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Ministry of Municipal Affairs Report for the year ended December 31, 1978 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1979]

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  Province of British Columbia
Ministry of
Municipal Affairs
Report for the
year ended
December 31, 1978
Honourable William N.Vander Zalm, Minister
 PAGE TWO
 Honourable Henry P. Bell-Irving, D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D.
Ueutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit
herewith the Annual Report of the
Ministry of Municipal Affairs
for the year ended December 31, 1978.
William N. Vander Zalm,
Minister of Municipal Affairs
na, British Columbia
THREE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
  -
The Honourable William N. Vander Zalm,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir:
I have the honour to submit the Annual Report
of the Ministry of Municipal Affairs for the year
ended December 31, 1978.
R. W. LONG,
Deputy Minister
BRITISH COLUMBIA
  CONTENTS
Publications Page   9
Activities Page 10
Legislation Page 13
Financial Management Page 15
Administrative Services Page 24
Planning Services Page 30
Transit Activities Page 37
Islands Trust   Page 40
SEV*
SEVEN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 Municipal Affairs
The Honourable William N. Vander Zalm
Minister of Municipal Affairs
R. W. Long, F.C.I.S., Deputy Minister and
Inspector of Municipalities
C. H. L. Woodward, F.C.I.S., Assistant
Deputy Minister and Deputy Inspector of
Municipalities   ■
J. P. Taylor, Assistant Deputy Minister and
Deputy Inspector of Municipalities
G. E. Whelen, F.C.I.S., Executive Officer
W. MacMunn, Comptroller
D. A. Swallow, Director of Personnel
Research Branch
K. MacLeod, Director
B. Walisser, Research Officer
R. T. Cubbon, Research Officer
B. Sikstrom, Research Officer
Administrative Services
T. F. Moore, F.C.I.S.; Executive Director
A. R. Clarke, Senior Administrative Officer
J. G. Callan, A.C.I.S., Senior Administrative
Officer
W. J. Larter, Administrative Officer
N. A. McCrimmon, A.C.I.S., Administrative
Officer
D. Conway, Administrative Officer
L. C. Strachan, Administrative Officer
A. O. Ferguson, Administrative Officer
B. Tabor, Administrative Officer
Financial Management
H. G. Topham, C.A., Executive Director
W.J. Sommerville, Senior Financial Officer
F. J. Thompson, C.G.A., Senior Financial
Officer
W. E. Ballard, Financial Officer
W. H. Boyce, C.A., Financial Officer
H. L. Clarkson, C.G.A., Financial Officer
W. E. Eurchuk, B.Comrn., Financial Officer
N. D. Goldie, C.G.A., Financial Officer
A.J. Tamblin, C.A., Financial Officer
K. Jolley, C.A., Financial Officer
PAGE EIGHT
 Planning Services
G. C. Harkness, M.C.I.P., Executive Director
W.J. Tassie, M.C.I.P., Director
B. S. Jawanda, M.C.I.P., Director
T. Maftechuk, M.C.I.P., Senior Planning
Co-ordinator
L. V. Luchin, P.M.C.I.P., Senior Planning
Co-ordinator
E. Cull, Senior Planning Co-ordinator
A. L. Quinn, P.M.C.I.P., Planning
Co-ordinator
B. Martin, P.M.C.I.P., Planning
Co-ordinator
M. Fumalle, Planning Co-ordinator
G. Paget, Planning Co-ordinator
R. Ghosh, Planning Co-ordinator
R. Addison, Planning Co-ordinator
Publications
Annual Report
Municipal Statistics
Statistics Relating to-Regional and Municipal
Governments
Regional Districts in British Columbia
A Guide to Municipal Management
A Guide to Regional District Management
Acts Administered by
Municipal Affairs
Municipal Act
Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act
Local Services Act
Municipal Finance Authority of British
Columbia Act
Mobile Home Tax Act
Urban Transit Authority Act
Sewerage Facilities Assistance Act
Resort Municipality of Whistler Act
Revenue Sharing Act
Provincial Transit Service Act
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 Ministry Activities
The provision of high quality local
government services to a growing population
continues to be the main function of British
Columbia's municipalities and Regional
Districts. Most provincial guidance and
assistance directed to the benefit of local
government is provided or co-ordinated by
the Ministry of Municipal Affairs.
From a structural point of view Municipal
Affairs operated for most of 1978 as part of
the combined Ministry of Municipal Affairs
and Housing. In December 1978 Municipal
Affairs was once again constituted as a
separate Ministry. The present Ministry of
Municipal Affairs has essentially the same
structure and responsibilities as it did before
the creation of the combined Ministry of
Municipal Affairs and Housing. The most
significant difference is the transfer of
administrative responsibility for
improvement districts from the Ministry of
Environment to the Ministry of Municipal
Affairs.
Basic physical services, such as roads, water
works and sewerage systems, are essential to
the formation and survival of modern
communities. The necessity for a wide range
of social, recreational and protective services
is likewise firmly established. Many local and
government services represent substantial
and increasingly costly capital investments.
The rising cost of capital development and
the accompanying increases in operating and
other costs are reflected in the expansion of
municipal revenue requirements. In the six
year period from 1971 to 1977, municipal
revenues, including those of utilities, have
increased by approximately $442,000,000 to
$857,000,000. Debenture debt over the same
period has increased to more than
$1,035,000,000 from less than $500,000,000.
The financial base of local government has
also expanded. The assessed value of real
property actually taxed for municipal
purposes rose by 21% over 1977 to almost 14
billion dollars in 1978. It must be noted that
due to changes in assessment legislation the
1978 figures are not precisely comparable
with those of 1977 or earlier years.
Although property taxes have increased, the
level of tax collection has for the past several
years remained stable at the point where
approximately 96% of current taxes are
collected during the year in which they are
levied. The matter of assessment and
taxation is dealt with more fully in that pan
of the report relating to financial
management.
One of the principal statutory duties of the
Ministry of Municipal Affairs is the
supervision of municipal and regional
district long-term borrowing for capital
programmes. This responsibility rests with
the Inspector of Municipalities and during
the year under review the total borrowing
authorized for a variety of projects
amounted to $135,942,253. The proportion
of current revenue expended to service long
term debenture debt is not considered
excessive and is well below the amount
expended in other provinces.
The Minister attended the annual meeting
of Provincial Minister of Municipal Affairs
held in Banff, Alberta in mid-August. He
was accompanied by several senior Ministry
officials.
The Ministry of Municipal Affairs maintains
regular contact with several Government of
Canada departments and agencies, induding
the Ministry of State for Urban Affairs and
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation
The Ministry is represented as often as
possible at inter-ministry or
inter-governmental meetings affecting
municipalities.
Various senior staff members were involved
in national conferences such as the
Municipal Finance Officers and the
Provincial Planning Officers. A delegation
led by the Minister participated in
discussions concerning the possible
establishment of a federal provincial
Community Services Programme. The
Ministry staff also participated in the annual
conference of the Municipal Officers
Association of British Columbia.
The Union of British Columbia
Municipalities held its convention in
Penticton and senior staff members attenoei
to provide an opportunity for those
interested to discuss local problems. The
Minister addressed the convention and ntf'
with representatives of the Executive of the
PAGE TEN
 Union of British Columbia Municipalities on
several other occasions.
Since the annual edition of municipal
statistics is an important source of
information to investment houses, financial
institutions and others, distribution of the
publication is made as early as possible in the
year. Municipal statistics include some 36
different schedules. Prior to publication, the
financial and statistical returns of the
municipalities and regions are closely edited
to ensure conformity and adherence to
statutory and other requirements.
The provincial government established a
Regional District Review Committee to
report on various aspects of the structure
and performance of regional districts. The
Committee issued a report in October.
Following the release of the report, the
ministry and other interested agencies have
been considering its recommendations.
The annual shield award presented by the
Minister as an incentive to increase turn-out
at municipal elections was bestowed on the
following municipalities in 4977:
Voter Turn-
Category Recipient Out (Percent)
Cities and towns Hope 75.28
District Municipalities    Hudson's
Hope 84.53
Village municipalities    Midway 82.80
Second place recipients were Grand Forks
(cities and towns) with 74.38%, Peachland
(district municipalities) with 69.24%, and
Harrison Hot Springs (village municipalities)
with 80.64%.
Revenue Sharing
When it came into effect in the fiscal year
beginning on April 1st, 1978 the Revenue
Sharing Act replaced the existing $34.00 per
capita grant under the Municipalities Aid
Act as well as the interim revenue sharing
Programme. Under the revenue sharing
formula the annual combined dollar yield of
1 personal income tax point, 1 corporate tax
Point, 6% of renewable resource,
non-renewable resource and sales tax
revenue will be distributed in the form of
municipal and regional district grants.
Under the authority of regulations 8 grants
are funded by revenue sharing as follows:
1. Water Facilities grants are provided
under a formula which determines the
provincial contribution by reference to
municipal debt servicing costs and
assessment.
2. The basic municipal grant is a flat
$30,000 to each municipality regardless
of its size or fiscal capacity.
3. Municipalities and regional districts (the
latter on behalf of their unorganized
areas) were eligible for housing start
grants of $100 per net unit starts
regardless of price or density. This
programme terminated at the end of
1978 and was replaced in part by a new
Housing Growth Grant programme.
4. The Municipal Incentive Grant provided
$1,000 per start for housing which
conformed with specified price and
■  density standards and applied both within
municipalities and within electoral or
unorganized areas of regional districts.
Due to federal withdrawal this
programme terminated at the end of
1978 and was replaced in part by the new
Housing Growth Grant Programme.
5. The Municipal Major Road Grants
Programme will provide $15 million
dollars annually. The 1978 total was
approximately $4 million.
6. Municipal Planning Grants are available
on an approved cost sharing basis.
7. Administration, Planning and Basic
Grants are available to regional districts.
The basic grant is $30,000 per regional
district. The administration grant was
$10,000 per regional district. Geography,
population, development and planning
needs will determine the approval of cost
shared planning grants.
8. The unconditional municipal formula
distributes assistance according to
population, expenditure and tax base.
The Revenue Sharing budget for 1978-79
was approximately $138,300,000 including a
special transitional grant of $4,000,000. This
amount compares to a 1977-78 estimate of
approximately $114,600,000. Total 1978
unconditional grants were approximately
$106,100,000 compared to a 1977 total of
approximately $92,100,000.
Eleven
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 Sewerage Facilities Assistance Act
The Sewerage Facilities Assistance Act this
year provided assistance totalling
$20,788,056 to 110 municipalities and
Regional Districts in the Province.
Twenty-nine cities received grants
amounting to $4,932,284.19, 32 districts
received $13,075,963.73, nine towns
received $645,405.69, 37 villages received
$1,985,360.72, and three Regional Districts
received $149,041.26. The total value of
1978 grants under the Act exceeded last
year's total of $15,362,148 by more than
35%.
Municipal Commercial Vehicle Licence
Programming
A total of 131 municipalities participated in
the Municipal Commercial Licence
Programming during the 1977/78 licence
year. Sales of vehicle plates under this
programme, which is administered by the
Ministry on behalf of the municipalities,
generated $808,401 in revenue during the
year. After payment of incidental expenses,
these funds were distributed to participants
on a per capita basis. The municipalities
issued 63,932 licenced plates during the year
under review.
Special Courses
During 1978 the Board of Examiners, on
which the Ministry is represented, granted
18 certificates of proficiency. The following
table shows the classifications of these
certificates together with the total number
which have been issued.
Certificates 1978        To dale
Junior 9 115
Senior Administration 5 135
Senior Finance 2 124
Property Appraisal 2 82
Totals ~18~        456
The Board encourages applicants for
certification to avail themselves of the
opportunities to enroll in local government
related courses offered by the Chartered
Institute of Secretaries, the Certified General
Accountants Association, and various post
secondary educational institutions. The
successful completion of such programs of
study is a major consideration, together with
the appropriate experience and offices held
when the Board is evaluating applications
for certification.
Continuing Education
The Ministry is involved, through its
participation in the Municipal
Administration Education Council of the
B.C. Municipal Officers Association in
developing and appraising appropriate levels
of education for municipal officials. The
Ministry also holds or participates in
seminars or meetings from time to time to
assist local government personnel in dealing
with new legislation and new or revised
programmes. In 1978, Municipal Affairs
staff organized a series of regional meetings
to explain the new development permits and
development cost charge legislation. In
addition they met with staff of many
municipalities individually to assist in
preparing their development permit and
development cost charge by-laws.
Scholarship Programme
At the convention of the Union of British
Columbia Municipalities the Minister
announced a new programme of
scholarships and fellowships to
commemorate that organization's 75th
anniversary. The awards will comprise
several scholarships, each with a maximum
value of $5,000; and one fellowship, with a
maximum of $10,000. Recipients will be able
to use the funds for such purposes as
attendance at extended seminars or
enrolment in post-secondary educational
institutions in or outside of British
Columbia. The programme is designed to
foster the development of administrative
skills in local government in British
Columbia.
The scholarship and fellowship programme
will be administered by the Board of
Examiners. To assist the Board in the
performance of its various duties, an
Advisory Council has been established to
include representation from the Munidpal
Officers Association and the Municipal
Administration Education Council.
Research Branch
The Research Branch performs several
functions within the Ministry. It is involved
PAGE TWELVE
 in policy analysis and development on a
variety of issues varying from programme
evaluation to municipal finance and
organization. This function requires the
development of briefs and working papers to
assist the Ministry in defining its position on
policy questions relating to other
government and private agencies.
The Research Branch plays a major role in
developing the Ministry's programmes to
ensure that they are responsive to social and
economic needs. In addition, the Branch is
responsible for developing research tools
useful in administering the Ministry's
programmes.
Beyond drafting policy proposals and
Cabinet Submissions, the Branch produces
occasional papers of greater depth. A
prominent example in 1978 was the major
research paper on the Fiscal Impact of
Residential Growth. This methodology and
case study was a contribution to the
literature on fiscal impact analysis tailored
sperifically to the analysis of the impact of
residential growth in British Columbia
municipalities. Seminar sessions introducing
and explaining the work were held during
the year at the annual meeting of the
Municipal Officers Association and the
U.B.C.M. convention.
The Ministry also produced a publication
entitled Problems and Responses: Resource
Community Development. This publication
was prepared following a workshop on
resource community developments staged
for Ministry management personnel by the
research and planning services divisions.
The document focused on housing, financial
and organizational aspects of resource
community development, offering an
analysis of various solutions which might be
employed to address characteristic resource
community development problems.
Legislation
A number of technical and substantive
amendments to the Municipal Act, the
Municipalities Aid Act and the Provincial
Home-Owner Grant Act were made during
the 1978 session of the Legislative Assembly.
In addition, a major new piece of legislation
was introduced. A summary of the more
significant legislative developments follows
by Act.
Municipal Act
The Municipal Act was amended to restore
the power to appoint municipal regional
board members to municipal council. Rules
for calculating borrowing power were
modernized to reflect new assessment
procedures, metric conversion and the
inclusion of debt under Section 215A. The
council majority required to adopt an official
community plan zoning or land use contract
by-law was changed from two thirds to one
half. A parallel change applied to regional
board adoption of official regional plan and
settlement plan by-laws. Technical
amendments were also introduced in the
area of regional board vacancies and
technical planning committees.
Municipalities Aid Act
The Municipalities Aid Act was amended to
implement a new policy of payment of
grants on provincial property on the basis of
the general municipal and regional district
mill rate, including debt. The amendments
provided that the municipal assessment
option selected for general municipal
taxation purposes would also apply to
provincial property.
Provincial Home-Owner Grant Act
The Provincial Home-Owner Grant Act was
amended to increase the amount of the
grant for seniors, the handicapped and
certain veterans by $50.00 to a maximum of
$480.00. An extended claiming period was
introduced and certain residents of dwellings
under long term lease were made eligible for
the grant.
Urban Transit Authority Act
The Urban Transit Authority Act was
introduced to create a Crown corporation
known as the Urban Transit Authority of
British Columbia for the provision and
regulation of transit services. The new
system will include a Board of Directors
appointed from elected officials and Transit
Commissions throughout the province. The
new legislation replaces the Transit Services
Act, Provincial Rapid Transit Subsidy Act
and the Provincial Transit Fund Act.
^THIRTEEN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 Building Code
The relative sections of the 1977 edition of
the National Building Code came into effect
on March 1, 1978 under Minister's Order
No. 77152 which amended the Building
Regulations of British Columbia. The British
Columbia Plumbing Code was amended by
Minister's Order No. 78818. This affected
subsection 7.4.2.1 by removing the
mandatory requirement and time limit for
sewer connection by property owners. This
requirement is now under the authority of
the municipality or Regional District as
detailed in section 531 of the Municipal Act.
A Building Code Committee was established
to facilitate the necessary participation and
discussion required in submitting
recommended changes to the National
Building Code. The members are
representatives of various associations
involved in building construction. The
resulting recommendations will be
forwarded to the Provincial Advisory
Committee on the National Building Code.
A Plumbing Code Committee has been
formed to review the Canadian Plumbing
Code for the purpose of adoption with
minimum amendments appropriate for
provincial needs. This was the result of a
recommendation by the Building Regulatory
Activity Investigation Committee which, was
approved by Cabinet. Meetings have been
held and the review has been started.
The Building Code Appeal Board received
74 appeals regarding questions of
application and interpretation of the
Building Code and 14 applications for
approval of alternate materials for use in
plumbing during the year. These appeals
with the decisions of the Board were
distributed in three resumes to
municipalities, Regional Districts and
numerous organizations concerned with
construction.
The proposed Building Requirements for
the Physically Handicapped were completed
for adoption under the Municipal Act as
part of the British Columbia Building Code.
This document was circulated in draft form
in two editions to the many organizations
affected to ensure that comments from the
public and industry could be received and
evaluated for inclusion in the final
requirements.
Considerable progress has been made in
several other projects.
— Material has been collected and a
consultant has been employed for
development of a training and
certification program for Building
Inspectors employed by local
governments.
— The material for the initial issue of a
series of news bulletins has been prepared
for the purpose of providing information
to all those affected by the British
Columbia Building Code and related
regulations. These bulletins will indude
changes in legislation and building
standards as well as a technical support
service.
— A committee has been formed and studies
have commenced into the feasibility of
providing the services of accredited
inspection agencies to local governments.
These services will be available in support
of present local government inspections.
— The provincial representative on the
Provincial Advisory Committee on the
National Building Code has continued the
work with the other provinces and the
National Advisory Committee regarding
changes to the National Building Code.
Metric Conversion
Additional amendments to legislation were
processed as part of the metric conversion
program. This included the conversion of
the scale of fees for vehicles under section
458G of the Municipal Act.
The Ministry continued to participate in the
meetings and activities of the Provindal
Metric Conversion Committee. This
included the submission of reports and the
continuing of liaison with other Ministries in
the conversion program.
All by-laws submitted by municipalities and
Regional Districts were reviewed where
necessary to verify metric conversions of
measurements and terminology.
PAGE FOURTEEN
 Financial Management
Financial Management Division discharges
significant responsibilities under the
Municipal Act and other legislation. The
division administers certain grants
programmes, approves financial by-laws and
provides financial advice.
To the extent possible Financial
Management makes a point of trying to visit
the Municipalities to review their financial
procedures in addition to providing
invaluable assistance that can only be
achieved by personal contact. This also
permits our staff to better appreciate the
problems experienced by the municipal
administrative staff in both responding to
our requests and dealing with internal
matters that are better understood with a
visit to the municipal office.
During 1978 Financial Management and
Administrative Services made 121 field visits
not including those undertaken for a specific
purpose.
Assessment and Tax Collection
The major single revenue source for
municipalities in British Columbia continues
to be the real property tax. The growth in
assessed values of real property and revenue
from taxation of these properties over the
past 14 years is illustrated in the following
table. It will be noted that revenue from this
source of taxation in 1977 totalled
$853,846,602. Of this total $422,617,607
represented taxation for general municipal
purposes, arid $431,228,995 represented
taxation for school purposes.
1964
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
TABLE 5
GROWTH IN COMBINED ASSESSED VALUES AND TAXES
IN MUNICPALITIES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
GROSS ASSESSED VALUES
ASSESSED VALUES ACTUALLY
TAXED
Year
AU                                  Taxable
Properties                        Properties
School                            Municipal
Tax
Revenue
(Millions)                        (Millions)
(Millions)                          (Millions)
(Thousands)
4,118
11.1561
15.6082
11.9871
16,5?22
12.7821
17.6802
13.3451
18.1262
12,020*
18.2322
3,534
9,291*
10.8682
10.0071
11,4472
10.6421
12.0622
11,087*
12.4742
9.8901
14.9782
2,878
7,653
8,206
8,691
9,030
9,890
2,295
10,414
11,021
11,542
11,895
14,379
154,074
548,805
679,281
792,536
853,847
940,000s
'School values
2Municipal values
3Estimated
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 The following table (Table 6) provides a
further analysis of the assessed value of real
property and indicates the distribution of
1978 assessed values by class of municipality,
with the percentage increase over 1977.
TABLE 6
ASSESSED VALUES BY CLASS OF MUNICIPALITIES
GENERAL MUNICIPAL GROSS
ASSESSED VALUES
ASSESSED VALUES ACTUALLY
TAXED
AU
Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
(Millions)
$
%
(Millions)
$
%
(Millions)
$
%
(Millions)         %
It
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
7,098
7,929
229
361
71.78
11.16
(12.26)
( 7.91)
5,788
6,605
188
293
109.48
33.79
10.59
15.35
2,628
4,491
237
314
7.62
13.81
14.49
(1.88)
5,647    119.90
6,308      34.13
176      10.69
277      18.88
Subtotals
Vancouver
15,617
2,615
31.04
(57.88)
12,874
2,104
58.47
(51.63)
7,670
2,220
10.92
4.96
12,408      61.92
1,971     (53.42)
Totals
18,232
.58
14,978
20.07
9,890
9.52
14,379      20.89
As a result of the continuing rapid growth in
the urban communities, it is anticipated that
proceeds from real property taxation for
school and general municipal purposes in
1978 will reach $940,000,000. This would
represent an increase of approximately 111
per cent over the revenue of five years ago.
The total assessed values actually taxed for
school purposes in the Province in 1978
amounted to $12,282,688,361, an increase of
approximately $1,041,000,000 over 1977. Of
this amount $9,889,928,894 or
approximately 80 per cent, represented
assessed values in the city, district, town and
village municipalities.
Tax Collection
The tax collection picture in municipalities is
considered to be the primary indicator, not
only of the efficiency of the administration,
but also of the ability of the taxpayer to meet
the municipal tax levy promptly. In the year
under review, tax collections have shown a
slight increase over the collections of 1976
and continue to maintain a very high level.
During 1977, collections in all classes of
municipalities exceeded 96 per cent of the
levy. We have established a practice of
communicating with any municipality where
the arrears of taxes are in excess of 10 per
cent of the current levy in an effort to
determine the cause and what steps may be
taken to improve the position.
The collection of current taxes in British
Columbia continues to be the highest among
the provinces in Canada publishing statistics
of a comparable nature, while the
percentage of arrears is the lowest. Economic
factors may have contributed substantially to
the favourable position indicated in the
property taxation field; however, munidpal
treasurers and collectors are to be
congratulated for their continued efforts in
maintaining this high rate of tax collection.
Tables 7 and 8 reveal information relative to
tax collection by class of municipality for the
years shown.
PAGE SIXTEEN
 ■
TABLE 7
PERCENTAGE TAX COLLECTIONS
Percentage of
Total Collections
Outstanding Taxes
Current Levy
as a Percentage
as a Percentage
Collected
of Current Levy
of Current Levy
Cities (Except Vancouver)
1939
81.10
99.10
40.16
1970
99.46
99.69
4.64
1971
96.79
100.41
4.34
1972
97.05
100.62
3.88
1973
97.36
100.69
3.39
1974
96.71
99.38
3.95
1975
96.28
99.03
4.68
1976
96.50
100.04
4.49
1977
96.26
99.99
4.89
Vancouver
1939
91.00
103.10
30.06
1970
95.80
99.12
5.87
1971
96.29
100.17
5.28
1972
96.20
99.79
5.19
1973
97.03
100.82
3.51
1974
96.15
98.68
4.78
1975
96.02
98.99
5.08
1976
96.13
99.26
5.18
1977
96.45
99.78
5.08
Districts
1939
77.60
95.80
34.81
1970
96.37
99.48
4.54
1971
96.80
100.54
4.15
1972
96.88
100.39
3.96
1973
97.51
100.82
3.21
1974
96.62
98.88
4.03
1975
96.68
99.42
4.23
1976
96.40
99.53
4.51
1977
96.80
100.23
4.24
Towns
1958
89.55
97.06
13.62
1970
93.56
99.36
9.35
1971
94.59
101.03
7.96
1972
96.25
102.05
5.37
1973
96.75
100.69
4.48
1974
95.44
98.78
5.65
1975
95.73
99.30
5.14
1976
95.88
100.03
5.19
1977
96.77
100.30
4.42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 TABLE 7  (continued)
PERCENTAGE TAX COLLECTIONS
Percentage of
Total Collections
Outstanding Taxes
Current Levy
as a Percentage
as a Percentage
Collected
of Current Levy
of Current Levy
76.50
98.30
38.71
94.85
100.72
7.00
96.08
101.21
5.53
97.11
101.01
4.09
97.02
100.41
3.95
95.94
98.85
4.96
96.02
99.52
4.88
96.01
99.36
5.00
96.07
100.09
5.23
Villages
1939
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
TABLE 8
COLLECTIONS, 1977 (WITH COMPARATIVE FIGURES FOR 1976)
Percentage of
Current Taxes
Collected
Arrears as a
Percentage of
Adjusted Levy
1977
1976
1977
1976
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
96.26
96.80
96.77
96.07
96.50
96.40
95.88
96.01
4.89
4.24
4.42
5.23
4.49
4.51
5.19
5.00
Total
Vancouver
96.58
96.45
96.41
96.13
4.51
5.08
4.54
5.18
Grand Total
96.55
96.35
4.64
4.68
It is interesting to note that, notwithstanding
the fact that property taxes are increasing,
the level of tax collections remains high.
School Assessment and
General Municipal Assessment
It should be noted that the difference
between the school assessment and the
general municipal assessment is the result of
a number of municipalities using a dual roll,
i.e., general assessments are based on 100
per cent of market value, while the school
assessments are on 50 per cent of value.
This dual roll had the following effect in
1977:
School Assessment
Less — Landlord and tenant,
machinery and equipment
Adjusted school assessment
General municipal assessment
Less adjusted school assessment
Millions
$
9,031
1,243
7,788
11,895
7,788
4,107
The figure of $4,107,000,000 represents in
part the effect of the dual roll on the general
assessment. This roll is in effect in the
following municipalities: Penticton,
Vancouver, Burnaby, Peachland,
Summerland, West Vancouver, Kamloops,
City of North Vancouver, District of North
Vancouver, City of Langley.
PAGE EIGHTEEN
 The balance of the difference is represented
by B.C. Hydro values included in the school
assessment roll, but not included in the
general assessment roll. The Provincial total
for B.C. Hydro is $944,000,000, but no
breakdown is available at this time of the
amount applicable to the incorporated areas.
Revenues and Expenditures
The 1977 audited financial statements
indicate that British Columbia municipalities
continued to maintain a favourable financial
position. Gross revenues from all sources
during 1977 exceeded $1,276,000,000,
which represents an increase of $89,000,000
over the previous year.
The major revenue sources, with comparative figures for 1976, were as follows:
1977 1976       Increase
(Millions) (Millions) (Millions)
General municipal
taxation 423       388       35
School taxation 431 404        27
Transfers from other
governments 145 148      (  3)
Revenue from
own sources 277        247       30
1,276     1,187
89
The home-owner grant payments increased
by $9,000,000 in 1977 to a total of
$139,000,000. When this is offset against the
school tax levy of $431,000,000, a balance of
$292,000,000 remains of this levy to be
borne by the property owner.
The major expenditure items incurred
during 1977 with comparative figures for
1976, were:
1977 1976 Increase
(Millions) (Millions) (Millions)
 $ $ #	
General government          64 57 7
Fire protection 65 58 7
Administration
ofjustice 83 74 9
Public Works 93 80 13
Sanitation and
waste removal 42 38 4
Social Welfare 36 60 (24)
Education 432 405 27
Debt charges 103 77 10
Capital expenditure
from revenue 80 70 2
Other* 278 268 34
1,276     1,187
89
♦Includes recreation, public health, environment
development, utilities, and contributions to reserves
and other funds.
TABLE 9
TRENDS IN FINANCIAL ASPECTS OF MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT
COMPARED TO POPULATION AND INCOME EXPRESSED AS INDEXES
Total Revenue
Maximum
Total B.C.
(Excluding
Building
Debenture
Values
Personal
Year
Population
Utilities)
Permits
Debt
Taxable
Income
1961
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
1969
133.02
234.38
316.20
130.62
174.83
221.58
1970
138.35
266.95
291.26
132.10
192.06
239.33
1971
136.55
306.45
384.97
137.00
209.69
270.56
1972
143.60
337.75
414.34
145.75
252.93
303.03
1973
153.30
390.48
602.31
157.18
286.97
353.18
1974
160.06
446.36
614.20
175.76
345.80
412.32
1975
173.25
545.53
794.96
217.07
364.06
497.00
1976
156.88
640.80
571.87
254.04
375.33
588.21
1977
156.96
690.83
843.64
306.37
396.89
677.82
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 Reserves and Surpluses
The total statutory reserves and operating
reserves and surpluses held in all accounts of
the municipalities was $340,437,656. This
represents 36.28 per cent of the total
revenue, excluding school taxes, of the
municipalities. Of this total, $320,705,384 is
held in liquid form or in investments
authorized by statute, and a portion of the
surplus is represented in arrears of taxes and
other receivables.
Statutory reserve funds of various
municipalities have again shown an increase
over the previous year. At the end of 1977
these funds, held for a variety of purposes,
amounted to $109,643,120, an increase of
$15,414,904 over the previous year, after
giving effect to the fact that approximately
$25,000,000 was expended on capital works
from reserve funds during the year 1977.
Over the last seven years the amount held in
these reserve funds has increased from
$48,000,000 to the current figure of
$109,000,000, an increase of 127 percent
The following table provides an analysis of
these reserves and surpluses by class of
municipality:
RESERVES AND SURPLUSES 11977
Reserves                           Surpluses
Total*
Told1
Revenue
$                                         $
s
%
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Regional Districts
73,481,941
30,168,283
103,650,224
39.95
120,616,187
47,768,875
168,386,062
46.45
1,303,047
3,500,125
4,803,172
26.39
3,204,660
6,071,436
9,276,096
30.39
1,964,617
4,728,073
6,693,690
7.08
Subtotal
Vancouver
200,570,452
36,045,873
92,236,792
11,584,539
292,807,244
47,630,412
38.27
27.51
Total
236,616,325
103,821,331
340,437,656
36.28
1 Excluding School Taxation
Capital Programmes
The value of capital projects undertaken
during 1977 by municipalities amounted to
$603,000,000. Of this total programme,
$488,000,000 was completed during the
fiscal year, leaving a balance of works in
progress of $115,000,000 at year-end. In the
total capital programme, municipalities were
able to provide $81,000,000 from current
general revenue, sewer and utility revenue
funds, $27,000,000 from reserve funds, and
approximately $42,000,000 from
grants-in-aid from the Provincial and
Federal Governments, The balance of the
amount expended was financed by
debenture loans, temporary bank loans, and
other methods of financing. The activity in
this area over the past five years is indicated
in Table 10 following.
TABLE 10
CAPITAL PROGRAMMES
Projects
Undertaken
Works
Completed
Works in
Progress
SOURCE OF FUNDS
Year
Revenue
Reserve
Funds
Grants
$
$
$
$
$
$
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
338
360
424
500
603
273
295
329
388
488
65
165
95
112
115
57
66
71
78
81
20
18
33
23
27
10
17
25
40
42
Figures shown above are millions.
PAGE TWENTY
 Five-Year Capital Expenditure Programmes
summary
The programmes submitted by
municipalities and regional districts during
1978 and covering the five-year period
ending 1982 continued to provide
meaningful information and guidance, not
only to the local government bodies
involved, but also to the Ministry, other
levels and Ministries of government, and
various financial institutions. Reviewing each
of these submissions and offering
constructive criticism, where necessary, has
achieved maximum consistency in the format
of these programmes and has proved
beneficial to all concerned.
A summary of the Capital Expenditure
Programmes by year is provided in Table 11.
Included in the "General" heading under
"Classification of Expenditures" are all
capital expenditures for roads, sidewalks,
public buildings, recreational facilities, land,
and other capital projects not related to
either water or sewerage systems. As in the
past, municipal councils are attempting to
finance a large portion of their capital works
out of current revenue and reserves,
although the availability of federal-provincial
loans and the infusion of capital funds via
specific purpose grants have had a direct
effect on this policy.
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
TABLE 11
FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL EXPENDITURE PROGRAMMES SUMMARY
BY YEAR FOR ALL MUNICIPALITIES (INCLUDING VANCOUVER)
CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES
Year
Water                      Sewer
General
Total
$                              $
S
$
83,450,750
53,697,878
36,807,639
36,284,948
29,353,078
105,198.333
46,278,705
43,231,763
33,024,781
22,479,595
311,209,675
240,064,568
216,185,647
203,647,519
197,993,571
499,858,758
340,041,151
296,225,049
272,957,248
249,826,244
Totals
239,594,293    250,213,177 1,169,100,980 1,658,908,450
PROPOSED SOURCE OF FUNDS
Year
General
Reserve
Reserve                     Prior Year's             Debenture
Grants                         Funds                          Surplus                      Sales                            Total
$
$                                   $                                    $                               $                                   $
1978 136,520,641 44,213,354 60,017,356 7,403,722
1979 96,324,954 33,452,239 47,139,028             828,479
1980 88,065,190 34,329,244 38,530,065          1,475,100
1981 90,825,549 27,645,537 41,563,258 504,800
J982 88,999,749 24,422,053 40,229,355 428,500
Totals 500,736,083 164,062,427 227,479,062 10,640,601     755,990,277 1,658,908,450
251,703,685
162,296,451
133,825,450
112,418,104
95,746,587
499,858,758
340,041,151
296,225,049
272,957,248
249,826,244
Borrowing
During 1978, councils and regional boards
continued to meet a substantial demand for
munidpal services, and 194 term-borrowing
by-laws were approved by the Inspector of
Municipalities and subsequently adopted by
the local governing body that provided the
service.
A greater portion of this authorized
borrowing consisted of financing for sewers,
waterworks, parks and recreation, and civic
buildings.
Borrowing of $135,942,253 as summarized
in Table 12, is $23,060,582 more than was
authorized in 1977; the increase is
attributable to the fact that more money is
being spent on water and sewer projects.
Completion of the various projects
GE TWENTY-ONE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 authorized will be phased over a number of
years, and the demand for funds will follow
the pace of construction. Included in the
authorized borrowing is $8,535,789 in
short-term loans which, under the Municipal
Act, are subject to a per capita limitation.
The Inspector of Municipalities is not
required to approve the borrowing of the
City of Vancouver or the Metropolitan
Water and Sewer Boards. Such borrowing is
therefore not included in Table 12.
PreUminary borrowing of an estimated
amount of $7,403,557 was approved for
local improvement works. A number of
municipalities have established special
improvement funds to finance local works;
these have not been included in the figure
for preliminary borrowing approval.
TABLE 12
BORROWING AUTHORIZATION, 1978
Purpose
Regional
Districts
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Total
$
Waterworks
Sewers
Parks and Recreation
Civic Buildings
Equipment (including
fire protection)
Other Tangible
Assets*
4,727,640 18,645,280 11,714,100 1,141,000 2,196,200 38,424,220
12,936,600 14,252,287 22,512,400 58,000 3,972,583 53,731,870
5,340,000    1,578,000    5,984,067 135,000 — 13,037,067
1,730,000    5,672,900    1,907,000 67,000 351,500 9,728,400
356,150       821,325       205,000 190,000 190,748 1,763,223
500,000    6,633,500 10,688,000 736,000 699,973 19,257,473
Totals
25,590,390 47,603,292 53,010,567    2,327,000    7,411,004 135,942,253
*Other tangible assets include land assembly, road improvement and sidewalks, and storm drainage.
Debentures
Details of debenture issues and other
securities that have been approved in
principle at the time of adoption of loan
authorization by-laws are specified in
security-issuing by-laws; 168 security-issuing
by-laws authorizing the issue of debentures
and other terms of indebtedness in the total
amount of $104,578,797 were approved.
In 1978, no municipal debenture issues were
guaranteed by the Province under the
Municipal Assistance Act. Details of the
issues guaranteed as at December 31, 1978,
are shown below in Table 13.
TABLE 13
OUTSTANDING DEBENTURES GUARANTEED, 1978*
Municipalities
Assistance Act
Cities (excluding Vancouver)
Districts
Towns
Villages	
4,924,342
5,539,301
498,500
2,313,728
Subtotal
Vancouver
Greater Victoria Water District
Greater Nanaimo Sewer District
Greater Vancouver Water District
13,275,871
6,281,000
267,000
854,000
12,933,000
Total
33,610,871
* All remaining debentures guaranteed under the Village Municipalities Assistance Act were paid off in 1978-
PAGE TWENTY-TWO
 In addition to the totals shown in Table 13
of $33,610,871 as debenture debts
guaranteed by the Province, a total amount
at the end of the year of $20,085,000 was
guaranteed under the Greater Vancouver
Sewerage and Drainage District Act.
Total debenture debt as at December 31,
1977, of all municipalities, including the City
of Vancouver, is shown in Table 14
following. The debenture debt of the
Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage
District and the Greater Vancouver Water
District is not included.
TABLE 14
TOTAL DEBENTURE DEBT, DECEMBER 31, 1977
Sold
Unissued
and Unsold
Total
$
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Regional Districts
167,940,442
310,703,926
15,343,477
35,881,313
78,340,842
70,419,184
96,868,954
6,545,910
14,592,632
55,302,393
238,359,626
407,572,880
21,889,387
50,473,945
133,643,235
Subtotals
Vancouver
608,210,000
183,202,759
243,729,073
851,939,073
183,202,759
Total
791,412,759
243,729,073
1,035,141,832
Debenture sales for all municipalities
amounted to $110,479,774 for the year
1977. This resulted in an increase of
$86,938,530 in the total outstanding
debenture debt of all municipalities for
1977, after giving effect to the retirement of
debentures maturing during the year.
The percentage of current revenue
expended to service debenture debt
(exduding utilities) increased in 1977 in all
classes of Municipalities. These figures for
1977 are shown on the following page, with
the 1976 comparative figures.
Cities
Vancouver
Districts
Towns
Villages
PerCent
1977 1976
5.89
7.91
7.52
6.68
6.22
5.71
7.77
7.20
6.34
5.58
The debenture debt of utilities is serviced
almost entirely by revenue derived by
consumer charges and frontage taxes.
.5
^TY-THREE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 Administrative
Services
New Incorporations and Changes in
Structures
In 1978, the status of both The Corporation
of the Village of Princeton and The
Corporation of the Village of Parksville was
changed to a town municipality. Letters
Patent dated March 31st, 1978, were issued
with April 1st, 1978 the effective date of the
change in status of the Town of Parksville;
and Letters Patent dated September 21st,
1978 were issued, with October 1st, 1978 the
effective date of the change in status of the
Town of Princeton.
Studies initiated in regard to local
government structure in the areas of
Okanagan Falls and in the Western Sector of
the Capital Regional District (Colwood,
Langford, Metchosin, View Royal) resulted
in referenda being held on the question of
incorporation. The two referenda did not
receive the required majority vote of the
electorate, in favour of incorporation and, as
such, no new incorporations were completed
in 1978.
In addition, the review of local government
structure that commenced in 1977 for the
Duncan-North Cowichan areas resulted in a
referendum being held on the question of
the amalgamation of these areas into a single
municipality. The question of amalgamation
did not receive a favourable response from
the electorate.
Because of interest generated locally, a
review of local government structure was
initiated in the Fort Nelson, Williams Lake,
Quesnel and Westside areas during 1978.
Local Communities
In September, 1978, the Crooked River
Local Community was established by the
Regional District of Fraser-Fort George, and
is the first local community to be established
under section 766E of the Municipal Act,
provided by the 1977 Municipal Act
amendments.
The Regional District of Fraser-Fort George
has, by by-law authorized the Crooked River
Local Community to exercise the powers and
duties of an Advisory Planning Commission
and to undertake the day-to-day
administration of water system, fire
protection, and street lighting within the
boundaries of the local community which is
situated within the specified areas created
upon the dissolution of the Crooked River
Waterworks District in 1977.
Each local community is administered by a
three-member community commission which
has the powers and duties of an Advisory
Planning Commission and, as determined by
the Regional Board the day-to-day
administration duties associated with those
services provided by the regional district at
the expense of the taxpayers in that local
community. Such services may include not
more than three of the following: sewer
systems, water systems, street lighting,
garbage collection, garbage disposal, fire
protection and acquisition and operation of
recreational facilities.
Municipal and Improvement District
Boundary Revisions
Supplementary Letters Patent were issued
during 1978 authorizing extensions and/or
revisions in boundaries for 19 municipalities
and 5 improvement districts. The
municipalities affected, together with the
resulting adjustments in area and changes in
population are indicated in Table 1. A local
census is taken in the extended area and
added to the original population established
under the 1976 census in order to arrive at
the new municipal population following
extension. Letters Patent were also issued
which provided for the dissolution of 6
improvement districts.
By-law Approvals
All village by-laws must be submitted to the
Ministry for registration in the office of the
Inspector of Municipalities. Eight hundred
and thirty-six by-laws were examined and
subsequently registered, including seven
hundred and forty-seven village by-laws,
thirty regional district by-laws and forty-one
improvement district by-laws.
Included in this total are the by-laws of the
Resort Municipality of Whistler which are
subject to approval by the Inspector of
Municipalities prior to adoption. Eighteen
by-laws from this municipality were reviewed
and recommended for such approval in
PAGE TWENTY-FOUR
 1978. All by-laws, together with supporting
background material, are fully reviewed
before any suggestions or recommendations
are made for registration or before being
advanced to the approval authority. While
many of the initial submissions may be found
to be satisfactory, others require the
exchange of considerable correspondence.
In addition, many by-laws for all classes of
municipalities require approval from certain
governmental agents before adoption can
proceed or become effective. A significant
change in this regard was brought about by
the 1977 amendments to the Municipal Act
whereby the Minister of Municipal Affairs
was authorized as of September 1, 1977 to
approve certain by-laws that previously
were subject to the approval of the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council by way of
an Order in Council. This change in the
approval process necessitated the
introduction of a by-law approval register
and a system of publishing a weekly resume
of approvals so that various government and
private agents are notified on a weekly basis.
During 1978, one thousand two hundred
and twenty-three by_-laws were advanced to
the Minister of Municipal Affairs for his
consideration and subsequent approval. Of
the one thousand two hundred and
twenty-three approvals made by the
Minister, six hundred and three were
approved on behalf of the municipalities;
seventy-eight authorized the abandonment
and vesting of highways; seventy-six
approved municipal rates by-laws for water,
sewer and electricity; fifty-four provided for
the appointment of members of municipal
boards of variance; one hundred and
sixty-five authorized flood plain approvals
under section 187 of the Municipalities
Enabling and Validating Act and two
hundred and thirty were for other municipal
requirements. Of the five hundred and
eighty-seven approvals relating to regional
districts, four hundred and ninety-seven
were to approve subdivision, zoning and
land use contract by-laws; ten authorized
appointments of members of the regional
board of variance; thirty-one were for
building by-laws from various regional
districts and the balance of forty-nine met
other legislative requirements.
In addition, a total of thirty-three by-laws
were reviewed and recommended for
approval under the Islands Trust Act.
For a variety of purposes, one hundred
Minutes of Council were prepared and
subsequendy approved by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council. Of this
total, forty related to municipalities, eleven
related to improvement districts and
forty-nine related to regional districts.
During 1978 there was a sizeable increase in
the number of land use contracts approved.
This increase occurred as a result of 1977
amendments to the Municipal Act which
provided for the eventual phasing out of
land use contracts by January 16, 1979. On
June 22, 1978, a proclamation was issued
bringing the relative sections of the
amending legislation into force on
November 15, 1978. This prompted an
increase in the number of by-laws
authorizing land use contracts submitted for
approval of the Minister in the latter half of
the year. Ninety-six land use contract by-laws
were approved by the Minister under the
Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act,
of which fifty-five were approved between
July and December. One hundred and seven
land use contract by-laws were approved by
the Minister under the Municipal Act of
which seventy-three were approved between
July and December.
Debenture Approvals
Certification by the Inspector of
Municipalities of debenture issues of
municipalities and regional districts may be
completed on request. Before such
certification can be completed, certificates of
approval to the by-laws or resolutions are
issued authorizing the issuance of
debentures. Three hundred and
seventy-seven certificates of approval to the
by-laws or resolutions were issued
authorizing the issuance of debentures.
Three hundred and sixty-seven certificates
of approval were issued in 1977. In 1978,
debenture issues were processed with a total
par value of $80,720,810 through the
Municipal Finance Authority and
$14,267,481 on behalf of individual
municipalities and regional districts. More
information on debenture approval and
related capital expenditure matters may be
found under "Financial Management".
GET'
GE TWENTY-FIVE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 =
TABLE 1
MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY REVISIONS 1978
AREA1
POPULATION
Municipality
Before
Added
After
Before
Added
After
Cities
Castlegar
3,674.13
1,063.74
4,737.87<A)
6,255
32
6,287
Courtenay
883.53
135.55
1,019.08
7,773
38
7,771
Cranbrook
1,566.29
60.10
1,626.39
13.835
6
13,841
Cranbrook
1,626.39
4.02
1,630.41
13,841
2
13,843
Dawson Creek2
4,722.19
(3.76)
4.718.43(A)
10,528
NIL
10,528
Fort St. John
1,511.10
2.16
1,513.26
8,947
NIL
8,947
Vernon
1,893.59
40.89
1,943.48
17,658
NIL
17,658
Districts
NIL
Towns
-
Creston
414.18
6.69
420.87
3,644
NIL
3,644
Golden
2,192.77
118.60
2.311.37(A)
3,282
3
3,285
Parksville
691.35
18.89
710.24
3,187
NIL
3,187
Quesnel
1,721.39
581.98
2,303.37
7,637
27
7,664
Villages
Cache Creek
661.70
5.20
666.90(A)
1,074
NIL
1,074
Cache Creek
269.89
530.20
800.09
1,074
6
1,080
Chase
371.62
.19
371.81
1,425
NIL
1,425
Invermere
281.60
63.55
345.15
1,194
11
1,205
Lillooet
748.84
202.28
951.12(A)
2,218
NIL
2,218
Masset
811.02
1,520.37
2,331.39
1,563
31
1,594
Osoyoos
301.70
5.13
306.83
2,100
7
2,107
Pemberton
160.03
90.64
250.67
Port Clements
345.98
496.60
842.58(A)
409
NIL
409
Ucluelet
1,039.72
431.30
1.471.02(A)
1,180
24
1,204
1. Unless otherwise indicated area shown in hectares.
(A). Acres
2. Reduction in boundaries.
Source of base population figures is the 1976 census.
Regional District Activities
The role of regional government has, since
late 1977, been the subject of considerable
criticism with the result the Provincial
Government appointed a committee to
examine the jurisdictional role of regional
districts, including an examination of
present and future functions and
responsibilities. As a result, the activities of
most regional districts in 1978 were
diminished pending the outcome of the
Regional District Review Committee Report.
This report was presented to the Ministry by
the Committee on October 31, 1978.
Even with the reduced activities, some
eighteen new functions were granted the
twenty-eight regional districts in 1978. Table
2 summarizes those assigned, while Table 3
sets out all functions undertaken to date.
Supplementary Letters Patent were issued in
several instances to authorize the granting of
functions. Revision of the internal and
external boundaries is continuing and
amendments have been made to cost-sharing
formulas and other changes in corporate
structure.
PAGE TWENTY-SIX
 Specified Areas
Twenty-nine specified areas were established
by by-law in 1978. Of these areas ten were
established by petition method and nineteen
after the property owners voted favourably
on the proposal. In addition, amendments in
boundaries to twelve specified areas already
established were completed. Table 4
summarizes the specified areas established
and altered in 1978. Before regional
government was introduced, community
services administered locally in
non-municipal areas were provided through
the incorporation of improvement districts.
New local service needs for non-municipal
areas with the exception of water, irrigation
and dykes are almost all provided and
financed through the faculties of regional
districts.
Many of the specified areas have been
established adjacent to municipal
boundaries. As a demand for further
services develops, the trend will be toward
the incorporation of these areas within
present municipal boundaries. Those
specified areas in more isolated situations
will probably retain their non-municipal
status.
Improvement Districts
With the change in Ministerial
responsibilities that occurred in December
1978 the administration of some three
hundred improvement districts previously
under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of the
Environment were transferred to the
Ministry of Municipal Affairs.
TABLE2
FUNCTIONS ASSIGNED TO REGIONAL DISTRICTS DURING 1978
(Unless Otherwise Indicated, All Member Areas of the Regional
District Participate in This Function).
Alberni-Clayoquol —
Industrial Development Commission
Bulkley-Nechako —
Television Rebroadcasting (Smithers, Telkwa, Houston
and defined portions of Electoral Areas A and G)
Capital -
Septage Disposal
Central Okanagan —
Industrial Development Commission (Kelowna,
Peachland and Electoral Areas A, G, H and I)
Columbia-Shuswap
Recreational Programmes (Electoral Areas, C, D, E and
F)
Comox-Strathcona —
Nuisance Removal (Electoral Areas A, B, C, E, F, G
and I)
Cowichan Valley —
Industrial Development Commission (Duncan, North
Cowichan, Ladysmith, Lake Cowichan and Electoral
Areas A, B. C. D, E, F, G, H and I)
Dewdney-Alouette —
Noise Control (Mission and Electoral Areas B, C, D, and
E)
Kootenay Boundary —
Weed Control (Electoral Areas D and E)
Mount Waddington -
Development of Subdivisions and Housing (Electoral
Areas Only) Industrial Development Commission
(Port Hardy, Alert Bay, Port McNeill and Electoral
Areas A, B, C and D)
North Okanagan —
Industrial Development Commission (Armstrong,
Enderby, Vernon, Coldstream, Spallumcheen, Lumby
and Electoral Areas A, B, C, D, E and F)
Okanagan-Similkameen —
Industrial Development Commission (Penticton,
Summerland, Keremeos, Oliver, Princeton and
Electoral Areas A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H)
Peace River-Liard —
Industrial Development Commission (Dawson Creek,
Fort St. John, Hudson's Hope, Chetwynd, Pouce
Coupe, Taylor and Electoral Areas A, B, C, D and E)
Skeena-Queen Charlotte —
Industrial Development Commission (Prince Rupert,
Masset, Port Edward, Port Clements and Electoral
Areas A, B, C and D)
Grant-in-Aid —
Queen Charlotte Island Museum (Masset, Port
Clements and Electoral Area D)
Thompson-Nicola —
Industrial Development Commission (Kamloops,
Merritt, Ashcroft, Cache Creek, Chase, Clinton,
Logan Lake, Lytton and Electoral Areas A, B, C, D, E,
I, J, L, MandN)
Community Hall —
Chase and defined portion of Electoral Area L
GE TWENTY-SEVEN
rritish r.o? ttmrta
 TABLE 3
REGIONAL DISTRICT FUNCTIONS
1
x — indicates function
p — indicates application of function
— in part of Regional District only
J
1
I
i
as
J
§
1
1
a
1
I
u
i
a.
i
1
■a
1
1
1
I
1
i
j
i
a
J
s
i
a
1
a
1
1
1
1
1
E
a
s
i
!
■?
1
1
I
g
1
!
°?
I
g
I
1
1
1
§
I
o
I
i
1
1
.1
a;
|
a.
i
1
4
1
J
1
E
I
1
a
1
1
Activity Centre
p
Ambulance
X
p
p
P
p
p
X
p
p
P
X
Animal Control
P
Airport Facilities
p
p
Air Pollution
X
X
X
Bus Transit
p
Cemetery Operation
P
P
p
P
X
p
Community Health Services
X
Community Parks
p
p
P
p
X
p
p
Community Recreational Programmes
X
Community Recycling Grant
p
Community Services
p
X
Control of Gatherings
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Curfew Regulation
p
Development of Subdivisions and Housing
p
p
p
p
p
P
p
p
p
p
p
P
p
p
p
P
p
Dog Control
p
p
p
p
Economic Development Commission
p
Elderly Citizens' Housing
p
X
X
X
p
p
Emergency Programmes
X
X
X
X
p
Firearms
p
X
p
p
p
P
p
p
p
X
P
X
Fire Protection
p
p
Fireworks
X
p
X
X
X
p
p
p
X
P
X
Flood Control
p
p
Grants-in-aid
p
p
Health Regulation and Centre
p
X
p
Home Nursing
p
House Numbering
p
p
p
p
p
p
Industrial Development Commission
X
X
p
p
p
p
p
p
Intermediate Care Home
p
Joint Community Use of School Facilities
p
p
p
p
P
p
Labour Negotiations
p
Land Assembly, Housing and Land Banking
X
p
Library Study
p
p
X
Marina Operation and Development
p
Noise
p
p
p
p
Nuisance Control
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
X
p
p
Okanagan Basin Water Board
X
X
X
Operation of Wharves
p
Parks and Recreation Commissions
p
Park and Green Belt Land Acquisition
p
p
p
Pest Control
X
p
X
p
X
p
p
p
p
X
p
p
Public Library Service
p
p
X
p
p
P
X
Public Use Area Lighting
p
Recreation Facilities
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
P
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
Recreation Programmes
p
p
X
p
X
p
p
p
p
p
X
X
X
X
X
P
p
X
Refuse Disposal
X
X
X
p
p
X
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
X
P
X
p
Regional Parks
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
p
X
X
X
X
X
p
Resident Identification Cards
p
Septage Disposal
X
Septic Tank Effluent Disposal
X
p
p
-
Sewage Treatment and Disposal
p
p
Sewers
X
p
X
Sign Regulation
p
Soil Fill Regulation
p
—
Soil Removal
X
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
Street Lighting
p
p
p
Sub-Regional Airports
p
p
Television Rebroadcasting
p
p
X
p
P
Theatre
p
i
Tourist Association Grant
p
Untidy and Unsightly Premises
p
p
p
Urban Renewal
p
Water
p
p
p
p
Water Supply Study
p
Weed Control
-P
X
X
.p
p
X
PAGE TWENTY-EIGH
 TABLE4
REGIONAL DISTRICT SPECIFIED SERVICE AREAS ESTABLISHED DURING 1978
pilal
wage Collection and Disposal
(Salt Spring Island Electoral Area)
Sewer System (View Royal Electoral Area)
Water Supply and Distribution System (Saturna
Island)
riboo
wage Collection and Disposal (Wildwood)
Sewage Collection and Disposal (Pine Valley)
lira/ Kootenay
levision Repeater System (Grant-in-Aid Electoral
ftreaH)
fire Protection (Electoral Area I)
ire Protection (Robson and Raspberry)
Ural Okanagan
e Protection (Lakeridge Park)
Street Lighting (Lakeridge Park)
Senior Citizens' Centre (Electoral Area A)
Street Lighting (Kel-win Subdivision)
Street Lighting (Clearwater Subdivision)
mbia-Shuswap
tter Supply System (Falkland)
ire Protection (Anglemont)
vjx-Stratkcona
fuse Disposal (Campbell River)
later (Back Road — Lake Trail — Headquarters
Special Service Area)
tscr-Cheam
e Protection (Cultus Lake)
iser-Fort George
e Protection (Crooked River Volunteer Fire
Department)
load Paving (Bednesti Lake)
magan-Similkameen
one Power (Chain Lake — Osprey Lake)
tell River
port (Texada Island)
Ire Protection (Savary Island)
famish-Lillooet
fuse Disposal Service Unit
.North Lillooet Community)
tefuse Disposal Service Unit (D'Arcy - Devine)
Sunshine Coast
Street Lighting (Stockwell Road)
Thompson-Nicola
Television Rebroadcasting (Blue River)
Television Rebroadcasting (Electoral Area "B"
Grant-in-Aid)
Fire Protection (Pinantan Lake)
Amendments to Established Specified Service Areas
During 1978
Bulkley-Nechako   •
Fire Protection (Burns Lake Rural)
and extension of boundaries
Fire Protection (Fort St. James Rural)
and extension of boundaries
Central Kootenay v
Fire Protection (Ymir) and extension of boundaries
Columbia-Skuswap
Fire Protection (Sorrento and Blind Bay) and extension
of boundaries
Comox-Strathcona
Irrigation Waterworks (Headquarters Road) and
reduction of boundaries
Water (Back Road — Lake Trail — Headquarters
Special Service Area)
and reduction of boundaries
East Kootenay
Sewage Collection and Disposal (Edgewater) and
extension of boundaries
Fraser-Fort George
Waterworks (Crooked River)
and extension of boundaries
Kitimat-Stikine
Fire Protection (Thornhill)
and extension of boundaries
Nanaimo
Fire Protection and Street Lighting (Wellington) and
reduction of boundaries
Squamish-Lillooet
Fire Protection (Bralorne)
and extension of boundaries
Thompson-Nicola
Cemetery Operation (Electoral Areas A, B, D) and
extension of boundaries
r* TWENTY-NINE
1RITISH COLUMBIA
 Planning Services
Division
Role and Structure
The Planning Services Division is responsible
for supporting and advancing the
community and regional planning process as
it relates to local government as well as
Provincial planning responsibilities. The
Division is also responsible for co-ordinating
the development and implementation of
Provincial settlement policies and
programmes.
The Division is organized into two principal
staff groups: Plans Co-ordination and Policy
and Programme Planning. In addition, the
Division is supported by a Technical Services
group providing mapping, cartographic and
statistical compilation services, as well as
assistance in defining and meeting local
government mapping needs. The Division's
staff organization at the end of 1978
consisted of the Executive Director, 11
professional Planners, 5 Technical
Assistants, and 3 Secretarial staff.
Towards the end of 1978, the Division set up
a regional office in Prince George to be
responsible for planning matters in the areas
covered by the Regional Districts of
Bulkley-Nechako, Fraser-Fort George, Peace
River-Liard, Stikine, Cariboo and Central
Coast. This office is managed by a Senior
Planning Co-ordinator who will be located
initially in the Prince George offices of the
Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing.
Policy and Programme Planning Activities
1. Settlement Planning Research and Policy
Development
During the Spring of 1978, Planning
Services staff co-ordinated the completion
of a comprehensive 2V£ year planning
programme for a proposed new
community — Tumbler Ridge — in
northeastern British Columbia. The
planning programme consisted of
consultant studies related to townsite
design and engineering and was
undertaken under the auspices of the
Federal-Provincial Northeast Coal
Development Agreement. These
consultant studies and associated
Provincial staff investigations were the
responsibility of the inter-Ministry
Sub-committee on Townsite/Community
Development which was chaired by the
Division's Executive Director. The
planning programme for Tumbler Ridge
culminated in the publication of a series
of plans for the proposed community.
These plans, representing a- milestone in
comprehensive resource community
planning in the Province, cover social
physical, financial, and organizational
aspects of community development.
In addition to the comprehensive
planning programme for Tumbler Ridge,
a resource management plan was
developed for the Tumbler Ridge
townsite area under the auspices of the
Omenica-Peace Regional Resource
Management Committee and initiated by
Planning Services staff. As well, potential
impacts on existing communities in the
northeast region related to anticipated
coal development projects continued to
be assessed, and a settlement plan for the
rural areas in the vicinity of Chetwynd
was in preparation with the assistance of
consultants and the Regional District of
Peace River-Liard.
As a follow-up to the Tumbler Ridge
planning programme, the Division
commissioned consultants in the Fall of
1978 to develop an analytical framework
for evaluating various settlement options
related to resource development projects.
This evaluation framework, when
developed, is intended for application to
a range of situations in the Province
where proposed resource developments
would create settlement impacts,
including new or expanded communities
as well as related rural residential
development.
A further activity of the Division relating
to resource community policy
development involved a two-day
workshop primarily oriented to staff of
the Ministry but including key personnel
from other Ministries having a direct
interest in resource community matters.
The workshop was described as
"Problems and Responses to Resource
Community Development" and the
PAGE THIRTY
 proceedings of this two-day workshop
have been published in report form.
The Division also continued to examine
the organizational requirements for the
actual planning and construction of a new
community in order that the Ministry will
be in a position to respond quickly and
effectively if a new community is required
in relation to the implementation of a
resource development project.
2. Settlement Impact Assessment
The Division serves as the lead agency for
comprehensive reviews of proposed
development projects in terms of their
implications for existing community and
regional settlement patterns and for
proposed new communities. Development
projects that were reviewed during 1978
included:
i) Coal mining proposals coming under
the Provincial Coal Development
Guidelines Process: B.P./Sukunka
and Denison/Quintette in northeast
British Columbia; Elco, Line Creek
and Sage Creek in southeast British
Columbia, and Quinsam on
Vancouver Island;
ii) Transportation and Energy projects
coming under the Provincial Linear
Guidelines Process: the Alaska
Highway Natural Gas Pipeline; and
Hi) Projects initiated by B.C. Hydro: Site
C — Peace River, Kootenay
Diversion, Sparwood Thermal Plant,
Hat Creek Thermal Plant,
Mainland-Vancouver Island
Transmission Line.
3. Special Programmes
Other key activities of the Division
relating to settlement planning research
and policy development involved staff
participation on various inter-Ministry
technical committees. Staff continued to
play a key role as a member of the Green
Zone Committee which is developing
guidelines for effective relationships
between urban and agricultural land uses.
Staff participated in a committee
examining Provincial planning processes
with the long term objective of
recommending methods of integrating
various Provincial agency planning
programmes. Staff served on a resource
roads policy review group which is
developing economic evaluation,
planning, design and operational
guidelines for Provincial resource roads.
Staff also participated on a Task Force
established to develop proposals initially
for septic tank regulations in the
Okanagan Basin area but with future
applicability to other regions of the
Province.
The Executive Director together with the
Division's Planning Co-ordinator for the
Lower Mainland region continued to
participate with staff representatives of
the four Lower Mainland Regional
Districts in a comprehensive programme
to update the Official Regional Plan for
the Lower Mainland originally enacted in
1966. The objective of this programme is
to produce broad, up-to-date policies for
the management of growth and change
throughout the entire Lower Mainland
region. A Working Group, consisting of
staff representatives of the four Lower
Mainland Regional Districts and of the
Planning Services Division, is performing
the technical work of updating the Plan.
The Division's staff representative serves
as the Group's co-ordinator. Completion
of the O.R.P. Update project is scheduled
for mid 1979.
The Division provided technical
assistance in the selection of a
comprehensive ski development proposal
for Blackcomb Mountain in the Resort
Municipality of Whistler. In addition, the
Division continues to assist in the
Provincial monitoring of the development
programme for the creation of a Town
Centre in the Resort Municipality.
During the Fall of 1978, the Division
initiated a programme to co-ordinate the
technical review of a major ski resort
proposal for Panorama Mountain near
Invermere in the East Kootenays. It is
intended that this project be examined as
part of a broader regional planning study
for the Columbia-Windermere Lakes
area which is intended to be carried out
during 1979 under the direction of our
inter-Ministry steering committee.
GETI
GE THIRTY-ONE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 mmmm
.
Staff of the Division participated on the
inter-Ministry Task Force developing
land use/management policies for the
Cowichan River Estuary and also
continued to participate in the
intergovernmental planning project
involving the 200 acres of Federal lands
surrounding the George Derby Hospital
in Burnaby.
Plans Co-ordination Activities
1. Community and Settlement Plans
As a follow-up to the Ministry's 1977
planning legislation initiatives respecting
Official Community and Settlement Plans,
the Ministry introduced in 1978 a
programme of municipal and regional
district planning grants to encourage the
preparation of these plans. This planning
grants programme was established
pursuant to the Revenue-Sharing Act and
last year provided for a total of $1 Million
in grants for Regional Districts and a
further $1 Million in grants for
Municipalities. With the exception of the
annual unconditional grant paid to
Regional Districts for general planning
purposes (calculated on the basis of 20
cents per capita, minimum $7,000.00,
maximum $100,000.00), the planning
grants are available on a cost-sharing basis
and have been calculated using
population criteria.
Each Regional District is eligible for a
specific portion of the total amount of
Regional District shareable planning
grants provided that it undertakes to
prepare Official Regional or Settlement
Plans. The shareable planning grants are
designed to pay for two-thirds of the costs
of preparing official regional or
settlement plans. The formula used to
determine the amount of funding each
Regional District is eligible to receive in
the form of shareable planning grants is
as follows:
$1.00 per capita for the first 10,000
population;
$  .50  per capita for the next 20,000
population;
$ .25 per capita for the next 30,000
population; and
$  .10  per capita for the remaining
population in excess of 100,000.
In the case of Municipalities, the
shareable planning grants are available
primarily for the preparation of Official
Community Plans and related planning
programmes that focus on the
inter-relationship of land use planning
and the development of municipal
transportation systems: These shareable
grants are designed to pay for two-thirds
of a municipality's planning costs. Grants
to Municipalities are calculated on the
basis of $1.00 per capita (using the 1976
Census population), with a minimum
grant of $15,000 available to
municipalities and a maximum grant
available of $75,000. Municipalities must
apply to the Ministry to receive a grant
and the grant applications are considered
on a "first come, first served" basis.
The tables on the following pages indicate
those Municipalities and Regional
Districts which had planning programmes
approved in 1978 for the purpose of
receiving a planning grant, the amount of
which is also shown. It will be noted that
there are 74 Municipalities which
undertook community planning
programmes or related policy
development studies in 1978. In addition,
the Regional Districts initiated some 62
settlement plan programmes, most of
which will be completed during 1979.
As a further follow-up to the 1977
planning legislation, the Division drafted
Technical Guidelines for the Preparation
of Official Settlement Plans and Official
Community Plans in 1978.
PAGE THIRTY-TWO
 APPROVED* MUNICIPAL PLANNING GRANTS, 1978
Municipality
Planning
Grant
Municipality
Planning
Grant
Cities:
Armstrong
Courtenay
Cranbrook
Dawson Creek
Enderby
Fernie
Fort St. John
Grand Forks
Kamloops
Kelowna
Kimberley
Nelson
North Vancouver
Penticton
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Revelstoke
Rossland
Trail
Vancouver
Victoria
Towns:
Comox
Creston
Merritt
Parksville
Princeton
Quesnel
Sidney
Smithers
Williams Lake
$15,000
6,573
15,000
15,000
4,000
13,667
15,000
7,500
27,000
27,000
11,628
15,000
15,000
21,344
27,000
3,334
8,167
15,000
15,000
40,000
31,250
1,845
15,000
15,000
4,000
4,698
6,700
15,000
13,333
6,514
Total number of Municipalities: 74
Total Municipal Planning Grant: $958,223.00
*Actual payment of grant is subject to
the municipality's planning programme
being carried out.
Villages:
Ashcroft
Burns Lake
Cache Creek
Chetwynd
Clinton
Elkford
Fort Nelson
Gibsons
Harrison Hot Springs
Keremeos
Logan Lake
Lumby
Oliver
100 Mile House
Osoyoos
Port McNeill
Qualicum Beach
Sechelt
Tahsis
Vanderhoof
Warfield
Districts:
Abbotsbord
Burnaby
Campbell River
Central Saanich
Coldstream
Delta
Esquimalt
Kitimat
Langley
Mission
North Cowichan
North Vancouver
Pitt Meadows
Port Hardy
Richmond
Saanich
Salmon Arm
Sparwood
Summerland
Surrey
Terrace
West Vancouver
Whistler
$11,366
15,000
9,333
11,466
8,266
12,324
15,000
10,000
15,000
1,520
13,333
2,707
2,462
2,397
3,150
9,467
3,087
6,000
5,000
11,067
6,000
5,233
23,666
5,047
11,533
10,000
30,000
6,000
15,000
30,000
7,410
15,000
30,000
15,000
2,000
7,334
18,666
6,084
10,666
10,086
35,000
15,000
30,000
15,000
£
* THIRTY-THREE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 APPROVED REGIONAL* DISTRICT PLANNING GRANTS
AND PLANNING PROGRAMMES — 1978
Regional District
Planning
Grant
Regional Plan or
Settlement Plan Programme
Alberni - Clayoquot
$ 20,208
Bamfield
Old Nanaimo Highway
Cherry Creek — South Beaver Creek
Sproat Lake
Bulkley - Nechako
20,000
Smithers - Telkwa
Vanderhoof Fringe Area
Fort St. James Fringe Area
Capital
Cariboo
46,911
23,853
Western Community
Metchosin
Quesnel Fringe Area
Williams Lake Fringe Area
100 Mile House Fringe Area
Bridge Lake - Sheridan Lake Area
Central Coast
3,586
Bella Coola Valley
Central Fraser Valley
31,533
Official Regional Plan — update
Central Kootenay
12,000
Creston Fringe Area
Central Okanagan
28,149
Lakeview
Westbank
Winfield - Oyama
Columbia - Shuswap
12,912
Sicamous Area
Shuswap Region (Official Regional Plan)
Comox - Strathcona
25,280
Cortes Island
Quadra Island
Comox Valley
Cowichan Valley
22,988
Electoral Area "B"
Electoral Area "H"
Electoral Area "G"
Mill Bay Malahat
Dewdney - Alouette
24,427
Deroche - Lake Errock
McConnell Creek - Hatzic
Hatzic Lake
East Kootenay
23,229
Cranbrook Fringe Area
Official Regional Plan
Fraser - Cheam
24,000
Official Regional Plan —Update
Fraser - Fort George
29,908
Electoral Area "A"
Valemount Fringe Area
McBride Fringe Area
Electoral Area "C"
Electoral Area "D"
PAGE THIRTY-FOUR
 Regional District
Planning
Grant .
Regional Plan or
Settlement Plan Programme
Greater Vancouver
Kitimat - Stikine
Kootenay Boundary
Mount Waddington
Nanaimo
North Okanagan
Okanagan - Similkameen
Peace River - Liard
Powell River
Skeena-Queen Charlotte
Squamish - Lillooet
Sunshine Coast
Thompson - Nicola
Total:
*Actual payment of grant is
subject to work being the
regional district's planning
programme for 1978 being
carried out.
83,200
20,658
21,341
10,683
26,273
31,800
$662,702
Official Regional Plan ■
Thornhill
Update
Kettle River Valley Region
(Official Regional Plan)
Coal Harbour
Malcolm Island
Hyde Creek
Cedar Cranberry Bright
French Creek
Nanoose Bay
23,238
Electoral Area "A"
Parts of Electoral Area "B" a
24,143
Okanagan Falls
Naramata
Cawston
Hedley
Oliver Fringe Area
Osoyoos Fringe Area
Olalla
22,810
Fort St. John Fringe Area
14,500
Portion of Electoral Area "A'
Texada Island
Portion of Electoral Area "B'
12,206
Queen Charlotte Area
Dodge Cove Area
11,928
Hop Farm - Lillooet
10,963
Roberts Creek
Pender Harbour
Electoral Area "E"
Electoral Area "F"
Official Regional Plan
t	
&E THIl
£ THIRTY-FIVE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 The Official Settlement Plan Guidelines
were approved by the Environment and
Land Use Technical Committee on
October 28, 1978, and the distribution of
these Guidelines will be carried out early
in 1979. The draft Official Community
Plan Technical Guidelines were scheduled
for distribution in the Spring of 1979.
2. Development Control Legislation
Staff of the Division participated last year
in a number of conferences, seminars and
briefings to explain the provisions
introduced to the Planning Act in 1977
respecting development permits and
development cost charge bylaws. Sample
bylaws respecting these provisions were
provided to all Municipalities and
Regional Districts early in 1978 and the
Division continued to offer assistance to
local governments in implementing these
new planning tools.
3. Community Planning Assistance
The Division assisted a number of small
communities during the year in meeting
special planning requirements. As an
example, the. Division assisted the District
of Sparwood to plan for a major urban
expansion related to anticipated coal
mining developments in the Upper Elk
Valley region. The Division also arranged
for Provincial terrain suitability studies to
be carried out in the areas adjacent to
Fernie which expects to expand in
response to projected resource
developments. A third example involved
Planning Services staff co-ordinating a
general planning programme for the
Town of Creston and its environs.
Responsibility for this programme was
subsequently transferred to the Regional
District of Central Kootenay's planning
department part way through 1978.
4. Official Plan and Bylaw Review
The Division continued to perform its
statutory responsibility of reviewing land
use bylaws and official plan bylaws
submitted by local governments for
approval of the Minister. The Division
attempted during 1978 to increase its
efficiency in performing this statutory
role, thereby assisting in streamlining the
overall Provincial development approvals
process.
Technical Services
The Division's Technical Services group
continued to maintain a very ambitious
programme during 1978. During last year
the group accomplished the following tasks:
• produced a total of 25 new composite base
maps at standard metric scales and 13 air
photo mosaics for municipalities;
• prepared new or revised composite base
maps at standard metric scales for selected
Improvement Districts, Specified Areas
and Local Communities;
• prepared maps and graphics for various
reports /publications of the Division and
the Ministry for a variety of planning
projects initiated or co-ordinated by the
Division's planners;
• prepared legal descriptions for extensions
or amendments to the boundaries of
municipalities; electoral areas, specified
areas and improvement districts; and
• provided a co-ordinated Provincial
response to a wide variety of requests for
Provincial mapping and air photo material
initiated by municipal and regional district
planning offices.
PAGE THIRTY-SIX
 Transit Activities
Transit Services
The Transit Services Division offices are
located at 171 West Esplanade, North
Vancouver and in the Municipal Affairs and
Housing offices at 810 Blanshard Street in
Victoria.
On December 15, 1978 there were 17
provincial employees on staff, including
professionals engaged on contract.
Urban Transit Authority
In 1978 the Urban Transit Authority Act
was introduced and received approval of the
legislature. The Act established a crown
corporation, the Urban Transit Authority of
British Columbia, with responsibility for
ensuring a uniform provincial policy for
urban transit activities.
The Authority through the Act and
Regulations provides a framework for
financing, planning and evaluating
municipal transit operations with direct local
involvement in decision-making. The
primary roles of the Authority are those of
planning and funding. The Authority is not
an operator of transit services nor a taxing
agency.
A Board of Directors for the Authority was
I  named by Order-In-Council from
individuals holding elected municipal office
in those communities that have transit
systems. Mayor Jack Volrich of Vancouver
was elected by the Board as its first
Chairman. An initial staffing programme
Iwas approved by the Board, and a financial
accounting system was established for
implementation on April 1, 1979.
The phase-in of the provisions of the Urban
Transit Authority Act, including a revised
formula for sharing the costs of providing
transit services, is scheduled for April 1,
1979.
Transit in the Metropolitan Areas
I   During 1978 there was no significant
expansion of the transit services offered by
B.C. Hydro in Greater Vancouver and the
Metropolitan Victoria areas. Bus service
revisions in Richmond and Coquitlam were
introduced to meet changing demands for
services, and other minor improvements
were carried out in response to ridership
levels.
The cross-harbour ferry system, the Sea-Bus,
celebrated its first anniversary of service in
June by carrying the three millionth
passenger. By year end Sea-Bus had passed
the five million mark in total passengers
carried.
The Urban Transit Authority is providing
financial assistance for the Greater
Vancouver Regional District to proceed with
the study of Rapid Transit options for the
metropolitan Vancouver region. This study
includes an assessment of short term bus
improvements as well as potential alignments
and technology options for rapid transit.
In addition, funding was approved by the
Authority Board to assist the Capital
Regional District in assessing the transit
programme requirements and to negotiate a
Transit Service Agreement.
Small Community Transit Systems
The Transit Services Division undertook a
number of service reviews and ridership
promotional campaigns in the thirteen
communities that participate in the
Provincial transit programme. Regular
monitoring of the operations, particularly in
the newest systems established in Kelowna
and Prince Rupert was conducted by staff in
conjunction with the municipalities.
A major restructuring of the Prince George
Transit System was completed and the new
system began operation in November. The
new system significantly increased the level
of bus service provided to residents of Prince
George. A study of potential demand for
revised services was initiated in the Regional
District of Nanaimo. Planning for a
restructuring, similar to the Prince George
process, is underway by the Division and the
Regional District's Transportation
Committee.
In Kelowna, a promotional campaign was
launched by the Division in mid-year.
One-day and month long bus passes and
convenience tickets were introduced as
incentives for residents to use the Kelowna
Transit Service. The bus pass promotional
campaign together with a number of service
adjustments planned by the Transit
* THIRTY-SEVEN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 Committee have helped increase ridership
levels in Kelowna from previous years' totals.
The Division also undertook three transit
demand and feasibility studies in Port
Edward, Powell River and Port Alberni in
response to requests from Municipal
Councils and Regional Boards. The results
of these household surveys will be presented
to the elected officials for consideration of
further action.
TRANSIT SERVICES
PROVINCIAL TRANSIT SUBSIDY PAYMENTS 1973-78
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
Transit Services Funded under
Calendar
Calendar
Calendar
Calendar
Calendar
197S
Rapid Transit Subsidy Act
Year
Year
Year
.   Year
Year
Estimated
Kamloops
	
	
68,455
87.483(a)
(b)
(b)
Kelowna
	
	
21,065
25,437
98,080
121,000
Kitimat
	
67,734
156,461
137,039
108,290
190,000
Maple Ridge
	
—
—
10,410
31,281
37,500
Nanaimo Regional
District
188,336
170,292
278,328
217,930
279,590
355,900
Nelson
17,330
23,221
42,744
49,924
55,263
69,200
Penticton
—
—
1,097
8,028
78,712
96,700
Powell River
14,638
22,921
35,435
62,226
78,860
94,000
Port Alberni
—
—
29,925
46,877
53,745
67,000
Prince George
—
—
19,143
94,497
131,560
166,400
Prince Rupert
—
—
7,700
12,631
33,534
76,600
Trail
—
—
—
3,484
60,803
96,000
West Vancouver
174,473
324,777
148,507
432,675
222,141
882,494
333,084
1,089,050
423,651
1,433,369
600,000
Sub Total
1,970,300
Transit Services Funded under
Transit Services Act
Thompson-Okanagan
Transit
—
—
—
82,500
260,538
409,800
Vancouver Island
Transit Ltd.
—
—
95,000
*242,570
379,200
348,925
Vancouver Island
Transportation Ltd.
(V.I. Coach Lines) (d)
—
—
490,000
*920,072
1,435,255
1,513,538
Cowichan Valley
Stage Lines
5.000(c)
7,800
8,000
Cariboo West
Stage Lines
12,000
Coastal Bus Lines
(Kitamaat Village
Service)
3,500
TOTALS
324,777
432,675
1,467,494
2,339,192
3,516,162
4,266,063
* Adjusted for calendar year from fiscal year figures.
(a) From January 1 to September 30, 1976, Kamloops service was operated by Western Bus Lines and Valley Stage
Lines.
(b) From October I, 1976 Thompson-Okanagan Transit Ltd. began operating the bus service in Kamloops.
(c) "44" Taxi Company Ltd. began receiving monthly subsidy payments from May 1976 to operate the bus service in
Cowichan Valley Regional District.
(d) Includes subsidy paid to successor company, Pacific Coach Lines from September 1, 1978, to December 31, 1978.
PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT
 _
Inter-City Transit Services
A new publicly owned company, Pacific
Coach Lines was formed in September, 1978
to operate inter-city bus services in the
Fraser Valley, on Vancouver Island, and
between Vancouver and Victoria/Nanaimo.
The new company merged the regularly
scheduled services offered by Pacific Stage
Lines and Vancouver Island Coach Lines.
The merger was the result of a special task
force report that recommended the move
together with the shift of special sightseeing
services previously operated by both carriers
to the private sector. After accomplishing
this shift, significant economics in the
combined operation of the regularly
scheduled services is expected.
TOTAL NUMBER OF PASSENGERS CARRIED
1976
1977
1978
Kamloops
Kelowna
Kitimat
Maple Ridge
Nanaimo Regional District
Nelson
Penticton
Powell River
Port Alberni
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Trail
West Vancouver
Vancouver Island Transit Ltd.
945,700
N/A
441,300
15.100(a)
624,000
275,700
43,400
215,600
327,000
751,000
82,000
11.600(b)
2,368,000
270,300
1,426,000
240.884(c)
418,750
57,746
816,000
261,351
197,851
158,851
333,743
913,221
306.397(d)
225,000
2,119,446
276,000
(estimated)
1,497,000
503,000
431,300
59,800
856,000
275,500
209,700
200,000
350,000
958,800
320,000
100.000(e)
2.200,000
280,000
N/A — not available
(a) — from September 6 to December 31, 1976
(b) — from November 8 to December 31, 1976
(c) — from July 4, 1977 to December 31, 1977
(d) — from August 15, 1977 to December 31, 1977
(e) —labour dispute February-August
^TH
E THIRTY-NINE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 n
Islands Trust
Officers and Staff
John Rich
John Gaines
Gordon Wallace
Anthony H. Roberts
David Morris
Chris Foord
Gerry R. Tonn
Edward Pickard
Rixori Briggs
Chairman
Vice chairman
Vice chairman
Manager
Chief Planner
Planner
Planner
Technical Assistant
Technical Assistant
(seconded from
Public Works)
Research Officer
Administrative Officer
Clerk Steno 3
Office Assistant
Lorna R. Barr
Mary L. Lee
Carmen Thiel
Marie Nelson
Introduction
The Islands Trust under its Act has a
mandate to preserve and protect the Trust
Area. The way in which these responsibilities
are met was, however, materially changed by
the Islands Trust Amendment Act of 1977,
most of which came into effect on January
1st, 1978. From a watchdog role on Island
Planning done by 7 Regional Districts, the
Trust took over all planning responsibility.
The result has not only simplified and
speeded the formalities associated with
policy formulation and application
processing, but has provided a unified and
more responsive governmental system.
Trust Area Planning is shared by 13 Local
Trust Committees and a General Trust. The
Local Committees up until October 27th,
1978 represented the following main islands:
Bowen
Denman
Gabriola
Galiano
Gambier
Hornby Salt Spring
Lasqueti Saturna
Mayne South Pender
North Pender Thetis
Since October 27th, 1978 small islands have
been associated with the 13 main islands to
make 13 groups.
Each Local Trust Committee consists of the
three General Trustees and two elected
Local Trustees. General affairs and matters
affecting more than one designated island
group are under the General Trust.
Trust activity in 1978 was focussed on
planning assignments plus the need to set up
organizations, staff, procedures and policy
for the smooth operation of the new
functions.
Sub-Agencies and Staff
Advisory Planning Commissions:   12 have been
appointed mostly after local elections. These
Commissions involve 56 residents or owners
in addition to the Local Trustees. They
advise the Local Trust Committees on
planning matters referred to them.
Staff:  From 5 persons at the commencement
of the year, the staff increased to 10 persons.
Boards of Variance:   13 Boards of Variance
have been set up based on three groups of
three persons.
Council:  This is an informal quarterly
meeting of two days at which all 29 Trustees
met to discuss a wide range of subjects of
more than local importance.
Activity-Statistics (as of December 15)
Local Trust Committee Meetings Held   68
General Trust Meetings Held 47
Council Meetings Held 4
By-laws Passed 70
By-laws in Process 17
Subdivision Applications reviewed 148
Re-Zoning Applications received 34
Crown Lease Applications received 50
Siting Permits for Hornby and Denman 51
Land Use Contracts completed 9
Agricultural Land Reserve Applications 26
Public Hearings held 20
Board of Variance Applications 21
Research
During the year a report entitled "Land of
the Trust Islands" dealing with the extent of
subdivision, housing and ownership was
published. The Trust also published a report
on resource analysis for Bowen Island which
had been prepared by the Resource Analysis
Branch of the Ministry of the Environment.
A Trust consultant, Mr. Don Benn, has
completed an inventory of outdoor
recreation features in the Trust Area.
Stimulated by the Oil Ports Enquiry and the
vulnerability of the Trust Islands to oil spill
disasters, a paper on Oil Pollution and its
prevention was prepared.
PAGE FORTY
 The Trust is fortunate in having access to
and co-operation from many other ministries
of Government. For example, during the
summer the Trust supplied a temporary
staff person to work with the Water
Investigations Branch of the Ministry of the
Environment to study water supply on
Gabriola Island.
Policy Formulations
The Trust Council and its special
Committees have developed written policy
statements on the subjects of Road, Crown
Land and Wildlife Management. In addition,
the General Trust has adopted positions on
protection of Agricultural Land and has
made representation on public issues
affecting the Islands. Examples are the
strong opposition raised by the Trust to the
proposal to use islands as routes for high
tension power lines and the brief submitted
to the Regional Districts Review Committee.
Trust Committees have also made
representation on ferry schedules.
Community Planning
The community planning process is largely
based on preparation of Community Plans
and implementing subdivision and zoning
by-laws. At the end of the year the work on
community plans commenced by the
Regional Districts had been completed. All
13 main islands have operating Official
Community Plans of which 4 have been
passed by the Trust in 1978.
Zoning and subdivision by-laws exist for all
main islands and most work has been related
to revisions and amendments. At the end of
the year major subdivision and zoning
by-laws on Salt Spring, Mayne, North
Pender and Gabriola were in their final
stages of processing.
Finance and Administration
The 1978-79 Budget for the Trust is
approximately $356,000.00. This is pardy
financed by a 0.75 mill levy in the Trust Area
which raised $62,768.00. The remainder is
provided directly by the Province. The Trust
shares with the other sections of the Ministry
of Municipal Affairs some accounting and
personnel services.
Public Involvement
The Trust has encouraged public
involvement in the process of planning for
the Islands. In addition to the 94 Islanders
direcdy involved in committees and
commissions, the general public participate
at meetings held on the islands and obtain
information from newsletters, publications,
notices on island notice boards and
newspaper advertisements. The Trust's
Zenith number is used extensively. An
example of a publication is "A Guide to
Planning, Zoning and Subdivision Control in
the Islands Trust Area" issued early in 1978.
* FORTY-ONE
BRITISH COLUMBIA

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