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MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS ANNUAL REPORT for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1978 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1979

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
MINISTRY OF ENERGY,
TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
ANNUAL
REPORT
For the fiscal year ending March 31,
1978
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1979
  Victoria, B.C., December 31, 1978
To the Honourable Henry P. Bell-Irving,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned takes pleasure in submitting the Annual Report for the
Ministry of Energy, Transport and Communications for the fiscal year ending
March 31, 1978.
ALEX. V. FRASER
Minister of Transportation, Communications
and Highways
 Victoria, B.C., December 31, 1978
To the Honourable Alex. V. Fraser,
Minister of Transportation, Communications and Highways
Sir: I have the honour to present for your consideration the report of activities
of the Ministry of Energy, Transport and Communications for the fiscal year ending
March 31, 1978.
Respectfully submitted,
FRASER MacLEAN
Assistant Deputy Minister (Transport)
 CONTENTS
Introduction,
Transport Operations
Air Services Branch,.
Pack
.    7
Engineering and Inspection Branch     9
Motor Carrier Branch  11
Motor-vehicle Branch  12
Weigh Scale Branch    36
Transport Research and Planning,.
Communications
System Development and Regulation Branch-
Telecommunications Services Branch	
Administration
Finance	
Personnel Services,
38
40
42
44
47
  INTRODUCTION
During the year under report, this Ministry was affected by several changes
in areas of responsibility.
On December 8, 1977, the organization was amended by virtue of the Air
Services Branch being transferred back to this Ministry from the office of the
Provincial Secretary and Travel Industry. Around the same time, the Minister's
responsibility in reporting to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council for the B.C. Ferry
Corporation and the B.C. Steamship Corporation was transferred to the Minister
of Recreation and Conservation and the Provincial Secretary respectively.
The Ministry of Energy, Transport and Communications is comprised of three
service areas—Transport Operations, Communications, and Transport Research
and Planning. All energy matters come under the jurisdiction of the B.C. Energy
Commission.*
Under Transport Operations there are five branches—Air Services, Motor-
vehicle, Motor Carrier, Weigh Scale, and Engineering. Transport Research and
Planning, while related to transport operations, acts as a separate division. In
Communications there are two branches—System Development and Regulation,
and Telecommunication Services. Headquarters for the Ministry are located at
2631 Douglas Street, Victoria.
Reports from the various branches follow:
TRANSPORT OPERATIONS
AIR SERVICES BRANCH
This Branch is responsible for the provision of aircraft and crews to carry out
Air Transportation, Aerial Photography, and Air Ambulance requirements of
Provincial Government ministries.
The two Beechcraft A.200's continued to be used for the high altitude photographic role in the summer and for passenger transportation and air ambulance in
the winter. The three Cessna Citation 500's were also used for passenger transportation and air ambulance, and the Turbo Beech 18 assisted by a Citation 500 filled
the role on the Victoria/Vancouver scheduled flight service in the summer and
other transportation requirements in the winter. The two Beechcraft 18 aircraft
were used for low-level photography, and for lease to the Federal Department of
Fisheries and Environment, to undertake survey flying, including flight testing of a
data acquisition system.
The Otter aircraft on floats was used for transportation and support of survey
crews, aerial photography, and numerous other uses, while the Beaver aircraft,
based at Kamloops, was used in a similar role in that area.
The Flight Simulator installed in May of 1975 continues to operate effectively.
A total of 182.1 hours was flown on the machine for flight training in instrument
flying, emergency procedures, and pilot upgrading. This has reduced the actual
flight training and corresponding costs to a minimum. The flight simulator was
leased for pilot training to the Ministry of Transport, RCMP, and Woodwards Ltd.,
and other commercial aviation industry firms have indicated an interest for similar
type training.
• The B.C. Energy Commission regulates privately owned utilities in the Province, excluding B.C. Hydro
and city or municipally owned systems. The Commission also monitors the price of oil and oil by-products and
makes studies and prepares reports for the Minister on all matters pertaining to energy. Head office is located
at 1177 West Hastings Street, Vancouver. (The Act authorizing the establishment of the Commission was
assented to April 18, 1973.)
 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The scheduled flight service between Victoria and Vancouver continued at four
round flights daily with an added flight Friday afternoon and as required in the late
evening when the House was in session. This change in schedule has allowed a better
utilization of personnel and equipment. All other transportation flights continue
to be on a nonscheduled basis. Every effort is made to ensure that a maximum
number of seats are filled on each flight.
During the past year the Branch flew 5,756.6 hours in its air transportation,
aerial photography, and air ambulance* roles and carried 13,053 Government
employees over 1,315,988 passenger miles. In January 1977 the air ambulance
role was redeveloped in co-ordination with the Emergency Health Services and as a
result there was a 97-per-cent increase in air ambulance flights over the past fiscal
year.
In June 1977 the Travel Recording Centre began its operation under the
direction of the Air Services Branch. The purpose of this centre is to co-ordinate
and record all commercial and Government air travel by members of the Executive
Council and public servants of the Province of British Columbia and to ensure
maximum utilization of Government Air Service. The centre also provides statistical
and charge back returns for air travel to each ministry on a monthly basis.
Personnel in the Branch increased during the year from 41 to 47 positions
by the employment of four clerks in the Travel Recording Centre, a full-time clerk-
typist in the Hangar Administrative area, and a Stockman 2.
Summary of Statistics for the Fiscal Year 1977/78
Aircraft Flying Hours—
Beaver Aircraft (1) 	
Beechcraft 18 Aircraft (2)	
Beechcraft Turbo Aircraft (1)
Otter Aircraft (1) 	
  564.7 hours
  185.0 hours
  148.9 hours
  540.8 hours
Cessna Citation Aircraft (3)   2,800.5 hours
Beechcraft 200 Aircraft (2)   1,334.6 hours
Simulator (1)   18 2.1 hours
Total   5,756.6 hours
Air Ambulance Flights—
AirVacs 	
Number of patients
Flight time 	
Mileage	
Air Ambulance Transfers-
Transfers 	
Number of patients _.
Flight time 	
Mileage 	
Aerial Photography—
Total hours flown,
277
334
755.4 hours
184,043     miles
180
284
510.9 hours
117,436     miles
  929.4 hours
* This figure includes 929.4 hours flown on aerial photography in co-ordination with the Field Operations
Division of the Ministry of the Environment, and 457 air ambulance flights (1,266.3 hours) in co-ordination
with the Emergency Health Services and Canadian Forces Rescue Centre.
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
Over-all Operating Statistics, April 1977 to March 1978—
Total aircraft miles      437,390 miles
Total seat miles  2,951,824 miles
Total passenger miles  1,315,988 miles
Total Number of Passengers Carried—
Victoria/Vancouver scheduled service     9,810
Nonscheduled service      3,243
Total  13,053
ENGINEERING AND INSPECTION BRANCH
This Branch processes construction applications and inspects pipelines, railways, aerial tramways, logging equipment on industrial roads, and certifies operating
personnel for railways, aerial tramways, and industrial road equipment. It is also
the regulatory authority which administers the Railway Act, the Pipe-lines Act, and
the Industrial Transportation Act.
Inspections carried out during the fiscal year included 181 aerial tramways,
59 pumping and compressor stations, 45 bulk-fuel storage plants, 830 industrial
vehicles, 255 locomotives, 58 railway yards, 263 miles of industrial roads, 1,183
miles of railway trackage. In addition, 601 operating personnel were certified for
industrial roads and railways and 69 accidents were investigated.
The Branch was also involved in processing, inspecting, and testing the following new projects: nine new aerial tramways; 15 miles of new trackage, including
sidings and industrial leads; 214 pipelines; 20 new compressor stations; plus 352
crossing applications. The Branch is represented on two Pipeline Code Committees,
the Mobile Equipment Committee, and the Provincial Emergency Program's Hazardous Materials and Oil Spills Committee.
EXAMINATIONS
Railway operating examinations were conducted at various railway and plant
sites during the year. The following certificates were issued: diesel locomotive
engineer, 10; steam locomotive engineer, 1; hostler, 10; switchman, 35; conductor,
3; locomotive crane operator, 1; recreational locomotive engineer, 2; operators, 30;
and motorman, 27.
Industrial transportation: number of field lectures, 28; number of office lectures, 1; field lecture attendance, 372; office lecture attendance, 12; vehicle driver
examinations, 482.
Vehicles inspected: logging trucks, 642; gravel trucks, 138; crummies, 22;
loaders and spars, 28.
Statistics for the Period April 1,1977, to March 31,1978
Industrial Road Industry—
Industrial vehicles inspected  830
Field and office air brake lecture attendance  263
Industrial vehicle driver examinations processed  482
Industrial roads inspected (miles) 263
 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Industrial road bridges inspected  25
New vehicle applications reviewed and processed  499
Mobile Equipment Committee meetings attended  6
Industrial road accidents investigated  5
Lectures to RCMP (9) attendance  121
Railway Industry—
Railways under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Energy, Transport and
Communications:
British Columbia Railway
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Railway
B.C. Harbours Board Railway
Vancouver Wharves
Canadian Forest Products Railway
Crown Zellerbach Logging Railway
MacMillan Bloedel Company Railway
and some 43 other industrial railways, plus five recreation railways.
Locomotives and other motive power equipment inspected  255
Railway yards inspected  58
Railway operating personnel certified  119
New trackage applications reviewed and processed  38
Railway accidents investigated  21
Railway trackage inspected (miles) 1,188
Bulk fuel (petroleum derived) storage plants inspected  45
Dangerous commodity facilities inspected  2
Crossing applications   67
Automatic signalization applications  2
Shops and fixed installation inspections  4
Aerial Tramway Industry—
Annual inspections  181
Winter operational inspections  50
Engineering designs reviewed and processed for new aerial
tramway installations  9
Progress inspections carried out during various stages of construction of the nine new aerial tramways  70
Summer inspections   54
Pipelines Industry—
Number of pipeline projects reviewed and processed and endurance tested  .  214
Total length of pipelines approved for construction (miles) 393
Natural gas compressor stations inspected  30
Oil pumping stations inspected  6
Water injection pumping stations inspected  3
Pipeline crossing applications reviewed and processed  285
Pipeline failures investigated  43
New compressor stations approved and tested  20
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
Pipeline Breaks and Oil Spills April 1,1977, to March 31,1978
OIL
ll
Date
Company
Cause
Amount
04.21.77
Pacific Petroleums	
Amerada Petroleum	
25 bbls.
05.27.77
20 bbls.
05.28.77
Earth movement	
Earth movement    	
Weld failure	
4,975 bbls.
06.19.77
2,989 bbls.
06.23.77
Blueberry-Taylor Oil P/L. 	
3,169 bbls.
06.23.77
100 bbls.
07.18.77
Pacific Petroleums	
100 bbls.
08.13.77
1,900 bbls.
08.25.77
Pacific Petroleums-	
Pacific Petroleums	
15 bbls.
11.30.77
12.30.77
External corrosion	
300 bbls.
100 bbls.
01.03.78
Chautauqua Oil	
Pacific Petroleums	
Pacific Petroleums	
Pacific Petroleums 	
01 08 78
200 bbls.
02.01.78
15 bbls.
02.22.78
GAS
04.03.77
06.23.77
06.24.77
06.25.77
09.29.77
10.16.77
10.18.77
10.21.77
11.29.77
12.01.77
12.29.77
01.09.78
02.12.78
02.18.78
02.19.78
03.01.78
03.02.78
03.28.78
Placid  	
Pacific Petroleums	
Pacific Petroleums _	
Pacific Petroleums.	
Inland Natural Gas	
Pacific Petroleums	
Western Decalta, _	
Apache Oil _ 	
Pacific Petroleums 	
Dome Petroleum—	
Amoco Petroleum _ _
Pacific Petroleums	
Pacific Petroleums	
C.D.C. Oil and Gas _	
Pacific Petroleums  _ 	
Pacific Petroleums 	
Pacific Petroleums 	
Pacific Petroleums. 	
External load.
External corrosion..
External corrosion..
External corrosion.
Hit by grader	
Overpressure ,
Struck by bulldozer-
External corrosion	
Earth movement	
Hit by bulldozer	
Weld failure _	
Hit by bulldozer	
Fitting failure (human error).
Valve failure (design)	
Earth movement 	
External corrosion	
Human error	
Fitting failure _	
WATER
04.21.77
05.24.77
05.27.77
Texaco	
Weld failure	
06.21.77
W"1H failnr..
2 bbls.
07.18.77
Internal corrosion    _  „
07.30.77
Pacific Petroleums	
Pacific Petroleums	
08.30.77
10.10.77
12.02.77
5 bbls.
12.03.77
Overpressure
300 bbls.
12.04.77
Pacific Petroleums	
1,400 bbls.
* Note—bbls. denotes "barrels"
MOTOR CARRIER BRANCH
The Motor Carrier Branch serves as the operating arm of the Motor Carrier
Commission, a regulatory tribunal appointed by Cabinet.
The major function of the Branch is to investigate applications for permanent
motor carrier authority to transport goods or persons for compensation on British
Columbia highways. Following investigations, applications are referred to the
Commission. Once the decision has been rendered, the application is returned to
the Branch for processing. The Branch also investigates complaints from the ship-
 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ping or travelling public regarding the service of licensed carriers. Headquarters
are located in Burnaby, B.C., and there are seven field offices throughout the Province located at Dawson Creek, Prince George, Kamloops, Kelowna, Cranbrook,
Nanaimo, and Victoria. (During the year the Nelson office was closed and a new
one opened at Cranbrook.)
Enforcement under the Motor Carrier Act is undertaken by the RCMP and
weigh scale operators, who ensure that goods transported by freight concur with
the conditions of licence granted to a carrier or ensure that goods are being
transported by carriers adequately licensed under the Motor Carrier Act. Enforcement is also undertaken under the Motor Vehicle Transport Act (Canada) through
authority delegated to the Motor Carrier Commission by the Federal Government.
This Act applies to operations of an extra-provincial nature, for example, an Alberta
carrier must obtain authority not only from the home province of Alberta but from
the British Columbia authorities before operating into and out of the Province of
British Columbia.
During the year under report, the Branch, through its administration and field
inspectors, investigated and processed approximately 3,000 applications. In addition, complaints were investigated from shippers and motor carriers, and there were
24,853 motor carrier licences issued. These consisted of 1,547 bus licences, 2,184
taxi licences, 2,338 limited freight-vehicle licences, and 18,784 public freight
licences. Revenue collected amounted to $884,514.84. There were also 19,957
temporary permits issued to authorize temporary services in addition to the authorities being held by licensed carriers, or new services of a short-term duration.
MOTOR-VEHICLE BRANCH
The Motor-vehicle Branch is responsible for driver licensing, vehicle registration and licensing, and vehicle safety inspection. A Central Registry Division is
responsible for the registering of documents under the Bills of Sale Act, the
Conditional Sales Act, the Mechanics' Lien Act, and the Assignment of Book
Accounts Act.
HIGHLIGHTS OF BRANCH ACTIVITIES
Total registered vehicles licensed in 1977 was 1,556,262, an increase of
144,882 or 10 per cent over the previous year.
Original driver licences issued up to December 31, 1977, were 92,760, an
increase of 336 or 4 per cent over the 1976 total. The total number of licensed
drivers as of December 31, 1977, was 1,699,524, an increase of 65,201 or 4 per
cent over the 1976 total. There were 1,000,558 male drivers, while female drivers
accounted for 698,966.
The Motor-vehicle Inspection Program inspected 631,990 vehicles with
167,494 or 26 per cent rejected during the fiscal year April 1, 1977, to March 31,
1978.
The Central Registry Division processed a total of 585,336 transactions during
the fiscal year April 1, 1977, to March 31, 1978.
Following are reports from the four divisions—Motor-vehicle, Driver Licence,
Inspection, and Central Registry:
The Motor-vehicle Division is responsible for vehicle registration and
licensing, issuance of permits, and collection of revenue under the Motor-vehicle
Act, Commercial Transport Act, Social Services Tax Act, Automobile Insurance
Act, and Motive-fuel Use Tax Act.
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS 13
VEHICLE LICENCES
The total number of registered vehicles licensed during 1977 was 1,556,262,
an increase of 144,882 or 10 per cent over the 1976 total.
Passenger vehicles licensed totalled 989,119, an increase of 77,497 or 8 per
cent over the 1976 total.
Commercial vehicles licensed totalled 353,668, an increase of 45,148 or 14 per
cent over the 1976 total.
Motorcycles licensed were 26,521, an increase of 3,370 or 25 per cent over
the 1976 total.
Trailers licensed in 1977 totalled 186,954, an increase of 16,000 or 9 per cent
over the 1976 total.
Comparative Statement of Licences, Permits, Etc., Issued During the
Licence-years 1969-77, Inclusive
Licences Issued
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973    1    1974
1
1975
1976
1977
Motor vehicles—
Passenger. 	
Commercial	
790,493
197,755
811,590
207,495
856,086
228,098
906,268
256,313
1
961,497|   879,751
286,925|   270,101
884,250
283,198
911,622
308,520
989,119
353,668
Total motor vehicles 	
988,248
1,019,085
1,084,184
1,162,581
1
1,248,422|1,149,852
1
1,167,448|1,220,142
1,342,787
20,905
114,420
3,231
8,009
22,500
129,864
3,093
6,640
25,339
141,978
3,699
7,335
29,372
156,143
4,048
8,090
33,495
171,869
5,067
10,714
21,184
162,855
9,202
14,024
19,971
161,963
8,625
14,658
21,148
170,090
9,243
16,703
26,521
186,954
Extra-Provincial prorated
trucks.   ,	
Extra-Provincial prorated
trailers	
10,081
17,148
Total of all licensed vehicles
1,134,813
1,181,182
1,262,535
1,360,234
1
1,469,567|1,357,117
1,372,665
1
1,437,326(1,583,491
Transfer of ownership—
383,477
71,858
13,447
12,003
347,879
70,522
15,334
14,337
405,928
86,003
17,278
19,167
439,242
101,424
20,044
22,022
1
452,980]   291,027
112,273|     69,908
22,279|     11,312
26,282|     22,613
338,878
88,012
12,214
25,890
407,056
122,046
15,171
37,072
419,765
131,157
20,420
39,078
Commercial vehicles	
Motorcycles  ...
Trailers.    ...	
Total transfer of
ownership	
480,785
448,072
528,376
582,732
1
613,814|   394,860
464,994
581,345
610,420
Motor dealers—
1,173
1,538
124
95
1,204
1,490
141
84
1,205
1,538
148
134
1,274
1,674
150
158
1
1,392|       1,408
2,146|       2,098
1
167|          215
1
2071            93
 | 	
1,489
Additional licences	
Original   motorcycle
dealer licences	
2,334
182
—
	
Additional   motorcycle
dealer licences	
93
Demonstration—
Original licences.	
1,883
2,194
168
49
257
308
20
8
141
421
500
190
2,132
 |	
3,356
Original  motorcycle
licences.—	
1
123
Additional  motorcycle
licences 	
52
Transporter—
3fl
18
44
141
53
177
72
244
214
489
10
10
58
346
191
371
12
9
105
338
290
138
305
Additional licences
Manufacturer—
Original licences	
87|            95
1
 j	
206
22
 j      	
14
1
370
Original licences 	
Additional licences	
|
212
Repairman—
Original licences	
1
39
17
586
Additional licences. .
 1	
281
1                1
 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Comparative Statement of Licences, Permits, Etc., Issued During the
Licence-years 1969-77, Inclusive—Continued
Licences Issued
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
Permits—
Nonresident   touring
motor vehicle per-
590
19
20,696
3,029
540
10
21,596
3,156
550
1
33,880
4,488
496
2
33,443
4,001
468
3
40,508
4,900
266
5
39,923
2,412
226
69
88
Nonresident    special
motor vehicle per-
Nonresident    commercial motor vehicle
permits:
34,606
4,881
28,542
1,607
27,903
3,732
Totals  _.
23,725
24,752
38,368
37,444
45,408
42,335
39,487
30,149
31,635
Temporary    operation
permits—
20,260
49,665
20,805
52,831
23,814
69,648
26,600
80,603
29,402
75,983
52,027
60,221
41,558
47,674
59,389
57,070
57,476
Commercial	
55,091
Totals	
69,925
73,636
93,462
107,203
105,385
112,248
89,232
116,459
112,567
Temporary testing and
demonstration   permits—
Passenger... 	
Commercial  	
.„ 	
	
  	
	
1,888
63
11,788
2,231
46,851
8,174
55,419
11,256
Totals
1,951
14,144
3,983
89
2,580
14,019
14,227
3,426
130
2,559
55,025
19,379
2,744
115
2,003
66,675
Interim-licence/insurance
6,356
141
2,881
26,249
All-terrain vehicles—
17,456
84
908
3,048
102
1,765
Totals	
18,448
9,378
6,652
6,115
4,862
4,915
15,077
14,339
14,899
15,138
DISTRIBUTION OF MOTOR-VEHICLES
The following table provides information concerning the number of licences
issued and their locality. This table cannot be regarded as an accurate population
count of vehicles in the various parts of the Province as the owners move frequently
from one area to another and vehicles are often sold to new owners residing in
different localities than the previous owners. The table does, however, provide an
indication of how vehicles are distributed throughout the Province.
Licences Issued
Name
(1977 Licensed Vehicles)
District
Code
Passenger
Vehicles
Commercial
Vehicles
Commercial
Trailers
Utility
Trailers
Motorcycles
Abbotsford	
Agassiz  	
Alaska Highway  	
190
036
510
191
514
085
042
159
083
161
044
046
103
048
15,705
1,619
3,111
5,558
2
1,929
1,380
761
354
149
363
47
59,338
1,421
5,293
786
2,720
2,609
1,342
1,047
739
586
162
221
59
14,683
1,503
307
29
122
136
2,485
307
1,158
1,067
493
65
222
141
Armstrong	
64
37
47
23
16
5
486
430
204
88
47
61
13
5,925
568
71
44
Barriere	
32
15
2
21
7
3,348
120
1,173
Burns Lake	
72
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
Licences Issued—Continued
15
Name
District
Passenger
Commercial
Commercial
Utility
Motorcycles
(1977 Licensed Vehicles)
Code
Vehicles
Vehicles
Trailers
Trailers
010
7,839
3,787
171
2,377
272
182
123
382
4,363
387
1,955
25
69
83
1,114
51
129
Chase	
050
2,104
1,494
110
623
64
Chemainus	
017
1,568
797
21
436
35
038
17,098
6,239
339
3,459
639
052
028
492
24,568
588
7,600
42
449
179
3,844
13
Cloverdale	
511
Courtenay	
012
11,096
4,974
120
3,594
546
Cowichan  	
018
1,856
952
6
579
72
Cranbrook...	
125
6,867
4,192
745
1,837
259
Creston	
127
3,719
2,413
112
1,057
183
Dawson Creek	
167
4,995
4,578
380
1,589
169
Duncan	
019
11,572
5,172
393
2,673
341
Elkford	
516
087
1,751
1,548
1,354
1,290
28
109
591
388
91
Enderby.	
45
131
181
185
3,794
1,071
857
2,584
1,297
897
130
136
91
957
305
267
120
47
Fort St. James	
33
Fort St. John	
169
5,244
6,233
569
1,701
220
Ganges
023
2,107
886
24
389
68
Golden	
133
2,155
1,547
103
587
86
Gold River	
016
089
657
2,533
308
1,475
2
106
233
568
39
Grand Forks	
99
091
032
923
14,596
812
4,955
42
154
217
2,752
53
Haney 	
379
Hazelton
054
882
873
72
204
44
Hope,	
040
2,119
1,326
94
421
47
Houston	
056
1,067
930
107
318
68
186
1,191
1,365
140
376
61
Invermere	
135
1,924
1,710
124
495
74
Kamloops	
157
23,763
12,440
808
5,436
737
Kaslo	
137
449
343
15
162
50
Kelowna 	
093
31,102
12,018
769
6,707
951
Keremeos	
095
1,063
801
27
280
48
Kimberley	
139
3,160
1,846
49
1,002
166
Kitimat.	
058
3,703
1,538
57
875
132
Ladysmith	
021
3,007
1,355
44
800
73
059
061
915
314
777
286
36
6
225
70
50
Lytton	
13
McBride	
171
501
581
39
144
27
Merritt	
063
034
2,594
7,710
2,000
2,885
138
82
796
1,327
75
Mission	
191
141
006
775
19,467
673
7,381
38
262
328
4,327
49
Nanaimo                    .    .   .
697
Natal 	
143
150
5
6,145
6
2,560
66
2
1,371
Nelson	
225
New Denver	
145
393
288
7
101
22
New Westminster area 	
003
53,408
11,943
1,130
6,956
1,225
Northern Vancouver Island
515
5,541
3,974
64
1,199
277
North and West Vancouver,
004
61,497
7,871
585
4,791
1,280
183
143
86
22
15
Oliver 	
099
2,255
1,333
63
503
53
100 Mile House	
065
2,928
2,580
177
886
82
Osoyoos	
100
1,715
940
47
366
37
Parksville	
014
2,868
1,225
35
829
80
112
14,337
5,952
335
3,055
450
Point Roberts, U.S.A 	
512
1,672
1,074
33
269
85
Port Alberni	
008
9,632
4,513
73
2,977
305
175
6,065
2,530
81
2,046
175
067
24,200
15,268
1,103
6,291
785
069
4,529
1,848
89
723
132
Princeton ...
114
1,556
1,142
62
497
86
Qualicum	
015
1,855
861
17
495
44
520
1,121
1,002
25
257
51
Quesnel
071
5,807
4,941
330
1,660
293
Revelstoke	
116
2,716
1,909
137
768
131
Richmond	
102
64,922
12,402
506
7,509
1,187
147
148
128
792
69
529
33
38
215
1
Salmo          	
35
118
5,687
3,678
249
1,638
177
513
1,209
727
9
196
1
35
 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Licences Issued—Continued
Name
(1977 Licensed Vehicles)
District
Code
Passenger
Vehicles
Commercial
Vehicles
Commercial
Trailers
Utility
Trailers
Motorcycles
Sechelt           	
173
025
155
073
026
177
029
075
180
152
179
002
077
163
165
121
001
079
081
529
999
4,790
6,700
573
2,417
2,320
2,930
48,228
4,775
318
8,898
524
173,821
2,376
483
1,245
15,488
90,963
102
5,575
265
4
2,321
1,812
452
2,023
1,194
1,481
15,001
3,377
179
3,272
436
34,172
2,452
457
1,133
8,004
26,519
77
5,451
959
1
41
56
13
156
53
76
607
149
4
135
19
4,628
197
32
72
506
1,715
1
387
1,147
993
1,109
138
734
450
481
8,010
1,352
45
2,263
146
10,171
728
139
415
3,513
12,586
24
1,521
57
1
176
Sidney	
176
20
105
Sooke	
82
158
Surrey...  .	
1,142
194
Tnfinn
Trail 	
8
390
28
Vancouver.	
Vanderhoof	
2,988
128
32
56
522
2,340
Wells	
Williams Lake	
7
224
2
Total licensed vehicles	
1,556,262
989,119
353,668
26,887
160,067
26,521
Total registered vehicles....
2,542,684
1,606,335
515,566
29,814
309,871
81,098
The difference between total licensed vehicles and total registered vehicles is due to the licence with
owner concept, e.g., vehicles on dealers sales lots are not required to be licensed. Some vehicles have been
destroyed or removed from the Province but remain registered for six years or until notice is received.
REVENUE
Revenue received by the Motor-vehicle Branch from licences, permits, and
motor-vehicle inspection amounted to $57,853,816. Funds collected under the
Motive-fuel Use Tax Act, All-terrain Vehicles Act, social services tax, and the
Insurance Corporation of British Columbia premiums amounted to $6,227,953. A
further $50,697,586 in insurance premiums was collected by Motor-vehicle Branch
offices and accounted for directly to the Insurance Corporation.
Source of Revenue, 1977 Licence-year
Revenue collected by the Motor-vehicle Branch pursuant to:
$ $
Motor-vehicle Act      4,481,801.00
Commercial Transport Act      2,674,429.00
7,156,230.00
Revenue collected by the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia on behalf of
the Motor-vehicle Branch:
Motor-vehicle Act fees—
Passenger vehicles  20,685,756.00
Motorcycles 	
Notice of Transfer	
Duplicate of Registration Certificate of
Insurance 	
New vehicle registration	
Decal replacement 	
Substitution plate fee	
119,206.00
610,060.00
17,206.00
129,606.00
3,103.00
40,774.00
Commercial Transport Act fees—commercial vehicles
21,605,711.00
25,527,604.00
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS 17
Combined fees under Motor-vehicle Act and Commercial Transport Act—■
Trailers           848,144.00
Substitution plates  3,950.00
Decal replacements   504.00
—        852,598.00
Other fees      2,711,673.00
Total revenue, Motor-vehicle Act and Commercial Transport Act  57,853,816.00
Other revenue collected by the Motor-vehicle Branch—
Motive-fuel tax  36,442.00
All-terrain Vehicles Act  15,758.00
Social services tax        578,351.00
Insurance  Corporation  of  British   Columbia
premiums ...     6,227,953.00
     6,858,504.00
Insurance Corporation of British Columbia premiums collected by
Motor-vehicle Branch and accounted for directly to the Insurance Corporation     50,697,586.00
REFUNDS
Legislation provides for the refunding of licence fees where licence-plates are
surrendered to the Superintendent. A person who was allocated motor-vehicle
licence-plates for use on a vehicle registered in his name can, upon disposal of the
vehicle, retain, destroy, or attach the number plates to a substitute vehicle, or
surrender them to the Superintendent, together with an application for refund of
fees.
Refunds for motor-vehicle licence-plates are granted on the basis of the
unexpired portion of the licence-year, but no refund is made of an amount less than
$5.
On reassignment of the motor-vehicle licence-plates to a substitute vehicle, no
refund is granted if the combined licence and insurance fee is less than $5.
The following summary sets out the amount of money refunded for the 1977
licence-year:
Refunds, 1977
General refunds—
Motor-vehicle Act— $ $
Passenger   11,688 92,694.00
Drivers     81 1,825.00
Commercial   Transport  Act—commercial        6,255 95,071.00
      189,590.00
Relinquishment refunds—
Motor-vehicle Act—
Passenger     93,257        1,297,877.00
Drivers      1,703 4,894.00
2
 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Relinquishment refunds—continued
Commercial   Transport   Act—commercial   27,493
Total refunds
1,039,693.00
2,342,464.00
2,532,054.00
The Driver Licence Division is responsible for examination of the applicant's ability to safely operate a motor-vehicle, for the issuance of drivers' licences,
for the Driver Safety and Improvement Program, and for compiling and maintaining incident reports.
Drivers' Licences
Original drivers' licences issued during the 1977 licence-year totalled 92,760,
an increase of 336 from 92,424 issued in 1976.
The number of licensed drivers in British Columbia as of December 31, 1977,
was 1,699,524, an increase of 65,201 over the previous total of 1,634,323. There
were 1,000,558 male drivers, while female drivers numbered 698,966. The
analysis of drivers on record as of December 31,1977, indicating sex and classification, are shown below.
The fee for the unexpired full years of the five-year driver's licence is refundable under the following circumstances upon surrender of the licence to this
Branch:
(a) The licence has been surrendered due to the failure of the licensee to
qualify in a driver's examination.
(b) The licensee has taken up residence outside the Province.
(c) The licensee is deceased.
(d) The licensee has voluntarily surrendered his licence.
The following is a general description of driver licence classes:
Class 1-—Includes any vehicle except motorcycles.
Class 2—Includes large buses
Class 3—Trucks and combinations with small trailers.
Class 4—Taxis and small buses.
Class 5—Private cars and small trucks.
Class 6—Motorcycles.
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
19
Analysis of Drivers on Record as at December 31, 1977
MALE CLASSIFICATION
Age
I
2,6
3,61 3,4)3,4.6
4,6
5,6
ToUl
16-17 years
18-19 „ ...
20-24 „ ...
25-34 „ ...
35-44 „ ..
45-54 „ ...
55-64 „ ...
65-69 „ ...
70-74 „ ...
75-79 „ ,
80-84 „ ,
85-89 „ ,
90 and over.
Totals,
1
136
2,153
9,036
9,057
5,838
1,805
78
14
34
780
1,791
741
329
63
4
18
582
3,098
2,516
1,921
1,185
99
17
1
1
6
189
615
188
107
29
3
120
507
3,050
8,724
7,396
6,278
3,792
182
46
6
2
13
104
875
1,546
451
224
70
1
-I-
28,119(3,742
I
9,438 1,137 30,103
3,284
8
328
1,283
790
523
221
6
3
3
124
317
86
39
11
1
219
3,854
10,719
4,657
2,792
1,557
212
59
12
1
2
1
26
824
.733
290
109
36
25,791
38,896
97,292
204,864
147,405
127,449
103,589
41,211
28,683
16,127
7,508
3,311
1,037
1,322
3,067
14,966
22,046
4,236
2,299
968
190
53
18
15
4
1
167
141
477
551
59
49
32
18
20
13
5
7
1
27,414
43,165
125,494
266,323
177,872
147,957
113,358
42,005
28,896
16,177
7,532
3,325
1,040
3,162
581
24,08513.019
I
843,163 49,185
,540
1,000,558
FEMALE CLASSIFICATION
3
34
85
54
30
3
4
14
45
67
55
55
11
17,017
31,312
95,886
201,818
127,236
99,369
75,960
21,802
11,572
5,363
2,082
627
107
66
160
976
1,793
426
143
38
8
1
5
1
1
10
25
65
96
24
14
3
3
1
3
17,097
18-19    „    	
5
16
1
2
70
233
210
106
42
1
I
4
18
4
1
1
2
3
2
1
29
756
1,455
766
461
158
8
1
33
59
11
4
31,548
20-24    „   	
3
15
6
1
2
97,881
25-34    „    	
205,658
35-44    „    	
45-54    „     _.,
55-64    „    	
128,795
100,185
76,215
65-69    „   	
21,822
70-74    „   	
1
11,574
75-79    „    	
1
5,372
80-84    „   	
2,083
85-89   „   	
628
90 and over. 	
108
Totals  ...
210
22
664
28
251
9
25
2
3,634
108
690,151
3,618
244
698,966
Convictions
The receipt of notices of convictions for driving infractions under the Criminal
Code (Canada), Motor-vehicle Act, Motor-vehicle Act Regulations, and the reports
of violations of any law known as a "Traffic Rule," continued to supply information
for the inclusion in the individual driving records of each licensed driver in this
Province. Access to these records is available by means of the driver's licence
number or by the name of the driver. The retaining of these records and the furnishing of information which is invaluable for driver control is the main duty of the
Driver Licence Records Section. The control which is made possible by these
records is the responsibility of the Driver Safety and Improvement Section.
Convictions Under Criminal Code (Canada) 1974-77
Offences
1974
1975
•976
1977
Under Criminal Code (Canada)—
7
1
31
564
451
7,186
914
7,249
933
8
2
31
564
452
10,508
969
6,285
1,102
4
0
23
538
500
8,726
1,187
8,674
1,048
9
Causing injury by criminal negligence, sec. 204	
4
Criminal negligence in operation of motor-vehicle,
Failing to stoD after accident, sec. 233 Clt 	
sec. 233 (1)
35
553
560
Driving while ability impaired, sec. 234    	
3,991
Breath sample not Drovided. sec. 235   ,
1,337
Driving with more than 80 mg of alcohol in blood
Driving motor-vehicle while driver's licence under
238    	
sec. 236	
suspension, sec.
12,168
1,849
17,336
19,921
20,700
20,506
 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Convictions Under Motor-vehicle Act 1974-77
Offences
1974    i     1975
1976
1977
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Driving without obtaining driver's licence, sec. 18 (1)	
Driving without subsisting motor-vehicle liability policy, sec. 18 (2a).
Driving motor-vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's
licence, sec. 18 (6, 8)-_ __     _.	
Driving without having driver's licence and liability card in possession at time, sec. 19   _ 	
Driving when right to obtain licence is suspended, sec. 20 (2)	
Leaving the scene of an accident, sec. 54a _ _ 	
Using licence belonging to another, refusing to show licence, sec. 56,
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sec. 124	
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127, 128, 152 	
Failing to obey special signs re highway construction, sees. 134,
135, 137..., _.	
Careless driving, sec. 138   _  	
Slow driving, sec. 139   	
Exceeding maximum speed limit, sec. 140,
Exceeding speed limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec. 141	
Passing stopped school bus, sec. 142,    	
Failure to drive on the right, sec. 143	
Infractions of "lane" driving, sees. 144, 145, 146 _ 	
Infractions of "passing", sees. 148, 149, 150, 151, 153, 154  .._.
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees. 155,
156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162 _ _  	
Failure to yield right-of-way, sees. 163, 164, 165, 166, 167.     	
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 169, 171	
Failure to stop at railroad crossing, sec. 174 	
Failure to stop at intersection, sec. 177      	
Leaving vehicle improperly parked, sec. 182,   _ —
Backing vehicle illegally, sec. 184       	
Operating motorcycle with more than one person, sec. 185 _	
Failure to comply with requirements before moving vehicle, sec. 186
Improper control and operation of vehicle in canyon or defile, sec.
187 __    	
Failure to observe fire vehicle safety, sees. 189, 190,	
Driving on sidewalk, sec. 191   _ _.
Opening door requirements, sec. 194
Illegal depositing of articles on highway, sec. 195,.
Kiding motorcycle without safety helmet, sec. 207.
Other.  	
Under Motor-vehicle Act Regulations,
1.311 j
2.778 |
890 '|
I
2,587 |
12
537 |
202 j
1 i
185 j
I
0 I
80 •
2 !
501 |
13 |
11 I
6 I
32 |
28 |
I
26 I
24 |
19 |
1 I
47 |
566 |
2 I
4 I
63 I
1.275
1,273
779
I
'.,417
641 j
115 |
3 I
156 |
7
79
1
396
26
20
4
30 |
34 i
i
24 |
24 1
8 t
2 j
52 |
537  j
14 |
5 1
90 i
1,937  j
1.373  |
I
986 |
3,191  |
4 I
678 |
188 |
6 I
210 |
I
6
107
1
763
17
21
9
41
21
34
21
15
2
69
665
15
5
63
2.566
1,837
1,063
4,033
182
975
218
5
285
6
127
3
1,188
40
12
12
58
48
41
34
12
6
74
817
15
4
73
j
o i
1
1 1
0
0
3 1
3 1
4
4
5 I
10 |
8
5
0 |
3 1
4
5
219 |
196 i
188
172
311 |
313 |
332
368
8 1
5 I
3
1
10,480 |       8,552 |     10,987  |     14,289
7,580 |      7,962 |    10,953 |    10,850
I I      I
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
21
Violations Under Section 126k of Motor-vehicle Act, 1974-77
Offences
1974
1975
1976
1977
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sec. 124	
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127, 128, 152	
Failing to obey special signs re highway construction, sees.  134,
135, 137       __
Careless driving, sec. 138       	
Slow driving, sec. 139 _   .... 	
Exceeding maximum speed limit, sec. 140  _ _	
Exceeding speed limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec. 141   	
Passing stopped schooi bus, sec. 142 _   	
Failure to drive on the right, sec. 143 ..._  	
Infractions of "lane" driving, sees. 144, 145, 146	
Infractions of "passing", sees. 148, 159, 150, 151, 153, 154,	
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees. 155,
156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162 _ ,	
Failure to yield right-of-way, sees. 163, 164, 165, 166, 167.  	
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 169, 171 _
Failure to stop at railroad crossings, sec. 174     _
Failure to stop at intersection, sec. 177   ....	
Backing vehicle illegally, sec. 184 _    ..._	
Operating motorcycle with more than one person, sec. 185	
Improper control and operation of vehicle in canyon or defile, sec.
187      	
Coasting down grade with gears in neutral, sec. 188 	
Failure to observe fire vehicle safety, sees. 189, 190	
Driving on sidewalk, sec. 191	
Opening door when unsafe, sec. 194   ...   	
Other.,-     _	
Under Motor-vehicle Act Regulations ,  .
I
53
34,201
310
9,144
106
148,237
6,634
223
1,539
6,156
6,230
3,795
6,009 |
1,448
177
8,746
1,533
10
5
10
44
93
44
22
234,769
5,850
79
35,949
1,752
9,011
89
189,158
9,550
226
1,552
5,880
6,107
3,724
5,392
1,419
445
10,592
1,678
3
0
7
29
95
39
0
55
|    40,413
508
10,284
134
222,575
11,320
247
1,633
6,005
6,093
4.154
5,508
1,342
441
11,389
1,871
6
28
124
36
I     0
82
46,386
1,080
13,177
157
227,872
13,198
228
1,698
6,334
6,523
4,486
6,097
1,527
450
12,213
2,214
4
4
13
21
144
44
0
282,776 | 324,171  | 343,959
5,042
5,011
4,793
 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Total Number of Offences Under Motor-vehicle Act as Recorded on
B.C. Driver's Records
Offences
1975
1976
1977
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Driving without obtaining driver's licence, sec. 18 (1)      	
Driving without subsisting motor-vehicle liability policy, sec. 18 (2a)
Driving motor-vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's
licence, sec. 18 (6, 8).
Driving without having driver's licence and liability card in possession at time, sec. 19   _. _	
Driving when right to obtain licence is suspended, sec. 20 (2) .,,	
Leaving the scene of an accident, sec. 54a _   	
Using licence belonging to another, refusing to show licence, sec. 56
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sec. 124 ,,.
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127, 128, 152 	
Failing to obey special signs re highway construction, sees. 134,
135, 137...- _	
Careless driving, sec. 138 ...   _•.._
Slow driving, sec. 139.        	
Exceeding maximum speed limit, sec. 140 	
Exceeding speed limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec. 141	
Passing stopped school bus, sec. 142  _ _	
Failure to drive on the right, sec. 143.
Infractions of "lane" driving, sees. 144, 145, 146 _	
Infractions of "passing", sees. 148, 159, 150, 151, 153, 154 *	
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees. 155,
156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162    ..._
Failure to yield right-of-way, sees. 163, 164, 165, 166, 167	
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 169, 171  _.
Failure to stop at railroad crossing, sec. 174 _	
Failure to stop at intersection, sec. 177	
Leaving vehicle improperly parked, sec. 182	
Backing vehicle illegally, sec. 184-   ._	
Operating motorcycle with more than one person, sec. 185	
Requirements of safe driving on highway, sees. 186, 187 	
Coasting down grade with gears in neutral, sec. 188	
Failure to observe fire vehicle safety, sees. 189, 190 _	
Driving on sidewalk, sec. 191- - _ 	
Opening door requirements, sec. 194   ,
Illegal depositing of articles on highway, sec. 195	
Riding motorcycle without safety helmet, sec. 207	
Other - _	
1,337
2,807
903
2,640
12
548
206
61
35,073
316
9,954
113
153,079
6,875
238
1,641
6,340
6,539
3,933
6,289
1,498
208
9,211
570
1,612
15
72
10
48
101
45
224
319
8
252,845
1,289
1,290
808
2,454
9 I
649 !
117
84
36,810
1,791
9,977
91
194,743
9,876
253
1,633
6,087
6,431
3,861
5,642
1,460
453
11,114
540
1,794
9
94
8
36
112
42
202
328
5
300,092
Under Motor-vehicle Act Rcgulations..
14,414
13,771
1,963 I
1,391  j
1,008 |
3,235 I
4 I
683
190
64
41,353
517
11,392
138
228,994
11,659
275
1,728
6,193
6,401
4,275
5,807
1,395
448
11,976
672
1,983
12
70
4
34
136
40
196
344
3
344,583
2,602
1,869
1,098
4,101
185
987
224
88
47,353
1,106
14,490
162
234,530
13,600
246
1,803
6,538
6,868
4,644
6,372
1,567
464
12,810
828
2,356
9
81
13
32
158
49
174
379
1
367,787
16,372
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
Offences Committed by Juveniles 1974-77
23
Offences
1974
1975
1976
1977
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Driving without obtaining driver's licence, sec. 18 (1) 	
Driving without subsisting motor-vehicle liability policy, sec. 18 (2d)
Driving motor-vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's
licence, sec. 18 (6, 8) _	
Driving without having driver's licence and liability card in possession at time, sec. 19  ,	
Driving while right to obtain licence is suspended, sec. 20 (2)	
Leaving the scene of an accident, sec. 54a  _  _   	
Using licence belonging to another, refusing to show licence, sec. 56 ,
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sec. 124	
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127, 128, 152 	
Failing to obey special signs re highway construction, sees. 134,
135, 137  _ _	
Care'ess driving, sec. 138  _	
Slow driving, sec. 139 _	
Exceeding maximum speed limit, sec. 140.  ,
Exceeding speed limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec. 141	
Passing stopped school bus, sec. 142	
Failure to drive on the right, sec. 143  	
Infractions of "lane" driving, sees. 144, 145, 146	
Infractions of "passing", sees. 148, 149, 150, 151, 153, 154 .._ 	
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees. 155,
156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162	
Failure to yield right-of-way, sees. 163, 164, 165, 166, 167	
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 169, 171 _.
Failure to stop at railroad crossing, sec. 174  	
Failure to stop at intersection, sec. 177        	
Leaving vehicle improperly parked, sec. 182     	
Backing vehicle illegally, sec. 184 _ _.	
Operating motorcycle with more than one person, sec. 185   	
Failure to comply with requirements before moving vehicle, sec. 186
Improper control and operation of vehicle in canyon or defile, sec.
187         	
Coasting down grade with gears in neutral, sec. 188	
Failure to observe fire vehicle safety, sees. 189, 190 	
Driving on sidewalk, sec. 191 _  	
Opening door requirements, sec. 194	
Illegal depositing of articles on highway, sec. 195     	
Riding motorcycle without safety helmet, sec. 207 	
Other _ _ _	
26
29
13
53
0
11
4
1
687
6
730
5
4,341
228
4
96
152
281
112
256
31
7
418
4
■77
1
3
1
0
1
3
1
5
8
1
7,596
14
17
29
37
0
8
2
2
705
32
887
1
5,189
300
7
77
177
290
113
226
33
6
470
3
102
1
3
0
1
4
7
0
6
15
0
8,764
Under Motor-vehicle Act Regulations.
944
767
26
18
22
44
0
5
2
3
730
3
1,001
3
5,656
322
7
86
147
287
87
278
38
5
518
7
97
1
5
0
1
2
4
0
8
12
0
9,425
824
36
32
35
68
3
12
6
1
682
20
1,186
2
5,470
362
6
93
146
297
117
241
28
8
523
11
127
1
3
1
0
0
9
0
2
11
0
~~9ltW~
730
Driver Improvement Program
The Driver Safety and Improvement Section of the Driver Licence Division
continued the screening of unsatisfactory driving records which resulted in many
suspensions of drivers' licences, and continued to make progress in the controlling
of drivers whose actions become hazardous on the highways as a result of alcohol
involvement and other dangerous driving practices.
Legislation effective July 15, 1976, under section 86d of the Motor-vehicle Act,
requires a minimum three months mandatory suspension of a person's driving privileges upon conviction of a driving offence under the Criminal Code (Canada).
 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Summary of Action Taken Under Driver Improvement Program, 1977
Age 16-17
Age 18 and
over
Total
Warning letters	
Notices of intent to suspend	
Drivers' licences suspensions—
Male _	
Female 	
Previously suspended..,.	
Previously on probation	
Previously warned.
Drivers' licences placed on probation—
Male	
Female ..... _	
Impaired driving convictions 	
Total of all infractions received _  	
luvenile offences 	
Drivers required to pay assessment under section 18 (13) of the
Motor-vehicle Act   ,	
Reasons for suspension—■
Section 74 (court suspension)	
Section 78 (suspension by superintendent)	
Section  78   (5),   (6),   (7)   (suspension  for  nonpayment  of
penalty point premium),. ,,	
Section 84 (unsatisfied judgment)  ...  	
Section 86 (unsatisfactory driving record)	
Section 86c (nonpayment of assessment fee) _	
Section 86d (mandatory suspension)	
Section 87 (suspension outside of British Columbia)     	
Court recommendations	
Driver records reviewed    ....	
996
71
463
20
297
363
9
42,024
2,835
26,688
453
7,526
5,875
375
64,485
10,799
43,020
2,906
27,151
473
7,823
6,238
384
17,958
404,940
10,385
41,901
45
1,753
3,686
30
6,230
12,592
20,558
31
845
114,101
Examination of Drivers
During the year the Drivers' Examination Section of the Driver Licence Division examined 119,754 drivers, of which 92,760 were original licences.
It will be noted from the table below that 22 per cent of the drivers given
examinations indicated on their application that they had taken formal training,
either under the High School Driver Training Program or from commercial schools.
Analysis of Annual Input, 1977
Male Female Total
Original licences _   47,477 45,283 92,760
Examinations taken—
High school driver training    2,973 2,080 5,053
No professional training  33,598 23,425 57,023
Commercial school training    9,513 11,827 21,340
Unknown  25,011 11,327 36,338
Totals   71,095      48,659    119,754
Driver Training School Statistics, Licence-issuing Period of
March 1, 1977, to February 28, 1978
Issuances March 1, 1977, to February 28, 1978
Schools Operators     Instructors
Licences issued    91 91 275
Terminations  ___.      6 6 63
Suspensions     111
Total active licences as of February      .
28,1978  84 84 211
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS 25
Examinations Conducted, March 1, 1977 to February 28, 1978
Written examinations—
Passed      60
Failed     47
Total  107
Practical examinations—
Passed   71
Failed      14
Total      85
Temporary Permits
Original permits issued       77
Temporary instructors as of February 28, 1978       4
$500 Security Bonding, 1977
Bonded by surety  53x$500=$26,500
Security on deposit (parity bond) „__„ 33X500=$16,500
Security on deposit (cash)   5x500= $2,500
Total surety and security value $45,500
March I, 1977, to February 28, 1978, Revenue
School licences ($25)   $2,275
Operator's licences ($10)   910
Instructor's licences ($5)   1,375
Total   $4,560
Inspections Conducted
Driver training schools   189
Driver Education Incentive Program  134
Driver Education Incentive Program Certificates
Number of DEIP certificates received  9,600
Number of DEIP certificates approved  9,574
Number of DEIP certificates rejected  26
During the fiscal period ending February 28, 1978, there were 56 secondary
schools and 63 driver training schools approved to conduct Driver Education Incentive Program courses.
Driver Examiner Staff Training, March 1, 1977, to February 28, 1978
Phase I—
Part 1 (basic two weeks)      3
Part 2 (intermediate one week)     6
Part 3 (advanced one week)      0
Phase Ill-
Part 1 (Hydro, one week)      2
Part 2 (air and class 1 and 3 operation)  29
Part 3 (Examining Class 1 and 2) (Burnaby Centre)    7
Total  47
Training seminars—All driver examiners and examining supervisors received a one-day seminar in the use of the new road test paper. This was conducted on a regional basis by the regional examination supervisors and the headquarters training staff.
 26                                                          BRITISH COLUMBIA
Certification Program
With the introduction of the classified driver's licence system in 1971, a
Driver
Certification Program was offered to persons, schools, firms, and businesses in
volved in the transportation and trucking industry.
The privilege of certifying drivers is granted to those companies who meet
program standards.
There are 109 recognized authorities currently under the certification program
in the Province.
In 1977 there were 47 liaison visits to recognized authorities conducted by
supervisory examiners and members of the special programs staff.
Three recognized authorities were cancelled or withdrawn, and three new
companies were accepted into the program.
7977 Traffic Incidents by Police Jurisdiction
KELOWNA SUBDIVISION RCMP
Police Jurisdiction
Total
Fatal
Injury
Property
Victims
Victims
Location
Incidents
Incidents
Incidents
Damage
Killed
Injured
Armstrong   , 	
222
2    1      .90
52
23.40
i      I
168     75.70             2
95
Enderby  ,	
198
1    1      .50
67
33.80
130 | 65.70
1
106
Falkland   ... ,	
93
1
1.10
26
28.00
66 | 71.00
2
37
Kelowna	
2,917
10
.30
617
21.20
2,290 | 78.50
12
953
Keremeos 	
192
4
2.10
59
30.70
129 1 67.20
4
94
Lumby.	
210
2
1.00
48
22.90
160
76.20
1
71
20
6
30.00
14
70.00
9
Oliver    	
175
1
.60
52
29.70
122
69.70
1
61
Osoyoos 	
176
3
1.70
51
29.00
122 j 69.30
3
80
Penticton	
1,125
8
.70
244
21.70
873 j 77.60
8
355
Princeton.,, 	
368
9
2.40
102
27.70
257 | 69.80
12
165
572
12
2.30
115
22.00
395 | 75.70
14
174
Salmon Arm ...	
752
8
1.10
101
13.40
643 j 85.50
9
162
Sicamous	
161
5
3.10
40
24.80
116     72.00
8
68
Vernon   ,.,
1,650
16
1.00 |       289
17.50
1.345 | 81.50
17
472
Summerland , ,—	
177
   |          37
I
20.90
140 | 79.10
1
-—-
48
KAMLOOPS SUBDIVISION RCMP
Alexis Creek	
51
15
29.40
36  j  70.60
23
20
242
4
1.70
2
50
10.00
20.70
18  1 90.00
4
90
Ashcroft 	
188
77.70
Barriere 	
162
1     1      .60
36
22.20
125
77.20
1
59
71
284
4
1.40
18
95
25.40
33.50
53
185
74.60
65.10
4
26
163
Chase	
Clearwater 	
245
1
.40
62
25.30
182
74.30
1
107
Clinton      	
160
1
.60
65
40.60
94
58.80
1
97
Kamloops	
3,079
20
.65
493
16.00
2,566
83.30
23
762
Lillooet   	
202
2
1.00
40
19.80
160
79.20
2
68
Logan Lake 	
51
.,,.
11
21.60
40
78.40
14
Lytton    .,	
149
5
3.40
34
22.80
110 j 73.80 1          7
74
Merritt         	
460
2
.40
104
22.60
354 | 77.00 |          2
149
100 Mile House            	
446
8
1.80 1         95
21.30
343 I 76.90 1        11
151
Spences Bridge 	
83
9
10.80
23
27.70
51   | 61.40
10
61
135
1,195
1
7
.70
.60
32
253
23.70
21.20
102 j 75.60
935  j 78.20
1
1
9
59
373
Williams Lake ,	
NELSON SUBDIVISION RCMP
Castlegar     —	
1
365  |        4
1.10
79
21.60
282 | 77.30 1          5
117
Cranbrook  	
823 !        9
1.10
154
18.70
660 | 80.20 |        10
245
Crescent Valley	
141 |        2    |    1.40
42
29.80
97 | 68.80 I          2
60
Creston   .
388 1        6    |    1.50
76
19.60
306     78.90 [          7
124
Fernie	
340 |        5    |    1.50
1              1
91
26.80
244 | 71.80 |          8
!         I
183
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
27
7977 Traffic Incidents by Police Jurisdiction—Continued
NELSON SUBDIVISION RCMP—Continued
Police Jurisdiction
Total
Fatal
Injury
Property
Victims
Victims
Location
Incidents
Incidents
Incidents
Damage
Killed
Injured
Field	
71
4
5.60
9
12.70
58
81.70
6
17
Fruitvale	
133
1
.80
26
19.50
106
79.70
1
44
Golden	
428
7
1.60
96
22.40
325
75.90
8
168
290
209
1
5
.30
2.39
64
42
22.10
20.10
225
162
75.60
77.50
1
5
91
Invermere.	
69
Kaslo  	
82
3
3.70
19
23.20
60     73.20
3
29
Kimberley	
Midway ..,.	
238
55
23.10
183  I 76.90
80
119
8
6.70
24
20.20
87
73.10
10
34
Nakusp, ,,,	
120
27
22.50
93
77.50
42
Nelson  	
205
3
1.50
59
28.80
143
69.80
3
98
37
139
1
10
29
27.00
20.90
27
109
73.00
78.40
1
10
Radium 	
.70
41
Rossland 	
136
1
.70
27
19.90
108
79.40
1
41
Salmo	
105
4
3.80
29
27.60
72
68.60
4
41
Sparwood	
245
3
1.20
66
26.90
176
71.80
3
93
Trail	
448
1     |      .20
I
81
18.10
366
81.70
1
109
MUNICIPAL FORCES
25,082
3,179
1,971
141
462
286
1,565
1,000
2,791
1,378
338
470
55
7
6
4
6
2
4
6
2
.20
.20
.30
3,319
731
538
43
106
56
268
216
463
274
43
76
13.20
23.00
27.30
30.50
22.90
19.60
17.10
21.60
16.60
19.90
12.70
16.20
21,708
2,441
1,427
98
352
230
1,291
782
2,324
1,098
293
393
86.50
76.80
72.40
69.50
76.20
80.40
82.50
78.20
83.30
79.70
86.70
83.60
57
7
6
4
7
2
4
6
2
4,545
Victoria  ....	
990
762
66
Esquimau	
Oak Bay	
Delta ._..  	
Matsqui	
New Westminster.,	
.90
152
68
.40
.20
.14
.44
.59
.21
363
306
623
392
Nelson ,    	
64
110
PRINCE
GEORGE SUBDIVISIC
)N RCi\
IP
199
232
623
331
143
884
124
87
232
133
3,683
891
246
27
17
4
3
8
3
3
8
4
2
1
23
7
4
1
2.01
1.29
1.38
.91
2.10
.90
3.23
27
44
96
56
30
125
42
23
44
34
633
179
45
14
14
13.60
19.00
15.40
16.90
21.00
14.10
33.90
26.40
19.00
25.60
17.20
20.10
18.30
51.90
51.90
168
185
519
272
110
751
78
64
186
98
3,027
705
197
12
13
84.40
79.70
83.30
82.20
76.90
85.00
62.90
73.60
80.20
73.70
82.20
79.10
80.10
44.40
48.10
4
3
12
3
3
8
4
4
1
26
11
4
1
54
Chetwynd	
82
155
85
Fort St. James	
Fort St. John	
52
205
72
35
.96
.75
.62
.79
1.63
3.70
66
McBride ....  	
62
1,005
Quesnel  	
Vanderhoof	
Wells	
Watson       	
294
59
22
5
PRINCE RUPERT SUBDIVISION RCMP
Atlin	
Bella Coola	
Cassiar	
Hazelton 	
Houston	
Kitimat	
Masset   ,
Ocean Falls 	
Prince Rupert	
Queen Charlotte City
Smithers  	
Stewart _	
Telegraph Creek	
Terrace	
Granisle 	
8
71
18
66.70
94
1
1.06
15
16.00
185
2
1.08
53
28.60
232
1
.43
36
15.50
379
2
.53
79
20.80
73
16
21.90
13
3
23.10
620
3
.48
104
16.80
82
2
2.44
25
30.49
428
4
.93
65
15.19
51
4
7.84
9
17.65
40
1
2.50
8
20.00
636
6
.94
109
17.14
40
9
22.50
8
53
78
130
195
298
57
10
513
55
359
38
31
521
31
100.00
74.60
83.00
70.30
84.10
78.60
78.10
76.90
82.70
67.07
83.88
74.51
77.50 j
81.92
77.50
23
20
93
56
115
24
4
156
39
98
15
14
174
14
 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
7977 Traffic Incidents by Police Jurisdiction—Continued
LOWER MAINLAND DISTRICT RCMP
Police Jurisdiction
Location
Total
Incidents
Fatal
Incidents
Injury
Incidents
97
19.80
72
23.76
1,131
15.82,
37
19.68
332
21.17
588
22.26
255
18.00
151
27.06
36
17.22
345
21.79
167
28.64
567
18.27
726
19.18
50
19.46
190
24.52
1,187
22.57
41
13.80
4
36.36
45
13.08
108
26.15
303
30.82
104
36.11
27
26.21
Property
Damage
Victims
Killed
Victims
Injured
Abbotsford	
Agassiz	
Burnaby	
Boston Bar 	
Chilliwack 	
Coquitlam	
Haney 	
Hope 	
Gibsons	
Langley	
Mission	
North Vancouver, ,
Richmond	
Sechelt	
Squamish	
Surrey 	
University	
Vancouver Marine
White Rock	
Unit A Freeway-	
Unit B Freeway	
Unit C Freeway	
Pemberton	
490
303 |
7,151  |
188 j
1,568
2,642 |
1,417
558
209
1,583
583
3.103
3,785
257 |
775  |
5,259 j
297 !
II
344
413
983
288
103  (
I
3
5
13
5
7
4
3
8
4
10
4
3
9
3
6
35
.61
1.65
.18
2.66
.45
.15
•21 I
1.43 |
1.91  |
.63 !
.69 i
.10 !
.24
1.17
.77
.67
.58
.48
1.22
1.74
3.88
390
226
6,007
146
1,229
2,050
1,159
399
169
1,228
412
2,553
3,050
204
579
4,037
256
7
297
303
668
179
72
79.59
74.59
84.00
77.66
78.38
77.59
81.79
71.51
80.86
77.57
70.67
81.63
80.58
79.38
74.71
76.76
86.20
63.64
86.34
73.37
67.96
62.15
69.90
3
9
15
7
8
5
3
11
4
13
5
3
10
3
6
41
2
3
13
5
5
148
127
1,571
65
498
827
384
273
43
524
241
746
1,016
78
300
1,814
54
7
60
173
455
154
38
VICTORIA/COURTENAY SUBDIVISION RCMP
Alert Bay	
Campbell River.
Chemainus	
Colwood _	
Courtenay 	
Duncan	
Ganges 	
Gold River .:....
Kelsey Bay	
Ladysmith	
Lake Cowichan .
Nanaimo—	
Parksville	
Port Alberni
Port Alice	
Port Hardy	
Shawnigan Lake
Sidney ,
Sooke	
Tahsis  ....
Toflno	
Ucluelet	
Port McNeill ....
Powell River	
67 |
1,190   I
193 |
900 j
1,073  j
1.247  |
167  |
165 |
87  |
274 I
205  I
2.174
592 I
1.300 I
94 I
277
280
320
350
110
41
137
136 |
. 403 |
7 |
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6 I
- i
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2 I
7 I
2 1
3 I
.25
.78
.56
.48
1.15
.73
.49
.37
1.35
.31
1.06
.72
2.50
.63
.73
.74
18
26.87
215
18.07
47
24.35
245
27.22
240
22.37
223
17.88
43
25.75
25
15.15
10
11.49
68
24.82
52
25.37
353
16.24
128
21.62
253
19.46
15
15.96
39
14.08
67
23.93
80
25.00
108
30.86
7
6.36
11
26.83
21
15.33
21
15.44
101
25.06
49
972
146
648
827
1,018
124
140
76
204
152
1,813
456
1,043
78
236
206
238
242
103
30
115
115
299
73.13
81.68
75.65
72.00
77.07
81.64
74.25
84.85
| 87.36 |
74.45 |
74.15 I
83.39
77.03
80.23
82.98
85.20
73.57
74.38
69.14
93.64
73.17
83.94
84.56
74.19
1
2
1
21
2
11
2
27
305
63
356
328
358
55
36
14
103
79
514
194
351
^2
61
105
139
146
8
18
29
32
146
OTHER
POLICE FORCES
1
68 |
36  1
9
4
13.24
11.11
24.20
59
32
235
86.76
88.89
74.84
3
12
9
Miscellaneous  	
328 |        3    |      .96 |         76
|       332
Totals
115,046 |    617
!
21,559
92,586
718
| 31,942
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
Incidents and Victims by Month During 1977
29
Month
Fatal
Deaths
Personal
Injury
Injuries
Property
Damage
Number of
Vehicles
Pedestrians
Incidents
January  	
February    	
March  	
April,.,	
May.,, _	
June .._
July  	
August _,	
September,—	
October	
November 	
December	
Totals (1977)
33
34
47
47
72
41
62
74
45
68
56
38
617
39
39
49
54
81
47
74
87
61
81
63
43
718
1,575
1,390
1,591
1,622
1,949
1,819
2,007
2,062
1,912
1,927
1,914
1,792
21,560
2,238
2,035
2,372
2,439
3,018
2,789
3,175
3,154
2,756
2,796
2,659
2,511
31,942
7,839
6,704
6,957
6,644
7,402
6,655
7,001
7,377
7,560
8.271
10,594
9,865
92,869
20,150
17,191
18,087
17,597
19,800
17,857
18,949
20,036
20,066
21,592
26,782
24,543
242,650
156
149
172
160
139
176
170
210
291
305
351
398
2,677
9,447
8,128
8,595
8,313
9,423
8,515
9,070
9,513
9,517
10,266
12,564
11,695
115,046
Vehicle Types Involved Related to Damage Severity
Vehicle Type
Passenger car 	
Car and trailer.. _ 	
Single unit truck, light ,...	
Single unit truck, heavy	
Combination unit truck, light	
Combination unit tractor-trailer
School bus ,,. _	
Public bus _	
Motorcycle   ,
Cycle, play vehicle	
Truck Camper/Motor Home—
All-terrain vehicle _	
Total vehicles	
No
Damage
30,609
136
8,159
720
347
870
64
385
409
1,025
1,552
130
44,406
Light
Damage
77,020
249
13,691
461
206
595
87
465
779
59
2,987
156
96,755
Moderate
Damage
57,762
163
9,477
269
115
389
41
180
642
22
2,138
123
71,321
Severe
Damage
18,155
77
3,288
159
42
265
7
29
227
15
719
57
Demolished
23,040
5,425
30
1,101
41
17
139
2
9
103
20
222
19
7.128
Total
188,972
655
35,715
1,650
728
2,257
201
1,068
2,160
1,140
7,619
485
242,650
 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Motor-vehicle Inspection Division is responsible for continued inspection of vehicles with regard to their mechanical safety.
MOTOR-VEHICLE INSPECTION
During 1977 the compulsory program of motor-vehicle inspection continued
in the Victoria area, the Lower Mainland, and the Nanaimo area. These areas are
served by five inspection stations, with a total of 15 lanes. The stations are located
in Victoria, Vancouver, Richmond, Burnaby, and Nanaimo.
The following table shows the number of inspections completed at each
inspection station:
Inspection Station
Approved
Rejected
Percentage
Rejected
Inspections
Conducted
Victoria—■
1
1
1976      	
106,542
36.558
25.5
143,100
1977_     	
108,906
32,999
23.1
141,905
Vancouver—
1976    	
109,420
48,560
30.7
157,980
1977 ,.   	
112,973
49,926
30.6
162,899
Richmond—
I
1976 ,	
78,116
22,339
22.2
100,455
1977    ,       	
72,098
21,094
21.0
100,192
Burnaby—
1976 ,     	
145,703
56,848
28.1
202,551
1977 -	
136.587
53,642
28.1
190,229
Nanaimo—
1976,	
22,449
11,570
34.0
34,019
1977, ,, 	
26,932
9,833
26.7
36,765
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
33
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 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Notices requiring the owner to present his motor-vehicle for inspection were
mailed to 530,605 of whom 260,580 required a second notice.
During the inspection of motor-vehicles it was found that 167,494 did not
meet the standards and were rejected. The total number of defects found were
349,743 or 2.08 defects for each rejected vehicle.
The inspection stations found 204 vehicles to be in such condition that they
could not be allowed to return to the highway. The vehicles were condemned, their
licence suspended, and they were towed away from the inspection station.
Causes of Rejection
Code
Agel
Age 2
Age 3
Age 4
Total
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
Motor-vehicle licence..
Number-plates	
Plate-lamp	
Tail-lamps .	
Stop-lamps	
Turn-signals	
Reflectors	
Horn	
Windshield-wipers__
Left window-raiser_
Doors, body hood_
Bumper, mudflaps—
Headlamps1-
Identification lamps.
Spot-lamps	
Fog-lamps	
Auxiliary lamps	
Wheel alignment	
Steering mechanism-
Tires, wheels	
Fuel system	
Exhaust, muffler-
Service Brakes	
Pedal reserve	
Brake connections..
Air or vacuum	
Vehicle noise	
Parking Brake	
Visibility-
Driver seat-belts	
Miscellaneous	
Grand totals. .
,345
,660
,954
,099
,589
,806
933
,039
643
439
849
942
,971
,308
,641
764
,235
,668
,584
,036
439
166
,469
,252
.754
409
515
,259
,864
,412
,425
755
1,889
8,090
3,418
5,202
5,821
928
1,805
2,016
714
2,503
1,387
20,017
1,127
975
2,575
609
4,210
11,666
12,604
574
14,560
8,308
1,676
4,355
386
739
4,658
4,780
1,744
2,044
250
1,065
5,177
2,607
4,295
5,148
656
1,504
1,430
490
2,941
1,190
14,562
465
321
1,364
342
3,228
9,664
7,258
332
9,161
4,958
1,559
3,513
262
387
2,878
2,726
1,070
1,138
66
327
1,130
725
1,367
1,357
465
353
560
117
991
345
2,980
287
123
232
118
625
2,829
1,597
148
2,003
1,251
518
754
74
121
691
519
184
341
103,469    |     131,135
 I	
I
91,941
23,198
2,416
4,941
19,351
8,849
15,453
16,132
2,982
4,701
4,649
1,760
7,284
3,864
52,530
3,187
3,060
3,935
2,304
12,731
32,743
31,495
1,493
35,890
22,986
5,005
12,376
1,131
1,762
11,486
12,889
4,410
5,948
349,743
1 Headlight adjustments, 53,882.
Vehicle Age Code: Age 1, 1973 and later; Age 2, 1968 to 1972; Age 3, 1963 to 1967; Age 4, 1962 and earlier.
Twenty-nine Authorized Fleet Inspection Stations have been established.
Three of the stations inspect all types of vehicles, and 26 are authorized to inspect
regular (commercial) trailers only. Vehicles inspected and approved at these
stations totalled 4,867.
Another service provided by inspection stations is the mechanical inspection
of salvaged vehicles. A total of 1,008 salvaged vehicles was inspected and those
that were approved were issued a Certificate of Mechanical Condition. The average
time taken to inspect a salvage vehicle is 1.5 hours.
SCHOOL BUSES
Control over the use and operation of school buses engaged in the transportation of students to and from schools in the Province is the responsibility of the
Superintendent of Motor-vehicles. The control extends to the setting of minimum
standards for the construction and maintenance of school buses and provides for
periodic inspection of school buses. The inspection is carried out on behalf of the
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS 35
Superintendent of Mechanical Inspectors of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police,
the Motor Carrier Branch and senior Motor-vehicle Inspectors of the Branch.
Motor-vehicle Inspectors at the five inspection stations operated by the Branch are
appointed mechanical inspectors for the inspection of school buses. School buses
in the Victoria, Greater Vancouver, and Greater Nanaimo areas are inspected either
at the inspection station in the area or by an inspector from a station.
During the year there were 1,450 permits issued for vehicles to be used as
school buses. These include 1,281 renewal permits and 169 permits for new vehicles.
This compares to 1,482 for the previous year. Of the number of permits issued, 75
were cancelled as the result of the sale and transfer of vehicle or because of poor
mechanical condition. From April 1, 1977, to March 31, 1978, school buses were
involved in 185 accidents, 164 were involved in property damage, and 21 cases
involved personal injuries.
PERMITS FOR FLASHING RED AND AMBER LAMPS, SIRENS, THEFT
ALARMS AND ALLEY LIGHTS, FLASHING HEADLAMPS
Under provisions of the Motor-vehicle Act Regulations, the Superintendent
may, issue permits to allow a vehicle to be equipped with a flashing lamp. Such
permits are required for vehicles such as public utility vehicles which must stop on a
highway to repair power or telephone lines. In each case the permit is issued where
a hazard exists, and only with the approval of the local enforcement agency. The
regulations also specify, however, that certain emergency vehicles, tow cars, and
pilot cars may be equipped without obtaining such a permit.
From April 1, 1977, to March 31, 1978, 60 permits were issued for flashing
amber lamps and 20 permits for flashing red lamps. In addition, 13 permits were
issued to allow installation of sirens and red flashing lamps on vehicles. These
vehicles were usually ambulances or the personal vehicle of the chief of a volunteer
fire department in a small community.
Four permits were issued for the installation of theft alarms in vehicles.
Fourteen permits were issued to allow fire departments the use of flashing
headlamps.
CENTRAL REGISTRY*
The Superintendent of Motor-vehicles is also the Registrar General and in
this capacity is responsible for the operation of Central Registry.
Documents are searched and recorded in accordance with the Bills of Sale
Act, Conditional Sales Act, Mechanics' Lien Act, and Assignment of Book Accounts Act; and are registered in connection with the Companies Act when chattels
refer to motor vehicles. A certificate issued in respect of a grant made under the
Provincial Home Acquisition Act, describing a mobile home situated in a mobile
home park, is also registered in the office of the Registrar General. In the case of
corporations, personal goods or chattels other than motor-vehicles, are recorded
with the Registrar of Companies.
The Central Registry accepted for registration a total of 413,827 documents
during the 1977/78 fiscal year which was a decrease of 3,339 documents when
compared with the 1976/77 fiscal year. However, there were 19,907 discharges
accepted for registration during the 1977/78 fiscal year, which is an increase of
8,804 documents over the previous year. This increase is a reflection of certain
amendments made to the statutes administered by the Central Registry and now
• The Central Registry was transferred to the Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs on April   1,
1978, and M. A. Jorre de St. Jorre, Registrar of Companies, assumed the duties of Registrar-General.
 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
permits this office to provide up-to-date information, as well as eliminate obsolete
information from the files.
The Mechanics' Lien Act was amended whereby the Central Registry may now
accept a mechanics' lien regarding a boat or boat motor.
Search fees for the year amounted to $533,943.50, an increase of $164,795.55;
photographic copying fees amounted to $9,006.25, an increase of $661.20; and
document registration fees amount to $3,442,944, an increase of $1,284,238.
The total amount accounted for by Central Registry for the 1977/78 fiscal year
amounted to $3,985,893.75, an increase of $1,449,694.75 over the previous year.
A statistical comparison with the 1976/77 fiscal year follows and provides
a detailed report of the various activities carried out by the Registry.
Statistical Comparison 1976/77 and 1977/78 (April 1 to March 31)
Total documents filed under—
Conditional Sales Act     89,944
Bills of Sale Act	
Mechanics' Lien Act	
Assignment of Book Accounts Act.
Companies Act
Provincial Home Acquisition Act	
Late order filings under Conditional Sales Act
Late order filings under Bills of Sale Act     15,344
Late order filings under Assignment of Book
Accounts Act	
Documents discharged under—
Conditional Sales Act	
Bills of Sale Act	
Mechanics' Lien Act	
Assignment of Book Accounts Act.
Companies Act.
Provincial Home Acquisition Act	
Total  number of  documents  ac-
1976/77
Fiscal Year
1977/78
Fiscal Year
89,944
75,970
257,979
258,994
33,622
35,412
1,508
1,841
644
867
2,334
1,095
4,658
4,204
15,344
15,436
30
101
1,931
3,740
5,603
12,031
2,783
3,309
76
106
292
330
418
391
Number of records added to file
Serial file	
Alphabetical file
430,686
140,365
Total number of entries added to
cepted  417,166        413,827
443,501
141,835
Central Registry records  571,051        585,336
Total value of— $ $
Document registration fees received., 2,158,706.00 3,442,944.00
Search fees  369,147.95 533,943.50
Photographic copies  8,345.05 9,006.25
Total revenue   2,536,199.00 3,985,893.75
WEIGH SCALE BRANCH
This Branch operates 39 permanent weigh scales throughout the Province,
situated at strategic points along the main highway system. Thirty-five of the scales
are manned on a regular basis, with certain Border scales being operated on a 24-
hour seven-day-week basis.
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
37
The Branch also has 17 portable units to monitor commercial vehicle activity
in areas where there are no permanent scales. Portable operators also monitor
logging-truck loads through data compiled by Ministry of Forests' scalers. This
involves up to 700,000 loads per annum.
In addition to monitoring and checking commercial vehicles, weighmasters
are responsible for issuing various types of permits, such as temporary operation,
nonresident, motive-fuel user, highway crossing, overweight, and oversize.
Weighmasters are also required to enforce the various statutes pertaining to
the operation and movement of commercial vehicles, and are empowered to lay
charges under the Commercial Transport Act, Motor Carrier Act, Motor-vehicle
Act, Highway Act, Motive-fuel Use Tax Act, and Motor Vehicle Transport Act
(Canada).
During the year substantial amendments made to the Commercial Transport
Act Regulations took effect. These changes allowed for greater flexibility in the
use of highway transport vehicles as well as for some increase in gross vehicle
weights to counteract increased fuel costs and other factors affecting highway
transportation costs.
Simultaneously, the regulations were converted to the System International,
and all weights and dimensions are now indicated in both metric and imperial to
familiarize industry with the changeover.
Statistics for this Branch for fiscal year 1977/78 are as follows:
Commercial vehicles checked  1,925,860
Prosecutions entered         6,255
Permits Issued
Single trip and short term (oversize and overweight)         70,759
Nonresident
Temporary operation	
Motive-fuel (permits and/or emblems)
Restricted route 	
Highway crossing	
Special temporary (Motor Carrier)
Term overweight and oversize	
31,823
33,556
11,521
6,540
1,150
1,235
582
Total permits issued        157,166
Revenue Collected, 1977/78
Oversize and overweight permits	
Nonresident permits	
Temporary operation permits  	
ICBC (nonresident, temporary operation, and highway crossing) 	
Restricted route permits	
Motive-fuel tax 	
Highway crossing permits .
Supplementary fees 	
Special temporary permits
$
1,062,569
799,767
100,640
425,482
228,681
134,311
11,500
12,251
4,283
Total
2,779,484
 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TRANSPORT RESEARCH AND PLANNING
The Research and Planning Division is playing an expanding role in the
activities of the Ministry related to Provincial transport policy development and
its application to specific projects. With proposed changes to the Federal transport
policy affecting a wide range of Provincial jurisdictions, and together with a maturing of the infrastructure in British Columbia, the need for refinement of terms of
reference for the future has never been more apparent. The impetus in evolution
of a Provincial transportation policy for the past year was provided by the Division
through programs principally in airport, railway, marine, and surface modes.
During the year under report the Provincial Air Transport Assistance Program
was established to meet airport facility needs of regional and subregional centres
by improved access for basic scheduled and emergency services. Applications by
communities for project assistance are now being received, and the budget of
$5 million for the first year of the program, 1978/79, is expected to be fully
allocated through grants. The program is expected to rekindle the interests of the
private sector and the spirit of local responsibility, both inherent elements of
success. Also, its impact will be positive in terms of social and economic objectives
for, particularly, the more isolated areas of the Province.
This Division, together with Transport Canada, is also actively pursuing the
development plans of instituting a land-based air passenger service between downtown Victoria and Vancouver International Airport with possible extensions of
service to other British Columbia centres and Seattle. Both DASH-7 and helicopter equipment alternatives are being considered.
With respect to construction of other airports in the Province, the Division
continues to liaise with Transport Canada on matters of site selection and cost
responsibility. Personnel are also active in issues of Canada-United Kingdom
bilateral agreement negotiations, general aviation policy, and air service systems
planning development.
In matters of railway service, the Division continued its effort to ensure that
economic and financial realities are thoroughly considered for rail abandonment
proposals, doube-tracking projects, and passenger service changes. Specific issues
arose in connection with Provincial positions on Canadian National's application
to abandon the Cowichan and Saanich Subdivisions on Vancouver Island, CP
Rail's similar application for the Okanagan Subdivision, CP Rail's Lake Louise
double-tracking project, and passenger operations of the Esquimalt and Nanaimo
Railway and the U.S. Amtrak service to Vancouver. Where abandonment of rail
service has taken place, the question of right-of-way disposal arises. The Division
intends to lead a multi-ministerial committee in proposing a formal policy for
implementing the Province's interest. Such interests may relate to maintaining
transport corridors, or alternative uses in agriculture, highway access, and commercial/industrial planning.
The Division continues to monitor any activity by the State of Alaska in
respect of their consideration of a rail connection to the lower 48 states.
The B.C. Rail Royal Commission concluded its investigation into operations
of the Province's railway in the past year. Depending on its recommendations and
matters of acceptance and decisions made by the Provincial Cabinet, the Division
may be required to contribute significantly in economic planning for the future of
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
39
B.C. Rail. Although the Ministry did not participate in public hearings, the proceedings were monitored with a view toward possible involvement in respect of
implementing the conclusions.
The Province's most important users of bulk rail service—forest and mining
industries—are concerned about the impact of revisions to the Railway Cost Order.
Cost determination of the Canadian Class I Railways is critical for calculation of
subsidies for passenger services and branch lines, assessment of minimum and
maximum freight rates, and evaluating the economies of branch line abandonment
proposals. The positions on these specific matters together with prescribed acceptable depreciation practice, cost of capital, and overhead allocation techniques are
represented by the Division in meetings with the other nine provinces and the
Canadian Transport Commission.
In marine matters, the Research and Planning Division continued its liaison
function in a number of Federally initiated port development and policy-oriented
issues. Expansion of grain and bulk handling facilities at Prince Rupert and proposed construction of Phase II at Roberts Bank for coal, potash, and sulphur
loading continued to be at the forefront of port planning. A delicate balance of
economic objectives and environmental protection must be sought by all involved
parties, particularly in the Roberts Bank activity. Improvements in port capability
have been proposed for Masset, Stewart, and Campbell River. These too, are under
consideration by the Division.
In proposed amendments to the Canada Ports Policy, Bill C-6, and the regulations of the Canada Shipping Act, Bill C-54, the Division was active in delineating
those areas of impact to British Columbia as a Pacific Rim trading partner and an
entrepot for western Canada. The Province's position on establishment of a
Canadian merchant fleet is also a responsibility.
The Division continued its participation in the Western Provinces Inter-Modal
Passenger Study under the auspices of the Federal Provincial Committee on Western
Transportation. The Inter-Modal study will identify areas in the passenger transport
sector that require service change and improvement.
The Alaska Highway Gas Pipeline proposal is one of the most important
transportation developments in British Columbia. The economic implications of
the pipeline system, apart from carefully studied social and environmental consequences, will have a significant impact on the distribution of energy resources in
North America. The Division has an active part in the transportation impact of
pipeline development: pre-construction, construction, and operating phases.
A good deal of the Division's effort has and continues to be devoted to the
transportation requirements of Northeast Coal development. The co-ordinated
planning effort between various ministries and B.C. Rail for provision of road and
rail infrastructure is being led by the Division.
Finally, the Federal Government has proposed a national formula designed to
integrate existing rail relocation and grade separation projects into an expanded
Urban Transportation Assistance Program. The Research and Planning Division
is co-ordinating British Columbia's role in this program.
 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
COMMUNICATIONS
SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION BRANCH
The function of this Branch is to deal with the "public interest" aspects of the
Government's involvement with communications. This includes dealing with the
impact technological developments will have on people of the Province, the need
for extension and improvement of service, and rates which will be charged for
service. Since communications services are provided mainly by companies under
Federal jurisdiction, many of the Branch activities are by way of liaison, negotiation, and intervention before Federal boards.
This Branch provided liaison with the Federal Department of Communications and the Ministry of Education for the use of the Hermes Satellite and the Anik
B Satellite for educational television purposes. Personnel also participated in the
interministry committee investigating the uses of remote sensing satellites for Provincial Government purposes, and prepared a policy paper on satellite earth station
ownership for presentation to the Provincial Cabinet and forwarding to the Federal
Government.
In the field of Federal-Provincial relations, staff participated in a Federal-
Provincial Working Group investigating Pay Television, analysed and made recommendations regarding the revised Federal Telecommunications Bill C-24, and prepared all background papers for the Federal-Provincial Communications Ministers'
Conference originally scheduled for November 1977 and finally held in March of
1978.
Branch staff prepared the Provincial position paper and attended the hearing
on the CN/CP interconnect application with the Bell system before the CRTC commencing in March 1978. In addition, staff monitored various CRTC broadcast
public hearings for applications affecting the citizens of British Columbia.
A brief was prepared and submitted to the CRTC on the proposed joining of
Telesat and the Trans-Canada Telephone System. This paper was subsequently
presented to the Commission through the Ministry of the Attorney-General.
Staff participated in two studies—an interministerial study on electronic payment systems, and a study on the communications requirements for the proposed
Alcan Pipeline. In addition, previous estimates submitted by this Branch on the
proposed Northeast Coal Development Project, were reviewed and updated.
Considerable emphasis was placed on communications requirements in the
northern part of the Province. Liaison was furthered with the Kitimat-Stikine
Regional District and the ground work was undertaken to retain a consultant to
prepare a report on existing communications facilities. This report detailed the
needs and priorities for communications requirements in the northwest corner of
the Province, from Highway 16 north to the Alaska border.
Some considerable time was spent in the preparation of goals for provision of
telecommunications services in British Columbia, and a comprehensive submission
was prepared by staff for the Provincial Cabinet on the telecommunications industry
in British Columbia and in Canada.
Preliminary investigation was undertaken into the possible introduction and
implementation of a Province-wide emergency response system utilizing the 911
telephone system.
Investigations were carried out on complaints received about cablevision,
radio, and television services in the Province, and work done by the Branch resulted
in a number of these complaints being satisfactorily resolved.
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
41
A responsibility of this Branch is to provide staff support to the Motor Carrier
Commission in its regulation of Okanagan Telephone Company (OK Tel). Accordingly, staff continued work on four orders from the MCC Decision 61-76 requiring Okanagan Telephone Company to
(a) submit a proposal for establishing and maintaining a Continuing
Property Record which will provide greater detail on the cost and
location of units of telephone plant;
(b) conduct a study with a view to revising its depreciation rates;
(c) provide the Commission with advance information concerning its
construction program;
(d) file with the Commission regular reports of a specific list of standard
indices disclosing quality of service furnished.
A rate increase application was filed with the Commission in June 1977, to
obtained uniformity of rates with the B.C. Telephone Company rate increase of May
1977. Staff prepared material concerning income debenture financing, the growth
parameters of the construction program, service standards and rates for the Commission's review.
The company's application was granted approval with the exception of the
mobile stations tariff where the Commission requested that a revised application
be submitted.   This issue was still under review at the close of the fiscal year.
While the B.C. Telephone Company is currently regulated by the Federal
Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) in
Ottawa, the Government of British Columbia, through the Attorney-General,
intervenes on behalf of the B.C. Tel subscribers when that company applies for
rate increases. The purpose of the intervention is to closely scrutinize the material
which the company advances to support its case, and to bring to the Commission's
attention any concerns which the Government may have concerning B.C. Tel's
operation. Branch staff works with counsel from the Ministry of the Attorney-
General to prepare the Government's case and to advise counsel during the public
hearings.
During December 1977, B.C. Tel applied for a restructuring and increase in
their CATV Support Structure Services (Private Services Tariff CRTC (TP) No.
52). Staff prepared a submission for a public hearing scheduled for May 1978
expressing concerns about the method of evaluating the proposed tariff's effect
on the CATV and B.C. Tel subscribers.
Throughout the year, staff prepared reports concerning the impact of the
TWU strike in late 1977; the impact of the Provincial Government interventions at
BC. Tel rate hearings; an historical analysis of telecommunications in the Province;
and regulatory decision analysis.
Over the year many complaints were received from British Columbia residents
about telephone service provided by both B.C. Tel and OK Tel. While primary
responsibility for dealing with complaints about B.C. Tel rests with the CRTC,
this Branch nevertheless provides assistance to any resident of British Columbia
who seeks it in the resolution of problems with service. B.C. Telephone Company
officials have co-operated well with Branch staff, and many cases have been satisfactorily resolved.
In this process the Branch is able to obtain an indication of areas with deficient
service standards. Since OK Tel is within Provincial jurisdiction, any complaints
respecting that company are handled directly by Branch staff on behalf of the Motor
Carrier Commission.
 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
During the year staff participated with the CRTC on an intergovernmental
committee attempting to resolve an impasse between the Prince Rupert Telephone
Department and B.C. Tel concerning the sharing of toll revenue, but to date the
issue has not been decided.
The Branch, with the assistance of consultants, participated in Phase I of the
CRTC Inquiry into Telecommunications Carriers' Costing and Accounting procedures. The topics of depreciation and income tax were the main concerns of
this phase of the inquiry.   Phase II is scheduled for the latter months of 1978.
An application by a local group from the Dease Lake-Iskut/Eddontenajon
area for a telephone system in this area was first raised in January 1977, and staff,
acting on behalf of the MCC, continued to meet with company officials, technicians,
and the Commission to review this project.
Branch personnel experienced in utility regulation continued to be called to
make recommendations on oil pipeline tariffs submitted to the Minister for consideration under the Pipe-lines Act. Applications were reviewed from Westcoast
Petroleum Ltd. and Pacific Petroleums Ltd.
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SERVICES BRANCH
This Branch is responsible for the co-ordination, design, provision, maintenance, and operation of telecommunications systems and services required by Provincial Government ministries and some agencies, with the exception of the radio
systems owned and operated by the Ministry of Forests and the Ministry of Highways
and Public Works. The major activities of the Branch are concerned with telephones, radio systems, data communications, and a variety of local communications
systems.
Telephone Systems Division
During the year the Division processed a total of 2,811 service orders to
telecommunications common carriers. These resulted in an increase in telephone
rental costs amounting to $450,000 annually, and a nonrecurring installation cost
amounting to $293,000.
A major disruption in the productive effort of this Division occurred because
of a B.C. Tel strike/lockout situation, with the work stoppage lasting from November
24, 1977, until February 13, 1978.  The principal adverse effects were
(1) part of the Government private-line network became inoperative,
causing a large increase in the B.C. Tel long distance network at
extra cost;
(2) all work on alterations and new installations stopped. This resulted
in a massive backlog of projects when work was resumed.
(3) all planning and engineering by B.C. Tel stopped because supervisory personnel were involved in B.C. Tel operations. This increased the backlog.
At the end of the fiscal year, a rigid priority system for telephone work was in
effect, but the combination of a large backlog and an unusually large amount of
new work was causing long delays in provision of telephones, particularly in the
Victoria area.
In May 1977, most Government offices in the downtown Vancouver area were
connected to a new Centrex operation which provides dial access direct to each
local telephone without the assistance of an operator. This additional automation
was necessary because of the growth of the system, and for most offices it is more
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS 43
efficient than the old system. However, the function of some organizations demands
the services of an operator, and provision was made for the necessary systems,
separate from the Centrex.
Assistance in an advisory and co-ordinating capacity was provided on request
to municipalities interested in establishing the emergency telephone number "911".
This was particularly effective in the case of Kamloops, where good progress was
made in the development of their system.
Telephone Operations Division
The two Telephone Operations Division, one in Victoria and the other in
Vancouver, continued to provide effective service for Government personnel and
the public. There was one partial exception, when the B.C. Tel strike/lockout
resulted in picketing which was selectively directed to the telephone operators at
the main Parliament Buildings exchange in the Douglas Building. However,
operation of the exchange continued in the automatic mode.
Because of the nature of their work, the job of the Ministry's telephone
operators on busy exchanges is unusually demanding and rigorous, and the cheerful
service they habitually provide is thoroughly commendable.
Radio Division
A number of projects reached or approached completion.   Examples are
(1) Ambulance Service—a number of local base stations, including
radio paging systems for effective control of personnel.
(2) Co-ordinated Law Enforcement Unit—a radio system in the
Victoria area and a number of smaller projects.
(3) Sheriff's Service—a number of base stations.
(4) Air Services Branch—an improved H/F system to extend radio
communications throughout the Province, and a VHF ground-to-air
system for the Victoria-Vancouver area.
(5) Fish and Wildlife Branch—additional base stations and mobile
radios.
(6) Provincial Fire Marshal—a new base station.
(7) Telecommunications Services Branch—minor advances toward
an electronic laboratory, and development of a computer-assisted
program for processing and recording radio licensing for all ministries.
Data Communications Division
At the end of the fiscal year, the Data Communications Network consisted of
110 Telex stations, 70 TWX stations, and nine Facsimile stations.
During the year, messages processed by the Message Centre numbered as
follows: Telex and TWX, 43,611; Facsimile, 3,294.
Auxiliary Communications Division
This Division is concerned with local communications services such as the
sound reinforcement systems in the Legislature and elsewhere, numerous paging
and public address systems for courtrooms, many types of office intercommunications, and other audio and visual systems.
A major project in this category is the sophisticated sound, visual and animation production and control system which is progressively being developed and
installed to augment the exhibits of the Provincial Museum. This project moved
slowly because of financial restraint. However, with the development of additional
museum displays, it is expected that the work will accelerate in subsequent years.
 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ADMINISTRATION
FINANCE
HOW THE ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
DOLLAR IS SPENT
Fiscal Year 1977/78
60.13%
1. General Administration, Engineering Branch.
2. Weigh Scale Branch.
3. Motor-vehicle Branch.
4. Motor Carrier Branch and Commission.
5. Telecommunications Services Branch and System Development and Regulation Branch.
6. Transport Research and Planning Branch.
7. B.C. Energy Commission.
8. Building Occupancy Charges.
9. Computer and Consulting Services Branch.
10. B.C. Ferries Corporation—annual highway equivalent subsidy and lease
payments on ferry vessels.
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
45
Summary of Expenditures, Fiscal Year 1977/78
Vote
102—Minister's Office	
103—General Administration
104—Engineering Branch 	
105—Weigh Scale Branch -	
106—Motor-vehicle Branch ...
107—Motor Carrier Branch _
108—Telecommunications Services Branch 	
109—Communications System Development and Regulation
Branch 	
110—Motor Carrier Commission	
111—Transport Research and Planning Branch
112—British Columbia Energy Commission	
113—British Columbia Ferries 	
114—Building Occupancy Charges	
115—Computer and Consulting Charges
Total
$
125,013
581,615
544,510
2,379,957
10,794,7631
782,293
10,858,420
350,636
211,434
1,733,049
1,260,631
48,378,5002
1,666,619
789,000
80,456,4403
i The Central Registry Division of the Motor-vehicle Branch was transferred to the Ministry of Consumer
and Corporate Affairs, effective April 1, 1978.   Expenditures for the fiscal year 1977/78 amounted to $334,500.
2 Comprised of the Annual Highway Equivalent Subsidy to B.C. Ferry Corporation ($43,558,700), and lease
payments for three ferries operated by the Corporation ($4,819,800).
3 Total expenditures do not include operations of the Air Services Branch, which was transferred from the
Ministry of the Provincial Secretary and Travel Industry, effective December 8, 1977 (fiscal year total $1,782,116).
 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MINISTRY EXPENDITURES BY STANDARD OBIECTS OF EXPENDITURE,
FISCAL YEAR 1977/78
o
00
t-;
O
H
U~i
O
#
 MINISTRY OF ENERGY, TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS
47
PERSONNEL SERVICES
Major changes occurring during the year included the introduction of a comprehensive short-term and long-term illness and injury plan for all employees; a
management classification study known as the "Hay Plan" was implemented for all
excluded management employees and also included a new benefit package; plus
there were changes to the optional selection of benefits plan for all licensed professionals. Staff changes included the appointment of Roy Illing, former Marine
Administrator with the Federal Ministry of Transport, Ottawa, to the position of
Deputy Minister, effective June 1, 1977; and Harold Page, former Director of
System Development and Regulation Branch, was appointed Assistant Deputy
Minister, Communications, on November 1, 1977.
Due to reorganization of the Public Service Commission, Treasury Board,
and the Government Employee Relations Bureau, there was a large increase in the
work load of the Ministry's personnel offices, with only a slight increase in staffing
activity over the previous year as a result of a continuing program of staffing
restrictions.
Total employees hired (regular, auxiliary)
Employees hired (auxiliary, limited) 	
Employees promoted	
Employees receiving lateral transfers
Resignations	
Retirements	
Deaths	
Voluntary demotions
294
136
58
9
72
11
3
3
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1979
1230-179-7458
 

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