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Minister of Highways and Public Works REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1977/78 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1978

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Minister of Highways
and
Public Works
REPORT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
1977/78
ISSN 0706-2109
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1978
  The Honourable Alex. V. Fraser, Minister of Highways and Public Works
 To the Honourable Henry P. Bell-Irving, D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I respectfully submit the Annual Report of the Ministry of Highways
and Public Works for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1978, in compliance with the
provisions of the Ministry of Highways and Public Works Act.
ALEX. V. FRASER
Minister of Highways and Public Works
Office of the Minister of Highways
and Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, August 31, 1978.
 Victoria, B.C., November 23, 1978
The Honourable Alex. V. Fraser,
Minister of Highways and Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir: I am pleased to present the Annual Report of this Ministry for the fiscal
year ended March 31, 1978.
This is the first year that the reorganization of the headquarters section of the
Ministry and the two new regional offices at Nanaimo and Terrace have gone into
full effect.
The Highways section is administered and operated by two Assistant Deputy
Ministers, four Executive Directors, 12 Branch Heads, and is now decentralized
into six regional offices, each directed by a Regional Highway Engineer. Total
establishment of permanent staff is 6,000 and in the summer of 1977 a total of
3,270 auxiliary staff was given employment, 664 of whom were students.
The Public Works section of the Ministry is administered by the Assistant
Deputy Minister (Administration) through the Executive Director of Safety Engineering and other Branch heads.
The input to the total program by the executive of the Ministry is hereby
acknowledged. Individual reports and statistics from the Assistant Deputy Minister
(Administration), the Regional Highway Engineers, the Branch and Section Heads
are contained herein.
The program of highway construction and maintenance outlined herein is the
largest in dollar amounts ever undertaken and among the largest in volume of
roadwork ever achieved in this Ministry.
In the period April 1, 1977, to September 30 of that year, a total of 112 contracts was bid and let with the average amount of each contract close to $1 million,
as an indication of the activity the Ministry reached in the summer season of 1977.
During the year, retirement of long-service employees were:
35 years—Harvey E. Stenquist, Motor-vehicle Operator, Vernon.
35 years—Kenneth B. Charters, Mechanic, Langford Garage, Saanich
Highways District.
33 years—James E. Dennison, Assistant Deputy Minister and Chief
Engineer, Victoria.
R. G. HARVEY
Deputy Minister
R. G. Harvey
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Title-
Photo of Minister-
Minister's Letter—
Deputy Minister of Highways.
Page
1
3
4
5
HIGHWAYS
List of Highways Personnel-
Assistant Deputy Minister (Operations).
Executive Director, Engineering Division	
Director of Highway Design and Surveys-
Director of Geotechnical and Materials Engineering.
Director of Bridge Engineering	
Bridge Design Engineer-
Bridge Construction Engineer-
Director of Traffic Engineering-
Highway Safety Engineer..
  11
  14
  15
  15
  24
  36
  36
  38
Dock Design, Construction, and Maintenance  42
  45
  47
  49
  49
  56
  60
  61
  61
  65
  69
  69
  72
  73
  73
  74
  75
  75
  76
Executive Director, Construction Division-
Director of Construction	
Director of Paving-
Legal Surveys Officer-
Executive Director, Operations Division-
Director of Maintenance Services	
Maintenance Management	
Director of Equipment Services	
Superintendent of Ferries	
Communications Engineer	
Executive Director, Planning Division	
Transportation	
Municipal-
Systems Planning-
Approving	
Assistant Deputy Minister (Administration).
Director of Personnel Programs     77
Director of Property Services     79
Insurance and Claims Officer     80
PUBLIC WORKS
Report of Executive Director of Safety Engineering Services Division  85
Report of Boiler Safety Branch  87
Report of Building Standards and Research Branch  90
Report of Chief Gas Inspector  92
Report of Chief Electrical Inspector  95
Contract Statistics  104
Summary by Electoral Districts of Projects  104
7
 TABLE OF CONTENTS—Continued
Page
Tenders Received and Contracts Awarded  109
Highways  109
Paving  110
Bridges  114
Ferry Terminals  118
Miscellaneous  120
Regional Reports  124
Day-labour Statistics  167
Winter Maintenance Costs  193
Highway Statistics  194
Mileage by Surface Type  194
Mileage by Class    198
Classified Mileage by Municipality  202
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS
Reports of the Director of Financial Services  209
Highways Division  209
Public Works Division  279
 HIGHWAYS
  HIGHWAYS PERSONNEL AS AT MARCH 31,  1978
The Honourable Alex. V. Fraser, Minister of Highways and Public Works
Victoria
R. G. Harvey, Deputy Minister and Chairman, Highway Board.
T. R. Johnson, Assistant Deputy Minister (Operations), Highway Board.
Engineering Division
M. G. Elston, Executive Director.
E. E. Readshaw, Director of Highway Designs and Surveys.
J. W. G. Kerr, Director of Geotechnical
and Materials Engineering.
W. A. Bowman, Director of Bridge Engineering.
J. H. Harding, Director of Traffic Engineering.
J.  Lisman,  Highway  Safety  Engineer.
Construction Division
R. G. White, Executive Director.
N. R. Zapf, Director of Construction.
D. F. Martin, Director of Paving.
F. A. Clapp, Land Survey Officer.
Operations Division
Executive Director (Position Vacant)
P. B. MacCarthy, Director of Maintenance
Services.
E. A. Lund, Maintenance Management Engineer, Director of Equipment Services.
S. E. Blanchard, Superintendent of Ferries.
C. G. Shearing, Communications Engineer.
Planning Division
E. B. Wilkins, Executive Director.
D. R.   Parkes,   Transportation   Planning
Engineer.
D. L. South, Service Approving Officer.
J. A. Stewart, Municipal Programs Engi-
A. E. Rhodes, Assistant Deputy Minister, Public Works and Administration, Highway Board.
S. E. Price, Director of Financial Services.
A. R. Limacher, Director of Personnel Programs.
A. F.  Park, Senior Training and Safety
Officer.
W. I. N. Higgins, Senior Personnel Officer.
G. A. Cavin, Insurance Claims Officer.
V. A. Drew, Director of Property Services.
R. J. Baines, Senior Information Officer.
R. A. Fisher, Contract Documents Officer.
C. E. Parker, Chief Records Officer.
(Mailing address for above
Ministry of Highways and Public Works, 940 Blanshard Street, Victoria, B.C.)
Region 1
P. J. Carr, Regional Highway Engineer.
R. W. Veitch, Regional Maintenance Operations Manager.
J. H. Lawrence, Regional Personnel Officer.
R. A. R. Fru, Regional Construction Engineer.
W. E. Mercer, Regional Approving Officer.
A. G. Tranfield, Regional Superintendent
of Highway Design and Surveys.
Position vacant, Regional Geotechnical and
Materials Engineer.
D. Byers, Regional Maintenance Systems
Engineer.
J. Hynds, Regional Paving Superintendent.
L. H. Mercier, Regional Property Negotiator.
R. D. Page, Regional Traffic Superintendent.
T. R. Yearsley, Regional Mechanical Superintendent.
O. T. King, Regional Office Manager.
H. Dennies, Regional Safety Officer.
H. G. Robertson, Regional Driver Trainee.
Position vacant, District Highways Manager,
North Vancouver.
T. M. Forsyth, District Highways Manager,
Gibsons.
A.  Walisser,   District  Highways   Manager,
New Westminster.
N. W. Wells, District Highways Manager,
Chilliwack.
T. A. Tasaka, Dock Engineer, Dock.
11
 Region 2
R. W. Gittins, Regional Highway Engineer.
D. C. MacVicar, Regional Maintenance
Operations Manager.
J. D. Sutherland, Regional Personnel Officer.
A. W. Slater, Regional Construction Engineer.
H. F. Blunden, Regional Approving Officer.
A. W. G. Smith, Regional Superintendent of
Highway Design and Surveys.
G. E. Miller, Regional Geotechnical and
Materials Engineer.
R. L. Chapman, Regional Maintenance
Systems Engineer.
J. F. Meidinger, Regional Paving Engineer.
R. E. Burnett, Regional Property Negotiator.
J. T. Evans, Regional Mechanical Superintendent.
D. W. Hill, Regional Office Manager.
D. W. Grant, Regional Safety and Health
Officer.
H. E. Rozander, Regional Driver Trainer.
S. J. Sviatko, District Highways Manager,
Kamloops.
W. A. Budden, District Highways Manager,
Salmon Arm.
P. S. Dunn, District Highways Manager,
Vernon.
S. N. A. McLeod, District Highways Manager, Penticton.
Position vacant, District Highways Man-
ager, Merritt.
Position vacant, District Highways Manager, Lillooet.
Position vacant, District Highways Manager, 100 Mile House.
W. J. McDonald, District Highways Manager, Kelowna.
Region 3
W. M. Sproul, Regional Highway Engineer.
H. J. Kelsall, Regional Maintenance Operations Manager.
E.  K.  Lloyd,  Regional  Personnel  Officer.
G. J. Sutherland, Regional Construction Engineer.
P. J. Bonser, Regional Highway Design and
Surveys Engineer.
P. Barnes, Regional Geotechnical and Materials Engineer.
Position vacant, Regional Maintenance Systems Engineer.
R. Pratt, Regional Paving Engineer.
J. Mintak, Regional Property Negotiator.
R. E. Johnson, Regional Mechanical Superintendent.
S. J. Dixey, Regional Office Manager.
R. Mack, Regional Safety Officer.
W. P. Puhallo, Regional Approving Officer.
R. F. Lines, Regional Driver Trainer.
W. R. Ball, District Highways Manager,
Nelson.
R. E. McKeown, District Highways Manager, Rossland.
W. G. Helmsing, District Highways Manager, Grand Forks.
B. D. Hunter, District Highways Manager,
New Denver.
H. F. Popoff, District Highways Manager,
Cranbrook.
G. K. Austin, District Highways Manager,
Fernie.
C. S. Shaw, District Highways Manager,
Golden.
J. W. Lay, District Highways Manager, Revelstoke.
R. A. Jackman, District Highways Manager,
Creston.
Region 4
L. A. Broddy, Regional Highway Engineer.
A. L. Freebairn, Regional Maintenance Operations Manager.
W. J. Doddridge, Regional Personnel Officer.
D. Chisholm, Regional Construction Superintendent.
E. A. Beaumont, Regional Highway Design
and Surveys Engineer.
F. J. Morey, Regional Geotechnical and
Materials Engineer.
Position vacant, Regional Maintenance Systems Engineer.
H. A. Waring, Regional Paving Superintendent.
E. S. Gowman, Regional Property Negotiator.
G. A. Warrington, Regional Mechanical Superintendent.
C. J. Smaaslet,  Regional Office Manager.
J. B. Mill, Regional Approving Officer.
C. E. Lord, Regional Safety Officer.
D. G. Johnson, Project Design Engineer.
E. Hicks, Regional Driver Trainer.
S.   Young,   District   Highways   Manager,
Prince George.
A. N.  Hepp, District Highways  Manager,
Quesnel.
S. D, Gladysz, District Highways Manager,
Dawson Creek.
H. L.  Good, District Highways Manager,
Fort St. John.
A. W. Horsnell, District Highways Manager,
Vanderhoof.
J. E. Steven, District Highways, Manager,
Williams Lake.
Position vacant, District Highways Manager,
McBride.
12
 Region 5
M. J. O'Connor, Regional Highway Engineer.
N. Hope, Regional Maintenance Operations
Manager.
D. Jenkinson, Regional Personnel Officer.
D. M. Moore, Regional Construction Engineer.
G. C. Stock, Regional Geotechnical and
Materials Engineer.
P. M. Wightman, Regional Maintenance Systems Engineer.
Position vacant, Regional Paving Engineer.
R. L. Enright, Regional Property Negotiator.
J. E. Robinson, Regional Mechanical Superintendent.
W. D. Chapelle, Regional Office Manager.
R. S. Saul, Regional Driver Trainer.
Position vacant, District Highways Manager,
Prince Rupert.
Position vacant, District Highways Manager,
Terrace.
G. F. Kazakoff, District Highways Manager,
Dease Lake.
F. J. R. Martin, District Highways Manager,
Smithers.
D. H. Hutton, District Highways Manager,
Burns Lake.
Region 6
B. L'Hirondelle, Regional Highway Engineer.
D. P. Doyle, Regional Maintenance Operations Manager.
T. B. Minifie, Regional Personnel Officer.
R. K. Dash, Regional Construction Superintendent.
T. C. West, Regional Approving Officer.
Position vacant, Regional Maintenance Systems Engineer.
T. S. Cook, Regional Paving Engineer.
D. F. MacSween, Regional Property Negotiator.
S. Cutt, Regional Mechanical Superintendent.
W. H. Ryan, Regional Office Manager.
A. J. Montador, Regional Geotechnical and
Materials Engineer.
Position vacant, Design and Surveys Superintendent.
J. W. Morris, District Highways Manager,
Nanaimo.
G. W. Harper, District Highways Manager,
Saanich.
R. W. Ellis, District Highways Manager,
Port Alberni.
G. R. Kent, District Highways Manager,
Courtenay.
13
 14 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
T. R. Johnson.
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER
(OPERATIONS)
Submitted herewith are the reports of the Executive Directors of the Planning,
Engineering, Construction, and Operations Divisions, and the six Regional Highway
Engineers.
All divisions and sections of the Ministry enjoyed an active and productive
year.
Roads and highway planning in most communities in the Province was particularly active as many municipalities and cities prepared their road network plans to
support applications for road construction grants under the Revenue Sharing Act.
The Ministry staff were involved in assisting with development of these network
plans as well as their normal planning role for trunk highway development.
Smooth development of new projects from planning to engineering to construction was greatly assisted by the Executive Directors of these Divisions.
With rising costs of highway construction and maintenance due to inflation
and other cost increases, the Ministry staff has been challenged to implement
improved procedures and techniques in an effort to hold down costs and continue
to provide a uniform high level of service on the highway system.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS) 15
M. G. Elston, Executive Director,
Engineering Division.
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF HIGHWAY DESIGN AND SURVEYS
E. E. Readshaw
Highway design and surveys carried out during the fiscal year from April 1977
to March 1978 are listed in this Report, totalling 243.54 kilometres of completed
or partially completed design work, 342.74 kilometres of location line survey and
304.28 kilometres of preliminary line surveys.
Of the highway design completed, 18 separate projects were submitted for
awarding to contract and 26 projects for construction by the Ministry's own forces;
a total of 195 kilometres.
High on the priority list and work load was the design of the Coquihalla Highway for which planning, design, and environmental studies are being carried out
simultaneously. Environmental studies conforming to the Guidelines for Linear
Development are proceeding; Phase I of the process is almost complete for the
section from Hope to Merritt. Some detailed studies of the effect on the steelhead
in Coquihalla River are being done. Current planning indicates that there will be
about 25 separate contracts to build. One of these between Nicolum and Peers
Creek is almost completed and another between Sowaqua Creek and Karen Creek
is being worked on in detail. Other sections totalling some 26 kilometres will be
surveyed in the field during 1978. Studies for the connecting road from Merritt
to Kamloops (Highway 5) have also commenced. On the Trans-Canada Highway,
design work continues on the four-laning near Hope and on various truck and
passing lane sections between Kamloops and Hope.
Sections through urban areas on Vancouver Island are being designed for four
lanes with curb and gutter necessitated by the increasing development and resultant
traffic demand of such areas, e.g., Duncan and Ladysmith.
The Island Highway continues to receive attention to bring up to four-lane
standards with curb and gutter through urban areas at Parksville, Courtenay, and
Port Hardy.
Work on the proposed coal development near Chetwynd has resulted in substantial completion of the design of the road in the Sukunka Valley. Studies for
access roads from the Sukunka to the proposed town-site at Tumbler Ridge have
continued. Combinations of environmental concerns and difficult soil conditions,
particularly at Murray River and Bullnose Creek, and the access to future coal mine
sites, have made the final choice of the route to be followed a difficult one.
 16
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
At Revelstoke, detailed work on the relocation of 73 kilometres of Highway 23
in connection with the construction of the dam has commenced. The design is
10 per cent complete. Field surveys will be carried out in the summer of 1978.
Design should be completed by the fall of 1978. The steep terrain with heavy rock
work made this project expensive and difficult to locate. Several sections of the
John Hart Highway 97 are under design; at Prince George, from Salmon River to
Parsnip River, and at East Pine River bridge where the existing narrow bridge
must be reconstructed to modern standards. The approaches to this bridge presently
follow a steep tortuous alignment with several switchbacks. However, any improvement aimed at eliminating the switchback involves a new grade separation of the
BCR in very heavy rock sections.
On Highway 16 between Terrace and Prince Rupert design work on the last
remaining 21 kilometres of substandard section is well under way and should be
completed by the end of 1978.
On Highway 37 from Kitwanga to Nass River design work on the last 54
kilometres should be complete by the end of 1978. Environmental problems
involving fish streams and the wintering areas for deer and moose have been
resolved, and some 15 kilometres of line has been relocated to avoid the worst
conflicts.
In the Okanagan, design to four lanes is proceeding between Kelowna and
Vernon on Highway 97, but some difficult social problems remain to be resolved
where the existing two-lane road, now at capacity, runs through the urban area
which is developing at a rapid pace. The mix of tourist traffic, local traffic, and
commercial trucking makes it extremely difficult to provide an adequate level of
service for all these elements at once. Bypass construction has and is being investigated, but the volume of local traffic is becoming so great that the existing road
serving the existing communities must also be improved. Bypass construction is
complicated by the narrowness of the valley, the presence of unique environmental
features, lakes, parks, agricultural land, etc., consequently it becomes very difficult
and expensive to locate an acceptable route.
Details of design work on all highways is given in more detail in the following
table.
Name of Project
Distance in Kilometres
P.-Line
I..-Line
Design
Lower Mainland Roads
Highway 1
2.41
0.48
0.32
2 25
0 06
1 92
0 29
9 66
2.89        |          0.32
14 18
Highway 7
0 14
Totals	
         |                  |         0.14
Highway 15
0.80
Totals	
0.80
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
17
Name of Project
Distance in Kilometres
P.-Line
L.-Line
Design
Highway 99
Mamquam revision    	
Brohm Lake to Cheakamus Canyon	
Cheakamus Canyon to Whistler Mountain
Sunset Point Intersection  -
Totals	
Highway 99k
Whitehouse Corner to Highway 99	
Fraser Highway to 96th Street	
Totals _ _	
Highway 101
Barnes Road	
Totals.
Miscellaneous
Cole Road rest area 	
Glover Road to Fraser Highway at 209th Street...
16th Avenue to Marine Drive _	
Boundary Road to Byrne Street 	
Highway 10 at 177b Street Intersection	
Fraser Highway at 244th Street Intersection..
Cariboo Road Connector  _	
Glover Road to 208th Street 	
Newcombe to McBride Boulevard..
Campbell Creek crossing..
2.58
3.22
0.40
1.85
Chilliwack, curb and gutter (Yale Road, west)..
Totals _	
8.05
Vancouver Island
Highway 1
Bench Road to Duncan..
Totals	
Highway 4
West Boundary District Lot 9 to Alberni Junction..
Somass River to Great Central Lake Road  _...
Totals _ _	
Highway 19
Superior Road to Nanoose Overhead.	
Parksville, curb and gutter.. __	
Parksville to Qualicum Bypass	
Courtenay, curb and gutter, Embleton to 21st Street.
Port Hardy to Bear Cove	
Port Hardy Airport to ferry	
Totals	
2.00
X25
9.25
Miscellaneous
Meaford to Latoria _	
West Saanich, curb and gutter	
Crofton access  	
Boulder Creek bridge site (Nanaimo Lake Road)..
Gabriola Island, South Road to Wharf Road	
Compton Road..
Port Alberni, curb and gutter, Third Avenue to San Mateo Drive.
Buttle Lake to Camp 8 _ _
Totals __	
4.33
Interior Roads
Highway 1
Oregon Jack Indian Reserve 5  	
Cherry Creek to Cornwall Lodge 	
Off ramp: Comzett Street to Battle Street	
Totals _	
0.48
0.48
12.88
1.00
0.24
1.85
3.09
0.24
1.45
1.69
2.64
8.05
8.05
2.41
0.97
0.48
         [        12.88        |          3.86
1            1
         1          1.48
9.00        |          9.00        |
9.00        |          9.00        |          1.48
         |          0.80
         |                  |         0.80
0.48
5.63
1.93
0.02
0.02
0.40
0.16
8.64
0.13
—        1                  1          0.13
2.25
0.68
8.05
2.25        |         .         |          8.73
0.72
0.75
0.71
0.11
2.29
10.24
0.56
0.56
 18
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Name of Project
Distance in Kilometres
P.-Line
L.-Line
Design
Princeton slide	
District Lot 980 to Princeton..
Highway 3
Hedley to Keremeos; District Lot 3202 to District Lot 3849..
Hedley to Keremeos: District Lot 1970 to District Lot 294 .
Hedley to Keremeos: District Lot 1970 to District Lot 2286	
Keremeos to Kaleden Junction: District Lot 1711 to District Lot 2169.
Keremeos to Kaleden Junction: Yellow Lake to Twin Lake—	
Keremeos, curb and gutter, Sixth Avenue to Seventh Avenue	
Trail to Glenmerry..
Rossland Avenue Interchange	
Fruitvale Intersection: Columbia Road at Highway 3..
Beaver Creek site plan _	
Boulder Creek bridge approaches	
South Fork to Salmo  	
Crawford Bay bridge approaches _
Fairy Creek bridge approaches	
Carbon Creek bridge approaches-
Totals _	
Highway 6
Vernon to Lavington, four-laning .
Vernon, curb and gutter, 30th Street to 34th Street..
Cape Horn to Corey Creek	
Totals  — _	
Highway 16
Prince Rupert Arterial to Galloway Rapids_
Kasiks River to Backwater Creek..
CNR Tunnel at Kwinitka to Igneous Creek..
Khyex River to Tyee..
Terrace, curb and gutter, Kenney Street to Eby Street-
Kitsequecla to South Hazelton..
Carnaby crossing to Kitsequecla Bridge-
Prince George to Airport Hill	
Totals _  	
Highway 20
Kleena Kleene relocation 	
District Lot 229 to District Lot 333 (east of Redstone)..
Totals 	
Highway 23
Nakusp, curb and gutter, Broadway Street, Sixth to Nelson..
Revelstoke to Mica Village	
Totals 	
Highway 24
Little Fort to Phinetta Lake..
Totals	
Highway 26
Mitchell Bridge relocation-
Mile 18 slide	
Totals..
Highway 27
Nechako bridge approaches (Vanderhoof)..
Totals   	
Highway 29
Watson Hill slide...
Totals.	
Highway 31
Armstrong Lake to District Lot 7950	
Trout Lake to Gerrard 	
Totals   _
1.09
10.09
1.46
1.72
6.81
4.06
3.00
27.73
2.64
12.49
24.55
5.60
3.73
3.16
2.04
0.77
0.35
1.02
0.53
0.95
18.15
8.05
9.01
0.12        |
0.90
0.60
0.40
0.25
0.10
1.37
0.56
4.18
3.95
2.41
2.01
2.03
0.40
4.47
0.08
12.49
17.06
11.40
	
1.66
1.64
4.70
	
1.66
6.34
0.64
0.16
16.12
0.64
16.28
27.20
18.41
	
27.20
18.41
	
0.19
1.61
0.48
0.64
0.19
2.09
0.64
22.80        i         	
22.80        |                  j         	
1.92
1.93
1.92
1.93
12.00
12.55
0.12
	
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
19
Name of Project
Distance in Kilometres
P.-Line
L.-Line
Design
Highway 37
Kitwanga to Nass River: District Lot 1206 to District Lot 1879	
19.32
32.75
26.10
19.48
21.96
29.27
19.00
14.88
6.20
6.00
Totals	
42.07
96.81
46.08
Highway 93/95
CPR Overhead and airport access at Cranbrook	
0.50
7.87
1.74
10.86
0.40
0.50
Totals	
0.50
9.61
11.76
Highway 97
0.74
2.00
1.75
3.48
1.93
1.40
1.61
2.62
0.40
4.19
8.26
6.11
8.63
4.02
1.85
3.75
4.73
1.53
1.77
1.21
2.25
0.50
1.29
1.53
6.92
8.21
	
3.06
19.31
3.22
0.97
Boundary-Similkameen: District Lot 1822 to District Lot 3030	
0 80
1.61
4.54
27th Street (Vernon), curb and gutter, 43rd Avenue to 48th Avenue
27th Street (Vernon), curb and gutter, 32nd Avenue to Reservoir Road ..
1.00
1.60
Pleasant Valley Road (Armstrong)	
Monte Creek to Westwold	
3 86
Nechako River to Chief Lake Road	
Salmon River to Parsnip River, Bear to Red Rocky Creek Section
Pine Pass revision	
1.13
Chetwynd to BCR Overhead	
Totals                  	
52.74
56.50
Miscellaneous
4.25
6.12
1.45
0.86
13.33
3.00
1.05
15.67
2.17
1.16
2.78
15.15
1.45
4.18
1.32
1.21
2.82
0.80
11.02
2.04
42.49
3.24
2.30
Westside to Nahun: District Lot 3541	
Springhill Road to Mission Flats.	
87th Street, Osoyoos                  	
Savona to Merritt Road: Nicola Mameet Indian Reserve    	
Corbin Road 	
Toby Creek Road      .
Esling Creek (north of Trail)	
20 23
Chetwynd to Martin Creek              	
22 00
Highway 97 Junction to Martin Creek           	
Alaska Highway to Northwest Territories boundary	
13 68
51.54
82.48
76.28
 20 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
PRELIMINARY STUDY SECTION
The following has been undertaken by this section of the Design and Surveys
Branch between April 1, 1977, and March 31, 1978.
Sufficient high-level photography was obtained to produce low-order recce
mapping on the following:
1. Anarchist Mountain.
2. Remac to Highway 6.
3. Fort St. James Town-site.
4. Telegraph Creek to Dease Lake.
Sufficient low-level photography was obtained to produce high-order mapping
on the following:
1. Western Community.
2. Squamish to Pemberton.
3. Swan Lake Junction to Grinrod.
4. U.S. Border to Penticton.
5. Spences Bridge to Savona.
6. Horsehoe Bay to Second Narrows.
7. 209th to Glover.
8. Nanaimo Bypass.
9. Kingsvale to Merritt.
10. Mud Lake to Black Creek.
11. Westbank Bypass.
12. 16th Avenue, UBC.
13. Whitehouse Corner to 166th.
14. Parksville.
15. Gibson Road and Annis Road.
16. Chetwynd.
17. Shawnigan Lake to Mill Bay.
Low-order mapping was obtained on the following:
1. Remac to Highway 6.
2. West Nechako Bridge.
3. Telegraph Creek.
4. Highway 3 to McGillivray.
5. Salmo to Creston Summit.
Low-order mapping was obtained on the following:
1. Millstream to Latoria.
2. Como Lake to Kingsway.
3. Hastings Street to Port Moody.
4. 209th Street to Glover.
5. Meaford to Trans-Canada Highway.
6. Royston Road to Headquarters Road.
7. Parksville.
8. Gibson Road to Annis Road.
9. Chetwynd railway crossing.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
21
Route projections or layouts were made on aerial photographs for the following:
1. 209th Street to Glover Road.
2. Sparwood.
3. Meaford to Latoria.
4. Meaford to Trans-Canada Highway.
5. Ashcroft Junction to Hat Creek.
6. Annis and Gibson Roads.
7. NE. Coal routes.
8. Westbank Bypass.
9. Nanaimo Bypass.
10. Byrne to Queensborough.
11. Courtenay Bypass.
12. Creston Bypass.
13. Winfield Bypass.
14. Clements Lake.
15. Hope to Merritt (continuing).
16. Merritt to Kamloops (continuing).
The Avalanche Occurrence and Frequency Study through Boston Bar Creek
continued with bi-weekly trips being made into the area between September 1977
and May 1978.
This investigation is continuing with the aid of the B.C. Research Council,
the Hydrology Division of the Ministry of the Environment, and the Atmospheric
Environment Service of the Federal Government.
Consultants
Design Kilometres
Project Urban Rural
North Road to Cape Horn  2.89         	
Haney to Silverdale      3.22
Highway 10, Ladner  0.64         	
Westsyde Road, Kamloops  0.64         	
McKenzie Avenue, Williams Lake  2.25        	
Highway 97, Prince George North  5.47        	
Springhill Drive: Mission Flat to Kamloops     0.48
Haney Bypass ■-  1.29        	
Mary Hill Bypass: Cape Horn to Pitt River 8.05         	
Scott Road: Highway 10 to 80th Avenue  4.18         	
UBC: 16th Avenue and Southwest Marine
Drive    4.66         	
Lillooet Waterfront Road       4.83
27th Street to Vernon  0.96         	
Glenmore Street to Kelowna  1.61         	
Revelstoke to Mica     77.44
NE. Coal access:   Chetwynd to Gwillim
Lake  49.24
Totals  32.64     '  135.21
 22 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Preliminary Studies
Stanley Park causeway.
Rossland Avenue Interchange, Trail.
Vanderhoof bridge approaches.
NE. Coal Access: Gwillim Lake to Tumbler Ridge.
ANNUAL REPORT OF METRIC CO-ORDINATOR, 1977/78
In 1977, we entered Phase Four of Metric Conversion of the Ministry of Highways and Public Works. Phase Four is called Implementation. We now put into
practice the many months of planning that has been done.
Perhaps the most obvious evidence of this was the Public Awareness Program
that was introduced last summer prior to the conversion of Highway traffic signs.
This program was prepared in the spring and summer and launched on 1977-08-15.
It involved newspaper advertisements, radio and television spots, posters and
counter cards, billboards, litter bags, and a metric information pamphlet that was
handed out to 900,000 households on a "postal walk." Many thousands more
were distributed at all the border crossings. On 1977-08-15, the Minister of Highways and Public Works held a press conference and announced the highway sign
changeover.
Thirty-eight thousand highway signs were converted in three weeks and the
change over was generally accepted by the public, almost a "non event." The fact
that it went so smoothly, reflects the many months of preparatory planning by many
agencies in the Province and across Canada.
Amendments to the various Highway Acts were presented to the Legislature
and have since received ratification.
Staff training was started by giving special lectures to groups of key personnel
and showing them how to train their staff. Regional and District Highway Managers
were chosen to train the clerical and secretarial staff and the Maintenance Management personnel were asked to train the field crews and outside workers. This is an
ongoing process and by this method it is hoped that we will reach all employees of
the Ministry.
A study group was conducted at the WACHO Conference held in Victoria
this year. This resulted in an exchange of ideas with our neighbouring provinces
and territories which was very helpful and informative.
All Branches report good progress on Metric Conversion with few problem
areas in evidence.
ARCHAEOLOGICAL REPORT
The archaeological site survey was conducted for the B.C. Ministry of Highways
and Public Works and administered by the Archaeological Sites Advisory Board.
The project was conducted during the period June 1 to August 31, 1977. The
project objectives included:
1. Locating and recording archaeological sites;
2. Assessing potential conflicts with Highway projects; and
3. Providing information for the Provincial site inventory.
Site survey was conducted by two field crews consisting of two members each.
The projects are a continuation of field investigations carried out by the Provincial
Archaeologists Office over the past five years with funds provided by the Ministry of
Highways and Public Works.   The crews were provided with a van, field equipment,
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
23
and office materials. Most project lists and key plans were supplied by the Branch
or District Office of the Highways Ministry.
Areas investigated include four districts in Region 1, eight districts in Region 2,
nine districts in Region 3, and in the north, Region 4, 106 projects were investigated.
In the first three regions no conflicts were reported although several sites were discovered. In Region 4, out of 106 projects investigated, 18 new sites were discovered and eight found in conflict. All conflicts have been resolved to date with
three of them being excavated prior to highway construction.
In total the crews covered 13,675.50 kilometres.
 24
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF GEOTECHNICAL AND
MATERIALS ENGINEERING
J. W. G. Kerr
GENERAL
The Geotechnical and Materials Branch has had a busy year and has completed several major studies.
MANAGEMENT, ADMINISTRATION, AND SERVICES
As a result of reorganization of the Ministry of Highways and Public Works,
the Senior Geotechnical and Materials Engineer received a new title of Director
of Geotechnical and Materials Engineering and now reports to the Executive Director, Engineering rather than the Chief Planning Engineer.
The Branch was fortunate to be able to recruit Dr. D. Haughton, P. Eng., to
Headquarters engineering staff. Unfortunately, the gain was offset by the loss on
transfer of T. S. Coulter, P.Eng., to Construction Branch.
L. Keller was appointed Diamond Drilling Superintendent to replace J. W.
Botham who died in service.
With the approval of 10 additional positions to the Approved Annual Work
Force it has been possible to strengthen the technical capability of the Branch.
An additional auger drill crew has been appointed with Headquarters in Nanaimo.
An aggregate prospector has been appointed in Prince George. Competitions
have been advertised for the positions of Assistant Regional Geotechnical and
Materials Engineer, Prince George, Headquarters Field Engineer at Kamloops,
and Regional Geotechnical and Materials Engineers for Region 5 at Terrace and
Region 6 at Nanaimo. Other positions are still under administrative review but
it is hoped all will be filled by the end of 1978. Positions have been transferred
from other areas to strengthen the Region 5 organization at Terrace and to provide
a nucleus of staff for Region 6 at Nanaimo. It is hoped to have all positions filled
by late summer.
The effectiveness of the new regional groups will depend on the provision of
suitable accommodation and testing facilities by BCBC at Nanaimo and Terrace.
Region 4 Geotechnical and Materials Group were finally able to move to a
new and improved office and laboratory at Prince George in October 1977, although
production was affected by delays in completion of facilities until December 1977.
Region 4 took over responsibility for McBride District from Region 2 in the
spring of 1978 and should be able to assume responsibility for Williams Lake District by mid-summer.
Staff specialists continued to serve on five CSA technical committees, on the
National Advisory Committee on Rock Mechanics, the Pavement Management
Committee of Roads and Transportation Association of Canada, Technical Committee on Soil Sampling of the Canadian Diamond Drilling Association, and have
co-operated with the Western Division of the CDDA, Manpower and the Ministry
of Education in providing lecturers and assisting in training programs for diamond
drillers at the Pacific Vocational Institute at Haney.
A. J. Montador, P.Eng., presented a paper entitled "Concrete Bridge Decks in
British Columbia—A Comparison" to the Transportation Research Bureau of the
U.S. National Research Council, Washington, D.C.   Time was also spent discussing
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS) 25
quality of concrete for bridge deck surfacing with Virginia Highway Research personnel at Charlottesville.
T. S. Coulter, P.Eng., represented Canada at the OECD Research Group
CM1, dealing with construction of roads on compressible subsoils, at Paris, France
and Brussels, Belgium.
The Rockwork Engineer, B. W. R. Eastman, P.Eng., visited Washington State
Department of Highways at their request to discuss common rockwork problems.
Our electronics expert, T. G. Kirkbride, has been asked to serve on the Electronics Advisory Committee at Camosun College.
Various staff members attended the following sehrinars and conferences to
improve their specialized knowledge and make contributions: Wave Equation
Seminar on Pile Driving, Olympia, Wash.; Bridge Deck Seminar, Edmonton, Alta.;
Remote Sensing Workshop, Vancouver, B.C.; Canadian National Committee on
Rock Mechanics, Elliot Lake, Ont.; Pile Driving Workshop, Boulder, Col.; Society
of Exploration Geophysicists, Calgary, Alta.; Permafrost Geophysics Symposium,
Saskatoon, Sask.; Canadian Geotechnical Conference, Saskatoon, Sask.; Sulphur
Symposium, Calgary, Alta.; Seminar on Engineering for Open Pit Mines, Kingston,
Ont.
ROUTE SURVEY INVESTIGATIONS
This year mileage of route soil surveys totalled approximately 160 miles excluding surveys performed by consultants. There was a low volume of service requests early in the year and increased emphasis on spot drilling on day-labour
projects. Some of the surveys included Summit Drive to Victoria Street Extension,
Kamloops; Little Fort to Phinetta Lake; alternate alignments at Cape Horn Bluffs,
where very steep terrain and rock stability pose a very difficult problem; alternate
alignment for Fort Nelson River Crossing; Kwintsa Tunnel to Igneous Creek; Kitimat to Minette Bay; several sections of Highway 97 such as Hash Lake, Chief Lake
Road to Parsnip River, Bear Lake to Kerry Lake, Azouzetta to Half Way Lodge;
Kitwanga to Meziadin Lake (Mile 12-40); Aiyansh; and Chetwynd to Martin Creek
for the NE. Coal access road study. A small but technically difficult relocation
near an old landslide area was reviewed at Mitchell Creek (Barkerville Road).
Smaller investigations were performed at Gerrard, Clements Lake, Bear Pass, and
West Fraser Road at Quesnel. Surficial geology mapping of the Hope to Merritt
Highway corridor was performed in the summer and detailed soil survey of the
Coquihalla Pass route commenced late in 1977 on the first 8 miles out of Hope.
A proposed relocation of Marine Drive in Burnaby between Boundary and
Byrne traverses soft grounds. A larger diameter sewer pipe occupies the centre
of the proposed route. To evaluate possible construction difficulties and establish
an acceptable construction method, a heavily instrumented test fill, simulating
proposed construction conditions was built over a 250-foot section of the route
and numerous readings taken to monitor movements and assess stresses that occur
in the supported pipe. Analyses of the test results and recommendations for the
final design and construction have been made.
While soil survey activity was down, a large program of bridge foundation
design work was undertaken. Unlike other years, no building foundation investigations were requested. For the year, 64 projects were completed, including a number of small bridge sites between Terrace and Prince Rupert, some pedestrian overpasses and sites for major bridges such as the new Fraser River crossing at Lillooet.
At Scott and Hoy Creeks, where it was proposed to install large precast segmental
concrete box culverts, it was determined that the weight of normal granular fill
would cause fairly large settlements, likely to disrupt the structure.   It was, there-
 26 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
fore, recommended that lightweight fill be used; for the first time the Ministry used
pumice sampled and tested by the Branch for the lightweight fill. Work is underway on a further 27 projects for planned completion by summer 1978. Considerable drilling, geophysical investigation and analysis of rock structure was undertaken at Cheakamus Canyon to identify bedrock under blocky talus to establish
suitable foundation sites for a bridge structure. Foundation investigations were
also carried out for aerial and reaction ferry towers at Usk, Isle St. Pierre, and
Marguerite. Extensive foundation investigation work was completed for the proposed Mission Flats Overpass at Kamloops.
In addition a start has been made on foundation investigations for another 33
bridge sites on Highways 23 and 23a between Kitwanga and the Yukon Boundary.
The Branch has made increasing use of the recently acquired 10-ton static
cone penetrometer equipment to supplement subsurface investigation by rotary
drilling methods. The use of the cone penetrometer has already permitted substantial savings to be made from the original design on two projects (Halston and
Sardis). These estimated savings have already exceeded the initial purchase price
of the static cone machine.
STABILITY INVESTIGATIONS
Landslides and rockfalls are a recurring feature along the highways of British
Columbia where the geology, topography, and precipitation combine to produce
mass movements which are both a nuisance and a hazard to the public.
Headquarters staff worked on several remedial projects and are investigating
or monitoring 10 other problem areas. Region 4 staff investigated 27 problem
areas, and issued recommendations for stabilization or relocation for failures ranging from minor landslides to major slope failures. Among these projects are Stone
Creek (97 South), Peace River Hill, Cluculz Lake Hill (16), Quesnel Hixon Road,
Olson Road, Alix Creek, McLeod Lake, Buick Store, Watson Hill Slide, Cinema
Slide, Exchamsiks River, Minette Bay, Old Lakelse Road, and Park Avenue,
Prince Rupert.
A number of difficult rock slope stability problems received attention. A
stability assessment was made of a high rock bluff at Keenleyside Road, Castlegar.
Drilling, blasting, rock bolting, and scaling requirements were determined, a report
issued, and the remedial work subsequently executed by the Branch high scaling
crew. A geological study to assess the stability of rock for backslope design and
to determine the depth of overburden in talus slopes in Cheakamus Canyon was
completed early in the year; a report was issued recommending revised slope design and ditch requirements for several large rock cuts. A study was made and
report issued for minimizing the problem of rockfalls on a section of Highway 3
between Ootischenia and Champion Creek (Projects 2497 and 2599). A study
was conducted and recommendations made for remedial work or highway relocation at the rock bluffs at Mile 131.5 (Garbitt Highway) of Highway 97 north of
Prince George. Savona Hill on Route 1 was also examined and recommendations
made for backslope design and ditch requirements for widening rock cuts in the
area. Studies are continuing on rockfall and icing problems at Elko Tunnel on
Route 3. Studies are almost completed on the rockfall problem at Yale Tunnel
on Route 1.
Slide 5 adjacent to Ferrabee Bluffs in the Fraser Canyon continues to be a
source of concern because of the frequent hazard of large rolling rocks and a winter hazard of snow avalanches. Our computer model for rolling rock on uniform
slopes proved inadequate in this case for predicting the pattern of rock arrivals.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS) 27
In order to obtain useful data for design of protective works, an on-site experiment
was conducted.
Three hundred and fifty large rocks were painted and rolled down various
areas of the slope. The passage of the rocks was filmed and trajectories were
plotted and analysed; a report has been prepared suggesting various options for
reducing the hazard.
Rockfalls are a continuing hazard on many other sections of highway and
the problem increases with aging and weathering of rock cuts and slopes. Scaling
and monitoring of slopes, therefore, is an ongoing activity of the rockwork section.
The rock-high scaling crew was active in all regions, scaling approximately 9,000
cubic yards of rock and debris from high slopes. Average production was 12.6
cubic yards per man-day scaling up from the 1976 figure of 11.8. The high scaling
crew also installed 16,000 square feet of wire mesh to contain rocks falling from
the cut faces at the Prince Rupert ferry terminal.
Rock slopes at Odium, Hells Gate, Jackass Mountain, Rattlesnake Bluffs, and
Moyie Bluffs were monitored. Because of the mild winter and low precipitation
in southern British Columbia over the year little movement was registered.
GEOLOGICAL HAZARDS
A significant amount of time was spent by the Branch on reconnaissance and
detailed studies of potential geological hazards that could affect land use. This
year, 125 specific subdivision proposals involving approximately 705 lots were
investigated and recommendations made to various approving officers. In addition, two major area studies of hazards to development on silt bluffs were completed and reports submitted for publication.   These were:
(a) "Geological Hazards and Urban Development of Silt Deposits in
the Penticton Area," published by the Ministry in May 1977.
(b) "Landforms  and  Observed Hazard  Mapping,  South  Thompson
Valley, British Columbia," completed December 1977.
Investigation and hazard mapping was also done for Sunshine Valley, and
reports entitled "Geological Harzards and Geology of the South Columbia River
Valley (Edgewater to Canal Flats)" and "Preliminary Geological Hazard Mapping,
Pemberton-Anderson Lake" are substantially complete and should be available
for publication by May 1978. The Garibaldi Advisory Panel requested some
additional field exploration which was carried out in difficult conditions in November and December.   Their final report is now expected in May 1978.
AGGREGATE INVESTIGATIONS
The search for and proving of aggregate deposits continued to be an important
major activity of regional crews assisted by Headquarters geophysical crews. This
year, 262 sources of aggregate were investigated.
A rat-hole drill was used to search for aggregate on the Fort Simpson Trail.
Helicopters were used both on the Fort Simpson Trail and north of Prince George
for first reconnaissance of gravel prospects, which saved many weeks of work on
the ground.
GEOPHYSICAL OPERATIONS
Three geophysical crews were employed throughout much of the year.
Sixteen geophysical projects were completed with resistivity and seismic surveys accounting for the major part of activities.
 28
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Projects of special interest included resistivity investigations for aggregate
sources to be used in reconstructing the Quesnel-Hydraulic and French Roads,
Quesnel Highways District, and seismic refraction and resistivity investigations
for the Coquihalla Highway, Hope-Merritt Highway Corridor. Seismic investigations were also conducted at Rubble Creek to provide geotechnical information
on slide debris for the Garibaldi Advisory Panel.
This year two new geophysical instruments were purchased which extended
the effective field season into the winter months with the use of an advanced electromagnetic technique rather than conventional resistivity. A Nimbus 24-channel
seismograph has provided much greater flexibility, sensitivity, and cost effectiveness
to seismic investigations, while a recently developed Geonic EM34 electromagnetic
conductivity instrument has allowed much faster, high resolution exploration for
aggregate resources while reducing unit survey costs.
DRILLING OPERATIONS
The Branch drilling section which operates a variety of drills and auxiliary
equipment continued to provide subsurface information and samples of soil and
rock, to install instrumentation and to carry out insitu tests.
Work volume for diamond drilling was relatively low until late fall when a
rapid increase in demand for investigations warranted staffing of operations to full
establishment. In spite of recession conditions in the mining industry, it was still
difficult to recruit trained drillers to Government service. It has not been possible
to expand rapidly and thoroughly train new men at the same time.
Work has generally been conducted safely, but unfortunately the group
suffered its first injury that resulted in more than three days of lost time, in more
than 10 years of operation.
More use was made of contracted drills, Becker-type drills which drive a
casing with a diesel pile driving hammer, and air trac drills. In suitable conditions
these machines get information very rapidly. A Ministry air trac was modified to
use a method of overburden drilling developed in Sweden some years ago and for
soil sampling drilling.
Demand for higher quality cored samples in soft rocks such as lignite, diato-
mite, hard silts, and clays has led to acquisition of large diameter triple-tube wireline core drilling equipment.
Drilling projects of special difficulty were those for highway construction from
Cape Horn to Pitt River, Quesnel slide drilling, barge drilling for the new Fraser
River crossing at Lillooet, Mica access road, winter drilling for soil surveys in the
Coquihalla Pass, and drilling for bridge sites on Highway 37 from Kitwanga north
to Cassiar.
A breakdown of drilling activities is given in the following table:
Job Types
Number
of Jobs
Number
of Holes
Footage
Ministry
Contractors
54
17
18
1
12
157
132
206
2
28
11,063
14,479
3,069
60
1,504
7,020
1 S74
ir>i
Total	
102
525
30,195        1        8,946
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS) 29
PAVEMENT EVALUATION AND DESIGN
Benkelman Beam rebound testing, drilling, damage reports, and design for
368 miles of highway, involving 50 projects, was completed this year. This involved
a wide variety of works such as testing for curb and gutter at Parksville, Courtenay,
and Port Hardy, Langley Bypass, Burns Lake Arterial, and for Sanca Creek to
Creston reconstruction. In addition to this, the normal spring load restriction
testing for District Highways Managers was performed on some 180 special test
sections across the Province. Special field investigations and designs were performed for an extension of the water bomber parking area at Castlegar, and for
repair of frost damage to highways in the McBride area. Ongoing investigation
of sections of highways built either in new ways or with less expensive materials had
to be limited this year because of shortage of trained staff.
QUALITY ASSURANCE
The Branch continued to perform an extensive program of concrete mix design,
field and plant inspection, and laboratory testing of material samples; to co-operate
and consult with other branches of the Ministry, with the Purchasing Commission
and other ministries for the purpose of ensuring sound construction specification and
purchase of materials of the required uniform level of quality.
Each of our regional operations are involved in differing areas of quality
assurance for the Ministry and for the Purchasing Commission.
Region 1
This region has been involved in some 2,700 separate inspections in the last
year with the major effort in gravel crushing, wire-fencing materials, glue-laminated
wooden beams, and manufactured concrete products. One major project involved
the rejection of some 450 out of 800 median barriers involving a total material
purchase price of some $50,000. On another project, 23,536 cubic yards of
concrete were inspected involving a material cost alone of half a million dollars.
Region 2
In this region quality assurance is mainly related to timber and wood products,
spiral corrugated culvert pipe, gravel crushing, and to placement of concrete. Inspection of foundations and concrete was done on five highway maintenance shops in
the region. The capital cost involved was $3,000,000. Over $ 1,230,000 of timber
materials were inspected last year on behalf of both the Ministry of Highways and
Public Works and the Ministry of Forests. Quality checking of 34 gravel-crushing
contracts required the full-time services of two geotechnical staff this year and
involved more than 1,200,000 tons of crushed aggregate. Testing of $923,000
worth of spiral corrugated culverts was a continuous procedure as materials are
sent to various parts of the Province. In addition, the staff inspected 150,000
linear feet (28.5 miles) of no-post guardrail, which were manufactured at six
different plants.
Region 3
Region 3 inspected concrete having a material value of $250,000; timber and
lumber, $133,038; fence-posts and pilings, $137,000, and miscellaneous materials
amounting to $113,000. Since poor quality materials that require early replacement
can cause costs many times the material value of $663,838, the importance of this
work is understated by these costs.
 30 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Region 4
Region 4 inspected 37 projects using concrete for a material cost alone of
$367,000; 170,000 linear feet of culvert for a material cost of $1,274,000; 700,000
board feet of lumber worth about $260,400, and 13,736 linear feet of no-post
concrete guardrail costing $56,000, plus miscellaneous materials involving an
estimated material value of $242,000.
The Victoria testing facility continued to provide advice co-ordination and
specialized testing for Headquarters Design Engineers and our regional operations.
This year special attention was given to developing improved methods of quality
assurance testing, preparing for metric conversion, and special projects for other
branches of the Ministry.
APPLIED RESEARCH
On behalf of the Bridge Branch and a consultant this Branch continued detailed measurements of any pavement wear or damage on the north approach to
Lion's Gate Bridge. This is to ensure that any problems which may develop are
remedied before the main bridge span is resurfaced with the same materials.
On behalf of the Maintenance Branch a field-test section was installed on the
Canim Lake Road to compare the performance of three different road-dust preventative products.
In co-operation with the Bridge Construction Section an extensive study of
the effect of road salt on bridge deck deterioration was completed; technical procedures and equipment were refined and now can be used by bridge construction
staff. Our one-man annual assessment of deteriorated bridges is continuing so that
the program for the following year's bridge redecking process can be planned.
The combination of sophisticated test procedures and extensive personal experience of one individual is beginning to yield positive benefits in planning work and
limiting removal of good areas of concrete deck.
Consultation was provided to the Avalanche Prevention Section of Maintenance Branch in designing an economical and effective system for obtaining weather
information from their remotely operated recording stations. The complexity of
the electronics and data assembly required several lengthy discussions with the
Vancouver-based consultant and the client.
In co-operation with the Construction Branch a large, 37-foot span, corrugated metal underpass south of Nanaimo (Wellington South Underpass) was
instrumented to measure earth pressures and movement of this structure during and
after construction. This design differs from the three similar previous structures
we have monitored in that its uses a heavily reinforced-concrete slab across the top
to spread the earth and traffic loads. The Ministry's co-operation with outside
consultants and the culvert industry has aided in advancing this type of structure
which may offer savings over other forms of construction.
With the co-operation of B.C. Buildings Corporation, a special study into
early prediction of concrete strength was conducted this year. The technical and
practical problems of making the new procedures work were largely solved. While
work by other agencies has been confined to large projects such as the CN Tower
in Toronto, our purpose is to make it usable for small projects of short duration
where previous experience with concrete quality control is limited or not available.
On behalf of the Public Service Commission, Accident Prevention Section,
the Branch tested all types of CSA approved hard hats for suitability of governmental use. This consisted of physical tests to determine which were the most
resistant to impact tests and a user preference survey to determine which models
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
31
each ministry preferred for their specific use. The interest by all users indicated
that this study was very welcome.
On behalf of the Motor-vehicle Branch an improved version of specifications
for vehicle licence-plates and decals was completed this year. Additionally,
considerable quality testing of the annual decals was necessary because of production problems. House trailer decals were also evaluated for the Ministry of
Municipal Affairs and Housing.
Because of increased cost of materials purchased by the Purchasing Commission on behalf of this and other ministries, new testing equipment was acquired
to permit a more rapid evaluation of purchased materials. An infra-red spectrophotometer and gas chromatograph have been used to quickly test organic materials
such as paints, plastics, concrete additives, while a Pritchard Photometer, which is
a portable light measuring instrument, has been used in the laboratory for finding
the best light reflecting materials and in the field to measure the actual amount of
light reflected from tunnel walls or road centre line markers. Test procedures
have been refined and staff trained. The units are expected to be used extensively
next year. Extensive aid was provided by the University of Victoria in selection
of the best equipment for our purposes.
In co-operation with the Ministry of Energy, Transport and Communications, the Branch has continued a study of the effects of very heavy loads on
existing highways during all seasons of the year. Although heavy loads can
reduce the useful life of a highway from 20 years to 10 years it is rare that
immediate damage is obvious; however, some degree of damage results, which
either increases maintenance or necessitates early reconstruction. Therefore, the
purpose of the present study is to determine the degree and type of increased
highway damage that may result from various degrees of heavier loads.
Information on rate and depth of ground freeze and thaw was obtained from
temperature probes extending to a depth of 6 feet under paved surfaces, installed
in the Prince George and Quesnel area.
On behalf of the Bridge Branch, instrumentation was developed and installed
for recording and collecting data on ice force against a bridge pier during ice
break-up at Kitwanga Bridge over Skeena River. Procedure was developed and
data gathered on the river ice thickness, quality, and compressive strength.
In preparation for the metric conversion program effective on April 1, considerable effort has been made to revise testing manuals, data sheets, computer
programs, and to redesign existing equipment to avoid unnecessary complication
of test procedures. Because of staff limitations this work will have to be extended
over a period of two years.
 32
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Region 5 beam truck, Highway 16 near Prince Rupert.
New sign and strobe dome-lights.   Fall 1977.
Texoma Rat-Hole Drill, gravel exploration, Fort Simpson Trail near Yukon border.
February 1978, —40°
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS) 33
Coquihalla Project.   Seismic refraction survey.     Explosive being loaded in shothole.
Coquihalla Project. Seismic refraction survey. Nimbus ES 2400 Seismograph in field operation.
Marine Way Test Section—top of final lift showing instrumentation.
 34
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Marine Way Test Section—TV camera used for before and after picture
of in situ of sewer pipe.
Cheakamus Canyon.   Station 56+00—north view of proposed rock cut site. The B.C. Hydro
power tower must be removed.   Note structure dipping into and out of rock face.
Thormanby Island silt bluffs and beach access assessed for erosion potential
at the public access for a subdivision.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
35
Scott Creek concrete box-culverts.   Highway 7a between Port Coquitlam and Port Moody.
Wellington South Underpass on Highway 1 near Cassidy was a joint project with
Construction Branch on the design of thin steel structure.
Kitwanga Bridge near Hazelton showing ice pressure instrumentation on upstream side of pier.
 36
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF BRIDGE ENGINEERING
W. A. Bowman
A total of 21.3 million was expended on bridges and ferry terminals and the
following reports of the Bridge Design Engineer, Bridge Construction Engineer,
and the Dock Engineer give details of the activities of the Branch over the year.
Completion of new bridges parallel to the existing ones across Nanaimo
River, Haslam Creek south of Nanaimo removed a bottleneck from the 16-km
four-lane section of the Trans-Canada Highway south of Nanaimo.
Minor new bridges on various arterial highways were welcomed by the
travelling public. Of major significance was the gratifying progress on the superstructures of Pitt River and Kitkatinaw River bridges on the Lougheed and Alaska
Highways respectively.
The major work by the Dock Section was the completion of a berth at
Tsawwassen for the Queen of Prince Rupert and the planning for a terminal for
this ship at Bear Cover, near Port Hardy.
Bridge Design
Design work was diversified throughout the Province. Increased activity in
the structures for the completion of the northern end of the Island Highway and
also structures on the Yellowhead Highway.
The following are details of the program:
Name of Structure
Preliminary
Study
Design in
Progress
Design
Completed
Tenders
Called in
1977/78
Trans-Canada Highway
Golden east structure.
Silver Hope Creek	
Whitehouse Creek	
Westholme Overhead -.
Bush Creek	
Holmes Creek	
Koksilah River	
Cowichan River.	
Chemainus River	
B.C. Hydro Underpass at Sardis...
Colquitz Creek Bridge Duplicate -
Colquitz Creek (Interurban)..
Portage Avenue pedestrian overpass _
Eagle River (Kay Falls)—- —
Culvert at Helmcken Road.—	
Yellowhead Highway
Kasiks Overhead ~.
Endako River 	
Endako Overhead -
Agate _	
Igneous —	
Backwater	
Snow  _	
East Kwinitsa	
Swamp.
Ekumsekum..
Maringosh	
Antigonish	
Inver 	
Aberdeen	
Log Creek 	
Slickenside Creek..
Polymar Creek-
Snowbound Creek..
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
37
Name of Structure
Preliminary
Study
Design in
Progress
Design
Completed
Tenders
Called in
1977/78
Southern Trans-Provincial Highway and Alternatives
Erie   -
	
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Lougheed Highway
Mission By-pass
Mission West Overhead _ 	
Mission Flyover	
	
Island Highway
Keta Lake Underpass	
X
X
x
Tistika River.	
Eve	
x
Region 1—Miscellaneous
Lockwood  .
Pipeline ...	
Chilluckthan Slough 	
X
Region 2
Ellis Creek	
Mission Flat Overhead -	
McCIinchy Creek	
Sallus Creek, culvert extensions	
 38
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
i Day labour.
Bridge Construction
Name of Structure
Preliminary
Study
Design in
Progress
Design
Completed
Tenders
Called in
1977/78
Region 3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
    /
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
x
McPhee .	
Trail CPR Underpass _	
Trail I/C Overpass -	
Trail I/C Footpath	
(1)
Old Columbia River Bridge at Revelstoke, redeck	
Westbridge _	
Region 4
West Pine 	
Twidwell Bend          	
Region 5
X
X
X
X
Cranberry 2 	
Region 6
Pete Wolf	
In the 1977/78 fiscal year, 10 vehicular bridges were completed or opened to
traffic with minor work yet to be done; in addition, a pedestrian subway and a
pedestrian overcrossing were completed. On March 31, 1978, 28 bridges were
under construction; work had not yet commenced on three other contracts involving five existing bridges, and a tender had been called but not yet awarded for one
pedestrian overcrossing.
Because of the slowdown in the economy the construction industry was
eager for work. As a result unit price generally levelled off or in some cases
decreased. The Ministry was, however, not able to take advantage of the situation
until mid-summer when the bulk of its work started to be tendered.
In June the substructure was ready for steelwork at the Kiskatinaw River
Bridge on the Alaska Highway about 25 miles southeast of Fort St. John. Erection,
however, did not commence until October due in part to a wet period which
delayed the rigging of the hi-line, an essential element in the erection. Once
started, erection continued through the rigors of Peace River area winter and was
completed in early March.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS) 39
The piers and abutments for the Pitt River Bridge on the Lougheed Highway
were completed by the end of May and by the end of July a contract was awarded
for the completion of the bridge. In addition to the manufacture and erection of
large precast beams and the construction of the deck this contract includes the
fabrication and erection of a steel swing span plus all mechanical and electrical
equipment necessary for its function. Also included in the contract is the provision of a cathodic system to protect against corrosion the steel piles that support
the piers and a TV system to aid the bridge tenders in their operation of the swing
span. At the end of the year all the precast beams were erected and four spans
of precast slabs were in position; the structural steelwork was 100 per cent fabricated and mechanical equipment 90 per cent fabricated.
During the year work was under way on 18 bridges on Vancouver Island,
most of which are located on the highway from Victoria to Port Hardy. In spite
of the late start in the construction season good progress was made on the seven
bridges under construction "north" of Sayward (near Kelsey Bay).
Hi-line equipment was used for the erection of the twin box steel girders for
the new crossing of Englishman River on the new four-lane section of the Island
Highway near Parksville. Tenders for the deck were called in October and
recalled in February.
The 1977/78 Bridge Resurfacing Program saw a record 200,000 square feet
of high-density concrete overlay placed in seven months. The marked increase
in production is largely attributed to the acquisition and use of new scarifying,
cleaning, and concrete finishing equipment. This overlay was applied to bridges
on the Island, in the East Kootenays, and in the Terrace area. Among the 29
bridges resurfaced, were several major structures: viz., Paulson Bridge (Highway
3), Yoho Bridge (Highway 1), and Parsnip River Bridge (John Hart Highway).
Two structures were resurfaced with high alumina cement concrete on an experimental basis. This material is rapid setting and requires a relatively short-curing
period, prior to traffic.
Of the approximate 3,200 tons of steelwork fabricated and erected this year
most went into larger structures. About 1,400 tons was used in the Kiskatinaw
River Bridge where, because of the size of some of the sections, site assembly
and fabrication was necessary. The Mamquam River Bridge steelwork was fabricated in Alberta at less bid cost than if it had been done in British Columbia.
In the past most of the precast-concrete bridge units manufactured for the
Ministry have been produced in the Vancouver area, but this year a Vernon firm
has shared in the activity. In total, some 14,000 lineal feet of I beams, 16,000
lineal feet of box beams, 1,200 lineal feet of culvert sections, and 3,000 square
feet of deck slabs have been purchased. This shows a considerable increase in the
use of precast concrete.
Where applicable, representatives of both Federal and Provincial fishery
authorities have attended preconstruction meetings with the contractor involved.
As a result there has been a better understanding of the problems involved and
the resulting co-operation has been good. On two occasions short reaches of
streams in the vicinity of bridge construction have been cleared of small fry by
fishery personnel so that they would not be harmed. Such dedication and enthusiasm has been an eye-opener to both contractor and Ministry personnel.
During periods of low construction activity field personnel were kept productively busy in other areas such as carrying out bridge inspection or working
for the districts.
 40
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
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 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
41
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 42 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Dock Design, Construction, and Maintenance Design
DESIGN
The following design works have been completed or are in progress:
A. British Columbia Ferries Division Projects
TFM-136—Bear Cove Ferry Terminal—Design of new ferry terminal at
Bear Cove near Port Hardy to accommodate the Prince Rupert/north coast ferry.
Design completed, tenders called.
TFM-143—Departure Bay Ferry Terminal—Design of coffee shop/waiting-
room and foot-passenger dropoff area.   Design in progress.
M-126—Otter Bay Ferry Terminal—Provision of two more floating leads.
Design completed, tenders called.
M-134 and TFM-142—Horseshoe Bay Ferry Terminal—Design of new
coffee shop/waiting-room and additions to offices.   Design in progress.
M-135—Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal—Revisions to existing coffee shop and
waiting-room building.   Design in progress.
M-145—Mill Bay/Brentwood Ferry Terminals—General repairs to marine
works.   Design completed, tenders called.
Queen Charlotte Island Ferry Terminal—Preliminary site study of three
possible sites for ferry terminal to accommodate the Prince Rupert/north coast
ferry.   Study completed.
Prince Rupert Ferry Terminal—Designs for new ferry berth and revisions
to existing terminal installation.   Design in progress.
Deas Maintenance Facility—Provision of fourth maintenance berth. Design
in progress.
Langdale Ferry Terminal—Replacement of wingwalls in Berth 1. Design in
progress.
B. Ministry of Highways and Public Works Projects
B.P. 1182—Campbell River Ferry Terminal—Design of new building containing washrooms and storage area.   Design completed.
CONSTRUCTION
The following have been completed unless otherwise noted.
A. British Columbia Ferries Division Projects
T.F. 183—Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal—New north breakwater and extension to existing north breakwater to protect Berths 3, 4, and 5.
T.F. 188—Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal—Rebuilding of Berth 2, which was
the original one at this terminal.
M-99—Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal—Also modifications and additions were
undertaken during the construction of Berth 5 to accommodate the Queen of
Prince Rupert.
M-119—Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal—Rebuilding of wingwalls in Berth 1
plus dredging of the berth area.
T.F. 184—Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal—Foot-passenger walkway for new berth
and waiting-room in walkway area.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
43
M-108—Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal—Relocation of foot-passenger toll-
booths, outside waiting-area, and baggage racks.
M-121—Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal—Dolphin and wingwall repairs in
Berths 1, 3, and 5.
Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal—Provision of an emergency generator complete
with building.
T.F. 190—Horseshoe Bay Ferry Terminal—Relocation of automobile toll-
booths and provision of canopy over tollbooths.
M-92—Horseshoe Bay Ferry Terminal—Installation of fire hydrants and
supply lines throughout the terminal.
M-98—Horseshoe Bay Ferry Terminal—Installation of deflector wall near
Berth 1 to prevent waterborne debris from damaging adjacent small boats and
floats.
M-lll—Horseshoe Bay Ferry Terminal—Revisions to foot-passenger entrance, tollbooths, outside waiting-area/washrooms, and baggage facilities.
M-117—Horseshoe Bay Ferry Terminal—Repairs to dolphins, Berth 3.
M-94—Departure Bay Ferry Terminal—New starboard turning dolphin in
Berth 2.
M-100—Departure Bay Ferry Terminal—Repairs to towers in Berth 1 due to
heavy scouring around piling.
T.F. 191—Langdale Ferry Terminal—Sewage treatment plant to replace
overloaded septic tank system.
T.F. 192—Langdale Ferry Terminal—New turning dolphin in Berth 1 to
facilitate stern landings at this berth by stretch ferries.
M-95—Langdale Ferry Terminal—Remodelling of existing washrooms.
M-125—Langdale Ferry Terminal—Repairs to wingwalls and dolphins in
Berth 2.
M-96—Saltery Bay Ferry Terminal—Contract for miscellaneous small buildings.
M-97—Sturdies Bay Ferry Terminal—Enlarging of existing waiting-room
building and a new tollbooth.
M-105—Deas Maintenance Facility—Dredging of northwest corner of basin
to improve access to the berths. Also dolphin repairs and dredging in Berths
1 and 2.
M-122—Earls Cove Ferry Terminal—Repairs to wingwalls and floating leads.
M-128—Village Bay Ferry Terminal—Repairs to tower support piles. Repairs
in progress.
B. Ministry of Highways and Public Works Projects
B.P. 1089—Little River Ferry Terminal—Revisions and dredging of berth
area to facilitate use by the Sechelt Queen. The holding compound and parking
areas are also being considerably enlarged and a new tollbooth and security room
provided.
B.P. 1146—Kootenay Lake Ferry Terminals—Construction of new steel pontoons and aprons to replace existing wooden units.   Construction in progress.
B.P. 1148—Chemainus Ferry Terminal—Enlarging of holding lanes.
B.P. 1149—Barnston Island Ferry Terminal—Modifications to existing marine
structures to accommodate the new ferry being constructed for this route.
 44 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
B.P. 1175—Little River Ferry Terminal—Repairs to dolphins and attendants
walkway.
MAINTENANCE
In addition to the above operations, major maintenance projects as well as
normal maintenance at all British Columbia Ferry Corporation terminals and at
those Ministry of Highways ferry terminals under this jurisdiction, were carried out.
T. A. TASAKA, Dock Engineer
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
45
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF TRAFFIC ENGINEERING
During the past year, activity again increased in the Province and the number
of vehicles using British Columbia highways was significantly higher than in the
previous year. The Traffic Engineering Branch continued to co-operate with individuals and organizations in the associated fields of traffic safety, traffic planning,
standardization of traffic control devices, and traffic operations.
The Director of Traffic Engineering represented the Ministry of the British
Columbia Safety Council, the St. John Ambulance Highway First Aid Committee,
the Roads and Transportation Association Council on Uniform Traffic Control
Devices for Canada and the Roads and Transportation Association Committee on
Traffic Operations.
Short-duration annual traffic counts were taken with automatic equipment at
approximately 700 locations throughout the Province. Traffic volumes are recorded
continuously throughout the year at 23 additional locations and eight of these
recorders count traffic separately for each direction of travel. A further 170 automatic counts were taken for special purposes such as railway crossing, intersection,
and planning studies.
Punched-tape traffic counters are used as much as possible so that calculation
of traffic count information can be done with data-processing equipment. A translator machine located in the Traffic Engineering Branch office is used to transfer
information from punched tapes to computer cards.
In the summer of 1972, the Branch began to install electronic loop detection
systems at regular short-duration traffic count stations on high speed/high volume
highways. The new detectors, replacing the rubber road tubes previously used,
allow employees to set up counters on the shoulder without having to venture onto
the travelled lanes. Over 760 "loops" have already been installed at approximately
240 count stations throughout the Province. The program will be continued this
summer.
Summer daily traffic volumes for 1977 showed approximately 61,000 vehicles
on Pattullo Bridge, 63,000 vehicles on Port Mann Bridge, and 47,000 vehicles on
Knight Street Bridge. Data from the permanent count stations showed marginal
increases in 1977 over 1976 of less than 2 per cent in the southern Interior and on
Vancouver Island, an increase of approximately 4 per cent in the Fraser Valley
and an increase of about 5 per cent in the northern Interior.
Many intersection problems were investigated during the year. This work
included the taking of counts of manual vehicle turning movements and the preparation of design for the improvement of approximately 40 intersections. These
improvements included widening, channelization, signing and signal revisions to
give greater capacity, eliminate hazards, and generally improve the flow of traffic.
Numerous highway design plans were reviewed to ensure that intersections
and interchanges would function well under actual traffic conditions.
Twelve railway grade crossings were signalized in co-operation with the
Federal Railway Transport Committee and the railways under the committee's
jurisdiction.
A number of speed limits were reviewed due to changing traffic conditions
and, in consultation with the police authorities, changes were made where they
appeared to be warranted. In some cases actual travel speeds were checked by
means of radar speed meter.
An addition of two changeable message signs to the existing system will be
completed by the Ministry in May 1978. This brings to 11 the number of change-
 46 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
able message signs located in areas where severe winter conditions occur. These
signs provide drivers with up-to-date information on road conditions. Drivers
assisted by the signs are those travelling the Roger Pass, Salmo-Creston Highway,
Fraser Canyon, Hope-Princeton Highway, and Terrace-Prince Rupert section of
Route 16. The sign locations were selected on the basis of the avalanche hazard
index, volume of traffic, and length and duration of road closures. The signs warn
motorists of road conditions far enough in advance so that they have time to consider taking an alternative route.
The signs have in a mini-computer a memory of 64 one-line messages. Up to
eight messages can be displayed in sequence at any time. The messages, made up
of 18-inch high letters, are called up through telephone lines by a portable computer
terminal. All that is required is the terminal and a telephone.
The ease of operation enables the Ministry to make available to the public
current information concerning road conditions, road closures, detour routes, and
length and location of delays. The motorist sees a series of three messages which
flash in sequence. Each message is exposed for a minimum of two seconds. The
message is read by motorists as they drive, in much the same way as overhead
directional signs. The signs can be controlled from the base of the sign, from the
local highway foreman's office, from the regional radio room or from Headquarters
in Victoria.
Four of the original changeable message signs have been updated with newer
equipment. These updated signs and the two new signs were designed and installed
by the Ministry at a cost of $191,000. Two of the updated signs were in operation
in March 1978. The other signs are expected to be operational in May 1978.
Traffic signals were designed and installed at 48 intersections throughout the
Province. Flashing beacons were installed at eight intersections. Approximately
900 street-lighting luminaires were installed at intersections, highway interchanges,
and ferry-landings.
Energy conservation continues to be the design criteria of the electrical section.
All new lighting installations are designed with the more efficient yellow sodium
fixtures.
This will allow us to light isolated intersection with the use of 150-watt high
pressure sodium fixtures instead of 400-watt mercury fixtures which reduces power
consumption by 60 per cent while still giving 80 per cent of the light of the mercury
fixture.
Electrical design in traffic control is aimed at reducing maintenance by employing solid state equipment, which does not require regular maintenance, but does
allow more design flexibility.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
47
REPORT OF HIGHWAY SAFETY ENGINEER
J. LlSMAN
Dealing with requests for the protection of child pedestrians remains a major
part of the highway safety work load. Forty-two crossings were investigated and
crosswalk treatments installed. These included signalling, signing, better lighting,
lowering of speed limits, two overpasses, and six underpasses.
Following the pilot project on Highway 3, between Hope and Keremeos, a
system of accurate reference markers was installed on all major highways in the
southern part of the Province and Vancouver Island. Over 900 reference marker
posts were installed during the summer, positioned at 5-kilometre spacing in rural
areas and 2-kilometre spacing in the Lower Mainland, which will assist policemen
in reporting the accurate locations of traffic accidents, enabling a clearer understanding of where accidents are taking place on the roads.
The value of this work is in its application through the Motor-vehicle Branch
Accident Reports which record all relevant facets of accidents, including certain
physical highway conditions. The information from the reports is being gathered
in the computer data bank, and will be extracted later to help diagnose the causes
of accidents, and in particular, to pinpoint those locations which have a poor accident
record.
The influence of highway features can thus be gauged, and modifications to
standards and practices made to reduce accident incidence and severity. This will
provide the rational basis for safety engineering improvement programs designed
to decrease road-user hazard by remedial engineering work, at minimum cost.
Computer research into the ability of the three types of concrete barrier, to
redirect vehicles safely, was arranged. The results are being analysed and guardrail
placement practices will be modified to make better use of the three types.
In co-operation with the Surrey School Board and Municipal Council a safe
and more convenient access to Anniedale Elementary School was designed and
constructed. This work involved direct participation with the parents group to
select an arrangement acceptable to the community.
Funds have been made available from the Branch budget to construct extra
shoulder guardrail along the Upper Levels Highway near Lloyd Avenue to prevent
vehicles leaving the highway and into adjacent houses.
Rural traffic accidents are often associated with curves and the night hours,
and better optical guidance for drivers is required to have them negotiate the road
ahead. The use of reflective delineators has been increased, and shoulders were
improved to enable white-painted shoulder-edge lines to be applied to the more
difficult stretches of highways.
An objective of the Branch has been to have district and field staff recognize
situations where more signing and delineation would approve the driver's response.
The work of one district is well worth mentioning. Safety oriented improvements
were carried out on Highway 1 in the Fraser Canyon near Jackass Mountain, and
since this was completed a remarkable reduction in accidents occurred.
Highway safety principles and topics were dealt with as part of two seminars
given to engineering and technical staff, on Traffic and Transportation Planning
matters. Techniques showing how highway construction and maintenance can be
made safer through relating them to real driver behaviour, were explained. It is
planned to give further seminars for foremen and district technicians, as well as
designers.
 48 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
During the year, work has progressed into the development of Highway safety
engineering practices appropriate to Canadian and British Columbia conditions.
This has meant adapting techniques which have developed in the U.S. since the
passage of their Highway Safety Act in the late 60's, which was followed by
Federal funding of States' activities. In Canada the Co-operative Federal-Provincial
Programme on Road Safety includes the development of national policies and
objectives, and the commissioning of applied research studies by universities and
consultants.
Of particular interest to British Columbia is the work being carried out on the
roadside hazard question, and two committees of the Roads and Transportation
Association of Canada were set up to produce a handbook on Canadian Roadside
Design Practice, and also to develop techniques for the Economic Evaluation of
Roadside Improvements. This will deal with the problem of removing large fixed
objects from the roadside, together with shoulder and ditch treatments, to minimize
the severity of the accident to drivers who run off the road. This continues to be
a major problem in British Columbia with its more difficult terrain.
British Columbia participated actively in the above two exercises, our emphasis
being on new standards for guardrail and the roadside hazard. The Highway Safety
Engineer continued as Chairman of the Inter-Ministerial Working Group on Traffic
Safety, and as a member of the executive of the B.C. Road Safety Co-ordinating
Council.
In addition to safety engineering work carried out by other Divisions of the
Ministry, the Highway Safety Branch spent $154,321.77 on special safety works.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
49
R. G. White, Executive Director
Construction Division
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CONSTRUCTION
N. R. Zapf
The 1977/78 year was a very active one for highway construction, with a total
of 33 contracts being handled by the Construction Branch. The total anticipated
cost of these contracts is $142,999,191 and the expenditure on them in the fiscal
year was $65,129,244. Six of the projects were completed during the year, representing 62 kilometres of the 457 kilometres which were under construction. Of
the remaining contracts, 22 are scheduled to finished in 1977/78.
The very favourable weather conditions during 1977 lead to good progress
throughout the Province on most contracts.
The major activity has been in the northwest of the Province and north Vancouver Island, with lesser activity elsewhere. On Highway 37, five major projects
are under way to complete gaps between Kitwanga and Meziadin Lake, and between Dease Lake and Good Hope Lake. The total length being ungraded is
about 150 kilometres. At the north end of Vancouver Island, four major contracts
were under way to complete Highway 19 between Say ward and Port Hardy. About
half of the 68 kilometres being constructed was almost finished by March 31, requiring only asphalt pavement to complete. The construction has been through
an environmentally sensistive area, which includes major salmon rivers and the
"moratorium" area of the Tsitika watershed. This necessitated many precautions
to minimize the impact of construction work. The total 68 kilometres section
should be completed by the summer of 1979.
On the Trans-Canada Highway six major projects were active, and four were
essentially completed. These included four-laning sections east of Kamloops, west
of Hope, south of Nanaimo, and between Duncan and Chemainus River. The remaining projects include the much needed four-laning east of Victoria which should
be complete in the summer of 1978 and a major rock excavation near Cache Creek
which is required to add a passing lane in difficult terrain.
North of Prince George, a total of 42 kilometres of Highway 97 is being constructed in two contracts between Parsnip River and Pine Pass. Both contracts
are progressing well and one is expected to finish late in 1978 and the other in 1979.
Construction of a revision on the Alaska Highway to the new Kiskatinaw
River Bridge has progressed, though the earthmoving was slowed since operating
in the heavy clay becomes almost impossible in wet weather.   Once the new align-
 50
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
ment is in operation a marked improvement will be seen over the present road
which is in slide-prone country.
Construction Branch personnel supervised some major Day Labour projects
for the regions and districts. Included were Quesnel to Hixon on Highway 97;
Bear Lake Road to Summit Lake on Highway 97 north of Prince George; Cassiar
Junction to Good Hope Lake on Highway 37 near the Yukon Border; clearing and
grubbing adjacent to Kitwancool over about 16 kilometres; approaches to the proposed Halston Overhead in Kamloops; and four-laning from Haslam Creek to
Nanaimo River on Highway 1.
Some surveying projects for the Design and Surveys Branch were carried out
by Construction Branch personnel. The most significant were the Bear Cove
Access, Port Hardy; Campbell River to Buttle Lake, and the Courtenay Bypass.
Major Day-labour Projects
Project
Number
Highway Section
Comments
2808
Reconstruction to four lanes was completed and included installation of a heavily instrumented 11 metre by 8 metre multi-
plate underpass.
Construction of approach fills to both structures has been delayed
by property acquisition and utility relocations. A storm sewer
contract will be awarded soon. Fills should be finished by the
fall.
Passing lanes on Highway 97 north of Penticton were completed
in May 1977.
A clearing and grubbing operation has been carried out using
local equipment and labour. This is to tie in with the other
projects on the Kitwanga-Meziadin Lake Highway.
This section of Highway 37 north of Dease Lake has been upgraded partially over about 40 kilometres.
Shoulder widening and alignment improvement almost completed.
2845
3102
Approaches  to  Halston  Overpass
and Overhead, Kamloops.
Trout Creek to Winfield	
3478
2823
3076
Highway   97,    north    of    Prince
George.
Kilometre 14-48	
3264
3264
Kilometre 59-80	
Kilometre 105 112	
Shoulder widening and alignment improvement 70 per cent completed.
Clearing and grubbing on new line about 5 per cent complete.
Construction of new road including clearing and gravelling, prior
to paving.   Length is 8.4 kilometres.
Shoulder widening and some major realignments is 70 per cent
complete.
Shoulder widening with some major realignment almost completed.
3074
3271
3267
Foothills   Boulevard:   North   Nechako Road to Chief Lake Road.
Prince George.
Quesnel-Cottonwood Bridge, Highway 97 (13 km).
Cottonwood    Bridge-Plett    Road,
Highway 97 (32 km).
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
51
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 52
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
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 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
53
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 54
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
55
raking west, seven miles east of Kamloops.
loking east, seven miles east of Kamloops.
>oking west from road level, seven miles east of Kamloops.
>oking east from road level, seven miles east of Kamloops.
joking west, six miles east of Kamloops.
rom centre line looking west, six miles east of Kamloops.
Joking west, K-Mart Plaza area, Kamloops.
Joking east, K-Mart Plaza area, Kamloops.
oject 3188—Near Kelowna-Vernon Airport looking north.
oject 3188—Looking north, near Kelowna-Vernon Airport.
oject 3188—Looking south, near Kelowna-Vernon Airport.
oject 3188—Looking south toward Kelowna-Vernon Airport.
oject 3188—Looking north near Kelowna-Vernon Airport.
 56
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PAVING
D. F. Martin
SURFACING
The 1977 season was very active in the paving industry. During the year,
385 miles (620 kilometres) of roadway were paved which showed a marked
increase from previous years. In 1977 a total of 30 contracts was called for the
paving of 364 miles (586 kilometres). Eighty-eight miles (143 kilometres) of
the 1977 contracts were completed which leaves a good continuing program for an
early start in 1978. In addition to the above contract work, Paving Branch crews
completed 135 miles (217 kilometres) of paving. This work comprised of 96 miles
(154 kilometres) of roadmixing and 39 miles (69 kilometres) of paving with the
use of the Ministry's newly acquired drum mixer.
The average increase in the unit price of asphalt pavement from the previous
year was approximately 6 per cent. This is considered to be very reasonable in
view of the increasing costs of heating fuels to the contractors. Liquid asphalt
products continue to escalate in costs by 12 per cent.
British Columbia paving contractors continued the trend of acquiring high
production drum mixers; the conventional mixers, both batch and continuous flow,
being relegated to stationary set-ups. The present plant capacity available in the
Province would appear to be adequate to sustain a 400 to 450 miles a year program
which is necessary to maintain the Provincial road systems to an adequate standard.
Materials Used Under Contract, 1977/78
Description
Conventional
Unit
Quantity
Metric
Unit
Quantity
Common excavation...
Trench excavation	
Select granular base—	
Crushed granular base 	
Crushed granular surfacing	
Crushed shoulder aggregate—	
Crushed aggregate in stockpile	
Sealcoat aggregate in stockpile	
Asphalt concrete pavement	
Asphalt concrete mix f.o.b. plant..
Asphalt curb-
Portland cement curb and gutter..
Portland cement curb 	
Concrete pipe installed..
Corrugated metal pipe installed..
Asphalt cement 	
Cutback asphalt	
Emulsified asphalt	
cu. yds.
cu. yds.
tons
tons
tons
tons
tons
tons
tons
tons
lin. ft.
lin. ft.
lin. ft.
lin. ft.
lin. ft.
tons
gals,
gals.
203,525
28,880
311,855
1,920
833,504
326,211
634,649
42,856
1,421,868
25,258
164,537
27,192
14,732
32,976
10,242
74,750
1,375,380
21,652
ms
m3
tonnes
tonnes
tonnes
tonnes
tonnes
tonnes
tonnes
tonnes
metres
metres
metres
metres
metres
tonnes
litres
litres
155 600
22 080
282 990
1742
756 356
296 017
575 907
38 889
1 290 261
22 920
50 148
8 288
1478
10 051
3 122
67 831
6 251727
98 418
Materials Used by Paving Branch Crews
Crushed granular surfacing.
Sealcoat aggregate	
Cutback asphalt  _.
Emulsified asphalt 	
tons
217,815
tonnes
tons
35,849
tonnes
gals.
2,726,328
litres
gals.
1,793,719
litres
197 654
32 531
12 392 400
8 153 268
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
57
Paving Contracts
Project
No.
Highway Section
Totai
Length
Miles
Miles
Completed,
Present
Fiscal
Year
S-6575
S-0276
S-0476
S-0576
S-0676
S-0776
S-0876
S-1176
S-2176
S-2376
S-2476
S-2576
S-2676
S-2776
S-2876
S-4076
S-4176
S-4276
S-4376
S-4476
S-4576
S-6176
S-6276
S-6376
S-6576
S-6776
S-0177
S-0377
S-0577
S-0677
S-0777
S-2077
S-2177
S-2277
S-2377
S-2477
S-2577
S-2777
S-2877
S-2977
S-3077
S-3277
S-3377
S-3477
S-3577
S-3677
S-3777
S-4077
S-4177
S-4377
S-4577
S-6277
S-6377
S-6477
S-6577
S-6677
Fort St. John, curb and gutter	
West Saanich and Shawnigan Lake Roads	
Highway 99 and Ladner Interchange 	
Westview-Lonsdale, Lynn Valley Road	
Highway 99—Whistler Mountain area 	
Highway 7a—Port Moody, curb and gutter...	
Highway 1—Haslam Creek to Fielding Road	
No. 5 Road, Richmond	
Highway 5—Little Fort, south sections.	
Medium cover aggregate, stockpiled 	
Highway 3—Hope to Rhododendron _	
Highway 1—Chase to Sorrento  	
Highway 97a—Grindrod to Sicamous..
Highways 5 and 8—Merritt, curb and gutter..
Highway 20—Riske Creek...
Highways 3 and 93—Elko to Wardner _
Highway 3a—Kootenay Bay to Sanca Creek. 	
Highway 3—Elk Valley Road  	
Medium cover aggregate, stockpiled  	
Crushed aggregate in stockpile—Fernie, Cranbrook,
Salmo _   _
Highways 93, 95, and 95a—MarysviUe to Kimberley
and Skookumchuck to Ta Ta Creek 	
Highway 16—Sob Lake to Bednesti 	
Highway 97—Plett Road to Cale Creek 	
Highway 16—Terrace to Esker Sections _
Highway 16—Bednesti to Parkridge..
Highway 16—Prince Rupert, curb and gutter..
Chilliwack, curb and gutter ~ 	
Oak Street Bridge _.  	
Highway 14—West Coast Road	
Highways 19 and 4—Parksville Bypass.
Second Narrows bridge approaches, south _
Highway 1—Boston Bar to Jackass Mountain 	
Highway 3—Skaist Creek to Copper Creek 	
Highways 3a and 97—Yellow Lake to Kaleden	
Trans-Canada Highway 1—Savona, truck lanes	
Highway 97—Schweb's Bridge, truck lane	
Highway 97—Miscellaneous lanes, Oyama to Winfield
Osoyoos, truck lanes.— _	
Highway 1—Jackass Mountain to Drynock	
Williams Lake, miscellaneous  	
Williams Lake, curb and gutter  _ _	
Likely and Horsefly Roads..
Highway 24 and Horse Lake Road	
Highway 16—McBride East   „	
Highway 1—Cherry Creek to Merritt Junction..
Heffley to Louis Creek and Mount Tod Road	
100 Mile House, miscellaneous roads	
Cranbrook, curb and gutter..
Highway 3—Grand Forks to Bootham..
Radium and Edgewater Streets .—	
Ootischenia to Meadows Siding.
of
Nazko, Blackwater, and Norwood Roads	
Highway 97—Chief Lake Road to O'Dell Road	
Miscellaneous    roads—Prince    George,    north
Nechako     	
Miscellaneous roads—Prince George, east of Fraser
River  	
Miscellaneous  roads—Prince   George,   outside  city
boundary _ 	
Totals ... 	
5.15
29.40
5.65
1.58
20.18
0.97
5.80
1.35
9.80
15.50
8.30
20.10
1.20
12.70
17.20
26.74
23.30
17.80
15.40
30.60
10.10
26.00
1.20
1.53
1.20
18.60
14.79
0.55
17.10
16.73
11.86
2.80
4.85
5.60
0.63
13.60
36.03
1.40
19.20
34.10
14.50
6.84
11.29
11.05
1.87
10.00
11.80
16.04
25.00
21.50
7.60
11.70
14.10
672.98
1 076.77 km
2.60
20.90
5.65
1.58
20.18
0.60
5.80
1.35
9.80
15.50
8.30
20.10
1.20
12.70
17.20
26.74
23.30
17.80
15.40
30.60
10.10
26.00
0.40
1.20
1.40
0.55
10.00
3.0
2.80
4.85
5.60
0.63
13.60
15.0
1.03
25.00
3.50
385.06
616.10 km
Continuing.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Continuing.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Completed.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Completed.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Completed.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
Continuing.
 58
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Surface Treatments by Paving Branch Crews
Job No.
Description
Roadway
(Miles)
Shoulder
(Miles)
3124
31.4
Highway 3a—Keremeos to Yellow Lake	
11.1
20.0
3222
17.4
3665
0.6
11.1
7.6
21.1
9.9
42.7
27.9
18.1
25.0
19.8
18.8
42.6
4.7
6.0
21.4
2.2
31.0
3754
16.0
4322
4424
4527
4741
4855
5654
5752
Highway 16 and Copper bridge approaches ...	
Miscellaneous roads, Creston  	
6239
7231
7331
7334
7636
7732
Highway 3—Elko to Fernie and Hosmer to Alberta border
7833
8035
2.0
8136
Totals	
279.5
4 47.2 km
128.9
206.24 km
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
59
Job No.
5121
5226
5327
5624
5724
5724a
5724b
5724c
5724D
5823
5922
9039a
9132
9132a
9132b
9132c
9132d
9233
9233a
9233b
9233c
9233d
9233e
9233F
9337a
9337b
Roadmix Paving by Paving Branch Crews
Description Mileage
Pinaton Lake Road  4.6
Highway 12—Lillooet to Cache Creek  5.2
Green Lake north and south   11.2
Bercelo Road  2.0
Island Road  1.4
Fairview to Cawston  2.3
Fairview to White Lake  4.3
Seacrest Road   0.2
Camp McKinney Road  1.0
Westside Road     11.1
Udel Road	
Holding Road 	
Lower Wynndel Road
Pass Creek Road	
Casino Road 	
LofI Road to Thrums Frontage Road
0.9
6.5
2.0
6.0
2.2
2.0
Lower Gibson Road     1.7
Cemetery Road     0.7
McDaniel Road
Blueberry Subdivision
Christina Lake	
Whitehall, Atwood, Nursery Road
Cameron and Darcy Roads	
North Fork 	
Hardy Mountain and London Roads
Hillview Road	
Jewel Lake Road 	
Toby Creek Road _ 	
Westside Road	
Timber to Ridge Road	
1.3
3.0
2.3
1.9
0.7
1.8
2.1
1.6
2.8
3.5
5.2
1.8
Total
95.3
152.48 km
Drum Mix Paving by Paving Branch Crews
Job No. Description                                                                                                         Mileage
1164      Courtenay area roads  14.69
1242      Quesnel area roads  19.35
1912      Pender Harbour roads      5.20
Total
39.24
62.78 km
 60
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
REPORT OF LEGAL SURVEYS OFFICER
F. A. Clapp
During the year a total of 350 kilometres of highway right-of-way was surveyed
under the Legal Survey and Construction Project Votes. In addition, a number
of surveys for foreshore lots, subdivision plans for gravel pits, drainage easements,
and reposting plans were completed. Referencing of survey monuments prior to
construction was also undertaken on a number of Contracts and Day Labour
Projects.
Expenditures for the year were— $
Legal Survey Vote  463,447.12
Construction Project Vote   104,005.18
567,452.30
Legal surveys were undertaken on the following:
Project 2490—Highway 7a to Dewdney Trunk, t
Project 2524—Valleyview to Campbell Creek, f
Project 2582—Sayward to Keta Summit, f
Project 2583—Keta Summit to Eve River, f
Project 2686—Hunter Creek to Floods.t
Project 2692—Duncan to Chemainus River, f
Project 2749—Craig's Crossing to Parksville.*
Project 2774—Prince George to Tabor Lake.f
Project 2790—Westsyde Road.f
Project 2808—Haslam Creek to Nanaimo River.*
Project 2900—Hammond Bay to Norwell Drive, f
Project 2902—Champion Creek to Meadows Siding, t
Project 2905—Glenmerry to Montrose, t
Project 2978—Harriet Road to Thetis Lake Overpass.f
Project 3121—Blanshard Street Extension.!
Project 3206—Vernon to Aberdeen Road.f
Project S-0776—St. John Street, Port Moody, f
Project S-3077—MacKenzie Avenue to Williams Lake.f
* Continuing surveys.
f Continuing surveys now complete.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS) 61
Position of Executive Director, Operations Division Vacant as of March 31, 1978
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF MAINTENANCE SERVICES
P. B. MacCarthy
The cost of maintaining the highway system, including bridges, ferries, and
machinery in the fiscal year 1977/78 was $144,000,000, which is a 22 per cent
increase over that of the previous year.
The snow avalanche program continues throughout the Province. Avalanche
activity affecting highways across the Province in 1977 was below average due to
the unusually low precipitation.
Avalanche training programs were again held in conjunction with the National
Research Council Canada, Parks Canada, and B.C. Institute of Technology. Several
in-service courses were also held. Over 200 employees received avalanche training
during the year.
Information meetings continue to be held at various locations throughout the
Province to inform the public about avalanche problems on our highways and the
Ministry's program to control them.
Equipment was upgraded to increase safety and rescue procedures. Additional
avalanche rescue beacons, radios, and rescue equipment were purchased.
Below-normal precipitation in the first nine months of 1977 facilitated paving,
oiling, and other dust-control programs for local roads involving district crews and
equipment throughout the Province.
With the allocation of substantial capital funds, an expanded major day-labour
program was undertaken in many districts. Additional funding to the performance
budget also allowed for an increased minor betterment allotment and program in
all districts.
The Ministry's gravel-crushing program was again greatly supplemented with
the calling of over 30 contracts in 1977 for the supply of an additional 2,000,000
tons of crushed-granular material. This was necessary to facilitate major day labour
and district minor betterment programs for road upgrading and paving throughout
the year.
MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
The 1977/78 fiscal year has seen the further refinement of the Maintenance
Management Program, which became fully operational in April 1976. Improved
management decisions have become apparent at all levels due to increased awareness
of work accomplishments, costs, and levels of productivity.
 62
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Performance budgets were prepared for each District beginning in January
1977, with districts and regions making representation for revisions to an initial
budget prepared on the basis of 1976/77 performance, maintenance standards, and
available resources. The 1977/78 budget allowed for a more refined method of
planning necessary resources for each work activity, as equipment needs were shown
by class of equipment and hours required. This information has helped considerably
in determining suitable fleet sizes for certain key pieces of equipment. Manpower
requirements could similarly be demonstrated both year-round and seasonally to
ensure staffing levels adequate to meet the labour hours of maintenance work in the
budget.
With the ability to plan more closely the required maintenance in 1977/78,
an expanded minor betterment program was made possible. These funds, comprising 7.5 per cent of the maintenance budget were allocated for districts to undertake small projects and improvements which would not be undertaken by capital
or day-labour programs.
Maintenance standards were approved for six activities, including the gravelling
of roads and winter ploughing, sanding, salting, and patrol. It is expected that the
winter standards will provide the Province with specific uniform guidelines to achieve
a high level of safety and utility in winter maintenance, while realizing economics
through efficiency and proper planning. The dust-control standard which was
approved in 1976 was given a good test this summer when extensive dry periods
were encountered. In spite of these severe conditions, the dust-control program
which was established for "average" conditions was only exceeded by 13 per cent
for the Province.
Better management and control has been demonstrated in 1977/78 in a
number of areas. The heavy day-labour program was carried out with no great
detriment to the maintenance, a departure from previous years when maintenance
was sometimes dropped and resources redirected to the capital program.
In general, there have been fewer financial fluctuations. Over and under
expenditures in excess of 10 per cent for most periods of the year have occurred
in only about 10 per cent of the districts.
Foremen and working supervisors are for the most part expressing satisfaction
that the Ministry is informing them objectively what its goals and expectations are.
As well, the instituting of monthly management meetings in the districts has allowed
foremen to take a more active part in decision-making and the co-ordination of their
activities with those of others.
Shortfalls which occurred in the Bridge Maintenance program in 1976/77
were well documented by that year's performance and cost reports. A more concerted effort was made to achieve the desired maintenance level in 1977/78.
A quality-control program has been proposed for 1978/79. This program will
attempt to further develop maintenance quality standards with due regard to utility
and cost, and to monitor and control quality levels, thereby relating the quantities
and costs of maintenance achieved to the resulting quality established.
ROADSIDE DEVELOPMENT
The roadside development program was active in all areas during 1977, with
vegetation control and hydroseeding on new road construction increased slightly
over last year. Fewer new rest areas were established than in previous years, but
emphasis is being placed on upgrading of existing facilities. Roadside beautification
was very prevalent in 1977 with extensive work done in several areas of the Province.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
63
The 1977 hydroseeding program totalled 5,644 acres (2 284 hectares), of
which 3,822 acres were seeded, 270 acres mulched, and 1.552 acres fertilized.
About one half of the total hydroseeding was for new construction while the remainder was for regular maintenance of highway rights-of-way. Region 1 received a
new hydroseeding unit in 1977 but, because certain safety modifications had to be
made on the machine, it was not in full service until later in the season.
The vegetation control program was in full swing in 1977 with all regions
actively engaged in shoulder sterilization and noxious weed control on right-of-way.
Herbicides were used to sterilize 1,956 miles (3 148 kilometres) of road
shoulder and treat some 2,748 acres (1112 hectares) of land infested with noxious
weeds, chiefly Knapweed and Canada Thistle. All brush control along roadsides
was accomplished by mechanical means.
Plans were initiated by the Ministry of Highways and Public Works and the
Ministry of Agriculture to have more weed control work taken on by the regional
districts in 1978. This arrangement should result in more efficiently distributed
operations and more timely applications of herbicides in relation to weed growth
cycles.
Two new rest areas were started at the Needles and Fauquier ferry docks in
the New Denver District. These two sites, together with the docks at Galena Bay
and Shelter Bay, will receive first-class toilet buildings to augment the facilities of
the ferries and accommodate the increased traffiic expected upon commencement
of the Revelstoke Dam construction.
A total of seven heavily used rest areas received major improvements such as
installation of water systems, septic tanks, and electrical lines to convert pit toilets
to flush toilets.
Major roadside beautification work was carried out in the Lower Mainland
area. The Trans-Canada Highway between Vancouver and Abbotsford received
additional plantations of Dogwood trees, while existing plantations of tree groupings
were further encouraged and beautified through placement of bark mulch, supplemental trees, and the planting of some 200,000 daffodil bulbs. This program will
be extended to Hope next year.
A total of four landscape maintenance contracts valued at $290,000 was let in
1977, three for maintaining the Upper Levels section of the Trans-Canada Highway
betwen Horseshoe Bay and Taylor Way, and one for the Marine Drive Interchange
at Knight Street Bridge.   All areas were kept in top shape during the year.
Preparatory work for landscaping was started on the Prince George Bypass.
Curbing and drainage was installed, topsoil screened, and plant material ordered for
next year.
Extensive topsoiling involving 6,300 cubic yards (4 816 cubic metres) was
carried out on the Golden arterial highway where considerable landscape improvements are intended for 1978.
Drawings were completed for approximately 15 projects, either now under
way or planned for 1978. These included proposals for a major rest area to serve
eastbound traffic on the freeway betwen Vancouver and Hope and final plans for
the landscaping of the Prince George Bypass.
Numerous research projects were carried out in 1977, including the testing
of new erosion control products and analysis of past years' seed test plots.
CENTRELINE AND PAVEMENT MARKINGS
During the 1977 road marking season, six centreline painting crews, two crosswalk crews, and one reflective marking crew were on the job.   The weather did
 64 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
not present any great problems in 1977. There was a great deal more prelining
carried out in the year because of extensive repaying and chip sealing.
A thermoplastic line-marking machine was used this season in the Lower
Mainland. The majority of crosswalks, stop-lines, and arrows were changed over
to thermoplastic this season.
Statistics for the work completed are as follows:
Centrelines, edge, and lane lines painted, 8,518 miles (13 628 kilometres);
pre-lining, 1,320 miles (2 112 kilometres); crosswalks painted, 73; stop lines
painted, 415; arrows painted, 614; parking stalls and digits painted, 152; traffic
islands painted, 560; curbs, no-post, and guardrail painted, 50,151 feet (15 296
metres); plastix and scotchlane applied, 1,114 feet (340 metres).
Thermoplastic markings: Crosswalks, 282; stop lines 306; arrows 737;
median, lane, and edge lines 102.2 miles (163 kilometres).
Catseyes and reflective road markings: Catseye castings, 2,275; catseye rubber inserts, 6,838; guardrail delineators, 1,278; reflective road markers, 27,130.
Materials used: yellow paint, 107,000 gallons (486 422 litres); white paint,
36,500 gallons (165 929 litres); glass bead, 870,000 pounds (394 110 kilograms);
white thermoplastic, 194,650 pounds (88 176 kilograms); yellow thermoplastic,
9,100 pounds (4 122 kilograms).
METRIC CONVERSION
In the fall of 1977 the Ministry accomplished the changeover of Provincial
highway signs to metric values with a minimum of difficulty and inconvenience to
the public. Some 40,000 additional metric signs and overlays were shipped out
from the Langford Sign Shop to the 38 highway districts during the year and the
change took place within two weeks from September 1.
There are about 38,000 signs on the British Columbia highways, including
many thousands of speed limit signs which had to be changed. This was achieved
in most cases with overlays and the addition of the "km/h" tab on the same sign
posts. Many other signs were involved, including height clearances, distances to
cities and towns, special advisory speed limits, summit elevations, maximum gross-
vehicle weight signs, and short-distance advance warning signs such as "Campground—400 metres."
Prior to the actual sign changes the public was advised about the speed limit
equivalents and given other information by means of an extensive public awareness campaign. The Ministry printed 1,500,000 brochures, 900,000 of which were
mailed out to all households in the Province and the rest distributed among clubs
and organizations, tourist information outlets, border crossing points, the Canadian
Automobile Association and the American Automobile Association. Posters and
counter cards were sent out and a widespread radio, television and newspaper advertising campaign carried out during the last two weeks in August and the first
two in September.
The Ministry also mounted billboards at all U.S. border crossings to advise
American visitors of the metric signing on the highway system. During the last
two weeks of September brochures were also handed out to motorists as they
crossed the border. A similar system may be adopted this spring as the tourist
inflow increases.
All the Ministry employees involved in the changeover, including the sign
shop, the maintenance management personnel, and the district crews did a commendable job in carrying out the huge conversion program smoothly and efficiently.
By and large the public has accepted it and is becoming used to metric values, both
in the speed limits and distances.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
Maintenance Management
65
Table 1—Road Feature Inventory
SUMMER CLASSIFICATIONS—DISTRICT TOTALS (OF ALL CLASSES)
Provincial
Totals
Region 1
Region 2
Region 3
Region 4
Region 5
Region 6
Surface type (lane kilometres)—
23 820.8
10 721.0
22.8
456.0
36 656.5
7 429.1
1067.2
3 938.4
665.9
21.3
1 031.9
64.1
121.4
4 972.3
3 862.1
3 698.0
2 895.8
1.4
309.0
4 145.5
779.2
199.2
5 263.6
582.5
1 970.5
169.4
3 978.0
2 545 3
.1
Treated... - 	
30.1
9 169.8
1411.7
9.6
3.6
14 652.8
4 726.8
535.5
113.3
4 817.5
421.1
199.8
2 839 0
Dirt	
26 2
Other   _
1.7
Total 	
80 173.4
5 843.0
19 455.6
12 028.1
25 764.8
7 578.3
Profile (lane kilometres) —
476.2
1000.9
74 682.9
2 994.6
1018.8
358.6
297.2
4 965.2
99.9
122.1
41.9
118.8
18 220.6
1063.9
10.4
.1
13.0
11001.9
822.8
190.3
102.5
24 729.4
456.5
476.4
75.6
4-lane undivided	
32.0
6 960.3
380.3
205.7
437.4
8 805.5
171.2
Other _	
13 9
Total	
80 173.4
5 843.0
19 455.6
12 028.1
25 764.8
7 578.3
9 503 6
Shoulders (kilometres)—
2 478.9
236.8
11 993.5
3 218.9
3 356.4
11062.6
38 940.1
53,126.0
74,819.0
15,824.0
1,096.0
77,821.0
91 210.0
559 527.0
145.0
172.0
1,665.0
1 074.6
46,258.0
44 691.8
1 791.0
829.0
1,007.0
172.0
8,389.0
917 065.0
1,523.0
375.3
2.9
798.5
852.7
441.4
1 355.2
2 145.8
6,531.0
5,378.0
1,150.0
560.0
17,202.0
13 610.0
231 804.0
9.0
6.0
194.0
210.4
9,952.0
5 891.6
586.0
78.0
4.0
61.0
3,461.0
326 688.0
534.0
316.2
27.1
4 443.6
514 3
1 113.3
2 361.3
6 066.0
7,397.0
13,045.0
3,873.0
95.0
15,887.0
38 084.0
51 603.0
60.0
56.0
460.0
277.4
5,554.0
9 285.6
207.0
209.0
626.0
101.0
494.0
105 875.0
208.0
254.8
17.7
2 691.1
854.3
382.3
1 942.2
4 472.6
3,781.0
12,313.0
1,821.0
99.0
11,121.0
11 985.0
183 390.0
41.0
37.0
350.0
206.7
4,609.0
5 824.8
67.0
180.0
209.0
6.0
1,003.0
88 203.0
38.0
613.8
149.6
1 672.3
446.3
955.2
2 346.3
17 105.5
19,101.0
20,972.0
4,666.0
144.0
13,643.0
8 451.0
22 540.0
14.0
36.0
377.0
209.8
17,996.0
12 049.2
734.0
164.tJ
130.0
657.5
39.5
562.5
74.5
437.0
911.1
4 448.4
2,017.0
8,009.0
1,504.0
34.0
5,484.0
6 996.0
12 838.0
7.0
17.0
184.0
60.0
3,930.0
4 257.3
121.0
44.0
34.0
261.3
1 825.5
476.8
27.2
2 146.5
4 701 8
Culverts (each)—
14,299.0
15,102.0
2,810.0
164.0
Roadway...	
Signs (each)—
Posts     	
14,484.0
12 084.0
Guardrail (metres)—
57 352.0
Rest areas (each)—
14 0
20 0
Litter barrels (each)	
100.0
110 3
Delineators (each)	
Mowing—
4,217.0
Railroad crossing (each)	
154.0
4.0
Tunnels and snow sheds (kilometres)..
40
1,565.0
191 074.0
486.0
702.0
52 324.0
56.0
1,164.0
152 901.0
201.0
WINTER CLASSIFICATIONS—DISTRICT TOTALS (OF ALL CLASSES)
Class A (lane kilometres)..
Class B (lane kilometres)...
Class C (lane kilometres)..
Class D (lane kilometres)..
Class E (lane kilometres) ...
Class F (lane kilometres) ..
Total of classes	
7 279.0
15 685.8
26 220.5
22 853.0
2 693.7
5 441.4
80 173.4
3 056.1
447.9
1010.5
1 056.5
104.2
167.8
5 843.0
1 357.8
3 039.0
6 898.7
6 564.7
1003.2
592.2
19 455.6
562.5
3 970.4
2 644.2
3 665.6
205.8
979.6
12 028.1
647.8
4 798.2
9 843 7
6 588.2
874.0
3 012.9
25 764.8
35.0
2 290.9
2 984.4
1501.7
230.8
535.5
7 578.3
1 619.8
1 139.4
2 839.0
3 476.3
275.7
153.4
9 503.6
 66 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Table 2—Work Activities Performed by Ministry Maintenance Crews
Activitv
No.
Description
Man-hours
Accomplishment
Average
Unit Cost
Total Cost
100
101
102
103
104
110
Ul
112
113
120
121
122
123
130
131
139
200
201
202
203
204
209
220
221
222
223
230
231
232
233
234
235
239
250
251
253
254
255
256
259
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
319
400
404
405
406
430
431
432
435
436
437
439
450
451
452
459
460
461
465
Hand patching	
Machine patch	
Surface treatment.
Crack sealing.
Pavement burning..
Grade reshape	
Grading.
Dust control	
Regravel roads	
Regravel shoulders .
Grade shoulders	
Sundry shoulder maintenance..
Asphalt curb maintenance	
Road base repair	
Railway crossing maintenance.
Other surface _ _	
Ditch clean 	
Grader ditch 	
Culvert maintenance —
Catch basin maintenance.
Culvert replace  _	
Other drainage-	
Machine area mowing	
Hand brushing...
Machine brushing.—	
Machine swath mowing	
Gardening  _	
Shoulder sterilization	
Right-of-way seeding	
Refertilizing   	
Hydroseeder mulching	
Weed and brush control  	
Other vegetation and landscaping .
Roadside litter pick-up  _	
Barrels and areas 	
Rock and debris patrol-
Road surface clean	
Rock scaling-
Hand surface clean.
Other garbage	
Truck plough	
Sand _	
Chemical — —	
Patrol (winter)	
Grader plough	
Ice blading .
Miscellaneous snow cleaning..
Drainage thawing	
Stockpile salt _ _.
Snowfences _	
Ploughboards..
Grader winging—
Other winter—	
Sign maintenance..
Signposts (yard)—
Sign fabrication	
Metric signs.
I
Pavement markings _	
Reflective road stud marking	
Traffic line painting— _	
Pavement marking eradication..
Prelining 	
Thermoplastic line application .
Other sign and marking—	
Signal maintenance	
Signal repair _	
Electrical patrol	
Other traffic controls.  	
Lighting maintenance	
Lighting repairs _	
Other lighting   _.
188
64
9
1.
2.
21
112
14
77.
68
17.
7.
1,
44,
5,
6,
121,
4,
44
5
23
15
10
203
12.
17.
39.
1
6
2
2
5
15
40,
50,
24
18.
4
16
6
122
188.
20,
170.
66.
13.
47,
28,
17.
2,
2.
29.
39
123
13
6
16,
9
3,
27,
9,
2,
21.
5.
9.
2.
2.
5,
12.
2.
,737.9
,360.8
,118.1
,710.9
,095.1
,548.4
,371.9
,472.6
,483.0
,900.9
,651.6
,176.3
,275.2
,357.8
530.9
831.9
,256.5
,263.5
,142.5
,804.1
,256.4
762.3
,601.0
,420.8
,511.4
,903.2
,242.6
,849.2
,981.9
,212.9
,124.2
,464.2
,482.7
382.8
,193.5
,151.0
,363.4
,945.4
,896.0
,260.6
,273.6
,507.5
.904.7
,146.8
,261.5
,487.4
551.7
,916.2
,660.1
,140.3
,580.9
,618.5
,327.5
,369.7
,662.0
,868.3
.605.5
,835.2
,754.8
,207.2
843.6
.106.3
577.0
.432.6
,553.5
,283.8
,472.0
,135.8
,507.2
,343.1
,560.7
29,548
84,162
332.
94
44
11,668
303,366
21,822
535,397
388,936
32,335
26,897.
32,609
227,043
5,550
6,795
3,661,685
1,161
36,239
9,442
2,226
15,456
9,369
203,349
4,721
32,924
39,760
1,837
3,779
1,679
274.
5,527
16,051
40,393
87,901
24,221
31,022
4,934.
16,849.
6,227.
1,818,865.
522,489
33,617.
2,366,274.
350,717
60,752.
47,896.
29,128.
76,182.
42,785.
4,591
122,526.
39,266
199,661.
41,383
7,034.
23,425
636,756.
47,607
9,437
14,598
1,609
242
21,453
1,403
1,978
24,705
2,135
2,964
4,591
2,570
.9 cubic yards
.0 cubic yards
7 miles
.1 lane miles
.7 lane miles
.4 miles
.0 pass miles
.4 sites
.7 cubic yards
.3 cubic yards
.8 pass miles
,0 cubic yards
.0 feet
5 cubic yards
9 man-hours
9 man-hours
.4 feet
8 miles
1 culverts
,0 catch basins
.2 culverts
.6 man-hours
.7 acres
.2 man-hours
.0 acres
4 pass miles
.1 man-hours
.6 shoulder miles
.2 acres
.5 acres
,4 acres
.0 acres
.2 man-hours
.7 man-hours
.7 barrels
.4 man-hours
.9 pass miles
.4 man-hours
.9 man-hours
.6 man-hours
.1 plough miles
.8 cubic yards
3 cubic yards
5 miles
.6 plough miles
,7 plough miles
6 man-hours
2 man-hours
8 tons
0 feet
.3 ploughboards
.6 plough miles
.5 man-hours
.6 posts
.4 posts
,1 man-hours
.6 posts
.5 square feet
.0 road studs
,2 pass miles
.5 square yards
.0 pass miles
.7 pass miles
.8 man-hours
.6 intersections
.0 intersections
.0 miles
.8 man-hours
.0 poles
.0 poles
.7 man-hours
$
102.28
36.94
1,228.61
313.33
754.83
71.79
12.96
60.55
4.14
5.03
15.73
5.74
0.67
5.17
26.23
20.47
0.87
123.86
18.05
8.82
360.57
18.78
22.17
10.58
127.70
11.11
10.81
54.36
121.26
39.63
606.30
25.01
14.13
12.55
8.66
15.76
13.91
19.31
11.27
14.81
1.45
13.34
59.04
1.37
6.83
7.04
23.77
17.67
54.32
0.71
18.67
8.13
15.61
10.73
3.27
12.76
17.81
0.22
3.34
118.95
0.65
67.12
466.28
13.19
68.56
89.30
1.80
20.65
41.88
66.62
20.93
3,022,390
3,109,648
408,761
29,485
33,741
837,704
3,932,844
1,321,423
2,216,993
1,958,517
508,735
154,466
21,896
1,174,364
145,638
139,124
3,213,783
143,903
654,233
83,320
802,721
290,384
207,765
2,151,716
602,872
366,053
430,150
99,900
458,283
66,559
166,369
138,243
226,842
506,982
761,746
381,747
431,648
95,321
190,044
92,293
2,654,532
6,971,528
1,985,072
3,241,402
2,398,474
427,982
1,138,722
514,883
4,138,918
30,381
85,750
996,578
613,050
2,143,657
135,724
89,804
417,230
143,931
159,405
1,122,609
9,517
108,002
113,167
283,179
96,232
176,648
44,697
44,122
124,157
305,880
53,824
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS) 67
Table 2—Work Activities Performed by Ministry Maintenance Crews—Continued
Activity
No.
466
467
469
470
471
475
476
479
500
501
502
503
504
505
506
507
508
509
510
513
514
515
516
517
518
520
521
522
523
524
529
560
561
562
563
564
565
566
567
568
569
570
571
572
579
580
581
582
583
588
600
601
602
603
604
606
609
610
611
612
613
614
615
617
618
619
651
653
654
Description
Motor generator maintenance...
Motor generator repair	
Other motor generator— —
Electrical service maintenance .
Electrical service repair—	
Control device repair 	
Control device manufacturing..
Other control device shop	
Bridge clean 	
Bridge rail paint  	
Bridge structure paint —
Sand blast—  	
Stream channel maintenance.
Deck surface repair-
Bridge repair and maintenance-
Bridge and dock inspection	
Bailey bridge maintenance  —
Miscellaneous hand painting	
Tunnel maintenance —	
Deck linseed oiling  _	
Plumbing-
Building maintenance	
Miscellaneous carpentry-
Concrete overlay	
Scarifying.
Concrete guardrail maintenance  and
repair
Fence repair  _.
Cattleguard repair...— _	
Steel   and   timber   guardrail   maintenance
Special fencing maintenance —	
Other structure maintenance	
Screen and stockpile -
Pit preparation and clean-up
Crush (primary)	
Crush (gravel)   _
Crush (fine gravel) 	
Asphalt mix  _	
Quarrying.
Grader premix	
Gravel stockpiling-
Other materials	
Ferry operation.
Ferry boat maintenance..
Ferry dock maintenance .
Other ferry work	
Equipment service	
Equipment repair	
Mechanical travel	
Fueling 	
Equipment rental. 	
General supervision	
Training and safety.	
Vacation and leave	
Sick time.— —
Workers' Compensation Board.
Stand-by-
Hauling (equipment) .
Light duties.
Travelling (four hours minimum)..
Traffic Patrol 	
Yard maintenance  	
Stock control  	
Camp operation-
Compensatory time off..
Tending.
Other overhead 	
Complaints and requests	
Draughting and calculating.
Maintenance management—
Man-hours
2,579.6
658.0
1,673.7
186.0
413.0
413.0
2,096.5
386.5
630.5
104.0
5,316.0
836.5
149.0
49.0
1,239.7
1,239.7
19,944.8
1,740.5
16,592.5
135,413.3
8,149.5
1,995.0
10,642.0
539.6
6,291.3
6,306.9
14,409.7
11,857.3
119,675.0
120,071.6
5,504.1
2,679.0
1,997.0
17,584.0
4,271.5
535.8
3,209.0
3,207.0
2,801.7
76,608.2
3,784.0
3,784.0
38,526.4
38,502.9
37,320.9
37,554.6
609.0
	
573.0
15,019.2
396,577.0
6,761.3
2,568.7
4,878.2
1,714.3
14,641.0
41,556.1
30,856.8
32,091.5
10,036.8
20,593.2
951.3
1,643.5
6,953.2
9,587.0
669.5
4,289.4
43,560.6
11,123.1
144,445.2
50,662.5
28,765.1
15,023.7
635,658.3
123,597.6
873,718.6
171,495.6
24,477.8
47,019.7
84,040.1
5,404.0
22,643.0
116,084.9
141,357.7
111,006.1
29,750.8
41,832.4
63,679.7
27,748.0
19,376.7
91,188.7
88,943.1
Accomplishment
units
units
man-hours
units
units
devices
devices
man-hours
bridges
linear feet
gallons
tons
man-hours
square yards
man-hours
bridges
pieces
gallons
man-hours
square yards
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
square feet
square feet
linear feet
112,165.0 linear feet
302.0 cattleguards
85,957.0 linear feet
1,714.3
14,656.0
576,651.2
33,371.7
2,011,695.7
426,631.3
88,255.0
37,546.0
7,287.5
140,868.2
9,571.0
668.5
4,280.9
44,058.6
11,125.6
144,396.2
50,751.3
28,816.1
15,073.2
5,164.0
636,316.1
123,556.9
874,673.5
171,983.3
24,477.8
47,124.2
86,398.1
5,404.0
22,666.9
116,225.6
141,832.7
110,810.5
44,994.3
41,789.9
64,675.7
27,733.2
19,359.7
91,155.3
88,786.1
man-hours
man-hours
cubic yards
man-hours
tons
tons
tons
cubic yards
cubic yards
cubic yards
cubic yards
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
pieces
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
man-hours
Average
Unit Cost
$
69.23
156.78
14.77
89.15
100.86
82.37
31.95
14.14
150.75
1.37
74.49
312.60
19.46
17.90
19.12
28.03
1.78
86.68
14.48
0.49
15.30
14.21
12.41
0.63
0.90
175.39
0.82
13.58
22.48
5.01
39.01
1.59
1.16
17.28
2.54
13.62
2.69
26.68
11.84
12.24
39.89
16.25
11.07
11.37
11.59
13.80
355.46
11.59
10.67
8.79
8.73
8.84
9.07
23.15
8.54
13.63
10.82
11.39
18.70
12.42
8.78
11.91
25.43
10.46
9.22
10.38
Total Cost
$
45,559
29,162
6,104
34,460
10,490
68,905
1,566
17,537
262,395
185,629
148,62)
168,684
122,794
212,361
2,296,152
75,105
31,358
46,447
46,457
37,806
57,903
547,443
466,149
6,970
11,099
250,329
101,957
52,969
71,204
23,289
329,530
2,892,843
1,301,861
1,304
3,201,366
495,877
1,525,595
95,716
99,307
379,384
255,360
7,921
52,405
1,757,797
180,818
1,599,055
577,234
334,055
208,091
1,835,639
7,378,421
1,318,812
7,695,767
1,503,053
216,533
427,705
2,000,180
46,195
308,968
1,257,809
1,616,549
2,072,699
559,102
367,210
770,419
705,519
202,599
841,005
922,344
 68 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Table 2—Work Activities Performed by Ministry Maintenance Crews—Continued
Activity
No.
Description
Man-hours
Accomplishment
Average
Unit Cost
Total Cost
656
658
660
661
666
668
670
671
672
673
674
679
700
701
702
703
704
705
706
707
708
709
710
712
713
714
715
716
717
718
719
720
721
722
723
724
725
726
727
728
729
730
731
732
733
734
735
736
737
738
799
810
900
901
902
903
904
909
996
998
999
Permits   —
Subdivisions, land use contracts, and
rezoning
Surveying, projects  	
Avalanche management -	
District administration 	
Surveying, other  —
Secretarial  _
General accounting    —
Payroll and personnel.— — -
Accounts payable 	
Secretarial, regular	
Other —   _	
Clearing and grubbing  _	
Rock blasting  	
Road bed construction 	
Road widening — _	
Shoulder widening  _ 	
Drainage ditch construction  —
Culvert installation 	
Multiplate installation 	
Machine paving.  	
Road or pulvimix   	
Guardrail installation 	
Right-of-way landscaping  	
Right-of-way fencing  _	
Roadside rest area development	
Retaining wall construction 	
Riprap    	
Curb and gutter construction	
Manhole and catch basin construction
Cattleguard installation 	
Chain link fence installation  _
Yard betterments— _	
Building construction  	
Dock construction-   	
Bridge construction  	
Fabrication of rest area appliances	
Electrical construction 	
Gravelling   _	
Asphalt curb construction. —	
Traffic islands  —	
Shoulder paving 	
Shoulder stabilization.— _	
Shoulder surface treatment 	
Rock drilling  _	
Slope and ditching surfacing.—	
Gravel surface treatment  	
Fabrication of 18-inch no-post guardrail
Fabrication of 27-inch no-post guardrail
Road stabilization  	
Other  	
Benkleman beam control section testing
Flood control and damage repairs	
Slide repair and removal  	
Snow slides   	
Winter damage repair.— — 	
Island area maintenance  _. _
Other extraordinary 	
Materials write-off 	
Stock transfer _ 	
District overhead  ~
23,745.2
48,085.9
182,153.5
5,135.3
312,614.8
77,794.1
106,176.0
38,182.3
83,897.2
76,538.5
22,027.4
22,314.7
152,703.2
16,109.9
153,834.6
147,031.3
43,865.5
30,118.0
43,516.3
18,328.2
37,782.1
24,603.6
31,148.9
11,304.9
43,654.8
14,709.0
4,148,7
8,725.9
5,418.0
2,120.5
1,708.5
2,168.7
21,817.4
30,325.9
3,852.5
94,134.3
5,043.0
28,824.0
192,241.1
2,597.6
3,143.1
7,465.2
520.1
112.8
24,828.1
423.0
1,468.0
9,249.9
28,042.3
732.4
74,281.6
2,728.1
57,535.7
32,568.3
5,818.1
97,373.9
9,722.2
9,281.4
7,456.4
9,146.8 permits
6,696.5 number
182
5.
313.
77
106
237
104
477.
23.
22
6
753
6
2:
889.
129
4.
293
234,
890.
14.
11.
180
5,
21.
30.
3.
94,
28.
5,674,
775.
4.
520.
38.
,063.7 man-hours
,132.8 man-hours
,090.1 man-hours
,753.7 man-hours
,164.5 man-hours
,016.2 $1,000 spent
,466.1 100's cards
,926.3 number
.336.5 number
,290.7 man-hours
,922.3 acres
,728.5 cubic yards
,456.1 miles
,847.9 miles
834.4 miles
,192.3 linear feet
,165.7 linear feet
,004.0 linear feet
,627.0 tons
231.6 miles
,094.5 linear feet
307.4 acres
,711.4 linear feet
,785.4 man-hours
,633.0 square feet
,783.0 cubic yards
,583.5 linear feet
114.0 manholes
192.0 cattleguards
531.0 linear feet
.924.9 man-hours
.350.0 man-hours
,793.5 man-hours
195.0 man-hours
13.0 appliances
,697.5 man-hours
.633.7 cubic yards
506.9 linear feet
,277.5 square yards
480.9 tons
27.8 shoulder miles
16.7 shoulder miles
,269.1 linear feet
,691.0 square yards
,416.8 square yards
,382.0 linear feet
94,487.0 linear feet
734,983.9 square yards
73,561.7 man-hours
700.0 number
58,970
33,885.
5,834.
100,347.
9,665.
9,381.
12.
1,267.
86,113.
,1 man-hours
2 man-hours
6 man-hours
9 man-hours
6 man-hours
9 man-hours
0 number
1 number
2 number
26.07
71.81
11.45
16.64
10.68
10.38
8.99
1.43
6.99
1.40
8.21
12.04
644.73
1.12
2,838.61
3,025.37
3,702.25
1.60
15.02
283.84
26.49
6,247.10
7.34
1,099.77
1.03
19.37
8.61
3.46
18.81
386.69
462.77
11.47
21.10
19.88
207.63
30.56
4,538.46
24.04
3.33
2.41
10.98
45.21
726.22
261.49
1.79
3.73
0.29
5.23
9.44
0.09
33.19
34.93
27.62
29.38
31.53
26.16
14.11
19.26
6,060.41
962.39
105.75
$
238,475
480,894
2,086,315
85,425
3,346,345
807,584
955,461
340,939
730,743
672,107
191,673
268,534
4,463,033
850,661
18,326,411
8,615,961
3,089,158
1,428,077
1,940,578
1,136,512
7,780,222
1,446,829
1,719,478
338,071
922,434
286,428
100,236
626,349
161,532
44,083
88,853
63,445
462,678
603,463
787,656
2,878,722
59,000
689,989
18,934,066
44,636
90,959
473,932
20,189
4,367
1,393,602
17,534
151,457
200,871
892,825
72,575
2,441,852
24,453
1,628,875
995,620
183,973
2,625,536
136,457
180,773
72,725
1,219,446
9,106,909
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS) 69
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF EQUIPMENT SERVICES
The Equipment Services Branch reorganized during the year into six regions
and in so doing J. E. Robinson became Regional Mechanical Superintendent at
Terrace and S. Cutt became Regional Mechanical Superintendent at Nanaimo.
J. L. Thornton, P.Eng., joined the Headquarters' staff as Fleet Co-ordinator.
The Branch purchased and placed into active service during the year 528
trucks, 44 graders, 58 loaders, 7 industrial tractors, 96 snow ploughs, 43 sanders,
and many other smaller pieces of equipment or attachments.
Eight public auctions were held at the Cloverdale establishment where approximately 380 pieces of equipment were sold to the highest bidders. These auctions
are becoming well known in the Lower Mainland, attracting a regular clientele
who pay good prices for the obsolete and replaced equipment. In addition, numerous pieces of equipment were disposed of by the Purchasing Commission and
several were transferred to other Ministries.
The continued expansion of the radial tire program was continued into Regions
2, 3, 4, and 5. The advantages of this program are that casings can be safely recapped several times and tire maintenance is substantially reduced.
The computerized Equipment Management System suffered a severe setback
when the British Columbia Systems Corporation took over all computer facilities
and the Branch's only Systems Analyst. A re-evaluation of the entire system was
required plus a new statement of justification. Subsequently, the Corporation
agreed to a time schedule of implementation which was not met. Implementation
of certain aspects of the Equipment Management System will be delayed one year
as the computer programming will not be ready to accept the Garage Management
data.
The Langford Fabrication Shop operated at a high rate of production in
cramped facilities to produce 6 custom designed sanders, 117 underbody snow-
plough blades, hydraulic systems for 117 trucks, 117 front-mounted plough frames,
and outfitted 16 tandems and large single-axle trucks.
A program of changing to the use of heat-treated grader and plough blades
was implemented throughout the Province with a gradual total conversion within
two years. This program will allow a greater length of time between blade changes
and hence less man-hours to change blades.
The Langford Sign Shop ran at full production capability for the year, with
increased auxiliary staff to almost double its normal yearly output of 90,000 signs.
The extra high production was necessary to facilitate the successful change over
of all highway signs to metric measurement. The value of signs produced this
year in the sign shop was $458,000.
Superintendent of Ferries
During the past year service was provided on 36 routes under the jurisdiction
of the Ministry. This was accomplished by a fleet consisting of 23 major ferries,
7 reaction ferries, 4 cable ferries, 5 subsidized ferries, and 5 miscellaneous ferries.
There are also 2 tugboats and 6 barges maintained for emergency purposes.
Traffic
The fleet carried 2,972,694 vehicles and 7,278,027 passengers during the
year.    The totals were 2,751,959 and 6,864,090 respectively the previous year.
 70 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Major Changes
A new 50-car ferry was put into service. This vessel MV Quinitsa, operates
between Nanaimo and Gabriola Island. The former vessel on this route, MV
Khaloke, was then transferred to Denman Island.
The MV Klatawa was put into service at Albion-Fort Langley.
A contract was let for a hoverlift ferry which will allow a river crossing over
the Fort Nelson River on the new Liard Highway.
Revenue
$
Comox-Powell River   975,216.28
Cortes Island  73,735.75
Denman Island  61,976.00
Gabriola Island  161,870.60
Hornby Island  22,046.40
Kelsey Bay  591,077.00
Nimpkish  165,772.00
Quathiaski Cove  173,317.10
Queen Charlotte Islands  82,493.50
Texada Island  125,861.35
Thetis Island  29,162.30
Woodfibre   12,5 84.00
Total   2,475,112.28
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS)
71
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 72 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Communications Engineer
During 1977, a number of mobile repeater changes were made to reduce
intra-district interference and to otherwise improve radio communications performance.
The radio repeater building near Bella Coola had to be replaced due to extensive wind damage. The new building incorporated several structural improvements
which have proved to be beneficial elsewhere.
Two new repeaters were installed to extend coverage, one located in Richter
Pass west of Osoyoos, and the other in the northeast coal area, southeast of
Chetwynd. These are unique in that they are solar-powered, with battery back-up
for extended periods of low sunshine. These units have now been operating for
more than six months with entirely satisfactory results. Regular maintenance need
only be carried out about once every 10 years, although normal system failures
are likely to occur during this period.
During the year, batteries were changed at 15 repeater sites where caustic-
potash disposable batteries are in use. Improvements were made to equipment at
sites near Kamloops, Victoria, Port Renfrew, and Nelson.
A new radio repeater site was established at Hells Gate and will be part of the
expanded Region 1 system in 1978. This expansion has been foreseen for some
time and the conversion of equipment in the Hope, Boston Bar, and Allison Pass
areas should go smoothly.
Because of the rapid increase in the number of radios in the field, we have
added Communications Technicians in Victoria and Salmon Arm. Another position
has been approved in Smithers. We unfortunately lost one of our leading technicians in Kelowna, Rolf Mathie, who died suddenly at the age of 63. His position
has been moved to Penticton for more even work distribution.
Fieldwork in the Terrace area was completed during the year to accommodate
the establishment of Region 5. Fieldwork involving new repeater buildings can
only be performed during the summer. Conversion of electronic equipment can,
however, be accomplished in the winter, weather permitting. Region 5 Headquarters will have a communications console as is the case elsewhere and radio
systems serving all its districts will be terminated there for full control during the
day. If control console operators are not employed on a 24-hour basis, the Region
5 system can be terminated in Kamloops or Prince George.
Toward the end of the year it was decided that the mobile radio communications system in all parts of the Province would be converted to our Region 1 type
of system. This has and will involve considerable planning since major equipment
changes will be made concurrently. Our existing system, although completely solid
state, is considerably outdated and should be replaced to accommodate system
improvement and increase reliability.
During the year 430 portable radios, 380 mobile radios, 10 base stations, and
much accessory equipment was purchased. Some of this was acquired for replacement purposes but most for additional requirements.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS) 73
E. B. Wilkins,
Executive Director,
Planning Division.
REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, PLANNING
E. B. Wilkins
The Planning Division was very active during the year as a result of certain
provisions of the Revenue Sharing Act which encourage community and settlement
plan adoption and cost-sharing on major streets in urban areas. The Division
participated in transportation network identification as a component in these plans
to the extent of available personnel resources. The activities of the four sections
of the Planning Division are reported as follows:
TRANSPORTATION SECTION
The Transportation Section undertook approximately 1,600 person-days of
travel investigations throughout the Province. Travel trends were evaluated at
strategically located check-points in two metropolitan areas. This was a continuation of a program of monitoring vehicle volumes and vehicle occupancy trends
initiated in 1972. The work involved 524 person-days. Roadside interviews were
undertaken in the Capital Region and repeated at several locations on the Island
Highway. The objective was to assess travel patterns and the purpose for such
movements and involved 203 person-days.
The Section also undertook 37 licence-plate tracing surveys involving 271
person-days. These included a truck speed survey in the Fraser Canyon, an assessment of traffic dispersal on the south side of the Pattullo Bridge, a review of traffic
circulation in a major interior centre and the movement of external traffic through
23 communities. The remaining surveys were to assess travel patterns in the metropolitan areas.
An intersection counting program was undertaken in eight communities and
involved 165 person-days. At three locations, representing over 60 per cent of this
work effort, the information was recorded to aid consultants retained to evaluate
the capacities of the existing road system and recommend improvements in traffic
operations.
Vehicles were classified by weight and axle configurations at three of the
permanent count locations, in conjunction with the interviews on the Stewart-
 74
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Cassiar Highway and at five of the licence-plate traces. This work involved 63
person-days. The classification data is required to compute the capacity of the
roadway concerned.
The program of goods movement surveys was continued and 44 person-days
allocated. One Interior site was monitored as were three in the Greater Vancouver
area. The purpose was to assess the types of commodities being transported,
origin, destination, and the weight and axle configurations of the trucks involved.
The program of evaluating the effect on traffic from various types of land
uses was continued. Emphasis was placed on industrial estates, residential developments, shopping centres, major motor hotels and car dealerships and comprised
41 sites and 145 person-days. The shopping centres were assessed during the
pre-Christmas period.
Work was continued on a study of inter-provincial truck traffic between the
Prairie Provinces and the Pacific Coast with special emphasis on the savings in
travel time for trucking which would be expected to use a route through the
Coquihalla Pass.
Work also continued on functional planning in the 49 communities and
initiated in nine new areas. The purpose of these plans is to identify physical and
land use limitations prior to urban development and thereby provide for transportation networks which can accommodate several cycles of urban land use.
These network plans form an important element in the documentation necessary
for municipalities contemplating application for Provincial cost-sharing funds
either under the Secondary Highway Program or under the Revenue Sharing Act.
In addition, functional planning and the preparation of alternate configurations was
continued at seven locations in the two major metropolitan areas. This planning
work also provides guidance to the approving officers and gives a framework for
decisions concerning zoning, access, subdivisions, and the internal lay-out of major
land use developments.
A study was also initiated into the traffic implications of the Coquihalla Route
and this documentation has been provided to the Federal Government. Also, a
study of the potential for increasing the traffic efficiency of the Pattullo Bridge was
initiated and a consultant retained jointly by the Ministry, Greater Vancouver
Regional District, and supported technically by the affected municipalities. This
report is expected early in 1978.
During the fiscal year, the person-days of field work of the Transportation
Section increased by 35 per cent while the analytical and planning work showed
an increase of 20 per cent over the previous year.
One junior engineer position was added to the Approved Annual Work Force.
MUNICIPAL PROGRAMS SECTION
During the fiscal year, the Municipal Programs Section administered funds in
the amount of $1,299,361 for capital works and $266,022 for maintenance works
on secondary highways. Discussions continued with the four super cities of Kamloops, Kelowna, Prince George, and Nanaimo, relating to amalgamation agreements, grants, and road and bridge work. Changes in route classification were
considered in 28 municipalities. Negotiations were conducted with nine municipalities concerning cost-sharing with bridge replacement and with 29 municipalities
regarding cost-sharing for improvements to arterial highways.
Input was also provided for the eligibility guidelines for major municipal
highway grants under the regulations of the recently proclaimed Revenue Sharing
Act.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (OPERATIONS) 75
SYSTEMS PLANNING SECTION
A number of changes were made to the Highways Landmark Inventory and
the Highways Technical Roadway Inventory during 1977. These two reports and
the photo-log of 13 000 kilometres of British Columbia highways were produced
in metric measurements. The capital project status file was kept current and
weekly reports produced. The Systems Planning Section collected data that will
be used to produce capacity and level of service calculations for the highways
system. The Section has continued research into the use of the British Columbia
pavement smoothness gauge as a pavement quality control device. A computerized
bridge inventory file and updating system for the Bridge Branch was developed
along with a number of improvements to the reporting capabilities of the Highways
inventory master file. The Systems Planning Engineer is preparing plans and
programs for computer services as well as continuing to co-ordinate research for
the Ministry. In addition to the foregoing, the Systems Planning Engineer also
represents the Ministry with respect to the Federal Provincial Western Northlands
joint cost-sharing program.
APPROVING SECTION
The plans for decentralization are continuing and regional approving offices
are now open in Nanaimo and Terrace. This continues the trend away from headquarters centralization and there are now seven offices where permits and subdivisions can be processed. This move ensures better service to the public,
especially on Vancouver Island and on the northwest sector of the Province.
The Ministry issued a booklet called "Whatever Happened to my Subdivision
Application" which explains the subdivision of land process in unorganized territory, and it has now been reprinted to ensure as wide a distribution as possible.
Copies are available from the district highways offices and from the Ministry in
Victoria.
Over 3,000 subdivision applications were processed and in June the Legislative
Assembly amended the Strata Titles Act to return the approvals function of strata
subdivisions without buildings from the regional districts to the approvals section
of the Ministry. We participated in drafting regulations for the bare land strata
plans. The two differences between a bare land strata plan and an ordinary subdivision of land are: the internal density of the plan may be altered as long as the
over-all density allowed by the regulations in place is not altered, and internal
access to each strata parcel may not be dedicated as long as it is adequate for
vehicular traffic.
The Islands Trust has taken over land use controls from the regional districts
and the Ministry has agreed that the Senior Approving Officer will act as their
approving officer.
 76
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
A. E. Rhodes, Assistant Deputy Minister.
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER
(ADMINISTRATION)
In 1977/78 the work program of the Design and Construction Services and the
Technical Services, Public Works Division, consisted mainly of finishing those
projects initiated by the Ministry. During this transitional period the Ministry
continued to function with a steadily decreasing staff and the extent of the work
load carried by this group is indicated by the major contracts called and awarded
as shown in the financial report of the Director of Financial Services. The reported
expenditures were for the most part recovered from the British Columbia Buildings
Corporation which has included them in its financial report for the same period.
The Safety Engineering Services Division continued to provide a high level
of service to the citizens of the Province, while representation to national code-
making bodies has ensured that the national standards system is appropriate for
adoption in British Columbia. Further decentralization was continued to ensure
that services are delivered in the most effective manner.
During the 1977/78 fiscal period, the major institutions accepted the principle
of a central linen service and the Glendale Regional Laundry has made plans for
the introduction of such a service on April 1, 1978. This change is expected to
provide an improved service in future.
The financial reports of both Highways and Public Works conclude this
Annual Report.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (ADMINISTRATION) 77
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL PROGRAMS
A. R. LlMACHER
The approved work force of the Ministry as at March 31, 1978, was 6,063
regular positions. In addition, seasonal auxiliary employees were hired to meet
temporary work requirements. The total number of auxiliaries on staff reached
a peak of 3,576 in the month of August 1977, and included 1,050 students.
As in the past, the majority of new employees were hired directly within districts and branches for entrance level positions. Promotional opportunities during
the past year required 1,506 postings, of which 511 were processed through the
Public Service Commission and the balance by Headquarters, Regional and District Offices with the assistance of personnel officers. This office authorized expenses on transfers for 151 employees at a total cost of $394,186.80.
Personnel staff members were active in compiling information required for a
major Provincial study on classification of excluded management positions and
the Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations and the Director of Personnel Programs,
participated in the study on behalf of the Ministry.
The Director of Personnel Programs represented the Ministry in negotiating
the B.C. Government Employees' Union Master Agreement and the Director of
Maintenance Services acted on the Management Committee for negotiation of the
B.C. Government Professional Employees Association Master and Component
Agreements. The Senior Personnel Officer and other Personnel staff represented
the Ministry on B.C. Government Employees' Union Component negotiations.
The new Regions, 5 and 6, were staffed during the year and Regional Personnel Officers appointed.
The Director served on the Provincial Merit Committee, Government Employee Relations Bureau Advisory Committee, Public Works Placement Committee,
BCIT Administrative Option Advisory Committee, and other committees on behalf
of the Government or the Ministry. Personnel Training and Safety staff also served
on various classification and management committees.
The British Columbia Buildings Corporation gradually assumed jurisdiction
over the majority of Public Works functions during the year. Many Public Works
employees accepted positions with the British Columbia Buildings Corporation
and the balance were placed or assigned to other ministries or chose early retirement.
The Public Works Safety Engineering and Glendale Laundry function are
continuing with this Ministry under the Assistant Deputy Minister of Administration with Personnel Training and Safety Services provided by our staff.
STAFF DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING
The Highway Technology Training Program continues to offer more to the
employee with 16 courses available and 13 under development. The enrolment is
now up to 1,420, counting only those active on the program. We look forward to
awarding the first Level 1 certificates this year.
Courses in metric training for clerical and for field staff were initiated with
provision to offer the course to all employees through the pyramid instruction system employed.
Sixty-four apprentices are indentured with the Ministry throughout the Province in six trade groups. Fifteen apprentices completed their apprenticeship this
year and 14 have continued employment with the Ministry as journeymen.
 78
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Approximately 350 employees have attended an oxygen-acetylene safety
course developed by this Branch.
A committee assigned to tour the Province then recommend the needs and
personnel for training equipment operators, submitted its report early this year.
Its recommendation that grader operators have special training has resulted in a
program through several of the colleges.
We are still unable to meet all the demands for training drivers due to lack
of trainers.
SAFETY
During the year, 709 vehicle accidents were reported, 348 of these considered
preventable.
There was an increase in personal accidents over the previous year, disabling
accidents standing at 393 and medical aid accidents at 457. There were two fatal
accidents.   The countable accident frequency rate was 42.2.
Region 3 won the Honourable Minister's trophy and Regional Safety Awards
were won by Chilliwack, Salmon Arm, Creston, Dawson Creek, Prince Rupert,
and Saanich.
There were no changes in the strength of the safety officer complement during
the year and the Regional Safety and Health Officers in Regions 1 and 4 continued
to assume responsibility in Regions 5 and 6 respectively.
Two additional sound measuring dosimeter units were purchased and the
sound level survey throughout the Ministry continued. Sound level certificates
have now been issued for 29 ferry engine rooms and 201 mobile units. In addition,
10 new certificates were issued for ferries that had been modified in one way or
another that would affect the noise level at employee work stations.
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (ADMINISTRATION) 79
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF PROPERTY SERVICES
V. A. Drew
The work program for the 1977/78 fiscal year was one of the largest in the
history of the Branch. A total of 1,230 claims was settled and a further 1792
claims were in the process of negotiation.   Two arbitration cases were completed.
The expenditure on acquisition of highway rights-of-way and other property
required by the Ministry totalled $11,778,272.29.
Land acquisition for the Libby Project required an expenditure of $36,800.
There were nine buildings sold by public auction and tender for removal from
highway rights-of-way. The recovery from these sales, including sales of other
chattel items, totalled $43,026,75. Also, 15 parcels of land were sold by public
tender for a total sum of $307,147.
During the period, 230 buildings and parcels of land were under lease or
rental. Gross revenue from rentals was $152,943.21. In addition to this, a number of properties were transferred to commissions under the jurisdiction of other
ministries for industrial, agricultural, and housing purposes.
 80
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
REPORT OF THE INSURANCE AND CLAIMS OFFICER
G. A. Cavin
(Motor-vehicle statistics are based on licence-year March 1 to February 28.)
The number of traffic accidents involving vehicles owned by (or leased to)
the Government was 1,556, including 224 accidents in which the Government
vehicles were parked.   In the previous year there were 1,310 accidents.
During the year, claim settlements were still being completed pertaining to
accidents occurring prior to March 1, 1974, at which date third-party liability
insurance coverage was effected for all licensed Government motor-vehicles. A
total of $52,454 was paid in settlement of these claims. The Government recovered,
either from its own collision damage insurers or from the third-party liability
insurers, a total of $182,070.
Motor-vehicles Involved in Accidents
(1976/77 figures in parentheses)
Ministry
Number of
Accidents
Number of
Vehicles
Per Cent of
Vehicles
Per Cent of
Accidents
Agriculture	
Attorney-General 	
Consumer and Corporate Affairs-
Education— — 	
Energy, Transport and Communications..
Environment  	
Finance 	
Forests  _  	
Health 	
Highways and Public Works..
Human Resources 	
Labour	
Mines and Petroleum Resources 	
Provincial Secretary and Travel Industry..
Recreation and Conservation.	
Other ministries  	
TotaL
31       (18)
143     (123)
15
3
17
58
9
(5)
(3)
(34)
(52)
(5)
262 (230)
114 (64)
709 (583)
59 (57)
12
10
17
(13)
(3)
(19)
108      (102)
.......      (.-)
166
863
45
30
69
291
54
1,572
538
4,802
399
65
56
131
545
3
(148)
(813)
(44)
(32)
(137)
(280)
(53)
(1,572)
(524)
(4,083)
(285)
(65)
(79)
(140)
(671)
(3)
1,5671(1,311)1
9,629 (8,929)
1.7
9.0
0.5
0.3
0.7
3.0
0.6
16.3
5.6
49.9
4.1
0.7
0.6
1.4
5.6
(1.7)
(9.1)
(0.5)
(0.4)
(1.5)
(3.1)
(0.6)
(17.6)
(5.9)
(45.7)
(3.2)
(0.7)
(0.9)
(1.6)
(7.5)
    ( - )
2.0
9.1
1.0
0.2
1.1
3.7
0.5
16.7
7.3
45.2
3.8
0.8
0.6
1.1
6.9
  (
(1.4)
(9.4)
(0.4)
(0.2)
(2.6)
(4.0)
(0.4)
(17.5)
(4.9)
(44.6)
(4.2)
(1.0)
(0.2)
(1.4)
(7.8)
 )
100.0 (100.0)
100.0 (100.0)
i Eleven accidents involved vehicles of two ministries.
Claims other than those arising out of accidents involving Government motor-
vehicles resulted in recovery of repair costs of $273,025 for damages to 87 lamp
standards; 36 bridges; 38 guardrails; 57 signs, signals, and flashers; and 77
miscellaneous items. Major items of recovery were $46,000, Bamberton Bridge
in Saanich District; $10,078, British Columbia Ferries Berth at Horseshoe Bay;
$9,352, Traffic Controller in Prince George District; $8,973, British Columbia
Ferries Booth at Horseshoe Bay. Also recovered from the insurers of a Government-owned building was $8,626, for fire damage.
The total paid out for 293 third-party miscellaneous claims was $72,349,
including $16,954 for 198 sealcoating claims and $18,065 for 45 claims against
B.C. Ferries. Among these were claims of $15,000 for a fatality and bodily injuries following a motor-vehicle accident in Delta; $12,500 for injuries sustained
aboard a B.C. Ferries vessel; and $6,800 for injuries as the result of a motor-vehicle
accident on the Port Mann Bridge.
Twenty-three cases which had gone to litigation were concluded as follows:
1 in favour of the Government, 1 decided by an equal division of liability, 1
 REPORT OF ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER (ADMINISTRATION)
81
decided as 75 per cent against the Government, 4 were dismissed, 5 were discontinued, 3 withdrawn and 8 settled out of court and the actions withdrawn. There
are presently 51 cases in various stages of litigation. In 4 of these the Government
is the plaintiff.
Premiums Paid for Insurance Placed During 1977/78
B.C. Steamship Co. (1975) Ltd  $57,287.57
Ministry of Highways and Public Works  88,066.90
British Columbia Ferry Corporation  731,664.00
Other ministries  184,843.73
Total   1,061,862.20
  PUBLIC WORKS
  SAFETY ENGINEERING SERVICES DIVISION
85
REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE
SAFETY ENGINEERING SERVICES DIVISION
G. W. Lawson
The Safety Engineering Services Division had a high degree of success in
meeting its primary objective, to provide a safe environment for the citizens of the
Province. This was evidenced by the comparative statistical data on deaths, injuries to persons, and property loss as contained in the following Safety Branch
reports.
To achieve the objectives of the safety legislation involved, the Division's
method of operations placed increased emphasis on the benefits of delivering safety
services in concert and in harmony with municipalities and industry. In response
to the desire to limit the amounts government spend to ensure that safety factors
are adequate, programs have continued to reflect the advantages of sharing responsibility. Despite the combined efforts to prevent injuries and property loss, eight
deaths, 30 serious injuries, and $12,500,000 in property loss were attributed to
the disciplines involved.
To achieve the best use of resources, the safety education content was increased through improved information systems on safety for the industry and
society. Some innovations in seminars, technical bulletins, releases, etc., were
introduced to help the industry become well informed and knowledgeable on the
latest safety standards. Appeals procedures were further refined and adopted to
ensure that persons subject to rulings of enforcing authorities will be able to obtain
impartial hearings on any of their concerns.
The branches have continued to contribute to the national standards system
and, through representation to national code-making bodies, have ensured that
such standards are appropriate for adoption in British Columbia wherever practical
national standards have been adopted as the Provincial minimum requirements,
such as the Canadian Gas Association Code B.149 which sets out the minimum
British Columbia requirements for gas installations. By recognizing the expertise
and efforts which go into, along with the advantages of, the national system, the
Province is provided with usable and tangible results, thereby obviating the high
costs of promulgating strictly Provincial standards.
The service delivery system for the Division has been under constant review
and revision to meet the changing needs of the citizens of the Province. Emphasis
has been placed on participation by the industry and society in the various branch
systems for developing and interpreting regulations. Such advisory activity has
increased considerably and resulted in many recommendations for improvements
in kinds and levels of service.
 86
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
To ensure that services are delivered in the most efficient and effective manner,
decentralization was continued for decision-making and the provision of services.
To coincide with this, staff development activities are under way so that members
will be better equipped to make prompt and knowledgeable decisions at the local
level.
Specific branch activities include surveys of plans and designs to ensure conformance with adopted safety standards, examination and certification of persons
and equipment, investigation of accidents and fires, installation inspections, and
educational functions, which include standards development meetings, code seminars, and dissemination of information on new and amended requirements.
Following are selected statistical data for 1977/78:
Inspections conducted	
Work permits issued	
Equipment certified	
Examinations given
Individuals or contractors certified
Investigations conducted
Plans examined or designs surveyed.
Meetings or seminars conducted
Written recommendations and reports on defects
and hazards (estimated) 	
Appeals  (Resource of Building Code Appeal
Board) 	
Fatal accidents	
Injuries (serious)	
Property loss	
140,645
74,667
21,667
6,237
14,602
350
8,008
400
60,042
100
8
30
$12,500,000
The Branch reports which follow detail the particular service delivered in the
efforts to minimize loss of life, injury, and property damage.
 SAFETY ENGINEERING SERVICES DIVISION
87
BOILER SAFETY BRANCH
As in the past several years our review boards and associated committees,
reporting on a regular basis in co-operation with the appropriate advisory boards
and consultants, plus public participation and input, have made great progress.
To this date the final revision of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act and regulations
has gone forward for submission to the Cabinet.
Branch projects toward reorganization have been instigated, with all personnel
contributing toward any changes which will benefit the Branch. Unfortunately,
some of the projects are already behind schedule because of unforeseen circumstances, rather extreme sickness affecting at least two of our inspectors, one early
retirement, and hospitalization of several others for differing periods of time.
We hope shortly to be able to continue with projects already in progress to a
conclusion, not too far behind the original schedule.
The work load has therefore put a tremendous strain on the rest of the
Branch personnel but we feel justly proud of being able to give a good accounting
under such difficult circumstances. The staff have made a gallant effort to sustain
service to the public.
Efforts are being made in promoting industry, contractors, and the various
tradesmen to monitor and use self-regulating systems to ensure safety and defect
prevention. It would appear that these efforts are gradually bringing about
changes necessary to allow our staff to cope with an ever-increasing and widening
field of activity.
Accidents occurred because of low water conditions, valve faults, thinning
of mud drum between tube ligaments, cracking of welds, and an economizer leak.
There was a case of scalding, though not severe, and one death which the Branch
was asked to investigate even though it was not within the Boiler and Pressure
Vessel Act.
Reports are on file giving full accounts of conditions and hazards investigated
by the Branch. Cause and effect reflect the necessity for proper, regular, and
constant vigilance and discussion between industry and the Boiler Safety Branch.
The following is selected statistical data for 1977/78:
Boiler Safety Branch
Inspections concluded
Work permits issued _
  12,891
  781
Equipment certified  7,938
Examinations given  5,994
Individuals or contractors certified  8,000
Investigations conducted  170
Plans examined or design surveyed  1,446
Meetings or seminars conducted  180
Written recommendations and reports on defects and
hazards   1,188
 88
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
PERMITS
1,400
1,200
1,000
600
400
INSPECTIONS
73-74     74-75   75-76 76-77    77-78
14,000
13,000
12,000
11,000
10,000
9,000
73-74   74-75   75-76   76-77   77-78
INDIVIDUALS AND CONTRACTORS CERTIFICATES
9,000
8,000
7,000
6,000
5,000
73-74  74-75 75-76 76-77   77-78
 SAFETY ENGINEERING SERVICES DIVISION
REPORTS ON DEFECTS AND HAZARDS CORRECTED
89
1,100
1,000
900
i
800
/
700
/
600
/
500
/
400
■
N
PLANS SURVEY
73-74 74-75  75-76  76-77   77-78
1,300
1 200
1,100
1,000
900
800
700
73-74 74-75 75-76   76-77   77-78
EXAMINATIONS GIVEN
8,000
7,000
6,000
5,000
4,000
L
73-74    74-75  75-76   76-77  77-78
 90 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
REPORT OF THE BUILDING STANDARDS AND
RESEARCH BRANCH
During the past year the work of this Branch has expanded in many ways.
While staff shortages have seriously affected operation, our direction became
clearer as the formation of the B.C. Building Corporation was completed.
At the request of the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing, we reexamined the programs initiated on their behalf and reassessed priorities to
provide more man-hours to those considered most critical.
Work on the establishment of an educational course in building regulations
has commenced. The first stage is proposed for a combination house inspector,
and will cover all aspects of house construction and lead to Provincial certification
for this function. Further stages are planned for general code users to cover all
other types of buildings.
In keeping with our policy of uniform code application, good communication
is critical. With this in mind an outline for a regular Municipal Affairs newsletter
has been prepared. This will be of a technical nature concerning the Building
Code and all standards governing construction. I will include discussion on basic
problems with possible solutions, future regulatory trends, reports on materials
and systems both new and existing.
The initial draft of "Measures for Energy Conservation for New Buildings"
has been received and evaluated for Municipal Affairs in conjunction with other
ministries. The first newsletter will actually be oriented to energy conservation
as the technical article will be a comprehensive evaluation of the various forms
of thermal insulation now available.
The proposed Building Requirements for the Physically Handicapped were
completed for adoption under the Municipal Act as part of the B.C. Building
Code. This document was circulated in draft form in two editions, to many of
those affected, in order to ensure that input from the public and industry could
be received and evaluated for inclusion in the final requirements.
Research into the various available types of smoke detectors has been completed and preparation of draft requirements to be included as an amendment to
the B.C. Building Code is under way.
The Branch's involvement with national and international standards organizations has expanded and occupied an ever-increasing amount of time. The
situation now is that these standards are referenced in building codes which have
been adopted as Provincial law. This was not anticipated when the standards were
prepared and now necessitates a far closer look at the various aspects of each
standard.
We provide Municipal Affairs' representation on an inter-provincial building
regulatory body, the Provincial Advisory Committee, and the last meeting was
held in Victoria. It was very successful and will, I feel, achieve many improvements.
Through all this, the research support of the Building Code Appeal Board
has continued at an undiminished level, though too often spreading staff resources
very thin. In connection with this work, the Branch's advisory service, provided
usually by telephone, has undoubtedly reduced the number of minor appeals
received.
 SAFETY ENGINEERING SERVICES DIVISION 91
For the future we look forward to a rationalization of our location, so that
we are able to organize effectively and proceed at an increased rate to deal with
our outstanding and proposed programs.
J. C. Currie, A.R.I.C.S.
Head,   Building  Standards
and Research Branch
 92 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
REPORT OF THE CHIEF GAS INSPECTOR
The Gas Safety Branch of the Safety Engineering Services Division has been
busy this past year with changes both in administration and regulations.
The Branch adopted the Canadian Gas Association Code B149.1-1976 for
natural gas burning appliances with some minor amendments. The Branch has
also put into effect an automatic mailing system whereby all gas-fitters, contractors, engineers, and other interested parties will automatically receive from the
Gas Branch, bulletins and technical publications with respect to gas installations
and equipment. This system has greatly improved our efficiency in providing
information to the trade and the public in gas safety.
The Branch, through reorganization, has established two administrative
positions for more effective control over its many activities. Further reorganization will be put into effect later in the year.
More emphasis has been put into staff training during this past year, particularly in the field of report writing and communications, which has resulted in
improved efficiency in our inspection reporting system.
There were also more meetings and seminars conducted with the trade this
past year to assist the contractors and fitters in the transition from the old gas code
to the new code.
The Branch has endeavoured to expand its communication with the trade
and industry, including municipal authorities, in order to ensure more uniformity
in the interpretation and enforcement of the new gas code.
In order to improve our education of gas-fitters in their courses at B.C.
Vocational School, a gas laboratory has been set up which will greatly assist in
the practical application of gas equipment and provide a better understanding
of a variety of gas appliances.
Although there was about a 15-per-cent decrease from the previous year in
the total number of gas permits issued, there was a general increase in all other
activities in the Branch, including design approval, field certification, and the
number of trade licences issued.
There were two fatalities during the year from carbon monoxide poisoning
as a result of a faulty furnace in a fairly tightly constructed house. There were
also six explosions, one of which resulted in three injuries.
The Branch is endavouring through its information and education system to
inform the trade of the hazards it has encountered during the year and thereby
greatly reduce the chances of these incidents happening in the future.
 SAFETY ENGINEERING SERVICES DIVISION
93
Summary of Work, 1977/78
New designs checked   3,234
Appliance certifications   2,018
Gas permits (Gas Branch only)   15,016
Gas fitter examinations
Gas fitter licences issued (new)
Gas fitter licences renewed	
Gas contractor licences issued (new)
Gas contractor licences renewed 	
Prosecutions  	
Licence suspensions 	
Special investigations—
Explosions (3 injuries) 	
Fires (2 injuries) 	
Other incidents—
(2 fatalities, asphyxiations)
(8 near asphyxiations) 	
540
281
2,818
74
848
5
6
14
10
W. R. Montgomery, P.Eng.
Chief Gas Inspector
 94
36,000
34,000
32,000
30,000
28,000
26,000
24,000
22,000
20,000
18,000
16,000
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
GAS PERMITS
GAS PERMITS
14,000
>
\
\
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V
\
\
\
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v
"""
\
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1
73/74
74/75 75/76 76/77
.— Includes municipalities.
— Gas Branch only.
77/78
GAS-FITTERS LICENCES
(New and Renewed)
NEW DESIGNS CHECKED
3,200
3,100.
3,000
2,900.
2,800
2,700
2,600
2,500
2,400
2,300
2,200
73/74    74/75    75/76   76/77
GAS EQUIPMENT CERTIFIED
77/78
2,200
2 200
2 100
2,000
1,900
1,800
1,700
1,600
1,500
1 400
1,300
1,200
73/74        74/75 75/76
76/77   77/78
73/74   74/75    75/76   76/77
77/78
GAS BRANCH STATISTICS
 SAFETY ENGINEERING SERVICES DIVISION
95
REPORT OF THE CHIEF ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR
The Electrical Safety Branch provides for the safety of the citizens of the
Province through a combination of electrical safety education, standards development, inspection, and enforcement. Even though high priority is given to safety
activities, accidents and fires occur because electrical equipment is used improperly,
abused, or misapplied. The resulting injuries, fatalities, time-loss, and property
damage represent irrecoverable costs to the citizens of the Province. During the
1977/78 fiscal year, electrical fires of all types numbered approximately 1,300,
property loss was $11,000,000, and there were 79 injuries and five deaths.
Electrical safety education activities include attendance and presentations at
meetings and seminars, technical discussions with the trade and the public, and
participation on advisary committees. Standards development activities include
implementation of Provincial advisory committees and participation on Canadian
Standards Association Committees on the Canadian Electrical Code Part I—
Safety Standards for Electrical Installations, and the Canadian Electrical Code
Part 2—Safety Standards for Electrical Equipment. In addition to membership
on the Part 2 committee, the Branch actively participates in the activities of 28
separate Equipment Standards subcommittees.
Activity in the field of codes and standards continued at a high level throughout the year. The Branch actively participated in revision and updating of the
Safety Standards for Electrical Installations at the national level through review of
some 130 separate proposals and attendance at two national meetings. In addition
the Branch participated in the upgrading of standards for electrical equipment at
the national level through review of 40 specification changes, eight fact-finding
reports, and 108 draft standards proposals.
On the Provincial scene the Branch's Electrical Safety Review Board met
on four occasions and the Electrical Wiring and Equipment Standards Committee
held six official meetings plus five additional meetings to consider editorial matters
related to bulletins. Eleven subcommittee and ad-hoc committee meetings were
also held to consider specific proposals.
The Branch also participated on standards advisory committees established
by other organizations. These included ICBC Fire and Intruder Alarms Committee, B.C. Hospitals Electrical Safety Committee, Workers' Compensation Board,
and the Provincial Fire Marshal.
Authorization to revise the organization structure of the Branch was received
during the year and changes which will provide improved service to industry and
the citizens of British Columbia are progressing.
Published statistics indicate that the construction industry remained fairly
active throughout the year with a total value for projects within British Columbia
totalling $1,485,000,000 during the fiscal year. This represented a decrease in
dollar value of approximately 7 per cent below the previous year.
Applications for examinations for certificates totalled 703. Distribution of
examinations was:
Class A Certificate of Competency
78
Class B Certificate of Competency  276
Class C Certificate of Competency  331
Projectionist     18
Other       2
Total
705
 96 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
The number of Certificates of Competency as Electrical Contractors increased
by 3.1 per cent over the previous fiscal year to 3,579. The distribution of certificates issued was:
Class A  722        Class B  1,120        Class C  1,386
Class RA_.__    15        Class RB._       42        Class RC__     292
        Class SB-        1 	
737   1,678
1,163
Total certificates issued, 3,578
As during the previous fiscal year, greater use was made of the multiple-use
application/permit form. Ease of handling and issuance of these forms is noted
and, although the physical count of permits issued decreased, the average value
of each permit increased by approximately 17 per cent to $33.61. The physical
count of regular installation permits issued was 58,006. In addition, annual
permits issued totalled 333.
Inspection requests received totalled 108,313 and inspections performed
totalled 89,434. In addition, the number of sets of plans received for examination
and approval rose to 3,328.
Applications for Provincial certification of electrical equipment rose by 24
per cent to 2,918. The number of individual pieces examined and labelled totalled
9,298. In addition, 2,493 mobile homes and factory-built structures were examined
and approved for use in British Columbia.
Fires and accidents investigated by the Branch during the fiscal year totalled
150. In addition, reports of eight such investigations were received from municipal areas.   Statistical analysis of these incidents is as follows:
INVESTIGATION BY
Electrical Safety     Municipal
Branch Authorities
Fatalities (human)  6 0
Fatalities (animals)   0 0
Electrical burns (more than one person was
injured in some incidents; total persons
suffering burns, 18)   11 3
Electrical shock   4 1
Broken limb from fall  0 1
Failure of equipment (no fire)  19 0
Overhead line contact (no injury)  2 0
Fires—
Attributed to human failing  4 0
Attributed to damaged or substandard
wiring  28 2
Undetermined origin  36 0
Equipment failure  26 1
Non-electrical causes  14 0
Totals  150 8
 SAFETY ENGINEERING SERVICES DIVISION
97
ELECTRICAL BRANCH STATISTICS
1977/78 FISCAL YEAR
PERMITS ISSUED
INSPECTIONS
100
sn
40
73/74    74/75      75/76      76/77
Fiscal Year
77/78
120
(A
c
o
V.    nn
Thousands of Inspec
s         i
80
73/74 74/75  75/76  76/77
Fiscal Year
77/78
EXAMINATIONS HELD
CONTRACTOR CERTIFICATES
ISSUED
700
600 *•
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/
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J
73/74     74/75      75/76      76/77      77/78
Fiscal Year
4
3
73/74  74/75
75/76  76/77
Fiscal Year
77/78
 98
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
FIRE AND ACCIDENT
INCIDENTS INVESTIGATED
ELECTRICAL EQUPMENT    /
CERTIFIED /
150
1
>
130
i
I
90 |
C
70
73/74  74/75  75/76  76/77  77/78
Fiscal Year
3.0_
2.5 _
■3 2.0—
1.5_
1.0-
73/74     74/75     75/76       76/77      77/78
Fiscal Year
PLANS EXAMINED
3 —
C
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2.5
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73/74     74/75     75/76       76/77       77/78
Fiscal Year
 SAFETY ENGINEERING SERVICES DIVISION
99
REPORT FROM GLENDALE REGIONAL LAUNDRY OPERATION
In reflecting on our endeavours over the 1977/78 fiscal year, we feel a sense
of achievement as we did accomplish a great many of our objectives.
One of the most significant of these was the establishment of a central linen
service for our major institutional users. Although the service is as yet in its
infancy, with the continued efforts of everyone concerned we are quite certain the
service will eventually benefit the person we are most concerned with—the patient
in hospital.
One objective set forth in last year's Annual Report, the establishment of a
properly functioning preventive maintenance program has not yet been achieved,
but B.C. Buildings Corporation had indicated that such a program would be set up
soon.
The planned establishment of a linen distribution centre for Glendale Lodge
will help our own operation. However, because it has not been set up before the
start of the central linen service, the space occupied by Glendale Lodge linen and
clothing carts did result in cramped quarters at the start of the linen service. We
hope to resolve this problem and bring about the speedy completion of the linen
distribution area shortly.
The equipment purchases during the past fiscal year greatly improved our
over-all operation. The purchase of new linen exchange cart carriers was a great
help when we went into the linen service.    Timing could not have been better.
Although we have achieved a great deal over the 1977/78 year, we realize
that we cannot rest on our laurels. We know there are many unresolved problems
ahead of us. We will again set our objectives for the upcoming fiscal year and
strive to achieve as many of them as possible.
L. Balmer
Administrator
Total Credits to March 31,1978
Royal Jubilee Hospital 19370
Glendale Lodge 	
Tillicum Lodge	
Gorge Road
Memorial Pavilion	
Saanich Peninsula Hospital
V.I.R.C.C. 	
Glenshiel Hotel
Detox Centre _
Juvenile Detention Centre
$647,155.60
308,757.17
41,310.08
182,488.68
150,555.40
43,825.32
13,403.20
2,458.80
1,795.80
1,573.00
$1,396,337.05
Total pounds of linen processed to March
31, 1978	
Average cost per pound	
Total staff at March 31, 1978
6,931,857 pounds
  $0.1986
  80
 100
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1977/78
REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS TRANSITION ADMINISTRATOR
The year under review, the final one for the Public Works Division of the
Ministry, saw the transfer of staff and duties to meet the statutory responsibilities
of the B.C. Buildings Corporation. The work program of the Design and Construction Services and Technical Services consisted mainly of finishing projects.
The extent of this is indicated by the major tenders called and contracts awarded
by the Division and reported in the B.C. Buildings Corporation annual report,
and in the financial report of this Ministry.
Staffing of the B.C. Buildings Corporation started early in the year and
gradually speeded up to a rate of about 200 persons per month. Some employees
took over their new duties upon appointment but most continued in their former
positions until the responsibility for their particular work function was transferred
to the Corporation. This process, although unavoidable, was difficult for both
the organization and the employees.
Regulations governing the disposition of staff were contained in Orders in
Council 2945, 2966, and 2947. In accordance with these regulations, approximately 974 Public Works employees were hired by the Corporation, 88 resigned
with severance pay, 70 chose early retirement, 44 retired normally, and 74 left
the service for various reasons. Of the remainder, 90 employees were placed by
the Public Service Commission in vacant positions in other ministries. This left
347 supernumerary to the Corporation's requirements.
A "Staff Relocation Committee" was formed by the Honourable Evan
Wolfe, Minister of Finance, under the chairmanship of Lome Tomalty, to
expedite the movement of supernumeraries from Public Works to other ministries.
Thanks to the efforts of this committee, aided by line staff in all ministries, all 347
supernumerary employees were successfully assigned to other ministries throughout the Province by April 1, 1978.
Walter W. Ekins
REPORT OF THE ACTING DIRECTOR OF MAINTENANCE
The former Director of Operations Services, Stan Lloyd, retired in October
1977, after leading the Maintenance Division for many years. In spite of this
and numerous other staff changes, plus the problems involved in the transition from
a Government ministry to a Crown corporation, the Maintenance Division provided
good service to other ministries throughout the Province. All employees can be
commended for their efforts in achieving most of the objectives set at the beginning
of the year and in completing many other tasks given them.
A. Antrobus, P.Eng.
Acting Director of Maintenance
 SAFETY ENGINEERING SERVICES DIVISION
101
REPORT OF THE CONTRACTS ADMINISTRATOR
The last tabulation of "Major Tenders Received and Contracts Awarded"
will appear in the annual report of the B.C. Buildings Corporation.
Since 1954, I have been directly involved with some of the more positive
aspects of the provision of buildings and other works for the benefit of the public.
I applaud my colleagues in design, construction, maintenance, and management.
Together we handled a great number of the requirements of other departments and
ministries as evidenced by the contract listing over the years and the numerous
fine buildings throughout the Province. From a score of projects worth an
average of $6 million in each of the early sixties, our work program increased to
the 200 and more contracts worth around $50 million in each of the last few years.
As a service department also, we did our best to conform to our unofficial
motto: "We must lead, not follow", and we were truly proud of the name
"Provincial Public Works." Information about the Public Works Department
can be obtained from the Provincial Archives. Public Works documentation is on
microfilm in various forms for the viewing and retrieval of written and graphic
information at the Central Microfilm Bureau and film capable of full-size drawing
reproduction is available elsewhere.
S. E. Edgecombe, A.R.I.C.S.
Contracts Administrator
  HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS
 104
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
CONTRACT STATISTICS
SUMMARY BY ELECTORAL DISTRICTS OF GRADING, PAVING,
BRIDGE, FERRY-LANDING, FERRY, CRUSHED GRAVEL AND
MISCELLANEOUS CONTRACT PROJECTS COMPLETED OR IN
PROGRESS
Electoral District
Alberni    .Paving:
S-0677
Project
Parksville Bypass  on  Highways  19  and 4,   and miscellaneous
roads in the Parksville area (14.79 miles).
Atlin  Grading:
3321
Reconstruction:  Derrick  Creek to District Lot 3411  on
wanga-Meziadin Lake section of Highway 37 (13.64 miles).
Kit-
Bridges:
1170
Fabrication and installation of steel grating decks and anciltary
works on Bell Irving 1 and 2; Devil Creek and Stikine River
Bridge on the Stewart-Cassiar section of Highway 37.
Crushed Gravel:
M-3195    Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile.
Contract 15: Bear Creek Pit, Dease Lake District.
Contract  17:  Aeroplane Lake and Deep Creek Pits in Dease
Lake District.
Boundary-Similkameen Paving:
S-2277
S-1177
Yellow Lake to Kaleden section of Highways 3a and 97 (11.86
miles).
Grand   Forks   to   Boothman   section   of   the   Southern   Trans-
Provincial Highway 3 and miscellaneous roads (10 miles).
Bridges:
1143
General construction of the Westbridge Bridge 2619 on the Rock
Creek-Kelowna Highway 33.
Crushed Gravel:
M-3195    Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile.
Contract 2: Graveyard Pit in Penticton District.
Contract 16: Mile 11 on Big White Road Pit in Kelowna District.
Burnaby-Edmonds Bridges:
1099
Cariboo Paving:
S-2977
S-3077
S-3277
S-3377
S-3777
S-6277
General construction of the Stormont Avenue Bridge and Stor-
mont Avenue Overhead on the Simon Fraser University Way.
M:scellaneous roads in the Williams Lake area (36.03 miles).
Mackenzie Avenue in Williams Lake, storm sewer, curb and
gutter, and paving (1.40 miles).
Likely Road and Horsefly Road (19.2 miles).
Junction of Highway 97 to Deka Lake Road on Highway 24
(20 miles) and Horse Lake Road (14.1 miles).
Miscellaneous roads in the 100 Mile House area (11.05 miles).
Nazko,   Blackwater,   and   Norwood   Roads   north   of   Quesnel
(25 miles).
Bridges:
1096    Reinforced-concrete foundations, structural steel and wire rope
erection.
Contract 1: Marguerite and Isle Pierre ferries.
Contract 3: Big Bar and Lytton ferries.
Crushed Gravel:
M-3195    Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile.
Contract 1: Forestry Pit in 100 Mile House District.
Contract 6: In 100 Mile House District.
Contract 13: Centennial Pit in Williams Lake District.
Contract 18: 106 Mile Pit in 100 Mile House District.
Chilliwack.
.Paving:
S-0177
Old Yale Road in District of Chilliwhack, storm sewers,
and gutter, and paving (1.53 miles).
curb
Bridges:
Columbia River..
1098
..Paving:
S^»377
Construction of the B.C. Hydro Railway Underpass 2624 over
the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
Contract 1: Substructure.
Contract 2: Steelwork.
Paving Radium streets, Edgewater streets, and section of Highway 93/95 (11.8 miles).
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
105
Electoral District
Comox
Coquitlam
Cowichan-Malahat
Delta
Dewdney.
Esquimalt .
Fort George .
Project
-Bridges:
1082 General construction of Adam and Eve River Bridges on the
Island Highway 19.
1083 General construction  of the Stowe Creek,  Lower Elk Creek,
and Upper Elk Creek Bridges on the Island Highway 19.
1087 General construction of the Black Creek Bridge on the Island
Highway 19.
1088 General construction of the Mohun Creek Bridge on the Island
Highway 19.
1141    General construction of the Quinsam River Bridge 312 on the
Gold River Road.
1175    Dolphin repairs at the Little River ferry terminal.
Crushed Gravel:
M-3195    Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile.
Contract 10: Islands off the east coast of Vancouver Island and
Port Hardy.
Grading:
3144    Preliminary roadwork on the Lougheed Connection  to Cape
Horn-Pitt River Highway.
Bridges:
1177    Construction of traffic barriers at the Port Mann Bridge 1614 on
the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
Miscellaneous:
E-7667    Signal and lighting installations on Highway 7a, St. John Street
in Port Moody.
-Paving:
S-0876    Haslam Road to Fielding Road on the Trans-Canada Highway
1 and roads in the Cedar Road area (7.1 miles).
Bridges:
975 General reconstruction (widening) of the Holmes Creek, White-
house Creek, and Chemainus River Bridges on the Trans-
Canada Highway 1.
1084 General construction of the Westholme Bridge Duplicate 1306
on the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
..Ferry and Ferry Terminals:
T.F. 183    Electrical installation at the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal.
Miscellaneous:
E-7656    Lighting installations on Highway 17  at the interchange  with
Highway 99.
M-119    Dredging and wingwall replacement at Berth 1 of the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal.
-Paving:
S-0277    Agassiz townsite on Highway 9; storm sewer, curb and gutter,
and paving (0.90 mile).
Bridges:
870    Contract 4: Alternatives of structural steel
vs.
870    Contract 5:   Prestressed concrete in the superstructure of the
Pitt River Bridge upstream structure on the  Lougheed Highway 7.
-Paving:
S-0577    West Coast Highway 14 (18.6 miles).
Bridges:
1095 Colquitz River Bridge on Trans-Canada Highway 1.
Contract 1: Piledriving.
Contract 2: Substructure.
Contract 3. Fabrication and erection of structural steel.
1181    General  construction  of the  Interurban-Burnside  Bridge  2656.
Miscellaneous:
2805    Bituminous surfacing of Gillespie Road  to Pike Road on  the
East Sooke Road (4.8 miles).
.. Grading:
2842    Honeymoon Creek to District Lot 8917 on John Hart Highway
97 (13.72 miles).
Paving:
S-3477    McBride east on the Yellowhead Highway 16 (14.5 miles).
S-6377    Chief Lake Road to O'Dell Road on John Hart Highway 97 and
Salmon River Road (21.5 miles).
S-6477    Miscellaneous   roads   in   the   Prince   George   area   north   of
Nechako River (7.6 miles).
S-6577    Miscellaneous roads in the Prince George area east of Fraser
River (11.7 miles).
S-6677    Miscellaneous  roads  in   the  Prince  George   area  outside  city
boundaries (14.1 miles).
Bridges:
1096 Reinforced-concrete foundations, structural steel and wire rope
erection.
Contract 1: Marguerite and Isle Pierre ferries.
 106
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Electoral District
Kamloops	
Keotcnay .
Langley..
Mackenzie -
Nanaimo..
Nelson-Creston.
North Okanagan.
Project
-Paving:
S-3577    Cherry Creek to Merritt Junction on the Trans-Canada Highway
1 (6.84 miles).
S-3677   Junction of Highway 5 to Mount Tod Road on the Heffley-
Louis Creek Road and the Mount Tod Road (11.29 miles).
Bridges:
1096    Reinforced-concrete foundation, structural steel, and wire rope
erection.
Contract 4: McLure and Littlefort ferries.
Crushed Gravel:
M-3195    Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile.
Contract 4: Watson Pit in Kamloops District.
Contract 5: Pinantan Pit in Kamloops District.
Contract 21: Johnson-Blackpool Pit in Kamloops District.
Contract 22: Peterson (Scott)-Barriere Pit in Kamloops District.
-Paving:
S-4077    Resurfacing Fourth Street North to 12th Street North and 12th
Street North to 30th Avenue North on Southern Trans-Provincial Highway 3 in the City of Cranbrook (1.34 miles), storm
sewer, curb and gutter, and paving (1.87 miles).
Bridges:
1169    General construction of the Wasa Bridge on  the Kootenay-
Columbia Highway 95.
Crushed Gravel:
M-3195    Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile.
Contract 9: Corbin Pit in Fernie District.
-Bridges:
1149    Construction  of  marine  structures  at   Barnston  Island   Ferry
Terminals.
Miscellaneous:
3322   Landscape development of the Pike Road Interchange to 264th
Street Interchange on the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
-Ferry and Ferry Terminals:
T.F. 191    Langdale Ferry Terminal.
Contract 1: Construction of sewage collection, treatment, and
disposal systems.
Contract 2:  Construction of concrete block sewage treatment
building.
Contract 3: Installation of mechanical ventilation and electrical
works in the sewage treatment facility.
Miscellaneous:
M-95    Revisions to washroom facility at the Langdale Ferry Terminal.
M-96   Construction of minor buildings at the Saltery Bay Ferry Terminal.
M-122    Installation of brace piles to wingwalls of Berth 2 at Earls Cove
Ferry Terminal.
-Grading:
2900    Reconstruction:   Norwell   Drive  to   Hammond  Bay   Road   on
Island Highway 19 (2.97 miles).
Paving:
S 0876    Haslam Road to Fielding Road on the Trans-Canada Highway
1 and roads in the Cedar Road area (7.1 miles).
Bridges:
1074    Contract 3: Deck construction on the Englishman River Bridge
on the Island Highway 19.
1101    Marine structures at the Nanaimo and Gabriola Island Ferry
Terminals.
1167    Electrical installations at the Thetis Island Ferry Terminal.
Crushed Gravel:
M-3195    Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile.
Contract 7: Degnin Pit on Gabriola Island in Nanaimo District.
Contract 10: Islands off the east coast of Vancouver Island and
Port Hardy, Region 6.
Miscellaneous:
M-94    Installation of a new turning dolphin at Berth 2 in the Departure Bay Ferry Terminal.
-Paving:
S-4577    Ootischenia to Meadows Siding section of the new Southern
Trans-Provincial Highway 3 (16.04 miles).
Bridges:
1164    General  construction  of the  Meadows  Siding  Overhead  and
Beaver  Creek  Bridge  on  the  new  Southern Trans-Provincial
Highway 3.
-Grading:
3188    Reconstruction: Reids Corner to Ellison Lake on the Okanagan
Highway 97 (4.14 miles).
3206    Reconstruction:   Vernon   to   Aberdeen   Road   on   Highway  6
(2.79 miles).
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
107
Electoral District
North Peace River 	
Omineca
Prince Rupert-
Richmond	
Revelstoke-Slocan..
Rossi and-Trail-
Saanich and the Islands.
Shuswap-
Skeena-
South Peace River..
Surrey..
Project
...Grading:
3534    Tsinhia Lake to Northwest Territory boundary on Fort Nelson
to Fort Simpson (Liard) Highway clearing only (29.84 miles).
Ferry and Ferry Terminals:
1100    Hovercraft Ferry for the Fort Nelson River crossing.
Crushed Gravel:
M-3195    Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile.
Contract 3:   McLeod and Lind Lake Pits in the Vanderhoof
District.
..Paving:
S-6776 Fairview Bay to Eighth Street on the Yellowhead Highway 16
in Prince Rupert; storm sewer, curb and gutter, and paving
(1.20 miles).
-Paving:
S0377    Resurfacing the Oak Street Bridge on Highway 99.
Bridge:
627    Contract 13:  Rehabilitation of bulkhead on the Crown Zellerbach Dock of the Knight Street Bridge.
Miscellaneous:
M-93    Dredging and dolphin replacements at the Deas maintenance
facility.
M-105   Dredging northwest corner of basin at the Deas maintenance
facility.
.Crushed Gravel:
M-3195    Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile.
Contract 11: Kelly Pit in Revelstoke District.
-Paving:
S-4577    Ootischenia to Meadows Siding section of new Southern Trans-
Provincial Highway 3 (16.04 miles).
-Grading:
3121    Blanshard Street Extension (1.42 miles).
Crushed Gravel:
M-3195    Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile.
Contract 10: Islands off the east coast of Vancouver Island and
Port Hardy.
Miscellaneous:
2639    Bituminous surfacing on Isabella Point Road and Cranberry
Road (3.3 miles) on Saltspring Island.
E-7668    Signal   and  lighting  installations  between   Harriet  Road   and
Thetis Lake Overhead on the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
M-97    Construction  of a waiting shelter and  toll  booth  at Sturdies
Bay Ferry Terminal.
M-102    Port wingwall replacement at Montague Harbour Ferry Ter-
mineral.
M 120    Electrical installations at Montague Harbour Ferry Terminal.
M-121    Wingwall and dolphin repairs at the Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal.
M-128    Ramp tower pile repairs at the Village Bay Ferry Terminal.
- Crushed Gravel:
M-3195    Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile.
Contract 8: Grube Pit in Salmon Arm District.
Contract 12: Zickmantel Pit in Salmon Arm District.
Contract 20: Watershed Pit in Vernon District.
-Grading:
3320    Kitwanga to District Lot 1206 on Kitwanga-Meziadin Lake section of Highway 37 (12.82 miles).
Bridges:
1096    Reinforced-concrete foundations, structural steel and wire rope
erection.
Contract 2: Usk ferries.
1168    General construction of the Agate Creek 2237, Igneous Creek
2581 and Kwinitsa Creek Bridges on the Prince Rupert to Terrace section of the Yellowhead Highway 16.
-Grading:
3198 Junction of Highway 97 to Martin Creek  on Gwillim  Lake
Road;
clearing and grubbing (14.01 miles).
3199 Martin Creek to Gwillim Lake on Gwillim Lake Road;
clearing and grubbing (28.28 kilometres).
-Bridges:
1177    Construction of traffic barriers at the Port Mann Bridge 1614
on the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
Miscellaneous:
3322    Landscape development of the Pike Road Interchange to 264th
Street Interchange section of the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
 108 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Electoral District Project
Vancouver South    Bridges:
627    Contract 13:  Rehabilitation of bulkhead on the Crown Zellerbach Dock at the Knight Street Bridge.
Miscellaneous:
M-3202    Landscape maintenance at the Marine Drive to Knight Street
Bridge Interchange in Vancouver.
Victoria Grading:
3121    Blanshard Street Extension (1.42 miles).
West Vancouver-Howe Sound Bridges:
1090    Mamquam River Bridge 1029 on the Garibaldi Highway 99.
Contract 1: Substructure.
Contract 2 (in previous year's report).
Contract 3: Deck.
1172    Contract 1:  Superstructure maintenance of suspended spans in
the Lions Gate Bridge modifications.
Miscellaneous:
2127    Contract 2: Landscape development at Wildwood Lane between
15th Street and Taylor Way underpasses on the Trans-Canada
Highway 1 (Upper Levels).
M-92    Installation of a Are protection system at the Horseshoe  Bay
Ferry Terminal.
M-117    Dolphin repairs at Berth 3 of the Horseshoe Bay Ferry Terminal.
M-3189    Landscape maintenance.
Contract 1: Horseshoe Bay to Caulfeild Underpass (2.55 miles)
on the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
Contract 2:  Caulfeild Underpass to 21st Street Overpass (5.56
miles) on the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
Contract 3: 21st Street Overpass to Taylor Way (1.64 miles) on
the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
Yale-Lillooet Grading:
2802    Construction of passing lanes on the Spences Bridge to Cache
Creek section of the Trans-Canada Highway 1 (9.35 miles).
Paving:
S-2077    Boston Bar to Jackass Mountain section of the Trans-Canada
Highway 1 (17.1 miles).
S-2177    Miscellaneous sections between Skaist Creek and Copper Creek
on the Southern Trans-Provincial Highway 3 (16.73 miles).
S-2877    Jackass Mountain to Drynock Overpass section of the Trans-
Canada Highway 1 (13.6 miles).
Bridges:
1096    Reinforced-concrete foundation, structural steel  and wire rope
erection.
Contract 3: Big Bar and Lytton ferries.
Crushed Gravel:
M-3195    Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile.
Contract 19:  Copper Mountain and Boulder Pits in Penticton
District.
Miscellaneous:
E-7703    Lighting installations in the Sailor Bar and Saddle Rock Tunnels on the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
Various Electoral Districts Bridges:
757    Contract 4: Modifications to bracing on five steel through truss
bridges.
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED
109
Highways
Description of Work and Name of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project 2802—Trans-Canada Highway passing lanes: Spences
Bridge to Cache Creek section (9.35 miles):
$
3,476,062.00
4,179,860.40
4,830,924.00
5,168,210.20
5,481,579.00
5,657,486.00
5,726,313.00
6,071,396.00
6,784,334.00
8,472,988.00
9,737,933.00
10,510,942.00
10,827,456.50
1,255,594.00
1,315,253.00
1,432,280.65
1,475,193.85
1,644,121.24
1,722,863.45
2,646,275.80
2,658,328.03
2,663,530.60
2,948,934.50
618,135.50
657,135.94
667,099.00
692,837.60
744,999.00
768,970.00
796,732.85
945,063.50
1,655,182.45
1,717,321.00
1,834,806.50
1,887,977.00
1,976,806.65
1,988,855.00
2,134,345.00
2,138,041.00
83,900.00
123,600.00
132,300.00
256,368.20
291,400.00
341,619.00
34? 960 OO
Blackstone Paving Ltd _ _ _   	
Project 2842—John  Hart-Peace  River  Highway  reconstruction:   Honeymoon  Creek   to   District  Lot   8917   section
(13.72 miles):
Project 2900—Island Highway reconstruction: Norwell Drive
to Hammond Bay Road section (2.97 miles):
Hub City Paving Ltd	
Standard General Construction (B.C.) Ltd 	
Webb & Trace Ltd	
Project   3121—Blanshard   Street   Extension,   Victoria   (1.42
miles):
H.B. Contracting Ltd	
Project 3144—Contract  1:   Cape Horn-Pitt  River  Highway
preliminary roadworks: Lougheed connector:
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd	
Standard General Construction (B.C.) Ltd	
Miller Cartage & Contracting Ltd. _	
Project   3188—Okanagan   Highway   reconstruction:    Reid's
Corner to Ellison Lake section  (4.14 miles):
Geddes Contracting Co. Ltd	
Awarded.
Miller Cartage & Contracting Ltd	
Edgeworth Construction and Rentals Ltd	
Project 3198—Contract 1:  Gwillim Lake Road clearing and
grubbing: Junction Highway 97 to Martin Creek section
(14.01 miles):
Roller Bros. Construction Ltd	
Tompkins Contracting Ltd	
Miann Contracting Ltd	
Procan Industries Ltd	
Western Earthco Ltd	
Miller Cartage & Contracting Ltd..
346,640.00    |
Geddes Contracting Co. Ltd	
SQ4 960 00     1
 110
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Highways—Continued
Description of Work and Name of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project 3199—Contract 1:  Gwillim Lake Road clearing and
grubbing: Martin Creek to Gwillim Lake (28.283 km):
Tompkins Contracting Ltd _ - —
Miann Contracting Ltd -	
Procan Industries Ltd _ -	
Western Earthco Ltd 	
Tacfor Logging Ltd  _
Chinook Construction & Engineering Ltd	
Miller Cartage & Contracting Ltd _ 	
Geddes Contracting Co. Ltd..
Project 3206—Vernon-Slocan Highway reconstruction: Vernon to Aberdeen section (2.34 miles), reconstruction:
Kalamalka Lake Road (0.24 mile), construction: Pottery
Road (0.21 mile):
LeDuc Paving Ltd _ _	
Miller Cartage & Contracting Ltd	
Goodbrand Construction Ltd _	
View Construction Ltd 	
Midvalley Construction Ltd _	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
Jack Cewe Ltd _ _	
Project 3320—Kitwanga-Meziadin Lake Highway construction: Kitwanga to District Lot 1206 section (12.82
miles):
Miller Cartage & Contracting Ltd _
Geddes Contracting Co. Ltd.
Edgeworth Construction & Rentals Ltd.-
Emil Anderson Construction Co. Ltd	
Chinook Construction & Engineering Ltd	
Dawson Construction Ltd	
Project 3321—Kitwanga-Meziadin Lake Highway reconstruction: Derrick Creek to District Lot 3411 section (13.64
miles):
Emil Anderson Construction Co. Ltd	
Blackstone Paving Ltd.	
Dawson Construction Ltd -	
Dillingham Corporation (Canada) Ltd..
Chinook Construction & Engineering Ltd..
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd.	
Project 3534—Fort Nelson-Fort Simpson (Liard) Highway
clearing: Tsinhia Lake to Northwest Territory boundary
section (29.84 miles):
General Enterprises Ltd	
Miann Contracting Ltd	
Procan Industries Ltd	
Tacfor Logging Ltd.
Tompkins Contracting (1977) Ltd...
North American Road Ltd 	
Geddes Contracting Co. Ltd	
173,501.20
288,502.00
341,251.27
354,002.40
368,114.23
480,653.24
688,828.39
2,487,853.86
1,279,222.00
1,297,770.00
1,302,818.00
1,594,448.00
1,599,495.00
1,698,996.00
1,722,670.67
4,197,531.50
4,349,244.50
4,544,198.22
5,369,599.00
5,459,320.00
5,589,778.50
7,539,944.00
7,558,535.57
7,587,605.50
8,463,767.00
9,254,675.00
9,711,411.00
376,756.00
403,800.00
420,764.00
430,270.00
438,764.00
452,650.00
718,740.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
I Awarded.
Paving
Project  2639—Contract   1:   Isabella   Point   and   Cranberry
Roads, Saltspring Island (3.3 miles):
Jack Cewe Ltd. _ _	
Island Asphalt Producers Ltd -	
Project 2805—Contract 1: East Sooke Road from Gillespie
Road to Pike Road section (4.8 miles):
Island Asphalt Producers Ltd  	
Standard General Construction (B.C.) Ltd	
Project S-0876—Trans-Canada  Highway:   Haslam  Road  to
Fielding Road section and Cedar area roads (17.1 miles):
Hub City Paving Ltd _ _  	
LeDuc Paving Ltd _	
I
79,600.00
101,240.00
116,550.00
122,500.00
571,932.00
753,099.00
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
i
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
111
Paving—Continued
Description of Work and Name of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project S-6776—Pillsbury Avenue to Eighth Street and Eighth
Street to Third Avenue, Prince Rupert:
Jack Cewe Ltd	
Granby Construction & Equipment Ltd..
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd. _	
H.B. Contracting Ltd-
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd.-
Project S-0177—Old Yale Road reconstruction: Hodgins Avenue to Sardis Interchange section (1.53 miles):
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd _ _	
River Construction Ltd— _	
Goodbrand Construction Ltd  - 	
Standard General Construction (B.C.) Ltd.
Jack Cewe Ltd  _..
H.B. Contracting Ltd-
Project S-0277—Highway 9 in Agassiz Townsite:  McDonald
Road to Pioneer Avenue section (0.9 mile):
Goodbrand Construction Ltd	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd _ _	
River Construction Ltd  _	
Jack Cewe Ltd  	
Miller Cartage & Contracting Ltd..
Imperial Paving Ltd 	
H.B. Contracting Ltd.
Standard General Construction (B.C.) Ltd..
Project S-0377—Highway 99: Oak Street Bridge (1.2 miles):
Standard General Construction (B.C.) Ltd.
Jack Cewe Ltd  	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd..
Project 5-0577—Highway 14 (West Coast Road): Tugwell
Creek Bridge to west of Jordan River sections (18.6
miles):
Victoria Paving Co. Ltd	
Hub City Paving Ltd _	
O.K. Paving Co. Ltd.
Standard General Construction (B.C.) Ltd...
Dawson Construction Ltd _	
Project S-0677—Highways 19 and 4:  Parksville Bypass and
miscellaneous roads in Parksville area (14.79 miles):
R.&E. Paving (1975) Ltd.
Midvalley Construction Ltd	
Island Asphalt Producers Ltd.
Dawson Construction Ltd	
Standard General Construction (B.C.) Ltd..
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd-
Project   5-2077—Trans-Canada   Highway:    Boston
Jackass Mountain section (17.1 miles):
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd _ 	
Bar   to
Dawson Construction Ltd	
Midvalley Construction Ltd..
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
Project S-2177—Southern Trans-Provincial Highway: Skaist
Creek to Copper Creek miscellaneous sections (16.73
miles):
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd _ _ _	
LeDuc Paving Ltd..
Midvalley Construction Ltd..
Project 5-2277—Highway 97: Waterman Hill to Okanagan
Game Farm section (2.82 miles) and Highway 3a: Yellow Lake south to Highway 97 north junction and Highway 97 south junction spur (9.04 miles):
Peter Bros. Industries Ltd. & Jacfor Logging Ltd	
H. Williamson Blacktop & Landscaping Ltd.	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd    	
LeDuc Paving Ltd.
Midvalley Construction Ltd..
1,726,041.13
1,783,565.77
1,795,328.70
1,882,444.90
1,894,857.00
967,277.25
1,010,233.36
1,122,396.10
1,179,843.50
1,185,810.96
1,385,417.27
357,699.00
378,707.88
380,700.38
446,406.15
448,115.80
484,883.40
486,314.40
526,584.00
124,300.00
147,020.00
218,955.00
717,718.00
727,085.00
749,460.00
771,245.00
,073,651.00
616,663.75
619,850.20
657,781.50
692,230.70
742,586.40
816,290.00
834,475.00
908,130.00
1,059,770.00
1,145,100.00
1,055,890.00
1,116,535.00
1,288,602.50
561,025.00
599,400.00
633,500.00
645,410.00
943,155.00
Reconstruction and widening
Pillsbury Avenue to Eighth
Street, recapping Eighth to
Third Avenue. Second call
for tenders.    Asphalt paving.
Awarded.
Storm  sewer,  curb  and  gutter
and paving.
Awarded.
Storm  sewer,  curb  and  gutter,
sidewalk and paving.
Awarded.
Removal of existing pavement
and replacing medium mix
asphalt pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt    concrete    levelling
course and pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Medium cover seal coat aggregate in stockpile; asphalt
concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
 112
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Paving—Continued
Description of Work and Name of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project S-2877—Trans-Canada  Highway:   Jackass  Mountain
to Drynock Overpass section (13.6 miles):
Dawson Construction Ltd.
Midvalley Construction Ltd.
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd	
Project S-2977—Williams Lake area, miscellaneous paving
(36.03 miles):
H. Williamson Blacktop & Landscaping Ltd	
Midvalley Construction Ltd.. „ - 	
Dawson Construction Ltd     	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd   - -
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd _  	
Project S-3077—MacKenzie Avenue between Old Chilcotin
Bridge and Comer Street, Williams Lake (1.40 miles):
Winvan Paving Ltd -	
Jack Cewe Ltd _	
Goodbrand Construction Ltd.- —-	
B.A. Blacktop (Kamloops) Ltd -	
Standard General Construction (B.C.) Ltd	
H.B. Contracting Ltd.
Project S-3277—Likely Road from junction of Highway 97
toward Likely (7.9 miles) and Horsefly Road from junction of Likely Road toward Horsefly (11.3 miles):
H. Williamson Blacktop & Landscaping Ltd 	
West Coast Paving Co. Ltd	
Midvalley Construction Ltd 	
Dawson Construction Ltd  	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd  	
Project S-3377—Highway 24 from junction of Highway 97 to
Deka Lake Road (20.0 miles) and Horse Lake Road
from junction of Highway 97 easterly (14.1 miles):
Dawson Construction Ltd  	
West Coast Paving Co. Ltd  	
Midvalley Construction Ltd.	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd _ _	
Project S-3477—Highway 16 from 2.65 miles east of McBride
easterly (15.25 miles):
Midvalley Construction Ltd ._	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd    	
West Coast Paving Co. Ltd	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
LeDuc Paving Ltd.
Project  S-3577—Trans-Canada   Highway   from  Afton   Miles
turnoff to Highway 5 junction (5.89 miles)  and Cherry
Creek easterly (0.95 mile):
B.A. Blacktop (Kamloops) Ltd.   	
Dawson Construction Ltd  	
Peter Bros. Industries Ltd. _	
Midvalley Construction Ltd _	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd. _ __	
Project S-3677—Heffley-Louis Creek Road between Highway
5 and Mount Tod Road (10.84 miles)  and Mount Tod
Road (0.45 mile):
B.A. Blacktop (Kamloops) Ltd. _	
Dawson Construction Ltd — -	
Peter Bros. Industries Ltd „	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd  _	
Project S-3777—Miscellaneous paving in the Forest Grove
and Horse Lake areas east of 100 Mile House (11.05
miles):
Peter Bros. Industries Ltd _	
Dawson Construction Ltd „	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd	
723,950.00
783,220.00
791,200.00
1,582,245.00
1,648,824.00
1,672,664.35
1,737,950.50
1,926,257.50
1,046,676.65
1,115,306.18
1,217,759.00
1,260,171.55
1,287,593.70
1,655,538.15
1,047,570.00
1,097,005.00
1,148,890.00
1,238,628.00
1,347,070.00
1,531,614.00
1,898.
2,052.
2,095,
2,111,
2,131.
1,248.
1,372.
1,394.
1,524,
1,626.
700.00
178.00
755.00
823.00
800.00
,250.00
,370.00
035.00
.500.00
.480.00
Lane additions, crushed granular surfacing, asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Crushed     granular     surfacing,
asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Storm   sewer,
and paving.
Awarded.
curb  and  gutter
Crushed granular surfacing and
asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Crushed     granular     surfacing,
asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
I
518,866.95
526,635.00
548,545.00
594,980.00
723,665.00
316,816.95
324,645.00
334,725.00
396,452.00
626,760.00
653,805.00
837,445.00    |
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Intermittent recap with apshalt
concrete levelling course and
pavement.
Awarded.
Crushed granular surfacing and
asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
113
Paving—Continued
Description of Work and Name of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project S-4077—Highway 3 (Cranbrook Street) between 12th
Street north and 30th Avenue north and resurfacing
Fourth Street north to 12th Street north (1.87 miles):
B.A. Blacktop (Cranbrook) Ltd  	
Goodbrand Construction Ltd _	
Interior Contracting Co. Ltd — -	
Jack Cewe Ltd.      	
H.B. Contracting Ltd.
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd._
Project S-4177—Highway 3 from Grand Forks to Boothman
(5.75 miles) and intermittent sections east and west of
Grand Forks (4.25 miles):
H. Williamson Blacktop & Landscaping Ltd 	
Peter Bros. Industries Ltd.	
LeDuc Paving Ltd  _	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd _ _	
Midvalley Construction Ltd..
Project S-4377—Radium streets (3.4 miles), Edgewater streets
(5.0 miles)  and Highway 93/95, intermittent recap between Radium and Windermere Junction (3.4 miles):
LeDuc Paving Ltd.
West Coast Paving Co. Ltd.-
Peter Bros. Industries Ltd	
Midvalley Construction Ltd...
Project S-4577—Southern  Trans-Provincial   Highway:   Ooti-
schenia to Meadows Siding section (16.04 miles):
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd..
LeDuc Paving Ltd..
West Coast Paving Co. Ltd  	
H. Williamson Blacktop & Landscaping Ltd..
Midvalley Construction Ltd - 	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd	
Project S-6277—Nazko Road from Mile 5.1 to Mile 22.0
(16.9 miles), Blackwater Road from Mile 5.0 to Mile
11.2 (6.2 miles), and Norwood Road from Mile 0.0 to
Mile 1.9 (1.9 miles):
Dawson Construction Ltd _	
H. Williamson Blacktop & Landscaping Ltd. 	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd   „	
Midvalley Construction Ltd  —	
Project 5-6377—John Hart Highway 97: Chief Lake Road to
O'Dell   Road  section   (20.5   miles)   and   Salmon   River
Road (1.0 mile):
L. G. Scott & Son's Construction Ltd      	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd —.—	
West Coast Paving Co. Ltd..
H. Williamson Blacktop & Landscaping Ltd..
Dawson Construction Ltd	
Midvalley Construction Ltd..
Project S-6477—Prince George area, miscellaneous roads (7.6
miles):
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd ._	
L. G. Scott & Son's Construction Ltd.    _
Project S-6577—Prince George area, miscellaneous roads east
of Fraser River (11.7 miles):
L. G. Scott & Son's Construction Ltd.	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd.— -	
Project S-6677—Prince George area, miscellaneous roads outside of city boundary (14.1 miles):
L. G. Scott & Son's Construction Ltd	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd. -	
703,973.38
723,770.20
830,786.00
882,935.98
948,252.85
948,700.50
557,780.00
572,950.00
586,410.00
717,610.00
744,864.00
398,504.00
423,390.00
425,760.00
474,976.00
1,867,822.00
1,994,574.70
2,037,704.00
2,038,984.00
2,632,977.00
2,637,081.00
496,215.00
532,350.00
573,290.00
845,985.00
984,670.00
994,915.00
1,054,620.00
1,058,900.00
1,081,120.00
1,129,585.00
446,515.00
533,900.00
548,630.00
738,165.00
632,960.00
714,855.00
Storm  sewer,  curb  and  gutter,
and paving.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Crushed granular base, crushed
granular surfacing, and asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Crushed granular surfacing and
asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
Asphalt concrete pavement.
Awarded.
 114
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Bridges
Description of Work and Name of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project 627—Contract 13: Knight Street Bridge 2403:
McDermids & Lofting (1967) Ltd	
$
37,774.00
41,222.90
44,477.65
53,206.00
58,043.48
78,735.00
53,801.00
57,583.00
92,696.00
97,292.00
2,938,139.57
3,077,875.78
4,155,406.00
2,846,164.00
3,240,324.00
3,488,190.00
254,456.00
256,876.94
286,922.00
306,397.39
333,256.45
344,341.30
295,370.70
308,521.00
362,263.00
379,766.25
456,780.00
314,149.00
329,135.56
346,460.98
359,995.30
360,161.00
388,875.00
399,230.00
408,322.51
440,156.42
771,581.40
863,516.30
864,239.00
888,626.68
894,514.20
1,086,515.39
1,146,502.50
1,249,429.60
917,145.40
990,277.00
1,004,227.30
1,004,536.25
1,062,338.90
1,227,102.50
1,250,737.20
1,432,384.10
Rehabilitation of bulkhead  for
Crown Zellerbach dock.
Project 757—Contract 4:   Five steel through truss bridges
(Kingsgate, Ryan, Yale, Upper Illicillewaet, and Coquitlam River):
Modifications to bracing.
Canron Ltd., Western Bridge Division	
Project 870—Pitt River Bridge upstream structure:
Contract 4: Superstructure:
Structural steel alternative.
Contract 5: Superstructure
Prestressed concrete alternative.
Project 975—Contract 1: Holmes Creek, Whitehouse Creek,
and Chemainus River Bridges, Trans-Canada Highway:
Partial demolition and widening
of Holmes Creek and White-
house Creek bridges; construction of two abutments al
Chemainus River Bridge.
Awarded.
Cana Construction Co. Ltd 	
Project 1074—Contract 3: Englishman River Bridge, Island
Highway:
Deck.   First call for tenders.
Continental Construction Ltd - _
Second call for tenders.
Project   1082—Contract   1:   Adam   River   and   Eve   River
bridges, Island Highway:
Scheme A—Concrete alternative:
Cascade Builders Ltd. and Cascade Industries Ltd	
General contract.
Awarded.
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd	
Chinook Construction & Engineering Ltd  	
Peter Kiewit Sons Co. Ltd 	
Scheme B—Steel alternative:
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
115
Bridges—Continued
Description of Work and Name of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project 1083—Contract  1:   Stowe Creek,  Lower Elk Creek
and Upper Elk Creek Bridges, Island Highway:
Scheme A—Concrete alternative:
Manning Construction Ltd _
Cana Construction Co. Ltd  _	
G. W. Carlson Construction Ltd _	
Cascade Builders Ltd. and Cascade Industries Ltd..
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd.	
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd	
Chinook Construction & Engineering Ltd..
Bastion Construction Ltd  _	
Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd _	
Kingston Construction Ltd 	
Scheme B—Steel alternative:
Manning Construction Ltd..
Cana Construction Co. Ltd 	
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd..
Bastion Construction Ltd 	
Kingston Construction Ltd 	
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd	
Cascade Builders Ltd. and Cascade Industries Ltd...
Chinook Construction & Engineering Ltd _
G. W. Carlson Construction Ltd _	
Project 1084—Contract 1: Westholme Duplicate Bridge 1036,
Trans-Canada Highway:
Dura Construction Ltd   	
G. W. Carlson Construction Ltd—
Bastion Construction Ltd	
Cascade Industries Ltd	
Kingston Construction Ltd	
A. R. Grimwood Ltd  _	
Barnett-McQueen Co. Ltd	
Cana Construction Co. Ltd—
Chinook Construction & Engineering Ltd _ 	
Project 1087—Contract 1: Black Creek Bridge 1062, Island
Highway:
Kingston Construction Ltd  _ -
G. W. Carlson Construction Ltd — _	
Hallcraft Construction Co. Ltd	
Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd  _	
Cana Construction Co. Ltd 	
Cascade Builders Ltd. and Cascade Industries Ltd..
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd   	
Chinook Construction & Engineering Ltd _ 	
Manning Construction Ltd  	
Project 1088—Contract 1: Mohun Creek Bridge 1515, Island
Highway:
Kingston Construction Ltd.
Caversham Construction Ltd 	
Cascade Builders Ltd. and Cascade Industries Ltd..
Hallcraft Construction Co. Ltd 	
G. W. Carlson Construction Ltd	
Barnett-McQueen Co. Ltd _ 	
Bastion Construction Ltd. _ _
Cana Construction Co. Ltd	
Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd—
Project 1090—Mamquam River Bridge 1029, Garibaldi Highway:
Contract 1—
Kingston Construction Ltd _	
G. W. Carlson Construction Ltd _	
Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd  	
Caversham Construction Ltd	
Contract 3—
Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd.
Kingston Construction Ltd...
Bastion Construction Ltd	
Cana Construction Co. Ltd.
573,781.00
656,679.00
659,419.20
669,717.65
674,655.00
675,469.00
702,454.00
715,549.67
718,692.30
727,947.60
647,843.00
709,552.07
755,736.00
773,279.80
804,665.75
807,112.13
807,387.65
815,472.40
934,110.30
365,820.00
384,159.52
399,399.78
407,430.50
409,336.06
438,192.05
453,236.95
456,233.25
625,124.60
138,563.65
159,798.25
168,298.00
176,583.00
178,170.00
179,504.05
184,700.00
230,658.00
254,292.00
279,586.20
284,104.00
285,744.00
293,419.00
303,010.76
312,964.00
314,523.71
328,641.00
402,357.00
78,771.25
98,002.60
99,401.00
102,190.00
139,954.00
147,620.54
152,228.00
155,420.00
General Contract.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
General contract.
Awarded.
General contract.
Awarded.
General contract.
Awarded.
Substructure.
Awarded.
Deck.
Awarded.
 116
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Bridges—Continued
Description of Work and Name of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project 1095—Colquitz River Bridge Duplicate 2655, Trans-
Canada Highway:
Contract 1—
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd.	
Franki (Canada) Ltd.
Harbour Pile Driving Co. Ltd	
Contract 2—
Cascade Industries Ltd	
Dura Construction Ltd	
G. W. Carlson Construction Ltd-
Cana Construction Co. Ltd	
Farmer Construction Ltd 	
Kingston Construction Ltd..
Project 1095—Colquitz River Bridge Duplicate 2655, Trans-
Canada Highway:
Contract 3—
Canron Ltd., Western Bridge Division..
Brittain Steel Ltd.— _	
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd..
Great West Steel Industries Ltd 	
Surrey Ironworks Ltd  	
Inlet Metal and Machining Co. Ltd.
Project 1098—B.C. Hydro Railway Underpass 2624,  Trans-
Canada Highway:
Contract 1—
Scheme A—Expanded tip pile alternative:
Kingston Construction Ltd	
Mutual Construction Ltd	
A. R. Grimwood Ltd  	
River Construction Ltd	
Kenyon Construction Ltd	
Cana Construction Co. Ltd—	
Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd	
Chinook Construction & Engineering Ltd..
Goodbrand Construction Ltd	
Manning Construction Ltd..
Hallcraft Construction Co. Ltd	
Dillingham Corp. (Canada) Ltd	
Scheme B—Steel pipe pile alternative:
Kenyon Construction Ltd..
Chinook Construction & Engineering Ltd..
Goodbrand Construction Ltd	
Dillingham Corp. (Canada) Ltd	
Contract 2—
Canron Ltd., Western Bridge Division .
Brittain Steel Ltd _	
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd	
Surrey Ironworks Ltd—
Project 1099—Contract 1: Stormont Avenue Bridge and Stor-
mont Avenue Overhead, Simon Fraser University Way:
A. R. Grimwood Ltd _ 	
H. Haebler Co. Ltd _	
Kingston Construction Ltd  	
Project 1141—Contract 1: Quinsam River Bridge 312, Gold
River Road:
Bastion Construction Ltd _	
Dura Construction Ltd 	
Cascade Industries Ltd 	
Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd	
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd..
Dillingham Corp. (Canada) Ltd—.
Nootka Sound Construction Ltd—
G. W. Carlson Construction Ltd—
Kingston Construction Ltd	
20,277.88
35,408.00
56,033.20
45,433.76
45,490.00
48,673.70
52,000.00
57,938.92
67,345.35
171,273.00
191,399.00
215,077.00
219,460.00
227,400.00
261,677.00
159,140.10
165,531.00
179.921.00
186,022.88
190,285.00
199,630.00
205,270.00
205,317.00
211,677.00
242,000.00
249,987.00
278,332.00
226,223.00
245,351.00
272,954.50
328,944.00
235,007.00
245,077.00
287,875.00
288,500.00
916,114.90
1,047,828.49
1,113,121.55
86,823.27
87,715.98
97,861.54
113,874.00
130,893.53
145,490.00
153,040.66
156,321.70
163,441.45
Piledriving.
Awarded.
Substructure.
Awarded.
Fabrication
structural
Awarded.
and
steel
erection    of
works.
j Substructure.
| Awarded.
Not awarded.
Supply,    fabrication,    delivery.
and    erection    of    structural
steelwork.
Awarded.
General contract.
Awarded.
General contract.
Awarded.
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
117
Bridges—Continued
Description of Work and Name of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project  1143—Contract   1:   Westbridge   Bridge   2619,   Rock
Creek to Kelowna Highway:
Kenyon Construction Ltd _  	
A. R. Grimwood Ltd. & Russword Construction Ltd	
Kingston Construction Ltd 	
G. W. Carlson Construction Ltd  -	
Interior Contracting Ltd _	
Manning Construction Ltd _	
Project 1164—Contract 1: Meadows Siding Overhead 2593
and Beaver Creek Bridge 2644, Southern Trans-Provincial Highway:
Scheme A—Prestressed-concrete alternative:
Kenyon Construction Ltd..
Manning Construction Ltd	
Goodbrand Construction Ltd —	
Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd  	
Kingston Construction Ltd	
Boundary Structural Ltd..	
G. W. Carlson Construction Ltd   	
Scheme B—Structural-steel alternative:
Kenyon Construction Ltd	
Manning Construction Ltd	
Goodbrand Construction Ltd.	
Kingston Construction Ltd -	
Boundary Structural Ltd	
G. W. Carlson Construction Ltd	
Project 1168—Contract 1: Terrace to Prince Rupert Bridges
(Agate Creek 2237, Igneous Creek 2581, Kwinitsa Creek
2580), Yellowhead Highway:
Kingston Construction Ltd	
Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd	
Bastion Construction Ltd 	
Project 1169—Contract 1: Wasa Bridge, Kootenay-Columbia
Highway 95:
A. R. Grimwood Ltd. & Russword Construction Ltd	
Kenyon Construction Ltd..
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd	
Dillingham Corp. (Canada) Ltd	
Goodbrand Construction Ltd 	
G. D. Shaw Construction Ltd. & Ansha Contracting Co. Ltd.
Cana Construction Ltd	
Maxum Structures Ltd _  	
Project 1170—Contract 1: Bell Irving River Bridge 1 (2154),
Bell Irving River Bridge 2  (2195), Devil Creek Bridge
(2326), and Stikine River Bridge (1576), Stewart-Cassiar
Highway:
Bickerton Bridge & Steel Erectors Co	
Walter Cabott Construction Ltd.	
Surrey Ironworks Ltd   	
Canron Ltd., Western Bridge Division	
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd.  	
Project 1172—Contract 1: Lions Gate Bridge, modifications,
suspended spans:
Canron Ltd., Western Bridge Division	
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd. „ -	
Brittain Steel Ltd.  	
Project 1177—Contract 1: Port Mann Bridge, Trans-Canada
Highway:
Surrey Ironworks Ltd..	
Robertson Building Systems Ltd	
Walter Cabott Construction Ltd	
Alpine Steel Ltd.
Delta Aggregates Ltd	
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd.
X.L. Ironworks Ltd 	
Coast Steel Fabricators Ltd	
Brittain Steel Ltd —	
Canron Ltd., Western Bridge Division..
295,037.90
343,181.25
364,009.70
395,057.70
407,558.00
440,303.00
419,223.00
481,614.00
557,410.00
565,801.00
571,110.15
644,105.90
810,097.85
542,525.50
579,903.00
672,700.00
689,198.85
741,194.40
1,091,655.05
374,519.82
398,992.20
467,471.35
1,978
1,988
2,057
2,131
2,155
2,261
2,373
2,543
,858.40
891.10
457.80
,335.00
,265,00
,397.20
,000.00
,902.68
1,962,015.00
2,093,029.00
2,139,829.00
2,229,437.00
2,552,132.00
168,775.00
231,408.00
595,055.00
227,018.00
238,647.00
293,397.00
296,000.00
321,500.00
330,085.00
330,667.00
361,111.00
386,104.00
412,009.00
General contract.
Awarded.
General contract.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
General contract.
Awarded.
General contract.
Awarded.
Fabrication and installation of
steel grating decks and ancillary works.
Awarded.
Superstructure maintenance.
Awarded.
Traffic barriers.
Awarded.
 118
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Bridges—Continued
Description of Work and Name of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project 1181—Contract 1: Interurban-Burnside Bridge 2656,
Burnside Road:
$
108,066.16
111,784.32
119,035.74
119,096.65
124,661.27
125,678.00
134,617.50
137,251.00
General contract.
Kingston Construction Ltd  _   _
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd	
Ferries and Ferry Terminals
Bridge   Project   1096—Reinforced-concrete   foundation   and
structural steel and wire rope erection:
Contract 1: Marguerite and Isle Pierre reaction ferries
and Marguerite aerial ferry:
Demac Engineering Ltd.
Canron Ltd., Western Bridge Division .
Surrey Ironworks Ltd   	
Kenyon Construction Ltd..
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd  	
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd  _	
Brittain Steel Ltd    	
Contract 2: Usk reaction ferry and Usk aerial ferry:
Surrey Ironworks Ltd  _.   _	
Brittain Steel Ltd	
Canron Ltd., Western Bridge Division.
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd—
Contract 3: Big Bar and Lytton reaction ferries and
Big Bar aerial ferry:
Norgaard Construction Ltd. _ _ _	
Demac Engineering Ltd	
Brittain Steel Ltd _ _ _
Canron Ltd  _ _ _ 	
Surrey Ironworks Ltd  	
Contract 4:   McLure  reaction  ferry  and  Little  Fort
aerial ferry:
Norgaard Construction Ltd  	
Surrey Ironworks Ltd  _ 	
Demac Engineering Ltd— _ _ ~
Brittain Steel Ltd     _ 	
Canron Ltd., Western Bridge Division .
Bridge Project  1100—Hover  Ferry  for  Fort  Nelson   River
Crossing, Fort Nelson to Fort Simpson Highway:
Yarrows Ltd.
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd..
Vancouver Shipyards Co. Ltd...
Bridge Project 1101—Contract
ferry terminals:
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd.
1:   Nanaimo   and   Gabriola
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd..
Dillingham Corporation (Canada) Ltd 	
Harbour Pile Driving Co. Ltd  	
Bridge  Project  1149—Contract   1:   Barnston   Island   ferry-
landings:
Quadra Construction Co. Ltd—
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd	
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd  _	
Dillingham Corporation (Canada) Ltd 	
Bridge Project 1167—Thetis Island ferry terminal:
Hamilton Electric Ltd   _	
Canpac Installations Ltd...
Thiel Electric Ltd	
Western Power Cable Jointing Ltd—
Rathlef Electric Co	
73,676.00
79,293.00
95,120.00
124,500.00
131,275.00
147,782.00
165,000.00
60,000.00
83,000.00
90,000.00
96,160.00
88,900.00
89,800.00
97,500.00
128,706.00
139,307.00
56,450.00
67,800.00
69,200.00
78,000.00
81,357.00
613,300.00
638,200.00
827,934.00
275,850.00
275,925.00
357,084.00
364,230.00
30,628.00
33,723.00
46,552.00
49,914.00
10,729.00
11,130.00
11,940.00
12,290.00
12,927.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Marine structures.
Awarded.
Marine structures.
Awarded.
Electrical installation.
Awarded.
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
119
Ferries and Ferry Terminals—Continued
Description of Work and Name of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Bridge Project 1175—Little River ferry terminal:
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd	
Harbour Pile Driving Co. Ltd..
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd	
Project M-92—Horseshoe Bay ferry terminal:
Tideline Enterprises Co. Ltd—
D. C. Festing & Sons Ltd	
Hallcraft Construction Co. Ltd	
Tideline Enterprises Co. Ltd 	
Project M-93—Dease maintenance facility:
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd—
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd..
Project M-94—Departure Bay ferry terminal:
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd-
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd	
Dillingham Corporation (Canada) Ltd.
Project M-95—Langdale ferry terminal:
Edward Epp & Associates 	
Gaines Construction Ltd..
Dube Construction..
Project M-96—Saltery Bay ferry terminal:
Doiron & Woodman Construction Ltd	
Laycon Construction & Development Ltd-
Project M-97—Sturdies Bay ferry terminal:
Raymond Enterprises Ltd  _ 	
Easton Contracting Ltd 	
W. & W. Electric Ltd   	
Project M-102—Montague ferry terminal:
Harbour Pile Driving Co. Ltd 	
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd..
Project M-105—Deas maintenance facility:
Scheme 1—Disposal by ocean dumping:
J. N. Services Ltd 	
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd	
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd	
Scheme 2—Disposal on dry land:
J. N. Services Ltd  —	
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd	
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd-
Project M-117—Horseshoe Bay ferry terminal:
Dillingham Corporation (Canada) Ltd 	
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd—  	
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd—
Project M-119—Tsawwassen ferry terminal:
D. J. Byrne Construction Ltd..
Dillingham Corporation (Canada) Ltd..
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd..
Project M-120—Montague Harbour ferry terminal:
Mawson Gage Associates Ltd	
E. H. Emery & Esquimau Electric Ltd..
Hamilton Electric Ltd   	
Heal Electric Ltd 	
Scott Electric Ltd 	
Ricketts-Sewell Electric Ltd..
Gamma Electric Ltd	
E. H. Emery and Esquimau Electric Ltd.
Mawson Gage Associates Ltd 	
Thiel Electric Ltd  	
Hamilton Electric Ltd 	
Heal Electric Ltd _  	
Ricketts-Sewell Electric Ltd-	
Harland Electrical Services Ltd—
82,100.00
94,459.00
121,490.00
27,500.00
44,161.00
39,453.00
45,241.00
95,765.00
111,120.00
143,997.00
144,518.00
161,754.00
13,000.00
13,506.00
19,300.00
7,297.31
8,960.00
12,897.00
32,442.00
4,260.00
49,360.00
53,370.00
44,874.00
39,150.00
41,400.00
32,940
40,340
65,200
118,481
144,684
199,450
163,030
166,119
185,197
11,942
12,880
14,983.
16,694
16,890
19,324.
20,320
12,483.
12,942,
13,580.
14,982.
15,988.
17,424.
26,539.
Dolphin repairs.
Awarded.
Fire  protection  system.     First
call for tenders.
Not awarded.
Second call for tenders.
Awarded.
Dredging and  dolphin  replacement.
Awarded.
New turning dolphin, Berth 2.
Awarded.
Washroom revisions.
Awarded.
Minor buildings.
Awarded.
Waiting shelter and tollbooth.
Awarded.
Bid on electrical work only.
Port wingwall replacement.
Awarded.
Dredging   northwest   corner   of
basin.
Not awarded.
Awarded.
Dolphin repairs, Berth 3.
Awarded.
Wingwall      replacement      and
dredging,   Berth   1.
Awarded.
Electrical installation. First call
for tenders.
Not awarded.
Second call for tenders.
Awarded.
 120
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Ferries and Ferry Terminals—Continued
Description of Work and Name of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project M-121—Swartz Bay ferry terminal:
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd	
Dillingham Corporation (Canada) Ltd	
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd—	
D. J. Byrne Construction Ltd	
Project M-122—Earls Cove ferry terminal:
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd 	
Dillingham Corporation (Canada) Ltd	
D. J. Byrne Construction Ltd 	
Project M-128—Village Bay ferry terminal:
Harbour Pile Driving Co. Ltd	
D. J. Byrne Construction Ltd	
Fraser River Pile Driving Co. Ltd	
Dillingham Corporation (Canada) Ltd	
Can-Dive Services Ltd. 	
Greenlees Piledriving Co. Ltd        	
Delta Aggregates Ltd	
H.B. Contracting Ltd	
Project T.F. 183—Contract 3: Tsawwassen ferry terminal:
Gamma Electric Ltd	
Daken Installations Ltd.	
C.H.E. Williams Co. Ltd	
Mott Electric Ltd	
Project T.F. 191—Langdale ferry terminal:
Contract 1—
Tideline Enterprises Co. Ltd.
Seaward Construction Ltd	
Mutual Construction Ltd	
D. C. Festing & Sons Ltd.	
Manning Construction Ltd—..
Contract 2—
Raymond Enterprises Ltd.	
Ambrose Dube 	
Guran Construction Co. Ltd..
Contract 3—
B.E. Electric Ltd	
Smith Electric Ltd	
Gamma Electric Ltd 	
Raymond Enterprises Ltd.
199,525.00
232,500.00
267,357.00
269,206.00
40,320.00
43,696.00
44,425.00
43,056.00
69,613.00
81,331.00
93,800.00
99,870.07
112,790.00
139,000.00
151,500.00
15,218.95
20,288.00
21,411.00
22,159.00
66,234.00
74,100.00
79,788.00
81,394.00
82,750.00
10,700.00
11,905.00
38,682.00
6,626.00
9,612.50
12,200.00
27,300.00
Wingwall and dolphin repairs.
Installation   of   brace   piles   to
wingwalls, Berth 2.
Awarded.
Repairs to ramp tower piles.
Awarded.
Electrical work at Berth 5 and
breakwater lighting at Berths
3 and 5.
Awarded.
Installation of sewage collection treatment and disposal
systems.
Awarded.
Concrete   block   sewage   treatment building.
Awarded.
Mechanical ventilation and electrical works for sewage treatment facility.
Awarded.
Miscellaneous
Project 2127—Contract 2: Upper Levels Highway at Wild-
wood Lane between 15th Street and Taylor Way Overpass:
Mandeville Gardens  _ _  	
Turner's Nurseries and Landscaping Ltd   	
Ekset Contracting Ltd  _ _ _ _ _ _.
Ocean Park Nurseries Ltd _ _ _ _	
Project   3322—Contract   1:
Pike
Trans-Canada   Highway:
Road Interchange to 264 Street Interchange:
Turner's Nurseries & Landscaping Ltd _ _ _ 	
Jackway Landscaping Ltd   _     _ 	
Ekset Contracting Ltd  _   _ _ 	
Project  E-7656—Route   17   and   Route  99   Interchange   and
Route 99 from Route 17 to Slough Bridge, Delta:
Ricketts-Sewell Electric Ltd _ _ _ _ _ —
United Power Ltd  _ _ _ _ _
C. H. E. Williams Co. Ltd. _   —
Scott Electric Ltd _   _ _ _ _ _ _
Goodbrand Construction Ltd _ _ _ - -
6,752.00
8,327.00
13,820.00
19,877.00
32,047.72
33,440.00
46,300.00
91,347.27
94,482.65
101,100.25
108,306.00
129,868.00
j Landscape development.
I
| Awarded.
Landscape development.
Awarded.
Lighting installation.
Awarded.
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
Miscellaneous—Continued
121
Description of Work and Name of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project E-7667—Route  7a   (St.   Johns  Street)   from   Grant
Street to Clearview Drive, Port Moody:
Ricketts-Sewell Electric Ltd _ _ _ _ _.
Scott Electric Ltd _ _ _ _  	
C. H. E. Williams Co. Ltd   _ __.
I
Project E-7668—Route 1 from Harriet Road to Thetis Lake
Overpass:
Ricketts-Sewell Electric Ltd 	
Heal Electric Ltd  _ - _ _ _ _
Trilec Installations Ltd _   _ _ _ _
Project E-7703—Route 1, Sailor Bar and Saddle Rock Tunnels
Rickett-Sewell Electric Ltd _ _ _ _....
Heal Electric Ltd _ _ _. _ _ _ _.
S. & S. Electric Ltd    _. _ _	
Mott Electric Ltd  _ _   _
C. H. E. Williams Co. Ltd.  _ - _ _ _—
Project M-3189—Trans-Canada Highway:
Contract 1: Horseshoe Bay to Caulfield Underpass:
Ekset Contracting Ltd    _   	
Holland Landscapers Ltd  -   	
Contract 2: Caulfield Underpass to 21st Street:
Ekset Contracting Ltd  _ _ _ _ 	
Holland Landscapers Ltd    _.. 	
Contract 3: 21st Street Overpass to Taylor Way:
Holland Landscapers Ltd _ _   _ _„
Ekset Contracting Ltd.
Project M-3195—Crushed granular surfacing in stockpile:
Contract 1:  Forestry Pit 2724 on Hendrix Lake forest
access road:
W. E. Robertson Construction Co. Ltd  _
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd      	
Argus Aggregates Ltd.. _ _ _ _ 	
Contract 2: Graveyard Pit in Penticton Highway District:
D.M.J. Construction Ltd  _ _ _ _.	
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd  _ _ 	
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd      	
Argus Aggregates Ltd   _ _ - 	
Contract 3: McLeod Pit 4505 near Vanderhoof and Lind
Lake Pit 4512 near Fort St. James:
W. E. Robertson Construction Co. Ltd _ _ _
David Martens & Sons Ltd _ _ _  	
Rocky Mountain Crushing Ltd  _	
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd    	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd _ _ _ _ _ _	
Argus Aggregates Ltd  	
Contract 4: Watson Pit at Savona:
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd	
Jalor Holdings Ltd    _   _	
R. L. Shanko    _ _ _ 	
Rocky Mountain Crushing Ltd    	
D.M.J. Construction Ltd.    	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd _ _ - - _	
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd	
Contract 5: Pinantan Pit on Pinantan to Pritchard Road:
Jalor Holdings Ltd. — _ _   _..	
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd .._ _ —	
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd    	
D.M.J. Construction Ltd  _ _ _	
Rocky Mountain Crushing Ltd   _ _	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd. _ _ _ _	
Contract 6: South Fork Pit 2732 on Eagen Lake Road
and Green Lake Pit 2756 east of 70 Mile House:
D.M.J. Construction Ltd _ _ _ _   _	
Jalor Holdings Ltd     _ _ 	
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd —   	
Rocky Mountain Crushing Ltd _ _ _  	
Vernon Paving Ltd    _ _  	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd  _ _ _ 	
Signal and lighting installation.
21,875
29,800
32,150
57,880
77,837
81,455
24,777
31,777
46,560
63,628
69,775
44,810
49,370
36,530
56,235
45,540
48,140
I Awarded.
i Signal and lighting installation.
I
I
I
|
| Lighting installation.
j Awarded.
I
I
I
Landscape development.
Awarded.
i Awarded.
I
I
1 Awarded.
53,400.00      Awarded.
61,500.00 |
91,200.00 I
I
49,500.00 | Awarded.
85,500.00 |
86,500.00 |
105,000.00 |
175,500.00
187,500.00 |
193,500.00 |
201,750.00 j
273,750.00 |
307,500.00 |
Awarded.
61,700.00      Awarded.
61,854.00
70,000.00
77,400.00 |
85,200.00 |
91,400.00 |
119,200.00 |
44,976.00 | Awarded.
46,000.00 |
46,800.00
58,000.00 |
59,600.00 i
81,600.00 I
94,000.00 I Awarded.
94,800.00 |
111,000.00 |
134,000.00 |
147,000.00 |
181,500.00 I
 122
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Miscellaneous—Continued
Description of Work and Name of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project M-3195—Continued
Contract 7: Degnin Pit, Gabriola Island:
Victoria Paving Co. Ltd _ _	
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd —
Hub City Paving Ltd 	
Contract 8: Grube Pit west of Chase:
Jalor Holdings Ltd  - _	
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd..
Peters Bros. Sand and Gravel Ltd..
D.M.J. Construction Ltd 	
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd _ _	
Argus Aggregates Ltd  _ _ —
Contract 9: Corbin Pit in Fernie Highway District:
D.M.J. Construction Ltd  _ _  	
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd  - _ _ 	
Argus Aggregates Ltd _ _ _   	
Contract  10:   Islands off the east coast of Vancouver
Island and at Port Hardy:
Island Asphalt Producers Ltd.
Jack Cewe Ltd _ _	
Argus Aggregates Ltd   _	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd _   _	
CR. Aggregate Sales Ltd  _ _	
Winvan Paving Ltd _ _ _ _ _	
Contract 11: Kelly Pit, north of Revelstoke:
Rocky Mountain Crushing Ltd _ _ _	
D.M.J. Construction Ltd _ _ _	
Peters Bros. Sand & Gravel Ltd _	
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd.  __	
Midvalley Construction Ltd   _ _.
Contract 12: Zickmetal Pit west of Falkland:
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd   _   _
Vernon Paving Ltd  _ _ _ _	
D.M.J. Construction Ltd _ _ _ -	
Rocky Mountain Crushing Ltd	
Peters Bros. Sand & Gravel Ltd	
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd—
Argus Aggregates Ltd..
Contract 13: Centennial Pit south of Williams Lake:
Quesnel Redi-Mix Cement Co. Ltd - _	
D.M.J. Construction Ltd _ _ _ _
Jalor Holdings Ltd   _ _ _ _
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd _ _ _ _	
Rocky Mountain Crushing Ltd _ _ _	
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd   _ _	
Argus Aggregates Ltd..
Contract 15: Bear Creek Pit P5382 north of Atlin:
Rocky Mountain Crushing Ltd _ _  	
Dawson Construction Ltd   _ _ _	
C. & R. Contracting (1975) Ltd _ _ _ 	
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd    _ 	
E. Lobe Contracting Ltd   _ _ _ 	
Contract  16:   Mile  11  Big White  Road  Pit,  Kelowna
Highway District:
Vernon Paving Ltd _ _ _ - — -	
D.M.J. Construction Ltd  _ — _ _	
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd _   	
Goodbrand Construction Ltd _ _ _ _ _
Argus Aggregates Ltd.
Contract 17: Aeroplane Lake and Deep Creek Pits in
Dease Lake Highway District:
C. & R. Contracting (1975) Ltd  _ _ _ __
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd  _ _ 	
Rocky Mountain Crushing Ltd. _ _ _ _	
Geddes Contracting Co. Ltd   _ _ _ _
Argus Aggregates Ltd _ _ _ - _ _ _
42,000.00
60,000.00
63,000.00
55,500.00
56,250.00
58,150.00
58,700.00
78,650.00
111,000.00
58,500.00
77,850.00
148,050.00
650,980.00
701,700.00
703,658.50
727,980.00
770,951.00
1,388,352.00
74,000.00
74,900.00
76,500.00
80,100.00
98,500.00
74,175.00
84,500.00
85,850.00
92,050.00
94,750.00
95,250.00
148,750.00
62,500.00
62,500.00
63,400.00
72,100.00
73,400.00
76,100.00
113,000.00
133,200.00
142,200.00
147,000.00
161,400.00
192,000.00
46,500.00
49,000.00
64,000.00
66,300.00
112,000.00
172,700.00
174,000.00
214,000.00
258,000.00
263,000.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Crushed granular surfacing and
asphalt cold mix material in
stockpiles.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 CONTRACT STATISTICS
123
Miscellaneous—Continued
Description of Work and Name of Tenderers
Amount of
Tenders at Unit
Rates Based
on Estimated
Quantities
Remarks
Project M-3195—Continued
Contract  18:   106  Mile  Pit  2906,
House:
D.M.J. Construction Ltd   	
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd—
north  of   100  Mile
Quesnel Redi-Mix Cement Co. Ltd..
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd	
Argus Aggregates Ltd..
South Grove Gravel Ltd      	
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd  - — 	
Contract 19:  Copper Mountain and Boulder Pits, Penticton Highway District:
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd  _   	
D.M.J. Construction Ltd _ _ _ _ _ _	
Rocky Mountain Crushing Ltd   _ _	
South Grove Gravel Ltd  _ _  	
Peters Bros. Industries Ltd   _ - 	
Ceccon Trucking and Excavating Ltd—
Argus Aggregates Ltd	
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd-
Contract 20: Watershed Pit 2438 east of Enderby:
D.M.J. Construction Ltd  	
Petes Developments Ltd—
Rocky Mountain Crushing Ltd _
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd.,.
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd	
Vernon Paving Ltd 	
South Grove Gravel Ltd 	
Argus Aggregates Ltd—
W. E. Robertson Construction Co. Ltd..
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd  _ 	
Contract 21: Johnson-Blackpool Pit, south of Clearwater
River Bridge:
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd.
Rocky Mountain Crushing Ltd 	
W. E. Robertson Construction Co. Ltd..
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd —	
D.M.J. Construction Ltd  _
West Coast Paving Co. Ltd 	
Petes Developments Ltd.	
Argus Aggregates Ltd—
Columbia Bitulithic Ltd 	
Contract 22: Peterson (Scott)-Barriere Pit, north of
North Thompson Bridge on Yellowhead South Highway:
D.M.J. Construction Ltd   	
Rocky Mountain Crushing Ltd  	
Ptarmigan Gravel Ltd..
Johnson's Trucking Western Ltd	
Petes Developments Ltd _ _   	
Argus Aggregates Ltd  	
Project M-3202—Landscape Maintenance:  Contract 1:  Marine Drive and Knight Street Interchange:
Ekset Contracting Ltd .	
Holland Landscapers Ltd _ 	
$
53,550.00
58,275.00
64,350.00
73,350.00
78,300.00
81,900.00
115,650.00
77,250.00
79,500.00
96,750.00
97,500.00
110,250.00
118,750.00
154,750.00
163,750.00
49,500.00
55,500.00
62,400.00
62,400.00
62,700.00
65,400.00
78,000.00
84,000.00
90,000.00
107,400.00
66,850.00
70,300.00
79,500.00
81,700.00
85,000.00
99,400.00
99,500.00
116,400.00
127,200.00
44,900.00
45,600.00
47,800.00
57,800.00
64,000.00
79,600.00
120,750.00
157,700.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 124
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
REGIONAL REPORTS
REGION 1
(P. J. Carr, Regional Highway Engineer, Burnaby)
North Vancouver, Gibsons, New Westminster, and Chilliwack Highway Districts
North Vancouver District
Roads
Maintenance—Moderate weather, with three substantial snowfalls, resulted in
an increase in winter activities in comparison to the previous two years. District
roads were well maintained through the winter months. In January, snowslides
closed Garibaldi Highway 99 in the Cheakamus Canyon between Squamish and
Whistler. Early in November, heavy rains and run-off caused a creek to overflow
its banks at Porteau on the Horseshoe Bay to Squamish section of Garibaldi Highway 99. A substantial quantity of gravel was deposited on the roadway due to this
overflow. As the previous winter was mild, we did not experience any flood conditions or related drainage problems during the spring of the year. Through the
summer months, considerable time was spent on asphalt patching on Garibaldi
Highway 99 in the Squamish to Garibaldi and Whistler to Pemberton sections in
an effort to preserve the rapidly deteriorating pavement. In the Squamish area, 4
kilometres of the Squamish Valley Road, surface material was mixed with lignosul-
phonate to help control the dust problem. In the Whistler area, the Alta Lake Yard
was prepared for paving and paved along with the Garibaldi to Mons paving contract.
Extensive hand brushing was accomplished on the Upper Levels section of the Trans-
Canada Highway 1 on the Student Program. During the latter months of the fiscal
year, scheduled rock scaling on the high bluffs was undertaken on the Horseshoe Bay
to Britannia section of Garibaldi Highway 99. Also, a major regravelling program
was undertaken on the Squamish Valley Road, Lillooet Lake Road, Pemberton
Portage Road, and on Highway 99 at Brunswick Beach Hill. At Garibaldi, a bridge
was eliminated and replaced by culverts. On Bowen Island, a box-culvert was
replaced and an extensive tree trimming program was undertaken. Snowfall was
between moderate and average in all areas of the district, with totals of 40 centimetres at North Vancouver, 92 centimetres at Bowen Island, 120 centimetres at
Britannia, 230 centimetres at Squamish, 518 centimetres at Whistler, and 360
centimetres at Pemberton.
Construction—Reconstruction projects on Garibaldi Highway 99 comprised
the major portion of the Day Labour Program this year. Upon completion of the
reconstruction of Atlas Hill and Brandywine Creek sections, the contract for paving
30 kilometres of the Garibaldi to Mons section was completed and 4 570 metres
of Type A guardrail was installed. The remaining 3 660 metres of Type A guardrail required to complete this section will be installed in 1978. Work commenced
on 27.3 kilometres of the Whistler to Pemberton section of Highway 99, with
widening and drainage improvements on the Green River Hill section. This is a
continuing project consisting of widening, drainage improvements, some realignment, and a truck lane. Paving and reinstallation of Type A guardrail and median
barrier was completed on the Suicide Hill section of Highway 99 south of Pemberton, except for the stabilization of the fill slope at the north end of this project.
The Mamquam Bridge approaches and riprap were completed on the new reloca-
 REGIONAL REPORTS
125
tion of Highway 99 from Squamish to Alice Lake. The new bridge is under contract and nearing completion. Completion of the Furry Creek Hill truck lane on
Highway 99 south of Britannia has this section ready for paving during 1978. On
Highway 99, approximately 28 kilometres of shoulder upgrading and paving were
completed on the Horseshoe Bay to Squamish section and 2 kilometres were completed on the Squamish to Garibaldi section. In the last month, 14 kilometres of
shoulder upgrading and paving were completed on the north end of the Horseshoe
Bay to Squamish section and the remaining 3 kilometres should be completed
during 1978. Work continued and the reconstruction was completed and ready
for paving on the Pemberton Portage Road, White Creek to Poole Creek section.
This is a continuing project and consists of widening, some realignment, and grade
changes. Smaller projects undertaken in the district consisted of base strengthening
and repaving 4.5 kilometres of the Pemberton Portage Road, and reconstruction
and realignment of the Capilano Bridge approach on the Trans-Canada Highway 1
was completed to the paving stage.   Paving will be undertaken during 1978.
Bridges and Ferry-landings
On Trans-Canada Highway 1, expansion plates were replaced on the Second
Narrows Bridge approaches, the Trans-Canada Underpass 2 structure, the Premier
Street Overpass structure, and the Eton Street Overpass structure. This work was
undertaken at night to avoid the heavy traffic volume. Log stringer bridges over
One Mile Creek on Highway 99, and Ditch Creek on the Pemberton Portage Road,
were replaced by prestressed-concrete box-stringer bridges. One truss section of
the Red Bridge, over the Lillooet River on the Pemberton Portage Road, collapsed
and was replaced by 30 metres of Bailey bridge. Montizambert Creek Bridge, on
Montizambert Road north of Horseshoe Bay, was replaced with 12 metres of
Bailey bridge. On Gates Creek Road, Gates Creek Bridge was reconstructed as
the old bridge was unrepairable.
Buildings
No major work was done on any of the facilities in the district this year.
Routine maintenance was done by British Columbia Buildings Corporation.
Gibsons District
Roads
Maintenance—Normal maintenance was carried on throughout the district
with the major activities being brushing, ditching, patching, and gravelling. Winter
maintenance was normal with only a few minor problems. No spring flooding
problems were encountered. Metric signing was completed on time with no
problems. Four kilometres of road were roadmixed and 2.5 kilometres of road
were reconstructed with our Minor Betterment Program.
Construction—About 1.6 kilometres of Highway 101 in the Powell River
area were widened and paved. Garden Bay Road, Chaster Road, and Chamberlin
Road were reconstructed. Eureka and Sandy Hook Roads were widened and
paved. Also, 0.32 kilometre of Sechelt Arterial Highway was widened, paved, and
curbed. Approximately 18 kilometres of side roads in the Pender Harbour area
were improved in preparation for paving by the Drum Mixer Program. During
March an extensive gravelling, brushing, and shouldering program on side roads
was undertaken and completed. Nine old wooden box culverts under Highway
101 in the Powell River area were replaced.
 126 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Bridges
No. 7329 Stowe Bridge was replaced with a concrete abutment and stringer
structure. Stringers and deck were replaced on No. 7338 Murphy Foot Bridge.
This construction and all regular maintenance was undertaken by the North
Vancouver bridge crew.
Buildings
Additional office space was obtained for the district office. A trailer was
purchased to provide assembly room and foreman office space on Texada Island.
An exhaust system was installed in the Gibsons garage and new overhead doors
were put on the Madeira Park garage. Routine maintenance was provided by the
British Columbia Buildings Corporation.
New Westminster District
Roads
Maintenance—The district once again experienced a mild winter and was able
to catch up on small activities that are often overlooked under pressure of more
important events. Emphasis was given to bringing up to standard the ditches
throughout the district, with litter pick-up, road surface cleaning, shouldering and
patching being some of the other major maintenance activities. All district road
crews, along with the sign crew, were involved with the massive job of converting
all the road signs to metric.
Construction—Base strength and pave 1.5 miles of Pacific Highway 15 from
64th Avenue to Fraser Highway.
Extension of Southwest Marine Drive for access to parking facilities, and
intersection improvements with 16th Avenue, UBC.
Install multi-plate casing pipe for major gas line relocation at Colony Farm
access, Mayfair Development.
Extensive shoulder paving on Sea Island Way, Oak Street, Westminster Highway, Steveston Highway, Matthews, King George VI Highway 99a, and Campbell
River Interchanges on Highway 99. Shoulder paving at Johnston Road, Hjorth
Road, and Clover Valley Interchanges on the Trans-Canada Highway 1.
Reshape and pave 1.5 miles of Westminster Highway, from Boundary Road
to Hamilton Road.
Regrade and pave 0.5 mile of Kensington Avenue from the Trans-Canada
Highway 1 to Sprott Street.
Reshape and pave 2 miles of Scott Road from 72nd Avenue to 80th Avenue,
and at the intersection of Old Yale Road.
Install twin 17-foot pipe-arches at Campbell River and build road from
Second to Eighth Avenue on 172nd Street.
Replace 7 miles of highway fencing on the Trans-Canada Highway 1 and
Highway 99 under a continuing Day Labour program.
Build curb and cutter section of lane in the vicinity of 92nd Avenue to
eliminate access from King George VI Highway 99a.
Intersection improvements and channelization on Pacific Highway 15 at 96th
Avenue, Fraser Highway 1a at 92nd, 240th, and 264th Streets; Highway 10 at
148th and 192nd Streets; King George VI Highway 99a at Colebrook Road.
Landscaping—Regrading of slopes and ditches was done on the Trans-Canada
Highway 1 and Highway 99 with planting and bark mulching at various locations
in the median of the Trans-Canada Highway 1.   Planting and bark mulch was also
 REGIONAL REPORTS 127
done at pedestrian overpass at Dewdney Trunk Road and Lougheed Highway 7, at
Queens JPark, New Westminster, at south end of Oak Street Bridge, and at Highway
99 and Westminster Highway.
Auxiliary weeding crew and contract gardening was continued on Knight
Street Bridge and associated interchanges.
Bridges
Expansion joints on Oak Street Bridge were rebuilt and the deck repaved.
Foundation and abutment preparation was done for the two bridge structures at
Stormont Interchange, Trans-Canada Highway 1. The laminated deck on the
Nicomekl Bridge on Fraser Highway 1a was replaced and paved.
Eight-foot box culvert on Glover Road was extended.
Sign bridge protection was installed on the Knight Street Bridge.
Maintenance on all other structures was carried out with considerable time
being taken on concrete deck patching.
Ferries
This year a new ferry the Klatawa was introduced into the Fort Langley-
Albion run replacing the T'Lagunna.
Deck restoration and repairs to docking installations were undertaken at both
the Albion and Barnston Island ferry-landings.
Chilliwack District
Roads
Maintenance—Roads in the Chilliwack District were well maintained. District
crews installed 1,800 feet of guardrail on the Agassiz Bypass. Old guardrail was
removed, the shoulders paved and 27-inch guardrail installed on sections of the
Trans-Canada Highway 1 and Lougheed Highway 7. Flooding in early November
caused extensive damage to Hemlock Valley Road, washing the road out in several
locations. Weaver Creek and McConnell Creek channels were completely plugged
with debris for several hundred feet, causing damage to Morris Valley Road and
to Sylvester Road. The stream channels were cleaned out and the roads repaired
by the district.
Construction—Reconstruction was completed of a 1.1-mile section of Sylvester
Road. An additional 2.6 miles was ditched and gravelled in preparation for paving.
Reconstruction, realignment, and widening was commenced on a 3-mile section of
Columbia Valley Road. A 1.5-mile section of Hartley and Stave Lake Roads was
ditched, gravelled, and widened ready for recapping. The intersection of Fraser
Highway 1a and Mount Lehman Road was widened for left-turn slots and signal
lights.
Surfacing
The district paved or recapped 3.7 miles of Sylvester Road, and 1.5 miles of
Columbia Valley Road by contract. District crews paved or recapped 10.8 miles
of road.
Snow Removal
Snowfall was below average; however, icing conditions occurred more frequently than normal. Roads were patrolled continually, sanded, and ploughed as
required.
 128
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Bridges
Hemlock Valley Bridge 2 was reconstructed from the ground up and Morris
Valley Bridge was replaced by a culvert and fill. Weaver Creek 1 Bridge was
washed out by the November floods. A Bailey bridge was erected as a temporary
replacement until a new bridge can be constructed.
REGION 2
(R. W. Gittins, Regional Highway Engineer, Kamloops)
Kamloops, Salmon Arm, Vernon, Penticton, Merritt, Lillooet, 100 Mile House,
and Kelowna Highway Districts
Kamloops District
Roads
Maintenance—Routine maintenance was carried on with the three largest
summer activities being hand patching, machine patching, and grading. Hand and
machine patching required the placement of 4,500 cubic yards of ashphaltic
material, while grading required 14,000 pass miles throughout the district. Minor
betterments used in conjunction with regular maintenance funds allowed the district
to do 52,000 feet of ditching, including 15,000 feet of new ditch.
Winter maintenance crews encountered two exceptionally large snowfalls
which required extensive use of hired equipment. Winter sanding required 37,000
yards of sand; road patrols covered 98,000 road miles and grader ploughing cleared
28,000 plough miles between November 1, 1977, and March 31, 1978.
Construction—Major construction projects included Trans-Canada Highway
1, 6 miles of four-laning between the intersection of the Yellowhead South Highway
5 and Afton Mines; Bridge Lake Road 24, 1.3 miles of reconstruction; Shuswap
subdivision paving; Upper Clearwater Valley Road 1214, 1.9 miles of reconstruction and East Barriere Lakes Road 0694, reconstruction of 1.5 miles around
the Richter Slide area.
Bridges
Besides the regular bridge maintenance which included bridge cleaning and
bridge repair, the bridge crew placed new stringers, ties, deck, and railing on the
Walhachin Bridge and replaced the Tranquille Bridge 2. A considerable amount
of bridge inspection was done this year in an attempt to stay ahead of developing
problems.
Ferries
New cable towers were installed at the McLure ferry-landings and a new all-
year aerial passenger basket was installed at the Little Fort ferry along with an
upgrading of the ramp approaches.
Salmon Arm District
Roads
Maintenance—Routine maintenance was carried out in all areas of the district.
Major improvements to note are 26.5 miles of road regravelled, 61.0 miles of road
oiled (dust control), 7.8 miles of road widening, ditching, and minor clearing, and
18.7 miles of drainage ditch improvements (gradal).
 REGIONAL REPORTS
129
Construction—Reconstruction of 90.84 miles of road was carried out with
the following breakdown: 25.25 miles of road were sealcoated, 13.97 miles of road
were pulvimixed, 16.26 miles of road were hotmixed, 28.74 miles of road widening,
diversion, gravelling, ditching, no-post installation, passing lanes, and 6.62 miles
of road right-of-way cleared.
Snow Removal
Normal snow conditions prevailed throughout the district,
district were kept open and good driving conditions prevailed.
All roads in the
Bridges
General maintenance was carried out on all bridges. One bridge was constructed and three were reconstructed.   Solsqua Bridge was demolished.
Safety Program
Salmon Arm Highway District came through with the "Lowest" Accident
Frequence Rate in Region 2, winning the Roy McLeod Trophy for 1977.
Vernon District
Roads
Maintenance—General maintenance was carried out on all district roads with
minor improvements on side roads continuing. Frost damage throughout the district was not severe, except on Highway 6 east of Lumby, which again required
extensive patching. A moderately warm summer increased the demand for dust
pallatives. The intensive ditching program was carried on in all areas of the district.
Subdivision activity continued active in the North Okanagan-Shuswap. The Vernon
office processed 173 tentative subdivisions, 127 final subdivisions, and 35 land use
contracts and rezoning applications. Building construction was less active throughout the area and 498 permits were issued for works on Crown land. The roadside
development plant in Vernon operated by the district produced 14,890 lineal feet
of 18-inch no-post guardrail, 18,616 lineal feet of 27-inch no-post guardrail, and
512 lineal feet of bridge transition no-post guardrail. Sixty-four terrazzo-finished
concrete picnic tables and 62 toilets were manufactured for various roadside rest
stops throughout the Province. Eleven new bear-proof garbage barrel containers
were also manufactured.
Construction—Reconstruction of the Lumby—Mabel Lake Road continued at
Mile 20. District forces tackled a difficult narrow section of the road south of new
Mabel Lake Provincial Park. Work also continued on the Enderby-Mabel Lake
Road at Mile 11.05, where heavy rock work proved expensive. Two and one-half
miles of the remaining 5 miles (Mile 9.30-14.40) was completed and ready for
paving. A 1-mile section of the Silver Star Road, known as Postill Hill, was
reconstructed improving the grade considerably. A new gravel pit on Silver Star
Road at Mile 11 was cleared and grubbed to be utilized for continuing construction.
Five miles of the Carr's Landing Road was ditched and gravelled in preparation
for paving. An additional 3 miles of the Sugar Lake Road was reconstructed and
gravelled and 1 mile of the Creighton Valley Road east of Lumby was reconstructed
and graveled. Eight miles of the Westside Road from Whiteman's Creek to Fintry
Delta was gravelled in preparation for paving. District forces continued the widening program on Highways 97 and 97a at Oyama, O'Keefe, and Armstrong. The
three-lane sections of Highway 97 were completed for paving and the four-lane
 130 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
section of Highway 97a near Armstrong continued, including the design and
relocation of the Pleasant Valley intersection in the Municipality of Spallumcheen.
Two intersections within the City of Vernon at 25th Avenue (junction of Highway
6) and 43rd Avenue were widened to improve turning movements. Work was
commenced in the fall on a 12-mile widening program of Highway 6 from just east
of the Coldstream Ranch through Lumby to the Creighton Valley Road junction
in preparation for resurfacing contract.
Surfacing
A contract was called by the district to pave the newly constructed three-lane
sections on Highway 97 near Oyama and the O'Keefe area. Another contract was
also called to pave the Carr's Landing, Coral Beach, and Terrace Roads, which
included patching on Oyama Road, all in the Oyama and Okanagan Centre area.
Two small contracts were called to pave side roads in the Vernon and Enderby
areas of the district, which totalled 4 miles, much to the delight of the residents
living along these roads, who have been plagued with dust and pothole problems
for years. District forces also undertook a sealcoating problem completing 13.55
miles in the Oyama and Enderby areas.
Snow Removal
Snowfall was above average throughout the district, particularly in December
and early January, taxing our snow-removal fleet to the fullest. Cold weather
helped to keep Silver Star Road in good winter condition, cutting down on icing
conditions on this mountain road. Snowfall in excess of 500 centimetres was
recorded on Silver Star Road and the Monashee Pass.
Bridges
Necessary repairs to bridges throughout the district were carried on in a
routine basis. The Mara Bridge at Mara Station over the Shuswap River was
redecked by district forces. Jones Creek and Lumby Bridge in the Village of
Lumby on Highway 6 were redecked when serious rot was found in the laminated
deck system. Design for two new permanent spans to replace these structures is
almost complete. The Miller-Harris Bridge on Whitevale Road, southeast of
Lumby, was reconstructed by district forces, utilizing a prestressed precast box-
stringer span. Design for a new bridge on Horner Road was completed and
materials purchased for reconstruction.
Penticton District
Roads
Maintenance—Various aspects of the Maintenance Program were highlighted
last year, most noticeably an extensive patching, ditch cleaning, and shoulder
program. Winter maintenance remained relatively light; however, costs did exceed
the previous years.
A Student Employment Program was used to augment brushing activities in
the district. Also, concrete cattleguards were replaced by metal ones, and no-post
guardrial was laid in separate programs.
Spring run-off was minimal, therefore, flood control was not a major concern.
Construction—Four-lane construction was completed and ready for paving on
the Hope-Princeton Highway 3 from Manning Park to the highway's camp.  The
 REGIONAL REPORTS
131
Members of the Penticton bridge crew
installing steel stringers on Green Mountain
Road.
This A-frame salt shed was built by the
Penticton District. The design lends itself
to easy maintenance and supplies ample
storage space.
Naramata received some benefits from the hot-mix paving program recently carried out
on sundry roads in the Penticton District.
 132 HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
Hedley-Keremeos section of Highway 3 is in various stages of completion, with
considerable improvements made. Contract paving on Highway 3 a should be
complete in May of 1978. Other improvements and paving were carried out on
Princeton-Summerland Road, Apex Mountian Road, Copper Mountain Road, and
Naramata Road. In addition, an extensive hotmix paving program was carried
out in the Penticton, Oliver, Osoyoos, Keremeos, and Hedley areas, on sundry
roads.
Bridges
Some bridge construction was completed in the Oliver and Penticton areas
while the Ashnola and Keremeos Creek Bridges were commenced. The bridge
crew had a heavy maintenance program with emphasis on redecking work and
bridge repair.
Buildings
Crew assembly room alterations were completed at Allison Pass and Princeton.
Salt sheds were completed in both Keremeos and Osoyoos.
Merritt District
Roads
Maintenance—Spring flooding on the Tulameen River necessitated a dyking
program on the Tulameen River Road, which was incorporated with road upgrading. Heavy rain in November in the Hope area led to flooding of the Trans-
Canada Highway 1 at Gordon Creek south of Yale, resulting in partial loss of the
road shoulders and nearby CPR rail tracks.
Through the Fraser Canyon area, the rock-scaling program continued, and
during the summer months, helicopter patrols, reinforced by ground patrols, were
introduced for holiday weekend traffic observation and control.
Demand for dust-control measures continues to increase significantly in the
Merritt area. The knapweed control program in ranching areas continues as a
priority item.
Winter maintenance conditions were average over all with snow ploughing
and salting activities being higher than planned and sanding being below the
planned amount.
A large program of minor betterments was undertaken, with significant
improvements being made to many district roads, particularly the Douglas Lake,
Petit Creek, Lytton Ferry, Botannie Creek, Tunkwa Lake, Silver Hope, and Coal-
mont roads. In addition, a program of clean-up and rehabilitation of depleted
gravel pits was instituted.
Construction—The passing lane construction program initiated in 1976 continued. Forty-five lane miles have been constructed to date and of these 32 lane
miles have been paved and put into use.
Over 14,000 lineal feet of concrete guardrail was installed on high warrant
road sections, mostly on the Alexandra Bridge-Spences Bridge section of the
Trans-Canada Highway 1.
The upgrading program on Highway 8, Merritt-Spences Bridge and Cold water
Road continued. On Highway 8 one section was undertaken co-operatively with
the Water Resources Service to provide rock for riprapping along the Nicola River
to preserve farmland. Shoulder widening and drainage improvements were undertaken on Highway 5 south of Merritt and a curve elimination project on the
Meadow Creek Road was completed.
 REGIONAL REPORTS
133
Bridges
Necessary maintenance was undertaken on all bridges. Due to the flood
damage in the Hope area in November, two new timber bridges were installed on
Eureka Creek on the Silver Skagit Road. Due to ground instability, Drynoch West
overhead on the Trans-Canada Highway 1, had the west end of the beams raised
and blocked to restore the correct road profile. Additional work on the east end
is planned for the coming year.
Ferries
The North Bend aerial ferry was out of service for nine days to allow changing
of the main haulage cables. Service was maintained with tug boats. Some 12
years had elapsed since the last previous cable change.
Major modifications were carried out to the Lytton reaction ferry. New steel
towers and concrete anchors were installed by contract along with a new main
cable, to replace the old wooden tower. The timber superstructure of the ferry was
removed and replaced with Bailey bridging, decreasing the weight of the ferry and
increasing the pay load. This work, along with paving of the east side approach
road, completes the over-all upgrading of this ferry.
Multiplate cattle underpass, 8 feet 10 inches by 12 feet 9 inches by 70 feet installed on
Highway 5, vicinity of Courtney Lake for Douglas Lake Cattle Company.
Two views of clean up of rock after blasting corner on Highway 8, 9 miles from Merritt.
 134
HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1977/78
jji...    f .»*
Blasting of rock corner, 9 miles west of Merritt on Highway 8 to improve sight distance
and horizontal alignment. Three views numbered 1, 2, 3.
1. Aerial view of flood damage on the Silver Skagit Road south of Hope at Eureka Creek.
2. Partially completed passing lane construction on Highway 1 north of Lytton.
3. Section of newly completed passing lane construction on Highway 1 south of Lytton.
4. Result of flooding at Gordon Creek south of Yale on Highway 1.
5. Repair work under way to Highway 1 and CPR at Gordon Creek,
Highway 1 south of Yale.
 REGIONAL REPORTS
135
Lillooet District
Roads
Maintenance—In the Ashcroft foreman's district, shoulder widening and
strengthening was carried out on the Cariboo Highway 97 from Cache Creek to
the Loon Lake turnoff.
Reditching, brushing out, and regravelling of back roads in this area was also
carried out.
In the Goldbridge foreman's area, reditching, clearing of catch roads, and
brushing was carried out, with several thousand yards of rock being blasted out for
widening on the Gun Lake Road 91. Snow slides—heavy falls of late winter snow
in the Bridge River Valley caused the Lillooet-Pioneer Road (Bralorne Road) 40
to be closed for a week in February. Some 40 slides over a 20-mile area just east
of Goldbridge occurred. All available equipment was used to reopen the road,
with helicopters being used to service the citizens living in the Goldbridge-Bralorne
area. Elsewhere in the district, snow falls were average or a little below with
chemicals being used to keep both the Trans-Canada Highway 1 and Highland
Valley Road 173 bared off.
In the Lillooet foreman's area, on the Lytton-Lillooet Highway 12 and the
Lillooet-Cache Creek Highway 12, some 20 miles of ditching and shouldering were
carried out, similarly on the Lillooet-Cache Creek Road, some 8 miles of shouldering and ditching were carried out.
One mile of subdivision roads in the area known locally as the "Hop Farm"
Road 110 were upgraded with widening and upgrading of the Lillooet-Pioneer
Road 40 adjacent to this Hop Farm area.
Hand brushing and ditch cleaning were carried out on 1 mile of the Texas
Creek Road 204. Elsewhere in the Lillooet foreman's area considerable patching
was required.
Construction—One and one-half miles of the Lillooet-Cache Creek Highway
] 2 were rebuilt, thus continuing a rebuilding of this road toward Lillooet, some of
this reconstruction was adjacent to the B.C. Railway, necessitating some careful
rebuilding in order not to hold up rail traffic.
Two and one-half miles of the Gun Lake road were constructed over new
location, along the east side of the lake, this being a continuation of the perimeter
road to serve properties around the l