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Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing report for the year ended December 31 1976 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1977

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 ROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VKnistry of
Municipal Affairs
ind Housing
oort for the
r ended
j-cember 31 1976
Prinred by K. M. MacDONALD, Printer ro the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in righr of the Province of British Columbia.
1977
;e ONE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 PAGE TWO
 ro the Honourable Walter S. Owen, Q.C., LL.D., Lieutenant-
Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
/1AY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual
Leport of the Ministry of Municipal Affairs
nd Housing for the year ended December 31, 1976.
IUGH A. CURTIS,
■linister of Municipal Affairs and Housing.
ictoria, British Columbia.
iGE THREE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 PAGE FOUR
 >ROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Municipal Affairs
.eport for the
ear ended
)ecember 31 1976
INISTRY OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS AND HOUSING
ctoria, British Columbia
lGE FIVE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
The Honourable Hugh A. Curtis,
Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing*^
Sir: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs for the year ended
December 31, 1976.
This Report contains a review of Departmental activities and observations of the programmes and financial positioi
of the municipalities and regional districts within the Province. Greater detail with respect to these areas is contained ii
the publications Municipal Statistics and Statistics Relating to Regional and Municipal Governments in British Columbia
which are published annually by the Department from information contained in audited financial and other statements of
the municipalities and regional districts.
R. W. LONG,
Deputy Minister.
PAGE SIX
 1UNICIPAL AFFAIRS
CONTENTS
Departmental Publications    Page   9
Departmental Activities  Page 10
Legislation  Page 12
Administrative Services   Page 13
Financial Management  Page 19
Planning Services   Page 27
Transit Services  Page 30
Charts  Page 34
GE SEVEN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
THE HONOURABLE HUGH A. CURTIS
MINISTER OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS AND HOUSING
R. W. Long, F.C.I.S., Deputy Minister and Inspector of Municipalities
C. H. L. Woodward, F.C.I.S., Assistant Deputy Minister and Deputy Inspector of Municipalities
J. P. Taylor, Assistant Deputy Minister and Deputy Inspector of Municipalities
G. E. Whelen, F.C.I.S., Executive Officer
K. MacLeod, Research Officer
R. T. Cubbon, Research Officer
Administrative Services
T. F. Moore, F.C.I.S., Executive Director
A. R. Clarke, Senior Administrative Officer
J. G. Callan, Senior Administrative Officer
W. J. Larter, Administrative Officer
R. O'Genski, Administrative Officer
N. A. McCrimmon, A.C.I.S., Administrative Officer
D. Conway, Administrative Officer
Financial Services
H. G. Topham, C.A., Director
W. H. Boyce, C.A., Assistant Director and Departmental Comptroller
F. J. Thompson, C.G.A., Administrative Officer
W. J. Sommerville, Administrative Officer
R. M. A. Brearly, R.I.A., Administrative Officer
W. J. Eurchuk, Administrative Officer
W. E. Ballard, Administrative Officer
Planning Services
G. C. Harkness, M.C.I.P., Executive Director
W. J. Tassie, M.C.I.P., Senior Planning Co-ordinator
B. S. Jawanda, M.C.I.P. Senior Planning Co-ordinator
B. Chambers, M.C.I.P., Senior Planning Co-ordinator
L. Ward, M.C.I.P., Senior Planning Co-ordinator
T. Maftechuk, M.C.I.P., Senior Planning Co-ordinator
L. V. Luchin, P.M.C.I.P., Senior Planning Co-ordinator
A. L. Quinn, P.M.C.I.P., Planning Co-ordinator
B. Martin, P.M.C.I.P., Planning Co-ordinator
Transit Services
B. E. Sullivan, Acting Director
C. A. Spratt, Manager—Marketing and Operation
PAGE EIGHT
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
UBLICATIONS
nnual Report
lunicipal Statistics
tatistics Relating to Regional and Municipal
Governments
.egional Districts in British Columbia
Guide to Municipal Management
Guide to Regional District Management
ACTS ADMINISTERED BY
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
Municipal Act
Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act
Local Services Act
Municipal Finance Authority of British Columbia Act
Mobile Home Tax Act
Provincial Rapid Transit Act
Provincial Transit Fund Act
Transit Services Act
Sewerage Facilities Assistance Act
Resort Municipality of Whistler Act
VGE NINE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
DEPARTMENTAL
ACTIVITIES
The provision of high quality local government
services to a growing population continues to be the main
function of British Columbia's municipalities and Regional
Districts. Most provincial guidance and assistance directed
to the benefit of local government is provided or
co-ordinated by the Department of Municipal Affairs and
its successor, the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and
Housing.
Basic physical services, such as roads, water works
and sewerage systems, are essential to the formation and
survival of modern communities. The necessity of a wide
range of social, recreational and protective services is
likewise firmly established. Many local government
services represent substantial and increasingly costly
capital investments. The rising cost of capital
development and the accompanying increases in operating
and other costs are reflected in the expansion of municipal
revenue requirements. In the six year period from 1969 to
1975, municipal revenue's, including those of utilities,
have increased by approximately $352,000,000 to
$675,000,000. Debenture debt over the same period has
increased to more than $806,000,000 from less than
$462,000,000. t
Following adoption at the 1976 legislative session of
the Government Reorganization Act, the operations of the
Department of Municipal Affairs have been carried on
under the authority of the new Ministry of Municipal
Affairs and Housing. From a structural point of view the
new Ministry unites the programmes and personnel of two
former departments. In so far as programme administration
and policy development are concerned, the Ministry is
divided into two Sections, each headed by a Deputy
Minister. One of these Sections corresponds to the former
Department of Municipal Affairs, the other to the former
Department of Housing. However, since the transition to
the new organizational structure took place halfway
through the year, and in keeping with the provisions of the
Department of Municipal Affairs Act, the Municipal
Affairs Section will be referred to as "the department" in
portions of this report.
The financial base of local government has also
expanded. The assessed value of real property actually
taxed for municipal purposes rose by almost five per cent
to more than eleven and one half billion dollars in 1976. It
is worth noting that while property taxes are increasing,
the level of tax collections has for the past several years
remained stable at the point where approximately 96 per
cent of current taxes are collected during the year in which
they are levied. The matter of assessment and taxation is
dealt with more fully in that part of the report relating to
financial management.
One of the principal statutory roles of the department
is the supervision of municipal and regional district
long-term borrowing for capital programmes. This
responsibility rests with the Inspector of Municipalities
and during the year under review the total borrowing
authorized for a variety of projects amounted to
$175,577,670. The proportion of current revenue
expended to service long-term debenture debt has
declined in districts, towns and villages, but has increase'
slightly in the cities (including Vancouver). The
proportion of revenue expended for this purpose is not
considered excessive and is well below the amount
expended in other provinces.
The Minister attended the annual meeting of Provincial
Ministers of Municipal Affairs held in Kingston, Ontario ii
mid-August. He was accompanied by several senior
departmental officials.
The Department of Municipal Affairs and its
successor, the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing
maintains regular contact with several Government of
Canada departments and agencies, including the Ministr}
of State for Urban Affairs and Central Mortgage and
Housing Corporation. The department is represented as
often as possible at inter-departmental or
inter-governmental meetings affecting municipalities. An
example of this activity is the department's participation
with representatives of the Ministry of Transport (Canada
concerning airport development.
Various senior staff members were involved in
national conferences such as the Municipal Finance
Officers and the Provincial Planning Officers. British
Columbia was represented at the Ministerial level at the
United Nations Conference on Human Settlements held
in Vancouver between May 29 and June 11, 1976. The
Honourable Mr. Curtis was a member of the Canadian
delegation and Mr. R.W. Long served as an advisor.
Since the annual edition of Municipal Statistics is ar
important source of information to investment houses,
financial institutions and others, distribution of the
publication is made as early in the year as possible.
Municipal Statistics includes some 36 different schedule;
Prior to publication, the financial and statistical returns c
the municipalities and regions are closely edited to ensui
conformity and adherence to statutory and other
requirements.
The Union of British Columbia Municipalities held
its convention in Vancouver, and senior staff members
attended to provide an opportunity for those interested
discuss local problems. Departmental staff also
participated in the annual conference of the Municipal
Officers Association of British Columbia as well as other
similar meetings.
PAGE TEN
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
The annual shield award presented by the Minister as
in incentive to increase turn-out at municipal elections
.vas bestowed on the following municipalities in 1976:
Category
Cities and Towns
District Municipalities
tillage Municipalities
Voter Turn-out
Recipient (percent)
Greenwood 66.95
Hudson's Hope        77.50
Midway 76.15
Second place recipients were Nelson (cities and
owns) with 63.62 per cent, Peachland (district
nunicipalities) with 73.11 per cent and Sayward (village
nunicipalities) with 72.6 per cent.
Building Code
A meeting of the Provincial Committee on the
National Building Code was held in Ottawa and attended
Dy representatives from all provinces.
A staff member attended the meeting in Ottawa of
:he sub-committee on Part 2 of the National Building
2ode. Provincial representatives were enabled to exchange
/iews on this part of the code and to recommend changes.
During 1976, the Building Code Appeal Board
eceived 78 appeals concerned with the interpretation and
ipplication of the code and 18 requests for approval of
ilternate plumbing materials. During this period, three
iummaries of appeals and board decisions were distributed
:o municipalities and regional districts and to numerous
nterested organizations. This continuing activitity
ndicates the Board is providing a very necessary and
;ffective service for the construction industry,
-nunicipalities and individuals.
Technical support for the administration of the code
ind the operation of the Building Code Appeal Board is
jrovided by the Building Standards and Regional Branch
)f the Ministry of Highways and Public Works. Building
standards for the Handicapped have also been drafted and
;irculated for comment. If suitable, these standards will be
ncorporated in the present building code.
Metric Conversion
An Inter-provincial Committee on Municipal Affairs
vas established to facilitate communication between
provinces on metric conversion as it affects municipalities.
This committee participated in a meeting in Toronto with
he Federal Government Metric Commission to discuss
problems in the municipal field and submit
ecommendations to the Metric Commission. British
Columbia provided representatives from the City of
Vancouver, the U.B.C.M. and the Ministry.
With recent emphasis on the amending of legislation
and by-laws related to the registration and use of land, a
circular letter was distributed to all municipalities and
regional districts containing information and suggestions
regarding conversion of such by-laws. This included
metric dimensions and suggested material for zoning and
sub-division by-laws.
The regular meetings of the Provincial Metric
Conversion Committee were attended, reports from the
Ministry were submitted and the co-ordinating of
conversion with other Ministries was continued.
Municipal Commercial Vehicle Licensing
Programme
A total of 132 municipalities participated in the
Municipal Commercial Vehicle Licensing Programme
during the 1975/76 licence year. Sales of vehicle plates
under this programme, which is administered by the
Department on behalf of the municipalities, generated
$952,439 in revenue during the year. After payment of
incidental expenses, these funds were distributed to
participants on a per capita basis. The municipalities
issued 78,193 licence plates and 95,178 exempt plates
during the year under review.
Local Government Restructuring
The major restructurings of Kamloops, Kelowna,
Castlegar-Kinnaird, Prince George and Nanaimo have
been described in previous annual reports. The
experiences of these communities have generally been
favourable and a number of provincially assisted transition
programs remain in effect. Further information on this and
the following topic appears in the Administrative Services
section of this report.
Amalgamation
Other groups of communities have expressed interest
in the possibility of restructuring. Among them are the
North Cowichan-Duncan area, the Matsqui-Abbotsford
area, and the western portion of the Capital Regional
district.
Sewerage Facilities Assistance Act
The Sewerage Facilities Assistance Act this year
provided assistance totalling $11,261,666.16 to 89
municipalities and Regional Districts in the Province.
Twenty-four cities received grants amounting to
$1,870,193.44; twenty-four districts received
$8,641,994.80; seven towns received $182,083.37;
thirty-one villages received $525,360.47; and three
Regional Districts received $42,034.08. The total value of
1976 grants under the Act exceeded last year's total of
$7,453,997.74 by more than 51%.
•AGE ELEVEN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
1976
To date
4
104
3
124
2
120
2
78
11
426
Special Courses
During 1976, the Board of Examiners on which the
Department is represented, granted 11 certificates of
proficiency. The following table shows the classifications
of these certificates, together with the total number which
have been issued:
Certificates
Junior
Senior Administration
Senior Finance
Property Appraisal
Totals
Thirty-one persons employed in the municipal field
enrolled in courses offered by the Chartered Institute of
Secretaries for the 1976/77 academic year. In addition to
the professional degree "A.C.I.S." (Associate of the
Chartered Institute of Secretaries) which may be granted
to a graduate of the course, application may be made for a
certificate of proficiency in municipal administration or
finance, depending upon experience and office held.
The Certified General Accounts Society (C.G.A.) has
at the present time more than sixty students enrolled who
are employed in the local government field. They may
upon completion of their studies also make application for
a certificate of proficiency in municipal administration or
finance.
Continuing Education
In co-operation with the Municipal Officers'
Association, the Union of British Columbia Municipalities,
and the Ministry of State for Urban Affairs, the
Department is represented on the Municipal
Administration Education Council. The purpose of the
Council is to make a study of existing courses for the
education of municipal administrators in the Province, and
to recommend measures which may be necessary to
improve or supplement existing courses.
LEGISLATION
A number of technical and substantive amendments
to the Municipal Act were made during the 1976 session o
the Legislative Assembly. A summary of the more
significant amendments follows by topic.
Municipal Elections
The Act was amended to enlarge the definition of
"owner" to include persons purchasing or leasing property
and to permit persons and personal corporations holding
property in a municipality to be registered and vote in an
election. Limitations were placed on the number of votes
which corporations or agents may cast. Appropriate forms
were specified.
Registration procedures were also simplified for thos
persons otherwise qualified who are not on the Voters'
List.
Municipal Finance
Important changes in municipal auditing
requirements were introduced. The qualifications for
municipal auditors are the same as these specified in the
Companies Act. Five other sections were amended to
require new audit practices for municipalities in keeping
with current professional practice.
A statutory amendment authorized municipalities to
incorporate companies under the Companies Act or
purchase shares in existing corporations with the consent
of the Inspector of Municipalities. Municipalities were als<
given the power under certain circumstances to acquire
and mortgage property without elector consent.
Another set of amendments permitted the Council t(
set a penalty interest rate of up to 12% on delinquent taxe
and taxes in arrears, and to choose its own bonus rate for
advance payments of taxes.
By-law powers and approvals
Several types of approval were made subject to an
affirmative vote of two-thirds of the members present am
entitled to vote. These included Official Community Plan
zoning and land-use contract by-laws. Regional District
regulatory by-laws were made subject to a similar
requirement. The advertising requirement in respect of
zoning by-laws was simplified.
Regional Districts were placed under a requirement t
obtain approval from the Inspector of Municipalities of a
proposal to submit a question to the electors, but were
given the power to enter into agreements with the
provincial government under the Department of Housing
Act.
PAGE TWELVE
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
ADMINISTRATIVE
SERVICES
vfew Incorporations and Changes in Structure
While no new incorporations or changes in structure
vere completed in 1976, a number of studies were
indertaken in regard to the local government structure in
he general areas of Campbell River, Quesnel, Williams
ake, the western sector of the Capital Regional District
Langford, Colwood, Metchosin and View Royal) and
jibsons and the Sechelt area.
In addition, at the request of the Council of the
Ullage of Invermere, preliminary arrangements have been
nade to review the local structure in that area with a view
o determining the long-term requirements for the overall
rea.
A similar review was undertaken concerning the
verall demands being placed on the local government
tructure at Creston. The recommendations made
allowing this review are being used by the municipality as
guide in determining its priorities.
Municipal and Improvement District Boundary
Revisions
Supplementary Letters Patent were issued during
1976 authorizing extensions and/or revisions in boundaries
for 19 municipalities and six improvement districts. The
municipalities affected, together with the resulting
adjustments in area and changes in population are
indicated in Table l.-Page 14- A local census is taken in
the extended area and added to the original population
established under the 1971 census in order to arrive at the
new municipal population after extension.
Letters Patent were also issued which provided for
the dissolution of 4 improvement districts. The assets of
the Brentwood, Deep Cove and Sidney Waterworks
Districts were transferred to the Municipalities of Central
Saanich, North Saanich and Sidney respectively and the
function of water supply given to the Capital Regional
District. The Campbell River Fire Protection District was
dissolved and the function of Fire Protection given to the
Regional District of Comox-Strathcona.
\GE THIRTEEN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
TABLE 1—MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY REVISIONS 1976
Municipality
Area (Acres)
Population
Before
Added
After
Before
Added
After
2,019.56
163.61
2,183.17
7,184
NIL
7,184
1,977.56
127.20
2,104.76
4,422
4
4,426
88,448.00
(11,494.40)
76,953.60
55,090
NIL
55,090
56,145.60
285.56
56,431.16
45,117
NIL
45,117
4,559.85
119.15
4,679.00
13,954
112
14,066
11,739.00
862.89
12,601.89
2,990
NIL
2,990
12,601.89
—
12,601.89
2,990
NIL
2,990
12,617.04
3,916.80
16,533.84
5,551
17
5,568
959.98
42.74
1,002.72
3,204
92
3,296
3,919.78
333.74
4,253.52
6,442
NIL
6,442
1,499.49
968.89
2,468.38
3,864
159
4,023
544.81
116.89
661.70
1,019
24
1,043 n£
236.00
187.78
423.78
1,718
199
1,917
1,114.14
64.68
1,178.82
1,934
2
1,936*:
655.33
38.50
693.83
1,065
1
1,066
704.46
3.96
708.42
396
NIL
396
332.47
360.80
693.27
1,120
224
1,344
301.00
94.42
395.42
157
35
192
375.00
169.99
544.99
872
268
1,140
409.60
8.93
418.53
465
NIL
465
Cities
Courtenay
Fernie
Kamloops1
Kelowna
Vernon
Districts
Sparwood
Sparwood (redefinition)
Summerland
Towns
Creston
Quesnel
Smithers
Villages
Cache Creek
Cumberland
Gibsons
Invermere
Lions Bay
100 Mile House
Pemberton
Salmo
Sayward
Source of base population figures is the 1971 census
'Reduction in boundaries.
By-law Approvals
All village by-laws must be submitted to the Ministry
for registration in the office of the Inspector of
Municipalities. In addition, many by-laws for all classes of
municipalities require approval from certain governmental
agencies before adoption can proceed or become effective.
Included in this category are by-laws which establish
consumer or user charges for water and sewer services.
Such by-laws, together with supporting background
material, are fully reviewed before any suggestions or
recommendations are made and before being advanced to
the approving authority. While many of the initial
submissions may be found satisfactory, others require the
exchange of considerable correspondence. A total of 885
by-laws was examined and subsequently registered,
including 817 village by-laws, 28 regional district by-laws
and 40 improvement district by-laws. By-laws of the
Resort Municipality of Whistler are subject to approval
the Inspector of Municipalities prior to adoption. Fourte
by-laws from this municipality were reviewed and
recommended for such approval.
For a variety of purposes, 776 Minutes of Council
were prepared and subsequently approved by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council—99 authorized the
abandonment and vesting of portions of highway; 101
approved municipal rates by-laws for water, sewer and
electric power; 30 authorized appointment of members
the municipal Boards of Variance and 142 were for othe
municipal miscellaneous requirements; 404 were for
regional district purposes of which 308 approved
subdivision, zoning and land use contract by-laws; 7
authorized appointment of members to Regional Boards
PAGE FOURTEEN
 [UNICIPAL AFFAIRS
ariance and the balance of 89 met other legislative
quirements.
In addition, 121 rezoning by-laws applicable to land in
le flood-plain area of the Lower Mainland were reviewed
nd recommended for approval by the Minister under
:ction 187 of the Municipalities Enabling and Validating
;t. Eleven building by-laws from various regional
istricts were also reviewed and recommended for
Dproval by the Minister pursuant to section 798D.
)ebenture Approvals
Certification by the Inspector of Municipalities of
ebenture issues of municipalities and regional districts
lay be completed on request. Before such certification
in be completed, certificates of approval to the by-laws or
isolutions are issued authorizing the issuance of
ebentures. A total of 471 certificates of approval to the
y-laws or resolutions was issued authorizing the issuance
F debentures. A total of 342 certificates of approval was
sued in 1975. In 1976, debenture issues were processed
ith a total par value of $112,500,000 through the
lunicipal Finance Authority and $22,901,000 on behalf of
.dividual municipalities and regional districts. More
■formation on debenture approval and related capital
penditure matters may be found under "Financial
'.agement".
gional District Activities
Regional government in British Columbia has, since
inception in 1965, been reviewed and discussed in
revious annual reports and is now recognized in our
rovince and elsewhere as a significant part of the
cal government system.
As in the past, further expansion of local government
rvices was undertaken by regional districts.
Some 45 new functions were granted the 28 regional
stricts in 1976; Table 2 summarizes those assigned,
hile Table 3 sets out all functions undertaken to date.
For services required by the greater community, the
gional approach has provided a reasonably acceptable
ilution. Provision of sewage disposal and garbage disposal
e particularly appropriate to this concept, and such
I notions as joint computer operations, fire protection,
insit, and construction equipment-pools could
nceivably be handled for the greater community by
gional districts. Services can be provided by regional
stricts to municipal and non-municipal areas, either
rectly or by contract.
Supplementary Letters Patent were issued in several
stances for purposes other than to authorize the granting
functions. Revision of the internal and external
mndaries is continuing and amendments have been
ade to cost-sharing formulas and other changes in
rporate structure.
Specified Areas
Thirty-six specified areas were established by by-law
in 1976; of these areas 17 were established by petition
method, and 19 after the property-owners voted favourably
on the proposal. In addition, amendments in boundaries to
5 specified areas already established were completed.
Table 4 summarizes the specified areas established and
altered in 1976. Before regional government was
introduced, community services administered locally in
non-municipal areas were provided through the
incorporation of improvement districts, either under the
Water Act as administered by the Water Rights Branch of
the Ministry of the Environment, or under the Municipal
Act. In some other instances, local areas were established
under the Local Services Act. The latter two Acts, it
should be noted, are administered by this Ministry. New
local service needs in non-municipal areas, with the
exception of water, irrigation, and dykes, are almost all
provided and financed through the facilities of regional
districts.
Many of the specified areas have been established
adjacent to municipal boundaries. As the demand for
further services develops, the trend will be toward the
incorporation of these areas within present municipal
boundaries. Those specified areas in more isolated
situations will probably retain their non-municipal status.
cGE FIFTEEN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
TABLE 2—FUNCTIONS ASSIGNED TO REGIONAL DISTRICTS DURING 1976 (UNLESS OTHERWISE
INDICATED, ALL MEMBER AREAS OF THE REGIONAL DISTRICT PARTICIPATE IN THIS FUNCTION).
Bulkley-Nechako—
Television Rebroadcasting (Fraser Lake and Electoral
Area "D")
Joint Community Use of School Facilities (Smithers,
Telkwa and defined portion of Electoral Area
"A")
Capital—
Ice Arena and Swimming Pool (North Saanich and
Sidney)
Water Supply (Saanich Peninsula), (Central Saanich,
North Saanich and Sidney)
Cariboo—
Public Library Service (Quesnel, Williams Lake, 100
Mile House, Electoral Areas D, E, F, G, H, I, J
and K)
Arena Improvements (Defined Portions of Electoral
Areas D, E and F)
Central Coast—
Television Rebroadcasting (Electoral Areas C, D and
E)
Regional Parks
Columbia-Shuswap—
Refuse Disposal (Electoral Areas C, D, E and F)
Community Parks (Electoral Areas, B, C, D, E and
F)
Comox-Strathcona—
House Numbering (Electoral Areas A, B, C, D, E, F,
I and J)
Street Lighting (Electoral Areas A, D, E, F and I)
Fire Protection (Campbell River, defined portion of
Electoral Area D and Electoral Areas E and F)
Economic Development Commission (Comox,
Courtenay, Cumberland, Sayward, Tahsis, and
Electoral Areas A, B, C, D, E and H)
Cowichan Valley—
Regulation of Signs (Electoral Areas only)
Community Centre Complex (Duncan, North
Cowichan, and Electoral Areas D and E)
Recreation Commission
Community Parks (Electoral Areas A, B, C, D, E, F
and I)
Dewdney-Alouette—
Untidy and Unsightly Premises (Electoral Areas B, C,
D and E)
Regional Parks—Green Belt (Pitt Meadows, Mission
and all Electoral Areas)
Fraser- Cheam—
Ice Arena (Kent, Harrison Hot Springs and Electoral
Area "F")
Fraser-Fort George—
Garbage Disposal (McBride and defined portion of
Electoral Area H)
Kitimat-Stikine-
House Numbering (Electoral Areas only)
Kootenay Boundary—
Animal Control (Greenwood, Grand Forks and
Electoral Area D)
Refuse Disposal (Electoral Areas A and B)
Elderly Citizens' Housing (Trail and Warfield)
Ice Arena Operation (Grand Forks and Electoral Art
D)
Mount Waddington—
Ice Arena (Port McNeill, Electoral Area D and
defined portion of Electoral Area C)
North Okanagan—
Community Parks
Recreational Programmes and Facilities
Okanagan-Similkameen—
Community Hall (Oliver and Electoral Area C)
Fire Protection (Keremeos and defined areas of
Electoral Areas B and G)
Peace River-Liard—
Community Centre (Fort Nelson and Defined Portic
of Electoral Area A)
Swimming Pool (Fort Nelson and Defined Portion
Electoral Area A)
Neighbourhood Parks and Ball Diamonds (Fort
Nelson and Defined Portion of Electoral Area
Mosquito Control (Fort Nelson and Defined Portio
of Electoral Area A)
Library Operation (Fort Nelson and Defined Portio
of Electoral Area A)
Cemetery Operation (Fort Nelson and Defined
Portion of Electoral Area A)
Recreational Programmes
Community Services
Regional Parks
Control of Noxious Weeds and Other Growths
Sunshine Coast—
Sewage Collection, Treatment and Disposal (Seche
and Electoral Areas B, D, E and F)
Firearms Regulation (Electoral Areas only)
Joint Community Use of School Facilities, (Sechelt
and Electoral Areas A, B, C, D, E and F)
PAGE SIXTEEN
 [UNICIPAL AFFAIRS
TABLE 3 — REGIONAL DISTRICT FUNCTIONS
x - indicates function
p - indicates application of function
in part of Regional District only.
1
1
1
«3
c
1
^5
1
1
5
1
1
1
J
1
3
C3
g
1
8
5
c;
cj
'i
.5
1
C31
|
1*1
8
I
e
c
<7
1
fc
s
1
rj
r5
3
i
3
1
1
1
1
■«
j
1
1
1
a.
=2
3
-5
§
1
i
1
!■
to
1
3
<
1
Activity Centre
P
Ambulance
X
p
p
p
P
P
X
p
P
p
X
Airport Facilities
P
P
Air Pollution
X
X
X
Bus Transit
P
Cemetery Operation
p
p
P
X
Community Health Services
X
Community Parks
p
p
p
P
X
p
Community Recreational Programmes
X
Community Recycling Grant
p
Community Services
P
X
Control of Gatherings
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Dog Control
p
p
Economic Development Commission
p
Elderly Citizens' Housing
p
p
X
X
X
p
p
Emergency Programmes
X
X
X
X
p
Firearms
p
X
p
P
P
p
p
p
X
p
X
Fire Protection
p
Fireworks
X
p
X
X
X
P
P
p
X
p
X
Flood Control
P
p
Health Regulation and Centre
P
X
p
Home Nursing
p
House Numbering
p
p
P
p
p
p
Intermediate Care Home
p
Joint Community Use of School Facilities
P
p
p
p
Labour Negotiations
p
Land Assembly, Housing and Land Banking
X
p
Library Study
p
p
X
Marina Operation and Development
p
Noise
p
P
Nuisance Control
p
p
p
P
p
p
P
p
P
X
p
Okanagan Basin Water Board
X
X
X
Operation of Wharves
p
Park and Green Belt Land Acquisition
P
P
P
Pest Control
X
p
X
X
p
p
p
p
X
p
p
Public Library Service
p
p
p
p
X
Public Use Area Lighting
p
Recreation Facilities
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
P
p
p
p
p
p
p
P
p
p
p
p
Recreation Programmes
p
X
p
X
p
p
p
p
p
X
X
X
X
X
p
p
X
Refuse Disposal
X
X
X
p
p
X
p
p
p
P
p
p
p
p
p
P
p
p
p
X
p
X
p
Regional Parks
X
p
X
X
X
X
p
X
X
X
p
X
X
X
X
X
p
Septic Tank Effluent Disposal
X
p
p
Sewage Treatment and Disposal
p
p
Sewers
X
p
p
X
Sign Regulation
p
Soil Fill Regulation
P
Soil Removal
X
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
Street Lighting
p
p
p
Sub-Regional Airports
P
Television Rebroadcasting
p
p
p
p
X
p
p
p
Theatre
p
Untidy and Unsightly Premises
p
p
p
Urban Renewal
P
Water
p
p
p
Weed Control
p
p
X
p
i
GE SEVENTEEN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
TABLE 4—REGIONAL DISTRICT SPECIFIED SERVICE AREAS ESTABLISHED DURING 1976
Bulkley-Nechako—
Street Lighting (Decker)
Capital—
Recreational Facilities (Salt Spring Island)
Community Theatre (Colwood, Langford, and
Metchosin)
Cariboo—
Fire Protection (Bouchie Lake)
Fire Protection (Lac La Hache)
Recreational Facilities (McLeese Lake)
Water System (Wells)
Garbage Collection and Disposal (Wells)
Central Okanagan—
Ornamental Street Lighting and Street Name Signs
(Shannon Lake Estates)
Community Parks, Walkways, Trails and Open Space
(Shannon Lake Estates)
Water System (Shannon Lake)
Columbia Shuswap—
Refuse Disposal Unit (Malakwa)
Comox-Strathcona—
River Bank Protection (Oyster River Bank)
River Bank Protection (Oyster River Bank Second)
Garbage Collection Service Unit (Denman Island)
Cowichan Valley—
Community Parks and Recreation Facilities (Youbou)
East Kootenay—
Recreation Services (Canal Flats)
Fraser-Cheam—
Street Lighting (Silver Creek)
Fraser-Fort George—
T.V. Broadcasting Service (Stone Creek)
Community Hall (Nukko Lake)
Kootenay Boundary—
Electrification (Big White)
Mount Waddington—
Fire Protection (Mitchell Bay)
Fire Protection (Coal Harbour)
Street Lighting (Coal Harbour)
Nanaimo—
Water Supply and Distribution System (Sandpiper)
Street Lighting (Nankivell Point)
North Okanagan—
Drainage (Springbend Creek)
Fire Protection (B.X.—Swan Lake)
Powell River—
Fire Protection (Lasqueti Island)
Sunshine Coast—
Parkland (Hopkins Landing)
Fire Protection (Halfmoon Bay)
Sewage Collection, Treatment and Disposal Sechelt)
Thompson-Nicola—
Street Lighting (Avola)
New Roof for Community Hall (Little Fort)
Cemetery Operation (Electoral Area D)
Amendments to Established Specified Service Areas
During 1976
Comox-Strathcona—
Waterworks and Irrigation Facilities (Headquarters
Road) and extension of boundaries
Kitimat-Stikine—
Recreation (Electoral Area Cl) and extension of
boundaries
Public Cemetery (Electoral Area C3) and extension o
boundaries
North Okanagan—
Garbage Disposal Site (Mabel Lake Hupal District)
and extension of boundaries
Fire Protection (Lumby Rural Area) and extension o
boundaries
PAGE EIGHTEEN
 V1UNICIPAL AFFAIRS
FINANCIAL
VLANAGEMENT
Assessment and Tax Collection
years is illustrated in the following table
It will be noted
The major single revenue source for municipalities in
that revenue from this source of taxation
in 1975 totalled
iritish Columbia continues to be the real property tax.
$679,281,460. Of this total, $341,228,401 represented
The growth in assessed values of real property and
taxation for general municipal purposes,
and $338,053,059
evenue from taxation of these properties over the past 12
represented taxation for school purposes
*
TABLE 5—GROWTH IN COMBINED ASSESSED VALUES AND TAXES
IN MUNICIPALITIES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Assessed Values Actually
Gross Assessed Values
Taxed
All                              Taxable
Tax
Year                                                      Properties                         Properties
School                           Municipal
Revenue
(Millions)
(Millions)
(Millions)
(Millions)
(Thousands)
1964                                         4,188
3,534
2,878
2,295
154,074
1972                                         8,292'
11,6772
7,042'
7,9502
5,753
7,744
390,368
1973                                           8,869'
12,8552
7,539'
9,0232
6,171
8,612
444,994
1974                                       11,156'
15,6082
9,291'
10,8682
7,653
10,414
548,805
1975                                       11,987'
16.5722
10,007'
11,4472
8,206
11,021
679,281
1976                                       12,782'
17,6802
10,642'
12,0622
8,691
11,542
820,0003
'School values.
2Municipal values.        3Estimated.
The following table (Table 6) provides a further
nalysis of the assessed value of real property and indicates
the distribution of 1976 assessed values by class of
municipality, with the percentage increase over 1975.
TABLE 6—ASSESSED VALUES BY CLASS OF MUNICIPALITIES
General Municipal Gross
Assessed Values
All
Properties
Assessed Values Actually
Taxed
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Subtotals
Vancouver
Totals
(Millions)
$
4,049
7,008
111
373
11,707
5,973
17,680
8.61
7.95
16.38
17.66
8.65
3.02
6.68
(Millions)
$
2,684
4,765
179
245
7,873
4,181
12,054
%
9.02
5.63
19.33
22.50
7.51
1.38
5.30
(Millions)
$
2,355
3,775
193
305
6,628
2,063
8,691
5.27
6.19
4,89
21.51
6.44
5.70
5.90
(Millions)
$
2,525
4,509
150
220
7,404
4,138
11,542
7.30
4.86
4.89
15.58
5.95
2.60
4.72
AGE NINETEEN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
As a result of the continuing rapid growth in the urban
communities, it is anticipated that proceeds from real
property taxation for school and general municipal
purposes in 1976 will reach $820,000,000. This would
represent an increase of approximately 110 per cent over
the revenue of five years ago. The total assessed values
actually taxed for school purposes in the Province in 1976
amounted to $10,778,657,803, an increase of
approximately $473,000,000 over 1975. Of this amount,
$8,690,992,275 or approximately 81 per cent, represented
assessed values in the city, district, town and village
municipalities.
Tax Collection
The tax collection picture in municipalities is
considered to be the primary indicator, not only of the
efficiency of the administration, But also of the ability of
the taxpayer to meet the municipal tax levy promptly. In
the year under review, tax collections have shown a slight
increase over the collections of 1974 and continue to
maintain a very high level. During the period, collection in
cities, districts and villages exceeded 96 per cent of the
levy, and towns collected in excess of 95 per cent. We
have established a practice of communicating with any
municipality where the arrears of taxes are in excess of 10
per cent of the current levy in an effort to determine the
cause and what steps may be taken to improve the
position.
The collection of current taxes in British Columbia
continues to be the highest among the provinces in
Canada publishing statistics of a comparable nature, while
the percentage of arrears is the lowest.
Chart 1, to be found at the back of this report, shows
the percentage of tax collection for the period 1965 to
1975, inclusive, and Tables 7 and 8 reveal further
information relative to tax collection by class of
municipality for the years shown.
TABLE 7—PERCENTAGE TAX COLLECTIONS
Percentage of      Total Collections Outstanding Taxes
Current L^evy       as a Percentage     as a Percentage
Collected of Current Levy     of Current Levy
TABLE 7—PERCENTAGE TAX COLLECTIONS
Percentage of      Total Collections Outstanding Taxe:
Current l^vy       as a Percentage     as a Percentage
Collected of Current Levy     of Current Levy
Cities (Except Vancouver)
1939 81.10
1968 96.65
1969 96.82
1970 99.46
1971 96.79
1972 97.05
1973 97.36
1974 96.71
1975 96.28
99.10
100.20
100.32
99.69
100.41
100.62
100.69
99.38
99.03
40.16
4.44
4.15
4.64
4.34
3.88
3.39
3.95
4.68
Vancouver
1939
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1973
1975
Districts
1939
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
Towns
1958
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
Villages
1939
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
91.00
95.67
96.11
95.80
96.29
96.20
97.03
96.15
96.02
77.60
97.00
96.85
96.37
96.80
96.88
97.51
96.62
96.68
89.55
93.98
93.45
93.56
94.59
96.25
96.75
95.44
95.73
76.50
95.45
95.70
94.85
96.08
97.11
97.02
95.94
96.02
103.10
98.87
99.96
99.12
100.17
99.79
100.82
98.68
98.99
95.80
100.29
100.08
99.48
100.54
100.39
100.82
98.88
99.42
97.06
100.20
99.46
99.36
101.03
102.05
100.69
98.78
99.30
98.30
99.97
100.27
100.72
101.21
101.01
100.41
98.85
99.52
30.06
5.75
5.22
5.87
5.28
5.19
3.51
4.78
5.08
34.81
3.90
3.95
4.54
4.15
3.96
3.21
4.03
4.23
13.62
9.06
9.08
9.35
7.96
5.37
4.48
5.65
5.14
38.71
6.15
6.39
7.00
5.53
4.09
3.95
4.99
4.88
PAGE TWENTY
 1UNICIPAL AFFAIRS
TABLE 8—COLLECTIONS, 1975
(WITH COMPARATIVE FIGURES FOR 1974)
Percentage of
Arrears as a
Current Taxes
Percentage of
Collected
Adjusted Levy
lties
)istricts
'owns
Ullages
Total
ancouver
Grand Total
1975
96.28
96.68
95.73
96.02
96.49
96.02
1974
1975
96.71
4.68
96.62
4.23
95.44
5.14
95.94
4.88
96.59
4.44
96.15
5.08
96.49
4.58
1974
3.95
4.03
5.65
4.96
4.08
4.78
4.25
It is interesting to note that, notwithstanding the fact
at property taxes are increasing, the level of tax
llections remains high. The percentage of arrears is
creasing, reflecting the fact that some taxpayers would
ther use the money for other investments.
:hool Assessment and General Municipal
ssessment
It should be noted that the difference between the
hool assessment and the general municipal assessment is
e result of a number of municipalities using a dual roll,
;., general assessments are based on 100 per cent of
arket value, while the school assessments are on 50 per
nt of value.
This dual roll had the following effect in 1975:
Millions
:hool assessment
ess—Landlord and tenant,
machinery and equipment
eneral municipal assessment
ess adjusted school assessment
8,205
1,185
7,020
11,021
7,020
4,001
The figure of $4,001,000,000 represents in part the
feet of the dual roll on the general assessment. This roll
in effect in the following municipalities: Penticton,
incouver, Burnaby, Peachland, Summerland, West
mcouver, Kamloops, City of North Vancouver, District
North Vancouver, City of Langley.
The balance of the difference is represented by B.C.
ydro values included in the school assessment roll, but
it included in the general assessment roll. The Provincial
tal for B.C. Hydro is $656,000,000, but no breakdown is
available at this time of the amount applicable to the
incorporated areas.
Revenues and Expenditures
The 1975 audited financial statements indicate that
British Columbia municipalities continued to maintain a
favourable financial position. Gross revenues from all
sources during 1975 exceeded $1,013,000,000 which
represents an increase of $183,000,000 over the previous
year.
The major revenue sources, with comparative figures
for 1974, were as follows:
1975 1974 Increase
(Millions)    (Millions)    (Millions)
General municipal
taxation
341
288
53
School taxation
338
261
77
Transfers from
other governments
134
119
15
Revenue from
own sources
200
162
38
1,013
830
183
The home-owner grant payments increased by
$6,000,000 in 1975 to a total of $88,000,000. When this is
offset against the school tax levy of $338,000,000, a
balance of $250,000,000 remains of this levy to be borne
by the property owner.
The major expenditure items incurred during 1975,
with comparative figures for 1974, were:
1975 1974 Increase
(Millions)    (Millions)    (Millions)
General
government
Fire Protection
Administration
of justice
Public Works
Sanitation and
waste removal
Social welfare
Education
Debt charges
Capital expenditure from
revenue
Other*
49
49
44
38
64
71
51
57
32
55
339
62
27
65
262
53
63
229
59
174
1,013
830
5
11
13
14
5
(10)
77
9
4
55
183
'Includes recreation, public health, environment development, utilities,
and contributions to reserves and other funds.
.GE TWENTY-ONE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
TABLE 9—TRENDS IN FINANCIAL ASPECTS OF MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT COMPARED TO
POPULATION AND INCOME EXPRESSED AS INDEXES
Total Revenue                                                                                      Maximum                   Total B.C.
(Excluding                    Building                    Debenture                      Values                       Personal
Year                                             Population                    Utilities)                      Permits                         Debt                         Taxable                       Income
1961
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
122.44
180.90
252.27
127.48
145.10
178.09
127.14
207.52
269.74
127.46
156.88
194.37
133.02
234.38
316.20
130.62
174.83
221.58
138.35
266.95
291.26
132.10
192.06
239.33
136.55
306.45
384.97
137.00
209.69
270.56
143.60
337.75
414.34
145.75
252.93
303.03
153.30
390.48
602.31
157.18
286.97
353.18
160.06
446.36
614.20
175.76
345.80
412.32
173.25
545.53
794.96
217.07
364.06
497.00
Reserves and Surpluses
The total statutory reserves and operating reserves
and surpluses held in all accounts of the municipalities was
$250,424,324. This represents 35.13 per cent of the total
revenue, excluding school taxes, of the municipalities. Of
this total, $224,981,537 is held in liquid form or in
investments authorized by statute, and a portion of the
surplus is represented in arrears of taxes and other
receivables.
Statutory reserve funds of various municipalities have
again shown an increase over the previous year. At the end
Reserves and Surpluses—1975
of 1975 these funds, held for a variety of purposes,
amounted to $83,497,730, an increase of $7,553,638 over
the previous year, after giving effect to the fact that
approximately $32,000,000 was expended on capital work
from reserve funds during the year 1975. Over the last
seven years the amount held in these reserve funds has
increased from $39,000,000 to the current figure of
$83,000,000, an increase of 113 per cent.
The following table provides an analysis of these
reserves and surpluses by class of municipality:
Total'
Reserves
Surpluses
Total
Revenue
$
$
$
%
Cities
50,767,803
22,992,958
73,760,761
36.67
Districts
83,352,930
32,408,819
115,761,749
40.54
Towns
1,147,718
2,425,074
3,572,792
27.58
Villages
1,892,184
3,657,521
5,549,705
27.91
Regional Districts
1,225,319
3,993,889
5,219,208
10.18
Subtotal
138,385,954
65,478,261
203,864,215
35.72
Vancouver
40,497,522
6,062,587
46,560,109
32.78
Total
178,883,476
71,540,848
250,424,324
35.13
'excluding school taxation
Capital Programmes
The value of capital projects undertaken during 1975
by municipalities amounted to $424,000,000. Of this total
programme, $392,000,000 was completed during the fiscal
year, leaving a balance of works in progress of $95,000,000
at year-end. In the total capital programme, municipalities
were able to provide $71,000,000 out of current general
revenue and utility revenue funds, $33,000,000 from
reserve funds, and approximately $25,000,000 was
obtained from grants-in-aid from the Provincial and
Federal Governments. The balance of the amount
expended was financed by debenture loans, temporary
bank loans, and other methods of financing. The activir
in this area over the past five years is indicated in Table j
following.
PAGE TWENTY-TWO
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
TABLE 10—CAPITAL PROGRAMMES, 1975
Source of Funds
Year
Projects
Works
Works in
Reserve
Undertaken
Completed
Progress
Revenue
Funds
Gran
$
$
$
$
$
$
166
153
13
37
10
7
215
200
15
43
14
6
338
273
65
57
20
10
360
295
165
66
18
17
424
329
95
71
33
25
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
Figures shown above are million.
ive-year Capital Expenditure Programmes
ummary
The programmes submitted by municipalities and
igional districts during 1976 and covering the five-year
eriod ending 1980 continued to provide meaningful
lformation and guidance, not only to the local
overnment bodies involved, but also to the Department,
ther levels and departments of government, and various
nancial institutions. Departmental review of each of
lese submissions and the offering of constructive
•iticism, where necessary, has achieved maximum
insistency in the format of these programmes and has
roved beneficial to all concerned.
A summary of the Capital Expenditure Programmes
by year is provided in Table 11. Included in the
"General" heading under "Classification of Expenditures"
are all capital expenditures for roads, sidewalks, public
buildings, recreational facilities, land, and other capital
projects not related to either water or sewerage systems.
As in the past, municipal councils are attempting to
finance a large portion of their capital works out of current
revenue and reserves, although the availability of
Federal-Provincial loans and the infusion of capital funds
via specific purpose grants have had a direct effect on this
policy.
vGE TWENTY-THREE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
TABLE 11—FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL EXPENDITURE PROGRAMMES SUMMARY
BY YEAR FOR ALL MUNICIPALITIES (INCLUDING VANCOUVER)
Classification of Expenditures
Water Sewer
General
Total
$
$
$
$
1976
50,154,373
87,323,214
229,935,335
367,412,922
1977
29,826,381
37,685,858
184,261,676
251,773,915
1978
24,139,465
36,954,269
188,456,391
249,550,125
1979
22,483,815
23,639,166
157,559,722
203,682,703
1980
24,242,527
28,673,559
160,199,330
213,115,416
Totals
150,846,561
214,276,066
920,412,454
1,285,535,081
Proposed Source of Funds
General
Reserve
Prior Year's
Debenture
Year
Revenue                       Grants
Funds
Surplus
Sales                           Total
$
$
$
$
$
$
1916
76,062,514
33,411,256
49,456,377
5,582,445
202,900,330
367,412,922
1977
66,864,970
23,409,488
29,965,208
347,800
131,186,449
251,773,915
1978
63,391,792
21,466,890
28,968,816
553,800
135,168,827
249,550,125
1979
63,162,697
13,055,403
24,155,516
453,800
102,855,287
203,682,703
1980
65,679,569
11,581,251
20,716,635
375,350
114,762,611
213,115,416
Totals
335,161,542
102,924,288
153,262,552
7,313,195
686,873,504
1,285,535,081
Borrowing
During 1976,
councils and regional boards continue
d            $9,815/
)70 was approved for local improvement works. .
to meet a substantial demand for municipal services, an
d               number
of municipalities have established special
195 term-borrowing by-laws were approved by the
improve
ment funds to f
inance local works; these have n
Inspector of Municipalities and subsequently adopted b
y             been in
:luded in the fif
,ure for preliminary borrowing
the local governing
body that provided the service.
approva
.
A greater portion of this authorized borrowing
consisted of financ
ng for sewers, water
works, and civic
buildings. Funds for parks and road improvements also
constituted a substantial portion.
Borrowing of $175,577,670, as summarized in Table
12, is $52,893,356 more than was authorized in 1975; the
increase is attributable to the fact that more money is
being spent on water and sewer projects. Completion of
the various projects authorized will be phased ove.r a
number of years, and the demand for funds will follow the
pace of construction. Included in the authorized borrowing
is $5,545,125 in short-term loans which, under the
Municipal Act, are subject to a per capita limitation.
The Inspector of Municipalities is not required to
approve the borrowing of the City of Vancouver or the
Metropolitan Water and Sewer Boards. Such borrowing is
therefore not included in Table 12.
Preliminary borrowing of an estimated amount of
PAGE TWENTY-FOUR
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
TABLE 12—BORROWING AUTHORIZATION, 1976
Regional
Purpose
Districts
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Total
$
$
$
$
$
$
Waterworks
1,682,000
6,074,000
17,979,875
135,000
5,945,300
31,816,175
Sewers and drains
12,822,000
33,251,300
49,086,000
2,469,000
5,847,944
103,476,244
Parks and recreation
8,651,475
3,777,815
1,322,000
486,200
62,900
14,300,390
Civic buildings
1,271,500
5,587,492
7,544,356
20,000
117,000
14,540,348
Consolidated local improvements
—
1,179,460
4,401,464
674,932
—
6,255,856
Road improvements and sidewalks
90,000
2,574,000
775,000
955,000
85,282
4,479,282
Equipment (including fire
protection)
250,000
132,200
253,175
—
74,000
709,375
Totals
24,766,975
52,576,267
81,361,870
4,740,132
12,132,426
175,577,670
5
ebentures
Details of debenture issues and other securities that
lave been approved in principle at the time of adoption of
oan authorization by-laws are specified in security-issuing
ly-laws; 226 security-issuing by-laws authorizing the issue
If debentures and other terms of indebtedness in the total
mount of $110,204,782 were approved.
In 1976, no municipal debenture issues were
;uaranteed by the Province under the Municipal
Lssistance Act. Details of the issues guaranteed as at
)ecember 31, 1976, are shown below in Table 13.
TABLE 13—OUTSTANDING DEBENTURES
GUARANTEED, 1976
Village
Municipalities      Municipalities
Assistance Act      Assistance Act
Total
ities (Excluding
Vancouver) 68,000
Districts
Towns 111,500
tillages 63,000
Subtotal 242,500
Vancouver
jreater Victoria
Water District
reater Nanaimo
Water District
greater Nanaimo
Sewer District
reater Vancouver
Water District
Total 242,500
7,367,809
7,133,212
492,000
2,962,412
17,955,433
7,756,000
374,000
20,000
1,078,000
14,488,000
41,671,433
7,435,809
7,133,212
603,500
3,025,412
18,197,933
7,756,000
374,000
20,000
1,078,000
14,488,000
41,913,933
In addition to the totals shown in Table 13 of
$46,034,800 as debenture debts guaranteed by the
Province, a total amount at the end of the year of
$21,654,000 was guaranteed under the Greater Vancouver
Sewerage and Drainage District Act.
Total debenture debt as at December 31, 1975, of all
municipalities, including the City of Vancouver, is shown
in Table 14 following. The debenture debt of the Greater
Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District and the
Greater Vancouver Water District is not included.
TABLE 14—TOTAL DEBENTURE DEBT,
DECEMBER 31, 1976
Sold
Unissued
and
Unsold
Total
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Regional
Districts
Subtotals
Vancouver
Total
126,061,648
223,473,237
9,102,407
14,238,067
32,935,876
405,831,235
187,853,816
593,665,051
55,175,931
84,729,744
5,834,961
18,469,574
48,348,005
212,558,215
212,558,215
181,237,579
308,202,981
14,937,368
32,707,641
81,283,881
618,369,450
187,853,816
806,223,266
Debenture sales for all municipalities amounted to
$129,931,101 for the year 1975. This resulted in an
increase of $102,127,329 to the total outstanding
debenture debt of all municipalities for 1975, after giving
effect to the retirement of debentures maturing during the
year.
;
GE TWENTY-FIVE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
The percentage of current revenue expended to
service debenture debt (excluding utilities) increased in
cities and the City of Vancouver, and decreased in
districts, towns and villages. These figures for 1975 are
shown on the following list, with the 1974 comparative
figures.
Per Cent
1975
Cities
Vancouver
Districts
Towns
Villages
The debenture debt of utilities is serviced almost
entirely by revenues derived by consumer charges and
frontage taxes.
1975
1974
5.83
5.59
7.93
7.56
6.40
6.55
6.70
8.61
5.06
6.54
PAGE TWENTY-SIX
 [UNICIPAL AFFAIRS
LANNING SERVICES
DIVISION
Idle and Structure
The Planning Services Division is responsible for
upporting and advancing the community and regional
lanning process as it relates to local government as well as
'rovincial planning responsibilities. This role is part of the
irger responsibility of the Ministry of Municipal Affairs
nd Housing to serve as the key link between the
Jovernment of British Columbia and the municipalities
nd regional districts throughout the Province.
The Division's over-all program consists of the
allowing major functions.:
1) Co-ordinating Provincial policies and programs as they
affect urban and rural areas.
2) Investigating the need for Provincial policies
respecting urban settlement patterns.
5) Identifying the implications of local planning issues for
Provincial interests.
1) Assisting regional districts and municipalities in
meeting special planning needs, including the
establishment of local planning programs.
5) Maintaining a continuing review of the planning and
development tools provided for under the Municipal
Act and companion legislation.
To meet these responsibilities, the Division in 1976
'as organized into three main program streams:
I) Urban Plans Co-ordination, which included liaison and
co-ordination activities related to the two major
metropolitan areas of the Province as well as other key
urban centres.
I) Regional Plans Co-ordination, encompassing liaison
and co-ordination activities related to the regional
districts and municipalities outside the Greater
Vancouver and Greater Victoria areas,
i) Policy and Program Planning, covering policy studies,
special projects, interdepartmental liaison and
co-ordination, and related research, data collection,
and mapping services.
Late in the year, the Division re-structured its staff
ganization into two principal groups: Plans Co-ordination
id Policy and Programme Planning. Mr. B. Jawanda and
lr. Bill Tassie were appointed as Directors of these
roups respectively, reporting to the Division's Executive
•irector. The Plans Co-ordination group will be
isponsible for the urban plans co-ordination and regional
lans co-ordination programme streams.
frban plans Co-ordination
Considerable staff time normally available for this
rogramme was allocated during the last half of 1976 to
assisting the Ministry's Transit Services Division in
co-ordinating the integration of the future Burrard Inlet
ferry system with the transit services on the north and
south sides of the Inlet. This activity, however, enabled
staff to maintain close liaison with municipalities in the
Greater Vancouver Regional District as well as with the
regional district itself.
The City of Kamloops railway relocation study,
initiated in 1975, became fully operational during 1976
with the appointment of consultants. Although the
Provincial Government is not formally participating in this
project, a staff representative of the Planning Services
Division sits on the project's tri-level steering committee
in a watching-brief role.
Community plans for the unincorporated areas of
Bowen Island and the Colwood-Langford area were
advanced during 1976 by the Greater Vancouver and
Capital Regional Districts respectively. These plans were
the subject of extensive review by staff of the Division in
consultation with technical staff of the regional districts
concerned.
Staff maintained continuing liaison with the Ministry
of State for Urban Affairs on a number of matters,
including federal and provincial positions respecting
regional planning proposals for the Greater Vancouver area
and research studies into the development of
resource-based communites.
Regional Plans Co-ordination
During 1976, the Division continued its efforts to
improve and advance the process of planning at the
regional district and municipal government level
throughout the Province. A key element of this
programme is the identification of the implications of local
planning proposals for provincial objectives as early as
possible in the process of formulating land use policy plans
and regulatory by-laws in order to head off potential
conflicts between provincial and local government
planning objectives.
The Division also continued its statutory role of
reviewing local plans and by-laws submitted for provincial
approval. The main objectives of this review role are (1) to
ensure there are no significant conflicts with provincial
objectives, (2) to ensure that local policies and regulations
are compatible with provincial legislation, (3) to determine
if sound planning principles are being pursued by local
governments which have been delegated the responsibility
for land use planning under the Municipal Act, and (4) to
suggest improvements to wording and format.
With several major development projects being
planned or investigated in the Province, the Division was
involved in reviewing the implications of these projects for
local communities and rural areas in consultation with local
government officials. Projects reviewed for their potential
\GE TWENTY-SEVEN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
community/rural area impact included the Hat Creek and
Kootenay coal fields developments, the Site C dam on the
Peace River, the Revelstoke dam, and the CN Railway
route realignment between Valemount and Tete Jeune
Cache. With respect to the proposals for further
development of the Kootenay coalfields, staff participated
in a series of provincial-municipal/regional district
discussions aimed at enabling local governments in the
East Kootenay region to cope effectively with the potential
impact of the coal mine proposals.
Staff of the Division were also responsible for or
participated in a number of community and regional
planning studies throughout the province aimed at
establishing policy guidelines for the wise use of land and
water resources. These studies involved such areas as
Creston, Mt. Waddington Regional District,
Terrace-Thornhill and Lower Vernon Creek.
In order to assist regional districts and municipalities
with their mapping requirements, the Division's senior
technicians organized a series of regional
workshop-seminars in conjunction with the Map
Production Division of the Ministry of the Environment to
explain the new provincial system of mapping and its
relationship to local government mapping programmes. At
the same time, these workshop-seminars enabled our staff
to begin an assessment of municipal and regional mapping
needs that will enable a more effective programme to be
established by the Division that will provide continuing
assistance to local planning authorities in their mapping
activities.
Staff of the Division continued to work with
representatives of the four Lower Mainland Regional
Districts on initiating a comprehensive review of the
official regional plan for the Lower Mainland early in 1977.
It is intended that the review be conducted by professional
staff on contract with funding provided jointly by the
Provincial Government and the lower mainland regional
districts.
Policy and Programme Planning
While the Ministry's policy on planning grants for
regional districts remained under review during 1976, the
basic grant programme was continued on the basis of 20
cents per capita, with a minimum grant of $7,000 and a
maximum of $33,000. The Ministry also maintained its
programme of incentive grants for regional districts
enacting official regional plans. A grant of 10 cents per
capita to a maximum of $50,000 was provided to regional
districts with official regional plans in place as of
December 31, 1975.
The Division's major staff activity under the policy
and programme planning heading was focussed on an
investigation of the feasibility and cost of building a new
town in northeast British Columbia to serve a number of
proposed coal mine developments in the region south of
Chetwynd. The investigation also encompassed an
evaluation of the impact of the coal mine proposals on
existing communities in the region.
The Division was asked to chair a special inter-agency
Sub-committee on Townsite/Community Development
matters, reporting to the Coal Committee of Cabinet. The
Subcommittee, one of five responsible for northeast coal
development investigations, was composed of staff
representatives from 13 provincial agencies and the
Regional District of Peace River-Liard. The Division's
principal responsibility was to co-ordinate the activities of
the Sub-committee members and to prepare a final report
for Cabinet early in 1977. Concurrently, consultation with
municipalities and the regional district in northeastern
British Columbia was maintained throughout the year in
respect of the coal and other resource development
proposals. Specific planning guidelines were prepared for
the Village of Chetwynd to enable the municipality to
anticipate and prepare for a possible influx of population
and an expansion of the community's commercial and
public facilities.
A further responsibility of the Division related to the
northeast townsite assignment was the preparation of
terms of reference for and the supervision of a consultant's
study into alternative methods of financing and developing
a new resource-based community. While this responsibilir
was in part shared with members of the
Townsite/Community Development Subcommittee, it
remained the Division's task to maintain ongoing contact
with the consultant and to provide overall direction for the
study.
Throughout 1976, the Division's staff represented tht
Ministry on a number of inter-agency committees,
including a task force on provincial highway access
approvals, a committee to prepare a "model" mobile homi
park by-law, the Outdoor Recreation Co-ordinating
Committee, and the Technical Committee to the
Environment and Land Use Committee of Cabinet. Staff
also provided key assistance to the Provincial Metric
Conversion Committee in preparing guidelines for local
government respecting metric conversion involving land
use planning matters.
Considerable policy research investigations were
carried out during the year to serve as the basis for
proposed legislative amendments to the Municipal Act
respecting community and regional planning matters. An
examination of the need for legislation respecting natural
hazards was also commended in co-operation with the
Ministry of Highways and Public Works.
Staff assistance was continued respecting the
preparation and enactment of an official community plan
for the Resort Municipality of Whistler. The Plan for
Whistler was enacted by the Minister in December, 1976
PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
Staff also continued to participate in the planning for a
town centre/ski village to serve as the focus of activity in
Whistler.
The Division's planning technicians continued the
function of preparing legal boundary descriptions in both
written and map form respecting the extension or
adjustment of municipal, specified area, improvement
district and electoral area boundaries. Our technicians also
maintained an on-going programme of preparing and/or
improving composite base maps for selected municipalities
and regional districts.
AGE TWENTY-NINE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
TRANSIT SERVICES
DIVISION
The Transit Services Division is located in Suite 470,
700 West Georgia Street in Vancouver, at 171 Esplanade
in North Vancouver and in the Municipal Affairs offices at
810 Blanshard Street in Victoria.
On December 31, 1976 there were 9 provincial
employees on staff assisted by 6 full-time and 4 part-time
professionals engaged on contract.
Transit in Large Cities
The responsibility for bus service planning on routes
operated by B.C. Hydro in Greater Vancouver and
Victoria, previously carried out by the Bureau of Transit
Services, has now reverted to B.C. Hydro. With the bus
expansion of the previous years completed, Hydro
concentrated on "fine tuning". Patronage growth
continued; increasing 7.2% overall for Greater Vancouver
and 10.5% in the Capital Region for the first 11 months of
1976 compared with the same period in 1975.
The zone fare structure introduced in 1973 in
conjunction with suburban bus expansion was abandoned
in November and a greatly simplified fare system
introduced by Hydro. A single adult fare of 350 covered
95% of transit trips in place of the previous 250 to 800
fares. Student and senior citizen fares remain unchanged
at 100 and 150, but extend over a much wider area.
Double fares are needed to reach a small part of the
region.
Long-range planning for the province's two largest
regions was pursued by the TSD. In Vancouver, rapid
transit planning was limited to preserving options and
refining preliminary plans. The commuter rail study
commissioned from Canadian Pacific in 1975 was
completed. It evaluated a peak hour only service from
downtown Vancouver to Port Coquitlam that could be
implemented with relatively modest cost. Dependent on
population growth, operating costs of the commuter train
would become lower than the alternate bus service within
the short-term of 3 to 5 years.
Transit in Small Cities
Existing Systems
Cowichan Valley—Service to this area is provided by
Cowichan Valley Stage Lines under a contract with the
Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing. No changes
have been made to routes and schedules pending
completion of studies to be undertaken with the Cowichan
Regional District.
Saanich Peninsula, Southwest Communities—These area
are served by Vancouver Island Transit Ltd., a
Crown-owned company. Major schedule changes occurre
on July 4, when Sunday service was introduced and an
additional weekday Saanich trip added. Significant
improvements in operating efficiency were the principal
features of this schedule change, since the consolidation c
what were formerly two separate companies permitted
scale economies to be realized.
Kitimat—Schedules were streamlined to cut costs an
increase drive productivity on October 4. Three new
transit buses were delivered in September and now handl
most of the service. Despite the decrease in the amount
service offered, passenger totals for 1976 are one-third
higher than for 1976.
Nanaimo—Route extensions to the Hammond Bay
and Chase River areas were implemented on November 8
1976 in a joint Regional District/Transit Services Divisio:
programme. Three additional transit buses were added ti
the Nanaimo system from the Provincial fleet, and a majo
study of existing services is now underway.
New Systems
The introduction of Provincially funded transit serv:
was approved for six new cities and announced by the
Minister on July 6th, 1976. Planning and implementatior
followed rapidly.
Kamloops—Two separate transit companies were
acquired and replaced by a single city-wide bus system or
October 10, 1976. Thompson-Okanagan Transit Ltd., a
Crown Company, is the new operating organization.
Service frequency has been increased overall, and routes
have been extended into developing residential areas. F(
the first time in many years, Sunday service was
implemented. Within one week of service expansion
ridership had doubled.
Kelowna—Several options for organisation and servic
are being investigated with municipal officials in Kelowna
Resolution of many of the outstanding items is expected i
the early part of 1977. The introduction of transit service
should follow quickly thereafter.
Prince Rupert—Tenders for four alternate service
levels will be opened on January 31, 1977. City Council
will examine all bids received to determine both the i
operating company and the initial service level. Routes
and most operating details have been finalized, and thre
new transit buses have been allotted from the Provincial
fleet.
Penticton—Tenders were opened for a
purchase-of-service contract in early November, and City
Council awarded the contract on November 22 to Berry
and Smith Trucking Ltd., the local school bus operator, f
basic service frequency of 30 minutes will be offered on K
PAGE THIRTY
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
routes, and three new transit buses have been assigned to
the system from the Provincial fleet. (Service was
inaugurated on January 3, 1977 with three new transit
buses providing a half-hourly frequency on three routes.)
Trail—Service was inaugurated with one bus covering
the entire city on November 8, 1976. Response to even
this modest level of service has been impressive, with
passenger totals averaging over 200 per day. The City of
Trail is now in the process of improving its vehicle
maintenance facilities so that two additional new transit
buses can be accommodated for the second phase of
service, starting January 17, 1977.
Maple Ridge—Two new buses re-introduced transit
service to Maple Ridge residents on September 7, 1976,
after a period of over a year without service. Ridership has
since stabilized at about 200 passengers per day; further
market penetration awaits operating integration with the
Greater Vancouver system and the introduction of more
peak-hour services. As in Trail, the initial service level is
quite modest, and buses operate a basic 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
schedule six days per week. Most users are travelling for
purposes of shopping, medical appointments, or social
isits, according to onboard surveys.
It can be seen that the establishment of small city
transit services follows a standard pattern. The
municipality passes a Transit Enabling by-law and
petitions the Province for service. Once approved, TSD
taff work closely with local planners to design routes and
et service standards. A purchase-of-service contract is put
Co open tender and awarded to the lowest qualified bidder
who is then provided with buses from the Provincial fleet
under a lease that controls their use and maintenance.
Only where no acceptable bids are received from a private
:ompany is operation assumed by the municipality or by a
3rown company. Planning, timetables, bus stop signs,
publicity and marketing are provided by TSD in
fonjunction with the municipality.
The programme thus maintains flexibility to meet the
requirements and particular circumstances in each city,
including considerable local input, while maintaining
Province-wide standards and identity. Buses, bus stop
•igns and timetables throughout the Province have
dentical colours and designs.
•urrard Inlet Ferries
Following a major review and cost-benefit study at
he beginning of the year, approval was given to continue
he construction of the Burrard Inlet Ferries. This resulted
n the resumption of existing contracts and the awarding of
he remaining contracts. The ferries were launched and
iccepted by the Premier in a brief ceremony in August.
("he subsequent sea trials were highly successful. The first
•Derating positions for the ferry were filled under a
contract with Case Existological Laboratories Ltd., and
staff are now being trained.
The floating terminal on the North Shore was towed
into place in November. Its structural work was basically
complete at the end of the year while the South Shore
terminal was nearing completion in the Dillingham
dry-dock. Negotiations continued with Marathon Realty
Ltd. to use the concourse of the CPR station in downtown
Vancouver, for access to the ferry terminal. Construction
of the walkway and escalator bank to connect the station
and ferry terminal was underway at the year end.
Transit Vehicles
No new vehicles were ordered in 1976. Deliveries
continued from past orders including 40 foot diesel and
trolleybuses that were assigned to B.C. Hydro, and a fleet
of smaller buses that were assigned among Interior systems
as well as B.C. Hydro. A Light Rapid Transit railcar was
received and placed in storage pending a decision on a
possible public demonstration.
A standard vehicle lease form was developed and
implemented together with control procedures by a new
group of transit equipment specialists within TSD. Except
for B.C. Hydro these leases were also applied
retroactively. They specify the permitted uses of
Provincial buses and ensure correct and adequate
maintenance. A minimum level of public liability
insurance is also required to be held by each operator in
addition to normal ICBC insurance.
The allocation of all transit buses in the Province is
shown in the following table.
Transit Legislation
There were no additions to the British Columbia
transit legislation in 1976. The provincial transit
programmes operated under the Transit Services Act, the
Provincial Transit Fund Act and the Provincial Rapid
Transit Act, Subsidy payments for the years 1972-76 are
itemized below by system.
'AGE THIRTY-ONE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
TABLE 15—PROVINCIAL TRANSIT SUBSIDY PAYMENTS 1972-76
Municipal/Regional
Transit Systems*
1972
(9 months)
1973
Calendar
Year
1974
Calendar
Year
1975
Calendar
Year
1976
Estimated
Kamloops2
Kelowna
Kitimat
Maple Ridge
Nanaimo
Nelson
Penticton
Powell River
Port Alberni
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Trail
West Vancouver
Sub-Total
Crown Transit Systems
B.C. Hydro
Transportation Division
Thompson-Okanagan
Transit Ltd.
Vancouver Island
Transit Ltd.
Vancouver Island Transportation Ltd.
(V.I. Coach Lines)
Totals
60,667
17,049
25,456
82,266
185,447
185,447
118,336
17,330
14,638
174,473
324,777
324,777
67,734
170,292
23,221
22,921
148,507
432,655
432,655
68,455
21,065
156,461
278,328
42,744
35,435
29,925
19,143
7,700
222,141
881,397
95,000
490,000
1,466,397
83,162
25,000
186,150
13,713
614,000
48,000
3,000
53,000
47,000
61,000
11,500
2,150
297,000
1,444,675
100,000
287,650
1,060,000
2,892,325
'Note that for those systems paid for under the Provincial Rapid Transit Subsidy Act, payment is made of 50% of the actual deficit in the previous year
Thus calendar year 1976 deficits are included in the 1977/78 budget estimates.
2Transit operations in Kamloops is provided by a Crown operation. In other cities operation is provided either by the municipality or by private
companies under contract.
3B.C. Hydro Transportation Division operates the bulk of transit services in Greater Vancouver and the Capital Region. In each year through fiscal
1975-76 it has received $2,000,000 directly from the Province as a contribution to the reduced fares for senior citizens. Additional losses on transit
operations have been met from Hydro's general revenues, i.e. utility customers.
4B.C. Hydro Transportation Division was reimbursed in full for its transit losses in 1976 by direct payment from the Province. TSD was not responsible:
for auditing or specifying the services operated by Hydro in Greater Vancouver and the Capital Region. However, TSD did provide the capital for new
buses, purchased under the Provincial Transit Programme and assigned to Hydro. Hydro was also reimbursed in full including all overheads for work ii
performed on Provincial buses that were assigned to other operators.
PAGE THIRTY-TWO
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
TABLE 16—TRANSIT FLEET (AS OF JANUARY 1977)
INCLUDES ALL ROLLING STOCK USED BY THOSE SERVICES WITHIN THE PROVINCIAL PROGRAMME
WHETHER OWNED BY B.C. HYDRO, A MUNICIPALITY OR THE MINISTRY OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS AND
HOUSING.
Bus and Motor Coach
Rail and Water
Standard Style                                         Other                                         New Look
Total
Bus
Dual   "Conven-                 Light
Dual      and
Service:   tionaf                  Duty                                          Service
Motor
28'-38'   40'   Suburban   Buses                    Bus                   40'    28'-38' Suburban
Coach     Rail     Light    Rapid
Double Motor- Motor- Motor-   Semi-       and     Trolley-     and    Motor   Motor   Motor    Semi-
Diesel   Rapid  Transit
Deck   Coach    Bus     Bus Suburban Coaches    Buses     Coach    Coach     Bus      Bus   Suburban
Cars      Car     Ferry
Vancouver-Hydro
12
311
337
38
160
858
West Vancouver
17
15
32
Powell River
3
3
6
Pacific Stage Lines
1
1
124
6
132
Victoria-Hydro
12
21
5
1
1
30
39
12
120
Victoria-VITL
4
7
11
Nanaimo
3
5
12
3
52
30
VICL
12
60
72
Nelson
l3
4
Kamloops
10
4
2
16
Penticton
1
3
4
Prince Rupert
3
3
Trail
1
1
21
41
Kitimat
21
21
Port Alberni
2
2
Maple Ridge
2
2
Kelowna
8
8
Prince George
22
22
B.C. Railway
4
Burrard Inlet Ferries
2
(In Storage)
6
17
6
1
41
1
72
1
Prov. Totals
24
7
55
18
5
7
352
14
186
391
140
185
1,341
123 = awaiting delivery
'AGE THIRTY-THREE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
PERCENTAGE      TAX       COLLECTIONS
CHART 1
LEGEND
 Cities  Villages
—^— Districts  Vancouver
••' Towns
%
PERCENTAGE    OF    CURRENT    LEVY   COLLECTED
■s.
•
••*'""*
i ^
ti£L.
"*
?
,*
'"*■••
...
■''
D
%
OUTSTANDING   TAXES    AS   A    PERCENTAGE OF    CURRENT    LEVY
14
13
11
10
***'i.t
..
9
-V	
8
 *l
	
■,
X1
	
\
\
5
AV
^
V
^
s
*
Sr-
•'•■
.'
,,t
\
V-.
\
.....           N
"K
-"^
3
0
^^^.
^~^.
IMS 68 «7 tt » 70 71 72 73 7« 1175
PAGE THIRTY-FOUR
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
TRENDS    IN     FINANCIAL   ASPECTS   OF   MUNICIPAL    GOVERNMENT
COMPARED      TO    POPULATION    AND      INCOME
CHART 2
LEGEND
^-^*^^~ Population   in   millions 	
— Total   revenue   in   millions   of   dollars
Building    permits    in    millions   of  dollars        	
 Debenture    debt     in     millions   of    dollars
' Maximum  values  taxable in
hundreds of  millions of dollars
Personal   income in  hundreds
of  millions of dollars
2000
1000
^'
800
_^-'
.-—•"■*"
«»   •
 —
—'^—
^
400
^^-"'
„---
■-"*"
300
200
100
90
SO
70
60
50
40
30
20
^-^
, •/.•/
nvmvm
,
	
,	
	
...*"
#..#*
	
...-
■*"'
	
,.•*
.•*•
	
	
5
1
PAGE THIRTY-FIVE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
MUNICIPAL   REVENUES
BY    MAJOR    SOURCE    1975
CITIES   (EXCLUDING   VANCOUVER)
CHART 3
%0F   REVENUE
100%
UTILITIES111
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER    PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL   MUNICIPAL  TAXATION'
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER  GRANT
S  PER  CAPITA
S441.97   (429.WI
SCHOOL TAXATION
1974   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-5278,678,806   TOTAL   POPULATION   630,534
DISTRICTS
JOI-   REVENUE
100%
S   PER  CAPITA
$540.04   (440.42)
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL   MUNICIPAL TAXATION'21
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER  GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
1974   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$431,588,082   TOTAL POPULATION-799,181
NOTE:-   (1)  Utilities    represents    amount    appropriated   from   utility   operations    for    General    Municipal    Purposes,    is   not    Major
Source of   Revenue   for   Districts, Towns, Villages   and   Vancouver,  included   in  'Licenses  and  Other'   for  1971   and   1972.
(2) General   Municipal   Taxation   includes  Ad Valorem Tax,   Business  Tax, Sewer   and Water   Frontage   Tax   and   Special
Assessments.
PAGE THIRTY-SIX
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
MUNICIPAL   REVENUES
BY    MAJOR    SOURCE    1975
TOWNS
CHART 3
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER    PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION1
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL  TAXATION
%   OF   REVENUE
S  PER CAPITA
$ 459.52  (317.93)
19.28  (19.57)
11.48      9.S8
29.50 (31.77)
10.99 (11.98)'
37.74 (32.34)
$88.59(75.75)
9.23(9.78)
 .00 (16.32)
'% 34.00 (34.00)
135.58 (122.95)
173.38 (125.16)
1974   FIGURES    SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$19,767,560    TOTAL POPULATION-43,018
VILLAGES
LICENSES   AND   OTHER
OTHER PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION"'
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER  GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
%  OR  REVENUE
22.49 (22.70)
1.30 ( 4.76)
16.91  (11.91)
24.33 (26.66)
10.12 (12.80) —
34.97 (33.97)
$  PER  CAPITA
S450.95   (341.95)
101.34 (77.62)
5.84 (16 .28)
34.00 (34.00)
109.66 (91.14)
T57.59 (116.17)
1974   FIGURES    SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$26,538,810     TOTAL POPULATION - 63,328
NOTE -   (1) General   Municipal   Taxation  includes   Ad  Valorem Tax,   Buaineai   Tax,  Sewer and  Water   Frontage   Tax   and   Special
Assessment*.
PAGE THIRTY-SEVEN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
MUNICIPAL   REVENUES
BY   MAJOR   SOURCE    1975
VANCOUVER
CHART 3
LICENSES    AND   OTHER
OTHER   PROVINCIAL GRANTS
PROVINCIAL SOCIAL ASSISTANCE   GRANT
PROVINCIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT  GRANT
GENERAL  MUNICIPAL TAXATION"'
PROVIDED   BY   PROVINCIAL
HOME-OWNER GRANT
SCHOOL TAXATION
%  OF   REVENUE
m%
14.55 (21.(3)
38 jiffUsflpp .
8.33    ( 7.16)
41.85  (37.37)
141 (7.58 —
34.68   (31.13)
S PER  CAPITA
1497.97 (474.711)
S 72.43(103.62)
2.95   (3.72)
.00  (8.15)
34.00   (34.00)
208.29(177.40)
172.56(147.74)
1974   FIGURES    SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL REVENUE-$21X,13S,150     TOTAL POPOLATION-426,256
NOTE:-   (1) General   Municipal   Taxation  includes   Ad Valorem Tax,   Business   Tax,  Sewer  and  Water   Frontage  Tax   and   Special
Assessments.
REVENUE    SHOWN    FOR   ALL   CLASSES    OF    MUNICIPALITIES    INCLUDING    VANCOUVER    DOES    NOT     INCLUDE
APPROPRIATION    OF    PRIOR   YEARS    SURPLUS.
PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
VENUE    EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR    FUNCTION    1S75
CITIES     EXCLUDING   VANCOUVER
CHART 4
% OF   EXPENDITURE
190%	
S PER  CAPITA
$494.04 (427.54)
GENERAL   GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION   OF   JUSTICE
OTHER   PROTECTION
TRANSPORTATION    SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL   HEALTH
SOCIAL  WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL   EXPENDITURES   FROM   REVENUE
6.15
4.61
6.77
1.00
8.86
4.46
( 6.06)
( 4.76)
( 5.91)
( 1.01)
( 8.44)
( 4.55)
5.59   ( 9.13)
37.21   (31.57)
7.02   ( 6.39)
12.50    (16.59)
5,3 ' 5M)    Y///////&      23M (23-90)
28.36   (27.33)
$24.81 (25.91)
18.62 (20.37)
27.34 (25.25)
4.06 ( 4.33)
35.79 (36.07)
18.02 (19.46)
22.58 (39.02)
150.35  (134.99)
50.52   (70.92)
1974    FIGURES    SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$254,759,788     TOTAL   POPULATION - 630,534
DISTRICTS
% OF   EXPENDITURE
190%
GENERAL   GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION   OF   JUSTICE
OTHER   PROTECTION
TRANSPORTATION   SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL   HEALTH
SOCIAL   WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURES   FROM   REVENUE
4.90 ( 5.71)
4.49 ( 4.00)
5.34 ( 5.39)
1.25 ( 1.37)
7.60 ( 7.59)
3.31 ( 3.56)
7.70 ( 9.76)
35.76 (34.06)
6.40   (6.55)
6.04   (5.59)
17.21   (16.48)
tizzs^
"t'i,rr*tiK
$   PER CAPITA
$533-74    (433.41)
V7777/77,
$26.15 (24.75)
23.98 (17.36)
28.51 (23.37)
6.66 ( 5.94)
4059 (32.88)
17.55 (15.45)
41.12 (42.62)
190.86 (147.60)
34.11  (28.39)
32.24 (24.23)
91.80    (71.41)
1974   FIGURES    SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$426,556,124    TOTAL   POPULATION -799,181
NOTE:-Expenditures   for    Health   included   in   Other.
PAGE THIRTY-NINE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REVENUE   EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR    FUNCTION    1975
TOWNS
CHART 4
GENERAL  GOVERNMENT
FIRE
OTHER    PROTECTIONS
TRANSPORTATION  SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL   HEALTH
SOCIAL WELFARE
EDUCATION
% OF   EXPENDITURE
100%
S PER  CAPITA
$445.73   (334.07)
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL   EXPENDITURE   FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
T22 (7.66)
1.73 (2.04)
4.29 (4.44)
9.36 (10.23)
mssm
4.69
2.90
( 4.98)
( 7.62)
38.96      (32.74)
6.70       (8.61)
8.01     ( 7.28)
15.63    (14.40)
$3440 (25.47)
7.70 ( 7.85)
19.11    (17.04)
41.73 (39.29)
20.90 (19.13)
12.92  (29.26)
173.65(125.74)
29.88   (33.07)
35.71  (27.95)
69.73 (55.32)
1974   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$19,174 ,535     TOTAL   POPULATION - 43,018
VILLAGES
S   PER CArlTA
S 433.40   (333.M)
GENERAL     GOVERNMENT
FIRE
OTHT"
OTHER  PROTECTIONS
TRANSPORTATION  SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL   HEALTH
EDUCATION
DEBT  CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL   EXPENDITURE   FROM   REVENUE
OTHER
11.10 (11.40)
1.88  ( 2.12)
• 95 (   1.14 )
11.13   (12*4)
4.91 (  5.17)
36.45 (34.22)
5.06 (6.54)
10.04 (12.41)
16.48 (14.96)
$48.09 (38.60)
4.'14 ( 3.11)
48.25 (40.77)
21.29 (17.50)
157.99  (115.89)
21.94 (22.17 )
43.50 (42.02)
80.06 (50.69)
1974   FIGURES   SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-$27,446,465      TOTAL   POPULATION-63,3 28
NOTE  -   Expenditures    for    Health   included    in    'Other
PAGE FORTY
 [UNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REVENUE    EXPENDITURES
BY    MAJOR    FUNCTION    1975
VANCOUVER
CHART 4
GENERAL   GOVERNMENT
FIRE
ADMINISTRATION   OF JUSTICE
OTHER   PROTECTION
TRANSPORTATION    SERVICES
ENVIRONMENTAL   HEALTH
SOCIAL  WELFARE
EDUCATION
DEBT   CHARGES   (NET)
CAPITAL  EXPENDITURES  FROM  REVENUE
OTHER
X  OF   EXPENDITURE
100'/.
S PER  CAPITA
S514.29 (471.03)
3.65 ( 3.73)
7.74 ( 6.67)
10.88 ( 9.79)
1.36 ( 1.401
4.95 I 4.19)
3-10 ( 2.64)
3.46 ( 5.13)
33.91   (31.S6)
7.93   (   7.56)
7.02    (10.79)
16.00    ( 16.44)   <WZ
mzm
W////M
18.66    ( 17.57)
39.83   (31.431
( 46.13)
(    6.58)
(  19.75)
15.95   f 12.43)
17.79   ( 24.14)
55.94
7.02
25.44
174.46 (149.13)
40.83 ( 35.59)
36.10 ( 50.83)
82.27 ( 77.45)
1974   FIGURES    SHOWN   IN   PARENTHESIS
TOTAL   EXPENDITURES-S219,219,236    TOTAL   POPULATION   426,256
NOTE'-Expenditures   tor    Health    included   in 'Other.'
>AGE FORTY-ONE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
  'ROVINGE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Housing
teport for the
ear ended
)ecember 31 1976
1INISTRY OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS AND HOUSING
ictoria, British Columbia
\GE FORTY-THREE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 PAGE FORTY-FOUR
 [OUSING
The Honourable >
iugh A. Curtis,
vlinistry of Municipal Affairs and Housing
'arliament Buildings
/ictoria, B.C.
7
I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of Housing for the year ended
December 31, 1976.
AWRENCE I. BELL
Deputy Minister of Housing
PAGE FORTY-FIVE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 HOUSING
 [OUSING
CONTENTS
Housing: a review  Page 51
Regional reports    Page 52
Financial assistance programmes  Page 60
Development programmes  Page 63
Technical services  Page 65
B.C. Housing Management Commission  Page 66
Housing Corporation of British Columbia  Page 68
Provincial Rental Housing Corporation    Page 70
'AGE FORTY-SEVEN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 HOUSING
DEPARTMENT
OF HOUSING
THE HONOURABLE HUGH A. CURTIS
MINISTER OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS AND HOUSING
MINISTER'S OFFICE
Parliament Buildings, Victoria V8V 1X4
Project Coordinator, Thomas Dykes
Executive Assistant, Wayne Steeds
HEAD OFFICE
810 Blanshard Street, Victoria V8W 3E1
Deputy Minister, Lawrence I. Bell
Associate Deputy Minister, George L. Chatterton
Assistant Deputy Minister, George C. Gray
Director, Special Admin. Project, Jack Williams
Director, Policy Administration, David Lines
Director, Field Operations, Lou Marcoux
Acting Director, Land Acquisition, Malcolm Pearse
Acting Director, Rural Subdivisions, Ron O'Genski
Director, Technical Services, George Goos
HOME PURCHASE ASSISTANCE
827 Fort Street, Victoria V8W 2Y5
Director, Home Purchase Assistance, Harry Rounds
Prog. Mgr., Conversion & ARP, Fred Berg
Prog. Mgr., AHOP, Ron Messent
RentAid, Gerry Porter
CRANBROOK REGIONAL OFFICE
103-135 10th Ave. S., Cranbrook VIC 2V3
Regional Manager, Frank Bertoia
KELOWNA REGIONAL OFFICE
207-260 Harvey Ave., Kelowna V1Y 7S5
Regional Manager, Howie Morgan
PRINCE GEORGE REGIONAL OFFICE
319-280 Victoria St., Prince George V2N 2X7
Regional Manager, Vic Hamm
VANCOUVER REGIONAL OFFICE
1525 West 8th Avenue, Vancouver V6J 1T5
Regional Manager, Ray Skelly
VANCOUVER ISLAND REGIONAL OFFICE
810 Blanshard, Victoria V8W 3E1
Regional Manager, Doug McColl
PAGE FORTY-EIGHT
 HOUSING
PROGRAMMES
The following programmes, boards, commissions and
Crown corporations are under the jurisdiction of the
Department of Housing.
CROWN CORPORATIONS
Housing Corporation of British Columbia
Provincial Rental Housing Corporation
COMMISSION
British Columbia Housing Management Commission
STATUTES UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE
HOUSING DIVISION OF THE MINISTRY OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS AND HOUSING
Better Housing Act
Department of Housing Act
Elderly Citizens' Housing Aid Act
Home Purchase Assistance Act
Housing Act
Leasehold and Conversion Mortgage Loan Act
Provincial Home Acquisition Act
Strata Title Act
PROGRAMMES
Assisted Home Ownership Programme
Assisted Rental Programme
Senior Citizens Housing Programme
Home Conversion Loan Programme
Home Purchase Assistance Programme
Co-Operative Housing Assistance Programme
Land Servicing Programme
Replotting Assistance Programme
Municipal Incentive Grant
Neighbourhood Improvement Programme
Remote Area Housing Programme
PAGE FORTY-NINE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 HOUSING
POPULATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1966-1976
(As of June 1 Each Year)
Year
Population
1966
1,873,674'
1967
1,945,000
1968
2,003,000
1969
2,060,000
1970
2,128,000
1971
2,184,621'
1972
2,247,000
1973
2,315,000
1974
2,395,000
1975
2,457,000
1976
2,406,212'
Growth
Rate
%
4.3
3.8
3.0
2.8
3.3
2.7
2.9
3.0
3.5
2.6
2.0
1975 population total of 2,457,000 is only estimated
1976 population total of 2,406,212 is actual (census year)
'Census years.
Source: Statistics Canada, Ottawa
HOUSING STARTS BY TYPE IN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
1966-1976
Single-detached,
Row,
Semi-detached,
Apartment,
Year
and Duplex
and Other
Total
1966
10,201
7,552
17,753
1967
14,027
10,073
24,100
1968
13,613
12,582
26,195
1969
14,411
17,409
31,820
1970
14,860
12,456
27,316
1971
18,927
15,838
34,765
1972
19,708
15,609
35,317
1973
22,214
15,413
37,627
1974
19,304
12,116
31,420
1975
20,181
13,971
34,152
1976
21,970
15,757
37,727
PAGE FIFTY
 LOUSING
OUSING 1976:
A REVIEW
A major change in 1976 saw the amalgamation of the
departments of municipal affairs and housing into one
ministry—the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing.
This amalgamation unites the programmes and
personnel of the two former departments, providing
increased internal efficiency and ensuring prompt,
fully-informed and co-ordinated responses externally.
The municipal affairs and housing sections of the new
Ministry are headed by deputy ministers and remain
distinctly separate in some essential respects, but there are
many areas where a co-ordinated effort is required.
Experience shows the amalgamation to have been a logical
and productive decision.
(Complementing the amalgamation has been the
mplementation of improved cost control and accounting
methods as well as an improvement in management
procedures to ensure that public dollars in the Ministry are
used in the most responsible and productive manner
possible.
The philosophy of the housing department was also
changed in 1976. Fundamental to the Ministry's existence
is the commitment to provide a variety of housing for all
titizens—present and future. That commitment means
ssisting in the delivery of housing through the private
sector in co-operation with local governments and, where
absolutely essential, by government initiatives alone.
The commitment means more than just building
housing units. It recognizes that the Ministry is
responsible for establishing residential standards; setting
uniform and readily understood regulations; examining
and encouraging innovative forms of housing and services
to housing; increasing the efficiency of the private
as well as responding to the strong citizen desire for
ownership while providing for the needs of those who
require assistance in getting a roof over their heads.
The change in emphasis of the Ministry was reflected
n the introduction of new housing programmes in 1976.
The results of these programmes are visible in the
tatistical reports that are included in this report.
The Assisted Rental Programme (described on page
51) was introduced in co-operation with the federal
government. It represents the happy marriage of private
financing, private initiative and government assistance,
research and subsidies. It is based on the premise that
»iven a reasonable financial incentive, the private sector
will respond in the public interest. The programme
esulted in the commitment of 2,920 rental units in 1976,
with a value of $93,110,337.
One of the keys to the government's housing policy
relates to the identification, designation and disposition of
Crown land suitable for housing throughout British
Columbia. First lots under the Crown land housing
programme may be available for sale in the fall of 1977.
It was a record year for urban housing starts in British
Columbia during 1976. Those starts totalled 29,750, an
increase of 4 percent over the previous record year of 1973,
an increase of 12 percent over 1975. Metropolitan Victoria
exceeded its previous record year by 6 percent. In
metropolitan Vancouver, starts were up 25 percent in 1976
over 1975.
In regard to the type of housing units being built,
single-detached starts continue to represent between 55
and 58 percent of all starts in B.C.
The current upturn in housing production began in
mid-1975 and appears to have coincided with a decline in
British Columbia's population growth rate from 3 percent
to approximately 1.3 percent. This reduction in growth has
been the result of a decline in the migration of families
from other provinces as well as a decline in international
immigration to British Columbia. Traditionally in years
prior to that, British Columbia had a net gain of about
3,000 to 4,000 families per year from other provinces.
In 1975-76, there was a small net outflow of families
from the province. Partly as a result of this reduction in
demand, vacancy rates have increased and the inventory of
newly-completed unoccupied dwelling units in metro
Vancouver and metro Victoria is more than 3,000 units.
Thus, house prices have stabilized and a fall in
mortgage interest rates is bringing home ownership within
the income range of lower and middle-income families.
A sign7cant step will be taken by the housing and
construction industry on January 1, 1978 with the
conversion from imperial to metric measure.
In anticipation of this change, and to aid in the
conversion, the Ministry began the development of four
pilot metric projects in B.C. to provide a construction
experience for the industry.
Another change in 1976 involved Dunhill Development
Corporation Ltd., wholly owned by the province. It is now
known as the Housing Corporation of British Columbia
and has shifted its emphasis to the development of
programmes to provide serviced land for the building
industry.
The Corporation also provides:
• Professional services to government.
• Project co-ordination for large-scale land
development schemes undertaken in support of
regional and community growth objectives.
• Programmes to help local governments replot and
increase the supply of serviced land at minimum cost.
>AGE FIFTY-ONE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 HOUSING
HOUSING 1976
REGIONAL
REPORTS
CRANBROOK REGIONAL OFFICE
103-135 10th Ave. S., Cranbrook VIC 2V3
Regional Manager, Frank Bertoia
KELOWNA REGIONAL OFFICE
207-260 Harvey Ave., Kelowna V1Y 7S5
Regional Manager, Howie Morgan
PRINCE GEORGE REGIONAL OFFICE
319-280 Victoria St., Prince George V2N 2X7
Regional Manager, Vic Hamm
VANCOUVER REGIONAL OFFICE
1525 West 8th Avenue, Vancouver V6J 1T5    ''
Regional Manager, Ray Skelly
VANCOUVER ISLAND REGIONAL OFFICE
810 Blanshard, Victoria V8W 3E1
Regional Manager, Doug McColl
PAGE FIFTY-TWO
 lOUSING
:ranbrook
IEGION
Major projects in this region were concerned with the
;source management areas and the development of
dequate subdivisions and housing to accommodate the
ross-section of people moving into these areas.
There is great interest in the Crows Nest Pass
oalfields and the Ministry has been actively involved in
ssisting Sparwood, Fernie and Elkford in planning and
ind management. The Ministry is sponsoring Phase II of
land development project in Fernie and other land
evelopment areas are also under consideration.
A major project was begun in Creston. It was selected
j the site for one of four Pilot Metric Housing Projects
hich the Ministry is undertaking in the Province. The
reject will be an innovative duplex-quadraplex
evelopment of 24 units. Plans and specifications are
amplete and tenders will be called in Spring 1977.
The Ministry was very active in the region in the area
: social housing. Construction of senior citizen housing
iw 120 units being built in five communities with 84
serial care units in Trail. Forty-one houses were built
nder the Rural and Remote Housing Programme.
The Municipal Incentive Grant Programme got off to
good start with 462 applications approved by the
Ministry. The Assisted Rental Programme saw 121 units
developed and there was an increase in the number of
requests for assistance under the Home Purchase
Assistance Act.
Also in 1976, the Ministry in the Cranbrook region
was involved in the Neighbourhood Improvement
Programme, with projects in Grand Forks, Rossland,
Nelson and Kimberley.
CELOWNA
IEGION
The Kelowna regional office is responsible for the
)uth central interior from the U.S. border to the 52nd
arallel.
Sixty-one houses were constructed to accommodate
imilies with low or moderate incomes in smaller
immunities under the Rural and Remote Housing
rogramme.
Approval was granted for more than 300 units of
df-contained senior citizens housing in eight centres
volving land acquisition and subsidized rents.
Twenty-four Municipalities and Districts have been
esignated to receive the Municipal Incentive Grants of
1,500 per eligible housing unit. These include the $1,000
rant from CMHC plus an additional $500 from the
rovince to promote the development of more land for
fordable housing.
Two communities will spend a total of $800,000 in
ans and grants to improve residential neighbourhoods
nder the Neighbourhood Improvement Programme.
The Ministry was involved in three rental housing
rojects containing 162 units under the Assisted Rental
Programme designed to close the gap between full
recovery and market rents.
Initial negotiations have been undertaken with two
municipalities and a regional district to acquire and
develop large tracts of Crown land for housing.
VGE FIFTY-THREE
BRITISH COUUMBIA
 HOUSING
PRINCE GEORGE
REGION
While 1976 was not one of the better years,
economically, for the mining and forest industries in
northern B.C., it did offer a breathing spell for many
communities which had been under extreme growth
pressures generated by the expansion of these industries.
The time was opportune for the Ministry to
encourage municipalities to take a different approach to
solving their housing problems.
A housing study guide was prepared by the Research
Branch of the Ministry to assist municipalities in assessing
their housing requirements. This study considered all the
major factors affecting housing such as population,
economy, building activity, land availability and cost,
water and sewer services, rental accommodation and the
real estate market in general.
Many northern communities have now undertaken
and completed these studies as a prelude to making
further decisions to proceed with programmes either of
their own design or with programmes available through the
Ministry.
One of the most popular of these programmes is the
development of Crown land. This includes the provision
of Crown land to a municipality for residential purposes as
well as the interim funds needed to finance development.
This programme was announced in September and by the
year's end, eight municipalities had taken definite steps to
participate.
The new Replotting Assistance Programme saw
Prince Rupert, Port Edward and Pouce Coupe declaring
an interest.
The Rural and Remote Housing Programme again
provided more new homes to families with low and
moderate incomes in the rural communities of northern
B.C. Homes were built in Fort St. James, Fraser Lake,
Masset, Hazelton, Port Edward, Pouce Coupe, Smithers,
Telkwa and Valemount. Houses were also built in some of
the unincorporated communities such as Hixon, Moberly
Lake and South Hazelton.
All but four communities in northern B.C. requested
and received a designation by the Ministry under the
Municipal Incentive Grant. Among those taking advantage
of this grant were, Prince George, Burns Lake, Fraser
Lake, Kitimat, Mackenzie, Quesnel, Vanderhoof and Fort
St. John. Other communities will be applying for the
grants as their projects reach completion.
The Ministry participated with the Federal
government in assisting builders to construct rental
housing units and low cost homes for ownership. Rental
Assistance was made available in Fort St. John, Dawso
Creek, Prince George and Williams Lake. Assisted hom
ownership units were built in Burns Lake, Dawson Cree
Fort Fraser, Fort St. James, Fort St. John, Fraser Lake
Hazelton, Hixon, Kitimat, Masset, Port Edward, Pouce
Coupe, Prince George, Prince Rupert, Quesnel, Smithei
Telkwa, Valemount, Vanderhoof and Williams Lake.
Sponsored societies in Burns Lake and Dawson Cre
received approval from the Ministry to proceed with pla
for construction of self-contained senior citizen housing
units. The Ministry has agreed to acquire land on their
behalf which will be leased back to the societies so long
the units are used as determined by agreement. These
projects should be ready for occupancy early in 1978.
PAGE FIFTY-FOUR
 IOUSING
ANCOUVER
LEGION
The Vancouver regional office serves an area,
tending to Lillooet and Ocean Falls, which contains
% of the total population of the Province. For this
ason the office is constantly involved in an
er-expanding range of duties stemming from the many
d varied programmes of the Ministry.
The Assisted Rental Programme was introduced in
76 and resulted (as of December 31, 1976) in 32
plications being received representing 1,786 units
tailing $60,741,840.
Another new programme, the Municipal Incentive
ant programme, produced notices of anticipated grants
r 1,817 units and formal applications for 98 completed
lits. As of December 31, 1976, the City of North
incouver had received $7,500 for 15 units and Hope
eived $2,800 for seven units. These were the first two
ntres to receive funds in 1976.
With regard to Senior Citizens' housing, 14 new
n-profit projects were approved for provincial
st-sharing with CMHC in 1976. These projects will
ovide 1,223 units at a cost of $30.78 million. The
gional office is responsible for the acquisition of land for
ch projects and for lease-back arrangements with the
dividual societies involved.
Another indication of the size and scope of the
ponsibility of the Vancouver office is seen in the
ocation of funds for the Neighbourhood Improvement
igramme. From the total Provincial N.I.P. Budget for
76, some 79% was allocated to the Vancouver region.
ine municipalities received N.I.P. allocations totalling
.2 million. Since the programme started in 1974, 25
sighbourhoods have been designated in the region.
In 1976, the Conversion Loan Programme had 27
plications representing 39 units approved for a total of
20,000. Since the programme started in July 1974, as of
5cember 31, 1976, there have been 92 applications
proved for 128 units amounting to $1,359,500. The
luations, inspections, and progress advances from the
)rtgage are the responsibility of the regional office.
During 1976, Phase 3 of the Strathcona In-fill
jusing Project was successfully completed. This phase
/olved the construction of 18 units constructed on
Dvincial land with provincial leasehold mortgages. Again
2 regional office was responsible for the valuations of the
its, for mortgage purposes, plus the inspections and
>rtgage advances.
On a continuing basis, the regional office liaised very
isely with B.C. Housing Management Commission on
policies affecting rental units managed by the commission
and on rent subsidies that it administered. In addition, a
close liaison was maintained with the Housing Corporation
of B.C. on the development of Crown-owned land, the
Replotting Programme and the Land Servicing
Programme. Under the latter Programme, formal
Agreements were executed with Matsqui and Surrey in
1976.
The B.C. Remote Housing Programme was active in
the area in 1976 in such communities as Lillooet, Gibsons
and Sechelt.
G
E FIFTY-FIVE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 HOUSING
VANCOUVER ISLAND
REGION
AU housing programmes of the Ministry continue to
increase in activity. The most significant were the Assisted
Rental Programme, with 1,284 units approved for
construction, and the Assisted Home Ownership
Programme with 1,560 units approved. The Land
Servicing Programme was particularly active in the
northern half of the Island where projects were initiated to
produce approximately 342 residential lots.
Four regional districts and one city have applied for,
and been designated eligible to receive, N.H.A. mortgage
financing in areas where this was not previously available
because of the lack of municipal sewerage disposal
systems.
The Neighbourhood Improvement Programme
progressed well with an additional two municipalities
receiving new projects for a total of nine active projects on
the Island. These projects take four years to complete.
To the end of 1976, requests for Municipal Incentive
Grants will produce 3,067 units of affordable housing.
These requests have been received and are paid as the
units are ready for occupancy.
In anticipation of future growth in the southern
portion of the Island, two major planning studies have
been undertaken by the Ministry.
PAGE FIFTY-SIX
 IOUSING
NET INTERPROVINCIAL FAMILY MIGRATION TO AND FROM BRITISH COLUMBIA
AS MEASURED BY THE NET TRANSFER OF FAMILY ALLOWANCE ACCOUNT
ansfer of FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA (1966-1976)
Accounts
6000	
5500>
5000-
•4500-
4000-
3500-
3000-
■2500-
-2000-
-1500-
-1000-
500-
.-500-
1966    1967    1968    1969    1970    1971    1972    1973    1974    1975    1976
5,721   3,198   2,746   4,202   4,339   3,546   3,813   4,594   3,731    -30   -1,094
KGE FIFTY-SEVEN
BRITISH COUUMBIA
 HOUSING
Percent
-.9 	
APARTMENT VACANCY RATES
METROPOLITAN VANCOUVER AND VICTORIA
(1966-1976)
1972                               1973
1974
1975
1976
APARTMENT VACANCY RATES
April 1976
October 1976
Units
Vacancy
Units      Vacan
1972       1973
1974      1975
Total
Vacant
Rate
Total
Vacant        Rate
Vancouver                            0.6        0.4
0.1         0.1
87,602
326
0.4
88,552
631            0.7
Victoria                                   0.8         0.3
0.1         0.1
16,260
52
0.3
16,640
93           0.6
VANCOUVER
VICTORIA
Newly Completed Unoccupied Row
Housing
Newly Completed Unoccupied Row Housing
and Apartments
and Apartments
1975
1975
March            June           September
December
March
June
September
December
1,263           1,690             1,417
1,700
188
306
223
395
1976
1976
March           June          September
December
March
June
September
December
1,539            1,399              1,699
1,699
195
85
194
703
Newly Completed Unoccupied Dwelling Units
1975
March            June           September December
1,288           1,100             1,099 1,289
1976
March            June           September December
1,547           1,193             1,269 1,405
Newly Completed Unoccupied Dwelling Units
1975
March June September December
72 74 51 40
1976
March June September December
46 69 170 189
PAGE FIFTY-EIGHT
 IOUSING
Newly Completed
and Unoccupied
-700
-100
NEWLY COMPLETED, UNOCCUPIED
DWELLING UNITS IN METRO VICTORIA
(1975-1976)
Houses and Duplexes
M
J
1975
M
J
1976
Newly Completed
and Unoccupied
—1700-
—1600-
—1500
-1400
-1300
-1200
—1100-
NEWLY COMPLETED, UNOCCUPIED
DWELLING UNITS IN METRO VANCOUVER
(1975-1976)
—1000-
— 900-
— 800-
— 700-
— 600-
— 500-
— 400-
-300-
-200-
— 100-
Houses and Duplexes
M
J
1975
1)
M
J
1976
lGE FIFTY-NINE
BRITISH COUUMBIA
 HOUSING
FINANCIAL
ASSISTANCE
PROGRAMMES
ASSISTED HOME
OWNERSHIP
PROGRAMME
This is a three-part programme
designed to enable families with low
and moderate incomes to buy their
own homes. It combines the assistance
provided by the Central Mortgage and
Housing Corporation with additional
funds provided by the Province.
Qualifying new homes are those built to be sold
within established AHOP price limits for the area
involved, supported by CMHC's lending value.
An interest reduction loan, provided by CMHC, ac
to reduce the mortgage interest to 8%, and is interest fr
for the support period. The repayment of the loan is
established so that total payments (including mortgage,
P.I.T., and the interest reduction loan) do not exceed 3C
of the total family income.
Two further subsidies are available, one from CMH
and the other from the provincial government. The first
subsidy applies if there is a dependent child and the
payments still exceed 25% of the family income after th
application of the interest reduction loan. There is a
maximum subsidy of $750 in the first year.
If the monthly payments still
exceed 30% of income after the
application of the interest reduction
loan and the CMHC subsidy, then a
provincial subsidy may be sought. TI
maximum subsidy in the first year is
$750.
In 1976 the number of units under construction or
available for sale under AHOP was 3,630.
By region the figures were:
Cranbrook 61
Kelowna 242
Prince George 766
Vancouver 1,697
Victoria 864
TOTAL
3,630
Since the inception of the programme in the
Summer, 1976, there have been 61 applications for
provincial assistance to a total value of $38,690.
PAGE SIXTY
 lOUSING
ASSISTED
IENTAL PROGRAMME
The Assisted Rental Programme was introduced in
'76 to provide financial incentives to private developers
build rental housing for their own management.
ARP combines the federal assistance provided by the
:ntral Mortgage and Housing Corporation with additional
sistance from the Ministry to provide a total of up to
i,000 per unit in the first year of operation of a rental
Rising unit.
The amount of assistance available to the builder is
Mermined by the number of units in the project, the
instruction costs, mortgage interest rate, operating costs
d attainable rents. The assistance is paid directly to the
lilder.
The annual assistance is designed to decrease by one
nth of the first year's assistance during the next 10 years
operation, although the programme allows for variations
pendent upon the profitability of the project.
A computer model to provide a cash flow analysis of
ojects built with ARP assistance was developed and is
ailable for financial planning.
Twenty-five percent of the units in projects built
ider the Assisted Rental Programme are earmarked for
rial housing with tenants paying not more than 25% of
dividual income in rent. The difference between rent
id and market rent is made up by the B.C. Housing
anagement Commission from funds made available
ider a federal/provincial agreement.
Applications for grants under ARP were received for
! projects in 1976 for a total estimated cost of
'3,110,337. This involved 165 buildings for a total of
920 units. At December 31, 1976, operating agreements
id been received for five projects covering 115 units.
SENIOR CITIZENS
HOUSING
Under the Elderly Citizens' Housing Aid Act, the
Ministry provides grants to encourage non-profit sponsors
such as service clubs, churches, ethnic and other groups to
build and manage various types of senior citizen housing.
The programme provides:
• grants of up to one third of capital costs to
self-contained home developments;
• grants of 35% for boarding residences and facilities
offering special care for occupants;
As of December 31, 1976, the Ministry was assisting
in the construction of 1,348 senior citizen units, of which
1,085 were under the Act described above. There were
1,414 starts in 1976 (1,286 under the Act) and 2,491
completions (1,017 under the Act).
HOME CONVERSION
LOAN PROGRAMME
Financial assistance is provided under this programme
to persons or corporations wanting to convert family
dwellings into duplexes or multi-unit accommodation.
In addition to increasing the housing supply, the
programme encourages more intensive use of municipal
services in built-up areas. Assistance is available in the
form of a loan of $15,000 for the first new unit and $9,000
for each additional unit. The loans are available only in
areas that have been designated by the Ministry, and the
conversion must meet all local zoning and building bylaws.
At December 31, 1976, 136 conversion mortgages had
been approved for the creation of 226 suites in the amount
of $2,294,750, for an average of $10,153.76 per suite.
G
E SIXTY-ONE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 HOUSING
HOME PURCHASE
ASSISTANCE
This programme makes funds available to buyers of
new or older homes, provided the cost of the home is
within specified price limits. The assistance can be in the
form of a $1,000 grant on new homes or a $5,000 second
mortgage loan on new or older homes. To be eligible the
house had to be bought on or after June 30, 1976. The
previous Home Acquisition Act was in effect until
November 30, 1976.
The $1,000 grant is available only for the purchase of
a new home, i.e. where the applicant is the first occupant
of the house. If anyone has occupied any part of the
house, it cannot qualify as a new home.
The second mortgage loan is available for the
purchase of a new or older home that is a single family
dwelling, or a property that is subdivided under the Strata
Titles Act, or a mobile home that is owned by the
applicant, and is affixed to the applicant's land. The
mobile home may be located in a mobile home park.
The cost of the mobile home must still fall within tl
designated price limits. In this case, "cost" is determin
by totalling the following:
i) The cost of the land
ii) The purchase price of the mobile home less th
cost of furniture and applicances.
iii) The cost of any improvements to the land.
The mobile home must be subject to assessment f
property tax purposes.
If there is a chattel mortgage or conditional sales
contract registered against the mobile home, the seconc
mortgage cannot exceed the difference between the val
of the mobile home itself (without value of land and co
of affixing) and the amount registered against it.
^  rz	
wmmm
PAGE SIXTY-TWO
 OUSING
•EVELOPMENT
ROGRAMMES
CO-OPERATIVE
HOUSING ASSISTANCE
Aid is provided by the Ministry through interim
financing and High Impact Grants for non-profit housing
co-operatives where members jointly own a multiple
family housing development and individually lease their
units from the co-operative.
Interim financing to buy the land for the co-operative
is provided when the co-op has been formally incorporated
and the Memorandum of Association has been approved
by CMHC and the Ministry, and 50% of the potential
number of members have bought share capital of at
least $500 each.
High Impact Grants of up to 15 percent of the
construction costs are awarded in special cases in the initial
years to bring rents down to an affordable level. These
grants are in effect until such time as the income of the
average member can support the co-operative's full
monthly charges (based on the assumption that the
average income will increase at a greater rate than
operating costs of the project.)
A total of 334 co-operative units were completed, 225
were started and 658 were under construction in 1976.
Under the High Impact Grant programme, seven
projects were approved in 1976 for a total of 576 units with
grants amounting to $1,952,692 to be paid over the 7 to 8
year period of the programme. Total grants approved
under the programme amount to $4,388,899.96 for a total
of 1,390 units.
IE SIXTY-THREE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 HOUSING
LAND SERVICING
PROGRAMME
The extension of the availability of land-servicing
agreements providing short-term financing for
municipalities under Section 215A of the Municipal Act
was announced in 1976.
Previously the programme assisted municipalities in
the Lower Mainland with the servicing of land to be used
for housing initiatives. In 1976 the programme was
expanded to include communities throughout B.C.
The programme primarily provides funds for essential
water, sanitary sewer, storm drainage or other essential
services on both private and public lands via short-term
loans to municipalities. However, the programme has been
designed to be as flexible as possible to allow
municipalities to make use of the programme within their
own administrative situations and development policies.
To the end of 1976 three agreements had been
completed, 10 were being negotiated, and preliminary
discussions had been held with 9 municipalities.
REPLOTTING ASSISTANCE
PROGRAMME
This programme was announced at the 1976
conference of the Union of B.C. Municipalities. Many
acres of land suitable for housing and capable of being
serviced are unused because of the unsuitability of the
existing grid pattern which may have no relationship to the
local topography.
The replotting process enables incorporated
municipalities to eliminate unwanted legal and road
patterns and help them introduce community plans more
in keeping with their needs.
Because many municipalities could not afford the
expertise needed to carry out replotting programmes, the
Ministry of Housing provides any municipality, on
request, the services of professionals with the necessary
planning, design, appraisal, negotiation, legal and
development skills to plan and implement such projects.
Priority is given to those projects fostering the
development of housing.
Since the programme was introduced, until the end of
1976, there have been inquiries concerning assistance from
11 communities involving more than 1200 acres of land.
MUNICIPAL
INCENTIVE GRANT
This grant was introduced in 1976 to encourage
municipalities to promote housing construction on
already-serviced land, to develop more land for mediun
density, modest size, affordable housing, and to speed
the housing approval process.
Grants totalling $1,500 per eligible unit were made
available to designated municipal governments. These
grants included $1,000 from CMHC and an additional
$500 grant from the province to incorporated
municipalities and Regional districts.
A total of 130 municipalities and Regional districts
were designated to receive the incentive grant in 1976.
Payments were made for 492 units that qualified
under the terms of the grant with a provincial expenditu
of $142,000.
NEIGHBOURHOOD
IMPROVEMENT
PROGRAMME
Funds are provided under this programme to upgra
older residential neighbourhoods that are worth saving a
for the improvement of social and recreational facilities
urban areas.
The costs are shared between the three levels of
government: federal—50%; provincial—25%;
municipal—25%; except for the up-grading of
municipal services when the federal and provincial
shares are 25% and 12.5% respectively.
In 1976, agreements were signed for 15
neighbourhood improvement projects in various
municipalities. (There were eight such agreements in 1
and 16 in 1975). There were seven urban renewal proje<
under way and ten completed.
PAGE SIXTY-FOUR
 OUSING
EMOTE AREA
[OUSING
The federal and provincial governments share on a
25 basis the construction costs of new homes in remote
as.
The homes are made available for sale to low and
derate income families with any subsidy costs being
ired on the same basis as construction costs by the two
/ernments.
The programme is for communities with a population
ess than 2,500, although large centres may qualify if
er government programmes are not available.
There were 228 construction starts under the
gramme in 1976. There were 323 completions and 136
er construction as of December 31, 1976.
ECIAL PROJECT
-CROWN LAND
MVENTORY
The Ministry was given a directive to compile an
entory of Crown land suitable for housing purposes. To
omplish this, research officers travelled the Province
aning information about Crown land in and around the
orporated communities, and visually inspecting this
d. This information was mapped and reports were
tten to achieve a community profile for each
nicipality.
TECHNICAL SERVICES
SECTION
The Technical Services Section acts in a consultative
capacity to the Ministry and others on technical matters
relating to land and housing.
The section provides technical advice and information
to programme managers, regional managers, and others
within the Ministry who are responsible for the
administration of various programmes.
Internally, the section:
• administers the property acquisition programme of
the Ministry;
• co-operates with other governmental agencies to
initiate and approve projects;
• conducts site investigation and property evaluation;
• co-ordinates and oversees the activities of outside
consultants working on special projects for the
Ministry;
• plans and conducts residential development
projects;
• co-operates with other agencies in studies and
investigations related to land development and
housing.
Working through the regional managers, technical
assistance is also provided to municipalities where
required. Expertise within this section include accredited
property appraisers, planners, architects and engineers.
Members of this section represent the Ministry on a
number of committees.
Externally, the section:
• plans analysis and studies for all types of residential
developments from single family to multiple family
housing;
• carries out engineering studies to evaluate the
feasibility of proposed developments;
• reviews plans and concepts for housing
developments;
• liaises with municipal officials (both elected and
appointed) to provide informal advice on technical
matters relative to land and housing.
JE SIXTY-FIVE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 HOUSING
B.C. HOUSING
MANAGEMENT
COMMISSION
1927 West Broadway, Vancouver V6J 1Z3
General Manager, Dick Bailey
Director, Housing Operations, Joseph Crocco
Director, Admin. Services, Dennis Emberley
Director, Financial Services, Keith Davis
Director, Community Services, Maureen Cochrane
Regional Manager Greater Vancouver, Allan Robinson
1927 West Broadway, Vancouver V6J 1Z3
Regional Manager Northern B.C., Joe Scott
P.O. Box 122, Prince Rupert V8J 1L5
Regional Manager Southern B.C., Fred Crockett
#4-311 Main Street, Penticton V2A 5B7
Regional Manager Vancouver Island, Al Stein
#202-3440 Douglas Street, Victoria V8Z 3L5
PAGE SIXTY-SIX
 OUSING
.C. HOUSING
IANAGEMENT
lOMMISSION
British Columbia Housing Management Commission
i provincial Crown corporation responsible for managing
ital housing developed and financed by the Province
d Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation. The
immission's housing portfolio also includes
;ommodation that has been sponsored solely by the
wince. In addition, the Commission administers
)grammes aimed at maintaining reasonable rents in
ler housing.
Prior to 1976, social housing was built for the
rvincial government by Dunhill Development
rporation (now the Housing Corporation of British
ilumbia). The housing was built under a "proposal call"
>gramme, which no longer exists.
Instead, the Ministry, in co-operation with CMHC,
5 developed the Assisted Rental Programme (ARP).
lis programme provides financial incentives to private
velopers to build rental housing for their own
inagement. Under the terms of the programme, the
ner may be required to lease to the Ministry, at market
es, 25% of the units in the project involved. The
mmission then places tenants from its waiting lists in
>se units. The tenants so placed pay only 25% of their
ome as rent.
The total housing portfolio for which BCHMC has
ponsibility is 8,450 units, representing 115 projects in
communities in B.C. This is a growth of approximately
!00 units in 1976. The units house approximately 6,000
lior citizens and 15,000 parents and children.
Most expenditures of the Commission are relate
ed costs, such as amortizing the capital cost of projects,
ying municipal taxes, heat and light. In 1976 a
;nificant sum went into improved maintenance and a
>dernization programme for some of the older
f'elopments. For example, a major renovation
gramme has been implemented at the 20 year old
chard Park project in Vancouver.
The Commission's community relations activities,
d its personnel, made a significant contribution in the
a of tenant-landlord relations, including the
ministration of a successful tenant association grant
>gramme. In 1976, 28 tenant associations in the Greater
ncouver area and 15 in other parts of B.C. received
ints.
A second major activity of BCHMC is the payment of
it supplements to operators of senior citizen non-profit
using projects. These federal-provincial funds are made
available to ensure that modest income occupants pay no
greater than 25% of their income. Under this programme,
in 1976, senior citizen non-profit societies with
approximately 3,000 suites in 57 projects received grants
in the total amount of $1.9 million.
The Board of Commissioners of BCHMC was
expanded in 1976, with the appointment of a private
citizen as chairman, Mary Kerr of West Vancouver. The
other commissioners appointed were: Maxine Caldwell,
Cranbrook; Ron Emmerson, Saanich; Norman Kelsey,
Burnaby; Peter Charnley, CMHC; David Lines, Ministry
of Municipal Affairs and Housing. The appointments were
reconfirmed of June Davidson, Fort St. John and Frances
Huot, Vancouver.
GE SIXTY-SEVEN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 HOUSING
HOUSING
CORPORATION OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
123 East 15th, North Vancouver V7L 2P8
President, Walter Webb
Vice-President, Finance & Marketing, Patrick Doyle
Vice-President, Professional Services, John Northey
Vice-President, Operations, Chris Ronnenkamp
Vice-President, Land, Dave O'Brien
Corp. Secretary, John Third
HOUSING
CORPORATION OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The year was one of change and adjustment for the
Company. The name was changed from Dunhill
Development Corporation Limited to the Housing
Corporation of British Columbia. A number of divisions
were reorganized to recognize a changing role for the
Corporation and it withdrew from building supply sales
and property management.
As an agent for the Province of British Columbia, tl
Corporation will continue to carry out specific projects on
fee basis. The Company will develop a limited number o
housing projects for sale. This will allow the Corporatior
to monitor, on behalf of the Ministry, trends in the
residential construction industry.
Weak performance by the economy generally was
reflected in the housing market. In response, the
Corporation reassessed its market objectives and is
undertaking an intensive effort to provide affordable
housing within the Assisted Home Ownership Programme;
guidelines. Three new projects have been started under
the AHOP programme.
The overall financial condition of the Corporation a:
of October 31, 1976 is strong by virtually any standard.
Shareholders' equity increased to $8.85 million.
Earnings in 1976 amount to $1.27 million as against
$2.59 million in 1975. The decrease in earnings was
attributable to a decline both in volume and profitability
house and land sales and also to a reduction in income
from fees.
The decrease in house and land sales was due to
generally poor market conditions throughout the real
estate industry in B.C. as well as Canada. "
The decrease in fee income resulted from th'e
elimination of public housing projects in favor of federal
and provincial AHOP and ARP housing programmes.
The Corporation derives no fee income from the
AHOP and ARP programmes.
PAGE SIXTY-EIGHT
 OUSING
JE SIXTY-NINE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
 HOUSING
PROVINCIAL
RENTAL HOUSING
CORPORATION
DIRECTORS:
Hon. Hugh A. Curtis
Hon. Evan M. Wolfe
Hon. Robert McClelland
Lawrence I. Bell
OFFICERS:
President:      Hon. Hugh A. Curtis
Secretary:       Lawrence I. Bell
Treasurer:      George C. Gray
PROVINCIAL
RENTAL HOUSING
CORPORATION
The Province is involved with public rental housir
1. In partnership with the Central Mortgage and
Housing Corporation (a federal agency);
2. Through ownership, with financing by CMHC;
3. Through ownership financed by the Province.
There are 5,589 units held throughout the Provinc
on the partnership account. The capital costs were shai
as to 75% by CMHC and as to 25% by the Province. 1
ongoing costs of operation are shared in the same ratio.
The Province owns 1,780 units being financed by
CMHC as to 90% of the capital cost. The ongoing costs
operation are shared equally by CMHC and the Provin
There are 389 units which are wholly owned and
financed by the Province both as to capital costs and
ongoing costs of operations.
This makes a total of 7,758 units with capital cost;
excess of $84 million and it was derided that, for the sal
of clarity and better accounting control of these assets, t
provincial equity should be conveyed to Provincial Rer
Housing Corporation. This Corporation has also been
charged with the responsibility for arranging the loans i.
CMHC and for the issue of debentures by way of securi
The financial statements of this Corporation as at
March 31, 1977 will be published as part of the Public
Accounts. They will reflect these transactions.
The ongoing operational costs will continue to be
shared by CMHC and the Ministry in the agreed
proportions. It should be noted in this regard that all re
charged are geared to the income of the tenants to ens
that the cost of the home is not an unreasonable burde
PAGE SEVENTY

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