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SERVICES FOR PEOPLE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTRY OF HUMAN RESOURCES 1977 With Fiscal Addendum April… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1978

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 ISSN 0317-4670
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
SERVICES FOR PEOPLE
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE
MINISTRY OF HUMAN RESOURCES
HON. WILLIAM N. VANDER ZALM
1977
With Fiscal Addendum
April 1, 1976, to March 31, 1977
 Victoria, B.C., March 1978
To Colonel the Honourable Walter Stewart Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Ministry of Human Resources for the calendar
year 1977, with fiscal and statistical addendum April 1, 1976, to March 31, 1977,
is herewith respectfully submitted.
WILLIAM N. VANDER ZALM
Minister of Human Resources
Office of the Minister of Human Resources,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
 Ministry of Human Resources
Victoria, B.C., March 1978
The Honourable William N. Vander Zalm,
Minister of Human Resources,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Ministry of Human
Resources for the calendar year 1977, with fiscal addendum April 1, 1976, to
March 31, 1977.
JOHN NOBLE
Deputy Minister of Human Resources
  SERVICES FOR PEOPLE
  Report of the Ministry, 1977
FOREWORD
On the following pages the reader will find a summary of the Ministry of
Human Resources' programs and services for people during the calendar year 1977.
Formal accounting in the Ministry is on a fiscal year basis ending March 31,
and therefore calendar year figures are estimates in a few instances. A fiscal and
statistical addendum in section VIII of this Report provides additional tables for
the 1976/77 fiscal year period.
The Annual Report is divided into the following sections:
I    Administration and Organization.
II    Family and Children's Services.
III Income Maintenance Services.
IV Health Care Services.
V Community Programs Services.
VI Residential Care for Adults and Handicapped Children.
VII Legislation Administered.
VIII Fiscal and Statistical Addendum, 1976/77.
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Highlight of 1977—Deputy Minister's Report	
Page
11
Summary of Ministerial Expenditures, 1977—   _. -  12
Section I    Administration and Organization  15
Ministry Organization and Administration   18
The Service Delivery System  19
Ministry Comptroller's Office     20
Office Administration and Public Information   20
Personnel Activities  20
Staff Training Division    22
Research Division  22
Ministry Inspectors Program    23
Ministry Evaluation Team    25
Section II    Family and Children's Services..
Introduction	
  27
  29
Preventive and Protective Services for Children and Their Families  29
Repatriation of Transient and Destitute Children   33
Child Day Care    33
Child Adoptions    3 7
Special Services to Children and Their Families   38
Infant Development Program  39
Summer Youth Hostel Program  40
Children's Rehabilitation Resources  41
Child Care Resources—Introduction  44
Child Fostering Program  45
Therapeutic Homes for Children    47
Group Homes for Children    47
Specialized Residential Treatment Programs  48
British Columbia Council for the Family    49
Section III    Income Maintenance Services     51
GAIN—
Basic Income Assistance Program	
For the Handicapped	
For Seniors, Age 60 to 64	
Supplementary Benefits to OAS/GIS/SPA Recipients	
Provincial Rehabilitation and Employment Program (PREP)
Work Activity Program	
Incentive Allowance Program	
Community Involvement Program	
Training and Education Program 	
Repatriation  	
Indigent Burials	
Section IV   Health Care Services	
Basic Health Care Services	
Pharmacare  _
53
56
57
58
60
61
62
63
63
64
65
67
69
71
 L  10
HUMAN RESOURCES
Page
Section V   Community Programs Services     73
Achievement Centres Program	
Bus Passes	
Community Grants Program	
Community Human Resources and Health Centres
Vancouver Resources Board	
Counselling .	
Homemaker/Housekeeper Services	
Meals on Wheels Program	
Senior Citizens Counsellor Service	
Seniors Day Centres Program	
75
78
79
85
87
87
90
93
94
95
Section VI    Residential Care for Adults and Handicapped Children
Adult Care Program  	
Halfway or Transition Houses and Hostels	
Residential Services for the Mentally Handicapped.
Glendale Lodge Society  _.
Tranquille.
Woodlands Program.
97
99
101
101
102
103
104
Section VII    Legislation,
107
Section VIII    Fiscal and Statistical Addendum, 1976/77  109
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 11
HIGHLIGHTS OF 1977
Report of the Deputy Minister, John Noble
In 1977 the process of integrating and consolidating social services in the
Province continued to completion. With the services of the Vancouver Resources
Board brought into its administrative structure, the Ministry now delivers services
throughout the Province with the assistance of approximately 5,000 staff, serving
over a third of a million citizens every month. In addition to the direct services of
the Ministry, a wide range of supplementary social services are provided through
local community projects initiated by local citizens with funds from the Ministry
as well as from other sources.
Special emphasis was placed on services to children in 1977. For many years,
concern had been expressed in a variety of reports that services to children were
fragmented and inefficient. Several initiatives have been taken to remedy this
problem by integrating the various services that have developed independently and
by placing a much greater emphasis on family support, rather than removal of the
child from his home.
The greater emphasis on community programs in recent years led to the
closure of Island Youth Centre, formerly Brannan Lake School, in December 1977.
In addition, a thrust toward more independent living for the handicapped is accelerating the process of de-institutionalization, and the greatest impact of this thrust
will first be seen at the Woodlands institution for the mentally handicapped.
The Infant Development Program, which assists parents in the early childhood
development of children with real or potential handicaps, was expanded, and for
some of the older children, efforts were increased toward integration of day care
services in which segregation of children with special needs is avoided.
The increasing concern over the need to integrate services to children suffering
from handicaps, abuse, or neglect, and the range of emotional, behavioural, and
developmental problems led to the establishment by Cabinet of an inter-Ministry
Committee of Children. This "Children in Crisis" Committee, consisting of the
Deputy Ministers of Health, Education, Human Resources, and the Commissioner
of Corrections, meets regularly to address concerns that may require a better service
co-ordination or development. This committee structure is repeated throughout the
Province at the regional and local district office level with encouragement to involve
other agencies that have an interest in services for children.
For many years the Ministry of Human Resources has been assisting the
elderly and the handicapped who were unable to afford long-term residential care
and who became pauperized as a result of paying for it. In 1977 the Cabinet
approved a highly progressive new Long-term Care Program which provides such
care at a daily cost which is affordable to those on a minimum income. This led
to the creation of the Long-term Care Program and administration within the
Ministry of Health and the transfer of these responsibilities from the Ministry of
Human Resources to the Ministry of Health. This has entailed a great deal of
co-operative endeavour between staff of the two ministries and this will continue
because of a number of areas of common interest in this program.
The Pharmacare Program administered by the Ministry of Human Resources
expanded in 1977 to include all citizens of the Province on a basis common to many
such insurance programs, namely, an annual deductible amount paid by the user,
with the balance paid by Government underwriting the cost of all prescription
drugs over that amount.
 L 12 HUMAN RESOURCES
SUMMARY OF MINISTERIAL EXPENDITURES,  1977
$
(Millions) PerCent
1. General administration        35.1 6.8
(Headquarters; administrative and support services;
building occupancy and computer charges)
2. Service for families and children     52.7 10.1
(Group, receiving, and foster homes; treatment resources;
day care; special services to children; adoption services)
3. Income assistance    165.8 31.9
(Basic assistance; low-income supplement; burials; transportation; repatriation; special needs; education and
training)
4. Services for seniors and handicapped  162.9 31.3
(GAIN for seniors, GAIN for handicapped, personal,
intermediate and nursing home care; homemaker services; achievement centres for handicapped)
5. Health services     38.3 7.4
(Drugs; dental; optical; medical; medical transportation;
emergency health aid)
6. Community programs      29.5 5.7
(Grants to community-based nonprofit societies; work
activity projects; Vancouver Resources Board administrative services)
7. Special programs for the retarded     35.2 6.8
(Residential programs at Woodlands, Tranquille, Glendale, and other institutions)
519.5 100.0
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
I. 13
Ministerial Expenditures, 1977
($519.5 million)
Figure 1
Income Assistance
31.9%
$165.8
GAIN for Seniors
and Handicapped
31.3%
$162.9
Community
Programs
5.7%
$29.5
Families and
Children
10.1%
$52.7
Administration
6.8%
$35.1
Programs
for the
Retarded
6.8%
$35.2
Health
Services
7.4%
$38.3
Note—See previous page for details of each category.
FEDERAL AND MUNICIPAL PROGRAM COST-SHARING
The Ministry of Human Resources provides a wide range of services to families
and children, and those disadvantaged because of age, handicap, and unemployment. Expenditures for the calendar year 1977 totalled $519.5 million. Table 1
illustrates a comparison of expenditures from 1973/74 through 1977.
 L 14 HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 1—Ministry of Human Resources Gross Expenditures—
Comparison of Fiscal Years 1973/74 to 1976/77 and Calendar Year 1977
1977 1976/77 1975/76 1974/75 1973/74
($ millions) ($ millions) ($ millions) ($ millions) ($ millions)
519.5 481.0 474.8 382.6 264.6
The Federal Government continued to contribute a significant proportion of
Ministry operating and program costs under an agreement with the provinces provided for in the Canada Assistance Plan (CAP) Act of 1967.
According to the terms of the Canada Assistance Plan, and within specified
limits, the Province may claim from the Federal Government up to 50 per cent of
the Provincial expenditures on income assistance and social service benefits, provided they are administered according to Provincial legislation that is within the
limits prescribed in the Federal Canada Assistance Plan Act.
The Province continues to negotiate toward optimum sharing and, because the
Federal legislation sets no ceiling on the gross amount to be shared, the Federal
share of costs has been increasing. However, only some programs are shareable
under the CAP Act. For instance, income assistance and child welfare services
are shareable, but the Guaranteed Available Income for Need payments to persons
60 years and over are only partially shareable, and the GAIN payments to persons
receiving Old Age Security and the Pharmacare expenditures to persons 65 years
and over are not yet shareable.
Municipalities also cost-share income assistance programs, day care subsidies,
health care programs, maintenance of dependent children, homemaker service, and
adult care. In 1977, municipalities were charged $30,262,996 or approximately
10 per cent of the cost of these programs. Throughout this Report reference is
made to cost-sharing between the Federal and Provincial Governments, but for the
programs described in this Report, municipal sharing is included as part of the
Provincial contribution.
 SECTION I
ADMINISTRATION AND
ORGANIZATION
CONTENTS
Page
16
Regional Map	
Ministry Organization and Administration   18
The Service Delivery System    19
Ministry Comptroller's Office  20
Office Administration and Public Information  20
Personnel Activities  20
Staff Training Division  22
Research Division  22
Ministry Inspectors Program  23
Ministry Evaluation Team    25
 December, 1977
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BRITISH  COLUMBIA
HUMAN RESOURCES REGIONS
December, 1977
1. Vancouver City, East area
2. Vancouver City, Burrard area
3. Okanagan
4. Kootenays
5. Prince George/Cariboo
6. Fraser Valley
7. Prince Rupert/Bulkley Valley
8. North and South Peace River
9. Kamloops Mainline
10. Vancouver Island North of Malahat
11. Victoria and Area
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13. Fraser North
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 L 18
HUMAN RESOURCES
MINISTRY ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION
Policy, priorities, and program contents are determined by Government
through legislation, Orders in Council, and Ministerial direction. The administrative implications to put these directions into effect requires the organization of
people, their effort and procedures. At the centre of this administrative unit is the
Deputy Minister and Executive Staff. Succeeding rings or spheres of accountability
and responsibility and authority extend outward into the service delivery system,
culminating with direct service program activity in the local office.
The Ministerial objective is to decentralize as much decision-making as possible
to the local level which relates to individual and community services, and centralize
those procedures and decisions which can best be served at Headquarters.
A functional reporting system, which involves delegation, responsibility,
accountability, direction, and control can be described graphically in a series of
concentric rings.
1. The Deputy Minister and Associate Deputy Minister are responsible for ensuring that
the Ministry's policies, priorities, and program content as determined by the Government are
administered appropriately.
2. Executive Committee members advise the Deputy Minister regarding policy and procedures and assume over-all responsibility for particular programs and the delivery of all
services in assigned geographical areas of the Province. The members include the Deputy and
Associate Deputy Ministers, five Executive Directors, the Manager of Personnel, the Manager
of Support Services, the Ministry Comptroller, and the Superintendent of Child Welfare.
3. Managerial personnel are assigned responsibility for the administration of a particular
program, or the delivery of all services in a regional management area. In 1977 there were
11 Divisional Managers, three Institutional Managers (Tranquille, Woodlands, and Glendale
Lodge), and 16 Regional Managers.
4. Supervisory personnel are assigned responsiblity for the delivery of services in a local
district office, a divisional subsection, or a department, or service facility in a larger institution
such as the psychology, dietary, or social services section at Woodlands.
5. Social workers; child care workers; financial assistance workers; case aides; psychologists; dietary, housekeeping, nursing, maintenance, and treatment staff of the institutions, and
the administrative support staff that service the almost 200 work locations about the Province,
provide the Ministry's services and programs at the local level.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 19
THE SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEM
The Ministry's basic delivery unit for the numerous social welfare programs
is the local district office under the direction of a supervisor. These are located in
all larger communities and within relatively easy commuting distance of the smaller
communities, except along the British Columbia coast and in the northwest
extremities of the Province. By design and policy the size of the offices is limited
and an effort is made to identify the office with a particular neighbourhood or area.
The Province has been divided into 16 management regions under the direction
of a regional manager. Some of the regional boundaries were changed during 1977.
The Ministry's regions are as follows:
Region 1: Vancouver City, East area, with 13 local offices;
Region 2: Vancouver City, Burrard area, with 14 local offices;
Region 3: Okanagan, headquarters at Vernon with offices at Grand
Forks, Kelowna, Oliver, Penticton, and Princeton;
Region 4: Kootenays, headquarters at Nelson with offices at Castlegar,
Cranbrook, Creston, Fernie, Invermere, Kimberley, New Denver,
and Trail;
Region 5: Prince George/Cariboo, with offices at Prince George (five
offices), Fort St. James, Mackenzie, 100 Mile House, Quesnel, Vanderhoof, and Williams Lake;
Region 6: Fraser Valley, headquarters at Abbotsford, with offices at
Abbotsford, Chilliwack, Hope, Maple Ridge, Mission, and Langley;
Region 7: Prince Rupert/Bulkley Valley, headquarters at Terrace, with
offices at Burns Lake, Houston, Kitimat, Prince Rupert, Queen
Charlotte City, and Smithers;
Region 8: North and South Peace River, headquarters at Dawson Creek,
with offices at Dawson Creek, Fort St. John, Fort Nelson, and
Chetwynd;
Region 9: Kamloops Mainline, headquarters at Tranquille, with offices
at Cache Creek, Golden, Kamloops (two offices), Lillooet, Merritt,
Revelstoke, and Salmon Arm;
Region 10: Vancouver Island North of Malahat, headquarters at Duncan,
with offices at Campbell River, Courtenay, Duncan, Nanaimo,
Parksville, Port Alberni, Port Hardy, and Alert Bay;
Region 11: Victoria and area (Capital Regional District), with 17 local
offices;
Region 12: Fraser South, headquarters at Delta, with offices at Delta,
Richmond, Surrey, and White Rock;
Region 13: Fraser North, headquarters at Burnaby, with offices at Burnaby and New Westminster City;
Region 14: West Coast, headquarters at Vancouver, with offices at
Sechelt, Coquitlam, Port Moody, North Vancouver, Squamish, West
Vancouver, and Bella Coola;
Region 16: Vancouver City, South area, with nine local offices;
Region 17: Vancouver City, West area, with nine local offices.
 L 20 HUMAN RESOURCES
Some services such as staff training, investigation, and inspections and coordinating of Child Care Services within the region are served from the Regional
Manager's office.
The Headquarters operation, which includes Pharmacare, Income Assistance
Division, Family and Children's Division, Community Programs, together with the
staff functions of Personnel, Training, Administration and Public Information, and
Accounting areas, is located in Victoria. Some centralized activities are located in
Vancouver, including Health Care and Adoption Placement Sections.
MINISTRY COMPTROLLER'S OFFICE
The Ministry Comptroller's Office is responsible for all matters pertaining to
financial accounting and fiscal control within the Ministry, financial reporting systems and procedures, and information systems pertaining to Ministry expenditures
of money.
During 1977 the Comptroller's Office continued its efforts to improve the
budgeting and financial management systems through further decentralization of
budget preparation.
The income assistance processing system used in Vancouver was expanded
to include Lower Mainland municipalities and several district offices.
Plans for restructuring the Financial Management Services section to assign
the responsibility for providing a full range of financial services to managers have
been approved with implementation expected in early 1978.
The Comptroller's Office continues to improve communication through the
introduction of an accounting policy and procedures manual and by conducting
more training seminars.
Plans for 1978 include standardizing accounting and financial reporting in
organizations funded by the Ministry, wherever possible, preparation of a detailed
budget preparation manual, and reviewing various computerized subsidiary systems.
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION AND PUBLIC INFORMATION
The Division of Office Administration and Public Information provides a range
of administrative support services to the Ministry. These include analysis and
consultation on administrative requirements in a variety of program areas; coordinating the purchase of supplies and equipment; design and distribution of forms;
planning and co-ordination of office space and buildings; the preparation, printing,
and distribution of program policy, procedures, and administration information;
and providing general information to the public.
The Division is also responsible for headquarters mail services and for the
issuance of bus passes to senior citizens.
PERSONNEL ACTIVITIES
Personnel statistics from the Vancouver Resources Board are not included in
this review of Personnel Activities.
As at December 31, 1977, there were 3,412 staff members in the Ministry of
Human Resources.
In 1977 the number of permanent positions in the Ministry increased from
3,025 to 3,217.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 21
Table 2—Permanent Positions Established in 1977
Established positions as of December 1976   3,025
Positions added by Lower Mainland municipal takeover      201
Positions deleted by transfer to Ministry of Health  9
Established positions as of December 31, 1977    3,217
Table 3—Personnel Activities in 1977 and 1976
Activities                                                                                                         1977 1976
Vacancies filled     729 738
Promotions    _     76 58
Reclassifications       158 270
Retirements and resignations    831 787
Transfers (nonpromotional movement of staff)      79 100
The Division recorded 24 grievances in 1977, submitted under the provisions of the
various collective agreements.
In 1977 Personnel Division prepared Treasury Board submissions and received
approval for several significant reorganizations. These reorganizations included
Federal/Provincial Agreements Section; GAIN for Seniors; Administrative Support
Staff; Family and Children's Services; Burnaby District Office.
By reallocating and reclassifying positions, the following were added to various
divisions and regions:
(a) 7 Family and Children's Services Co-ordinators within regional
offices;
(b) 7 positions for Family and Children's Services Evaluation and
Support Team;
(c) 50 positions for field offices to permit a continuous review of eligibility for GAIN for Seniors and Handicapped programs in order
to enhance Federal cost-sharing of these programs;
(d) 14 Administrative Assistant positions within regional offices;
(e) 4 Regional Managers to accommodate four new regions established
due to the addition to the Ministry of Human Resources of the former Vancouver Resources Board;
(/)  1 Research Officer for Federal/Provincial relations;
(g) 26 additional positions in the Provincial Rehabilitation and Employment Program;
(h) District offices were established in Revelstoke, Sooke, Clearwater,
and Cassiar;
(i) 1 Administrative Assistant for Provincial Rehabilitation and Employment Program.
 L 22 HUMAN RESOURCES
Personnel Division provided training in the administration of the union contracts and appraising work performance for all District Supervisors and Ministry
Managers in the Field Service and Headquarters.
During the latter part of the year the Division's major activities were in the
preparation for
(1) the January 1, 1978, integration of the Vancouver Resources Board
with the Ministry;
(2) the closure of Island Youth and Guthrie Centres in Nanaimo and the
subsequent reassignment of approximately 80 employees;
(3) the Government-wide review of managerial positions.
STAFF TRAINING DIVISION
Program objective—The objective of the staff training program is to ensure
that the Ministry's staff are capable of effectively administering the numerous programs operated by the Ministry. New staff must be trained and all staff must
remain current with policies and skills necessary to be effective when providing
services daily to approximately one out of every five citizens of the Province.
Description—Staff Training Division is a Ministry support service. It provides training and library services to staff in all Ministry classifications—management supervision, administrative support, social work, nursing, rehabilitation officers,
etc. Programs provided range from general orientation of new staff to special
counselling and personal care courses.
The Division frequently extends its services to other Government employees
and volunteers working in related services—probation officers, teachers, foster
parents, senior citizen counsellors, mental health workers, etc.
The Division liaises with universities- and colleges in the development and
maintenance of career programs relating to employment in the social services.
In 1977, Staff Training Division strengthened the decentralized nature of its
training services through the distribution of an "orientation kit" to assist supervisors
with the local training of new staff. In addition, a reported total of 5,380 permanent
as well as new staff members participated in 437 workshops, courses, seminars,
lectures, and special conferences throughout the Province. District Supervisors
were the focus of two major training programs in 1977.
The library increased its activities as an integral resource to the staff of the
Ministry. In 1977, total circulation and reference questions answered were double
those of the preceding year. In addition to increased service to Ministry staff, the
library assumed leadership in the establishment of the Government Libraries
Network in 1977.
Program cost-sharing—Costs for staff training are shared equally with the
Federal Government.
RESEARCH DIVISION
The Research Division was reorganized in 1977, with some of the responsibility
for Federal/Provincial planning, along with one staff member being transferred to
the Federal/Provincial Agreements Section. At the same time, new areas of intergovernmental co-operation were opened when staff members participated in a
Federal/Provincial Research Seminar held in Ottawa. This seminar resulted in the
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 23
establishment of a regular newsletter devoted to the exchange of information on
research projects being undertaken by the Federal and Provincial Governments.
Work continued on two major projects that were started in 1976 and a third
project was added in 1977. Development work on the Predictive Model of Basic
Income Assistance Caseloads and Costs continued. This model is designed to allow
the addition of modules that incorporate new factors into the model. In 1977,
modules that incorporated the effects of inter-provincial migration and of other
Federal and Provincial income maintenance programs were added. In addition,
consultation with other ministries engaged in economic and social forecasting was
instituted so as to facilitate the incorporation of the model into the general budgeting
process.
The Income Assistance Survey also continued into 1977. Although thoroughly
pre-tested in 1976 it was not possible to begin systematic interviewing of clients
until May 1977. Since that time, data gathering, which is to continue for a full
calendar year, has proceeded. Preliminary results have already demonstrated the
utility of the project.
The joint Federal/Provincial concern over the accuracy of the Ministry's
eligibility determination practices was demonstrated in a new assignment in 1977.
The object of this project was to determine the accuracy of information used to
determine eligibility for some of the income maintenance programs. What is unique
about this project is the application of rigorous sampling techniques to gain knowledge about a total program. This experimental project, which involves the cooperation of field staff, will continue into 1978.
The statistical responsibilities of Research Division came to the fore in 1977
with the expansion of some of the computer systems. Considerable staff effort was
expended in ensuring that these systems produced accurate, useful statistics. The
resulting saving in staff time more than compensated for the effort. For the first
time, the whole Province employs a common statistical reporting system.
Efforts to improve the ability of the Research Division to provide quick
answers to important questions continued throughout the year. These abilities were
enhanced both by technological improvements provided by the B.C. Systems Corporation and by increased access to relevant data.
Program cost-sharing—The costs of the research program are shared
equally with the Federal Government.
MINISTRY INSPECTORS PROGRAM
Program objective—The objective of the Ministry Inspectors Program
initiated in mid-1976 is to investigate alleged or suspected client-abuse of welfare
programs administered by the Ministry of Human Resources; to develop policies
and procedures to prevent potential fraudulent practices in welfare programs; to
recover client-initiated overpayments of welfare benefits and to submit appropriate
cases to court for prosecution.
Description—In 1977 there were 21 Provincial Inspectors, including six in
Vancouver Resources Board, and a Provincial Co-ordinator, who have responsibilities for receiving complaints or information concerning suspected or alleged
fraudulent practices by people applying for welfare benefits. The statistical trend
concerning newly reported cases is as follows:
 L 24                                                   HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 4—Monthly Reports of New Cases Referred to Inspectors
for Investigation
New Cases                                                               New Cases
January 1977  274                July 1977   289
February 1977   268                August 1977   342
March 1977    362                September 1977   339
April 1977    287                October 1977   251
May 1977     308                November 1977  335
June 1977  317                December 1977   273
Note—In addition to the foregoing cases referred to the inspectors, many other
cases of client-induced overpayments are dealt with monthly by staff directly responsible
for administering income assistance and social services.
The main thrust of the Inspectors' Program has been toward deterrent measures rather than prosecution.  The latter is resorted to only in more flagrant cases
and where prosecution would not adversely affect steps toward rehabilitation of the
client and reinstatement into the work force. The deterrent effect is hard to measure
as it is known that many clients, learning that an inquiry is about to commence,
discontinue requests for assistance.   Others, no doubt, hesitate to attempt fraudulent
receipt knowing that they may be brought to account for their actions by the
Inspectors.
As the Inspectors observe what they consider weaknesses in the Ministry's
systems which permit overpayments and abuse, the Inspectors are bringing them to
the fore with suggestions for improvement.  Through these recommendations anc
staff training, new procedures and checks have been implemented.
Program cost-sharing—Cost of the Inspectors Program is shared equally
with the Federal Government.
The following statistics for the calendar year ending December 31,  1977,
outline the work of this program during that period:
Table 5—Statistics for All Regions (Including VRB),
January 1 to December 31,1977
Total number of cases reported for investigation   —              3,645
Charges laid                   354
Cases still under investigation                   1,443
Unfounded complaints or insufficient evidence to proceed  ...                  994
Settlement otherwise negotiated  —                  339
Values of recoveries made, ordered, or agreed to      .                 $379,689.33
Table 6—Amount of Monthly Assistance Terminated, Due Mainly to
Involvement of Inspector (January 1,1977, to December 31,1977)
Total amount of monthly assistance terminated    $164,679.59
The above figure represents only the amount of monthly assistance being granted at
the time of termination.   It does not attempt to estimate an accumulation of the amount
which may have been received in the months ahead, had it not been terminated.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
L 25
MINISTRY EVALUATION TEAM
Program objective—The objective of the Ministry's Evaluation Team
established in 1976 is to evaluate and audit all programs in which funds are
administered by or on behalf of the Ministry of Human Resources in order to
determine adequacy of office practices and Ministry procedures and policies.
Description—In 1977 the Evaluation Team consisted of a stenographer,
a supervisor, and five staff with accounting and audit training. The team's first
priority has been to evaluate policies and procedures practices in all district offices
throughout the Province. The team's second priority has been to audit and/or to
evaluate programs administered by societies receiving operating grants from the
Ministry of Human Resources.
The team's third priority is to audit adult and child residential care facilities
to determine whether funds issued to operators of such facilities are being used
appropriately.
On the basis of the evaluations and audits completed to date, a number of
recommendations have been made pertaining to specific offices and/or to specific
clients. In addition, a number of recommendations have been made that have
resulted in policy and procedural changes, clarifications for field staff, or the
recommendations have resulted in the additions of new policies and procedures in
order to provide clearer directions to staff and better administration of programs.
During 1977 the Evaluation Team performed the following audits and
evaluations:
35 Ministry of Human Resources Offices;
48 societies funded by the Ministry of Human Resources;
8 adult care institutions receiving funding from the Ministry of Human
Resources;
2 organizations receiving funding from other ministries.
Program cost-sharing—Cost of the Evaluation Team is shared equally with
the Federal Government.
  SECTION n
FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S
SERVICES
CONTENTS
Page
Introduction  29
Preventive and Protective Services for Children and Their Families  29
Repatriation of Transient and Destitute Children  33
Child Day Care  3 3
Child Adoptions  37
Special Services to Children and Their Families    38
Infant Development Program  39
Summer Youth Hostel Program     40
Children's Rehabilitation Resources  41
Child Care Resources—Introduction  44
Child Fostering Program    45
Therapeutic Homes for Children  47
Group Homes for Children  47
Specialized Residential Treatment Programs  48
British Columbia Council for the Family  49
  REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 29
INTRODUCTION
The year 1977 has been marked by numerous changes for the Family and
Children's Services Division.
In April the previous Child Welfare Division, the Division of Residential and
Treatment Programs for Children, Day Care Services, and that portion of the Home-
maker Program not transferred to the Ministry of Health Long-term Care Program
were integrated into one new Division called the Family and Children's Services
Division.
The intent of this change was to achieve greater co-ordination and integration
of programs, as well as an increased administrative efficiency. It was hoped in this
way to emphasize more the family-support aspects of the Ministry's program and to
provide a co-ordinated and integrated approach to the delivery of social services
to families and children.
A focus on the de-institutionalization of children's services, such as those provided through Woodlands and Island Youth Centre, has resulted in the need to
develop smaller, community-based services. The increased emphasis on family
support and early intervention programs will enable more children to remain in
their own homes and communities.
The use of contracts for purchasing services on behalf of children has been
expanded and refined. Group Homes, Special Services to Children, and Residential
Treatment Programs have all been involved.
The number of children coming into the care of the Superintendent of Child
Welfare continues to decline. As of December 31, 1977, there were 9,038 children,
as opposed to 9,309 in December 1976.
A review of legislation pertaining to children's services was undertaken during
1977. The objective of this review was to amalgamate and integrate the numerous
statutes which provide the legal framework through which services are delivered to
children. Recommendations arising from this review will be considered for implementation during this coming year.
It is important to note that planning for children's services more and more
frequently involves the co-operative effort of a number of Government ministries.
Regular communication is taking place between this Ministry and the Ministries of
Health, Education, and the Attorney-General in relation to a number of shared
programs and planning for the delivery of children's services.
PREVENTIVE AND PROTECTIVE SERVICES
FOR CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES
The Protection of Children Act, a Provincial statute, provides for legal authority of the Superintendent of Child Welfare to intervene in the affairs of a family and,
where necessary, to involve the Provincial Court when care of a child falls below
the minimal acceptable standards of the community in which he lives, or where a
child's life or health may be endangered by the actions, or lack of action, of his
parents. Only a small proportion of these cases result in court action. The Superintendent's representatives in Ministry of Human Resources offices throughout
British Columbia continue to seek alternatives to help families to resolve their
problems and improve the standard of care for their children, so that the family
may be maintained as a unit, in preference to court action which may result in the
removal of children from their homes. Such efforts may appear to leave a child,
for a period of time, in a less than desirable situation. However, since changes are
often slow, Ministry of Human Resources staff have been equally active in their
 L 30 HUMAN RESOURCES
efforts to involve the community in the planning. In all matters involving the protection of children and services to their families, the most successful planning has
been evolved with community understanding and participation.
These efforts cannot always succeed in preventing the removal of children who
may, for their own safety and well-being, need to be separated from their parents
temporarily. Service to the family continues during any period of temporary
separation with a view to the earliest possible return of the child.
In those cases where a permanent separation is ordered by the court because of
circumstances which indicate that the child's welfare must take precedence over the
rights of parents who are unable in the foreseeable future to meet his needs, every
effort is made to find a permanent resource in which the child can remain until
independent. In particular circumstances, and for some older children, ties with
their natural family are maintained through visiting, even though they are in permanent care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare.
Children at present in care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare under the
Protection of Children Act are shown in the following table:
Table 7—Number of Children
n Care and Legal Responsibility of the Super-
intendent of Child Welfare
Under the Terms
of the Protection of Children
Act, as at December 31, 1977
Location
Wards
Children Awaiting
Hearing Before
the Courts
In British Columbia	
.. 5,617
462
2
464
Outside British Columbia
Totals 	
210
5,827
Under the section of the legislation dealing with mandatory reporting of child
abuse and neglect, increasing activity is noted through 1977, both in the number of
reports received and in the development of resources and skills to meet this particular problem. A medical-social work child abuse team, based in the Vancouver
General Hospital, and a team of social worker consultants with the Vancouver
Resources Board provided valuable assessment and treatment services, not only in
the area of Vancouver itself, but to many other parts of the Province. These teams
have also participated in training workshops for community and professional groups
in many areas of the Province. A Child Welfare Response Unit in Surrey was
formed by the local office of the Ministry of Human Resources to offer an immediate
response to complaints received concerning abuse or neglect of a child in the Surrey
area.
With the increasing awareness of the public at large, as well as the professional
people involved, situations are more frequently being referred for service before any
serious abuse has occurred, and parents who fear that they may react violently
against their children in a moment of stress are referring themselves for help.
Self-referral has been encouraged by the development and expansion of a community resource known as Parents in Crisis. Here, parents who have hurt, or fear
they may harm their children, can meet with others with similar problems, and with
the aid of trained sponsors, may learn more acceptable parenting methods.
There are now 15 groups operating in the Lower Mainland, with many other
communities throughout the Province organizing local groups through the past year.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
L 31
These are volunteer community-sponsored groups, but receive some funding from
the Provincial Government through the Community Programs Division. With the
development of knowledge and skills in this area, together with community-based
support services, fewer children need to be separated from their families because of
physical abuse and can be maintained safely in their own homes.
Table 8—Cases of Probable Child Abuse—A Comparison
Numbers of Children
Age and Sex 19731
Male—under 3 years   24
3-10 years    37
11 years and older    15
No age reported    	
Female—under 3 years   21
3-10 years     11
11 years and older  14
19741
28
36
12
2
27
24
16
1975
50
66
25
1976
58
92
41
31
46
44
52
90
84
Totals      122
145
262
417
1977
63
99
46
2
43
93
104
450
1 Figures are revised from those appearing in the 1974 Report. Cases of child neglect or unsubstantiated child abuse were included in the figures published in 1974 for period 1971 to 1974. Child
neglect and unsubstantiated child abuse cases do not appear in the 1973-74 figures presented here.
Children may come into care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare on an
agreement between the parents and the Superintendent. This "non-award" care
does not require intervention by the courts, but is a voluntary short-term arrangement to help parents who may need a temporary placement of their children due to
some crisis in their lives, such as ill-health, but who will shortly be able to resume
their parenting role. This type of care may also be a preventive service to families
where a child's "acting-out" or a parent's emotional problems due to marriage
breakdown or other stress require a temporary separation as a period of respite.
A responsibility of Protective and Preventive Services not directly related to
children coming into care is the preparation of reports for the Supreme Court on
matters concerning custody of children under the Equal Guardianship of Infants Act
and the Divorce Act. If the separated parents are unable to agree on arrangements
for custody of, and access to, the children of the marriage, the court may request,
through the Superintendent of Child Welfare, a report on the circumstances of each
parent to assist the Judge in making his decision. There were 86 such reports
requested in 1977 for the British Columbia courts. This service is also provided
to other provinces, and approximately 32 requests were received during 1977.
Issues of custody frequently come to the attention of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare because of the action of one parent "snatching" a child from the
other parent, to whom a court has awarded custody, and removing the child from
the jurisdiction of the court. These are extremely difficult cases to deal with, and
create serious hardship and anxiety for the parent who so "loses" a child. A new
Act passed in British Columbia in June 1976 provides for the enforcement in British
Columbia of custody orders made in other provinces. The Province of Manitoba
has similar legislation. Legislation of this nature provides one of the tools that will
help to protect children against the damaging effects of becoming victims of a
"tug-of-war" between parents.
 L 32
HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 9—Number of Children in the Care and Legal Responsibility of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare Under the Terms of the Equal Guardianship of Infants Act (EGIA), and the Family Relations Act (FRA), as
at December 31,1977
EGIA and FRA
Location Wards
In British Columbia   532
Outside British Columbia        55
Total    587
Committal of children to the charge of the Superintendent of Child Welfare
may also be a disposition of the Provincial Court under the Juvenile Delinquents
Act and, for 1977, the number of children "in care" under this Act are shown in
the following table:
Table 10—Number of Children in the Care and Legal Responsibility of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare, as a Result of a Finding Under the
Juvenile Delinquents Act (IDA) as at December 31, 1977
Location JDA Wards
In British Columbia      376
Outside British Columbia           6
Total      382
The following table compares the total number of children-in-care over several
years:
Table 11—Total Number of Children-in-care and Legal Responsibility of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare as at March 31, 1973—77, and at
December 31,1977
March 31,
1973
March 31,
1974
March 31,
1975
March 31,
1976
March 31,
1977
December 31,
1977
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 33
The Superintendent of Child Welfare has responsibilities under the provisions
of another statute, the Children of Unmarried Parents Act. This Act makes provisions for agreements or court orders for the maintenance of children born out of
wedlock. This Act also provides that any woman who is a mother within the
definition of the Act may apply to the Superintendent for advice and protection
in any matter connected with her child or the birth of her child.
Such services as are required are offered by the representatives of the Superintendent of Child Welfare in the local offices of the Ministry of Human Resources,
and may include counselling, financial assistance, appointment of legal counsel where
necessary to represent the mother in Court action, assistance toward reaching
agreements between the putative father, the mother, and the Superintendent for
maintenance of the child, and such other services as may be necessary to ensure
that the mother has all possible assistance in planning for her child.
Assistance is also provided to the mother in enforcing or applying for variation
in any order of maintenance made by the courts. A record is maintained in Family
and Children's Services Division of all moneys paid under the terms of an agreement
or a maintenance order so that action may be taken as quickly as possible when
arrears begin to accrue.
Total receipts obtained from putative fathers pursuant to the Children of
Unmarried Parents Act between April 1976 and March 1977 amounted to $331,777
for an average of $27,648 collected monthly.
REPATRIATION OF TRANSIENT AND
DESTITUTE  CHILDREN
Another service that the Family and Children's Services Division is involved
in is the repatriation of children, that is, arranging for the return of children to their
province or state of residence. Children under 17 years of age who are temporarily
stranded in British Columbia, and children from British Columbia stranded in other
provinces or states, are looked after by this program. Arrangements for transportation, contact with parents, stop-over supervision, escort where required, and liaison
with other child welfare authorities is undertaken. From March 1976 to April 1977,
892 transient and destitute children were repatriated. This figure incudes movement
in and out of the Province only. Within the Province there is also substantial
movement in returning children to their own homes.
Program cost-sharing—All costs of Preventive and Protective Services for
children and their families are shared equally with the Federal Government.
CHILD DAY CARE
Program objective—The objective of the Ministry's Child Day Care Program is to provide a variety of child day care services throughout the Province,
which meet licensing standards established by the Child Care Facilities Licensing
Board, permitting those families in need to have their children cared for in a secure,
supervised, socially desirable setting. These services supplement the care, protection,
and opportunities for growth provided by their parents.
Description—Day care is a preventive social service, offering six different
types of programs to meet individual family needs.
1. Family day care—Day care provided in a home other than the child's own
may be either licensed or unlicensed. A mother caring for three to five children
requires a community care facilities licence.    If one or two children are involved.
 L 34
HUMAN RESOURCES
then no formal licence is needed, but subsidization of parents using the home is
dependent on the approval of Ministry of Human Resources' staff. The majority of
children requiring care continue to be cared for in family day care homes.
Family day care has the advantage of being able to accommodate children
from infancy up to the age of 12 years. Hours can be flexible, and care more
readily found for children in their own neighbourhood, or near their schools.
At the close of 1977, there were 296 licensed family day care homes in British
Columbia.   This compares with 243 at the close of 1976.
An average of 3,267 children received subsidization each month in the licensed
and unlicensed family day care program.
2. Group day care—A regular group day care centre may provide service for
up to 25 children in one group for a period of up to 10 hours per day, five days per
week. Some children attend centres for half the day only. Staff require special
preparation in child care, and the services must meet basic standards of health and
safety.   Facilities are inspected at least annually by the Ministry of Health.
Group day care has the advantage of offering care by specially trained staff,
and makes it possible for children to mix with other children of diverse backgrounds.
At the close of 1977, approximately 44 per cent of the total number of community care facilities licensed group day care spaces were filled by children on
whose behalf subsidy was paid. There were 298 centres, licensed to provide 7,342
group day care spaces.
Table 12—Number of Group Day Care Centres in British Columbia
Operating and Being Developed at Year-end 1971—77
67
152
250
280
286
283
298
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
3. In-home care—This service is designed to enable subsidization of shift-
working parents to hire someone to come into their homes to care for their children.
Each plan must be individually approved by the administering authority in terms of
suitability and social need.
4. Out-of-school care—Family and group centres can often accommodate a
child up to 12 years of age needing care and supervision after school or when school
is not in session.
As of December 31, there were 151 licensed out-of-school facilities providing
service to 1,800 children compared to 107 facilities serving 1,396 children as of
December 1976.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
L 35
5. Nursery—This is a part-time service offering care, extra stimulation, and
preparation for school for children 3 to 5 years of age. It is also viewed as a support
for families where the parent may require short periods of relief, but not necessarily
full-time day care.
There are 349 community care facilities licensed nursery schools in the Province, providing a service for 7,901 children. An average of 530 children is
receiving subsidization each month. Families requesting subsidization are required
to meet financial needs criteria only.
6. Special needs care—The objective of the special needs service is to enable
children with physical, social, and/or emotional problems to receive assistance
through available day care programs in both regular and specialized centres:
(a) A child with social, physical, or emotional handicaps requiring more
support and services than the regular day care program is equipped
to provide may be designated as "special needs." As far as possible,
the integration of these children into existing regular programs is
encouraged.
(b) Where it is possible to document aspects of physical, social, or emotional problems seriously detrimental to the development of the child,
a non-profit group day care centre, nursery school, after-school
centre, with an enrolment of 50 per cent or more children requiring
very specialized care, may be designated as a specialized pre-school
service. A community care facilities licence for specialized day care
is required. Placement is made on an individual basis, related to the
developmental needs of the child.
There are now 59 specialized day care centres serving 1,232 children. In
keeping with more recent research, integrated programs, designed to meet the needs
of both normal and handicapped children, have developed, and wherever possible,
this is the program of choice.
During 1977, as a result of a decision to amalgamate all services to families
and children, child day care was brought into the Family and Children's Services
Division as a part of a Family Support Section with increased emphasis being placed
on the preventive and family aspects of the service.
Child day care services are now available in most communities within the
Province. Parents choose the day care program that best meets the need of their
family. Eligibility for assistance with day care fees in dependent upon the financial
situation of the individual family, based on an income or needs test and social need
as established by the Federal Government for cost-sharing purposes. The social
need criteria are as follows:
(1) A single-parent family requires day care services and that parent
works or attends an educational institution, or is undertaking medical
treatment or a rehabilitative program.
(2) A two-parent family requires day care services and both parents
work, or one parent works and the other spouse is either incapacitated, attends an educational institution, or is undertaking medical
treatment or a rehabilitative program.
(3) A single-parent or two-parent family requires day care services that
are recommended by or arranged by a social welfare agency as part
of a child protection service; or are arranged by or recommended by
a social welfare agency on the basis of an individual assessment of
special needs of the family or the child, including physical, emotional,
mental, developmental, language, or other identifiable and recog-
 L 36
HUMAN RESOURCES
(4)
nized handicaps; or are arranged by or recommended by a social
welfare agency due to conditions in which it is possible to document
aspects of the physical, social, or cultural environment which are
seriously detrimental to the development of a child and his equality
of opportunity when he enters the formal education system.
A single-parent or a two-parent family requires day care services due
to a short-term family crisis which is regarded as such by the
administering authority.
Table 13—Children Receiving Subsidized Day Care
as of December 31, 1977
Program                                                    Half Day             Full Day Total
Group day care         174              3,048 3,222
Family day care         211              2,772 2,983
Nursery school          528                      1 529
Out of school     1,686                   47 1.733
Special need centre          310                 577 887
In-home day care   ...      107                 575 682
Totals      3,016              7,020 10.036
Changing patterns—During the early part of 1977 the number of children
being subsidized in group day care declined, but by November the numbers had
increased to their former level. During this period, however, many centres faced
financial problems and closed as a result of a decline in enrolment. The number
of subsidized children enrolled in the part-time nursery programs increased from a
monthly average of 250 in 1976 to 550 in 1977.
The reason for these changes were believed multiple—the general economic
situation and its resultant high unemployment, higher salaries for those persons still
employed, and the level of the income test scale upon which subsidy application was
based. Recognition of this latter factor resulted in action to revise the income scale
for implementation on January 1, 1978.
There are indications that a number of group day care centres and family day
care operators are increasing their fee for service beyond maximum allowable subsidies. This situation is presently under review to determine the impact on the fully
subsidized family.
Program cost-sharing—The costs of the day care programs for children are
shared equally with the Federal Government, with the exception of
(1) the three-hour nursery program where application of the Federal
social needs criteria is not mandatory;
(2) when parents have qualified for subsidy using the Income Test and
the child is enrolled in a privately operated licensed centre;
(3) specialized day care centres where financial eligibility is not a
criterion. Parents are requested to complete an application for
subsidy, but this is not a requirement.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 37
CHILD ADOPTIONS
Program objective—The objective of the adoption program is to place
children of all ages for adoption when a child's immediate family and relatives are
no longer able, capable, or willing to care for them, and to ensure the social and
legal requirements of the Adoption Act have been fulfilled.
Description—Records of a child considered in need of adoption are referred
by local Ministry personnel to the centralized placement office in Vancouver.
Studies on families who have applied to adopt a child are also prepared by local
Ministry staff, and forwarded to the same placement office. The central office
selects the best home for the child considering his needs and the wishes of the
relinquishing parent. The two local offices who have prepared the reports on the
child and the adopting family put the adoption selection plan into effect.
The legal completion of Ministry adoptions is also a centralized service of the
Ministry.
The Ministry also assists, when required, with step-parent, other relative, and
private adoptions, but the legal aspects in such instances are usually undertaken by
the applicant's own solicitors.
The following table indicates the number of children for whose adoptions the
Superintendent of Child Welfare submitted reports to the Supreme Court in the
calendar year 1977 and the types of adoption. Figures for the calendar year of
1976 are given as a comparison.
Table 14—Adoption Reports Submitted to the Supreme Court
Number of Children for Whom
Type of Adoption Reports Were Filled
1976 1977
Ministry  of  Human  Resources  and  Vancouver  Resources
Board placements     .-.       831 843
Step-parent         867 791
Other relative          93 82
Private                54 39
,845 1,755
There was a reduction of 90, or 4.9 per cent, in the total number of children
reported on in 1977 as compared to 1976. There has been a reversal of the trend
in recent years toward slow and steady increase in step-parent adoptions, and in
1977 there were 76 fewer step-parent adoptions than in 1976. Private placements
decreased, despite the continued long waiting-periods for newborn children placed
by the Ministry of Human Resources.
Another highlight of 1977 saw the organization of a number of adopting
parents into the Adopting Parents Group of B.C. In its beginning stages it is being
organized in the more populated areas as an active meeting group. Other members
from more remote locations in the Province will be active on a correspondence
basis and the whole will be tied together by means of a regular newsletter.
The National Adoption Desk, commenced in September 1976, has had a productive year. The participation of this Province has included a total of 11 children
being placed from other parts of Canada in homes in British Columbia.
 L 38 HUMAN RESOURCES
The large number of available, approved adoption homes continues to increase
and currently stands at approximately 800 homes. Approximately three quarters
of these families wish only the newborn or very young, healthy infant. Placements
of first children are taking approximately 18 months to effect from the date of
application. Placements of second children in a family unable to have children by
natural means are taking longer, usually two years. Taken as a comparison of other
provinces these are relatively brief waiting-periods.
Single parents continue to apply to adopt. Several of them in the past have
asked to be referred for a Korean child, but that country is now refusing to accept
homes of single parents, even those who have previously adopted and who are
wishing another child of the same origin.
The most time-consuming and difficult part of the adoption program is the
placement of the child with special needs. These are the children who have medical
or physical difficulties, emotional or behavioural problems, mental limitations, or
who, by virtue of belonging to a family group of children, are not easy to place.
Resources are limited and it is only by special kinds of appeals that many of them
will become permanently settled in a home of their own.
Some interesting placements over the past year may serve to indicate more
than anything else, the nature and scope of the task of this section of the Ministry
working with social workers throughout the Province to facilitate the early placement of the children for whom this Ministry is responsible.
• Two infants were placed, both of whom had an unusually high-risk level
of possibly becoming schizophrenic in later years. The 50 to 60 per cent
risk for these children is caused because in each case both biological parents
were diagnosed as schizophrenic.
• An infant with serious heart complications was placed from hospital with
a family who is prepared to see her through some very high-risk surgery
when she is closer to a year in age.
• Two little sisters, both of very limited intelligence, were placed with a
family who is committed to nurturing them and assisting them to reach their
maximum potential.
• A little girl of 2 years was placed with a couple and, tragically, the husband
was killed in an industrial accident two months later. The surviving parent
was given full opportunity to consider the future and she has decided to
pursue this little girl's adoption as a single parent.
• An 8-year-old boy has been placed in the middle of a large family of seven
where they are committed to raising him and to help him overcome the
rejection by previous adults.
Program cost-sharing—The costs of the adoption program are shared
equally with the Federal Government.
SPECIAL SERVICES TO CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES
Program objective—The objective of the Special Services to Children and
Their Families Program is to enable children to grow up successfully in their own
homes or communities by providing child care counsellors or family support workers to the child and his family where a child is clearly at risk of being removed from
his or her own family or community, unless there is intervention.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
L 39
Description—Special Services is a program whereby time-limited, one-to-one
services are provided to identified children and their families. Family Support and
Child Counselling Services are purchased, on a fee-for-service basis, from community societies which employ Special Services workers. The nature, intensity,
duration, and costs of such services vary according to the needs of the individual
families, and specific goals of service are defined in a contractual arrangement at
the outset of the intervention.
During 1977, over 1,200 children and families received services which varied
in nature from short-term support during a family crisis to assisting parents in the
care and development of their physically or mentally handicapped child.
Program cost-sharing—The costs of the Special Services to Children Program are shared equally with the Federal Government.
Ministerial expenditures for Special Services to Children are as follows:
Table 15—Special Services to Children, Ministerial Expenditure,
Calendar Years 1975-77
$
1977        2,797,97'4
1976       1,836,477
1975          3,209,071
The Special Services to Children and Their Families Program has been and
continues to be one of the most effective and responsive programs for families and
children in providing a viable alternative to apprehension and residential treatment.
INFANT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
Program objective—The objective of the Infant Development Program is to
assist families in caring for infants aged 0 to 3 years who are exhibiting developmental delay. Goals are to optimize the infants' development and to assist their
families in responding to their infants in a positive, therpeutic manner.
Description—In 1977, Infant Development Programs operated in 11 areas
of the Province, including Burnaby, Castlegar, Duncan, Kamloops, Kelowna, New
Westminster, North Vancouver, Surrey/Delta, Upper Fraser Valley, Vancouver/
Richmond, and Victoria. Each program has a Supervisor with professional training
related to early childhood development, and an Advisory Committee comprised of
parents and professionals. The programs are funded by grants from the Ministry
to local sponsoring societies. A Provincial Steering Committee, appointed by the
Minister of Human Resources, and a Provincial Co-ordinator, assist in the formulation of guidelines and the development of local programs.
When an infant is referred to an Infant Development Program by a concerned
parent, doctor, public health nurse, or social worker, the family is visited by a professional staff person on a regular basis. During the home visits the staff person
works with the family to develop activities that will encourage the development of
the infant. In some cases other consultants, such as a physiotherapist will be
involved to assist in certain parts of the infant's program.
A delay in providing the kinds of activities and experiences that the infant
needs can result in more pronounced physical development delay which becomes
more difficult to remedy in later years.    In addition, secondary handicapping con-
 L 40                                                   HUMAN RESOURCES
ditions, such as speech problems, poor gait, or abnormal behaviour patterns can
develop that further hinder the infant's development.
Special toys, books, and other resource materials are made available to parents,
along with instructions on the appropriate use of these materials.   Opportunities to
meet other parents and to attend workshops on child  development  are  also
provided.
In all, 425 infants and their families were served by the Infant Development
Program in 1977.   Participation on the part of the family is voluntary and services
were provided free of charge.
Program cost-sharing—Costs are borne completely by the Province.
The following figures illustrate the Ministry's expenditure for the Infant
Development Program in fiscal year 1976/77 and calendar year 1977:
Table 16—Ministry Expenditures for Infant Development,
Fiscal Year 1976/77 and Calendar Year 1977
$
1977      351,471.22
1976/77        210,276.27
SUMMER YOUTH HOSTEL PROGRAM
Program objective—The objective of the Summer Youth Hostel Program
is to make temporary low-cost accommodation available for youth travelling in
British Columbia.
Description—In 1977, the Summer Youth Hostel Program involved  11
tiostels, most of them temporary, in eight communities in British Columbia. These
dostels provided 53,668 bed-nights for 50,054 individuals between June and
September.
As in past years, financial responsibility for the program was shared between
the Ministry of Human Resources and the Office of the Federal Secretary of State.
The Secretary of State, through grants to community groups, funded most of the
salary and operational costs of the hostels. The grant from the Ministry of Human
Resources was used primarily for costs which were not met by user fees for those
rostels outside the Vancouver area.
During the year the Association of B.C. Hostels merged with the Pacific
Region of the Canadian Youth Hostels Association. The new Association operates
under the name of Canadian Hostelling Association—B.C. Region.
Provincial expenditures for the youth hostel program over the last several years
were as follows:
Table 17—Youth Hostels, Provincial Expenditures,
Calendar Years 1972 to 1977
$                                                     $
1977      23,683                 1974                 120,503
1976      78,172                1973      127,592
1975       66,814                1972    425,000
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
L 41
The total number of people who used the Summer Youth Hostel Program are
illustrated in the following table:
To
ble 1
8—Sumi
Number
of
Persons
...    1,298
ner You
Number
Of
Males
938
358
537
171
324
200
3,276
497
216
th Host
Number
of
Females
360
130
295
87
116
102
1,638
201
780
12,0211
el Program Statistics,
Canadian     U.S.
Cit-          Citizenship   izenship      Other
940 207 142
323 55 111
598 85 153
149 63 43
235 96 109
116            115              71
3,513 2,486 1,704
245 99 138
191 108 108
393            250            162
9,786          1,303         6,133
1977
Money
Collected
$
2,502
864
2,262
496
1,570
983
14,025
2,786
1,686
3,528
85,154
Bed-
nights
1,600
509
976
269
683
480
7,699
1,005
674
1,345
36,978
488
832
258
Port Alberni
Prince George
Prince Rupert
440
302
...    4,923
Henry Hudson 	
Queen Mary     	
Vancouver YWCA
Vancouver   Jericho i
497
417
780
24,9571
Totals,
Totals,
1977
1976 ..
res are
ing the
50,063       31,494        15,030        16,409         4,867         8,874      115,856       52,218
._ 63,558       41,559       20,623       35,547         6,690       21,321      149,482       74,790
based on bed-night occupancy rate and do not necessarily reflect the number of
service.   Statistics for the Whistler Hostel are included in the Jericho figures.
i These figu
individuals utiliz
Federal/ Provincial Cost-sharing—The two senior Governments shared
costs of the program in 1977 as follows:
Table 19—Youth Hostel Program, Provincial and Federal Funding,
Calendar Year 1977
$
Federal  contribution         139.500
Total Provincial contribution 	
     23,683
Total Government funding   	
Provincial recovery re cost-sharing __ 	
.    163,183
.    11,841
Total Federal contribution    	
   151,342
CHILDREN'S REHABILITATION RESOURCES
Program objective—The objective of the Children's Rehabilitation Resources Program is to provide alternative programs to youth not attending public
schools.
Description—Rehabilitation programs for teenage youngsters have been in
existence in British Columbia for at least six years. Typically, they were started
by groups or societies which identified significant numbers of young people who
were dropping out of school without any viable alternative and simultaneously
exhibiting other social and/or legal problems. These programs were funded from
a number of sources—Federal OFY (Opportunities for Youth) and LIP (Local
Initiatives Program) grants, community grants from the Ministry of Human Resources, as well as some private sources. These programs were formalized for the
fiscal year 1974/75 and provision was made for joint funding by the Ministries of
 L 42 HUMAN RESOURCES
Education and Human Resources. There has also been some financial input from
the Corrections Branch (Ministry of the Attorney-General) to a few of the programs.
The Ministry of Human Resources function is largely a facilitating one in
making it possible for these children and young people to continue to participate in
an educational experience. In addition, there are very definite steps taken in most
of the programs to deal with family difficulties, acquisition of acceptable social
skills, and an orientation to the world of work. The Ministry's involvement in the
program is through the provision of child care workers to the 123 programs operating in the Province.
Close to half of the programs have some kind of work activity component
which is similar in its objectives to the Federally funded work activity programs for
adults (see Report in Income Maintenance section of this Report). There is also
a very significant life-skills component to most of the programs which includes
budgeting, job-finding, cooking, and housekeeping.
Most of the programs show a fairly high rate of reintegration into the community as indicated by return to regular school programs, entrance to vocational
training programs, or securing employment. In most cases this kind of movement
can be attributed to the intervention of the child care worker who is able to bring
about some modification of the behaviours which have led in many cases to the
child's exclusion from the school situation.
A survey conducted in 1974 indicated that almost half of the children enrolled
in these programs were on probation and a considerably higher proportion had been
in conflict with the law in some way.
In 1975 the use of this program was expanded to serve younger children who
are physically and/or mentally handicapped. This has resulted in the inclusion of
significant numbers of children who have been excluded from school and the
associated socializing experiences.
Program cost-sharing—Children's Rehabilitation Programs are funded
jointly by the Ministries of Human Resources and Education at a cost of $2.2
million in 1977, without Federal cost-sharing.
Projects funded by the Ministries of Human Resources and Education in 1977
were as follows:
Abbotsford: Reach Out; Transition Class.
Armstrong: Armstrong Rehabilitation Program.
Bella Coola: Bella Coola Rehabilitation Program.
Burnaby: Bonsar Park; Donald Patterson School.
Burns Lake: Rehabilitative Program for Youth.
Campbell River: Chimo School; Campbellton Elementary Class.
Castlegar: Open Road Centre.
Chetwynd: Chetwynd Attendance Centre.
Chilliwack: Operation "Bridge"; Program III; Re-Entry.
Clearwater: Clearwater Rehabilitation Program.
Coquitlam: SHAFT.
Courtenay: The House; Sandwick School.
Cowichan: Cowichan Valley Family Life Program.
Cranbrook: Cranbrook Early Intervention Program.
Creston: Creston Rehabilitation Program.
Dawson Creek: Dawson Creek Attendance Centre.
Fort Nelson: Fort Nelson Rehabilitation Program.
Fort St. John: Fort St. John Rehabilitation Program.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 43
Golden: Golden Alternate School Program.
Gold River: Gold River Alternate School.
Grand Forks: Grand Forks Rehabilitation Program.
Granisle: Babine Accelerated Survival Skills.
Invermere: Opportunities Co-ordination.
Kamloops: McDonald Park; Operation Re-Entry; Clinical Class.
Kelowna: Kelowna Alternate School Program.
Kimberley: Focus Lab.
Kitimat: Kitimat City High.
Lake Cowichan: Lake Cowichan Alternate Education; Limited Academic
Load Program.
Langley: Alternate Learning Environment Program; D. W. Poppy Junior
Secondary School; Brookswood; Junior Development Program.
Lillooet: Lillooet Rehabilitation Program.
Maple Ridge: Maple Ridge Rehabilitation Programs (three).
Merritt: Merritt Alternate School Program for Youth.
Mission: Education for Life Program.
Nanaimo: Northfield Alternate Program; Elementary Rehabilitation Class;
Physically Handicapped Class; Gyro Park.
Nelson: Aspire Program.
New Westminster: New Westminster Rehabilitation Program.
North Vancouver: Project Alternative Secondary School (PASS); Prince
Charles School; Progress Centre.
Oliver: Oliver Alternate School Program.
100 Mile House: Cedar Crest School; 100 Mile House Rehabilitation
Program.
Parksville: Parksville-Qualicum Rehabilitation Program.
Penticton: Penticton Rehabilitation Class—"Skaha House".
Port Alberni:  Development Centre for Special Children; Emotionally
Disturbed Class (Gill School Class); Project 70/74; Project 70/75;
Project 70/76.
Port Hardy: Alert Bay Rehabilitation Program; Holberg Rehabilitation
Program; Port Alice Rehabilitation Program; Port Hardy Rehabilitation Program; Port McNeill Rehabilitation Program.
Powell River: Powell River Rehabilitation School.
Prince George:  Aurora School for the Trainable Mentally Retarded;
Physically Handicapped Class.
Prince Rupert: Prince Rupert Rehabilitation Program.
Queen Charlotte Islands: Rehabilitation of Educationally Disadvantaged
Students.
Quesnel: Alternate Class Project.
Revelstoke: Revelstoke Rehabilitation Program.
Richmond: Station Stretch; Cook School.
Saanich: Warehouse School; Royal Oak.
Salmon Arm: Salmon Arm Alternate Learning Program.
Saltspring Island: Saltspring Island Resource Worker.
Sechelt: Sechelt Rehabilitation Program.
Smithers: Smithers Rehabilitation Program.
Sooke Village: Sooke Alternative Program.
Squamish: Squamish Rehabilitation Program.
Summerland: Summerland Rehabilitation Class.
 L 44 HUMAN RESOURCES
Surrey: Surrey Rehabilitation Programs (two).
Tahsis: Tahsis Alternate School.
Terrace: Terrace Rehabilitation Program.
Trail: Elementary Rehabilitation Class; Secondary Rehabilitation Program; Trail Autistic Class; Sunningdale School for the Trainable
Mentally Retarded.
Vancouver; Bridge; Byng Satellite; 8J-9J; East Side; Kumtuks; Oakridge;
OK East; OK West; Outreach; Riley Rehabilitation; Strathcona—
Division 33; Streetfront; Sunrise East; Total Education; The Vinery.
Vanderhoof: Nechako Attendance Centre; Fort St. James; Fraser Lake.
Vernon: Vernon Rehabilitation Program.
Victoria: George Jay Rehabilitation Program; Girls Alternative Program;
S. J. Willis Rehabilitation Program; Boys' Club of Greater Victoria.
West Vancouver: Sentinal Work Activity Program (SWAP).
Williams Lake: Williams Lake Rehabilitation Program; Program II.
CHILD CARE RESOURCES—INTRODUCTION
It is universally accepted that a sense of belonging is necessary to every child
in order for him to be able to inter-relate in a community of others. It is also
accepted that a child acquires this attribute by deeply experiencing that he is wanted.
Similarly a child builds his own storehouse of self-esteem by being with others
who accept and appreciate who and what he is.
The child acquires an ability to give and to love by being loved and given to.
A child obtains his own individual personhood by having the freedom to
discover what other people mean to him and what he in turn means to them.
A child grows through a stage of youth of maturity only when his personhood
is respected and cherished as being uniquely his.
This Ministry and other ministries of Government provide highly developed
programs and professional skills to meet the needs of children. These programs and
approaches can only be effective in our Provincial community if the people who
make up this community want and love children in a climate of hope and joy rather
than despair and fear.
The following table illustrates the variety of placements that are used for
children in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare:
Table 20—Children-in-care, by Type of Care, as at December 31, 1977
Children
Foster homes   _     5.824
Own homes or homes of relatives and independent living .... _. 1,259
Receiving and group homes and therapeutic homes  602
Adoption probation       385
Other resources     -....  968
Total number of children-in-care  9,038
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 45
CHILD FOSTERING PROGRAM
Program objective—The objective of the Child Fostering Program is to
provide good substitute family care for a child to meet his or her physical, emotional,
and social needs.
Description—Social workers attempt to find a family for each child that is
most suited to the child's individual requirements. The over-riding goal is, if at all
possible, to reunite the child with his or her natural family as soon as possible.
Human Resources staff work with the child's "natural" family as well as with the
foster family. If it is demonstrated that it is not possible to reunite the child with his
family, then attempts are made to provide an alternative permanent plan at the
earliest possible date. Usually this alternative plan is adoption, particularly in the
case of younger children. In some circumstances, however, especially with an older
child, adoption may not be possible. Many older children are ready for independence and sometimes have strong ties with the original parents. In some cases the
resource that best meets his needs is a group home or an independent boarding-
home.
In certain situations, particularly when a child is orphaned, a relative or close
friend of the parents assumes the foster parent role. This is often a voluntary
arrangement, with the Ministry providing advice or assistance if called upon.
Foster parents are paid varying rates according to the age of the child. These
rates cover clothing and basic maintenance such as food, the child's share of household equipment and operation, transportation, recreation, gifts, ?nd spending allowances. Family allowances are included in the rates but there is no fee for service
in the regular rates.
The basic rates paid to foster parents, effective June 1, 1977, are as follows:
Table 21—Basic Foster Care Rates for Chile
Age of Child
(Years)                                                   Maintenance
$
0- 5         93.89
6- 9     115.30
10-11                       130.93
'ren Placed in Foster Homes
Clothing                    Total
$                              $
18.62                 112.51
22.30                137.60
26.39                 157.32
26.39                  177.69
31.58                 198.37
12-13   	
151.30
14-19	
   166.79
The foster home program is the backbone of the child welfare program.
Approximately 64 per cent of 5,824 of the 9,038 children in care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare live in volunteer foster homes.
With the emphasis of the Ministry on keeping children in their own homes and
community through the use of prevention programs, and with the move away from
placing children in institutions, additional burdens have been placed on foster
parents who must cope with difficult children for short periods of time.
The concept of caring for a child for a long time and including him in the
home as part of the family is changing, because the majority of foster parents are
asked to cope with children for relatively short periods of time. This often means
that foster parents are not able to develop as close a relationship to a child as
previously. Further, with the emphasis on preventive programs, the type of child
who does come into foster care is more difficult to cope with than in the past. The
 L 46 HUMAN RESOURCES
effect of short-term involvement and caring for children having severe behaviour
problems is increased pressure on foster parents. As a result, there is a growing
need for supportive services to them. One study showed, for example, that there
was a 42-per-cent attrition rate of foster homes over three years. Ministry field
staff as well are finding it increasingly difficult to recruit foster homes, particularly
homes for teenagers.
The Foster Family Worker project was initiated in 1977 to try to reduce the
number of foster parent "drop-outs" by offering support to existing foster parents.
A secondary goal was to recruit new foster parents. The four offices where the
project was tested report excellent results, particularly because the Foster Family
Workers are themselves foster parents and relate easily to their peers. The staff
report that a number of foster parents who were planning to drop out changed their
minds through the efforts of the Foster Family Workers. The problems of recruiting
homes for teenagers continues, however.
Part of the pressure on foster parents results from the difficult children they
are now being asked to take into their homes. In an effort to upgrade the skills of
these volunteers, the B.C. Federation of Foster Parent Associations developed a
program in conjunction with Douglas College to teach basic fostering skills. This
course is now available to foster parents throughout the Province upon request.
The Federation also undertook a number of local workshops on such topics as
dealing with the mentally handicapped foster child. The Federation is beginning
to emphasize regional and local activities with the result that more local activities
will be undertaken in future. Perhaps through these efforts to upgrade the skills of
individual foster parents they will be better able to cope with the difficult children
they are fostering.
In June 1977 the Ministry announced an increase in basic foster rates. The
new rates are based on extensive studies over five years into the actual costs of
keeping a child. The rate covers clothing and basic maintenance such as food, the
child's share of household equipment and operation, transportation, recreation,
gifts, and spending allowances. The Ministry also initiated an increase in school
supplies payments, the first since 1968.
In an effort to assist the field staff, the Field Policies and Procedures Manual
was updated and now is the sole source of child welfare policy regarding foster
homes. Extensive revisions were also made to the child welfare forms to bring
them up to date. Representatives of the B.C. Federation of Foster Parent Associations participated in some of these revisions.
Program cost-sharing—The costs of the Foster Care Program are shared
equally with the Federal Government.
A comparison of the number of children in foster care during the last several
years is illustrated in the following table:
Table 22—Number of Children in Foster Home Care, as at
December 31, 1977, and March 31, 1973 to 1977
Number of Number of
Children Children
December 31, 1977  5,824 March 31, 1975   6,109
March 31, 1977   5,943 March 31, 1974   6,140
March 31, 1976   6,070 March 31, 1973  6,471
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 I. 47
Ministerial expenditures on foster home care in 1977 and fiscal years 1971/72
to 1976/77 are as follows:
Table 23—Foster Home Care, Ministerial Expenditures, Calendar Year
1977 and Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1976/77
$ Million $ Million
1977   13.1 1973/74     11.6
1976/77 ...... 12.0 1972/73  10.3
1975/76   13.3 1971/72  9.5
1974/75   14.6
THERAPEUTIC HOMES FOR CHILDREN
Program objective—The objective of the Therapeutic Home Program is to
provide contracted treatment services on a short-term basis in order to help emotionally disturbed children, or children with severe behaviour disorders to control
their behaviour.
Description—A therapeutic home is a residential resource, usually for one
child, operated by a person with child care worker skills in his or her own home.
The resource is selected when a child requires intensive treatment and would benefit
from receiving it in a family setting rather than a treatment institution. It is
frequently used in communities where no treatment institutions exist and the child
would otherwise have to move from the community.
A contract is made between the therapeutic parent and the Ministry of Human
Resources for three months and, where necessary, for further three-month periods
up to a maximum of one year. The contract outlines treatment goals, methods to be
used, and a date when progress will first be reviewed.
The therapeutic home is a short-term placement with the goal of resolving
specific behavioural or emotional problems and with a view to returning the child
to his or her home or to a less-intensive community resource within one year.
In the 1976/77 fiscal year, $398,402 was expended on this program, which
provided for an average of 55 homes on a total-year basis. Ministerial expenditures
on the program from January 1 to December 31, 1977, were $491,237.
Program cost-sharing—The costs for operating the Therapeutic Homes
Program are shared equally with the Federal Government.
GROUP HOMES FOR CHILDREN
Program objective—The objective of the Group Home Program is to
provide skilled, effective parenting or child care services to children who cannot
remain in their own or foster homes but who are able to function within the
community.
Description—Group homes are normally staffed by resident houseparents.
These homes have a capacity for five to eight children and are primarily suitable
for adolescents.
Group homes may have specialized functions such as receiving, assessment,
short-term treatment, or long-term care of difficult children, or they may provide
a combination of services.
 L 48 HUMAN RESOURCES
Group homes may be contracted for with private individuals, community nonprofit societies, or a combination of these two.
Contracts are negotiated locally and may be effective for up to a full fiscal
year. While only a total figure is agreed upon in the contract, the negotiation process
involves considering the cost of several aspects of the service. Therefore, the total
cost might include such costs as transportation, recreation, building occupancy, fee
for service, training, etc.
Where need for a receiving-home fluctuates or where there is no suitable
resource potential for group homes as outlined above, the Ministry may contract
for a "bed subsidy home" on a yearly renewable basis. Under the bed subsidy
arrangement, the Ministry pays a fee for service of $50 to $150 per month per bed
for up to six beds. Regular foster home rates are also paid for each child placed.
These resources are privately operated. The bed subsidy home in the past has been
used primarily to guarantee bed spaces for short-term receiving or emergency
services. This past year, in response to a growing need for a resource which falls
between the foster home and the group home, more flexibility has been built into
the bed subsidy home concept. While some bed subsidy homes are still for short-
term placements, a number have now been established which provide longer term
care. The most significant change in the Group Home Program this year has been
the increase in the number of bed subsidy homes.
Program cost-sharing—Costs for the Group Home Program are shared
equally with the Federal Government.
In December 1977, there were 168 group homes operating with an occupancy
rate for 996 children.
Table 24—Group Homes (Including Receiving Homes), Ministerial
Expenditures, Calendar Year 1977 and Fiscal Years 1971/72
to 1976/77
$ MiMion
$ Million
Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1977.. 8.09                Fiscal year 1973/74 ....
..  3.54
Fiscal year 1976/77 .  7.45                Fiscal year 1972/73 ....
..   1.94
Fiscal year 1975/76  4.42                Fiscal year 1971/72 ....
..  1.55
Fiscal year 1974/75          3.73
SPECIALIZED RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT PROGRAMS
Program objective—The objective of the Residential Treatment Program
for children is to provide residential care for children in need of specialized child
care services because of emotional or behavioural difficulties, or because of physical
and mental handicaps. The goal of this program is to provide specialized care and
treatment to restore the child to as normal a life-style as possible. The efforts of
Government have been to reduce the size in institutions and the numbers of
children placed in institutions, wherever possible.
Description—Residential placements for children with emotional and behavioural difficulties are generally used when the problems are sufficiently severe that
they require a greater level of professional care on a 24-hour basis than can be
provided in local foster or group homes. There are approximately 400 children in
British Columbia at any given time placed in 41 specialized residential treatment
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 49
programs. The average capacity of these resources is 10. (This figure does not
include those children in residential care at Woodlands, Glendale, or Tranquille.)
The majority of these programs are operated through independent societies
which vary in objectives and treatment methods. The Ministry continues to emphasize shorter-term residential treatment and greater community involvement and
family support. The goal of this kind of residential placement is to help the child
adjust to living again in his community with the minimum of support possible. A
number of the societies are developing shorter-term assessment capacities and have
initiated day programs to assist this movement.
The majority of the resources are highly staffed. A number of resources have
staff resident ratios of one to one or higher.
Program cost-sharing—Costs for the Specialized Residential Treatment
Programs are shared equally with the Federal Government.
Ministerial expenditures for specialized residential treatment programs in
calendar year 1977 and fiscal years 1971/72 to 1976/77 were as follows:
Table 25—Specialized Residential Treatment Programs, Ministerial
Expenditures, Calendar Year 1977 and Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1976/77
$ Million $ Million
1977    15.4 1973/74   8.8
1976/77    12.3 1972/73    4.7
1975/76    13.2 1971/72   4.4
1974/75    8.4
Note—Costs exclude operating costs for Woodlands, Glendale, and Tranquille, with
the exception of 1973/74 when Glendale's operating costs were included.
BRITISH COLUMBIA COUNCIL FOR THE FAMILY
A new development in 1977 was the establishment of the British Columbia
Council for the Family, as recommended by the B.C. Conference on the Family,
1975/76. The Council is a registered, non-profit society, with representatives from
religious bodies, ethnic groups, community agencies, and the four major political
parties.
The council is funded by the Government through the Ministry of Human Resources, religious bodies, and interested individuals and organizations. The participation of all the parties indicates an increasing awareness that all segments of
society must work together to strengthen and support family life.
The Ministry of Human Resources is making a major contribution to the
Council by providing the two staff (a Co-ordinator and Secretary), office space,
and a budget for expenses. This allows the council to develop a truly Province-
wide organization with local branches which will provide a family focus in the community and stimulate and facilitate family support programs.
The council also has liaison with the Ministries of Education, Attorney-General,
Consumer and Corporate Affairs, Health, Provincial Secretary, Municipal Affairs
and Housing, Recreation and Conservation, all of which have family-related services.
In addition to developing self-help programs at the community level, the
council has two other major purposes:
 L 50 HUMAN RESOURCES
(1) To be a forum where responsible representatives of communities
throughout the Province may communicate to each other, to various
levels of government, voluntary agencies, and the private sector,
their concerns about the needs of the family, and receive help in
preparing plans and projects to meet such needs:
(2) In association with appropriate bodies, local, provincial, national,
or international, to increase public knowledge, arouse public concern, and promote positive action to enhance the well-being of the
family.
A major program Provincially was the proclamation and celebration of "Family
Month" in May. In May 1977, the first Family Month, 45 committees organized
activities in 58 communities. Along with the family fun events, picnics, swimming,
fishing, bike rides, and neighbourhood cleanups, there were essay and poster contests, displays of community services in shopping malls, and family educational
programs.   Some ongoing family support projects were also initiated.
Program cost-sharing—The costs for the British Columbia Council for the
Family are shared by the Ministry of Human Resources, up to a maximum of
$48,000, with the Council contributing, to date, approximately $20,000, which
covers Family Month promotion, seed money for local branches, the cost of the
Board and committee expenses, and all other operating expenses.
 SECTION HI
INCOME MAINTENANCE
SERVICES
CONTENTS
GAIN— PAGE
Basic Income Assistance Program    53
For the Handicapped    56
For Seniors—Age 60 to 64  57
Supplementary Age Benefits to OAS/GIS/SPA  58
Provincial Rehabilitation and Employment Program (PREP)  60
Work Activity Program  61
Incentive Allowance Program    62
Community Involvement Program  63
Training and Education Program  63
Repatriation  64
Indigent Burials  65
  REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 53
GAIN—BASIC INCOME ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
Program objective—The objective of the Basic Income Assistance Program
is to provide a substitute income sufficient to maintain a basic standard of living for
those persons under age 60 years who are unable to provide for themselves through
employment or other resources.
Description—Basic income assistance recipients are comprised of the following groups of people:
1. Single-parent families—The largest group of recipients is made up mainly of
mothers and their children. The intent of the program is to provide security to the
mother so that she can devote her time to raising her children.
2. Persons unable to be employed for physical or mental health reasons—A
large percentage of income assistance recipients are unemployed due to physical or
mental health reasons. Often the disability is of a temporary nature and the program
attempts to provide the necessary financial and social supports during the period of
convalescence. It is hoped that the recipient will eventually be able to return to
full-time or at least part-time employment. People in this group are under extra
psychological stress due to the fact that they are no longer participating in the work
force and often there is only minimal participation in the social life of the
community.
3. Children living with relatives—Although the Ministry's goal is to keep
parents and children together, in some instances of parental illness, desertion, or
other reasons, children must be placed in another home. Placing them with relatives
is usually a positive step in that some continuity of familiar surroundings is provided,
and the child is less upset by the move. The program provides the relatives with
financial assistance at the same rates as for foster children.
4. Persons who are employable but out of work—The program provides short-
term help to those individuals without means to support themselves. Many of these
recipients are only marginally employable as they do not have the necessary skills
to compete for the more permanent jobs. The duration of aid for this group is brief
as many require help for only a short period of time.
1977 Amendments—In 1977 the Guaranteed Available Income for Need
Regulations (GAIN) were amended several times. In so far as the basic assistance
program is concerned, these amendments resulted primarily in new benefit levels
for those on assistance less than four months, the availability of a shelter overage
to single individuals for whom no job was available, a revised definition of the term
"spouse", and a clarification of some incomes included in the term "unearned
income".
Applying for income assistance—Eligibility for income assistance is
according to criteria legislated in the GAIN Act and regulations. An examination of
need is based on an individual's or a family's financial assets, income, housing costs,
and family size. Certain assets and income are excluded from consideration, for
example, the family home and car and Federal family allowances are exempt.
 L 54 HUMAN RESOURCES
Basic income assistance rates to eligible persons are as follows:
Table 26—Basic Income Assistance Rate Schedule as of L
(Applicable rates during first four months of eligibility for
Family Unit Size
(Number of Persons)                                             Support              Shelter
$                         $
One   ..   100                  75
December 1977
benefits)
Monthly Total
Basic Maximum
$
175
285
335
385
435
480
520
560
600
640
Two 	
  165                 120
Three  	
...... 200                135
Four 	
  235                150
Five	
...... 275                160
Six  	
...... 310                170
Seven     ..
.  340                180
Eight 	
...... 370                190
Nine   	
...... 400                200
Ten  	
...... 430                210
Table 27—Basic Income Assistance R
(For persons on assistance five o
Family Unit Size
(Number of Persons)
One (under aee 55) 	
2te Schedule
r more conseci
Support
$
100
155
165
200
.. 220
235
270
... 310
as of December 1977
itive months)
Monthly Total
Shelter        Basic Maximum
$                         $
75                175
75                230
120                285
120                 320
120                 340
135                370
150                420
160                470
170                515
180                555
190                595
200                635
210                675
One (age 55 or over) 	
Two (adults under 55)    	
Two (one adult, one child) 	
Two (two adults, one or both 55
Three   	
+ )-
Four  	
Five    	
Six  	
345
375
.'. 405
Seven     	
Eight   	
Nine  	
435
465
Ten   	
Shelter overage allowance—Where an individual or family's actual rental
cost, or mortgage and property tax cost exceed the amount of the basic rate for
shelter, 75 per cent of the extra amount, up to a ceiling of $500, may be provided
by the Ministry.
For single persons, the maximum monthly shelter overage that may be granted
is $40.
Items of special need—There are often items of special need required by
income assistance recipients who experience emergencies but do not have assets,
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
L 55
family help, or credit resources to meet the need. Within the provisions of the
GAIN Regulations, most of these needs, if they are essential, can be provided.
Examples of special need are repairs to washing-machines, stoves, and similar
appliances, repairs to septic tanks or other essential household repairs which, if not
repaired, could result in a hazardous condition or would affect the recipients' health.
Expenditures for items of special need were as follows:
Table 28—Items of Special Need, Ministerial Expenditures,
Calendar Year 1977 and Fiscal Years 1972/73 to 1976/77
1911  3,689,917
1976/77  2,931,327
1975/76  3,995,513
1974/75  2,344,397
1973/74   1,097,095
1972/73      281,555
Various other forms of help are given by the Ministry and include purchase
of tools or clothing to help a recipient secure employment and provision of transportation and moving costs when it is necessary to move to take advantage of a confirmed job opportunity in another community. A dietary allowance for special
health conditions, of up to $20 per month, may be granted on the recommendation
of the family physician. A natal diet allowance of $25 per month to cover higher
food costs may be allotted to expectant mothers for several months before and after
the birth. To help families with children, it has been the practice of this Ministry
to pay a school start-up fee. In 1977 the start-up fee was increased to $20 per
year for children under 12 years of age, and to $30 for children over the age of 12.
It is also the practice of the Ministry at Christmas-time to allot an additional $15
per single recipient, or $25 per family.
Earning exemption—A very supportive policy for recipients has been the
earnings exemption. This allows a recipient to engage in part-time work without
losing all financial gain through deduction from his income assistance.
The Ministry allows exemptions on earnings of $50 per month for a single
person and $100 per month for a person with dependants or a single handicapped
person. This policy encourages part-time employment that helps the recipient to
gain or retain job skills that may eventually lead to full-time employment. (See also
description of the Incentive Opportunities Program.)
Table 29—Average Number of Recipients per Month: Basic Income Assistance, Fiscal Years 1972/73 to 1976/77 and January to December 19771
105,300
108.500
111,693
127,551
112,938
112,770
1972/73    1973/74    1974/75    1975/76    1976/77     1977
i December 1977 statistics had to be estimated to average 1977 figures due to change in computer
systems and unavailability of final December statistics.
 L 56
HUMAN RESOURCES
Note—Averaging statistical data January to December 1977, the number of
basic assistance recipients in various categories were as follows: 29,170 heads of
families (approximately two thirds of which were single parents); 59,091 dependants, mainly children; 14,397 single men; 10,111 single women.
Supplementation of low-income earners—Persons working in part-time
or full-time employment at low wages may apply to have their income supplemented
up to the appropriate income assistance level, as determined by family size.
Program cost-sharing—All basic income assistance programs are shared
equally with the Federal Government.
Total expenditures on income assistance are as follows:
Table 30—Total Basic Income Assistance, Ministerial Expenditures,
Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1976/77 and Calendar Year 1977
$94
million
$92
million
$117
million
$187.5
million
$171.98
million
$157.77
million
$165.79
million
1971/72        1972/73        1973/74        1974/75        1975/76        1976/77 1977
GAIN FOR THE HANDICAPPED
Program objective—The objective of the GAIN for Handicapped Program
is to provide a guaranteed minimum income to residents of British Columbia
declared handicapped.
Description—Eligibility for assistance is based on an individual test or application. An examination is made of the individual or family's financial assets,
income, family size, and the individual must have a medical examination which
determines if the person may be designated a handicapped person within the
meaning of the regulations. The individual must be over 18 years of age, have a
monthly income not in excess of the guaranteed level, and, if single, the assets must
not exceed $2,500 (if with dependants, the assets must not exceed $5,000). Certain
items and income are excluded from consideration, for example, the family home
and car and Family Allowances are exempt. If all aspects of eligibility are met,
the monthly income levels vary from $265 per month in the case of a single person
up to $835 per month for a family of 10, provided both parents are handicapped.
An additional amount may be paid for shelter if the rental or mortgage payments
are in excess of the basic shelter provision.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 57
In December 1977, there were 11,435 recipients of benefits through this program. Non-handicapped dependants of handicapped recipients would be shown
statistically in the GAIN—Basic Income Assistance Program.
Program cost-sharing—Through the Canada Assistance Plan the Federal
Government participates in cost-sharing of this program to individuals whose assets
do not exceed $1,500 in the case of a single person or $2,500 in the case of a person
with dependants. Therefore, because the Ministry's eligibility criteria is in excess
of this amount, the Province does not obtain full Federal cost-sharing on all benefits
paid to handicapped persons. Approximately 93 per cent of the Ministry's dollar
expenditures on this program are cost-shareable with the Federal Government.
GAIN FOR SENIORS, AGE 60 TO 64
Program objective—The objective of the GAIN for Seniors Program is to
provide a guaranteed minimum monthly income to all senior citizens of British
Columbia who are age 60 years and older and who are not in receipt of Federal Old
Age Security benefits or Federal Spouses Allowances.
Description—Eligibility for this program is determined on an individual
application basis. An examination is made of the individual's assets, income, familv
size, and other personal data. To be eligible a person must meet the following
qualifications:
(a) Be age 60 years or over and not in receipt of Federal Old Age
Security benefits, nor the Federal Spouse's Allowance:
(b) Have a monthly income not in excess of the GAIN guarantee level:
(c) Have five consecutive years' residence in Canada or hold Canadian
citizenship and reside in British Columbia:
(d) If single, have assets not in excess of $2,500, or if with dependants,
assets not in excess of $5,000. Certain assets such as a family home
and car are excluded from consideration.
If the individual or family meet the above-noted requirements, there would be
eligibility to raise their monthly income level to $265 per month in the case of a
single person and to $530 per month in the case of a couple, both of whom are over
age 60.
Most individuals who apply for this program are those who have retired from
employment or who are dependants of retired individuals, or widowed. As of
December 1977, there were 13,757 recipients who were either single or married
couples both over age 60. Grants to dependent family members are shown under
the GAIN—Basic Income Assistance Program. Since July 1975, there has been a
continuing decrease in the number of recipients under this program, because of the
Federal Government implementing its Spouse's Allowance Program; because of an
asset test being applied effective April 1976; and because of increased private and
Federal pensions.
Program cost-sharing—The Federal Government shares in the cost of
assistance to those individuals designated as "persons in need" under the Canada
Assistance Plan. Under the current agreement, approximately 25 per cent of the
total Provincial expenditure is returned to the Province in the form of Federal
cost-sharing payments. With the inception of the asset test, this shareable percentage has been constantly increasing.
 L 58
HUMAN RESOURCES
GAIN SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS TO
OAS/GIS/SPA RECIPIENTS
Program objective—The objective of the Supplementary Benefits Program
is to provide a guaranteed minimum income to all senior citizens in British Columbia, 60 years of age and over, who are in receipt of the Federal Old Age Security
benefits (OAS), Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS), and Federal Spouse's
Allowance (SPA).
Description—Persons age 65 and over with dependent spouses age 60 and
over, resident in British Columbia, who are receiving Federal Old Age Security/
Guaranteed Income Supplement and related Spouse's Allowance payments, are
automatically granted a supplementary payment by the Province to raise their total
income level from all sources to a monthly average of $294.82 in the case of a
single person and $293.95 each in the case of a married couple (December 1977
rates). The guaranteed minimum income has continued to increase each quarter
year when the Federal OAS/GIS/SPA increases.
Eligible persons are paid automatically on the basis of information received
from the Federal Old Age Security Division. As of December 1977, a total of
92,506 British Columbians received benefits through this system.
Program cost-sharing—During 1977, needs testing was initiated on all
recipients of the GAIN Supplement Program, in order to achieve Federal cost-
sharing.   Prior to such needs testing, there was no Federal cost-sharing.
Statistical data—The following bar graph represents the number of people
in receipt of GAIN for Seniors and Handicapped payments in December 1972,
1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, and 1977. The Federal Government's Spouse's Allowance Program, the inclusion of qualifying asset levels, and increased Federal pensions
accounted for the 1977 reduction in numbers.
Table 31—Total GAIN for Seniors and Handicapped Recipients,
1972 to 1977
110,000
persons
118,000
persons
128,000
persons
122,000
persons
124,000
persons
117,698
persons
December
1972
December
1973
December
1974
December
1975
December
1976
December
1977
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
Figure 2
GAIN Recipients as at December 1977
L 59
(Group C)
OAS/GIS/SPA
Supplement
78.6%
Group A. Handicapped:   11,435 persons
Group B. Age 60 and older, not receiving OAS/GIS/SPA: 13,757
persons
Group C Age 60 and older, receiving
OAS/GIS/SPA:   92,506   per-
Proportion of Total Expenditure, GAIN for Seniors and Handicapped, December 1977
Group A. Handicapped   $2,936,266
Group B. Age 60 and not receiving
OAS/GIS/SPA .... $3,211,081
Group C. Age 60 and receiving
OAS/GIS/SPA .... $2,966,166
Total  $9,113,513
 L 60
HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 32—Number of GAIN for Seniors (60 and Over Not in Receipt of Old
Age Security /Guaranteed Income Supplement or Spouse's Allowance)
Recipients
16,281
13,757
As at December 1976
As at December 1977
Table 33-
-Expenditures by the Ministry for GAIN for Seniors
and Handicapped Program
Calendar Year
Expenditure
$
109,039,198
  114,220,370
   106,990,000
Calendar Year
Expenditure
$
100,042,000
54,479,000
4,624,000
1977
1976
1975 	
1974 	
1973	
19721 	
ed December 1972.
1 Program commenc
PROVINCIAL REHABILITATION AND EMPLOYMENT
PROGRAM   (PREP)
Program objective—The objective of the Provincial Rehabilitation and
Employment Program (PREP) is to find employment and job-training opportunities
for income assistance applicants and recipients.
Description—PREP staff, consisting of job-finders and stenographers, are
located in 22 offices throughout the Province. All PREP offices, except Surrey,
are located in Canada Manpower Centres. PREP staff contact employers to locate
job opportunities, and they refer welfare recipients to these jobs. At the same time,
they co-operate closely with Canada Manpower, using Federal training programs
for clients who require job skills and Federal mobility and relocation grants to help
clients move to job opportunities. PREP staff and Canada Manpower staff share
information on job opportunities when either party is unable to fill a job vacancy
with its own clients.
The flow of job opportunities is maintained by regular personal employer visits
by the job-finders, and by direct mailing and telephone soliciting.
PREP staff also use a variety of indirect approaches to create and enhance
awareness of PREP services. Informational services are supplied to trades organizations, employer groups, chambers of commerce, and other job-generating
resources. PREP personnel undertake speaking engagements, furnish program
brochures, and present the program at fairs and exhibitions.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 61
PREP staff continue to use programs for client training sponsored by Canada
Employment centres, but there is a noteworthy trend toward initiation of work
preparation and work activity projects by PREP with the co-operation of private
enterprise, other Provincial Government ministries, and administrations within the
Ministry of Human Resources, such as the Community Programs Division.
The incentive work program of the Ministry is used very extensively by PREP
as a training resource for registrants interested in clerical careers. Field offices
report good placement results in private business and industry following a period of
incentive training within the program.
Notwithstanding a sharp decline in the job market, the Provincial Rehabilitation
and Employment Program maintained a healthy success rate in assisting its registrants to gain or regain a useful place in the work force. PREP employment coordinators applied to good advantage the experience gained in the first program
year, both with respect to improving their job-finding techniques, and with respect
to adapting their services to peculiar features of local or area employment markets.
Increasing familiarity with opportunities offered by pre-employment and vocational
training programs was an additional factor attributing to the program's success,
despite unprecedented unfavourable national employment conditions.
In retrospect, the program's pursuit of the Ministry's objectives during the year
1977 has been most successful in terms of developing and presenting viable alternatives for those seeking income assistance.
Program cost-sharing—The cost of the Provincial Rehabilitation and
Employment Program (PREP) is shared equally with the Federal Government.
WORK ACTIVITY PROGRAM
Program objective—The objective of the Work Activity Program is to
provide rehabilitation in the form of employment preparation programs for persons
who have unusual difficulty in obtaining and maintaining employment or in benefiting from other training programs.
Description—Groups of trainees who have been carefully selected go through
a training program which may last six or more months. The components include a
work-setting, such as a forestry project, counselling and education, which will
include some life-skills training, designed to help the individual cope with his or her
environment (e.g., money management, job interview techniques, holding on to
a job).
In addition, programs can be adapted for special groups such as the handicapped.
The programs can be available to persons receiving some form of income
assistance under the GAIN Regulations, or are considered likely to be in need under
the terms of the Canada Assistance Plan.
There were three projects with a capacity for 98 participants in operation at
the start of 1977. Through expansion of existing programs and approvals for five
additional programs, there were eight projects at the end of the year with a capacity
to serve 234 participants at a time. The average time of participation being six
months, 468 clients could be served in one year by means of those projects. Proposals for an additional three projects were in the processing stage toward the end
of the year, with an additional seven proposals being received for processing.
Existing work projects serve a variety of handicapped and socially disadvantaged clients in the Fraser Valley, Cowichan Valley, Victoria, Surrey, Vancouver,
and Kamloops.    Specific target groups are those disadvantaged through lack of
 L 62                                                   HUMAN RESOURCES
education or work experience, those with debilitating family and personal circumstances and problems, those with physical, mental, and emotional handicaps, and
youth.
Women were involved as participants in most projects this year.   This move,
along with the inclusion of clients with a variety of handicapping conditions, represented a significant expansion of the focus of the work activity concept.   Proposals
for new projects came from several regions, some of which had not had projects
jreviously, and this represents a growing interest in using such projects as part ol
;he rehabilitation process for special needs clients.    It should be noted that a
workshop for all project co-ordinators and supervisors was arranged and set up
for January 1978 as a prelude to a year of new energy, new ideas, and new projects.
Program cost-sharing—The cost of the Work Activity Program is shared
equally with the Federal Government pursuant to the terms of Part III of the
Canada Assistance Plan Act.
Ministerial expenditures for work activity projects are as follows:
Table 34—Work Activity Projects, Ministerial Expenditures, Calendar
Year 1977, and Fiscal Years 1972/73 to 1976/77
Year                              Expenditure                     Year                                Expenditure
$                                                                                  $
1977 (Calendar)  641,177                1974/75   313,117
1976/77    340,288                1973/74    _  366,710
1975/76         .     399,604                1972/73    279,257
INCENTIVE ALLOWANCE PROGRAM
Program objective—The objective of the Incentive Allowance Program is
to provide a work experience to an income assistance recipient in preparation for
entry into the employment market.
Description—A special allowance of up to $50 per month can be paid to a
single income assistance recipient and up to $100 per month can be paid to a family
lead for participation in a local community service program. This is a rehabilitative
measure and the purpose is to give the individual an opportunity to gain experience
and confidence in working with others, as well as making a contribution to the
community. The payment provides incentive and assists with costs of clothing and
transportation that are required by this kind of participation.
Incentive allowance is paid to income assistance recipients, who may be handicapped persons or persons who have been removed from the labour force for a long
jeriod of time, such as mothers who have either never worked or have not worked
'or a long period of time due to family responsibilities.   The allowance is not
ordinarily paid for a period exceeding six months, but depending on the individual
situation, job readiness, and opportunity for employment, the program may be
extended to 12 months where necessary.   Eligible persons are selected on the basis
oi availability of opportunities and the potential of the individual for rehabilitation.
Handicapped benefit recipients may receive the allowance for a more extended
period of time where this is essential.   There are approximately 2,400 persons
participating in the program at any one time.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
L 63
Program cost-sharing—The cost of the Incentive Allowance Program is
shared equally with the Federal Government.
The following table illustrates numbers of persons and costs involved in the
Incentive Allowance Program:
Calendar Year
1977	
Table 35-
—Incentive Allowance Prograrr
Number on Program
in 12-month Period
      2,400
Cost of Program
$
2,234,810
2,965,270
2,415,000
4,400,000
2,550,000
1976  ......
      2,400
1975  ......
     2,000
1974 ......
     4,200
1973   ......
         2,400
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT PROGRAM
Program objective—The objective of the Community Involvement Program
is to provide an opportunity for socially handicapped or otherwise unemployable
persons to participate with others in community services endeavours, thereby benefiting both themselves and their community.
Description—This program was introduced in June 1976. Like the Incentive Allowance Program, the Community Involvement Program is operated at the
local level with income assistance recipients participating in volunteer activities in
non-profit agencies, performing useful community work.
The Ministry of Human Resources provides a grant to participants in this
program of $50 per month to cover transportation, clothing, and miscellaneous
expenses associated with the program.
Unlike the Incentive Opportunities Program, there are no compulsory hours
for participants in the Community Involvement Program, nor is the duration of the
contract time-limited. These aspects are determined by the needs of the individual.
Program cost-sharing—The Community Involvement Program is cost-
shared equally with the Federal Government.
TRAINING AND EDUCATION PROGRAM
Program objective—The objective of the Training and Education Program
is to assist income assistance recipients needing vocational, educational, or rehabilitative training in order to obtain employment.
Description—The Training and Education Program is used to assist income
assistance recipients to obtain vocational training to enhance employment opportunities when this assistance is not available from any other source. In addition
to continued payment of income assistance, up to $20 per month in the case of a
single recipient and up to $30 per month in the case of a family head is provided
to assist with cost of transportation fees and school supplies. An amount up to
$50 monthly for a single recipient, or up to $100 monthly for recipient with
dependants, may be exempted as income if received through a Ministry of Education loan or grant arrangement, or a Canada Manpower training allowance.
 L 64
HUMAN RESOURCES
Educational and vocational upgrading is paid to income assistance recipients
who cannot be assisted from other sources such as Canada Manpower or the
Ministry of Education, and who require assistance in order to become employable.
Eligible persons are identified by Ministry staff, often with the aid of, or recommendation from, the Provincial Rehabilitation and Employment staff (PREP) of
the Ministry. The constant endeavour of all Ministry staff is to assist income
assistance recipients to become employed. If the persons are deemed not "job
ready" due to lack of education or vocational training, they are assisted by this
program.
The restricted employment market during 1977 presented problems for recipients seeking upgrading and vocational training courses that will best benefit
them when seeking employment. A survey of major district offices of the Ministry
indicated the following concerns:
(1) There are lengthy waiting-periods before clients are able to participate in vocational or job skill training courses. Too often, the
waiting-period outlasts the clients' motivation and patience.
(2) Too often there are no job opportunities for graduates of vocational
training.
These identified problems have required closer co-ordination of efforts between PREP staff, financial assistance workers administering income assistance
benefits, and staff of the Canada Manpower centres.
Program cost-sharing—The cost of Training and Education Programs for
income assistance recipients is shared equally with the Federal Government.
Table 36-
-Educational Upgrading and Vocational Training, Ministerial
Expenditures, Calendar Years 1972-77
$160,000
$80,000
$185,000
$290,000
$303,566
$757,967
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
REPATRIATION
Program objective—The objective of the Repatriation Program is to assist
welfare recipients to return to other provinces, and occasionally other countries,
when required for social reasons.
Description—The program is available to income assistance recipients who
demonstrate a social need for this type of help. Often this is because of health
reasons, having a family in another province, finding employment in another prov-
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
L 65
ince, or wishing to return permanently to one's homeland in another country. The
program, although of much benefit to the client from a strictly humanitarian standpoint, is also a constructive force in that many clients reunited with their families,
or placed in a job, are no longer on income assistance.
Table 37—Repatriation, Ministerial Expenditures, Calendar Year 1977
and Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1976/77
Year
Amount
1977.......  56,038
1976/77....  57,105
1975/76   32,482
1974/75   30,325
Year Amount
$
1973/74    11,951
1972/73-.-      9,224
1971/72   21,369
The increased expenditures for repatriation reflect extra costs of individual
repatriation rather than an upsurge in the number of repatriations.
Program cost-sharing—The program is shared equally with the Federal
Government.
INDIGENT BURIALS
Program objective—The purpose of the Indigent Burial policies is to permit payment of burial or cremation costs where no other resource to meet them
exists.
Description—Burial services, including provision of burial plot, casket,
and basic dignified burial, are provided in accordance with arrangements worked
out with the Funeral Directors Association for deceased persons who have left
no estates, and who have neither families or others able or prepared to take this
responsibility.
Burial or cremation costs are paid on behalf of persons who die within the
Province, leaving no estate to provide for their funeral, and who have no family
or other source able or prepared to meet the cost of burial. The Ministry can be
contacted by police, a relative, Official Administrator, the Public Trustee, or other
interested persons.
Program cost-sharing—The cost of this program is shared equally with
the Federal Government.
Some financial recoveries for funeral costs paid for by the Ministry are made
through claims against estates that become known or settled after burial, or from
refunds of Canada Pension death benefits, where such recovery works no hardship on surviving family members.
Table 38-
Year
-Burials, Ministerial Expenditures, Calendar Year 1977 and
Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1976/77
Amount
$
1977    246,474
1976/77   332,573
1975/76  220,654
1974/75  187,027
Year Amount
$
1973/74.....   158,109
1972/73   166,212
1971 /72..__   187,513
  SECTION rv
HEALTH CARE SERVICES
CONTENTS
Basic Health Care Services
Pharmacare
Page
69
  REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 69
BASIC HEALTH CARE SERVICES
Program objective—The objective of the Health Care Services Program is
to arrange for provision of quality health care for eligible persons at a reasonable
cost.
Description—The Ministry's Health Care Division offers consultation to the
Ministry's district office staff to ensure that they are aware of the available health
care services. In order to ensure the best possible service, the Division has the
capacity to retain specialists in any field for consultation.
The following groups of persons are eligible for health care coverage through
the Ministry:
(1) "Unemployable" persons under 60 years of age who receive GAIN
payments.
(2) Children in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare or in
the home of a relative who receives income assistance on their behalf.
(3) GAIN recipients over 60 years of age who qualify through a needs
test.
Accounts from medical practitioners (doctors, chiropractors, physiotherapists,
etc.) are paid by the Medical Services Plan of British Columbia. Accounts for
hospital services are paid by the Hospital Programs Branch of the Ministry of
Health. The Health Care Division of the Ministry of Human Resources processes
accounts for the following additional services:
A. Medical services—Payment is made for examinations that are required by
the Ministry of Human Resources in connection with the administration of the
GAIN Program.
Payment is made on behalf of eligible persons who require medical clearance
for activities such as camp attendance and sports.
In some cases, when the yearly Medical Services Plan limit for physiotherapy
has been exhausted, the Division may pay for a limited number of additional
treatments.
B. Dental services—Basic dental care is provided for all eligible persons.
Special dental care, such as partial dentures, may be provided, with the prior
approval of the Division and its consultative staff.
Dentists are paid at 90 per cent of their 1977 fee schedule.
C. Optical services—Standard single vision or bifocal glasses are provided
when prescribed by an ophthalmologist or optometrist. Unusual needs, such as
special lenses, trifocals, or contact lenses, may also be provided, with prior approval
of this Division.
Optical suppliers are paid wholesale costs of materials, plus a fee for service.
D. Ancillary services—The Division provides prescribed nontransferable medical needs such as braces and surgical supports when clients' assets do not permit
private purchase.
Prescribed wheel-chairs may also be provided. In such cases the client's
needs may be assessed by the Canadian Paraplegic Association or other specialized
agencies, at the Division's request and expense, for the best advice in ordering the
specific chair or other equipment which will meet the client's physical needs and
environmental circumstances. Purchasing is arranged through the B.C. Purchasing
Commission to obtain the best possible price.
 L 70 HUMAN RESOURCES
E. Transportation—Transportation to and from clinics, nursing-homes, rehabilitation centres, and hospitals can be provided for clients who cannot use public
transportation. In cases of life-saving emergencies, transportation costs may be
met for persons on marginal incomes. Local transportation can be authorized by
the local office. Out-of-Province transportation requires the prior approval of the
Division.
F. Special Health Needs Program—The Division may, at its discretion, provide any of the services listed in sections A to E above to persons on marginal
incomes.
G. Experimental programs—Although program budget is limited, the Division
is always willing to consider provision of extraordinary items or treatment which
may be prescribed for eligible clients. In 1977, for instance, the Division made
some payments for acupuncture treatments and a successful bio-feedback.
Table 39—Gross Costs of Medical Services for Fiscal Years 1972/73
to 1976/77 and Calendar Year 1977
Provincial Ancillary Transporta-
Year                    Medical       Pharmacy        Dental          Optical         Services            tion Total
1977      915,469          252,320       6,152,356       784,813          811,131          570,152 9,486,241
1976/77  1,008,073           625,640        5,487,320        644,315           524,832          438,963 8,729,143
1975/76      793,8681        622,300       4,209,007       486,080          616,2343        374,850 7,102,239
1974/75      754,422           591,5392      2,380,266        409,213          257,808          387,554 4,780,801
1973/74      634,136       3,256,259       2,655,573        322,489          328,510         419,451 7,616,420
1972/73      677,194       3,626,268       2,429,538        304,387          264,522         367,888 7,669,797
1 Costs in 1975 Report included some figures which are now under ancillary services.
2 Substantial reduction in 1974/75 and 1975 Provincial Pharmacy costs are accounted for by the
introduction of the Pharmacare Program, commencing January 1, 1974. Drug costs for individuals
eligible for the Ministry's health care services had been budgeted through the Provincial Pharmacy prior
to January 1, 1974.
3 Increase over 1975 Report costs is due to inclusion of figures which were previously under medical
costs.
Applications for handicapped allowance—With the assistance of consultant
medical specialists, Health Care Division is responsible for deciding on the medical
eligibility of GAIN for Handicapped Persons benefits; 3,030 applications were
processed in 1977.
Program cost-sharing—Most Health Care Division programs are equally
cost-shared with the Federal Government.
Table 40—Total Number of Persons Eligible for Health Care
as at December 31,1966 to 1977
Total Number Total Number
Year of Persons Year of Persons
Dec. 31, 1966   76,474 Dec. 31, 1972   112,836
Dec. 31, 1967   79,085 Dec. 31, 1973   120,836
Dec. 31, 1968   85,430 Dec. 31, 1974   131,855
Dec. 31, 1969   98,902 Dec. 31, 1975   126,633
Dec. 31, 1970  115,512 Dec. 31, 1976   117,682
Dec. 31, 1971   115,813 Dec. 31, 1977   87,975
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1977 L 71
PHARMACARE
Program objective—The objective of the Pharmacare Program is to provide
full or partial financial assistance to eligible persons purchasing designated prescription drugs, osteomy supplies, and designated prosthetic appliances.
Description—Pharmacare administers four programs, each benefiting a
different group of people. While benefits are identical within the four plans, eligibility and degrees of assistance vary.
Pharmacare is of particular benefit to the senior citizens of British Columbia
for, of the 281,000 senior citizens in the Province, more than half have no taxable
income. Approximately 30 per cent of the elderly suffer from one or more chronic
diseases or conditions, many of which can be controlled or alleviated by the proper
use of drugs.
Before establishment of this program in 1974, the expense of proper medication represented a heavy burden for the elderly. Accounting for approximately
10 per cent of our population, the elderly received 22 per cent of all prescriptions
and accounted for over 28 per cent of all drug expenditures. Following the lead
of British Columbia, most other provinces have instituted free drug programs for
the elderly, and 90 per cent of Canada's senior citizens are now covered by a
Provincial drug plan.
Normal professional services of physicians and pharmacists are extended to
Pharmacare recipients in an identical manner to that enjoyed by all citizens.
A higher number of prescriptions are being filled for elderly citizens than was
the case prior to Pharmacare. This, however, was a prime consideration in establishing the program, as many elderly citizens avoided having a prescription filled
due to the cost factors. Failure to obtain necessary medication meant incomplete
therapy and possible waste of the medical and/or hospital care already provided.
Pharmacare also provides fully paid assistance to all citizens declared eligible
for medical benefits of the Ministry of Human Resources as well as to all citizens
receiving "care" in long-term care facilities.
Universal Pharmacare, introduced in June 1977, provides partial protection
against major drug and other expenses for all citizens not receiving benefits on a
fully paid basis. Universal Pharmacare will provide 80 per cent reimbursement for
all eligible expenses exceeding $100 in a calendar year.
PHARMACARE PLANS
Details of the various plans may be summarized as follows:
Plan A—Any person who has resided in the Province of British Columbia for
90 days or more and who is 65 years of age or more is entitled to receive free of
charge designated benefits prescribed by a physician, upon presentation of a
Pharmacare card to the pharmacist or other supplier filling the prescription.
Any person 65 years or over registered with the Province's medical insurance
carrier, the British Columbia Medical Plan, is automatically provided with a
Pharmacare card.
Plan C—Plan C is designed to provide eligible persons (exclusive of senior
citizens) in receipt of financial assistance from the Ministery of Human Resources
with their prescription drugs free of charge. Children in foster care are included
in this plan.
As a general rule, the persons eligible for benefits under Plan C are those
persons in receipt of financial assistance from the Ministry of Human Resources
 L 72
HUMAN RESOURCES
because of inability to work or, in the case of single parents, those persons who
must stay home to care for their young children. The person who is able to work,
but who is temporarily in receipt of financial assistance because of unemployment,
is not eligible for these benefits.
Plan D—Plan D is intended to provide full payment for designated benefits
received by those citizens resident in licensed long-term care facilities.
Plan E—Plan E will provide 80 per cent reimbursement of all allowable
expenses exceeding $100 in a calendar year, provided the recipient is not eligible
for fully paid assistance and is registered with the B.C. Medical Services Plan.
The following table presents figures on the number of persons registered for
benefits in the four plans:
Table 41—Number of Persons Eligible for Pharmacare in 1977
Estimated
Plan Number of Persons
A       281,000
C     100,000
D      17,000
E          2,200,000
Total     2,598,000
Program cost-sharing—At present only costs relating to prescription drugs
and supplies provided to holders of a valid Ministry Medical Services Program card
are shareable equally with the Federal Government. These card-holders are income
assistance recipients and children in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare.
 SECTION V
COMMUNITY PROGRAMS
SERVICES
CONTENTS
Page
Achievement Centres Program    — 75
Bus Passes    78
Community Grants Program  79
Community Human Resources and Health Centres    85
Vancouver Resources Board  87
Counselling    87
Homemaker/Housekeeper Services    90
Meals on Wheels Program .  93
Senior Citizens Counsellor Service    94
Seniors Day Centres Program  95
  REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
L 75
ACHIEVEMENT CENTRES PROGRAM
Program objective—The objective of the Achievement Centres Program is
to provide assistance to registered non-profit societies or agencies which operate
programs designed to improve the quality of life for handicapped persons over
school-leaving age.
Description—At least three types of achievement centres have evolved
throughout the Province:
(1) Centres which offer programs for teaching and practice of life skills
and social skills, and which often use arts and crafts as focal points
of operation:
(2) Workshops which aim to provide supervised and non-competitive
work for those persons unable to enter the regular labour force
(this is most often accomplished by the manufacture or refurbishing
of articles for sale, or contract work for other organizations):
(3) Work-rehabilitation programs, which by means of assessment, training, and job-seeking, aim to place people into the regular labour
force.
A number of centres operate components of all three programs.
To be eligible for financial support from the Ministry of Human Resources,
operators of centres must agree to the following conditions:
(1) To serve physically or mentally handicapped persons over school-
leaving age, regardless of the handicapping condition:
(2) To provide evidence of continuing community support:
(3) To accept participants from community boarding-homes without
charging a fee (approximately half of the subsidized centres in the
Province charge a "training fee" to participants who do not reside in
boarding-homes):
(4) To ensure that charges made for contract work are comparable to
rates charged by the private sector for similar work performed:
(5) To operate under the auspices of a registered agency or non-profit
society.
Once approved, centres submit monthly billing forms to the Ministry of Human
Resources. Payment is based on a formula using the number of hours per month
spent by the participants in a centre's programs (referred to as "user-hours"). The
monthly grants give assistance with staff salaries and/or costs of supplies.
The current formula pays a rate of 62.5 cents per "user-hour." In October
1977, the transportation allowance to help people attend the centres was increased
from $10 to $20 a month.
At year-end, 67 centres were in receipt of grants, and the amounts paid to each
are listed at the end of this section. Approximately 4,000 persons attend the centres
each month.
Handicapped Industries Guild—Those agencies which operate sheltered
workshops continue a drive to expand their spheres of operation into wider areas
of production and services. To assist these objectives the Ministry has established
a Handicapped Industries Guild which operates under the direction of a Boafd
established by appointment from the Minister of Human Resources, and funded
under the auspices of the Community Care Services Society.
The guild has specific terms of reference in the areas of product development,
marketing, promotion, quality control, and transportation. Workshop societies may
avail themselves of the assistance offered, but there is no obligation for them to do
 L 76 HUMAN RESOURCES
so.   Autonomy of the societies, with community participation, still remain key
factors in the Achievement Centres Program.
Program cost-sharing—The Federal Government shares costs based on
the percentage of achievement centre participants whose income is no higher than
Provincial income support levels. For example, if 80 per cent of an achievement
centre's participants are GAIN recipients, the Federal Government will pay 50 per
cent of the costs on that 80 per cent.
Ministerial expenditures to achievement centres in 1977 were as follows:
Amount Granted.
Project Location 1977
Abbotsford: $
MSA Community Services             37,735.39
MSA Association for the Retarded            53,784.00
Armstrong:
Armstrong-Enderby Association for the Mentally Retarded          19,206.25
Burnaby:
Burnaby Association for the Mentally Retarded         53,684.32
Canadian Mental Health Association           5,690.62
Campbell River:
Campbell River District Association for the Mentally Retarded   ..        19,221.55
Castlegar :
Kootenay Society for the Handicapped          11,594.90
Chilliwack:
Chilliwack and District Opportunity Workshop         22,275.00
Courtenay:
Bevan Lodge Association           65,288.13
Cranbrook:
Kootenay Society for Handicapped Children          32,880.38
Creston:
Kootenay Society for Handicapped Children             16,248.50
Dawson Creek:
Dawson Creek Society for Retarded Children            18,807.78
Duncan:
Duncan and District Association for the Mentally Handicapped ....       41,584.00
Grand Forks:
Grand Forks and District Society for the Handicapped         13,662.25
Hope:
Hope Association for the Retarded             10,800.00
Invermere :
Windermere and District Social Service Society  :        15,000.00
Kamloops:
Kamloops Society for the Retarded         80,131.25
Kelowna:
Canadian Mental Health Association          49,612.41
Kelowna and District Society for the Mentally Retarded       52,785.89
Langley:
Langley Association for the Handicapped   — —.      29,752.51
Maple Ridge:
Maple Ridge Association for the Mentally Retarded        27,653.00
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community Services Council         36,792.76
Merritt:
Nicola Valley Association for the Mentally Retarded         12,190.00
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
L 77
Project Location
Mission:
Mission Workshop Association  	
Nanaimo:
Canadian Mental Health Association 	
Nanaimo Association for the Mentally Retarded
Amount Granted.
1977
39,881.02
8,280.00
35,602.29
Nelson:
Kootenay Society for the Handicapped   .,.        22,975.01
New Westminster :
New Westminster-Coquitlam Society for the Retarded          93,815.65
SANE Society              40,265.76
North Vancouver:
Canadian Mental Health Centre    	
North Shore Association for the Mentally Retarded 	
Penticton;
Penticton and District Society for the Mentally Handicapped
Port Alberni:
Alberni District Association for the Mentally Retarded 	
Port Coquitlam :
New View Society    	
Powell River:
Powell River Association for the Mentally Handicapped 	
Prince George:
Prince George and District Association for the Retarded
Princeton:
Princeton and District Community Services	
Quesnel:
Quesnel and District Association for the Mentally Retarded ..
Richmond:
Vancouver-Richmond Association for the Mentally Retarded
Salmon Arm:
Salmon Arm Association for the Mentally Retarded	
Sardis:
Upper Fraser Valley Society for the Retarded    	
Surrey:
Surrey Association for the Mentally Retarded 	
Surrey Rehabilitation Society  	
Terrace:
Terrace Association for the Mentally Retarded
Trail:
Kootenay Society for the Handicapped 	
Vancouver:
Arbutus Work Incentive Society 	
Canadian Mental Health Association
Coast Foundation Society 	
St. James' Social Service Society	
Vancouver Central Lions Club 	
15,266.75
54,898.38
62,605.13
17,954.26
18,951.64
38,994.89
28,998.63
10,198.63
12,780.00
52,415.63
29,976.20
19,017.38
44,714.27
20,580.63
14,814.51
16,396.63
6,971.88
51,669.40
48,542.76
15,940.00
11,250.00
38,054.50
Vancouver Mental Patients Association Society  	
Vancouver-Richmond Association for the Mentally Retarded       148,636.
 L 78 HUMAN RESOURCES
Amount Granted,
Project Location 1977
Vernon: $
Canadian Mental Health Association     26,568.00
Vernon and District Association for the Mentally Retarded   67,656.00
Victoria:
Arbutus Crafts  Association        38,040.14
Canadian Mental Health Association     67,056.14
Garth Homer Achievement Centre .    5,718.13
Greater Victoria Association for the Mentally Retarded   90,218.02
White Rock:
Semiahmoo House Association      37,500.00
Williams Lake:
Williams Lake and District Association for the Mentally Retarded.... 12,644.05
Total cost of Achievement Centres Program in 1977   2,091,230.08
BUS PASSES
Program objective—The objective of the Bus Pass Program is to aid and
encourage mobility among low-income senior citizens and handicapped persons.
Description—Bus passes are issued semi-annually for the period December 1
to May 31 and June 1 to November 30. The cost is $5 for all or part of each
six-month period and permits travel without payment of fares on all B.C. Hydro
urban service vehicles in Victoria and Greater Vancouver.
Bus passes are issued to
(a) residents of British Columbia, 65 years or over, who are in receipt of
the Federal Guaranteed Income Supplement and/or GAIN for
Seniors;
(b) residents of British Columbia, 60 to 64 years of age, who are in
receipt of GAIN Age Benefits;
(c) residents of British Columbia under 60 years of age who are in
receipt of GAIN Handicapped Persons Income Assistance.
Number of passes issued between December 1, 1976, and May 12, 1977,
was 29,500.
Approximately 2,500 first-time applications are processed each issue. It is
anticipated that the program will continue to grow at its present steady rate.
The following table shows the number of passes issued in the last 10 issuing
periods:
Table 42—Number of B.C. Hydro Bus Passes Issued
December 1977   29,765 June 1975   26,685
June 1977   30,443 December 1974   25,428
December 1976  29,543 June 1974   23,000
June 1976   28,718 November 1973   20,570
December 1975   27,970» May 1973     18,657
1 Revision of 1975 Annual Report estimated figures.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 79
Program cost-sharing—Administrative costs of this program are borne by
the Ministry of Human Resources. All revenue occurring as a result of the $5
charge is remitted to B.C. Hydro. The Federal Government does not participate
in this program.
COMMUNITY GRANTS PROGRAM
Program objective—The objective of the Community Grants Program is
to provide encouragement to non-profit, community-based societies to offer social
service programs which meet a recognized need, are supportive to the statutory
programs of the Ministry, and, in addition, offer opportunities for citizens to
volunteer their services.
Description—In all areas outside Vancouver City, societies submit applications for grants through the local office of the Ministry. In order to ensure that
services are co-ordinated, do not duplicate or fragment existing programs, and fall
within the guidelines of the Ministry, all proposals are screened by the Regional
Manager. Recommendations are then forwarded to Community Projects Division,
where staff process the information for senior administration.
In 1977, a total of 264 grants to community projects provided 600 full or
part-time jobs throughout British Columbia (excluding Vancouver City which is
reported as a separate item). The emphasis, however, continues to be on encouraging the use of volunteers and thus a far greater number of persons assisted projects
by providing skills, time, and effort.
The following table shows Ministerial expenditures on community grants in the
calendar year 1977 and fiscal years 1971/72 through 1976/77.
Table 43—Community Grants, Ministerial Expenditures, Calendar
Year 1977 and Fiscal Years 1971/72 and 1976/77
$ $
1977   6,326,184 1973/74 __ 2,871,707
1976/77   5,856,612 1972/73    737,850
1975/76   8,092,303 1971/72    242,678
1974/75   9,313,165
Note—Ministerial   grants  include  those   made   through  the  Vancouver   Resources
Board.
Program cost-sharing—Claims under Part 1 of the Canada Assistance Plan
Welfare Services are made against the Federal Government. The amount of share-
ability varies according to each project. The expectation is that an average between
25 to 30 per cent of total budget will be recovered.
Several of the projects that received community grants are listed in the Report
under the related statutory programs they support. Funded projects that do not
easily fit into one specific category are listed here:
FAMILY SUPPORT PROGRAMS
Amount Granted.
Project Location 1977
Armstrong: $
Armstrong-Spallumcheen Community Services (percentage)        39,132.00
Burnaby:
Burnaby Lifeline Society          55,029.00
 L 80 HUMAN RESOURCES
FAMILY SUPPORT PROGRAMS—Continued
Amount Granted,
Project Location 1977
Chilliwack: $
Chilliwack Community Services (percentage)           11,175.00
Coquitlam :
Coquitlam Share Society (percentage)     —        37,910.25
Grand Forks:
Boundary Family and Individual Service Society (FISS)   935.00
Maple Ridge:
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community Services (percentage)   1,210.00
Merritt:
Merritt Listening Post Society       4,442.49
Penticton:
Penticton Social Planning Council (Special Action Project)         13,982.43
Prince George:
Prince George Moms & Kids Drop-In Centre         22,755.19
Prince Rupert:
Prince Rupert Friendship House Association    9,606.00
Terrace :
Terrace Mothers Time Off           18,927.00
Vancouver:
Catholic Community Services        43,750.00
Coalition of B.C. Rape Centres  31,624.00
Family Services of Greater Vancouver—North Shore Branch  22,060.00
Family Services of West Vancouver    8,000.00
John Howard Society—Family Service Project   41,500.00
Lower Mainland Parents-in-Crisis     22,500.00
North Shore Neighbourhood House (percentage)   9,727,26
Vernon:
Vernon Community Services Society          6,801.00
401,066.62
SOCIAL SUPPORT SERVICE WORKERS
Saltspring Island:
Salt Spring Island Community Society          16,602.00
Victoria:
Downtown Blanshard Advisory Committee    15,309.00
Esquimalt-Vic West-View Royal Advisory Committee   18,444.00
Peninsula Community Association      15,900.00
66,255.00
TRANSPORTATION PROGRAMS
Coquitlam:
Coquitlam Share Society (percentage)              14,379.75
Cranbrook:
Cranbrook Homemakers Service    3,265.92
Dawson Creek:
Community Effort for Senior Citizens          35,810.00
Delta:
Deltassist Society (percentage)            90,845.28
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
TRANSPORTATION PROGRAMS—Continued
L 81
Project Location
Kelowna:
Kelowna Multiple Sclerosis Transportation .
Kimberley:
Kimberley Homemakers Society	
Matsqui-Abbotsford :
Matsqui-Abbotsford Transportation Service
Mission :
Mission Community Services (percentage)
Nelson:
Nelson and District Homemakers Society ..
New Westminster:
Western Society for Senior Citizens	
North Shore:
North Shore Transportation Service 	
Penticton:
Penticton Multiple Sclerosis Society
Penticton and District Social Planning Council (percentage)
Port Alberni:
Port Alberni Wheels for the Handicapped Society  	
Prince George:
Prince George Carefree Society  	
Princeton :
Princeton Community Services (percentage) 	
Quesnel:
Quesnel and District Community Aid —  	
Amount Granted,
1977
$
3,556.50
3,900.00
30,000.00
4,360.00
11,097.75
...     136,215.72
94,941.98
12,212.85
5,064.64
7,629.00
80,937.30
25,884.56
35,052.00
Richmond:
Richmond Volunteer Transportation     2,010.00
Sechelt:
Sunshine Coast Community Resource Society (percentage) —       29,913.49
Surrey:
Surrey Community Resource Society (percentage)        111,574.11
Vernon:
Vernon and District Volunteer Bureau Transportation Project
Victoria :
Arbutus Crafts Society 	
Handicapped Resource Centre—Victoria
Victoria and Vancouver Island Multiple Sclerosis Society
White Rock:
White Rock Community Aid Society	
1,000.00
10,269.15
2,000.00
11,702.00
52,686.78
Pro vince-wide:
B.C. Lions Society for Crippled Children        80,625.00
898,673.47
 L 82 HUMAN RESOURCES
MULTI-SERVICE AGENCIES
Amount Granted,
Project Location 1977
Chilliwack:        . $
Chilliwack Community Services (percentage)        30,731.00
Cowichan:
Cowichan Lake Activity Centre (percentage)           35,356.32
Cowichan Valley Activity Centre (percentage)   5,031.00
Crescent Beach:
Crescent Beach Community Services (percentage)    6,015.00
Delta:
Deltassist Society  (percentage)         59,046.00
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows:
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community Services (percentage)         34,470.00
Matsqui-Sumas- Abbotsford :
Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Community Services (percentage)        35,135.00
Mission:
Mission Community Services (percentage)   —.      29,090.00
Nelson :
Nelson Community Services Centre (percentage)         25,181.00
Parksville:
District 69 Society of Organized Services (percentage)          3,318.00
Penticton:
Penticton and District Social Planning Council (percentage)         11,255.00
Sechelt:
Sunshine Coast Community Resource Society—Community Service
Centre     - .-- 462.00
Surrey :
Surrey Community Resource Society (percentage)   „         37,694.00
312,784.32
YOUTH PROGRAMS
Abbotsford:
Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Community Services  (percentage)  .....       15,796.00
Armstrong:
Armstrong-Spallumcheen Community Services (percentage)           9,179.27
Burnaby:
Burnaby Citizens Development Fund    75,600.00
Burnaby Lochdale Area Community School     11,914.47
Fraser Correction Resources Society PURPOSE     82,054.50
Burns Lake:
Bridge the Gap Society             10,409.55
Campbell River:
Campbell River Youth Centre Society         26,106.00
Comox:
Comox Youth Chance Society         22,648.00
Cowichan:
Cowichan Valley Activity Centre (percentage)           6,290.00
Cranbrook:
Cranbrook Boys and Girls Club     .-      23,968.80
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
YOUTH PROGRAMS—Continued
Project Location
Crescent Beach:
Crescent Beach Community Services (percentage)  	
L 83
Dawson Creek:
Nawican Friendship Centre 	
Delta:
Hillside Boys Club of North Delta
Duncan:
Duncan Community Options Society
Falkland:
Falkland Youth Centre  	
Fort Nelson:
Fort Nelson-Liard Friendship Centre
Grand Forks:
Grand Forks Community Service Worker
Hazelton:
Hazelton Youth Centre   	
Amount Granted,
1977
$
6,015.00
7,840.00
25,422.75
21,178.44
12,893.00
2,500.00
10,054.53
19,470.00
Kamloops:
Kamloops Boys and Girls Club	
Kamloops Community "Y" (Youth Project)
Westsyde Human Action Movement	
Kitimat:
Kitimat Youth Centre   	
Lake Cowichan:
Lake Cowichan and District Community Activity and Resource
Centre (percentage)   	
Maple Ridge:
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community Services (percentage) 	
Mission;
Mission Community Services (percentage)    	
22,957.47
25,605.00
16,877.49
4,845.00
5,344.00
8,466.00
2,180.00
Nanaimo:
Nanaimo Boys and Girls Club            27,967.00
Nelson:
Nelson Youth Activities Society  	
New Westminster:
New Westminster "Y" Detached Youth Worker
North Vancouver:
Capilano Youth Worker
North Shore Neighbourhood House (percentage)
Penticton:
Penticton Boys Club
Penticton Social Planning Council (Employability Project)
Powell River:
Powell River Youth Centre Society   	
Richmond:
Friendship Home Society (Lindsay Garden Project)
Richmond Project Contact .   	
Salmo:
Salmo Youth Centre  	
18,086.70
32,714.00
2,314.47
9,727.26
9,963.00
21,287.00
11,751.00
34,003.00
102,570.00
8,100.00
 L 84 HUMAN RESOURCES
YOUTH PROGRAMS—Continued
Amount Granted.
Project Location 1977
Salmon Arm : $
Shuswap Youth Centre     45,608.73
Sidney:
Sidney Teen Activity Group    7,280.00
Smithers:
Smithers Youth Centre      38,472.00
Surrey:
Grandeur Recreation Society      18,543.42
Guildford Gardens Recreation Society       22,138.00
Mayfair Family Program Society     22,313.00
Victoria:
Victoria Boys and Girls Club (Langford)     17,221.21
Victoria Boys and Girls Club (Newton Gardens)     12,432.00
Victoria "Y" Detached Youth Program    76,125.24
Vic West Community Development Association  38,841.47
Williams Lake:
Cariboo Youth Outreach—The Lighthouse   13,775.22
1,066,848.99
MISCELLANEOUS PROGRAMS
Coquitlam :
Pacific Association of Communication in Friendship Indian Centres
PACIFIC       _        37,500.00
Kelly Lake:
Kelly Lake Community Development—Frontier College        24,342.00
Nanaimo:
Nanaimo Community Employment Strategy Board         16,157.28
Port Coquitlam:
Port Coquitlam Women's Centre              2,550.00
Prince George:
Prince George Community Service Centre   6,000.00
Quesnel:
Quesnel Advisory Committee       500.00
Vernon:
Vernon Social Planning Council     ...         5,292.00
Province-wide:
B.C. Federation of Foster Parents   .._.  56,509.50
B.C. Federation of Women     850.00
B.C. Association of Social Workers    15,547.00
Canadian Council on Social Development     16,000.00
Social Planning and Review Council   ..—   37,500.00
218,747.00
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 85
ANTI-POVERTY/LOW-INCOME GROUPS
Amount Granted,
Project Location 1977
Coquitlam : $
Coquitlam SHARE Society (percentage)        37,910.00
Courtenay:
Upper Island Low Income Society           18,458.00
Kelowna:
Kelowna SHARE Society            10,208.31
New Westminster:
New Westminster SANE Society          26,643.00
North Okanagan:
North Okanagan Aid Society        2,438.00
North Shore:
North Shore Co-operative Projects Society           19,810.00
Sidney:
Sidney Community Action     190.65
Vancouver:
Federated Anti-Poverty Groups     9,000.00
Victoria:
Victoria Community Action Society   18,458.00
Victoria and Vancouver Island Mobile Community Food Service 8,834.74
Victoria Self Help Society        1,074.00
143,272.00
HANDICAPPED PERSONS PROGRAMS
Canadian Wheelchair Sports Association—B.C. Division    10,800.00
Victoria Society for the Recreation of Handicapped Persons   5,000.00
Canadian Paraplegic Association   81,480.00
Garth Homer Achievement Centre       35,189.06
Physically Handicapped Action Committee    14,848.53
Greater Victoria Citizens Advocacy       26,270.25
Senior Citizens Activation and Motivation Program'..   61,936.00
Pacific Association for Autistic Children    10,143.00
Nanaimo Citizens Advocacy     5,610.00
Associaton of Concerned Handicapped     5,697.00
Surrey Rehabilitation Workshop __._.       5,850.00
Nelson Silver King Workshop       750.00
Qualicum Workshop for the Handicapped     800.00
North Shore "Y" Integrated Handicapped Program   1,215.00
265,589.00
COMMUNITY HUMAN RESOURCES AND HEALTH CENTRES
Program objective—The objective of the Community Human Resources
and Health Centres is to provide a community-based, integrated delivery of health
and social services with an emphasis on prevention.
Description—The four Community Human Resources and Health Centres in
the Province (in Granisle, Houston, James Bay (Victoria), and the Queen Charlotte
Islands) are jointly financed and supported by the Ministry of Health and the Min-
 L 86 HUMAN RESOURCES
istry of Human Resources. They provide primary medical care, public health
nursing, and social services under the direction of an elected Community Board.
The Community Resources Board Act provides the legislative basis for these centres.
A multidisciplinary team called the Development Group is responsible for consultation and management of these centres.
The centre's services are available to everyone in the community. Social
services and public health services are provided on the same basis as similar Ministry programs.
The Development Group for Community Human Resources and Health
Centres maintains over-all planning, program, and monitoring responsibility for the
four pilot centres.
In 1977 the Audit Committee's report on the Human Resources and Health
Centres was completed. This committee with representation from RNABC,
BCMA, BCASW, UBC (Faculty of Commerce), Ministry of Health and Ministry
of Human Resources, visited each of the centres twice, and reviewed all available
financial and statistical data pertaining to the centres. In summary, the committee
concluded that the centres were making significant progress toward their stated
objectives; that the centres provided significant improvements in service to the
communities concerned; and that the centres appeared to be cost-effective. The
report recommended that the centres be continued for at least three more years
and that the Government give serious consideration to expanding this concept to
other suitable communities. These recommendations of the Audit Committee were
accepted by the Minister of Health and the Minister of Human Resources.
With the evaluation report behind them, the centres were concentrating more
on program and organizational development at the year-end.
The first terms of the original Board of Directprs of the four centres expired
in November 1977 and new boards were elected in the November elections.
In the summer of 1977 the Development Group for Community Human
Resources and Health Centres commenced its involvement in the planning and
development of the Province's new Long-term Care Program.
In October of 1977 the group was transformed into the Program Development
Group, responsible to the Associate Deputy Minister, Planning and Support Services, Ministry of Health. While still maintaining responsibility for the Human
Resources and Health Centres, the group has been assigned responsibility for planning, policy development, and initiation of major programs within the Ministry of
Health.
In relation to the Long-term Care Program, the Program Development Group,
in conjunction with other branches of Health and the Ministry of Human Resources,
played an integral role in the following areas, working with the staff of Public
Health, Mental Health, and Hospital Programs:
(a) General planning and organizing of the new program:
(b) Co-ordination of policy development:
(c) Determining and negotiating resource requirements for the program:
(d) Recruitment and appointment of key staff positions involved in the
administration of the program:
(e) Orientation of new field and administrative staff in the program.
Program cost-sharing—All those services and programs that are generally
cost-shared within the Ministries of Health and Human Resources are also cost-
shared for the centres.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 87
VANCOUVER RESOURCES BOARD
Program objective—The objective of the Vancouver Resources Board was
to maximize community involvement and accountability with respect to the Board's
operation of all programs of the Ministry in Vancouver.
Description—The Board of Directors consisted of one school trustee, one
parks board commissioner, two aldermen, and three ministerial appointees. A chief
executive officer reported to the board. The comptroller, personnel director, and
eight other managers reported to the chief executive officer. The entire staff, consisting of former staff from the City of Vancouver, the Catholic Family and
Children's Service, and Vancouver Children's Aid reported through this structure.
Legislation was introduced in 1977 to amend the Community Resources
Boards Act. Pursuant to those amendments, the role of the Vancouver Resources
Board was terminated at the end of December 1977, and all personnel and their
positions were transferred to the Ministry of Human Resources, effective January 1,
1978.
COUNSELLING
Program objective—The objective of the Counselling Program is to assist
people who have personal problems that may be of many different types, but which
can be ameliorated by appropriate counselling or referral to a community agency.
Description—When people have personal, social, or family problems that
may or may not be associated with needs relating to income assistance or other
Ministry services and programs, the Ministry of Human Resources provides a counselling and referral service. The Ministry also assists by funding, in whole or in part,
non-profit societies who operate crisis, information, and referral centres and Family
Life programs.
Any person wanting specific information abount community services or needing personal counselling may direct his request to any local Ministry office, or to
any Information and Referral Centre, Crisis Centre, Family Life Centre, or Family
Support Program.
Counselling Services are an integral part of the Ministry's field staff services,
as they are with the Vancouver Resources Board's staff, whose salaries were funded
by the Ministry.
Program cost-sharing—Staff costs are shared equally with the Federal
Government. In the case of community grants, the sharing is determined by the
numbers of persons who are in need, which involves taking into account income
levels according to family size.
The following community grants were made in 1977 to non-profit societies
offering counselling services:
FAMILY LIFE PROGRAMS
Amount Granted,
Project Location 1977
Abbotsford: $
Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Community Services (percentage)         15,796.00
Campbell River:
Campbell River Family Counselling and Crisis Line (percentage)...       13,398.00
Chilliwack:
Chilliwack Community Services (percentage)            4,467.00
Cowichan:
Cowichan Family Life Association           12,613.80
 L 88
HUMAN RESOURCES
FAMILY LIFE PROGRAMS—Continued
Project Location
Golden:
Golden Community Resource Society	
Kamloops:
Kamloops Family Life Association (percentage)
Langley:
Langley Family Services  	
Mission:
Mission Community Services (percentage)
Nanaimo :
Nanaimo Family Life Association .....	
North Shore:
North Shore Institute of Living and Learning
Parksville:
District 69—Society of Organized Services (percentage)
Port Alberni:
Port Alberni Family Guidance Association   	
Saanich:
Saanich Peninsula Guidance Association —
Surrey-White Rock:
Surrey-White Rock Family Life Association
Victoria:
Greater Victoria Citizens Counselling 	
Amount Granted,
1977
2,640.00
32,760.00
19,937.00
4,359.00
16,065.00
14,401.36
3,318.00
17,880.00
16,002.00
17,127.00
30,933.31
221,697.47
CRISIS CENTRE PROGRAMS
Campbell River:
Campbell River Family Counselling and Crisis Centre (percentage)
Coquitlam :
Coquitlam Share Society (percentage)   	
Courtenay:
Crossroads Crisis and Family Service Centre 	
Cranbrook:
East Kootenay Mental Health Centre (percentage)
Fort St. John:
Fort St. John Crisis Line   	
Kamloops:
Kamloops Family Life Crisis Centre
Kelowna:
Advice Service (percentage)	
Maple Ridge:
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community Services—Problem Centre
Nanaimo:
Nanaimo Association for Intervention and Development	
Nelson:
Nelson Community Services Centre (percentage)
13,398.00
37,910.25
25,911.00
15,714.00
765.00
9,240.00
10,677.00
15,723.24
40,644.00
18,751.85
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 89
CRISIS CENTRE PROGRAMS—Continued
Amount Granted.
Project Location 1977
Prince George: $
Prince George Crisis Centre              28,345.38
Quesnel:
Quesnel Contact Line and Centre           24,302.49
Richmond:
Chimo-Richmond Crisis Centre     ._..        51,348.75
Surrey:
Surrey Intersection Society     7,500.00
Terrace:
Terrace  Community Services Crisis and Volunteer Bureau   (percentage)         8,721.25
Vernon:
Vernon and District Volunteer Bureau (percentage)         11,787.50
Victoria:
NEED Crisis Line             32,798.00
353,538.00
VOLUNTEER BUREAUX
(Provide support to many other programs)
Agassiz:
Agassiz Social Services       7,125.03
Capilano:
Capilano Community Services Society   _.   7,419.57
Castlegar:
Kootenay Castlegar Volunteer Exchange       1,746.00
Chilliwack:
Chilliwack Community Services (percentage)           9,498.00
Coquitlam:
Greater Coquitlam Volunteer Bureau    6,375.00
Cranbrook:
East Kootenay Mental Health Society (percentage) _..        15,714.00
East Kootenay Volunteer Bureau     2,655.00
Fort St. John:
North Peace Community Resource Society ...-.   .—       22,838.73
Kelowna:
Advice Service (percentage)         10,677.00
Kitimat:
Kitimat Community Services—Volunteer Bureau         12,335.50
Langley:
Langley Community Services           12,900.00
Langley Family Life Volunteer Training    1,000.00
Matsqui-Sum as-Abbotsford :
Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Community Services  (percentage)        15,796.00
Mission:
Mission Community Services (percentage)          3,487.00
 L 90
HUMAN RESOURCES
VOLUNTEER BUREAUX—Continued
Nelson:
Nelson Community Services (percentage) 	
North Shore:
North Shore Volunteers for Seniors   	
Parksville:
District 69—Society of Organized Services  	
Penticton:
Penticton and  District  Social  Planning  Council—Penticton  Cooperative Community Services 	
Port Alberni:
Port Alberni Volunteer Bureau Society   	
Princeton:
Princeton Community Services (percentage) 	
Sechelt:
Sunshine Coast Community Resource Society (percentage) 	
Smithers :
Smithers Volunteer Bureau     	
Surrey:
Surrey Co-ordinating Centre
Terrace:
Terrace Community Resources Crisis Centre and Volunteer Bureau
(percentage)   	
Vancouver:
Volunteer Bureau of Greater Vancouver   	
Vernon:
Vernon and District Volunteer Bureau (percentage)
Victoria:
Greater Victoria Volunteer Society	
Oak Bay Community Association 	
$
9,643.81
10,830.27
3,318.00
7,878.00
21,191.25
8,628.00
14,956.84
9,211.00
14,388.00
8,711.25
29,125.00
11,552.00
29,910.40
1,667.00
310,578.00
HOMEMAKER/HOUSEKEEPER SERVICES
Program objective—The objective of the Homemaker/Housekeeper Program is to provide a broad range of homemaker and housekeeper services as an
alternative to institutional care for the aged, handicapped, physically and mentally
ill, and to keep families together in times of emotional, mental, or physical stress.
Homemaker services are also provided to ease the burden of long-term chronic
illness, to encourage the reintegration into the community of young disabled persons,
and to assist in improving the child-care and home-management skills of parents
whose children are "at risk" of being apprehended.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
L 91
Description—Homemakers provide temporary or long-term care for families,
the ill, and aged. Duties include household cleaning, laundry, shopping, meal
preparation, teaching of household routine, limited personal care, and the care of
children. A homemaker works under supervision and acts as part of a team in the
support of the family or individual client.
On behalf of eligible persons, the Ministry purchases homemaker services on
a fee-for-service basis from non-profit and, to a lesser extent, proprietary agencies.
Grants are also awarded to community groups to provide home-help services.
During 1977 the use of homemakers and home aides continued to increase
rapidly, resulting in an increase of at least 30 per cent in the staffing complement
of most homemaker agencies. As Ministry staff become increasingly aware of the
valuable role homemakers can play in supporting families and assisting individuals
in their own homes, the demand for well-trained homemakers rises. This demand
is reflected in the number of homemakers enrolled in the Provincial Homemaker
Training Program, co-ordinated by the Ministry in conjunction with the Ministry
of Education and Canada Manpower. In 1977, a total of 240 homemakers completed the training program, compared to 100 homemakers in 1976. Courses were
held in Burnaby, Chilliwack, Duncan, Maple Ridge, Nelson, North Vancouver,
Parksville, Penticton, Sechelt, Surrey, and Victoria.
A total of 62 non-profit societies provided homemaker services in 1977. No
new non-profit homemaker societies were established in 1977.
Wages for homemakers continued to rise in 1977, ranging from $3 to over
$5 per hour for more skilled homemakers. With the emphasis on avoiding or
delaying the unnecessary institutionalization of elderly people, the proportion of
homemaker services provided to the elderly increased, relative to other groups.
Eligibility for homemaker services remained unchanged in 1977 with subsidies
provided on the basis of individual financial need, in accordance with the GAIN
Regulations. Individuals are ineligible for the subsidy if assets exceed $1,500 for a
single person, or $2,500 for a person with dependants.
Toward the end of 1977, responsibility for homemaker services within the
Ministry was transferred from the Adult Care Division to the newly established
Family Support Section of the Family and Children's Services Division. Planning
was also well under way to transfer, effective January 1978, administrative responsibility for the following portions of homemaker services to the Long-term Care
Program of the Ministry of Health:
(1) Assistance to individuals eligible for long-term care (exclusive of
those referred to Ministry of Human Resources for needs testing):
(2) Negotiation of appropriate fees to be charged by individual home-
maker societies:
(3) Homemaker staff training program:
(4) Development of homemaker services:
(5) Establishing and monitoring of standards for homemaker services:
Family support homemaker services will continue to be administered by the
Ministry of Human Resources.
Program cost-sharing—The cost of the Homemaker/Housekeeper Program
is shared equally with the Federal Government.
 L 92
HUMAN RESOURCES
The following table illustrates the Ministry's expenditure for homemakers in
fiscal years 1972/73 to 1976/77 and calendar year 1977:
Table 44—Homemaker Services, Ministerial Expenditures,
Fiscal Years 1972/73 to 1976/77 and Calendar Year 1977
$1,394,221
$2,812,704
$4,258,384
$7,000,155
$7,428,522
,199,252
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
1975/76
1976/77
1977
The following non-profit societies received grants through the Ministry of
Human Resources in 1977 to assist with the administration costs for homemaker
services:
Boundary Homemaker Service Association.
Campbell River Homemaker Services.
Castlegar & District Homemaker Service.
Central Fraser Valley Homemaker Service.
Chilliwack Homemaker Services.
Comox Valley Homemaker Services.
Cowichan Family Life Association.
Cranbrook Homemaker Service.
Creston Valley Homemakers Services.
Delta Homemakers Service Society.
District 69 Society of Organized Services.
Fernie & District Homemakers Service.
Golden Community Resource Society.
Greater Kamloops Homemakers Service.
Hazelton Community Resource Society.
Howe Sound Homemaker Society.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 93
James Bay Community Homemakers Service.
Kaslo & District Homemaker Society.
Kelowna Homemakers Service.
Kimberley & District Homemaker Society.
Langley Homemakers Service Society.
Lower Similkameen Community Services.
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Homemaker Service.
Nakusp & District Homemaker Service.
Nanaimo Red Cross Society.
Nelson & District Homemaker Service.
New Westminster Red Cross Society.
North Peace Homemakers Service Association.
Penticton Homemakers Service.
Port Alberni Homemaker Society.
Powell River & District Homemaker Service.
Prince George & District Homemaker Service.
Prince Rupert Homemaker Service.
Quesnel Homemaker Service.
Revelstoke & District Hospital Society.
Saltspring Island Homemakers Service.
Shuswap Homemakers Service.
Smithers Community Services.
South Cariboo Homemaker Service.
South Okanagan Homemakers Society.
Sparwood-Elkford Homemakers Service.
Summerland Community Homemaker Service.
Sunshine Coast Homemaker Service.
Surrey & White Rock Community Homemaker.
Terrace & District Community Resources.
Trail & District Homemakers Society.
Vernon & District Homemakers Society.
Victorian Order of Nurses—North Shore Division.
Williams Lake & District Homemakers.
New Denver-Silverton & District Homemakers.
Princeton & District Community Services.
Tamitik Status of Women Homemaker Service.
MEALS ON WHEELS PROGRAM
Program objective—The objective of the Meals on Wheels Program is to
provide hot, nutritious, and appetizing meals, at cost, to elderly and infirm persons
confined to their homes and unable to prepare a meal for themselves, or who have
lost interest in eating and would suffer from malnutrition if this service were not
available.
Description—Meals on Wheels is a volunteer community program which
delivers meals to those persons requiring a supplemental food service. They may
be referred by a local doctor, public health nurse, social worker, or community
citizen. Local programs serve anywhere from one to six days per week and may
include a visit by a volunteer which is important, as it may be the only contact with
the community.
 L 94 HUMAN RESOURCES
Volunteers provide the staffing for the program and their visits provide a
continuing link between the homebound individual and the community, as well as
helping to identify other problems and needs before a crisis occurs.
The Ministry of Human Resources has been involved in assisting with the
establishment of several new programs. Grants have been made to some Meals on
Wheels groups to offset the costs of co-ordinating the service or to partially subsidize
the cost of providing the meals. It is important to note that Government input
has been to support the efforts of the volunteers, without whom Meals on Wheels
programs would founder.
Forty-seven Meals on Wheels programs are now operating throughout the
Province, making British Columbia the leader in Canada in this area. In several
communities, Meals on Wheels is run in association with a homemaker service.
Community grants were made to Meals on Wheels programs in the following
communities during 1977:
Burnaby: Burnaby Meals on Wheels.
Campbell River: Campbell River Meals on Wheels.
Chilliwack: Chilliwack Meals on Wheels.
Cranbrook: Cranbrook "Sparkling Grannies."
Creston: Creston Meals on Wheels.
Kelowna: Kiwanis Meals on Wheels.
Maple Ridge: Maple Ridge Meals on Wheels.
Nakusp: Nakusp Meals on Wheels.
Nanaimo: Nanaimo Meals on Wheels.
New Denver: Upper Slocan Meals on Wheels.
New Westminster: New Westminster Meals on Wheels.
North Vancouver: North Shore Mobile Meals.
Parksville: Parksville SOS Meals on Wheels.
Port Alberni: Port Alberni Meals on Wheels.
Rossland: Rossland Meals on Wheels.
Saltspring Island: Saltspring Island Meals on Wheels.
Terrace: Terrace Meals on Wheels.
Trail: Trail Meals on Wheels.
Vancouver-Richmond: Vancouver-Richmond Meals on Wheels.
Victoria: Victoria Silver Threads.
Program cost-sharing—The Federal Government does not participate in
sharing the costs of the Meals on Wheels Program.
SENIOR CITIZENS COUNSELLOR SERVICE
Program objective—The objective of the Senior Citizens Counsellor Service
is to provide a counselling and information service to senior citizens by counsellors
who are themselves senior citizens.
Description—The program began in 1968 with 30 senior citizen counsellors
recommended to the Ministry by old-age pensioners' groups. In 1977, there were
114. Working as volunteers, the counsellors' interest in other senior citizens
involves them in a helping role in a wide variety of activities—driving elderly people
for medical appointments; visiting the lonely, providing information, counselling,
and referral services; advising on Government programs; assisting with the completion of forms; or aiding in the development of programs in the community to
meet the special needs of senior citizens.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY/1977
L 95
The Counsellors work closely with their local Ministry of Human Resources
Office. They maintain and update their knowledge of services, and changes in
Federal/Provincial programs (e.g., OAS, GIS, GAIN, SAFER, etc.) by attending
workshops and seminars. Counsellors are appointed by the Minister of Human
Resources upon recommendation. They are respected members of their community,
involved and interested in services to seniors, and have usually been involved in
some community work prior to retirement.
Counsellors submit monthly reports for out-of-pocket expenses, and may be
reimbursed up to a maximum of $60 per month. The following table shows expenditures for the Senior Citizens Counsellor Service for the fiscal years 1971/72
through 1976/77 and calendar year 1977:
Table 45—Senior Citizens Counsellor Service, Ministerial Expenditures,
Calendar Year 1977 and Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1976/77
1977 (calendar)   53,008
1976/77   58,117
1975/76   54,874
1974/75   48,763
$
1973/74    38,074
1972/73    25,000
1971/72  21,100
The following table gives an estimate of the number of people served by senior
citizen counsellors:
Table 46—Numbers of Persons Served by Senior Citizen Counsellors,
Calendar Year 1977 and Fiscal Years 1971/72 to 1976/77
Number of
Persons
1977 (calendar)   73,500
1976/77  70,000
1975/76   66,750
1974/75   57,000
Number of
Persons
1973/74    49,000
1972/73     44,200
1971/72    37,600
Program cost-sharing-
of this program.
-The Federal Government shares equally in the cost
SENIORS DAY CENTRES PROGRAM
Program objective—The objective of the Seniors Day Centres Program is
to provide community-based drop-in centres for the elderly. The centres may
provide counselling and information, recreational activities, arts and crafts, together
with an opportunity for socialization. The intent is to enable a senior citizen to
remain in his own community and avoid becoming a shut-in and possible candidate
for some type of long-term care.
Description—Grants are provided to non-profit societies who operate such
centres. The grants assist with building upkeep, utilities, staff costs, and program
expenses.
The centres are usually open to all persons in the senior age range. In some
cases a modest membership fee is charged.
 L 96 HUMAN RESOURCES
Program cost-sharing—Federal cost-sharing of the program is based upon
the numbers attending the centres who are considered to be in need.
As part of the Ministry's Community Grants Program, a number of grants were
made to senior citizens' centres and projects in 1977. These centres provide information, counselling, and a place for seniors to drop in for group recreation and
socializing.
The following programs were funded in 1977:
SENIOR CITIZENS CENTRES
Amount Granted
Project Location 1977
Campbell River: $
Campbell River Old Age Pensioners Society _  ._..      4,599.00
Cowichan:
Lake Cowichan and District Activity and Resource Centre        3,739.00
Cowichan Valley Regional District Activity Centre—Senior Centre ....      6,516.00
Penticton:
Penticton and District Retirement Centre   '.....      22,368.00
New Denver:
Japanese Concord Society         7,500.00
North Shore:
North Shore Adult Day Care Society      35,107.00
North Shore Silver Harbour Manor Society      75,417.00
Victoria :
Silver Threads Service        .-    98,312.00
253,558.00
 SECTION VI
RESIDENTIAL CARE FOR
ADULTS AND
HANDICAPPED CHILDREN
CONTENTS
Pace
Adult Care Program    99
Halfway or Transition Houses and Hostels  101
Residential Services for the Mentally Handicapped  101
Glendale Lodge Society    102
Tranquille    103
Woodlands Program      104
  REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 99
ADULT CARE PROGRAM
Program objectives—The objective of the Adult Care Program is to subsidize elderly or handicapped people who must be cared for outside their own homes
and whose income is insufficient to pay for their own costs of such care. A second
objective is to encourage the development of resources for this purpose by nonprofit societies and by the private sector.
Description—The Ministry estimates that 2 per cent of people over the age
of 65 require extended care, while a further 5 per cent require personal and intermediate care.
The rates paid to care facilities on behalf of people receiving care vary with
the type of care that is required. All personal and intermediate care facilities in
the Province are licensed through the Community Care Facilities Licensing Board
of the Ministry of Health.
A definition of the types of care subsidized by the Ministry of Human Resources follows:
Table 47—Definition of Types of Care in British Columbia Subsidized
by the Ministry of Human Resources
TYPE 1—PERSONAL CARE
This is the type of care required by persons of any age whose physical disabilities are
such that their primary need is for room and board, limited lay supervision,
assistance with some of the activities of daily living, and a planned program of
social and recreational activities.
It is also the type of care required by persons with mild mental disorders who primarily
require room and board and limited lay supervision in a supportive environment.
Facilities providing Type 1 care have usually8 been called "rest homes" or "boarding-
homes" in the past.
TYPE 2—INTERMEDIATE CARE
This is the type of care required by persons of any age whose physical disabilities are
such that their primary need is for room and board, daily professional nursing
supervision, and/or psychiatric supervision, assistance with some of the activities of
daily living, and a planned program of social and recreational activities.
It is also the type of care required by persons with mental disorders who primarily
require room and board, daily professional supervision by a person with appropriate
psychiatric training, and a program designed to assist them to reach their maximum
potential in the activities of daily living.
Facilities providing Type 2 care are called "intermediate care homes" by the Ministry of
Health and the Ministry of Human Resources.
PRIVATE HOSPITAL NURSING-HOME CARE
This type of facility provides care to persons of any age with a severe chronic disability,
which has usually produced a functional deficit, who require skilled 24-hour-a-day
nursing services and continuing medical supervision. Most people who need this
type of care have a limited potential for rehabilitation and often require institutional
care on a permanent basis.
Extended-care hospitals provide this type of care, through the British Columbia Medical
Plan, at a charge of $4 per day (December 1977 rate). Private hospitals provide
care at up to $900 per month to persons who are unable to find a vacancy in an
extended-care hospital.
 L 100                                                 HUMAN RESOURCES
RATES AUTHORIZED
The Ministry subsidized costs of care in adult care facilities for persons in
need.   At year-end the rate paid to private operators for eligible persons requiring
personal care was $340 per month, ranging up to $500 per month for intermediate
care.   The rate for an adult in a private hospital was $750 per month.
Eligible residents of personal and intermediate care facilities operated by nonprofit societies were subsidized to assist them to purchase their care at a rate ap-
Droved by the Director, Special Care for Adults, Ministry of Human Resources.
Eligibility for subsidy in adult care facilities is the same as eligibility for income
assistance, except that assets of no more than $1,500 for a single person and $2,500
:or married couples are allowable.   Any assets in excess of these amounts must be
used to pay the cost of the person's care.
Requests to the local Human Resources offices for referral of patients to care
'acilities are made by relatives, friends, doctors, staff at acute care hospitals, anc
other members of the community.    Local Ministerial staff are responsible for
reviewing each application and are charged with making placements in the most
appropriate facility.   The patient contributes to care costs to the extent his income
permits, the balance of the cost being provided by the Ministry of Human Resources.
A monthly comforts allowance of up to $40 is paid to residents of adult care
'acilities whose personal assets do not exceed $500.
Ministerial programs such as Meals on Wheels and Homemaker/Housekeeper
Services play a role in helping the elderly or handicapped person who wishes to
remain at home.   Details of these programs may be found elsewhere in this Report
The following table gives expenditures and numbers of persons subsidized in
adult care facilities by the Ministry of Human Resources for calendar years 1976,
1977, and fiscal years 1972/73 to 1975/76:
Table 48—Adult Care Expenditures and Number of Persons Assisted by the
Ministry of Human Resources, Calendar Years 1976/77 and Fiscal Years
1972/73 to 1975/76
Private Hospital Care
Estimated Number
Estimated                       of Persons Assisted
Expenditure                  per Month (Average)
$
1977                   8,180,688                         1,800
1976                        9,042,050                        2,000
1975/76     6,727,770                        2,600
1974/75       5,120,742                        2,300
1973/74                          5,523,189                        1,350
1972/73       2,537,450                        1,400
Personal and Intermediate Care1
1977....       18,469,413                      13,300
1976       18,901,985                      13,000
1975/76                       14,064,092                      13,000
1974/75..   -   10,426,930                      10,000
1973/74         5,160,263                        3,600
1972/73                         4,908,706                       3,300
1 Excludes New Denver Pavilion and Ponderosa Lodge, Kamloops.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
L 101
The expansion of the extended-care program throughout the Province has
resulted in a decrease in the number of people cared for in private hospitals.
Program cost-sharing—The cost of subsidies for adult care was shared
equally by the Federal Government for persons designated as "in need." However,
as of April 1, 1977, the Federal Government initiated its "block" funding of adult
care patients. Block funding is paid to a province on a formula that takes into
account the Province's population and the only cost-sharing after April 1, 1977,
was 50 per cent of any subsidies required for a person in need to a maximum of a
sum equivalent to the Federal OAS/GIS payments paid to Canadian citizens.
Transfer of Adult Care Program—Effective January 1, 1978, the entire
Adult Care Program is to be transferred to the Ministry of Health, with the exception of adult care programs for the mentally retarded which will remain in the
Ministry of Human Resources.
HALFWAY OR TRANSITION HOUSES AND HOSTELS
Program objective—The objective of the Transition Homes and Hostel
Programs is to provide temporary room and board to people who may require
income assistance and who are "in transition", i.e., families in crisis, people recently
released from hospitals, prison, or other treatment centres, drug and alcohol
dependent persons, or women separated from their husbands and homes.
Description—Twenty-four facilities, administered by non-profit societies,
provide shelter on a time-limited basis. Residents who require financial aid may
apply to the nearest Ministry of Human Resources office, where their needs may be
met in the form of direct income assistance or the facility operators may be authorized to bill the Ministry directly on a per diem basis at a pre-determined rate.
Hostels are licensed through the Community Care Facilities Licensing Board of the
Ministry of Health, and hotels, which are sometimes used as hostel resources, are
approved locally by the Ministry of Human Resources. The budget for these
facilities is an integral part of the Adult Care budget and is administered through
the Income Assistance Division. However, grants to meet the needs of specific
groups are provided by the Government ministry concerned. For example, halfway houses for drug addicts and alcoholics receive grants directly from the Provincial Alcohol and Drug Commission. By year-end the bed capacity available to
the Ministry of Human Resources in these programs was approximately 1,460.
Halfway and Transition House staff may provide counselling services in addition to providing room and board. Hostel staff generally provide only room and
board, as well as some referral services to appropriate agencies.
Program cost-sharing—Shelter costs are shared equally with the Federal
Government for people designated as being "in need."
RESIDENTIAL SERVICES FOR THE MENTALLY HANDICAPPED
Program objective—The Ministry of Human Resources strives to improve
the quality of its programs for the mentally retarded. In line with the United
Nations Declaration on Human Rights of the Mentally Retarded, the Ministry is
committed to the normalization of the lives of the handicapped to the fullest extent
possible.
 L 102 HUMAN RESOURCES
Residential Programs
Foster homes—Whenever mentally retarded children, and a limited number of
adults, can be appropriately placed in foster homes, that is the first choice when the
natural parent's home is no longer an option.
Group homes—Private group homes, as well as those administered under the
auspices of non-profit societies, continue to be a much needed part of community-
based residential services for the mentally retarded.
Short-stay hostels—Many parents who wish to keep their handicapped children
at home still need a respite from time to time. The period of high demand for this
service is, of course, the summer holiday months. The Ministry has funded local
associations for the mentally retarded who operate hostels for July and August
only. In a number of cases, group homes are maintaining one or two beds to be
used for emergencies or parent relief. Five short-stay hostels with a total of 45
beds are in regular demand on a year-round basis.
Training centres—The six community-based training centres are now stressing
a drive to bring as many as possible of their residents to a point where they can
move into a semi-independent or independent living situation. After several years
of self-care training, work-skills training, as well as recreational skills, it has been
found necessary for the Ministry to fund some community workers to provide a
graduated system of in-home support for those persons moving out of the training
centres to live on their own.
The six training centres are: capacity
Endicott Centre, Creston    62
Northern Training Centre, Smithers    33
Beaver Lodge, Oliver  32
Variety Farm, Ladner     44
Chrisholme, Langley  24
Bevan Lodge, Courtenay    65
Boarding-home care—Whereas the Ministry of Human Resources funds the
Boarding-home Program, the supervision of them is jointly undertaken with the
Mental Health Boarding-home staff in the Ministry of Health. There are approximately 160 boarding-homes in the Province, ranging in capacity from 2 to 36
where the predominance of residents have been assessed as mentally retarded,
and requiring either personal care or intermediate care. This part of the total
program accounts for some 3,600 retarded persons.
Institutional care—There are three institutions within the Province established
for residential care of the mentally handicapped. These institutions are Glendale
Lodge in Victoria, Tranquille near Kamloops, and Woodlands in New Westminster.   Reports on these three institutions follow:
GLENDALE LODGE SOCIETY
Program objective—-The objective of the Glendale Lodge Society is to provide residential, assessment, and training services to the handicapped and mentally
retarded, specifically from the Vancouver Island and Gulf Islands area.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
L 103
Description—Glendale Lodge Society was established to provide
(1) 300 beds for the care and development of severely and profoundly
retarded persons on a long-term basis;
(2) 20 beds for retarded on a short-term basis (i.e., one week to three
months), to provide parent relief, parent vacation, parent respite
in family illness or emergency, behaviour shaping to facilitate individual accommodation in own home or a community resource;
(3) short-term training for the severely handicapped person;
(4) comprehensive assessment service for handicapped individuals
where there is an indication of retardation or of severe communication problems; this service also includes a travelling clinical team
which covers the major centres in the geographical area served,
quarterly or oftener if requested by professional people in the area,
and this team operates in conjunction with Health, Human Resources, and Education and also provides training programs for
teachers in schools, parent counselling in general, and advice and
guidance to parents who wish to keep the child in his own home;
(5) a screening assessment for those with impaired hearing in conjunction with the Ministry of Health and other professional groups
interested in hearing programs;
(6) a 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. day care program, five days per week, for the
physically handicapped and mentally retarded of the Greater Victoria area who are residing at home;
(7) dental services to retarded in the Greater Victoria area; it is also
in the process of establishing a regional pharmacy in co-operation
with the Ministry of Health and their Director of Government
Institutions, and Ministry of Human Resources.
The Glendale Lodge Society is operated under the Societies Act by a Board
of Directors appointed by Order in Council.
For program planning purposes, Glendale relates to the Ministry of Human
Resources in the same manner as Woodlands and Tranquille.
The following table gives statistical information on Glendale:
Table 49—Glendale Lodge
Resident population as at December 31 	
Admissions, 12 months      	
1976
305
14
16
383
1977
311
152
146
401
Discharges    	
Staff establishment as at December 31 	
TRANQUILLE
Program objective—The objective of the residential program located at
Tranquille is to provide care on a residential basis for mentally retarded persons
over the age of 6 years, resident in the central, northern, and eastern Interior of
British Columbia, requiring levels of care not normally available in their community.
 L 104                                                 HUMAN RESOURCES
Description—Resident services are provided only for very seriously retarded
persons who could not normally be cared for in their own homes or community.
Tranquille services and levels of care include
(1) extended care—to provide complete care and rehabilitative services,
where possible, to 80 severely physically handicapped and mentally
retarded persons;
(2) pcediatrics—to provide complete care and training, where possible,
to 100 severely retarded young people between 4 and 19 years ol
age   (these  persons  are  housed  in the  newly  opened   100-bec
Stsmemelt Village at Tranquille);
(3) moderately retarded—to provide care and training in life skills foi
48 mentally retarded adults and, where possible, to prepare the
residents for placement in a community boarding-home;
(4) severely retarded—to provide care and training in life skills for
56 mentally retarded adults and, where possible, prepare them for
placement in a community boarding-home;
(5) profoundly retarded—to provide complete care, and where possible,
rehabilitation services for 112 profoundly retarded adults.
The following table gives statistical information on Tranquille:
Table 50—Tranquille
1976                   1977
Resident population as at December 31     384                376
Admissions, 12 months       36                  45
Discharges         24                  55
Waiting-list (December 31)       45                 10
Staff establishment as at December 31   490               493
WOODLANDS PROGRAM
Program objective—The objective of the Woodlands Program is to provide residential, assessment, and training services for mentally handicapped persons, primarily from the Lower Mainland area of the Province.
Description—Woodlands' residents are divided into five Program Units, as
'ollows:
(1) Health Care Program 2 consists of eight wards with a resident
population of approximately 240.   The majority of these residents
fit the criteria of extended care.
(2) Developmental Opportunity Program 7 consists of five wards with
a resident population of approximately 120.   The general thrust for
this group is to prepare the children for return to the community as
quickly as possible.
The increase of community resources has resulted in a high
proportion of the ambulent population of Woodlands being within
the severe and profoundly retarded range.
(3) Intermediate Care Motivation Program  Unit 3 consists of eight
wards with a resident population of approximately 200.    A ward
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
L 105
for severely retarded who are blind is part of this unit and a
specialized program is required.
(4) Intermediate Care Preparation Program Unit 5 consists of six wards
and Alder Lodge with a resident population of approximately 180.
Within this program unit effort is made to give residents the training
and experiences that are necessary to pave the way for their return
to the community, usually to an intermediate-care level home.
Alder Lodge, residential facility for 50 in Maillardville, facilitates
the community placement of residents.
(5) Life Education Program Unit 4 consists of seven wards and a Halfway House with a resident population of approximately 170. The
residents within this program unit are primarily brighter and are at
Woodlands primarily because of psycho-social problems. The goal
is to help the residents achieve behaviour control to permit a return
to their families or communities.
Woodlands has an active Out-patient Department (now termed Assessment
and Resource Centre—Woodlands) which provides assessment, management plan,
and follow-up services.
Woodlands community consultation services include staff training and program evaluation. The Home Management Program provides direct services to
individual families, offering training in child management skills to parents in the
home.
Admissions for 1977 numbered 52, which is fairly consistent with recent years.
Many of these were admitted as crises when community resources were unable to
be mobilized. Many admissions have been averted by Woodlands continuing to
offer services to the retarded, their families, or community agencies through the
Assessment and Resource Centre, Home Management Program, or specialized
consultation.
Many innovative programs have been introduced in 1977 to provide extra
service to the children and adults in residence. Among these are the Early Learning Place, a special recreation playground for multiple handicapped children, a
Greenhouse Program, Adult Education through Douglas College, and Resident
Medication Profile.
The introduction of the proposed Community Living Board in 1977 has required considerable staff time spent preparing for an increased number of community placements through the auspices of the Community Living Board.
Through the efforts of the Social Service Department, together with ward
teams, there was an increase in placements during the year (110, as opposed to
75 in 1976).   This has helped the over-crowding in the institution.
The following table gives statistical information on Woodlands:
Table 51—Woodlands Program
1976
Resident population as at December 31    962
Admissions, 12 months      50
Discharges   	
Deaths, 12 months        10
Waiting-list (December 31)         3
Staff establishment as at December 31    999
1977
906
52
110
16
3
999
 L 106 HUMAN RESOURCES
LIFE (LIVING INDEPENDENTLY FOR EQUALITY)
In June 1977 The Honourable William N. Vander Zalm announced the LIFE
Program.
The origins of this program began with the Woodlands Parent Group. This
group of concerned parents of residents in Woodlands brought forward ideas as
to how many residents might live more independently in the community.
From this stimulus came the many ideas which culminated in Project LIFE.
Project LIFE consists of the following:
(1) The Handicapped Guild—A Board of Directors has been appointed
to a guild that will assist Provincial Achievement Centre Societies
and their staff in the development of marketing, promotion, transportation, and quality control of items manufactured by handicapped persons attending achievement centres.
(2) Community Living Society—A society has been established to
assist handicapped persons to live independently, by arranging for
placement, individualized services, and continuing support for these
persons placed in the community from institutions.
(3) Affirmative Action Program—A program is established to encourage
and promote the employment of physically and mentally handicapped persons, to establish an employment registry for the handicapped, and to co-ordinate all rehabilitation services of the Ministry.
 SECTION vn
LEGISLATION
The Ministry of Human Resources administers the following legislation:
1. Ministry of Human Resources Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chapter 111, as
amended)—This Act establishes the Ministry of Human Resources as having
jurisdiction over all matters relating to social and public welfare and income
assistance.
2. Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act (S.B.C. 1976, chapter 19)
and Guaranteed Available Income for Need Regulations (B.C. Reg. 479/76, and
amendments)—This Act and regulations provide a guaranteed minimum income
to the handicapped, all residents 60 years of age and over, and financial assistance
and several social services that are essential for individuals and families who are
unable to maintain themselves by their own efforts. The social services include
day care, homemaker services, residential care, counselling and rehabilitation services.
3. Adoption Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chapter 4, as amended)—The purpose
of this Act is to provide the same rights and privileges for adopted children as those
of children born to both parents in a family.
4. Children of Unmarried Parents Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chapter 52, as
amended)—This Act is to ensure that the interests of the mother and her child
born out of wedlock are protected.
5. Protection of Children Act (R.S.B.C. 1960, chapter 303, as amended)—
The purpose of this Act is to provide protection and care for children who are
neglected, abused, abandoned, or without proper supervision or guardianship.
6. Human Resources Facilities Development Act (S.B.C. 1974, chapter 39)
and Human Resources Facilities Development Act Regulations (B.C. Reg. 586/76)
—The purpose of this Act and regulations is to authorize Provincial grants to
municipalities, societies, and community resource boards, for the development of
residential facilities or centres for children, disabled persons, and senior citzens.
7. Community Resource Boards Act (S.B.C. 1974, chapter 18)—This Act
permits the Government to initiate local community resource boards and Human
Resources and Health Centres where the Provincial income assistance programs,
social services, and health services may be administered on a local community
basis.
8. Social Workers (Registration) Act (S.B.C. 1968, chapter 51)—This Act
permits the Government to establish a Board of Registration for social workers.
  SECTION vra
FISCAL AND STATISTICAL
ADDENDUM, 1976/77
  REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977 L 111
Table 52—Proportion of Total Gross Welfare Expenditures
1975/76
1976/77
Value
Per Cent
Value
Per Cent
Administration (including Minister's Office
and Vancouver Resource Board).
$
40,319,722
46,548,758
147,843,284
30,744,687
8,776,746
171,975,573
28,613,506
654,910
8.5
9.8
31.1
6.5
1.8
36.2
6.0
0.1
$
42,082,099
48,971,899
159,264,167
34,820,390
6,667,033
157,971,558
31,234,306
8.7
Services for Families and Children	
Services for Seniors and Handicapped  ...
10.3
33.1
Health Services .—    ...   ~	
7.2
Community Programs ...        _ .
1.4
Income Assistance -       	
32.8
Special Programs for the Retarded (includes
Woodlands, Tranquille, and Glendale)
Alcohol and Drug Commission	
6.5
Totals	
475,477,186
100.0
481,011,451
100.0
26,844,360
183,606,786
3,445,837
2,946,512
5.6
38.6
0.7
0.6
31,186,647
184,524,792
3,277,310
2,374,090
6.5
Federal Provincial cost-sharing:
Canada Assistance Plan
38.4
Department of Indian Affairs	
0.7
0.5
Table 53—Number of Cases by Category of Service} as at
March 31,1976 and 1977
Category
Region 3—
Okanagan
Region 4—
Kootenays
Region 5—
Prince
George/
Cariboo
Region 6—
Fraser
Valley
Region 7—
Prince
Rupert/
Bulkley
Valley
Region 8—
North and
South
Peace
River
Region 9—
Kamloops
Mainline
Category
1         1         1
197611977 11976(1977
1         1         1
1976
1977
1976
1977
1976
1977
1
197611977
1
1976
1977
398
1,609
414
1,234
163
366
1,470
161
240
1,326
158
404
1,029
137
276
1,261
111
279
1,010
133
270
1,779
253
794
1,609
211
333
1,602
265
591
1,601
202
229
2,467
204
628
1,701
163
211
2,442
179
552
1,747
162
301
571
57
226
508
230
285
470
45
186
541
95
97
521
73
194
539
95
86
449
46
167
508
77
173
1,284
125
362
1,143
122
161
Income assistance—
1,149
113
215
470
1,503
161
318
1,208
108
Income assistance totals
4,356
3,808|3,294!3,070
4,916|4,594|5,392
5,923
1,893|1,730|1,519|1,333
3,209|3,057
Category
Family Service 	
Income assistance—
Single person 	
Couple 	
Two-parent family	
One-parent family	
Child with relative	
Income assistance
totals   ....
Region 10—
Vancouver
Island
North of
Malahat
1976
322
3,000
349
943
2,176
274
1977
356
2,391
244
661
2,160
267
7,064|6,079
Region 11
—Capital
Regional
District
1976
551
3,479
284
521
1,904
121
6,860
1977
653
3,353
242
442
1,968
133
6,791
Region 12-
Fraser
South
Region 13
—Fraser
North
I I
197611977   197611977
I I I
458
1,841
108
629
2,254
136
715
2,121
148
728
2,579
168|
602
2,387
175
443
1,952
131
800
2,577
147
375
2,189
112
5,426|6,459i5,690[6,200
Region 14—
North
Vancouver
Region 15—
Vancouver
I I I
19761 19771 1976 I 1977
I I I
295
974
72
136
695
45
2,217
415
970
73
123
694
40
2,315
2,178
8,466
269
513
3,743
40
13,031
2,840
8,928
566
775
3,900
189
17,195
1976    1977
6,114
29,704,
2,342
6,263
20,756
1,866
64,867
7,545
28,947
2,342
5,563
21,575
1,952
67,924
i Source: Caseload Report Form W2.
 L 112 HUMAN RESOURCES
Table 54—Selected Expenditures for Income Assistance, 1976/77
$
Basic income assistance    138,259,881
Repatriation, transportation within the Province, nursing and boarding-home care,
special allowances and grants    _    57,105
Housekeeper and homemaker services   .    7,428,522
Emergency payments  _i     2,355
Hospitalization of income assistance recipients .1 _„    23,140
Total  ._.„         145,771,003
Table 55—Average Monthly Number Receiving Income Assistance
During 1975/76 and 1976/77
Average Case Load and
Category Recipients per Month
1975/76      1976/77
Heads of families             30,427 28,413
Single persons        27,986 23,809
Total case load (average)       58,413 52,222
Dependants   :_-.:      69,138 60,715
Average monthly total      127,551 112,938
Table 5<5—
Gross Costs of Medical Services f
or Fiscal Years 1967/68 to
1976/77
Year
Medical
Drugs *
Dental
Optical
Transportation
Other
Total
1967/68	
1968/69
1969/70
1970/71
1971/72	
$
2,344,676
1,403,378
465,738
591,206
614,365
677,194
634,136
754,422
1,099,479
1,008,073
$
2,157,182
2,423,798
2,444,968
3,102,874
3,334,159
3,626,268
6,461,4002
17,303,8923
23,642,3473
26,716,8863
$
773,979
792,475
1,611,115
2,491,589
2,403,257
2,429,538
2,655,573
2,380,266
4,209,007
5,487,320
$
145,588
140,591
219,858
282,272
290,116
304,695
322,489
409,213
486,080
644,315
$
187,357
212,550
252,999
326,166
342,712
367,888
419,451
387,554
374,850
438,963
$
50,524
53,571
72,862
121,892
165,980
264,700
328,510
257,808
310,623
524,832
$
5,659,306
5,026,363
5,067,540
6,915,999
7,150,589
1972/73	
1973/74	
1974/75
1975/76	
1976/77	
7,670,283
10,821,559
21,493,154
30,122,386
34,820,389
i Included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions.
2 Includes drug costs incurred in the Pharmacare Program in the last three months of the fiscal year 1973/74.
(Pharmacare Program commenced January 1, 1974.)
3 Includes costs under the Pharmacare Program as well as drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare
institutions.
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977
L 113
Table 57—Cost of Maintaining Children in Care, Fiscal Year 1976/77
The cost to Provincial Government of maintaining children for the fiscal year
was as follows:
Gross cost of maintenance of children in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare
(excluding Vancouver)— $
Foster homes          9,409,130
Other residential resources         17,231,546
Receiving special services        2,519,123 $
  29,159,799
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance of children in care of Vancouver Resources Board          8,683,807
Gross cost of transportation of children in care of Superintendent of Child Welfare       429,515
Gross cost of hospitalization of new-born infants being permanently planned for by
the Superintendent of Child Welfare     	
98,089
Gross expenditures       38,371,210
Less collections        8,916,841
Net cost to Provincial Government as per Public Accounts   29,454,369
 L 114
HUMAN RESOURCES
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 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY,  1977                                     L 115
Table 59—Number of Children in Care and Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of Child Welfare, by Type of Care, as at March 31,1977
Type of Care
Supervised by—
Total
Ministry
of Human
Resources
Vancouver
Resources
Board
Paid foster-home care  ...
Boarding-home, child maintains self	
5,016
187
699
396
1,594
150
927
25
118
57
280
20
5,943
212
817
453
1,874
170
Free home and free relatives' (or parents') home-
Adoption home  	
Resources1   	
AWOL   	
Totals   	
8,042
1,427
9,469
1 This covers a wide variety of placements ranging from subsidized receiving-homes to Federal institutions.
Table 60—Children in Care and Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare, by Age-group, as at March 31, 1977
Age-group
Ministry
of Human
Resources
Vancouver
Resources
Board
Total
Under 3 years 	
450
480
2,094
2,776
1,673
569
197
139
293
349
305
144
647
619
2,387
3,125
1,978
713
3-5 years, inclusive   	
6-11 years, inclusive  ....
12-15 years, inclusive  	
16-17 years, inclusive 	
18 years  	
Totals  	
8,042
1,427
9,469
Table 61—Number of Children Placed for Adoption by the Ministry
Resources and Vancouver Resources Board for Fiscal Years 1975/76
1975/76
Ministry of Human Resources    648
of Human
and 1976/77
1976/77
791
Vancouver Resources Board         103
74
Totals     751
865
 L 116 HUMAN RESOURCES
The following tables are available, on request, from the Division of Office
Administration, Ministry of Human Resources, Victoria:
Table 62—Number of Family Services Cases (Not in Receipt of Financial Assistance from the
Ministry of Human Resources) Served by the Ministry of Human Resources and Vancouver
Resources Board During Fiscal Year 1976/77.
Table 63—Number of Children Born Out of Wedlock in British Columbia, by Age-group of
Mother, During Fiscal Years 1975/76 and 1976/77.
Table 64—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare During and at End
of Fiscal Year 1976/77.
Table 65—Number of Children Admitted to Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare, by Legal
Status, During Fiscal Year 1976/77.
Table 66—Reasons for New Admissions of Children to Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare
During Fiscal Year 1976/77.
Table 67—Number of Children Discharged From Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare, by
Legal Status During Fiscal Year 1976/77.
Table 68—Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare for
Fiscal Year 1976/77.
Table 69—Children Who Are Legal Responsibility of Superintendent of Child Welfare Receiving Institutional Care as at March 31, 1977.
Table 70—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Ministry of Human Resources, by
Regions, and Vancouver Resources Board, by Type of Placement, for Fiscal Year 1976/77.
Table 71—Number of Adoption Homes Awaiting Placement, in Which Placement Made, and
Homes Closed for Fiscal Year 1976/77.
Table 72—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Ministry of Human Resources, by
Regions, and Vancouver Resources Board, by Religion of Adopting Parents, for Fiscal
Year 1976/77.
Table 73—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Ministry of Human Resources and Vancouver Resources Board During Fiscal Year 1976/77.
Table 74—Number of Children With Special Needs Placed for Adoption by Ministry of Human
Resources and Vancouver Resources Board During Fiscal Year 1976/77.
Table 75—Number of Legally Completed Adoptions, by Type of Placement, by Regions, and
by Vancouver Resources Board During Fiscal Year 1976/77.
Table 76—Number of Children Placed for Adoption by the Ministry of Human Resources and
Vancouver Resources Board for Fiscal Years 1975/76 and 1976/77.
Table 77—Total Number of Persons Eligible for Health Care as at December 31, 1967 to 1977.
Table 78—Payments to British Columbia Medical Plan and Doctors (Gross Costs), 1967/68 to
1976/77.
Table 79—Dental Expenses, 1967/68 to 1976/77.
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1978
4,030-378-8325

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