 004
 Table CIO
C. Forest Protection
Ightl
ng Costs per Fire, by Forest Region, 1979
Number of Fires
Ministry of Forests
Extinguishec
Without
Distribution of Fires by
Fire-fighting Costs
Cost to Ministry
Cost to Extinguish
of Forests
/ / <f  A A
/                                 /               SP                               /r$                         /J?
/    / i     A** /J
S /     -f           /cf£>   /ft/
if    /               *?$               /rf   £     / 4    £/
/                   z>
/ /
/ /
A
//
A A
/ H       /  cy
' §     / <§»      /
3£/ o° 4/ 6
/§ Ai L
/ i /i /$
*» /«   /j#    /
«> J? /Jo   fi /r\   fi    /
4   / O    CT / O    C;      /
625
2 298 509
11.9           4 163
73                552
29
216
173
81
53
108
1 284
6 674 352
34.7           5 829
139               1 145
41
573
338
85
1019
7 700 034
40.0            8 200
80                939
82
387
277
92
101
356
1 076 852
5.6            3 333
33                323
13
108
134
26
42
173
455 661
2.4            2 958
19                  154
11
65
54
11
13
392
1 041 375
5.4            3 184
65                  327
27
150
83
29
38
3 849
19 246 783*
100.0            5 594
409              3 440
203
1499
1 059
324
355
100.0
—
—                  —
10.6                89.4
5.3
39.0
27.5
8.4
9.2
2 584
7 780 034
100.0                —
455               2 129
522
852
484
127
144
100.0
—
—             —
17.6
82.4
20.1
33.0
18.7
5.0
5.6
Forest Region
Cariboo	
Kamloops	
Nelson	
PrinceGeorge	
Prince Rupert 	
Vancouver 	
Totals	
PerCent	
Ten-year Average.
PerCent	
Cost to other parties $4 930 276
Cost to Ministry of Forests $19 246 783
" Cost correct to date. Subject to later revision.
Detailed final costs are published one year in arrears in the table "Forest Service Expenditures" in each annual report.
 D. Timber Harvesting
Table D. 1        Total Amount of Timber Scale Billed in British Columbia, 1978 and 1979
(Includes Firmwood Rejects)
(Cubic Metres)
Forest Region
'Cariboo (C) 	
Prince Rupert (C) .
'Vancouver (C)	
Totals, Coast	
'Cariboo (I)	
Kamloops	
Nelson 	
PrinceGeorge	
Prince Rupert (I)...
'Vancouver (I)	
Totals, Interior	
Totals	
Ten-year
Average
Net
1970-79
1978
1979
Increase
Decrease
Increase
4 631 566
4 143 445
4 858 347
714 902
	
z
24 126 389
28190 485
25 707 861
—
2 482 624
—
28 757 955
32 333 930
30 566 208
—
1 767 722
—
4 327 227
7 469 233
6 503 757
—
965 476
—
8 070 308
8 908 157
8 812 840
—
95317
—
6129 083
7 254 651
6 903 662
—
350 989
—
12 220 468
13 927 056
15984819
2 057 763
—
—
4 313 557
5 280 057
6 668 587
1 388 530
—
—
75 421
—
754 206
754 206
—
—
35 136 064
42 839 154
45 627 871
2 788 717
—
—
63 894 019
75 173 084
76194 079
—
—
1020 995
* Prior to 1979 - Vancouver and Cariboo were not split into Coast and Interior.
rable D.2        Total Volume of All Products Billed, by Land Status and Forest Region, 1979
(Includes Volumes Charged to Cut Control and Excludes Firmwood Rejects)
(Cubic Metres)
Land Status Cariboo
Tree Farm Licences  151 870
Timber Sale Harvesting Licences   2 812 273
Timber Sale Licences   3 147 034
Farm Woodlot Licences  312
Licences to Cut  173 752
Right-of-way   4 872
Timber Licences   —
Timber Leases  —
Timber Berths   —
Special Timber Licences  —
Pulp Licences   —
Pulp Leases  —
Beachcomb, Trespass   —
Misc	
Subtotals, Crown Lands  6 290 113
Crown Grants to 1887  6 839
Crown Grants 1887-1906  24 807
Crown Grants to 1906-14  47867
Crown Grants to date  489 003
Dominion Reserves   —
Indian Reserves  14383
Totals  6 873 012
F
orest Region
Kamloops
Nelson
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Vancouver
Totals
790 605
1 454 064
595 421
2 446 454
6 878 645
12 317 059
3 671 290
2 614 234
9 024 586
6 205 455
5 516 573
29 844 411
3 254 684
1 631 224
5 191951
1 073 928
1 486 059
15 784 880
63
—
827
—
2 584
3 786
98 980
45 660
309 880
211 788
71311
911 371
5114
144
17813
10 737
7 547
46 227
—
9 833
13 456
—
10 467
33 756
—
—
—
—
1 082 039
1 082 039
—
9 103
—
—
211 592
220 695
280 540
79917
2 032
584 648
5 043 741
5 990 878
—
—
—
379 914
186 055
565 969
—
—
—
49 296
612 299
661 595
—
—
—
15415
97 081
112 496
7 442
22 753
—
—
113 597
143 792
8 108 718
5 866 932
15 155 966
10 977 635
21319 590
67 718 954
169 684
260 958
—
464
3 764 975
4 202 920
30 145
346 740
—
200 592
341 383
943 667
115091
66 000
73 654
81739
147 592
531 943
294 640
327 274
648 055
279 451
579 049
2 617 472
177
—
—
—
1 974
2 151
18 301
—
24 048
72 557
85 716
215 005
8 736 756
6 867 904
15 901 723
11 612 438
26 240 279
76 232 112
 D. Timber Harvesting
Table D.3        Species Cut, All Products, 1979
(Includes Firmwood Rejects)
(Cubic Metres)
Forest Region
Cariboo (C) 	
Prince Rupert (C)
Vancouver(C)	
Totals, Coast	
Cariboo (I)	
Kamloops	
Nelson	
PrinceGeorge	
Prince Rupert (I)...
Vancouver (I) 	
Totals, Interior	
Grand Totals 	
Forest Region
Cariboo (C)
Prince Rupert (C)
Vancouver (C)
Totals, Coast
Cariboo (I)
Kamloops
Nelson
Prince George
Prince Rupert (I)
Vancouver (I)
Totals, Interior
Grand Totals
:
Balsam
Cedar
Cypress
Fir
Hemlock
Larch
Lodgepole
Pine
608 779
1 017313
76 603
58 121
2 241 299
	
5 682
4 563 098
6 380 975
721 813
4 300 054
9124 463
-
6 038
5171 877
7 398 288
798 416
4 358175
11 365 762
-
11720
286 588
198 761
	
1 410 541
16 007
	
2 623 727
1 174 233
535 730
4
1 657 741
362 603
70 262
2 418 036
701 539
852 950
—
662 872
761 709
321 520
1 732 589
1 535 036
71 914
—
289 057
19 756
92
5 335 253
1 077 062
167 908
2
1994
976 007
—
2 620 876
184210
101 850
6 382
147 885
179 378
25
45 263
4 958 668
1 929 113
6 388
4 170 090
2 315 460
391 899
14 775 735
10 130 545
9 327 401
804 804
8 528 265
13 681 222
391 899
14 787 455
White
Yellow
Other
Other
Spruce
Pine
Pine
Conifer
Cottonwood
Hardwoods
Totals
813014
73
32
788
36 455
188
4 858 347
394 135
91 614
7
4 355
78 909
42 400
25 707 861
1 207 149
91687
39
5143
115 364
42 588
30 566 208
1 950 536
21
424
11 035
4 620
1497
6 503 757
2 457 221
49 828
69 158
17 237
381
406
8 812 840
1 570 387
254 043
30 156
7 434
8 348
115
6 903 662
8 695 261
9
—
12 054
17 173
9214
15 984 819
1 790 201
2
—
12 482
21 064
998
6 668 587
78 567
6 659
307
75
949
2 656
754 206
16 542 173
310 562
100 045
60317
52 535
14 886
45 627 871
17 749 322
402 249
100 084
65 460
167 899
57 474
76 194 079
Table D.4        Timber Cut and Billed from Timber Sales and Timber
Sale Harvesting Licences, 1979
(Cubic Metres)
Forest Region
Cariboo	
Kamloops	
Nelson	
Prince George ..
PrinceRupert ...
Vancouver	
Totals	
Special Forest
Logs
Products*
5 959 307
15 882
6 925 974
5 672
4 245 458
28 729
14216537
12 738
7 279 383
8 954
7002 632
54 220
45 629 291
126195
' Special Forest Products are defined as poles, posts, pilings, shakes, shingle bolts, Christmas trees and other
similar products designated in the regulations as special forest products.
Table D.5        Area Logged, 1979*
(Hectares)
Clear Selective
Forest Region Cutting Cutting                          Totals
Cariboo  20287 8250 28537
Kamloops  17114 8721 25835
Nelson  14026 8235 22261
PrinceGeorge  62559 85 62644
PrinceRupert  23519 1765 25284
Vancouver  31315 657 31972
Totals 1979   168820 27713 196533
1978   140169 25912 166081
1977   147897 28 055 175952
1976   133 277 23 699 156 976
1975   100501 19070 119571
1974   130849 18004 148853
1973   149250 23 926 173176
1972   132965 19428 152393
1971    135572 29559 165 131
* Includes all Crown land and excludes all private land except those in Tree Farm Licences, Tree Farms and
Farm Woodlot Licences.
 D. Timber Harvesting
Table D.6        Christmas Trees Billed, by Land Status and Forest Region, 1970-1979
(Number of Trees)
Forest Region
Cariboo
Kamloops
Nelson
Prince I
3eorge
Private
Crown
Private
Crown
Private
Crown
Private
Crovi
1979
2 460
4 852
32 933
8 572
309 336
175 620
1525
1300
1978
1201
6301
17 864
500
320 871
207 926
833
—
1977
6 020
3 866
32 011
12 723
433 841
195 341
60
500
1976
9 558
23 680
35 360
12 290
496 343
217 072
444
—
1975
8 020
19 634
63 057
13 829
505 372
334 010
677
—
1974
12 860
31486
76 884
10 709
557 240
210 764
645
800
1973
11677
28 588
61 401
25 467
603 533
225 036
185
—
1972
—
3 366
34 883
66 716
457 940
367 056
3 868
280
1971
—
—
83 188
77 783
752 079
448 423
188
900
1970
—
—
152 578
103 083
822 322
455 865
—
100
Prince Rupert Vancouver Totals
Crown    Private  Crown    Private       Crown       Private       Crown
Totals
600
83 876
7 026
430 130
197 970
628 100
600
81527
10173
422 296
226 500
648 796
600
90 129
14119
562 061
227149
789 210
495
77 554
7217
619 259
260 754
880 013
500
71617
6 926
648 743
374 899
1 023 642
500
85413
4124
733 042
258 383
991 425
—
81 743
7 348
758 539
286 439
1 044 978
500
72 067
10 985
568 758
448 903
1017 661
375
65 043
2 775
900 558
530 256
1 430 814
—
77 662
2 130
1 052 562
561 178
1 613 740
 E. Inventory Information
Table E. 1        Summary of Basic Data for Certified Tree Farms, 1979
(Private Sustained Yield Units Over Crown Granted Lands)
Forest Region
Included Within Tree Farm Licences
Nelson	
Prince George	
Vancouver	
Totals	
Not Included Within Tree Farm Licences
Nelson	
Vancouver	
Totals	
Grand Totals	
" Number of Christmas trees
Productive Area (ha)
Total
Allowable Annual
Cut or
Estimated
NSR
Number of
and
Area
Productive
Tree Farms
Mature
Immature
NCC
Totals
(ha)
Capacity (m:i)
2
309
1706
1 872
3 887
4 110
12210
1
13
422
59
494
518
1300
14
19 893
114 288
15 645
149 826
165 708
1 043 665
17
20 215
116416
17 576
154 207
170 336
1 057 175
10
40 266
92 040
37 538
169 844
214 839
469 925
292 943'
23
65 256
171 770
19 596
256 622
286 396
1 921 629
1000*
33
105 522
263 810
57134
426 466
501 235
2 391 554
293 943'
50
125 737
380 226
74 710
580 673
671 571
3 448 729
293 943'
Table E.2        Summary of Basic Data for Farm Woodlot Licences, 1979
(Private Sustained Yield Units)
Number of Productive Area (ha)
Farm Woodlot
Forest Region                                                                  Licences Crown Private
Cariboo                              10 1 180 98
Kamloops                               2 150 39
Nelson                               4 550 250
PrinceGeorge                               6 551 —
PrinceRupert                             4 516 59
Vancouver                           10 580 64
Totals                                   36 3527 510
Total
Allowable
Area
Annual Cut
Total
(ha)
(m")
1 278
1987
2 050
189
189
460
800
838
750
551
601
1 630
575
986
810
644
839
1990
4 037
7 690
 E. Inventory Information
Table E.3        Summary of Basic Data for Tree Farm Licences (Private Sustained Yield Units), 1979
TFL
Name
Productive Area (ha)
Schedule A   Schedule B Totals
Vancouver Region
* 2
Duncan Bay
6
Quatsino
7
Salmon River
10
Toba
12
Hardwicke
17
Knight Inlet
19
Tahsis
20
Tofino
21
Alberni
22
Maguinna
'25
Naka
26
Mission Municipal
27
Nitinat
36
Cordero
37
Nimpkish
38
Sguamish
'39
Haida
Crown Zellerbach Canada Ltd.
ITT Ind. (Canada)
MacMillan Bloedel Limited
Timberland Development Co. Ltd.
Crown Zellerbach (Hardwicke Island) Limited
British Columbia Forest Products Limited
Tahsis Company Ltd.
MacMillan Bloedel Industries Ltd.
MacMillan Bloedel Industries Ltd.
British Columbia Forest Products Limited
ITT Ind. (Canada)
Corporation of the District of Mission
British Columbia Forest Products Limited
British Columbia Forest Products Limited
Canadian Forest Products Ltd.
Empire Mills Limited
MacMillan Bloedel Limited
Regional Totals 17
* Tree Farm Licences 2, 25 and 39 are partly within the Prince Rupert Region.
Total Area     Allowable
(ha)        Annual Cut
(rn')
58 393
105 483
163 876
191 501
633 350
24 430
119 455
143 885
170 028
1 180 811
23 477
47 558
71035
78 755
523 861
247
38 139
38 386
232 411
179 245
664
8 068
8 732
9 472
70 792
234
47 727
47 961
275 777
223 210
7 570
105 260
112 830
191 479
989 672
57161
86 949
144110
172 552
1 084 783
105 502
110566
216 068
258 219
1 935 227
21326
130123
151 449
166 870
1 110 586
26916
64195
91 111
146 221
522100
1 187
5 367
6 554
7 672
32 281
1096
11883
12 979
14517
115077
2 322
8 662
10 984
11597
93 446
37 318
98 162
135 480
188 198
1 095 980
190
52 237
52 427
219014
263 380
71 854
183 557
255 411
428 993
1836 410
439 887       1223 391       1663 278      2 763 276    11890 211
Prince
1
Rupert Region
Port Edward
* 2
Duncan Bay
24
Moresby
'25
Naka
'39
Haida
41
Kitimat
Canadian Cellulose Company, Limited
Crown Zellerbach Canada Limited
ITT Ind. (Canada)
ITT Ind. (Canada)
MacMillan Bloedel Limited
Eurocan Pulp & Paper Company Limited
Regional Totals 6
' Tree Farm Licences 2,25 and 39 are partly within the Vancouver Region.
4 866       1211760       1216 626      2 425 121       1291560
10 883
13 363
24 246
27 586
208 605
2 967
74 781
77 748
112 470
436 079
15 526
50 766
66 292
308 255
93 960
41 104
176 186
217 290
297 431
1 502 520
—
243 718
243 718
1 022 378
566 400
75 346
1 770 574
1 845 920
4 193 241
4 099 124
Kamloops Region
9
15
16
18
32
33
35
Regional Totals
Okanagan West
Inkaneep
Monte Lake
Clearwater
Bolean
Sicamous
Jamieson Creek
Crown Zellerbach Canada Limited
Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd.
Crown Zellerbach Canada Limited
Clearwater Timber Products Limited
Crown Zellerbach Canada Limited
Federated Co-operatives Limited
Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd
682
65
72 252
72 934
79 293
210 394
45 785
45 850
48 670
73 057
48 634
48 634
51842
127 992
67 549
67 549
74 224
209 544
12 678
12 678
13 555
33 980
8 323
8 323
8512
28 480
37 246
37 246
40 051
89 664
292 467
293 214
316 147
773 111
Nelson Region
3
8
13
14
23
Regional Totals
Little Slocan
Boundary
Bull River
Spillimacheen
Arrow Lakes
Slocan Forest Products Ltd.
PopeS, Talbot Ltd.
Galloway Lumber Company Limited
Crestbrook Forest Industries Ltd.
Canadian Cellulose Company, Limited
39 558
39 558
79 687
119618
—
72 672
72 672
77 757
150 787
196
20 685
20 881
37 342
26 900
405
47 772
48177
139 520
115 533
15 073
376 579
391 652
1019 333
1 175 280
15 674
557 266
572 940
1 353 639
1 588 118
Cariboo Region
5
Mackenzie - Cariboo
Weldwood of Canada Limited
281
32 860
33 141
34 419
124 396
Prince George Region
30 Northwood
Northwood Pulp and Timber Limited
698
158 209
158 907
181 284
441 000
Grand Totals
34
532 633  4 034 767  4 567 400  8 842 006  18 915 960
Schedule "A" is land over which the Tree Farm Licence holder has cutting rights in addition to those conveyed by the Tree Farm Licence Agreement. This may include
land held in fee simple, and temporary tenure land such as timber leases, timber licences, pulp leases, pulp licences and timber berths. Following removal of
the mature timber, the temporary tenure lands are transferred to Schedule "B".
Schedule "B" is Crown land.
 E. Inventory Information
Table E.4       Summary of Basic Data for Public Sustained Yield Units, 1979
Productive Area
Total
Total Area
Date
Mature
Productive
Including
Volume
Forest Region and
of
Volume
Mature
Immature
(Includes
Non-forest
Commitment
Scaled
Unit Name
Survey
(m»)
(ha)
(ha)
NSRandNCC)
(ha)
(m»)
(m'l
Cariboo
Big Bar (Partial)
1976
38 412 540
282 097
159 249
450 158
546 521
444 500
289 641
Big Valley Blk. 2
1969
17 011 740
59 822
9 882
73 851
78 085
194 130
134 892
Bowron
1967
11 366 030
38 039
19 903
60 983
68 302
146 140
237 265
Chilko
1966
81 133 090
592 259
625 844
1 263 036
2 077 870
200 130
44 207
Cottonwood
1969
40 551860
126 478
'12 581
183 251
194 354
589 760
649 746
Lac la Hache
1972
64 993 210
320 669
264 769
616 951
720 001
954 490
874 118
Narcosli
1974
70 564 440
442 678
349 519
813 237
881 021
1 087 530
1 085 913
Quesnel Lake
1971
115 977 370
363 425
219501
621 965
839 063
1 050 600
1 314 490
Stum
1963,66
65 691 750
603 378
595 450
1 234 094
1 453 156
892 750
742 307
Williams Lake
1973
35 068 910
150 405
92 208
271 708
302 379
405 320
634 920
Regional Totals
540 770 940
2 979 250
2 378 906
5 589 234
7 160 752
5 955 350
6 007 499
Kamloops
Adams
1968
26 801400
91 183
99 633
200 867
236 622
413 470
464 487
Ashnola
1969
23 429140
107 445
57 267
170 880
212839
255 420
296 064
Barriere
1967
13 583 060
48 621
63 588
118 249
132 307
254 270
295 989
Barton Hill
1970
12 419 850
50 820
8 022
60 720
65 631
117 990
43 341
Big Bar (Partial)'
1976
9 010 320
67 226
42 827
111 063
130 789
—
69 270
Botanie
1970
36 884 250
212 895
111 185
348 711
525 468
371 240
410321
Eagle
1971
23 581890
59 034
35 526
102 999
142 395
271 980
341 349
Kamloops
1968
17 533 930
115 070
135 096
274 776
326 180
332 190
287 747
Nehalliston
1973
16902 080
70 479
64 945
140 775
157 984
283 200
290 873
Nicola
1970
29 119 330
149913
143 047
330 046
384 822
380 890
363 495
Niskonlith
1968
9 687 340
38 702
66 777
112193
119410
227 850
199 168
North Thompson
1967
46 029 520
142 054
34 375
190 365
398 092
284 100
325 798
Okanagan
1975
43 177 950
198 826
215 243
428 023
513 600
661 240
894 110
Raft
1967
21 742 140
77 757
111 538
204 533
225 594
358 090
374 845
Salmon Arm
1975
4 588 490
17 663
49 416
72 492
90 280
98 190
97 372
Shuswap
1975
38133140
96 548
87 780
209 453
306 026
385 470
314 901
Similkameen
1969
41463110
140 590
153 487
316 356
353 107
639 460
678 331
Spallumcheen
1972
46 364 400
141831
158 250
316918
396 842
824 040
811 074
Yalakom
1977
53 396 930
229 915
119 556
364 751
746 715
511720
365 379
Regional Totals
513 848 270
2 056 572
1 757 558
4 074 170
5 464 703
6 670 810
6 923 914
Nelson
Arrowhead
1962
14 359 710
45 289
32 859
81418
206 000
132 470
180 785
Cranbrook
1964
32 756 780
121 349
310411
493 492
698 431
652 400
424 272
Creston
1973
12 767 930
49514
146 621
209 027
274 678
291 700
266 839
Edgewood
1967
9 392 750
39 253
60 990
106 061
120 576
200 300
215 600
Fernie
1973
20186130
90 337
185 424
305 681
541 288
543 170
350 450
Granby
1967
10 442 630
39 128
154 668
203 972
260 297
249 530
281 941
Kettle
1963
14 657 560
76 838
206 570
308 836
332 861
383 640
457 168
Kinbasket
1968
66 647 720
165 827
132 772
318 707
925 647
726 660
845 737
Lardeau
1969
53 884 630
151089
202 430
373 126
739 692
466 940
305 822
Nakusp
1967
11 234 740
32 984
37 858
78 104
126 205
139 340
217 851
Salmo
1974
9 080 020
29 276
142162
181 979
254 973
290 740
314 578
Slocan
1967
9 695180
34 026
79 958
122212
209 579
202 550
175 500
Upper Kootenay
1965
34 370 200
138817
150 228
306 457
510170
471 540
577 594
Windermere
1974
13 130 630
53 739
93 546
152 894
326 284
183 600
134 143
Regional Totals
312 606 610
1067466
1 936497
3 245 966
5 526 682
4 934 580
4 748 280
Prince George
Big Valley-Blk. 1
1969
20445 960
63 235
6 565
74 324
80 796
232 780
270 965
Blueberry
1964
37962 590
187 825
441331
777 012
1 112 274
537 090
517 707
Canoe
1974
29 290 390
84 592
34 954
127 598
355 028
192 200
166 384
Carp
1973
90 833 800
272 077
224 771
523 438
601 628
824 430
673 506
Crooked River
1973
45 211320
130 451
90 107
240 135
271 037
505 440
756 636
Finlay
1972
265 096 070
1 443 392
755 510
2 386 591
4 715 902
3 003 620
2 350 328
Fontas
1969,70
9 352 140
40 634
297 427
436 687
1 092 292
220 870
282 505
Fort Nelson
1968
41 644 080
193 300
584 590
885 586
1 922 737
717 920
699 579
Kluskus
1975
33 663 300
179 125
136 862
316310
385 601
180 750
99 427
Kotcho
1970
11 051 650
58 845
755 052
1 246 321
2 231 182
—
—
Liard
1972, 73
130 671090
741 349
731 082
1 735 080
3 037 441
407 910
245 250
Longworth
1971
90 568 520
300 602
29 145
345 438
491 749
627 050
524 782
Moberly
1970
58 731 210
283 568
263 387
603 604
764 637
482 030
347 112
Monkman
1966
67264 670
280 704
13 240
302 346
547 808
443 380
433 087
Naver
1969
18 886 780
58 756
48 876
122 827
131 622
328 240
339 220
Nechako
1975
104 914 330
487 276
311475
827815
934 460
1417420
1 813 687
Parsnip
1965
65 060 360
318 532
67 256
444 328
597 310
612 760
579 594
Peace
1972
63 658 090
298 875
155 781
490 089
706 154
336 330
412 039
Purden
1967
46 075 280
168 855
30 289
215819
238 960
473 160
602 159
(continued)
 E. Inventory Information
Table E. 4       Su
immary of Basic
DataofPubli.
z Sustained Yield Units, 1979, (c<
>ntinued)
Productive Area
Total
Total Area
Date
Mature
Productive
Including
Volume
Forest Region and
of
Volume
Mature
Immature
(Includes
Non-forest
Commitment
Scaled
Unit Name
Survey
(m1)
(ha)
(ha)
NSR and NCC)
(ha)
(m')
<mJ)
Prince George (cont.)
Robson
1974
35 254 800
121221
65 804
200 780
533 384
218 520
260 379
Sikanni
1971
33 666 900
255 399
709 524
1 059 355
1 939 679
148 690
93 578
Stuart Lake
1970
72 476 290
267 189
200 799
487 517
611421
536 700
711 059
Takla
1970,71
137 510 480
526 916
339 714
904 573
1 238 629
1 053 540
1 126 636
Wapiti
1969
49 521370
246 595
522 118
845 492
1 162 118
294 670
247038
Westlake
1975
33 645 830
133 372
73 592
224 140
237 975
458 780
549 382
Willow River
1969
17 823 310
56 836
51 044
121925
129 426
334 760
263 730
Regional Total
1 610280610
7 199 521
6 940 295
15 954 130
26 071268
14 589 040
14 365 769
Prince Rupert (Coast)
Dean
1962,63,68
176 786 440
356 595
32 394
391 860
1 585 204
646100
331 246
Hecate
1964,65
285 530 910
630656
40 719
685 977
1711 167
505 460
441388
Queen Charlotte
1967
171 674 760
382 549
30 963
415 573
545 054
587 380
396 810
Rivers Inlet
1967
192 234 800
340 409
21 311
369 871
795 711
906 200
419437
Regional Subtotal
826 226 910
1710 209
125 387
1 863 281
4 637 136
2 645 140
1588 881
Prince Rupert (Interior)
Babine
1974
105 170 250
428 049
160 712
640 449
849 094
645 540
818 733
Bell Irving
1973
51 394 940
112 944
6018
132 165
639 826
—
3 340
Burns Lake
1976
49 737 120
235 057
150 587
394 092
440 519
747 730
738 402
Morice
1972
79 529 160
233 771
89 296
348 595
575 029
556 870
428 893
Ootsa
1976
129 649 850
515 370
270 785
797 902
1 080 748
1 503 210
1 767 916
Skeena
1976
309 494 070
674 737
148 945
847 600
1 584 362
1 628 590
1 200 719
Smithers
1976
89 615 760
307 309
99 587
412 769
582 513
745 450
1 096 549
Sustut
1975
153 710 060
566 477
43 630
628 504
1 562 060
—
—
Subtotal
968 301210
3 073 684
974 560
4 202 076
7314 151
5 327 390
6 054 552
Regional Total
1794 528 120
4 783 893
1 099 947
6 065 357
11951287
8 472 530
7 643 433
Vancouver
Dewdney
1974
123 610 740
209 310
154217
400 951
725 581
1 312310
1 490 387
Kingcome
1966,69,71,74
253 622 450
423 177
98 617
535 241
1 095 137
1266 810
1 310128
Nootka
1969
170 198 270
234 500
25 942
268 671
318 349
1 169 620
1 394 189
Quadra
1962,66,67,68
139 203 730
227 351
276 377
540 889
1 155511
2 097 870
1628 212
Soo
1975
74 842 120
128 243
76 396
212692
597515
584 810
614 921
Vancouver
1970
37 607 090
55 007
61623
129 332
222 734
345 760
348 138
Regional Total
799 084 400
1 277 588
693 172
2 087 776
4 114 827
6 737 180
6 785 975
Totals for Province
5 571 118 950
19 364 290
14 806 375
37 016 633
60 289 519
47 359 490
46 474 870
' - See Cariboo for commitment.
 E. Inventory Information
Table E.5        Summary of Forest Cover Map Production, 1979
Forest Region
Cariboo
Kamloops
Nelson
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Vancouver
Totals
Project Name
Prince George SSAS1/2
Williams Lake TSA (STUM)
Okanagan TSA
Sub-units
1. East Canoe Creek
2. Trinity Valley
3. McNulty Creek
4. Upper Yalakom
Cranbrook TSA
Prince George SSAN1/2
Prince George TSA
North Coast TSA
Lakes TSA
Quadra TSA
Sub-units
1. Potlatch Creek
2. Nahatlatch Creek
3. Mehatl Creek
4. Pemberton Creek
5. Ahta River
TFL37
All Projects
43
145
196
5
18
12
32
118
54
660
220
106
152
5
13
12
3
6
55
1855
43 43 43 43 43 100 43 43 43 43 43 43 43 100
,111 103 47 42 42 30 1 — — — — — — —
73 12 — — — — — — — — — — — —
5 5 5 5 5 100 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 100
18 18 18 18 18 100 18 18 — 10 — — — 0
12 12 12 — — 0 12 12 — — — — — 0
32 32 29 — — 0 32 32 — — — — — 0
118 110 73 72 72 61 — — — — — — — —
54 54 27 25 25 46 — — — — — — — —
26 26 — — — 0 26 22 — — — — — —
203 196 34 13 — 0 — — — — — — — —
7 5 1 — — 0 3 1 — — — — — —
80 73 49— — 0 — — — — — — — 0
5 55 55 100 5 5 555 — — —
55 55 55 55 55 100 55 55 55 — — — — 100
842 749 398 278 265 14 200 193 108 63 53 48 48 3
Forest Region
Cariboo
Kamloops
Nelson
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Vancouver
Totals
Project Name
Prince George SSAS1/2
Williams Lake TSA (STUM)
Okanagan TSA
Sub-units
1. East Canoe Creek
2. Trinity Valley
3. McNulty Creek
4. Upper Yalakom
Cranbrook TSA
Prince George SSA N112
Prince George TSA
North Coast TSA
Lakes TSA
Quadra TSA
Sub-units
1. Potlatch Creek
2. Nahatlatch Creek
3. Mehatl Creek
4. Pemberton Creek
5. Ahta River
TFL37
All Projects
 F. Range Management
Table F. 1        Use of Crown Range, 1979
Forest Region
Cariboo	
Nelson	
Kamloops 	
PrinceGeorge .
PrinceRupert...
Vancouver	
Totals 1979 .
1978.
1977.
1976.
1975.
1974.
1973.
1972.
1971 .
1970.
Grazing
Authorizations
Hay Cutting
Authorizations
Grazing Special
Use Permits
/
/j
/              /
Authorized Livestock
$  / £ /
ff/j? /
#    /   c^
/  A%^
//
/            &
/             ^
4   /
//  /
/                <9
/              £
/                 ^
/    #
/
/   &
/    fi
/   ^
/?i /
A/f
frrj    O^-               /
537
545
75 664
1625
344
386 234
55
702
2
40
4 836 400
284
256
17 569
509
—
73 750
2
35
5
328
598 636
473
498
76 053
307
978
307 954
—
—
21
1 167
3 360 530
481
367
32 382
2 729
36
124 627
12
209
1
55
874 016
71
71
5 039
408
—
15718
7
77
2
132
731 986
10
10
211
3
—
683
—
—
2
32
1725
1856
1 747
206 918
5 581
1358
908 966
76
1023
33
1 754
10 403 293
1911
1743
204 293
5163
1313
871 608
85
1057
48
2 839
10 256 289
1 779
1738
192 040
5 232
1985
828 173
85
1 149
57
5 930
10186 762
1801
1863
183 729
4 240
2 668
794 636
115
1250
55
5 368
95 10 834
1727
1912
181 117
4 907
882
787 406
155
1 931
56
5 322
95 10 855
—
2 000
183 156
5 546
1821
809 238
—
—
—
—
—
—
1920
177 785
5 748
1616
783 677
—
—
—
—
—
—
1968
174617
6 166
1432
787 589
—
—
—
—
—
—
1 920
178 772
6186
1484
829 337
—
—
—
—
—
—
1985
178 332
5 651
2 739
822 442
—
—
—
1 Animal Unit Month (AUM) is the amount of forage reguired for one month by an average cow, aged 6 months or older.
 G. Recreation Management
Table G. 1        User Visits to Recreation Sites, 1979
Forest Region (000 User Days)
Cariboo 232.0
Kamloops 450.0
Nelson 124.5
PrinceGeorge 210.9
PrinceRupert 175.0
Vancouver 460.0
Totals 1 652.4
Table G.2
Recreation Branch Projects, 1979
Number of Sites
Number of Sites
Number of Active
Trails Con
Total
Est'd During
Removed from
Sites at Year
structed
Trails
Forest Region
Year
Direct
End
1979
to Date
Management
(km)
(km)
Cariboo
Type A
3
—
114
—
—
TypeB
5
—
20
—
—
Totals
8
—
134
43
99
Kamloops
Type A
6
—
229
—
—
TypeB
11
2
40
—
—
Totals
17
2
269
41
386
Nelson
Type A
6
3
194
—
—
TypeB
—
2
32
—
—
Totals
6
5
226
2
1 017
Prince George
Type A
1
—
148
—
—
TypeB
—
2
19
—
—
Totals
1
2
167
—
240
Prince Rupert
Type A
6
—
55
—
—
TypeB
13
2
21
—
—
Totals
19
2
76
12
80
Vancouver
Type A
3
1
117
—
—
TypeB
4
2
35
—
—
Totals
7
3
152
10
430
Total B.C.
Type A'
25
4
857
—
—
Type B!
33
10
167
—
—
Totals
58
14
1 064
108
2 252
1 Type A Facilities: table, litter can, ground toilet.
1 Type B Facilities: litter can only.
 H. Forest Industry
Table H. 1        Wood Processing Plants of the Province, 1979
Forest Region
Cariboo	
Kamloops 	
Nelson 	
PrinceGeorge 	
Prince Rupert	
Vancouver 	
Totals 1979	
1978	
1977	
1976	
1975	
1974	
1973	
1972	
1971 	
1970	
Ten-year Average
1970/79	
Table H.2        Export of Logs, 1979
(Cubic Metres)
Ungraded and Exported
Grade Grade Grade Lumber Under
Species                                                                          1 2 3 Reject Totals Exportable1 Permit2
Balsam                — — — 123913.6 123913.6 2083.3 121830.3
Cedar      36 532.9 55 132.8 103 196.3 — 194 862.0 11663.4 183 198.6
Cottonwood            743.5 7428.1 2 544.5 — 10716.1 5055.1 5661.0
Cypress         3959.4 7008.7 59994.4 — 70962.5 36414.1 34 548.4
Fir          1155.2 4778.3 9772.2 — 15705.7 10263.7 5442.0
Hardwood                  — — — 20048.4 20048.4 15303.6 4 744.8
Hemlock        2863.0 12825.5 102361.3 — 118049.8 9543.8 108506.0
Lodgepole Pine            22.2 88.2 8892.7 — 9003.1 3444.7 5558.4
Spruce         7758.8 36 143.8 122962.2 — 166864.8 26440.3 140424.5
Totals 1979      53035.0 123405.4 409723.6 143962.0 730 126.0 120212.0 609914.0
1978      43493.8 118592.8 467 280.0 57073.3 686439.9 87701.3 598 738.6
1977      54578.3 176597.9 594020.5 207942.4 1033139.1 277731.4 755407.7
1976     28623.0 85605.7 377912.6 97 593.6 589732.9 251416.5 338316.4
1975     34170.9 84450.2 278660.3 27 875.4 425156.8 208001.9 217 154.9
1974      17 445.1 90 357.8 440492.1 46512.8 594 807.8 320772.1 274035.7
1973        4381.1 18068.2 92739.5 19353.9 134542.7 92 549.8 41992.9
1972     20308.3 65379.6 191250.6 11580.0 288518.5 85 124.3 203 394.2
1971      81400.2 172587.7 476 260.3 65827.0 796075.2 131132.9 664942.3
1970     91258.3 216078.8 872261.7 237780.4 1417379.2 381068.3 1036310.9
Ten-year Average
1970/79      42869.4 115112.4 420060.1 91550.1 669591.8 195571.0 474020.8
'Export priviledge — Exported from lands granted by the Crown on or before March 12,1906.
2 Exported under permit from Crown lands and from land granted by the Crown after March 12,1906 under authority of Section 135 of the Forest Act.
 I. Stumpage Prices and Ministry Financial Statements
Table 1.1        Average Stumpage Prices Received on Timber Scaled From Tree Farm Licence Cutting
Permits, by Species and Forest Region, 1979*
Balsam
Cedar
Douglas-fir
Hemlock
Volume
Price
Price Range
Volume
Price    Price Range
Volume
Price
Price Range
Volume
Price    Price Range
Forest Region
per
per
per            per
per
per
per            per
(m»)
m»($)
rrr>($)
(m»)
m'($)         m'($)
(m>)
m>($)
m"($)
(m»)
m>($)         m'($|
Cariboo
9 688
5.92
1.11-12.88
—
—                   —
64 042
21.27
14.33-32.51
1
1.36                1.36
Kamloops
123 439
3.68
0.39-21.13
12211
8.91       0.39-37.70
107 970
11.00
0.39-26.24
19 850
3.50       0.39-9.41
Nelson
160 370
4.37
0.30-12.82
218 531
21.74      0.30-40.22
84 705
13.40
0.30-28.79
398 971
0.49        0.28-4.89
Prince George
107 140
4.18
0.39-9.27
1
0.16                  Q.16
11667
17.91
0.39-25.30
1 795
3.27         0.39-9.26
Prince Rupert
344 884
1.84
0.39-12.20
375 292
12.86      2.05-17.16
50
1.77
—
1 320 066
2.08       0.39-1.89
Vancouver
1414 768
6.32
1.62-9.10
1 667 132
20.13      4.70-27.09
696 384
14.07
0.71-20.24
2 762 550
5.14         1.52-6.59
Totals
2 160 289
5.20
0.30-21.13
2 273 167
19.04       0.16-40.22
964 818
14.19
0.30-32.51
4 503 233
3.83        0.28-9.41
Larch
Lodgepole Pine
Spruce
White Pine
Volume
Price
Price Range
Volume
Price    Price Range
Volume
Price
Price Range
Volume
Price    Price Range
per
per
per            per
per
per
per            per
(m>)
m»($)
m"($)
(m»)
m»($)         m"($)
(nf)
mJ($)
m'($)
K)
ms($)         ms($)
Cariboo
—
—
—
30 829
9.93       2.87-16.16
47 305
12.85
7.34-22.07
—
—                  —
Kamloops
16 847
15.77
0.39-24.03
268 843
4.68       0.39-11.74
239 446
10.36
0.39-31.20
1 728
5.38      0.39-52.73
Nelson
34 610
12.45
0.30-26.37
194 652
4.46       0.30-12.74
256 346
10.44
0.30-21.06
105 515
21.47      0.30-50.11
Prince George
—
—
—
32 845
6.13       0.39-13.40
441 973
12.42
3.78-19.85
—
—                      —
Prince Rupert
—
—
—
37 034
1.50         0.39-2.10
318681
17.55
0.39-41.02
4
2.43                      —
Vancouver
—
—
—
223
6.07         1.12-1.12
75 094
26.34
1.23-50.79
18812
3.87         1.12-1.99
Totals
51457
13.54
0.30-26.37
564 426
4.77      0.30-16.16
1 378 845
13.65
0.30-50.79
126 059
18.62      0.30-52.73
Dther Species
All Species
Volume
Price
per
Price Range
per
Volume
Price   Price Range
per            per
(m»)
m»($)
m'($)
(m»)
m»($)         ms($)
Cariboo
6
6.14
1.11-12.88
151 871
15.36      1.11-32.51
Kamloops
271
5.97
0.39-20.37
790 605
7.38     0.39-52.73
Nelson
367
10.15
0.30-23.93
1 454 067
8.96     0.28-50.11
Prince George
—
—
—
595 421
10.67     0.16-25.30
Prince Rupert
50 446
21.56
35.61-37.73
2 446 457
6.11     0.39-37.73
Vancouver
208 244
41.82
6.91-63.10
6 843 207
11.29     0.71-63.10
Totals
259 334
37.80
0.30-63.10
12 281 628
9.75      0.16-63.10
* Excludes TFL 26.
 Table 1.2
I. Stumpage Prices and Ministry Financial Statements
Average Bid Stumpage Prices on Cutting Permits of Timber Sale Harvesting Licences and
Timber Sales, by Species and Forest Region, 1979
Forest Region
Cariboo
Kamloops
Nelson
Prince George
Prince Rupert (C)
Prince Rupert (I)
Vancouver
Totals
Cariboo
Kamloops
Nelson
Prince George
Prince Rupert (C)
Prince Rupert (I)
Vancouver
Totals
Cariboo
Kamloops
Nelson
Prince George
Prince Rupert (C)
Prince Rupert (I)
Vancouver
Totals
Balsam
Cedar
Douglas
fir
Hemlock
Volume
Price
Price Range
Volume
Price
Price Range
Volume
Price
Price Range
Volume
Price
Price Range
per
per
per
per
per
per
per
per
(rrV)
m'($)
m" ($)
(m»)
nf>($)
m> ($)
(m:l)
nf' ($)
m'($)
(m»)
m» ($)
m>($)
355 140
4.11
.39-12.68
207 530
3.20
.39-20.69
1 007 650
12.65
.39-26.10
45 360
1.12
.39-1.19
754 930
3.12
.39-13.67
524 420
17.11
.39-42.71
800 330
13.61
1.57-28.90
365 670
1.14
.39-16.04
335130
1.54
.28-10.69
400 150
18.49
.20-36.20
339 580
8.69
.33-21.01
239 730
0.34
.25-4.30
1 544 820
3.56
.39-12.56
171 240
8.02
.39-16.19
205 510
15.71
3.53-25.32
69 370
0.86
.39-2.05
416 990
2.25
.50-26.10
572 590
16.97
.39-51,70
95 480
6.75
1.49-13.19
1 128 230
2.88
.71-26.10
300 520
5.31
.20-29.95
104 700
12.13
.20-61.40
—
—
—
718 000
1.34
.20-30.48
1 575 270
4.25
.71-29.81
1 346 690
19.67
.71-60.02
639 800
10.49
.71-42.65
2 037170
4.55
.71-43.34
6 232 800
3.88
.20-29.95
3 327 320
16.80
.20-61.40
3 088 350
12.04
.33-42.65
4 603 530
3.06
.20-43.34
Larch
Lodgepole P
ne
Spruce
White Pine
Volume
Price
Price Range
Volume
Price
Price Range
Volume
Price
Price Range
Volume
Price
Price Range
per
per
per
per
per
per
per
per
(m»)
m3($)
m» ($)
(m»)
m»($)
m'($)
(m')
m»($)
m»($)
(nf')
m3($)
m»($)
—
—
—
2 767 610
3.66
.29-21.91
1 635 800
10.54
.39-22.41
—
—
—
32 680
12.62
5.87-21.39
1 337 590
4.28
.30-22.36
1 550 770
9.07
.36-15.04
36 940
32.22
2.16-81.00
197 250
12.68
—
1 405 240
1.93
.27-14.60
665 100
6.58
.28-16.99
175 500
31.71
.39-40.81
230
2.00
2.00-2.00
4 498 200
4.43
.35-13.24
8 434 040
9.02
.39-18.38
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
450 630
13.39
.40-75.50
6 000
0.62
.40-1.53
—
—
—
1 719 080
4.86
.35-27.72
1 099 580
8.73
.39-42.09
—
—
—
—
—
—
5 540
1.38
1.27-7.03
155 570
18.54
4.56-49.52
4 950
22.47
.95-34.06
230 160
12.66
2.00-21.39
11 733 260
3.99
.27-27.72
13 991490
9.31
.28-75.50
223 390
30.75
.39-81.00
Other Species
All Species
Volume
Price
per
Price Range
per
Volume
Price
per
Price Range
per
(m>)
m°($)
m»($)
((!>')
m'($)
m»($)
980
12.19
17.96-17.96
6 020 070
7.03
.29-26.10
21 300
5.44
.89-19.00
5 424 630
8.14
.30-28.90
14 420
6.35
.33-22.68
3 772 100
6.94
.20-40.81
780
0.47
.39-2.00
14924 190
7.11
.39-25.32
75 650
19.04
.71-59.80
2 745 570
8.02
.39-75.50
5 960
0.49
.39-0.50
4 947 840
5.48
.20-61.40
386 780
33.82
.42-62.17
6151770
10.61
,42-62.17
505 870
29.15
.33-62.17
43 986 170
7.57
.20-75.50
Table 1.3        Forest and Range Revenue, Fiscal Year 1978/79
Timber Licence Rentals and Fees $492 747.18
Timber Berth Rentals and Fees 62 005.17
Timber Lease Rentals and Fees 70 028.40
Timber Sale Rentals and Fees  5 842 927.41
Timber Sale Stumpage 222 522 428.02
Timber Sale Cruising and Advertising  258 635.64
Timber Royalties  7 819 598.20
Grazing Permits and Fees 559 305.73
Forest Protection Tax 643 922.68
Miscellaneous 1 155 259.60
Weight Scaling  4 978151.22
Coast Scaling 2 585190.72
Indian Affairs Agreement 136 850.00
TSHL Fire-fighting Costs Standby Crews 502.00
Reservoir Waterway Improvements  6 903 838.00
Total  $254 031389.97
 I. Stumpage Prices and Ministry Financial Statements
Table 1.4       Forest and Range Revenue, 1975-1979
12 Months 12 Months
to Dec. 31 to Dec. 31
1975 1976
Timber Licence Rentals and Fees   $551336.77 $536424.40
Timber Berth Rentals and Fees  75548.18 74772.43
Timber Lease Rentals and Fees  85 655.56 80 253.37
Timber Sale Rentals and Fees  693428.67 841 081.45
Timber Sale Stumpage  43437755.58 43691 476.49
Timber Sale Cruising and Advertising  113 492.20 199 208.82
Timber Royalties  6 142 472.77 6691 829.70
Grazing Permits and Fees  514 595.23 412 690.82
Forest Protection Tax   1136279.10 1421792.84
Miscellaneous  1 175699.59 1 267600.72
Weight Scaling  3 073 017.84 4 468 124.99
Coast Scaling   175 202.08 2 067 742.02
Indian Affairs Agreement  — 181848.14
TSHL Fire-fighting Costs Standby Crews   651038.38 775 716.72
Wood Products  154 285.90 2 792.17
Reservoir Water Improvements  — 305 101.00
Federal/Provincial DREE Agreement  — —
Totals  $ 57 979 807.85         $ 63 018 456.08
12 Months
to Dec. 31
1977
$512 757.29
70 324.86
74 757.20
806 406.86
62 314 958.73
275 650.62
8 628 049.98
503 775.34
1 198 161.44
1 203 475.27
4637 871.16
587 913.39
143 357.00
163 909.94
2 378 800.00
12 Months
to Dec. 31
1978
12 Months
to Dec. 31
1979
$505
64
72
724
159913
275
7 530
556
986
750
4 656
2 529
136
2
263.82
211.92
248.95
629.24
091.94
878,44
386.48
696.15
043.00
862.73
807.15
089.93
850.00
349.64
5 211 567.00
$499
63
129
14 173
416 933
40
12 831
777
123
1 316
5 048
3314
264
494.68
023.25
285.75
405.67
571.53
280.74
789.96
007.71
460.27
904.30
616.45
657.95
714.00
502.00
2 442 702.00
2 054 000.00
$83500 169.08        $183 915976.39        $460013416.26
Table 1.5       Amounts Charged Against Logging Operations, Fiscal Year 1978/79
Scaling Scaling
Forest Region Royalty Miscellaneous Expenses Fees Stumpage
Cariboo   $253597.47 $578275.28 — $2167.70 $39537642.87
Kamloops  440 777.60 1206 744.66 — 2 663.80 47 390 018.90
Nelson  326761.40 805669.32 — 305.42 27 104528.00
PrinceGeorge  358 993.20 1448 008.74 — 5 962.28 54 136 826.91
PrinceRupert  932011.21 783200.34 $40741.27 399593.46 21796545.80
Vancouver  5716173.44 558685.12 249660.88 1901352.09 72 114090.05
Totals1978/79  $8028314.32 $5380583.46 $290342.15 $2 312 044.75 $262 079 652.53
Rentals,
Cruising,
Advertising,
Transfer. Fees
Totals
$168 896.34
$40 540 579.66
472 021.98
49 512 226.94
745 408.23
28 982 672.37
520 706.53
56470 497.66
1054 392.58
25 006 484.66
4 715 391.66
85 255 293.24
7 676 817.32
$285 767 754.53
Table 1.6        Amounts Charged Against Logging Operations, 1979
Forest Region Royalty
Cariboo  $45 907.49
Kamloops  418 999.62
Nelson  251 178.15
PrinceGeorge  86231.47
PrinceRupert  1 027816.37
Vancouver  11 080 678.99
Totals  $12 910 812.09
Rentals,
Cruising,
Scaling
Scaling
Advertising,
Miscellaneous
Expenses
Fees
Stumpage
Transfer Fees
Totals
$686 403.77
—
$1 645.00
$53 150 462.01
$1 097 913.50
$54 982 331.77
1 406 260.49
$(17.21)
5 003.56
70 716 739.28
1 507 447.48
74 054 433.22
1 004 078.76
—
2119.22
47515403.02
1 398 016.97
50 170 796.12
1 457 667.53
—
6 703.25
110 667 698.71
2 908 975.71
115127 276.67
722 774.09
44 406.29
531 604.23
52 104 847.58
2 729 514.54
57 160 963.10
684 410.57
212 272.67
2 289 242.95
155 646 169.00
5 940 702.11
175 853 476.29
;5961 595.21
$256 661.75
$2836318.21
$489 801319.60
$15 582 570.31
$527 349 277.17
■
 I. Stumpage Prices and Ministry Financial Statements
Table 1.7        Forest Road Construction Credit Against Stumpage
Under Section 88 of the Forest Act, by Forest Region,
1979
Forest Region
Cariboo	
Kamloops	
Nelson 	
Prince George..
Prince Rupert...
Vancouver 	
Totals	
Road
Major Culverts and Bridges
Kilometres
Cost
Numbers
Cost
209
$4 037 000
5
$189 000
67
383000
2
193 000
166
3196 000
5
380 000
350
9 780 000
20
2 604 000
51
1670000
10
1 112 000
20
907 000
3
49 000
863
19 973 000
45
4 527 000
Table 1.8        Ministry of Forests Expenditures, Fiscal Year 1978/79
Minister's Office '        $124 684.02
Ministry Administration Program * 21192116.30
Engineering Support Services Program  9 799 700.84
Public Information Services Program 653 339.81
Resource Management Program'  8 202 670.47
Strategic Studies Program 1442 587.30
Reforestation Program 18 984 916.73
Research Program 2 051 087.83
Fire Suppression Program 18 768 603.07
Forest Protection Program * 8 848 814.30
Inventory Program 4 213 393.28
Scaling Program 10 623 874.00
Range Management Program 1 947 995.44
Forest Development Roads Maintenance Programs 8 965129.67
Reservoir Waterway Improvement Program8 6063 745.70
Building Occupancy Charges 3 577 021.03
Computer and Consulting Charges7 1 917 644.26
Bill 5 Intensive Forestry Program 8 601446.85
Implementation of New Legislation 3 343 620.13
Accelerated Reforestation Fund ■   —
Total  $139 322 391.03
1 Includes Special Warrants 25 and 73
2 Includes Special Warrant 74
3 Includes Special Warrant 3
* Includes Special Warrant 8
5 Includes Special Warrants 4 and 5
' Includes Special Warrant 21
7 Includes Special Warrant 39
■ See Table A.7
 MINISTRY OF FORESTS INVENTORY BRANCH
PUBLIC SUSTAINED YIELD UNITS
E2*3 Inside Pulpwood Harvesting Areas!  I
Naver
Nechako
Parsnip
Nehalliston
N i co1a
Niskonlith
North Thompson
Monkman
Purden
Outside Pulpwood Harvesting Areas
71.
77.
79.
59.
63.
64.
Stuart Lake
Westlake
Willow River
Raft
Salmon Arm
Shuswap
Spallumcheen
Quesnel Lake
60.
Rivers Inlet
62.
Salmo
68.
Smithers
92.
Sikanni
bb.
Similkameen
66.
Skeena
67.
Slocan
69.
Soo
72.
Stum
96.
Sustut
74.
Upper Kootenay
7b.
Vancouver
76.
Wapiti
78.
Williams Lake
80.
Windermere
81.
Yalakom
90.
Kotcho
91.
Liard
Fort St. James (O-I-C 1888/65)
Furry Creek (O-I-C 3909/67)
Prince George (O-I-C 2811/62)
MacMillan Bloedel Industries Limited
MacMillan Bloedel Industries Limited
British Columbia Forest Products Limited
Canadian Cellulose Company, Limited
BSHSfflPer Canada (B.C.) Limited
Rayonier Canada (B.C.) Limited
The Corporation of the District of Mission
British Columbia Forest Products Limited
Northwood Pulp Limited
Crown Zellerbach Canada Limited
Federated Co-Operatives Limited
Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd.
36. British Columbia Forest Products Limited
37. Canadian Forest Products Ltd.
38. Empire Mills Limited
39. MacMillan Bloedel Limited
41.  Eurocan Pulp and Paper Company Limited
Kilometres 20 0
tedraafc:
STATUS OF SUSTAINED-YIELD FORESTRY PROGRAMME
AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1979
Litho'd in Canada by Richmond Printers Ltd.
 138°
136°
134"
132°
130°
128°
126°
124°
122°
120°
116°
114°
112°
110°
MINISTRY OF FORESTS INVENTORY BRANCH
UNIT SURVEYS 1961 +
COMPLETED      |H       (1961-74   Fieldwork)
1.
Adams
33.
Kinbasket
65.
Similkameen
3.
Ashnol£
''*S
34.
Kingcome
70.
Spallumcheen
"      4.
Babine
35.
Lac La Hache
71.
Stuart Lake
5.
Barrier
36.
Lardeau
72.
Stum
6.
Barton Hill
37.
Longworth
73.
Takla
7.
Bell-Irving
38.
Moberly
74.
Upper Kootenay
9.
Big Valley
39.
Monkman
75.
Vancouver
10.
Blueberry
40.
Morice
76.
Wapiti
s 11-
Botanie
43.
Naver
78.
Williams Lake
12.
Bowron
46.
Nicola
79:
Willow River
14.
Canoe
47.
Niskonlith
82.
Alsek Proposed
15.
Carp
48.
Nootka
83.
Boundary Proposed
16.
Chilko
49.
North Thomoson
84.
Dawson Creek S.S.A. Proposed
17.
Cottonwood
52.
Parsnip
85.
Dease Proposed
18.
Cranbrook
53.
Peace
86.
Fontas
19.
Croston
54.
■Prince George S.S.A.
87.
Fort Nelson
20.
Crooked River
55.
Purden
88.
Kechika Proposed
21.
Dean
56.
Quadra
89.
Klappan Proposed
23.
Eagle
57.
Queen Charlotte
90.
Kotcho
26.
Finlay
58.
Quesnel Lake
91.
Liard
C; 27.
Fort St
. James S.S.A.
59.
Raft
92.
Sikanni
0; 28.
Furry C
reek
S.S.A.
60.
Rivers Inlet
93.
Stikine Proposed'
29.
Granby
61.
Robson
94.
Taku Proposed
j   30.
Hecate
UNIT SURVEY RE-INVENTORY 1973 - 1977
COMPLETED   ^B (1973-77   Fieldwork)
64. Shuswap
66. Skeena
67. Slocan
68. Smithers
69. Soo
96. Sustut
77. Westlake
80. Windermere
8J.. Yalakom
52°
50°
Province of British Columbia
Ministry of Forests
Kilometres 20
SCALE-1:3,500,000 (Approx.)
60        80        100       120       14
160 180 200    Kilom
PROGRESS OF FOREST-COVER MAPPING
BASED ON UNIT SURVEYS
OF AREAS UNDER PUBLIC MANAGEMENT
AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1979
Cap" Flo'l'ryc,
136°
134°
132°
130°
128°
126°
124°
122°
120°
118°
116°
Litho'd in Canada by Richmond Printers Ltd.

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