Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

Annual Report Department of the Provincial Secretary JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31 1975 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1976

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0377998.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0377998.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0377998-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0377998-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0377998-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0377998-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0377998-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0377998-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0377998-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0377998.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Annual Report
Department of the
Provincial Secretary
JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31
1975
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1976
  The Honourable Grace M. McCarthy, Provincial Secretary.
 Victoria, B.C., March 17, 1976.
To His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour, sir, to submit herewith the report of the Department of the
Provincial Secretary for the 1975 calendar year.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your most obedient servant,
grace m. McCarthy
Provincial Secretary
 Victoria, B.C., March 17, 1976.
The Honourable Grace M. McCarthy,
Provincial Secretary.
Madam: I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department
of the Provincial Secretary for the year ended December 31, 1975.
L. J. WALLACE
Deputy Provincial Secretary
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Statutes Administered by the Department  9
Introduction    11
General Administration  11
Orders in Council  11
The Great Seal  12
Appeals    12
Petitions of Right  12
Scholarships  12
Miscellaneous Grants      12
Capital Improvement District Commission  13
Official Visits and Functions  13
Voyageur Canoes  14
Personnel    14
Government House    14
Provincial Elections    15
The Queen's Printer  16
Provincial Archives  16
Aural History Division    17
Cataloguing Division  18
Map Division  18
Manuscript Division  18
Newspaper Index  19
Photographic Laboratory  19
Visual Records Division  19
Legislative Library    20
Staff  20
Service to Government Departments  21
Summer Programs  21
Newspaper Index   ._  21
Microform    22
Publications  22
Division Summaries    22
Reference  22
Interlibrary loan  22
Government publications  22
Cataloguing  23
Postal Branch    23
Central Microfilm Bureau  24
Provincial Emergency Programme  26
Oil and Hazardous Material Spill Activities  26
Training  26
Municipal training  27
Communications  27
Search and Rescue  27
Marine Rescue Service  27
Emergency Air Service  28
Emergency Welfare Services  28
Auxiliary Police Program  28
Public Information  2 8
7
 Pace
Archaeological Sites Advisory Board    29
Staff  30
Field Projects    30
Special Projects    31
Volunteer Wardens z    31
Historic Sites Advisory Board  31
Barkerville and Cottonwood House Historic Parks  _   32
Fort Steele Historic Park  34
Heritage Preservation  35
Fort St. James Historic Park    35
Craigflower School    35
Point Ellice House    35
British Columbia Forest Museum  36
British Columbia Transportation Museum    — 36
Captain Cook Bicentennial  37
British Columbia House, London  38
Indian Advisory Branch  _   39
Metric Conversion    44
Lotteries Branch      45
Leisure Services Branch    47
Special Provincial Programs  48
Research  48
British Columbia Festival  49
Working in Government ..  49
Library services  49
Drama Library  49
Recreation services for the blind ,  49
National involvement      50
Regional Reports    50
Sports and Fitness  —- 55
Coaching Development Program  55
Run-Walk-Cycle-Swim-Skate Fitness Program  56
B.C. Cultural Program  56
Conclusion      ___ 57
Information Services  5 7
Ask B.C  57
Distribution of Government Publications  57
Library Development Commission  5 8
Office of the Planning Adviser to the Cabinet _<■_  60
Motor-vehicle Branch    60
Appendices  61
A. Queen's Printer Balance Sheet and Profit and Loss Statement for Year
Ended March 31, 1975  61
B. Statistical Summary of Legislative Library Activities *l  63
C. Members of the Legislative Assembly and Executive Council, 1945-72 64
D. Reports to Be Tabled by the Department  89
 STATUTES ADMINISTERED DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY BY THE
DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
Agent-General Act.
Archaeological and Historic Sites Protection Act.
British Columbia Centennial '71 Celebration Act.
British Columbia Cultural Fund Act.
British Columbia Day Act.
British Columbia Tartan Act.
Canada-British Columbia Pension Agreement Act.
Canadian Confederation Centennial Celebration Act.
Capital Improvement District Act.
College Pension Act.
Constitution Act.
Daylight Saving Act.
Departmental Inquiries Act.
Dogwood, Rhododendron, and Trillium Protection Act.
Douglas Day Observance Act.
Emergency Programme Act.
Floral Emblem Act.
Indian Advisory Act.
Insurance Corporation of British Columbia Act  (from October 3 to
December 23, 1975).
Legislative Library Act.
Legislative Procedure and Practice Inquiry Act.
Liquor-control Plebiscites Act.
Lotteries Act.
Members of the Legislative Assembly Superannuation Act.
Metric Conversion Act.
Motor-vehicle Act (from October 3, 1975).
Municipal Superannuation Act.
Pacific National Exhibition Incorporation Act  (from December  23,
1975).
Parliamentary Association Conferences Act.
Provincial Coat of Arms Act.
Provincial Elections Act.
Provincial Secretary Act.
Public Documents Disposal Act.
Public Inquiries Act.
Public Libraries Act.
Public Printing Act.
Public Service Act.
Public Service Group Insurance Act.
Public Service Labour Relations Act.
Public Services Medical Plan Act.
Public Service Superannuation Act.
Queen Elizabeth II British Columbia Centennial Scholarship Act.
Revenue Surplus Appropriation Act, 1969.
Sessional Allowances Reduction Act, 1961 (and 1972).
Sessional Reports Suspension Act.
Special Assistance in the Cost of Education Act.
Teachers' Pensions Act.
  Annual Report of the
Department of the Provincial Secretary
INTRODUCTION
Because of the nature of the Department of the Provincial Secretary, changes
in responsibilities have been many through the years, and 1975 was no exception.
A number of new programs began this year, with the establishment of the
Leisure Services Branch being of particular interest. A telephone inquiry service,
"Ask B.C.," was also tried out on an experimental basis.
The Provincial Secretary assumed responsibility for the Motor-vehicle Branch
and the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia on October 3.
A General Election was held in the Province on December 11, resulting in a
change in administration, and the personal defeat of then Provincial Secretary
Ernest Hall.
On December 23 the Honourable Grace M. McCarthy was sworn in as the
Provincial Secretary, becoming the 40th person, and first woman, to hold this
senior Cabinet position. On the same date, she became Deputy Premier, and
Minister of Recreation and Tourism.
Also, on December 23, the Department became responsible for the administration of the Pacific National Exhibition Incorporation Act, and relinquished
ICBC, presaging a major reorganization of responsibilities throughout the Government.
In the months ahead, it is expected that the Motor-vehicle Branch will be
returned to the Department of Transport and Communications, and that the
Provincial Museum will be transferred back to the Department of the Provincial
Secretary.
The reports of the Public Service Commission and the Superannuation Branch
will be presented separately.
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
Orders in Council
The preparation and distribution of a resume of Orders in Council has proved
to be extremely popular. The resume is prepared after each meeting of the Executive Council, and is sent to all M.L.A.s, departments of Government, the news
media, Government Agents, lawyers, public, university, and business libraries, and
many other organizations and individuals who have requested the service.
In all, 51 issues of the resume were prepared and it is estimated that 1,000
copies of each issue were sent out plus two digests of all Bills passed at the sittings
of the Legislative Assembly.
A total of 3,953 Orders in Council was processed during 1975, compared with
4,161 the previous year.
ll
 AA 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Great Seal
The Great Seal of the Province was used 1,052 times during the year, compared with 916 in 1974. As usual, the most frequent use was on Crown grants
under the Land Act (672 times). The Seal was used 131 times on Letters Patent,
47 times on Proclamations, and 123 times under the Provincial Court Act.
Appeals
There were 33 appeals initiated under a variety of Acts, many of them, 13,
under the Motor Carrier Act. Of the other 20, seven each were lodged under the
Private Investigators' Licensing Act and the British Columbia Hydro and Power
Authority Act, three under the Water Act, and one each under the Societies Act,
the Change of Name Act, and the Public Service Act.
Petitions of Right
The Crown Proceedings Act, which came into effect on August 1, 1974,
repealed the Crown Procedure Act and eliminated the need to obtain a fiat before
initiating proceedings against the Crown. Two petitions of right were initiated
under the old Act as the cause for the petitions occurred before the Crown Proceedings Act came into force.
Scholarships
The Provincial Secretary administers the athletic and academic scholarships
funded through the British Columbia Physical Fitness and Amateur Sports Fund.
The following scholarships were awarded:
(a) Premier's Athletic Awards—five  scholarships  in  the  amount  of
$1,000 each.
(b) Nancy Greene Awards—19 full scholarships, each in the value of
$750, and two half scholarships, each in the value of $375.
(c) B.C. Athletic Awards—17 full scholarships, each in the value of
$500, and eight half scholarships, each in the value of $250.
The Provincial Secretary also administers the Queen Elizabeth II British
Columbia Centennial Scholarship, which is awarded annually to a graduate of one
of the public universities in the Province who is furthering his or her academic
studies in the United Kingdom. The winner of the 1975 Scholarship in the value
of $7,000 was Mark R. Steven, of Vancouver. Mr. Steven, a graduate of the
University of British Columbia, is presently reading law at Cambridge University.
Grants were also made from the British Columbia Special Events Fund, which
is funded solely by proceeds from the Western Canada lottery through the B.C.
Lotteries Branch. The Fund is designed to provide travel assistance to groups or
individuals who have been declared official British Columbia champions or representatives in open competition. The Fund may also provide a degree of support
to organizations and groups which do not qualify for grants from the B.C. Cultural
Fund or the B.C. Physical Fitness and Amateur Sports Fund. Grants from the
Fund cannot be used for capital acquisitions. In 1975, its first year of operation,
28 grants were approved with a total value of $123,554.
Miscellaneous Grants
Approximately 125 organizations received grants voted for the 1975/76
fiscal year during 1975.   The total provided for such purposes was $2,180,000.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 13
Capital Improvement District Commission
Supported by Provincial funds, the Commission is composed of 11 members
representing municipal, civic, and Provincial bodies. Through co-operative action,
it plans and carries out projects aimed at enhancing the attractiveness of the capital
area.
Members of the Commission are:
J. E. Brown, Chairman.
T. L. Sturgess, Deputy Chairman.
George Giles, Government Representative.
Dr. R. M. Grant, Government Appointee.
Alderman K. A. S. Hill, Esquimalt.
Alderman A. D. Hood, Victoria.
Richard W. Long, Government Representative.
His Worship F. L. Lum, Saanich.
His Worship Brian R. D. Smith, Oak Bay.
L. J. Wallace, Government Representative.
Mayor Michael D. W. Young, Victoria.
George Geddes, Secretary.
The Commission held three meetings during the year to discuss various proposals presented by municipal representatives and approved accounts in the amount
of $91,300 incurred on existing projects. As a result of recommendations to the
Government by the Commission, authorization to incur the following expenditures
were approved through Order in Council:
West Bay Development, Esquimalt—An initial sum not to exceed
$200,000 toward development and construction of the first phase
of shoreline improvement and beautification.
Fleming Beach, Esquimalt—A further sum of $7,677.27 toward completion of the elevated walkway above high tide and the installation
of marine floats.
A proposal from the Regional Bikeway Committee was considered and separate application for funds from the municipalities involved will be submitted in
1976.
Changes to the Commission's boundaries highlighted activity during 1975
and on October 3, 1975, an Order in Council was approved which incorporates
the Saanich Peninsula into the boundaries of concern to the Commission.
The importance of relocating the oil and gasoline storage tanks now situated
in the Songhees reserve area of the Inner Harbour was again stressed and Commission members urged that present leases in the area not be renewed.
To date, 53 projects have been approved by the Government since the formation of the Commission in 1956 and authorized expenditures on projects completed
or at present under way total in excess of $3.5 million.
Official Visits and Functions
The Department was responsible for the organization of a variety of visits and
functions, including a number of conferences attended by Government Ministers
from the western Provinces.
Provincial visits by a number of dignitaries were also co-ordinated by the
Department, and 210 luncheons and dinners were organized.
 AA 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Voyageur Canoes
The 12 six-man, 26-foot-long fibreglass voyageur canoes owned by the Province were used extensively by the five clubs who have them on loan. They were
recalled once during the year for New Westminster's Hyack Festival for a canoe
pageant from Hope to the Queen City.
Personnel
The past year witnessed the addition of several new branches to the Department.
Early in the year, a Cultural Program was initiated and T. G. Fielding, a
British Columbia native, was appointed as Director. Several months later, the
Government announced the appointment of Dr. E. F. Broom to the position of
Associate Deputy Minister responsible for Leisure Services. Dr. Broom is responsible for consolidating and co-ordinating the various Provincial Government
services to recreation, amateur sport, physical fitness, and cultural activities.
Soon after his appointment, the Community Recreation Branch of the Department of Travel Industry was transferred to this Department and, along with the
Cultural Program, became the components of the Leisure Services Branch. By
year-end this Branch was comprised of 24 full-time positions.
Another new development was the start-up on an experimental basis of a
telephone inquiry service. The program initially had a staff of 14 employees.
The Department witnessed the addition of the Motor-vehicle Branch in
October, which came complete with its own Personnel Officer.
The Postal Branch was the only existing area of the Department to add positions in 1975. In November, 10 positions, which had been of an on-going nature
for more than a year, were formally established.
With the exception of the Motor-vehicle Branch, 49 new positions were added
to the establishment in 1975.
The summer months were again highlighted by the student employment program, this year named Working in Government (WIG). As the total funds
budgeted were held to the level of the previous year, and salaries had increased,
fewer students, some 170 in all, were hired. The program again proved to be very
successful.
At the end of the year, with the exception of the Public Service Commission
and the Superannuation Branch, the Department employed some 380 regular and
100 auxiliary personnel.
GOVERNMENT HOUSE
The year 1975 saw a full schedule of activities at Government House. Over
13,000 guests were entertained at a variety of functions, including dinners, teas,
garden parties, and receptions.
Dignitaries entertained at Government House included the President of Iceland, the High Commissioners from Great Britain and New Zealand, and the
Ambassadors from Bulgaria, Denmark, Federal Republic of Germany, Finland,
the Netherlands, South Africa, the United States, and Venezuela.
An increased number of school-children were taken on tours of Government
House and offered refreshments in the form of soft drinks, cake, and cookies.
There were 23 of these school groups during 1975. An information booklet on
Government House was printed for presentation to each visiting school-child.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975
AA 15
Long-service awards to Provincial public servants were again presented in
Government House on two successive evenings. A buffet dinner was served on
each occasion to a total attendance of 458.
PROVINCIAL ELECTIONS
The Branch was involved in two major projects in 1975—the Provincial
General Election and the Commission of Inquiry into Redefinition of Electoral
Districts.
The Chief Electoral Officer and Registrar-General of Voters was appointed
to the position of Secretary to the Commission. In addition, Registrars of Voters
throughout the Province, and the staff of the Vancouver office, provided information, figures, mapping, and other services to the Commission between the time
it was appointed on July 21, and the completion of the report on November 7.
With the calling of the Provincial General Election on November 3, the Commission recommended that their report not be presented until after the election on
December 11.
An extensive registration campaign was conducted throughout the Province,
resulting in 1,559,548 voters being registered to vote at the election. It is expected
that the Statement of Votes will be published by late summer.
Members of the Commission of Inquiry into Redefinition of Electoral Districts whose
report was made public on December 19. Considering their proposed new electoral map
for British Columbia, from left: K. L. Morton, Secretary; L. I. Wallace, Deputy Provincial Secretary, Member; The Honourable T. G. Norris, Q.C, Chairman; and Dr. Fred
Bowers, of the University of British Columbia, Member.
 AA 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Vancouver office continued its policy of assisting other departments.
Approximately 70,500 addressograph plates were cut for the Department of Agriculture, Public Trustee, Liquor Administration Branch, Safety Engineering Services, Queen's Printer, Justice Development Commission, and the Public Service
Commission. Reading material was reproduced for seminars of the Judicial Institute, and the Department of Human Resources was helped in the conduct of its
Community Resource Board elections.
THE QUEEN'S PRINTER
For the third consecutive year the Queen's Printer experienced considerable
growth in all departments. Sales for printing and stationery purchases to the end
of the year were $8 million. The growth over this period was reflected by the
plant's 10 million press impressions per month which was supported by the purchase of 700 tons of paper.
During the year the paper and stationery shortages, which weakened the
service in the preceding years, disappeared. The stationery department, which
filled 40,000 orders, was able to improve its service with the hiring of several
auxiliary personnel. The prices for stationery items levelled off and in some
instances even decreased.
The objectives for the year were fulfilled. The service from the stationery
department was increased due to departmental reorganization. In addition, several
pieces of worn machinery were updated and replaced, including colour quality
control equipment.
During 1976 the Bureau will continue to improve its service and efficiency.
Emphasis will focus on reducing costs in both the duplicating and stationery areas.
The Queen's Printer Balance Sheet and Profit and Loss Statement can be
found in Appendix A.
PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES
The Provincial Archives is the repository for noncurrent Government records
of historical value and collects private papers, manuscripts, books, newspapers,
photographs, paintings, maps, and sound recordings bearing on the history of
British Columbia and related developments in neighbouring provinces and states.
During the year, significant additions were made to all of these resources, the
augmentation of the holdings having resulted in substantial measure from the contributions of many individuals and organizations.
The number of persons who carried out research in the Archives in 1975
totalled 9,070, an average of 36 persons per day. In addition, 802 persons consulted material during the extended hours in the evenings and on week-ends. The
level of usage, marginally higher than in 1974, was sustained as well in the inquiries
received by telephone and mail, and in the number of orders for photo copies of
material.
Special efforts were made to visit various centres in the Province to collect
materials and to render assistance in archival procedures to local historical societies, museums, and libraries. The latter undertaking involved visits to Prince
George, Creston, Cranbrook, Revelstoke, and Mission by staff of the Manuscript
and Visual Records Divisions. The Aural History Division conducted 10 workshops at various centres in the Province. The Provincial Archivist gave addresses,
on the subject of archives, at Vancouver, Victoria, Port Alberni, and Saturna
Island, and, assisted by several members of the staff, provided a two-day seminar
at Victoria for teachers of history in community colleges.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 17
The Provincial Archives co-operated with the University of British Columbia
Press in the publication of the reminiscences of Dr. J. S. Helmcken, edited by Dr.
Dorothy Blakey Smith. Progress was made in the editing of the journals of the
colonial councils, and in the preparation of a description of manuscript accessions,
1975, for distribution in 1976. Other publications, produced under the Aural
History program, are noted in the account of the activities of that division.
The Public Documents Committee, comprised of the Comptroller-General,
Deputy Minister of Finance, Deputy Provincial Secretary, Associate Deputy
Attorney-General, and Provincial Archivist (Chairman), met four times during the
year. Pursuant to the provisions of the Public Documents Disposal Act, the Committee approved 50 applications for the disposal of records of Government departments and agencies.
The Provincial Archives administers two historic buildings, Helmcken House
and Craigflower Manor, with a resident curator in charge of each. The number
of visitors during the year totalled 18,136 adults and 2,665 children at Helmcken
House, and 5,396 adults and 1,680 children at Craigflower Manor.
The staff of the Provincial Archives, directed by A. R. Turner, Provincial
Archivist, and D. B. Mason, Assistant Provincial Archivist, remained at the same
level as the previous year, with a total of 35 positions. In the area of staff training
and development, two archivists were enabled to take the annual course in archival
administration at Ottawa in September. The art curator attended a seminar of the
Pacific Conservation Centre on the care of artistic and historic works on paper,
two archivists attended a seminar of the American Records Management Association in Vancouver, a research officer in the Aural History Division attended a
colloquium on this subject in North Carolina, and staff of the photographic laboratory attended technical demonstrations, camera training sessions, and exhibits of
new equipment in Vancouver and Victoria.
Aural History Division
Under the direction of W. J. Langlois, this division continued the program of
tape-recorded interviews with persons throughout the Province, with special
emphasis on former cabinet ministers and long-term public servants. Students
were employed during the summer months to advance this work, and were used
intensively to record reminiscences of alumni of Victoria High School, which will
observe its centennial in 1976.
The collection of tape recordings, now totalling approximately 8,000 hours,
was increased substantially by the donation of several major collections, including
the Phil Thomas collection of folk songs, the Dorothy Livesay recordings with
Canadian and British Columbia poets, and the Imbert Orchard collection from
CBC Radio, Vancouver. Various co-operative projects with local museums, historical societies, institutions, and business enterprises also added to the number and
variety of tapes acquired.
Cataloguing of the collection proceeded apace, the system having been adapted
for transfer to computer cards and the eventual use of a computerized retrieval
system. Progress was made with the transcription of tapes with over 4,000 pages
of new typescripts produced.
The division continued the publication of Sound Heritage; reprinted the proceedings of the Centennial Workshops on Ethnomusicology; and completed work
on Steveston Recollected, a book to be distributed in 1976.
 AA 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Cataloguing Division
In 1975 this division catalogued over 1,000 new book and pamphlet titles,
and added more than 2,000 volumes to the Northwest Library, which now extends
to almost 48,000 volumes.   Some 400 items were donated to the collection.
The work of the staff, headed by Miss Linda Webster, included content analysis
of 500 items, preparation of approximately 9,000 index cards, and continuous
solicitation of "ephemera" and pamphlet material from various sources.
During the year a substantial number of duplicate volumes and nonhistorical
titles were removed from storage and distributed to other government libraries and
colleges in the Province.
Map Division
Approximately 1,250 maps were received from all sources, including some
200 townsite plans, a number of architectural plans of Point Ellice House, and
several British Admiralty charts. Over 500 maps were catalogued, and approximately 1,200 copied on 105-mm negatives. The latter process enables viewing or
printing, as required, and eliminates undue handling of original maps, many of
which are rare, fragile, and in need of conservation. Some 600 maps were copied,
or reproduced on 35-mm aperture cards, for internal use and in filling orders from
the public. Reference inquiries by telephone, letter, and personal visit exceeded
1,100. Mrs. Wendy Teece resigned as head of this division in mid-summer and
was replaced by Geoffrey Castle.
Manuscript Division
During 1975 the Manuscript Division accessioned 1,900 cubic feet of private
papers and Government records, and over 600 reels of microfilmed material.
Notable acquisitions included minutes of 46 Women's Institutes, the records of
Star Shipyard Ltd., New Westminster, the papers of Judge J. B. Clearihue, Frank
S. Swannell, Rev. A. D. Pringle, Inspector J. H. Mclllree, and Alan Thomson, and
through the co-operation of the Creston and District Historical and Museum
Society the papers of Guy Constable were microfilmed.
Extensive series of Government records were received from the Departments
of Human Resources (Deputy Minister and the Provincial Home at Kamloops),
Provincial Secretary (General files and Emergency Measures), and Health (Mental
Health Branch, Hospital Programs, and Division of TB. Control), and from other
agencies such as Liquor Administration, Superintendent of Credit Unions, the
Assistant Commissioner of Lands, Vancouver, and the Vancouver Court Registry
(probate records).
Through the Diffusion Program of the Public Archives of Canada, microfilm
copies of the Papers of the Right Hon. Sir John A. Macdonald and of postal inspectors' reports for British Columbia, 1875-1901, were deposited in the Provincial
Archives.
The staff of the division, headed by Miss Frances Gundry, catalogued 310
manuscript units and 662 reels of microfilm, and completed 43 finding aids. All
units were catalogued under a simplified system introduced at the beginning of
the year. In addition to service on the reference desk, the staff supplied written
replies to some 250 inquiries. Typed transcripts of manuscripts, totalling 900
pages, were prepared.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA  19
Newspaper Index
The clipping and indexing of a wide range of historical items from the daily
newspapers and weekly press of the Province was continued under the direction of
Mrs. Marjorie David. This work resulted in substantial additions to the vertical
files of source material which now occupy over 40 four-drawer filing cabinets and
are extensively used by researchers.
Photographic Laboratory
The laboratory, supervised by Peter Westoby, processed 981 orders for
photographs, producing 4,704 copy negatives, and 15,345 prints of all sizes.
Production for the year was below that of 1974, the result of a period of six weeks
during which modifications were made to the studio and the ventilation, electrical,
and plumbing systems. At the same time, there was a marked increase in orders
requiring meticulous and time-consuming work, such as retouching, copying from
albums, and poor quality subject-matter involving several photographic procedures.
Two new cameras and several much needed work tables were added to the equipment, and a start was made on a colour photographic inventory of the art collection.
Visual Records Division
The staff, headed by J. Robert Davison, processed approximately 900 orders
for photoduplication, including orders from the public and collections borrowed
for copying, and catalogued 2,814 new photographs. The actual number of acquisitions greatly exceeded the latter figure inasmuch as several large collections await
processing.
Among the significant acquisitions were the O'Hind collection depicting British Columbia railways, the McFetridge albums on the Bullion Mine at Quesnel
Forks, the Wilson, Nordling, and Mclllree photographs of northern British Columbia and the Yukon, further photographs of the Doukhobor community collected
by Koozma Tarasoff, some 700 stereoscopic views of Victoria and Vancouver
Island taken by George Larrigan (Sr.), the W. S. Lythgoe collection recording
early inns and hotels, photographs accompanying the papers of Judge J. B.
Clearihue, and, the largest single collection, approximately 14,000 negative files
of Kenneth McAllister, whose professional career as a photographer extended over
40 years.
Coverage of several communities was substantially increased through photographs loaned for copying by the Campbell River Historical Society, the Rossland
Museum, and Barkerville and Fort Steele Historic Parks.
With student assistance during the summer months, a large number of oversized photo prints were deframed and some 5,000 original photos removed from
user files for permanent storage under acid-free conditions. The physical arrangement of files and reference areas in the division was modified to provide a more
secure, efficient, and pleasant working area for staff and users of the photographic
collection.
The archivist in charge of paintings, drawings, and prints, J. W. Mossop,
carried out a general inventory of the holdings, preliminary to a new cataloguing
system, and a start was made on a 35-mm colour slide record of the collection.
Recent acquisitions and views of the west from the Illustrated London News were
displayed in the gallery, in which the following exhibits were also shown during
the year: "Canadian Nature Art '75", the Department of Public Works collection
 AA 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
of contemporary art, "Metric Conversion", "Our Hidden Heritage:  Women in
British Columbia History", and "The National Print Show".
Acquisitions in 1975 included, through purchase, E. S. Shrapnel's oil on
canvas, "Victoria, B.C., 1893"; water-colours of the Homathco River, by H. O.
Tiedeman; the Thompson River Valley, by F. A. Ames; and the following donations: 17 ink illustrations for J. D. Vallance's book, Untrodden Ways; a pencil
portrait of Mrs. Clark by Max Maynard; a watercolour of Beacon Hill Park by
Samuel McLure; an oil on canvas, "Trial Island from Beacon Hill", by Mrs. Kate
Ford Sweeney; and a portfolio, "The Salmon, Canada's Plea for a Threatened
Species", produced in a limited edition by Environment Canada.
LEGISLATIVE LIBRARY
The renovation of the library wing of the Parliament Buildings was formally
completed in the spring of this year. It had been a trying two years for both the
staff and the users of the library, to whom thanks must be expressed for the
patience with which they have borne the inconvenience. The refurbished library
is impressive and has received many compliments from visitors.
Staff
This has been a difficult year for the library in terms of staff shortages.
Several key positions became vacant, to be filled largely by existing library staff.
These promotions created new openings, the filling of which created still more.
It was not until December 1 that the library was again fully staffed.
Gordon Chope, the head of the Government Publications Department, retired
in April. Mr. Chope joined the library staff in the spring of 1947 after a successful
career in libraries in the United Kingdom. His devoted work in the Legislative
Library and his knowledge in the field of Government publications will continue
to be missed.
The Government Publications staff was further reduced during the year by
the retirement of Mrs. Ethel Dougan, who had been with Mr. Chope for a number
of years, and by the departure of Miss Patricia Mazurchyk, who left to become
librarian to the Territorial Council of the Northwest Territories.
Mr. Chope's position as head of the department has been filled by John Mac-
Eachern, Miss Mazurchyk's by Miss Mary-Ann Murphy, and Mrs. Dougan's by
Mrs. Peggy Copley. The delay in filling these positions, however, created a backlog of material awaiting processing.
A similar problem was created in the Cataloguing Department with the retirement in December 1974 of Miss Elizabeth Edwards. Her replacement as head of
the department, Mrs. Maedythe Martin, was appointed in July and the replacement for Mrs. Martin, who had been an assistant to Miss Edwards, was appointed
in December. Again the result of the vacant positions has been a large backlog
of material for both the Legislative Library and those departmental libraries
receiving cataloguing service.
The Reference Department has also faced the same problem. Mrs. Marion
Jensen left in June and Miss Mary-Ann Murphy moved to the Government Publications Department. Replacements for both librarians were delayed and problems
of maintaining service were serious for much of the year. New appointments in
the department include Miss Trudy de Goede and Robert Harvey.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 21
Service to Government Departments
The library now offers full cataloguing service to the following Government
departments and branches:
Department of Human Resources,
Department of Recreation and Conservation,
Department of Health,
Water Resources Service,
Department of Municipal Affairs,
Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources,
Mental Health Programs,
Provincial Museum,
Pollution Control Branch,
Department of Economic Development,
Environment and Land Use Committee,
Public Service Commission (Staff Training Division).
The last three libraries have been added to the service in the past year. In addition,
the library assisted in a crash program to produce a computer-based list of the
books in the collection of the Department of the Attorney-General and provided
supervision for the cataloguing of the collections of the Human Rights Branch and
the Assessment Authority. Full library service through the seconding of two
Legislative Library staff members continued to be given to the Department of
Human Resources and the Department of Recreation and Conservation. This
service is, however, one that will be re-examined in the next year to determine its
effectiveness.
Summer Programs
The library received assistance again this year under the Department of Labour's
summer employment program. Two library school students and four university
undergraduates were employed in the Cataloguing, Government Publications, and
Acquisitions work of the library and in continuing the periodicals inventory and
the British Columbia newspaper checklist.
Newspaper Index
The indexing of the Vancouver Province and Sun and the Victoria Colonist
and Times for news items of British Columbia interest continued. The index is
probably the most heavily used reference tool in the library, a fact which justifies
the time and effort required to maintain it. In 1975, some 50,000 items were
indexed, involving (because of the use of multiple-subject headings for individual
news stories) the addition of upward of 120,000 entries to the index. The current
index was refilmed in the spring by Commonwealth Microfilms and the film made
available for purchase by other libraries. The three largest Provincial universities
regularly acquire microfilm copies and all have commented on the importance of
the index in assisting research. In an effort to determine a more productive method
of maintaining the newspaper indexing project, the Department of Transport and
Communications was asked to examine the project to make recommendations for
improvement.   A report on this study is now under consideration.
Staff shortages again hindered progress in the retroactive newspaper indexing
project. Work was halted completely during much of the year in order to maintain
full service in the Reference Department.
 AA 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Microform
With the help of part-time assistance, the collation of the library's microfilm
holdings of British Columbia newspapers was completed. A study of the report will
be undertaken as soon as possible to determine the extent of the refilming program
that will be necessary. Once again the urgency of the microfilming program must
be stressed. The British Columbia newspaper holdings of the Legislative Library
are a unique archives of the Province's history. The deteriorating quality of the back
files necessitates action immediately if this valuable heritage is to be preserved and,
in addition, means must be found to ensure that current files are filmed regularly.
Publications
The library continues to prepare and to distribute the Monthly Checklist of
British Columbia Government Publications and a bi-monthly Selected List of Current Acquisitions. The Checklist, particularly, is in great demand, and distribution
must, in fact, be limited because of the difficulty of producing sufficient copies. It
is the only reasonably complete list of the publications of the British Columbia
Government.
A manual of library procedure designed to assist staff in small departmental
collections was compiled by Mrs. Maedythe Martin of the Cataloguing Department
and Mrs. June Love, a member of the Reference Department who is in charge of
library service to the Department of Human Resources. It was made available in
April and has proved extremely useful to the support staffs in the departmental
libraries.
Miss Margaret Hastings, the Assistant Librarian, prepared an extensive annotated bibliography of the indexes and the abstracting services available in the library.
It was designed for circulation to the Members and to senior research staffs of the
Public Service to draw to their attention the extensive range of such reference
material available to them in the library.
Division Summaries
Reference—The number of reference questions dealt with during the year
again increased and there was a noticeable increase in the complexity of the
questions asked.
The reciprocal service plan arranged in 1974 with the McPherson Library,
University of Victoria, is proving very successful from the point of view of both
libraries. It allows Provincial public servants freer access to material in the University of Victoria collection and provides for student use of publications available
only in the Legislative Library.
Interlibrary loan—As usual, the number of books lent by the Legislative
Library to other institutions increased and far exceeded the number borrowed by
the library—a continuing testimonial to the value of this library's holdings. In
co-operation with the FIN network in the Lower Mainland and with the help of
Peter Martin, of the Library Development Commission, a much more efficient
means of borrowing material from the University of British Columbia has been
achieved. Heavier use of the system is expected as familiarity with the service
increases.
Government publications—The number of documents received continues to
increase. This year's intake is almost 10 per cent higher than last year's. This is
the kind of increase that has been experienced for a number of years and one that
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 23
poses a serious storage problem even with the extra shelf space gained in the recent
renovation.
Cataloguing—A number of major changes in procedure were adopted during
the year. With the co-operation of the Library Development Commission, which
installed the service in January, the department conducts regular searches for
cataloguing information in the files of Information Dynamics' Micrographic Catalogue Retrieval Service (MCRS). Information for almost one third of all new
titles added to the union catalogue is now located in the MCRS file. A photocopy
of the material located is made and this is then sent to the Queen's Printer, who
processes a set of printed cards from the photographic copy. By this means the
individual typing of catalogue cards is eliminated for any title located in MCRS,
a considerable saving in staff time.
Another major change during the year was the adoption in July of the International Standard Bibliographical Description (ISBD) form of entry. This means
that the Legislative Library's cards now conform more closely not only to international standards but also, and of more significance, because of the opportunity
afforded to make use of prepared catalogue information, to the standards adopted
by both the National Library of Canada and the U.S. Library of Congress.
POSTAL BRANCH
Up to and including October 1975, the Postal Branch was heading for a
record volume of mail with a projected total of over 24 million pieces of incoming
and outgoing mail, an increase of some 15 per cent over 1974, the previous record
year. Labour unrest in the Federal Post Office reduced the final count to
19,586,867 pieces.
There were two major programs added to the operational functions of the
Postal Branch in 1975:
(a) Containerized mail originating in the Parliament Buildings in Victoria is being dispatched daily to 26 cities in the Province, and in
turn the 26 cities are dispatching mails originating in their area to
Victoria. This operation bypasses a sortation in the Victoria and
Vancouver Post Offices and the Provincial Government enjoys a
one-day service to all of the Province, whereas the private sector is
subjected to a two-day service to a majority of the cities involved.
(b) The Government Information Service had two large mail-processing
machines installed in the Postal Branch, one, a Kirk-Rudy labelling
machine is capable of labelling all types of mail to a maximum
capacity of 14,000 per hour, and a Pitney Bowes Insertimax
machine is capable of filling and sealing a maximum of 7,000
envelopes per hour. Up to the end of 1975 over 800,000 pieces of
mail were processed through these machines.
In the spring of 1975, at the suggestion of the Administrative Officer of the
Postal Branch, a system utilizing Return Postage in Cash labels for returns from
50 Motor Licence Offices in the Province was instituted. This system not only
eliminated field staff travelling to a post office, and maintaining a petty cash float
or postage stamp allowance, but it also eliminated the preparation of 48 monthly
cheque vouchers.
Better mailing classes were conducted in 1975 and several visits were made
to Government Agents by the Administrative Officer in 1975. Both of these programs will be continued in 1976.
 AA 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Total Volumes (Victoria and Vancouver Only)
Pieces Received Pieces Dispatched'
1974  6,717,151      15,618,026
19752   6,422,642      13,164,225
(7,411,728)     (15,206,319)
1 Figures represent metered mail dispatched through the Federal Post Office from the Postal Branch in
Victoria and Vancouver, and do not include internal mail collected, sorted, and delivered between offices in
these two areas.
2 The Federal Post Office was on strike for one week in April and seven weeks from October to December,
15.4 per cent of the working-days in the year. Figures in parentheses are projections of what would likely have
been handled had the strikes not taken place.
While the postal strike was in progress, the Postal Branch maintained an
exchange of Provincial Government correspondence throughout the Province.
Government aircraft were used on a twice-weekly schedule to 11 major cities. A
daily service was maintained by truck to Vancouver-New Westminster, the Fraser
Valley as far as Hope, and on Vancouver Island as far as Campbell River. Over
a ton of mail was carried daily to the Fraser Valley and return, at least 1,000
pounds daily to Campbell River and return. Two aircraft delivered and picked
up over a ton of mail twice a week.
CENTRAL MICROFILM BUREAU
The year under review did not fulfil all the objectives anticipated. Union
benefits such as the shorter hours of work had some effect on productivity. Scheduling of filming assignments was changed and others were temporarily suspended as
a result of some temporary personnel reductions and the clearing up of "banked"
holiday entitlements.
No Government decision has resulted from the Computer Output Microfilm
Report prepared by a team of consultants on the justification for an "in-house"
COM Service. The offices presently using microfiche systems are using the facilities of the Service Bureaus in Vancouver and Victoria.
The Bureau helped the British Columbia Assessment Authority to compile
assessment records by providing a copy of the 1975 assessment roll and also making
available the precision microfilm camera for filming in excess of 30,000 Victoria
Land Registry plans. The use of a rotoline camera was also provided, along with
full processing services, for all the films produced by their personnel.
The microfilming of Motor-vehicle Branch indices of computer-generated
information into the deka strip retrieval system terminated in February as the
Insurance Corporation of British Columbia assumed complete responsibility for
input of all vehicle documents records. The deka system was first introduced in
1967 and is now replaced by microfiche produced for the corporation by a commercial firm.
The microfilming of the backlog of the Vancouver Courthouse records that
was commenced during the latter half of 1974 was terminated. The need to film
the backlog was questioned by a firm of consultants and the Justice Development
Commission. Instead, their recommendation is to turn the vault spaces and the
records over to the Archives to assess the value of the records. The decision was
made to microfilm the file records from 1970 to 1975, inclusive, along with large
quantities of Supreme and County Court judgments and other similar records. The
Court records for the last six years will be the start of a microforms jacket program
that will be initiated for the daily input of cases commencing January 1976.
The Land Registry programs are continuing at about a normal rate of production in all but the Victoria area.  Vancouver Land Registry Office backlog still
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 25
has a substantial amount of records for filming which will carry the program right
through 1976. However, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nelson, and Prince George
have all backlog documents on film and are filming daily or at times that are convenient to each registry. Victoria Registry has not produced any backlog films
since June due to limitations on personnel replacements. The following roll totals
account for total camera films which are produced in duplicate:
New Westminster __     817 Nelson    180
Victoria  1,184 Kamloops  448
Vancouver   2,664 Prince George  198
During the year the Bureau was responsible for providing microfilm benefits to
seven branches which had not previously used our services. Early in the year the
Hansard transcripts were put onto microfilm from which additional sets were produced for dissemination to other branches. Beginning in April, the Public Service
Extended Health and Dental Membership Registration Card claims were committed
to a regular filming program. Filming for the Emergency Health Services Commission, Archaeological Sites Advisory Board, and Education Department Communications Publications Services began, and a major program was commenced in the
Vancouver Public Works offices.
The Association of Records Managers and Administrators (ARMA), Victoria
Chapter, met in the offices of the Central Microfilm Bureau on January 29. Following a talk on micrographics, the members toured the main offices, reprography,
and the film file areas.
A new classification series was authorized in the fall for the photographic
technicians responsible for processing, duplicating, quality control, and all the
preparation and editing of films. They were broadbanded with still photography,
cinematography, radio and television producers, and photo processing into a
photo/arts technician group. This is a.step forward and permits growth in the
field as advances in micrographics are achieved.
The year 1976 promises to be even more demanding of the capabilities and
expertise of the Bureau as every indication points to an ever-increasing use of
micrographics. A branch processing plant is anticipated to be operational early in
the new year in Vancouver to provide quick turnaround for on-line filming of daily
courthouse records and other filming projects in the area. In Victoria, filming of
the Department of Human Resources Social Assistance program will commence
and the Department of Housing has a large quantity of films that must be converted
to a unitized application.
The following are the comparative activity figures for 1974 and 1975:
1974 1975
Searches   5,325 5,535
Prints   13,543 12,278
Jackets  42,319 139,111
Aperture cards  9,318 8,816
Micro-strip holders  18,879 9,233
Processed film footage  2,077,250 2,274,715
Film duplicating  405,765 442,805
Document exposures  9,051,067 13,830,765
EDP continuous form film footage __ 193,480 112,750
 AA 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PROVINCIAL EMERGENCY PROGRAMME
There was a significant increase in the number of assigned emergency tasks
over previous years, caused largely by a 44-per-cent increase in search and rescue
missions.
Oil and hazardous material spill involvement is a new and rapidly growing
responsibility which will undoubtedly require assignment of a high priority in future
plans of the Branch.
Oil and Hazardous Material Spill Activities
In April 1975 the Provincial Emergency Programme was allocated the task of
co-ordinating Provincial Government response to oil and hazardous material spills.
Since that time we have participated, through the Burrard Inlet Working
Group, in producing a contingency plan for municipalities fronting on Burrard Inlet.
Similar groups comprising Federal, Provincial, municipal, and industry representatives are formulating contingency plans in the Victoria, Prince George, and
Kamloops Zones.
A Provincial Interdepartmental Committee has been organized in Victoria to
permit quick executive response to the requirements created by an oil or hazardous
material spill.
A mutual reporting system has been instituted with the Federal Ministry of
Transport and the Environment Protection Service of Environment Canada to
ensure that all concerned agencies are immediately notified of spill incidents. This
system is now in operation and working well. Over 50 spill incidents have been
recorded this year; fortunately most were of a minor nature.
A PEP Interim Contingency Plan has been distributed to zones and is currently being refined to permit its wider distribution.
Members of the Provincial Office and Zone Co-ordinators have undergone
training in oil spill and hazardous material containment and it is planned to extend
this training to municipal authorities.
Training
The training program during 1975 consisted of Basic and Advanced Search
and Rescue courses, Heavy Rescue courses, Community Emergency Planning
courses, and Techniques of Instruction courses.
The Search and Rescue and Heavy Rescue courses are designed to instruct
senior volunteer personnel from municipal emergency planning organizations in the
Province. These personnel develop, train, and supervise their own municipal rescue
groups, using the training they have gained at the Provincial Emergency Programme
College.
Techniques of Instruction courses provide accepted instruction methods to
personnel engaged as volunteer instructors in municipal organizations.
Community Emergency Planning courses are for municipal and zone personnel
who have a responsibility for emergency services in their appointed volunteer or
elected positions in the municipality.
In 1975, members of the training staff were enrolled in the following courses:
Correspondence courses—Accident Prevention (B.C. Safety Council).
Advanced Instructional Techniques (B.C. Institute of Technology).
Avalanche Rescue courses (National Research Council and B.C. Institute
of Technology).
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 27
During 1975, 238 students were trained at the Provincial Emergency Programme College in Victoria at the following courses:
Number of Number of
Course Courses Students
Community Emergency Planning  2 56
Heavy Rescue  3 26
Search and Rescue Basic  6 64
Search and Rescue Advanced  5 54
Techniques of Instruction  2 18
In addition, 45 British Columbia candidates nominated by the Branch attended
Emergency Planning Canada courses at the Federal Study Centre in Arnprior, Ont.
Municipal training—As of the first of the year, municipal training became the
responsibility of the zones acting under the Emergency Programme Director.
Communications
Expansion of Emergency Programme communications at the zone level has
been curtailed by limitations placed on capital expenditure. However, other
Government agencies with communications facilities, Amateur Radio and GRS
(Citizens' Band) operators continued to provide excellent support at the Provincial level.
Training persons to operate radios according to procedures laid down by
Communications Canada has increased and many have been qualified for the
Restricted Radio Operator's Certificate. In this way it is hoped that a standard
procedure that all understand will eventually prevail throughout the Province.
Exercising Emergency Communications, together with other activities such as
Air Service exercises and hospital disaster tests, has been encouraged as it provides
more realism than a communications exercise conducted on its own.
Search and Rescue
The Search and Rescue Service continues to be the most frequently needed
emergency service of the local Emergency Programmes.
The number of people who get lost or otherwise into difficulty in our mountainous wilderness continues to grow each year.
This year, teams responded to 173 calls for help. In most cases the search
and rescue missions were successful and the subjects returned to families and safety.
However, some unfortunates lose their lives each year and the demand for more
trained personnel continues to grow.
There are at the present time approximately 2,500 trained search and rescue
volunteers registered with the Provincial Emergency Programme and teams are
established in 77 communities. In addition, the B.C. Mountain Rescue Group is
ready to go anywhere it is required in the Province.
Marine Rescue Service
This year has seen a slow but steady growth in this relatively young service
which provides an added marine rescue resource in support of the Canadian Coast
Guard on the Coast, and of the RCMP on the Interior lakes.
Of particular interest was the formation in Prince Rupert early in the year of
"Rescue 15", a volunteer Marine Rescue group under the auspices of the Provincial
Emergency Programme.    Prince Rupert is a place where there has been much
 AA 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
unhappiness for some time about inadequate facilities to handle the many incidents
occurring there.
Marine Rescue groups were also busier this year on the lakes in the Okanagan
and in the Gulf of Georgia.
The Marine Rescue Service took part in over 112 marine tasks during the year.
Emergency Air Service
The Air Service continued to expand during the year, particularly in the Vancouver Zone where the newly appointed Air Chief set about organizing the available
resources in a most efficient manner. The other zones, all of which already had Air
Service organizations, have continued to improve their capabilities.
Searching from the air is an extremely difficult task for spotters, who sit in the
back seat. Spotting is not something which can be done efficiently by just anyone.
Training in how to look is essential and this year greater emphasis has been placed
on recruiting and training spotters.
The Air Service was involved in over 21 different tasks during the year. On
one, when assisting the Armed Forces, there were 25 Air Service aircraft compared
to five from the Armed Forces—a significant measure of the contribution from the
Provincial Emergency Programme in this field.
The Provincial Emergency Air Service is comprised of 630 members and 165
aircraft.
Emergency Welfare Services
Toward the end of June the Alaska Highway washed out in three places due
to heavy rains. This resulted in many vehicles being stranded in various places,
with 300 vehicles in Fort Nelson and approximately 110 vehicles between Mile 392
and Muncho Lake. This situation required a repetition of last year's Emergency
Programme airlift of food and supplies to the stranded motorists.
During the time required to make road repairs, two persons were flown out
for medical treatment.
Work during the past year has, to a large extent, been aimed at making the
professional in the field and the volunteers or volunteer agencies more aware of
each other. The results have been encouraging, with the professionals becoming
more conscious of the volunteer assistance that is available in the community and
the volunteers acquiring a better understanding of the responsibilities of the professional welfare worker.
Auxiliary Police Program
The program continues to enjoy respect and popularity in communities and
with police forces alike.
The training program under the Royal Canadian Mounted Police is being
expanded to include explosives handling and preventive policing.
The program at present has 958 serving RCMP auxiliary members and 58
applications being processed. Municipal police forces have approximately 300
volunteer auxiliaries now serving.
Public Information
A sound system and a brief taped explanatory commentary was installed in the
permanent display at the B.C. Pavilion at the Pacific National Exhibition.
In co-operation with the Department of Recreation and Travel Industry the
Branch  prepared   and  published   500,000  Wilderness   Survival  pamphlets   and
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975
AA 29
100,000 pamphlets on prevention and treatment of accidental hypothermia for
wilderness hikers.
The Branch, through the zone offices, continued distributing informational
pamphlets on surviving floods, earthquakes, and tsunamis. It also assisted the
Corrections Branch of the Attorney-General's Department in preparing a Safety
Standards Manual for High Risk Wilderness Programs. Three issues of the Emergency Programme News were published and distributed. Lectures to Advanced
Search and Rescue courses and Community Emergency Planning courses on planning and developing functional information programs for emergency operations at
the local level were also held.
The Branch continued to enjoy good public acceptance and media coverage,
gaining over 500 press mentions and many mentions on the electronic media.
ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES ADVISORY BOARD
The year ended December 31, 1975, has been the most significant ever for
the Archaeological Sites Advisory Board, both in terms of growth in budget and
staff, and in services provided to the public and Government agencies. As a result
of increased funding from both Government and private industry sources, the
Provincial Archaeologist's Office was able to participate in numerous environmental
impact studies and to increase the Provincial Archaeological Resources Inventory
by an additional 2,000 archaeological sites. This brings the total inventory to
approximately 9,000 sites.
With the continued excellent co-operation of the Department of Highways,
B.C. Hydro and Power Authority, the Canadian National Railways Company, and
Okanagan Helicopters Ltd., of Vancouver, provides the lifting power to move a
5-ton slab of rock containing ancient petroglyphs to a safe location. The rock carvings
rested on a small ledge above the swift waters of the Skeena River in the Kitselas Canyon
and were in danger of being dislodged by ice and logs during the spring run-off. The
move was carried out at the request of the Kitselas Indian Band.
 AA 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
many other Government and nongovernment agencies, it has been possible to carry
out archaeological impact assessments of all proposed major developments in the
Province. Where conflicts between such developments and archaeological resources
have become evident, these have been resolved either by a change in development
planning or by archaeological salvage excavations being carried out.
The Archaeological Sites Advisory Board met three times during the year to
consider major policy matters and to discuss numerous topics which required
clarification and comment to assist in the administration of the Archaeological and
Historic Sites Protection Act. In addition to attending general meetings, Board
members were involved in numerous committees established to examine, in depth,
specific programs and other matters relating to the operation of the Provincial
Archaeologist's Office and the general administration of the Act.
Staff
In addition to six established positions, the Board employed four full-time
and one part-time auxiliary employees during the fall and winter months. They
assisted the staff archaeologists in organizing material resulting from summer field
work, the preparation and distribution of such material to various Government
agencies and private companies, and in the preparation of reports and data resulting
from the Archaeological Resources Inventory Program.
For the first time, the two staff archaeologists, Art Charlton and Paul Sneed,
spent approximately three months in carrying out duties within their regions, with
Mr. Sneed being headquartered in Smithers and Williams Lake and Mr. Charlton at
Kelowna. Their presence in the regions was extremely valuable in terms of project
administration and direction and for the excellent opportunity to establish good
working liaison with local and regional governments as well as private industry and
local citizens. Although the concept of regional offices, even on a part-time basis,
is only in the trial stage, the staff archaeologists considered the eventual establishment of full-time regional offices as essential.
Field Projects
Continuing the Board's present policy of giving high priority to increasing the
archaeological site inventory for British Columbia, the majority of field work administered by the Provincial Archaeologist's Office during the summer of 1975 was
inventory oriented. In addition to the significant increase to the site record, ASAB
crews examined and re-recorded several hundred previously known sites. The
total number of field crews which were oriented toward the site inventory program
was 34, with crew size varying from one to 12 persons. Students employed under
the Government's WIG '75 program totalled 70.
The Provincial Archaeologist's Office was also involved in the administration
and direction of five major archaeological excavations. Three of these projects
involved archaeological field schools from the University of British Columbia, Simon
Fraser University, and Vancouver City College. The remaining two projects were
not associated with field school programs.
The most significant site inventory project in the South Coast Region, in terms
of number of sites recorded, was the continuation of the Strait of Georgia Inventory
(previously called Gulf Islands Survey). Two crews completed a systematic inventory of sites in the Gulf Islands and the adjacent east coast of Vancouver Island
from Comox to Victoria Harbour. A total of 800 sites was recorded during a
period of five months. With the inclusion of the 600 sites recorded in 1974 in the
Gulf Islands area, the total number of sites recorded by the Strait of Georgia Inven-
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 31
tory represents just under 20 per cent of the entire site inventory for the Province,
and we are in a position to begin to develop a long-range plan for the management
of the archaeological resources in this area.
Special Projects
Work has progressed on three short films relating to archaeological work in the
Province. A 20-minute film which records the relocation of a large petroglyph
panel in the canyon of the Skeena River is completed. A second film depicting
research on pictographs in the Similkameen Valley needs final editing, sound mix,
and credits. A third film, of about 30 minutes duration, records an informal interview with Dr. C. E. Borden, Chairman of the Archaeological Sites Advisory Board.
This film is of particular interest to students of British Columbia archaeology as it
summarizes the development of archaeology in the Province during the last 30 years.
The film is important primarily from an archival point of view and editing has
therefore been very limited.
The first two issues of the Archaeological Sites Advisory Board's newsletter
Datum were published in the spring and fall of 1975. The newsletter has been well
received and it is hoped that the Archaeological Sites Advisory Board can continue
publication of the newsletter on a twice-yearly basis in the future.
There were two other "special projects" carried out this past summer. One
resulted in amassing approximately 1,000 legal descriptions of properties containing archaeological sites. Most of these title searches were conducted on properties
in the Gulf Islands region. The ASAB also employed a law student for a period of
two months to continue legal research into all aspects of antiquities legislation in
Canada. The information gathered has been presented to the Archaeological and
Historic Sites Advisory Board's joint committee to propose changes to the Archaeological and Historic Sites Protection Act.
Volunteer Wardens
A program of voluntary archaeological wardens, which was first proposed by
the Archaeological Sites Advisory Board several years ago, has now become a
reality. By mid-October, 30 persons from all regions of the Province had been
appointed to function as wardens to aid the Provincial Archaeologist's Office in the
conservation and protection of British Columbia's archaeological resources.
On November 22 and 23, the first formal meeting of all designated wardens
took place in Victoria. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a general orientation and instruction concerning the archaeology of British Columbia, and to define
the wardens' terms of reference.
Wardens will work under the direction of the staff archaeologist responsible for
the region in which a particular warden, or group of wardens, function. Wardens
will carry out their duties on a voluntary, nonpaid basis. However, travel expenses
which have been authorized by a regional archaeologist will be reimbursed by the
Archaeological Sites Advisory Board.
HISTORIC SITES ADVISORY BOARD
It is the role of the Historic Sites Advisory Board to make recommendations
to the Minister concerning the protection of historic sites and objects of Provincial
significance.
In 1975 the Board met twice—Point Ellice House and Fort Defiance were
designated historic sites and the SS Naramata and the Hera were designated historic objects. In addition, the Church, Legislation, and Inscriptions Committees
met regularly.
 AA 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Historic Sites Advisory Board at Point Ellice House. From left: Don Tarasoff,
Research Officer; Gerry Wellburn; George Geddes, Secretary; Yorke Edwards; Gordon
Elliott; Ann Stevenson; Dr. Jim Hendrickson; Alan Turner; Bob Broadland, Historic Sites
consultant; L. J. Wallace, Chairman; Dr. Margaret Ormsby; Dr. Willard Ireland; Lloyd
Brooks. —Provincial Archives Photo
Upon the recommendation of the Board the Crown has acquired the Deegan
House in Yale, Point Ellice House in Victoria, and, in co-operation with the
Municipality of Oak Bay, the Tod House.
The staff of the Board conducted research on a variety of historic sites; these
included the townsites of Atlin, Discovery, and Centreville, St. Ann's Chapel, Fort
Defiance, Keremeos Grist Mill, Craigflower School, Point Ellice House, Koksilah
School, Pandosy Mission, and the Wood and Muir houses. In addition, through
co-operation with the Department of Highways, eight interpretation signs were
prepared.
During the summer, 17 students were employed. Nine students assisted in the
compilation of a Provincial Register of over 10,000 historic buildings; furthermore,
inventories were made of shipwrecks, Provincial courthouses, fur-trade posts, road-
houses in the Cariboo, and early architects and builders. In co-operation with
other Government departments, site surveys were conducted in Saanich and Chilliwack and on the Gulf Islands. At Point Ellice House eight students, some with
disabilities, assisted the Curator to accession almost 9,000 artifacts and to conduct
a salvage excavation. Plans have also been submitted for the future development
of this important historic site.
Barkerville and Cottonwood House Historic Parks
The Supervisor of Barkerville and Cottonwood House Historic Parks for over
a decade, John Premischook, decided to leave late in the year to accept a position
with the Historic Parks and Sites Division of the Department of Recreation and
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975
AA 33
Conservation. While sorry to see him leave, the Department wishes him well. It is
expected a successor will be named early in the new year.
Although no major development projects were undertaken this year, progress
was made on restoration of several buildings, a new campground was opened, and
curatorial work continued with planning and preparation of exhibits and expansion
of museum services.
In Chinatown, repair to the Quong Sang Wing building wall and foundation
was completed in October. The No. 3 warehouse has been repaired, with a new
foundation, replacement of some wall logs, and interior finishing to prepare it for
use as a freight-receiving depot and stock warehouse. Repair has been undertaken
on the main barn building through foundation installation, replacement of wall logs,
floor stringers, and decking. Throughout the winter, work will continue to complete
this building for use next year.
New exhibits were prepared for viewing at the "peace" house in Chinatown,
"deserted" miner's cabin, and the lobby of the Masonic Hall. Two new operating
exhibits were opened for the enjoyment of visitors—the blacksmith-wheelwright
shop and the cabinetmaker's shop. A few changes have been made in the Museum's
exhibits, and displays have been removed from the lecture room.
In May and June a record was established in school tours visiting the park.
A total of 3,257 students in 79 separate school groups toured Barkerville and were
guided by the staff.  This approximately doubled last year's attendance.
Progress has been made toward preparing the new geological exhibit, with
interpretive drawings and texts and collection of mineral, rock, fossil samples, and
artifacts.    Packed in a replica of an old iron-bound miner's wooden trunk, this
Research Officer Don Tarasoff at the site of the old Sport Mine, Port Hardy.
 AA 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
"Edu-Kit" will be sent through the schools of the Province, helping to bring the
gold rush days to life.
A survey has been made to establish the old town lot boundaries, location of
the important historic placer claims in and surrounding Barkerville, as well as
plotting a master plan of underground services in the townsite.
A successful program was carried on through the summer with guiding staff
providing town tours and dispensing information to park visitors. Work continues
on the educational program with preparation of a building, the Wendle House, for
incorporation into next year's presentation.
In an attempt to predict future visitor trends, establish which features are best
appreciated by visitors, and to facilitate future planning, the Research Section of
the Parks Branch's Planning Division conducted a survey during the summer. The
data will be evaluated for presentation in early 1976.
Park attendance, campers, and registrations at the Museum were down
approximately 20 per cent from 1974. This was likely caused by the general
economic situation, higher gas prices, and the cold, wet weather conditions of the
summer.
The Special Events season began, as usual, on the last Tuesday in June with
the opening of the Theatre Royal. Guest of honour was Gerry Wellburn. The
theatrical presentation was its usual success.
Revenue was up considerably over 1974, brought about mainly by increased
prices of souvenirs and theatre tickets, a shorter stagecoach ride on a new route,
and increased bakery production.
At Cottonwood House the main emphasis has been toward a maintenance
program this year, the only development being preparation of the interpretation
building and construction of display cases. The vegetable garden was very successful again and a profusion of chicks, ducklings, and kittens made their appearance
during the summer for the amusement of visitors and staff.
Possibly the most delightful event at either park was the birth of a Clydesdale
filly, Bonnie, in March.
Fort Steele Historic Park
Attendance of 270,000 visitors indicates a drop of approximately 9 per cent
over 1974. This may be attributable to a combination of a higher than normal
attendance last year as a spillover from Expo '74 at Spokane, coupled with fewer
people on the highway this year because of gasoline prices and an otherwise
depressed economy. On the other hand, people seemed to be spending more on
souvenirs, and increased their use of the theatre, railway, and stagecoach. Attendance at the Wild Horse Theatre was up 6 per cent.
Good results from working exhibits such as blacksmith, wheelwright, Cohn
house, and Kershaw store were noted. Satisfactory progress has been made on the
guide book, and although behind schedule, we believe it will be available for the
coming season.
School group visits nearly doubled over 1974 with 99 groups participating
this year; 21 of these groups came in the fall, with two groups of 45 each coming
from Calgary in November to spend two nights each living in the North West
Mounted Police compound.
An adult education lecture series was conducted in co-operation with the East
Kootenay branch of Selkirk College. More than 60 persons participated in eight
lectures and four field trips.   The program will be extended next year with the
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 35
addition of historic films of local interest. Other educational programs included
presentations to historical societies in the region, and workshops in archival procedures and aural history programs. Artifacts were loaned to responsible groups
for special exhibits.
Souvenir sales doubled over the previous year to a gross revenue of $31,000.
However, it is significant that more than $23,000 of that total came from the
Kershaw General Store. The items sold there are those generally not found at
other souvenir stands in the district, and are as nearly as possible items which
would have been available at Fort Steele at the turn of the century. The low-key
atmosphere of the store, as much as anything else, is aimed at a valuable person-
to-person contact between the staff and the public.
At the Museum, many laudatory comments were received about the special
exhibit prepared for International Women's Year. The second floor exhibit featured clothing and personal effects and paid specific tribute to numerous pioneer
women who lived at Fort Steele.
During the summer months a Park User Survey was conducted by staff of the
Parks Branch Research Section; 430 people were sampled toward a report which
should prove useful as a planning aid.
Underground conduit was installed throughout the building area in preparation for moving all electrical and communication lines underground in the spring.
Renovations were completed to the Egge House and the Dempsey House, both of
which will continue to be occupied by the resident families.
Acquisitions were completed of the inholdings of Hoffman, Ransopher, and
Nicol, and it is expected that the Johnson property across from the Museum will
be purchased shortly.
Heritage Preservation
Fort St. James Historic Park—A new Federal-Provincial agreement in respect
of the development of the park was drawn up by the Fort St. James Advisory
Board and it is expected that the agreement will be formally signed during the
forthcoming year. The time span for the development is expected to take a minimum of five years.
The site is open to the public from May 24 to Thanksgiving Day.
Craigflower School — Western Canada's oldest schoolhouse, Craigflower
School, is located a few miles from downtown Victoria on the Gorge waterway.
The school was acquired by the Provincial Government late in 1973 and has
proved to be a popular attraction, particularly for school groups interested in
seeing what conditions were like in 1855.
After a comprehensive survey by the Department of Public Works, the necessary maintenance work was completed in 1975, ensuring the preservation of the
school.   A program of restoration and interpretation is to commence shortly.
Point Ellice House—Late in 1974, on the recommendation of the Historic
Sites Advisory Board, Point Ellice House, a stately old home from our Colonial
period, was acquired by the Provincial Government. The house, the last remaining
one of its type, along with contents, is located on approximately 2Vi acres of waterfront land in Victoria.
 AA 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Point Ellice House was built in 1861,
and was the home of the Honourable Peter
O'Reilly, Gold Commissioner, County Court
Judge, and member of the first Legislative
Council of British Columbia. His grandson,
John O'Reilly, and his wife, have been retained by the Government as curators.
The contents of the house, including
much original furniture and family memorabilia, have been catalogued and an interpretation program is now under way.
Point Ellice House, under the joint
jurisdiction of the Capital Improvement District Commission and the Historic Sites
Advisory Board, is open daily from 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m.
British Columbia Forest Museum —
Development of the British Columbia Forest
Museum, established by Gerald E. Wellburn
in 1954 and acquired by the Provincial
Government in 1973, continued during the
past year.
Since its beginning, items have been
selectively acquired either by contribution
from the forest industry and private donors,
or by purchase, until today the museum
boasts one of the finest collections of operational vintage forestry equipment in North
America. A most successful new educational program for younger school children
in the area was started. It will be expanded
in the years to come. Attendance in 1975
reached 55,000.
The museum's many features include the ancient logging steam locomotives
which carry visitors over narrow-gauge track through 25 acres of heavily wooded
area, and over a long lakeshore trestle to view a magnificent variety of rolling stock,
early carriages, automobiles, trucks, and forest industry equipment used decades
ago. A logging museum building which now stands on the site of the area's first
combination church, town hall, and school, built in 1863, houses hundreds of
exhibits, historic photographs, heritage objects, and displays. Over 25 different
species of trees, including Douglas firs over 350 years old, can be viewed by visitors
on the "Foresters' Walk" trail included in the museum's boundaries.
Adjacent to the museum site is a 15-acre forestry nursery in which visitors can
view the various stages in forest growth and management.
A 50-acre green belt has been established to the south of the museum to
protect the site from industrial encroachment.
British Columbia Transportation Museum—A staff of three mechanics is continuing the restoration of the more than 20 vintage trucks in the museum, restoring
them to their former working condition. Most of the collection was donated to the
Government by Mrs. Jean King, widow of the late Aubrey King, of Vancouver, in
1974.
Japanese-style umbrella stand reconstructed from fragments unearthed
during a salvage excavation at Point
Ellice House.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975
AA 37
I
tip iwlfl^
f\ jmt00m h
B.C. Electric lnterurban Car of the type acquired by the Provincial Government,
one to be loaned to Heritage Park in Burnaby, and a second to be placed in the B.C.
Transportation Museum.  The cars, built in 1913, were in use until 1958.
—Provincial Museum Photo
Development plans include acquisition of more diversified forms of early
transport, and the effective use and display of the vehicles.
In addition to the repairs, a great deal of work has been done in building
storage for parts which have been sorted and catalogued. Benches were installed
and some additions in the manner of movable walls constructed. Two vehicles have
been borrowed from private sources and placed in the showroom as a display, along
with some old machinery, tires, desks, etc. Two vehicles have been acquired on
loan from Paccar Inc. Nine vehicles have been moved from storage at Lake City
to a new site at Oakalla Prison Farm. Initial proceedings have been instituted to
acquire one 1929 GMC truck which is restored.    Final decision is still pending.
A program allowing pre-school children to visit the premises at 854 West
Sixth Avenue has resulted in approximately 300 children visiting up to the end
of the year.
Captain Cook Bicentennial—A committee of the Council of the British
Columbia Historical Association met with the Deputy Provincial Secretary and
several members of the Department early in 1975 to make a number of proposals
for the commemoration of the Cook Bicentennial in 1978. Suggestions included
a historical conference, exhibits, school participation, commemorative stamps and
medallions, a public holiday, and an excursion to Nootka. At about the same lime
the History Department of Simon Fraser University proposed to sponsor a Cook
Conference, and there has been continuing consultation between the BCHA and
the university, which has already drawn up a program and contacted a number of
participants.
The Provincial Secretary approved the setting-up of an interdepartmental
committee to co-ordinate Government activity.    A preliminary meeting has been
 AA 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
held at which it was agreed that the Provincial Archivist and the Director of the
Provincial Museum would explore the possibility of joint or complementary exhibits
on the Cook theme for 1978. The Department of Education has been asked to
appoint a representative to the committee in order that possible school activities can
be developed. Meanwhile, the Provincial Secretary has contacted the Postmaster-
General and been given assurance that his request for a commemorative stamp or
stamps will be considered when the issues for 1978 are being determined.
In all of the discussions that have been held it has been recognized that participation of the Native people would not only be desirable but necessary in so far as
any visits to, or activity at, the Nootka site are concerned. Informal contact with
Parks Canada regional officers indicates that it is unlikely that an interpretation
centre or visitor reception facilities will be constructed at the national historic site
by 1978.
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON
Rear-Admiral M. G. Stirling retired as Agent-General for British Columbia in
July, having served since October 1968. His seven years in office was a postwar
record. During his period, he worked enthusiastically and unceasingly to promote
the interests of the Province and made many friends in London.
He was succeeded by R. M. Strachan, formerly Minister of Transport and
Communications, who took up his duties in London in early November.
A reception was held at British Columbia House in June in honour of Premier
Barrett during his visit to the United Kingdom to discuss possible future United
Kingdom participation in British Columbia resource and industrial development.
Arrangements were made by the Agent-General and his staff for the Premier and his
party to meet with key figures in the diplomatic, commercial, and industrial fields
to discuss mutual areas of interest.
During the year a number of visits were received from members of the Executive Council as well as Members of the Legislative Assembly and key executives of
Crown corporations. The Agent-General and his staff were pleased to assist in
arranging appointments and meetings when requested to do so.
Throughout the year the Agent-General, assisted by senior staff, attended
numerous functions as representatives of the Province. One of the more colourful
occasions was the ceremony at Guildhall in March when the Freedom of the City
of London was presented to the Right Honourable P. E. Trudeau, Prime Minister.
In October, in the absence of the Agent-General, the Administrative Officer
attended ceremonies marking the establishment of a Canadian Chair of Studies at
the University of Edinburgh. Among other prominent representatives were the
Secretary of State for Scotland and the Secretary of State for External Affairs,
A. J. MacEachen, as well as the Canadian High Commissioner.
There are three different Government departments represented at British
Columbia House—the Provincial Secretary, the Department of Economic Development, and the Department of Travel Industry.
Throughout the year assistance was rendered by the Commercial Officer to
United Kingdom and European businessmen and industrialists who were considering
British Columbia as a base for future expansion and investment. Close liaison was
maintained with the Department of Economic Development, both in Victoria and
Vancouver, and many visiting businessmen from Europe were recommended to call
at the Vancouver office and made it their "key" contact as they investigated prospects
firsthand.
L
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975
AA 39
Similarly, British Columbia businessmen called at B.C. House, London, for
assistance and advice in making suitable contacts in the United Kingdom and Europe
in their endeavours to find sources of supply, agents, distributors, etc.
Travel to the Province from the United Kingdom and Europe increased substantially in 1975. The Department of Travel Industry participated in a large number of joint travel promotions to Western Canada in conjunction with Travel
Alberta, the Canadian Government Office of Tourism, Air Canada, and CP Air.
The full report of the Director of Travel Promotion appears in the Annual Report
of the Department of Travel Industry.
For the first time in several years the number of immigration inquiries received
showed a marked drop over the previous year. This was due partly to the high
unemployment rate that has prevailed in Canada all year, discouraging prospective
immigrants, and partly to the tightening of entry requirements to Canada by the
Canadian Department of Manpower and Immigration. Nevertheless, the immigration counselling staff conducted many interviews and a substantial number of
written inquiries were handled.
Circulation of the monthly British Columbia News Letter increased. It is
distributed free of charge to individuals and businesses in the United Kingdom and
Europe who have interests in the Province, and endeavours to keep them advised
on the latest economic and social developments taking place.
The film library had another busy and successful year, the greatest demand
being from travel organizations, schools, and clubs. Over 100 films were loaned
out and viewed by an estimated audience of 10,000. In addition, a number of film
shows were held in British Columbia House mainly for travel organizations in the
United Kingdom specializing in travel to Canada.
The Agent-General sat on the annual scholarship committee of The Fairbridge
Society which met in April. These scholarships enable United Kingdom students
to attend universities in Vancouver and Victoria. This year three promising students
were selected, two of whom will attend the University of British Columbia and the
other the University of Victoria.
The annual Captain Vancouver memorial service took place at St. Peter's
Church on May 11. Wreaths were laid on behalf of the Royal Borough of Richmond and the City of Vancouver. St. Peter's Church dates back to before the
16th century and for a time it was feared that it might have to be closed due to the
high cost of repairs. However, a group of local citizens have formed "The Friends
of St. Peter's" and hope to raise sufficient funds to maintain the church in perpetuity.
During the year over 2,500 visitors from the Province registered at British
Columbia House and many availed themselves of the facilities for receiving mail
from home, with over 4,000 letters and parcels being handled. The reading room
was also a popular rendezvous spot as visitors kept up to date on events at home
by browsing through the many local newspapers available. The reception staff were
kept busy answering queries on where to go and what to see in London.
INDIAN ADVISORY BRANCH
The First Citizens' Fund is involved with status and non-status Indian communities and groups to assist them in the process of self-determination and self-
development. The involvement represents the administration of the Fund which
was established to provide financial assistance for special Indian-initiated projects
and programs.
The general philosophy of the Fund is based on the notion that community
development is a natural outcome of certain activities.    It is not something one
 AA 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Harvest time at the 530-acre farm operated by the Cowichan Indian
Co-operative Farm Association.
does, but something that happens as a result of what one does. Accordingly, a
major objective of the Fund is to assist the leadership of communities to move
progressively ahead and take charge of its own affairs. Indirectly, leaders are
encouraged to review their needs, examine their requirements, analyse their problems, and define their priorities.
The First Citizens' Fund Advisory Committee evaluates all applications for
assistance directed to the Fund that was established under the Revenue Surplus
Appropriation Act, 1969: "to help expand and contribute support to projects
involved with the advancement and expansion of the culture, education, economic
development, and position of persons of the North American Indian race who
were born in and are residents of the Province of British Columbia."
The Advisory Committee currently comprises nine members who represent
widely scattered areas of the Province. During 1975 the following members
actively served the Committee:
Mrs. Theresa Miller, Vancouver.
Mrs. Pearle Pearson, Masset.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975
AA 41
Mrs. Mildred Gottfriedson, Kamloops.
James Sewid, Campbell River.
Joseph Pierre, Cranbrook.
Arthur Helin, Nanaimo.
Mrs. Rose Charlie, Harrison Mills.
Peter George, Fraser Lake.
Eric Gilbert, Williams Lake.
R. J. Mclnnes, Co-ordinator, Victoria.
The Advisory Committee held eight meetings during 1975 to assess the
numerous projects and programs that were initiated by Indian communities, organizations, and individuals. The review resulted in 214 recommendations being
directed to and approved by the Provincial Secretary, with a total of $1,038,171
in grants being allocated.
The following table shows a breakdown of the grants authorized for the
period January 1, 1975, to December 31, 1975, listed as recommended at each of
the eight meetings of the committee.
Meeting
No.
Economic
Development
Education
Culture
Communications
Social
Service
Community
Centres
Recreation
Total
1	
$
11,600 (2)
57,534 (5)
$
10,328 (3)
11,234 (4)
18.268 C5I
$
$
47,142 (6)
49,176 (5)
104,570 (13)
25,126 (6)
50,065 (6)
24,709 (5)
24,500 (4)
18,674 (6)
$
$
52,578 (24)
40,309 (14)
28,898 (15)
41,930 (14)
17,964 (8)
10,655 (3)
15,060 (3)
61,610 (6)
$
121,648 (35)
2      .
33,090 (6)
38,208 (7)
985 (2)
9,250 (5)
191,343 (34)
3	
189,944 (40)
4	
5.200 (21   1  -"4.366 (51
97,607 (29)
5  	
10,000 (1)
50,231 (3)
16,000 (1)
6,253 (3)
2,920 (3)
17,020 (2)
7,550 (3)
	
93,532 (23)
6	
26,050 (2)
38,058 (3)
88,515 (14)
7 ..'.	
8	
1,960 (2)
29,100 (7)
100,590 (14)
154,992 (25)
Totals	
150,565 (14)
97,939 (27)
112,593 (29)
143 967. (5111   64 108 (S\
269,004 (87)
1,038,171 (214)
During the past year, committee members examined 344 applications for
financial assistance.    Total aid requested amounted to $4,727,891.
In most instances the interest of the Advisory Committee lies beyond the
specific project in the field of human resource development. It may be that in
certain instances economic development projects are more appropriate than cultural
development projects or vice versa. However, in many instances, the nature of
the project is secondary to the over-all goal of human resource development.
The many approved projects and programs reflect the local desire to develop
economic opportunities at the community level and at the same time help improve
the economic and social position of all contemporary Indian citizens of the Province.
During the past year the Ehattesaht Indian Band, through its Ehattesaht Cooperative Enterprises, continued to develop its logging operation on the west coast
of Vancouver Island. A First Citizen's Fund grant assisted in defraying certain
initial project expenses and relieved the concern about interim financing and established a base for more permanent funding through other channels. A sense of local
pride resulted from the operation and its employment of at least 14 individuals,
nine of whom were taken off welfare, will foster interest in further community
activities.
The Bella Bella Indian Band opened a newly constructed hotel complex during
1975 with financial assistance from the First Citizens' Fund. The complex comprises a 12-room hotel with a 40-seat cateteria, a 150-seat beverage room, a social
facility, and three office rentals.   The complex provides full-time employment for
 AA 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
at least nine Band members and provides a needed controlled social centre for the
community and assists the community in its plans to develop Bella Bella as a service
centre for the central coast of British Columbia.
The First Citizens' Fund contributed a grant to the Cowichan Indian Band
to help develop the Cowichan Indian Co-operative Farm Association. It was
founded to bring together many small holdings and to develop the highly arable
land into a viable farm unit. From a start of 107 scattered acres the co-operative
has now welded together 530 acres. The co-operative is striving to put an agrarian
base under the Indian community as well as offering an extension of periods of
employment. Successful production has now encouraged a study of local sales
through a road-side stand and the wholesaling to produce stores in the market area.
In addition, a First Citizens' Fund grant was awarded the co-operative to help
develop an aquaculture project in the Cowichan area.
Financial assistance was awarded to Clinton Indian Band to help provide
capital funding of a Band-owned economic development project known as the
Kanata Cattle and Hay Company Ltd. The business is located on 1,227 acres of
reserve land and employs members of the Band in all positions possible. The
project is conducted for the benefit of the Band as a whole to improve its economic
position and provide continuing employment for Band members. Projections call
for the eventual establishment of a basic herd of 500 cows.
The Spahomin Cattle Company Ltd. is a legal, registered company owned by
the Upper Nicola Indian Band members. It was formed with assistance from the
First Citizens' Fund to facilitate the expansion of their Band cow-calf operation to
a larger, and consequently more profitable, operation. By doing so, use is being
made of unused and leased parts of the Reserve, creating jobs for Band members.
Agriculture also plays an important part in the economy of the North Okanagan
region where the Spallumcheen Indian Band is located. A First Citizens' Fund
grant enabled the Band to undertake a program to greatly improve its irrigation
system.
The Native Brotherhood of British Columbia proposes the construction of
a multi-million dollar commercial-cultural complex in downtown Prince Rupert to
serve the needs of a large Indian population of the area. The First Citizens' Fund
awarded a grant to cover the cost of a feasibility study to determine details of
market possibilities, financial implications, and cultural requirements.
In addition, a.First Citizens' Fund grant enabled the North Coast District
Council, Prince Rupert, to undertake a program which provides training for Indian
people residing in the Miller Bay area, in basic hydraulics, mechanics, and other
problems relating to the fishing industry.
Because a multi-purpose building was needed in Lytton, both from an economic
and from a social point of view, the Lytton Indian Band was awarded a First
Citizens' Fund grant to help provide the community with such a facility. The
operation and use of the commercial building will provide impetus and vitality to
the Indian community's efforts at self-improvement and assist local leadership to
develop management and decision-making skills.
To take advantage of a tourist demand, band councils are taking steps to
develop community-operated camp-sites. Communities have long been aware of
the opportunities for developing the potential of the tourist industry in their immediate areas, and several camps are at present being operated successfully. During
the past year the Pacheenaht and Ohiaht Indian Bands were among the recipients
of First Citizens' Fund grants to help develop such facilities.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 43
Largely through strong self-motivation for economic and social improvement,
the Beecher Bay Indian Band developed a successful marina with financial assistance
from the First Citizens' Fund to serve a great demand for such service in the area.
There will be fuel, food, and complete camp facilities plus boat storage when the
development is complete.
Financial assistance was also given the Kincolith, Skidegate, North Thompson,
Comox, Stellaquo, Cowichan, Malahat, Takla Lake, and other Indian Bands to
help construct community centres which will enable Councils to offer Band members
needed cultural, recreation, social, and business facilities.
During the year the Opitsaht Homemakers was one of the native Indian
organizations that opened an arts and crafts retail outlet to assure producers of
markets for their merchandise at a good wholesale price, and merchandized by their
own people. The centre is located at Long Beach and will be an important outlet
for Indian artists and craftsmen. In addition to the retail branch, the organization is
dedicated to improving the quality of Indian crafts.
The production of arts and crafts represent an integral part of Indian culture.
Today, the demand for authentic work of the craftsmen is increasing, and Indian
entrepreneurs are becoming involved in the retail market. The First Citizens' Fund
has offered financial assistance to interested Band Councils to explore and develop
such projects.
The preservation and exhibition of native Indian culture is also of utmost
importance to Indian residents. The First Citizens' Fund has therefore continued to
encourage the development of programs that involve the native Indian people of
British Columbia in the collection of taped and written material pertaining to their
language, legends, customs, histories, and literature. The projects will enable the
Indian people to enhance their identity and sense of self-worth, and will help equip
young people to relate to their communities and to work with other Band members
in developing skills related to the cultural content of their heritage. The Bella
Bella, Masset, Glen Vowell, and Lakahahmen Indian Councils, and the Native
Benevolent Society are a few of the organizations that have undertaken such cultural
projects.
A need exists in Indian communities for higher education and more sophisticated leaders. The First Citizens' Fund continues to encourage the Indian student
to enrol in postsecondary educational institutions and is prepared to offer incentive
bursaries to those engaged in college or university courses. During 1975, 60
students were awarded financial assistance totalling $52,940. At the elementary
and secondary level, native Indian groups were awarded financial assistance to help
meet expenses of student exchange and educational tour programs.
Many Indian Education Committees have expressed the need for pre-school
instruction for children in the 3 to 5-year age-groups to ensure the younger children
are more fully prepared to enter the Provincial educational system. Emphasis is
also placed on the need for adequate study facilities for the student population
in individual Indian communities. First Citizens' Fund grants have assisted communities to conduct such programs successfully.
The Fish Lake Cultural Educational Centre is the result of the Indians of the
Williams Lake District collectively working toward some control of their own
destiny. It was the District Council that voiced the Band members' opinion that a
common Education Centre was needed by all Indians of the district to preserve
their culture, language, history, and resources, and to develop them in their own
way. The main function of the Resource Centre is to co-ordinate informational
and enrichment services at the Fish Lake Centre. The First Citizens' Fund contributed to the capital and operational expenses of the centre.
 AA 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Fund also offers financial assistance to a similar program of the
Coqualeetza Education Training Centre Association.
With financial assistance from the First Citizens' Fund, native Indian organizations are encouraged to arrange seminars, meetings, conferences, and conventions
with a view to improving understanding of culture, values, problems, and aspirations
of the Indian people.
The Indian people are actively involved in recreation activities. In consequence, the First Citizens' Fund continues to offer financial support for such programs on a cost-sharing basis at the community district and Provincial levels.
During the past few years the citizens of many urban areas observed a social
need among Indian people who were migrating into the cities in increasing numbers
for a variety of reasons. As a result, native Indian Friendship Centres have been
established in 14 centres in the Province. Along with private and business donations
from the community and financial support from the Federal Government and the
First Citizens' Fund, the centres have provided services to help meet the problems
encountered by Indian people living in urban areas. Such centres help foster the
development of identity and cultural pride.
The general philosophy of the First Citizens' Fund is to help the Indian people
help themselves. It has been the aim of the Advisory Committee to encourage and
stimulate Indian participation in financing various projects through shared-cost
arrangements whenever possible. The most important feature of the First Citizens'
Fund is that all projects and programs are initiated and controlled by the Indian
people.
Most locally initiated projects and programs could not have evolved without
assistance from the First Citizens' Fund. As a result, the Fund has a direct impact
on the quality of community life.
The sponsored programs reflect the desire of the Indian people to improve the
social and economic life of their communities, and at the same time preserve and
develop their native culture.
METRIC CONVERSION
During the year the Metric Conversion Co-ordinating Committee for Government Departments and Crown Agencies held six meetings. Various departments
also held committee meetings and started to conduct seminars for their field staff
who have maximum contact with the public.
Due to pressure of work, W. J. Williams stepped down as Chairman of the
Conversion Committee. W. F. Osselton was appointed as the Chairman and took
over his new duties in August. Two additional subcommittees were formed—
Consumer Protection, and Printing, with Chairpersons Ms. Elaine McAndrew and
C. E. Bennett respectively.
Numerous meetings of the various subcommittees were held to plan activities
in key areas, the results of which will be visible over the next few years. For
example, legislative changes, collection of suitable training material, and the start
of training for clerks, stenographers, technicians, and professionals, and public
awareness programs, received active attention.
The Chairman of the Conversion Committee, the Executive Director, and
departmental experts attended national meetings with the Metric Commission, the
provinces, and the two territories "in Quebec City, Ottawa, Calgary, Winnipeg, and
Regina. The meetings were useful in discussing the plans of the Federal Government departments, the other provinces, and in providing departmental representatives with the opportunity to meet with and exchange ideas on accomplishing
conversion while considering regional differences and interests.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,   1975 AA 45
During the year Canada had its first practical introduction to the International
System of Units (SI). Temperature readings were given in degrees Celsius as
of April 1. In September the rainfall was given in millimetres and the snowfall
in centimetres. As a public awareness program, the Department of Highways put
up 26 signs advising motorists how many kilometres to the next city. One of the
signs, near Lac la Hache, reads, "13 kilometres to the next town, 'One-Hundred-
Mile-House'."
The handicapped students hired through the summer produced several necessary and useful programs which were well received. A 3 8-minute script was prepared on tape cassette and recorded by the Provincial Library Development Commission to introduce the visually impaired to metric conversion. The tape was
mailed to every library in the Province. It is hoped to recall these tapes and issue
new ones as the Metric Conversion Program advances.
Initial mailing of metric material was made to native Band Chiefs. Bill Pulton,
the co-ordinator of the handicapped project, also appeared on the program, "The
Chinese Way," which was video-taped at Channel 10 in Vancouver. Twelve metric
scripts were prepared, each nontechnical but informative, and mailed to 57 radio
stations in British Columbia. Due to the positive response to these projects, it
is hoped to expand upon this program as resources permit.
A unique Metric Committee was formed at the request of the construction
industry. The British Columbia Construction Metric Conversion Committee has
representatives from the B.C. Construction Association, the B.C. Mechanical Contractors Association, the Portland Cement Association, the Electrical Contractors
Association, the Quantity Surveyors, the Specification Writers Association of
Canada, the Canadian Masonry Association, HUDAC, the Association of Professional Engineers of British Columbia, and the Architects Institute of British Columbia. Metric libraries have been established in the offices of the B.C. Construction
Association in Victoria, Vancouver, Kamloops, and Prince George.
The tempo of Metric Conversion is expected to increase in 1976 as soon as
the Canadian Federal Hearings on the Guideline Dates are concluded. The President of the United States signed a Metric Bill on December 23 which has provided
legislative backing to the multi-national industrial program for metric conversion
already under way in the United States.
During 1976, sugar, and most toilet goods will be packaged in SI units. On
April 1, the Atmospheric Environment Service will report atmospheric pressure in
kilopascals (kPa), windspeed in kilometres per hour (km/h) (except for marine
and aviation, which will remain in knots), and visibility in kilometres (km).
Metric units will be used at the Montreal Olympics in the summer.
In September the shoe industry is planning to convert to SI. Saskatchewan
will introduce SI in Grades IV to VI, Quebec in Grades IV, V, VI, XI, and XII,
New Brunswick in Grades IV to IX, and Prince Edward Island in Grades VI to IX.
British Columbia is scheduled to complete the academic program conversion
when metric is extended to Grades XI and XII from the previous Kindergarten to
Grade X, which was started in 1973. Community college courses are also expected
to be extended and enlarged for housewives, builders, technicians, and senior citizens.
LOTTERIES BRANCH
The Western Canada Lottery Foundation, of which the British Columbia
Lottery Branch is an equal partner, held four draws throughout the four Western
Provinces in 1975. One of the four final draws was held in the North Vancouver
Centennial Auditorium on May 12.    It was televised on the CBC television net-
 AA 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Western Canada Lottery draws in February, May, August, and November won five
lucky British Columbians major prizes totalling $750,000. Happy winners were, from top
to bottom: Robert Geddes, Vancouver, $100,000; Sam Popoff, Castlegar, $250,000; Doug
Glassford, Quesnel, $50,000; Steve Balatoni, Port Alberni, $250,000; Jean McKenzie,
Revelstoke, $100,000.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 47
work. A preliminary draw, attended by over 1,000, was held later in the year at
Heritage Court in Victoria. Other draws were held in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and
Manitoba.
At the beginning of August an office was opened in Vancouver at 1037 West
Broadway with a staff of three District Managers and two clerks. The purpose of
the office was to stimulate ticket sales and to assist selling agencies in setting up a
selling organization.
The head office of the Lotteries Branch was moved from Langley Street to
534 Broughton Street to where needed space and security features for the new
bearer ticket system were available.
A total of 2,762,558 tickets was sold by over 486 agencies during the year.
The agencies earned commission of approximately $1,191,680, which was used to
fund worth-while local projects. The Lotteries Branch net proceeds of $1,308,649
were turned over to the Lottery Fund. This new fund is used to supplement the
Physical Fitness and Amateur Sport and Cultural Funds.
A Special Events Fund, financed entirely from the lotteries revenue, provides
special grants to groups and individuals representing British Columbia at national
and international events. A total of 28 grants, amounting to $123,554, was made.
British Columbians won a total of 5,256 prizes with a value of $1,339,695
during the year. Two first prizes of $250,000 each were won by S. Popoff, of
Castlegar, and by S. Balatoni, of Port Alberni.
The Olympic Lottery administered by the Lotteries Branch was introduced
to British Columbia by Order in Council 654 in March; 627,458 tickets were sold
during the remainder of the year. The proceeds of the Olympic Lottery, $258,400,
were placed in a special holding account and will be devoted to the Physical Fitness
and Amateur Sports Fund as required for specific projects.
LEISURE SERVICES BRANCH
Dr. Eric Broom was appointed Associate Deputy Minister, Leisure Services,
under the Department of the Provincial Secretary on May 29.
The former Community Recreation Branch of the Department of Travel
Industry transferred to the Department of the Provincial Secretary in July, to join
with the B.C. Cultural Program as the Leisure Services Branch.
As a result of this change the Leisure Services Branch is undergoing a reorganization designed to provide better recreation services to the communities of British
Columbia. During the latter part of 1975 the Branch was preparing for change
consistent with the growth of the Province and services required for Government
aid to recreation.
The regular services of consultation and advice through area offices, plus grant
and resource services, were maintained as usual and as indicated in the area
reports. The Branch was also involved with such responsibilities as the British
Columbia Festival, Working in Government Student Programs, the new British
Columbia Coaching Development Program, the 1975 Canada Winter Games and
Western Canada Summer Games, and the establishment of a Leisure Development
Course in Kamloops at Cariboo College.
Three of the five grant programs, designed to encourage recreation leadership,
administration, and special projects, were of very significant service to recreation
commissions and departments throughout the Province. The other two are not of
major significance due to fewer requests for regional study and initial organizational
grants for regional recreation commissions.
 AA 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Number Amount Approved
$
Special project grants  277 167,335
Administration grants   355 106,500
Staff-hiring incentive grants   126 352,084
Regional district study grants        1 400
Regional District Recreation Commission Organization grants       2 6,000
Totals   761 632,319
The special project program encouraged many recreation leaders to experiment, expand programs, provide educational experience for staff, and establish new
programs. The popularity of this program was evidenced by the great demand
placed upon it. It became necessary to closely analyse grant use early in the fiscal
year in order to assure continuation of minimum assistance throughout the year.
The special project program serves a wide variety of projects which could not
be conducted without this aid.
During 1975, 44 new recreation positions were established in British Columbia. Each of these positions qualified for a staff-hiring incentive grant of either
$10,000 or $5,000 to be phased out over a period of four years. This program is
a great incentive for small communities to hire full-time recreation personnel.
The administration grants, designed to assist small community recreation commissions, remains constant. There will be a decrease in this service as communities
amalgamate and there is more recreation administration on the regional level.
The great increase in recreation facilities throughout the Province during the
past few years has increased community responsibility for the financing of operational and staff requirements. There has been considerable discussion concerning
increased grant aid to accommodate facility operation.
Major Provincial projects which were assisted by the Leisure Services Branch
special project program in 1975:
Provincial Recreation Conference in Kelowna.   Professional Recreation
Society short course in Kelowna.
Leadership Development Course in Kamloops.
Camp programs in East Kootenay, Burns Lake, and Prince George areas.
Run-Walk-Cycle-Swim-Skate Fitness Program.
Kamloops recreation study.
Travelling workshops staffed by skilled recreation administrators.   This
service went to each part of the Province.
Special Provincial Programs
Research—Three research projects were initiated during the year, the results
of which are expected to have far-reaching effects on leisure services in the Province. Under the chairmanship of Bill Webster, Dune Russell, and Norm Olenick,
three committees were established to study and report on issues related to the
delivery of leisure services—(1) an examination of Leisure Services Branch area
boundaries; (2) a study of leisure services delivery systems at municipal and
regional level; and (3) an analysis of postsecondary programs related to the training of recreation personnel.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 49
British Columbia Festival—The British Columbia Festival continued in 1975
with mass participation in community activities as its main theme. The British
Columbia Festival Program, under Manager Graham Hill, emphasizes "active"
participation in all types of leisure activities, art, culture, drama, sport, and social
activities, but audience participation is also encouraged. It is designed to act as a
catalyst to stimulate participation by community organizations and individuals,
and to encourage people to broaden their range of interest and to explore new
avenues of leisure.
During 1975, two time periods were designated as "showcase" periods. The
British Columbia Winter Festival was held between January 23 and February 17,
and the British Columbia Spring Festival was held from May 22 to June 16. The
many functions of the Festival office included the provision of advertising and
publicity (through radio, newspapers, Schedule of Events, and posters), the distribution of participation certificates, and general motivational and support functions to community organizations and individuals. Field trips were also an integral
part of the Festival Manager's duties and, apart from being motivational, they
were undertaken when help was needed to solve local Festival-related community
problems which could not be handled through correspondence or through telephone contact. They were also an important tool in gauging community reaction
to the program. During the year, several Province-wide field trips were undertaken, in addition to many meetings with representatives of the arts, recreation, and
sports.
Participation in the British Columbia Festival Program increased considerably
over previous years. During the Winter'Festival there were approximately 85,000
participants in almost 300 events, while over 125,000 people participated in almost
450 events during the Spring Festival. It is estimated that audience participation
in both Festivals totalled approximately 500,000.
The Regional Consultants of the Leisure Services Branch provided valuable
support to the Festival Program.
Working in Government—Working in co-operation with the Department of
Labour's student summer employment program, the Branch placed 112 students
in recreation positions throughout the Province. This program, similar in design
and implementation to the one irt 1974, enabled recreation and physical education
students to gain practical work experience to supplement their academic training.
The program was administered by the Victoria office and directed an additional
$330,000 in recreation funds into the Province over a four-month period.
Library services—The Leisure Services Branch Film Library is directed from
the Victoria office. Technical and instructional materials in a wide range of sports
skills and arts and crafts skills are now available in a Super 8 Ektagraphic format.
Both these and our regular 16-mm materials received heavy usage during the last
year. Up until the end of December 1975 there were 1,959 screenings with an
estimated audience of 64,939 persons. These figures are slightly down this year as
a result of booking and shipping difficulties caused by the 1975 mail strike.
Drama Library—The Drama Library, under the direction of Miss Anne
Adamson, also operates from the Victoria office. Its services have been in increasing demand throughout the year. Miss Adamson has also worked in close cooperation with the various Provincial arts associations, particularly in the allocation
of adjudicators for school and adult drama festivals.
Recreation services for the blind—Since the Leisure Services Branch was
established as the Community Programmes Branch in 1953, J. Lewis has been a
 AA 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA
member of the staff, providing recreation services for blind people. Mr. Lewis is
attached to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind in Vancouver, and under
their jurisdiction.
Mr. Lewis' office has provided an ever-increasing service to blind people. In
1975 the Bowen Island program, through the CNIB Lodge, was an outstanding
summer recreation service. Several sports including swimming, fishing, shuffle-
board, and bowling have many blind participants, as do more passive activities
such as choir, crib, Country Fair, and picnics.
The recreation services of the CNIB, under Mr. Lewis, reach many parts of
the Province and provide many blind people with recreation opportunity.
National involvement—The Leisure Services Branch was involved with several
national programs listed below. The Sports and Fitness Division provided the
co-ordination, administration, and management of British Columbia's participation
in the Canada Winter Games at Lethbridge and the Western Canada Summer Games
at Regina.   This is further reported under the Sports and Fitness Division:
Canada Winter Games.
Western Canada Summer Games.
Council of Provincial Directors meetings at Toronto and Ottawa.
Game Plan '76, 1976 Olympic Games.
National Conference on Recreation to Handicapped.
Canadian Parks and Recreation Association Meeting in Quebec City.
Coaching Development Program.
Regional Reports
Central British Columbia (R. Lamoureux, Kamloops)
A project of some significance was the beginning of a three-year Leisure
Development Course which was the result of co-operation between the Central
British Columbia area and the Similkameen-Okanagan-Boundary area. The first
year of the course at Cariboo College in Kamloops attracted some 39 recreation
professionals from all areas of British Columbia. Plans are at present under way
for the second-year program.
A course for summer playground leaders was organized with the Kelowna
Office and offered to 58 participants from both areas. A Facility Planning Seminar
attended by 28 persons was held at Salmon Arm, and a workshop for leaders
working with mentally retarded children was conducted at 100 Mile House.
An Orienteering Workshop was developed jointly with the Kamloops Parks
and Recreation Department, while a Football Clinic sponsored by the O'Keefe
Foundation and organized by the Leisure Services Branch and British Columbia
Sports Federation was held in Kamloops.
Area conferences were held in Revelstoke, Golden, and Williams Lake and,
finally, coaching seminars directed by Dr. Tom Tutko from San Jose State University were conducted in Williams Lake, 100 Mile House, and Kamloops. These
three seminars attracted approximately 800 people.
Other clinics sponsored or organized in part by the Leisure Services Branch
during 1975 were baseball (Vavenby and Williams Lake), power skating (Ashcroft
and Valemount), injury prevention (100 Mile House), square dancing and basketball (Golden), and karate (Kamloops).
The WIG '75 student program was again received very favourably by communities of the Central area. Because of this program, communities such as
Williams Lake, 100 Mile House, Lillooet, Lower Nicola, Salmon Arm, Cache Creek,
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 51
Vavenby, Golden, and Revelstoke were able to initiate new activities or supplement
some of their existing programs.
A few communities became involved in various aspects of recreational planning
this year. Brooker Engineering conducted a feasibility study at Clinton; Community Development Consultants Ltd. was involved with a project at Revelstoke;
and PERC of Calgary assisted the District of Salmon Arm, Merritt, and the Kamloops Community "Y" with some of their programs. These last three projects
were partially sponsored by the Leisure Services Branch.
Capital projects were also evident throughout the area in 1975. Various construction projects were carried out in Cache Creek, Celista, Kamloops, Revelstoke,
Salmon Arm, Valemount, Blue River, Clearwater, Alexis Creek, Williams Lake,
and Logan Lake. y
A few municipalities of the Central area were forced to "roll back" or reduce
their recreational budgets this past year; some by as much as 20 per cent. The
resultant effect is the weakening of essential services in many communities and the
elimination of some full-time positions in recreation.
Fraser Valley-Sechelt (D. M. McCooey, Abbotsford)
Despite fiscal retrenchment in a number of municipal service areas, parks and
recreation continued to generally hold its own and, in some cases, markedly expand.
A subregional recreation commission was formed in the Pemberton area and
a Regional Parks and Recreation Commission was established for the Sechelt area.
Major facility referendums received approval in six communities and branch
staff-hiring incentive grants enabled the hiring of six recreation administrators.
Special Project Assistance again proved to be considerably helpful—most
notably: A Benefit-Cost Evaluation Study at Surrey, a Leisure Service Master Plan
for Langley, a Community Band for Maple Ridge, and a Recreation Facility Study
for Matsqui-Abbotsford.
Assistance was also provided in organizing monthly seminars for Parks and
Recreation Commissioners and for professional recreationists, plus Sports Clinics
at the local level.
Development and liaison work continued with Douglas College, Fraser Valley
College, the Lower Mainland Parks Advisory Board, the Provincial Student Hiring
Program, the British Columbia Winter and Spring Festivals, the British Columbia
Recreation Association, the Professional Recreation Society of British Columbia.
The Run-Walk-Cycle-Swim-Skate Fitness Program, Regional Art Centres at Port
Moody and Abbotsford, the Canada Winter Games, and three Provincial recreation
study programs.
Greater Vancouver (C. M. Griffiths, Vancouver)
The availability of Provincial funding and increased population growth were
the major factors causing a great increase in the demand for more consultative
services. For example, in the City of Vancouver, one of the seven major areas
serviced by this office, there are now 21 community centres. Each of these centres
has a service population in excess of 25,000 people.
The demand for services was equally great in the other municipalities and cities
attempting to meet the need of additional programs for growing populations. These
areas include the Cities of North Vancouver and New Westminster; the Districts
of Coquitlam, Burnaby, North Vancouver, West Vancouver, and Richmond; and
the Electoral Area of Bowen Island. In addition, there are the Recreation Commissions of the Musqueam and Squamish Indian Bands and a multiplicity of semi-
 AA 52 BRITISH COLUMBIA
public agencies such as the YMCA, YWCA, Boys' and Girls' Clubs, Boy Scouts
Association, and Girl Guides Association.
The Vancouver office also maintained liaison, on behalf of the Branch, with
such organizations as the British Columbia Recreation Association, the British
Columbia Sports Federation, Recreation Canada (Western Division office), the
University of British Columbia (Recreation Department), and the Canadian
National Institute for the Blind.
Other functions carried out during 1975 included membership in the following
committees: Vancouver Community College Recreation Management Committee,
Capilano College Recreation Curriculum Committee, Canadian Red Cross Water
Safety Management Committee (B.C. and Yukon Division), and the 1975 Provincial Recreation Conference Committee. The office also served as liaison between
the British Columbia Canada Games office and related agencies and associations in
the Greater Vancouver area. The consultant himself was a mission member of
both the 1975 Canada Winter Games in Lethbridge, Alta., and the 1975 Western
Canada Summer Games in Regina.
Kootenays (G. E. Cameron, Nelson)
Community and regional recreation continues to grow throughout the Kootenays, particularly in the areas of leadership, programs, and facilities.
Branch staff-hiring incentive grants enabled two communities, Rossland and
Warfield, to engage full-time recreation professionals.
Special project grants made it possible for a variety of recreation programs
to be implemented, including programs for handicapped persons and senior citizens.
A $2,250 grant was approved for the East Kootenay Recreation Leadership School
held in June.
Major recreation complexes were completed in Nelson, Elkford, and Kaslo,
and several others were begun in 1975.
The Branch-initiated Run-Walk-Cycle-Swim-Skate Fitness Program is very
popular, with schools and recreation departments actively participating.
Perhaps the most important development in the West Kootenay was the Branch-
initiated summer outdoor recreation program. A recreation student engaged under
the WIG '75 program and working out of the Branch office co-ordinated this very
successful program. Other highlights in the East Kootenay were the Annual Conference and the leadership school.
Northeast (G. R. McClenaghan, Prince George)
Along with routine services to the recreation commissions, assistance was
extended on behalf of the Provincial Government to public and private agencies and
sport and cultural organizations. Zone meetings were held again throughout the
region to help recreation commissions gather and share information and ideas.
The highlight of the past year was the expansion of the City of Prince George.
Five very active recreation commissions were absorbed into the new boundaries and
the Recreation Department was able to decentralize some services. Five full-time
program staff were hired and located in various segments of the city.
"Northern Winter Games" was hosted by Fort St. John. This exciting concept
gave local people north of 100 Mile House an opportunity to compete in 11 sporting
events.
The Regional District of Fraser-Fort George and Peace River-Liard Regional
District are now searching out ways on how they can assist and encourage the
development of recreation in the rural areas.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 53
There were new recreation complexes built, and some renovated, that gave
communities a broader range of activities.
The Community Education (School) concept has firmly caught hold in several
areas. The main problem that has arisen is one of co-ordination and co-operation
with the Recreation Department.
A competition between Kamloops and Prince George climaxed the year. The
two cities challenged each other to a WACK (Walk a Calculated Kilometre)-
WAMM (Walk a Measured Mile) activity. The objective was to see which city
could walk the greatest number of miles. The people of Kamloops out-WACKed
the people of Prince George by 57,000 to 54,000 miles.
Northwest (W. W. Smith, Burns Lake)
The service of the Leisure Services Branch in the Northwest Region that was
most appreciated was the summer student program. Qualified students, under the
direction of the Branch, acted as Recreation Directors in many communities that
would not have been able to have this service without the help of these students.
Sports camps and clinics were developed from Hazelton to the Queen Charlottes by a graduate student from Simon Fraser. Several hundred young people
received coaching in soccer, basketball, volleyball, water polo, golf, wrestling,
gymnastics, and other sports at these very popular camps. Student camping coordinators organized leadership and camp programs that included assisting school
outdoor education programs and community summer camp programs.
An Indian student who is a second-year UBC education student did an outstanding job of organizing summer programs for native Indian communities ranging
from Fort St. James to Kitimat Village. Two students provided riding clinics in
many small rural communities as well as in the larger ones. Hundreds of young
people and adults enthusiastically turned out to upgrade their riding skills.
A summer recreational camp was sponsored by this office for a second time
in August. This camp was filled, as it was last year, by teenagers from all parts
of the Northwest. Inquiries have come from as far as Alaska to participate in
this popular program that gives teenagers a chance to develop basic outdoor recreation skills in canoeing, riding, camping, orienteering, mountaineering, life-saving,
and water-skiing.
This office co-ordinated the programs for a large week-end conference of
recreation people throughout the Northwest. Over 200 people took part in
seminars that included setting up fitness programs in the school and community,
developing more effective recreation commissions, upgrading or establishing good
youth programs, and many other educational sessions.
Eight new recreation commissions were established this year. Many of these
are Indian communities wanting to co-ordinate recreation in their area better.
Despite economic difficulties in the Northwest, a majority of residents of the
Regional District of Bulkley-Nechako (Fort St. James-Smithers) voted to take
recreation as a function.
Simlikameen-Okanagan-Boundary (J. M. MacKinnon, Kelowna)
The Similkameen-Okanagan-Boundary area stretches from Osoyoos in the
south to Mara Lake in the north; from Tulameen in the west to Christina Lake
in the east.
This area is made up of some 27 non-municipal recreation commissions, 11
municipal recreation commissions or departments, two special regional recreation
 AA 54 BRITISH COLUMBIA
commissions, and one regional Parks and Recreation Department for the Regional
District of North Okanagan.
During the past year, special projects continued to be a sought-after service
of the Leisure Services Branch. There were 30 projects in 17 communities, for a
total of $17,360.
The Similkameen-Okanagan-Boundary area continues to increase in terms of
the number of communities hiring paid recreation leadership. During 1975, eight
municipalities and regional districts had full-time recreation staff. Also in the
planning stages, Oliver is considering the establishment of a Parks and Recreation
Commission along with the hiring of a superintendent.
Boundary Regional Recreation Commission 2, which includes the communities
from Greenwood to Bridesville, is currently involved in studying the feasibility of
hiring a joint community education/recreation director. This project is under the
leadership of the Regional Recreation Commission and the Boundary Senior-
secondary School principal, Tony Rainbow.
Several significant programs have been either initiated or accomplished in
this area during the past year. Of particular interest is the result of the North
Okanagan Regional Recreation Feasibility Study. In November of 1975 the people
of the Regional District of North Okanagan approved a referendum for the district
to undertake the function of parks and recreation. This is a first for the Province
of British Columbia, and while the Leisure Services Branch was extremely active
in the establishment of the study committee for this program, most of the credit
goes to John Mahler, Superintendent of Recreation for the City of Vernon, and
Chris Nelson, Regional Recreation Director for the Regional District of North
Okanagan.
The Similkameen-Okanagan-Boundary and Central British Columbia areas
co-operated to offer a playground leadership school in Sorrento. This school was
attended by some 50 young people who received approximately 15 hours of expert
instruction in their particular field.
The Run-Walk-Cycle-Swim-Skate Fitness Program organized by the Coordinator of Sports and Fitness continues to be well accepted with many people
from all walks of life completing their various fitness levels. It can readily be seen
from this report that a continued commitment on the part of the Leisure Services
Branch is not only necessary but will be in demand.
Vancouver Island (P. W. Grant, Victoria)
This year has seen some rather interesting changes on Vancouver Island in
terms of the number of commissions being served. New commissions were activated on North Pender Island, North End Recreation Commission (Qualicum Bay
area), Halalt Indian Band, and the Tri-District Recreation Commission (Sidney,
North Saanich, and Central Saanich). Other recreation commissions such as
Powell River, Lund, Malaspina, Gillies Bay, and Texada were transferred to the
Vancouver Island jurisdiction, while the amalgamation of Nanaimo eliminated the
Northfield, Pleasant Valley, Harwood, Chase River, and Departure Bay Recreation
Commissions.
On Vancouver Island in 1975 a somewhat expanded special project budget
of $15,000 enabled many communities to develop new recreational opportunities
and expand existing programs. Ucluelet and Tofino, for example, were able to
expand their Learn to Swim Program; Comox developed an excellent sail training
program, while Cherry Creek developed an Arts Access open house to introduce
its citizens to the many recreational opportunities in the arts and crafts. The many
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 55
projects that were assisted by special projects funding ranged from sports clinics to
arts and crafts to educational seminars in playground training. These projects add
new dimensions to the leisure pursuits of people on Vancouver Island.
The highlight of this year's activity on Vancouver Island was the very successful Department of Labour WIG '75 program, in which 12 students were placed in
communities throughout the Island.
Sports and Fitness (G. J. Pynn, Co-ordinator)
The British Columbia Physical Fitness and Amateur Sports Fund makes available annually in excess of $1.5 million for sports and fitness programs throughout
the Province. British Columbia sports and fitness associations make application
to the Fund for grant assistance. These applications are evaluated by a Grants
Advisory Committee and recommendations are made for grant amounts to be
allotted to the applicants.
The objectives of the Fund are to promote and assist the development of
fitness and sports programs designed to encourage participation of both sexes and
all age-levels throughout the Province; to financially assist good coaching clinics,
workshops, seminars, and other activities designed to provide leadership for sports
and fitness programs in the Province; to financially assist sport governing organizations in promoting and developing their sport throughout the Province; travel
grants to a Provincial sport competing in an interprovincial play-off leading to a
national championship; travel grants where necessary to British Columbia competitors in international competition; and to encourage all sports groups to have
competition commensurate with the needs of the sport.
In order to meet these objectives, the Fund has allotted grants to all British
Columbia sport governing organizations and has provided financial support for
Provincial and Canadian championships for most of the amateur sports groups
in the Province.
The British Columbia Physical Fitness and Amateur Sports Fund provides
considerable financial assistance to the British Columbia Sports Federation, British
Columbia Federation of School Athletic Associations, and the British Columbia
Recreation Association.
During 1975, this office has been responsible for British Columbia teams
competing in the Canada Winter Games in Lethbridge, Alta., and the initial Western Canada Summer Games in Regina, Sask. The Province was represented by
250 athletes, managers, coaches, and officials at the Canada Winter Games where
the British Columbia contingent, consisting of 22 sports teams, finished in a strong
second position of all provinces and territories in Canada.
In the inaugural Western Canada Summer Games, British Columbia was
represented by 450 athletes, managers, coaches, and officials. The Province was
represented by 23 sports teams winning 17 of the sports competitions, winning the
team title by a wide margin.
Coaching Development Program—The British Columbia Coaching Development Program, which is part of a national program designed to assist the development of trained coaches in all sports, was inaugurated in the Province in August.
W. McAllister was hired to act as Co-ordinator. To date a number of General
Theory instructors' training courses have been held and some 20 coaches' courses
started or planned.
The main task of the Provincial Coaching Development Co-ordinators, who
are employed in baseball, basketball, diving, hockey, soccer, track and field, and
volleyball, is to implement the British Columbia Coaching Development program
 AA 56 BRITISH COLUMBIA
by directing and co-ordinating the program of coaches' courses throughout the
Province. Their secondary functions are to extend participation in their sport at
all levels; keep coaches fully informed on current happenings in their sports; and
to generally design, plan, and implement projects and programs for the development of the sport governing association.
Run-Walk-Cycle-Swim-Skate Fitness Program—The Run-Walk-Cycle-Swim-
Skate Fitness Program is an ongoing one which continues to be popular throughout
the Province. The program is conducted on the honour system and is proving to
be very popular, especially in the schools.
With Fund resources and assistance, sports and fitness associations continue
to open up new fields of development throughout the Province, and to explore and
expand many new concepts to improve sport and fitness programs. The Fund is a
vital and flexible resource, able to provide immediate and effective assistance to
help keep pace with the ever-changing needs.
B.C. Cultural Program
With the appointment of T. G. Fielding as Executive Director in April 1975,
the B.C. Cultural Program formally began to co-ordinate the Arts in British
Columbia.
Although the B.C. Cultural Program is relatively new, elements of its operation began with the establishment of the British Columbia Cultural Fund in 1967,
now an endowment fund of $20 million. The annual interest generated is used to
support and foster Arts activities throughout the Province.
One of the primary functions of the Cultural Program is to assist with the
evaluation and adjudication of all applications for grants to the Cultural Fund.
An advisory body, the B.C. Interim Arts Beard, was appointed in November
1974 to make recommendations on grants from the Cultural Fund.   Grants made
in 1974 were as follows:
$
64 Community Arts Councils      272,313
109 Nonprofit cultural organizations  1,437,776
167 Scholarships        100,640
Art acquisitions for Provincial collection        33,539
Special programs           32,237
Total  1,876,505
In addition, the B.C. Interim Arts Board has advised the Provincial Secretary
on general policy guidelines for cultural development.
Through their recommendations, small disciplinary advisory committees have
been established in order to provide knowledgeable and equitable systems of grants
adjudication.
The B.C. Cultural Program acts as a liaison, research facility, and secretariat
to this Board.
One of the priorities of the Cultural Program during the past year was the
establishment of a system of regional arts development. Pilot projects were initiated in four of 12 regions of the Province—Northcoast Islands, Northwest, Kootenays, and Cariboo—and major conferences were held under the guidance and with
the assistance of the Cultural Program. From each conference a local arts panel
was elected and charged with assessing the artistic needs and priorities of their area.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 57
This project is designed to encourage individual initiative and a co-ordinated
local participation in arts activities. Their activities and accomplishments are continuing to be evaluated.
The B.C. Cultural Program office acts as a liaison between other Provincial
and Federal arts agencies and is currently involved in co-ordinating arts programs
with the 1976 Olympic Games Cultural Committee and the U.N. Human Settlement Conference "Habitat", to be held in Vancouver, June 1976.
Within British Columbia, a communications vehicle is being developed
through the Arts Information Service, located in the Victoria office of the Cultural
Program. Through this service, a Handbook for the Craftspeople of British
Columbia was released in co-operation with the Department of Economic Development, in July 1975, and a Handbook for Visual Artists is nearing completion.
Two issues of a newsletter Arts B.C. have been released, providing information regarding the Arts Board, regional development, and information for the arts
community of the Province. Circulation to date is approximately 10,000. Handbooks for writers and performing artists are projected for 1976.
Conclusion
The year 1975 was very challenging for the Leisure Services Branch. Proposed changes as advocated in the Broom Report came under study for implementation and proposals for the future were being designed at the time this report
was written.
The regular services of the Branch, particularly the staff-hiring and special
project grants, played a very significant role in community recreation in the Province. Consultative services were strained due to many new responsibilities placed
on staff and the growth experienced in the Province.
INFORMATION SERVICES
Ask B.C.
In the spring of 1975, preliminary work began for a telephone inquiry service,
Ask B.C.
Investigation of the experiences of other jurisdictions in Canada suggested the
creation of a central telephone inquiry centre capable of handling up to 11,000
inquiries monthly. To meet this projected volume, the Telecommunications Branch
of Transport and Communications designed a telephone system incorporating free
calling from all parts of the Province and direct patch lines between the Ask B.C.
centre in Burnaby and the Parliament Buildings.
A staff of 14 was appointed in the fall and, following a two-week orientation
course, Information Counsellors were assigned departmental responsibilities and
the difficult task of building a data bank.
At year-end the data bank contained over 2,500 pieces of information (from
substantial bound volumes to individual information pamphlets) organized under
about 3,500 index titles. The Counsellors' key to this data bank is a computer
print-out containing over 7,500 alphabetical listings.
The service was ready to go into operation at the start of 1976.
Distribution of Government Publications
Following formal studies, informal discussions, much consideration, and
policy decisions, it was decided to establish a Branch to oversee the collection,
organization, and distribution of Government publications.   The office would not
 AA 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
supplant distribution systems now used by originating departments, but rather
would act as a centralized source for all material to fill supplementary demands
from the public.
The position of Director has been advertised, but the actual selection will not
take place until the new year.
LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION
New steps were taken in the five-year plan that is part of the Program for
Library Development, a continuing project to extend the organization of library
services over a regional framework.
The program proposes a network of 11 service areas, in each of which there
will be a formal library system, supported jointly by regional district government
and the Provincial authority, through the Library Development Commission. The
first of these systems was launched last year in the Thompson-Nicola Regional
District, and a second, the Greater Vancouver Library Federation, was established
in October of this year. Preparations are under way for a vote in the Kootenays
that may be held in the spring of 1976 to determine the immediate future of the
proposed system in that area.
The most remarkable occurrence has been a substantial increase in attention
and co-operation on the part of most library authorities. No doubt the Commission's good fortune in attracting more Provincial funds for library grants was
responsible in part, but planned system development seems to create its own interest.
It is a kind of long-range concern that promises accelerated expansion as it builds
on initial success. The Commission must maintain a reasonable rate of progress
while ensuring adequate Provincial support.
Variety is the spice of library life. British Columbia enjoys very marked
regional differences in geography, climate, topography, population, and attitudes,
which singly or in various combinations produce peculiar influences on the degree
of local interest in libraries. This accounts for the almost infinite variety of response
to the Commission's program from one area to another.
For example, the plan calls for two systems on Vancouver Island, but progress
has not gone beyond the stage of inconclusive discussion, local acceptance being
impeded by apparently irreconcilable views. System III, the library federation on
the Lower Mainland now under way, is one of the two examples of agreement on
a large scale, to which the Commission is fully committed. The fourth system on
the list, embracing the southern coastal area, has so far had little attention; individual
libraries within the area are continuing to receive Provincial support.
Fraser Valley, the largest of the three regional libraries that began 40 years
ago, is experiencing simultaneously growing and shrinking pains. The library
service itself is growing, but a large portion of the library district, the Municipality
of Richmond, has decided to withdraw, with Commission approval, its objective
being a municipal public library that will be a part of the Greater Vancouver
Library Federation. Despite the complexity of the problem, there is a sizeable
amount of agreement among those involved, encouraged by the prospect of a
substantial increase in Provincial funds in the next few years.
Another of the original trio, the Okanagan Regional Library, appears likely
to convert in the near future to organization on regional district lines, as demanded
by the program. The Library Board is awaiting enabling legislation. The seventh
system, covering the whole of the West and East Kootenays, is well advanced in
its negotiations, as already indicated. The Commission is preparing for action in
mid-1976, depending on the outcome of proposed referendums.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 59
System VIII is fully organized and functioning. Its service area was recently
completed by a referendum adding the Cariboo Regional District to that of
Thompson-Nicola. The last three on the list are still some time away from organization as fully integrated systems, but, as on the lower coast, individual libraries
continue to receive grants and other assistance.
Besides the formal framework of the 11 systems, other important related
services have been receiving the Commission's attention. Top priority is being
given to the plan to establish a catalog support network, fully automated, that will
provide all libraries in the Province with bibliographical data by computer and
produce a union catalogue of all the library materials in the Province. Secondly,
the Commission is working with the Legislative Library on a plan to bring the
library functions of Government departments into closer co-operation, in the hope
of providing benefits through greater accessibility of scattered or presently nonexistent resources.
Service to handicapped readers is already a Commission function, through its
production of "Audiobooks," a device for transferring to cassette tapes the complete text of every book for which there will be this special demand. Finally, the
Commission has in its plans a Provincial audio-visual centre and service to institutional libraries.
The Chairman and members of the Library Development Commission wish
to record their appreciation of the continuing support given the Commission by
successive Ministers under which it has served in its long career dating back to
1919. It has been especially gratifying to be able to provide both staff and funds
for the Provincial share in promotion and support of the continuing programs for
library development. Needless to say, the present Commissioners are hopeful that
the financial capability will continue and will increase to meet the need for Province-
wide organization.
The following statements show the operating expenditure of the Commission
for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1975, and the distribution of Provincial aid to
library development during the same period:
/. Operating $
Salaries   327,804
Office expense, equipment, supplies   34,850
Travelling expense (staff and vehicles)   29,253
Printing and publications  5,601
Books, binding, and periodicals  283,660
Transportation    2,485
Extension services   332
Freight   9,038
693,023
//. Provincial Grants—Libraries and Library Associations
$
Systems and system development      731,539
Municipal Public Libraries        576,196
Regional Libraries      476,450
Public Library Associations      185,943
Special grants        44,840
Special projects         36,170
2,051,138
 AA 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
OFFICE OF THE PLANNING ADVISER TO THE CABINET
During much of the year, this office performed its assigned tasks with the
Deputy Minister in charge reporting directly to the Executive Council.
The office was divided into three sections dealing with Policy and Research,
Co-ordination, and Intergovernmental Affairs.
The Office of the Planning Adviser to the Cabinet was disbanded on December
23 following the General Election, to be replaced by a new section, Intergovernmental Relations, in the Office of the Premier.
MOTOR-VEHICLE BRANCH
On October 3, the responsibility for the Motor-vehicle Act and the Insurance
Corporation of British Columbia Act was transferred from the Minister of Transport and Communications to the Provincial Secretary.
Responsibility for the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia Act was
transferred to the Minister of Education on December 23. As it is expected that
the Motor-vehicle Act will be transferred to the Department of Transport and
Communications in the, near future, the Report of the Motor-vehicle Branch will
not be printed here, but will continue to be printed by the Department of Transport
and Communications.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 61
APPENDIX A
Department of Queen's Printer Balance Sheet as at March 31, 1975
ASSETS
Current Assets $                    $
Inventory, March 31, 1975       722,370.23
Labour in process, March 31, 1975     112,114.01
Materials in process, March 31, 1975   91,150.93
      925,635.17
Accounts Receivable
Departmental       164,278.27
General             14,699.07
      178,977.34
Total current assets    1,104,612.51
Fixed Assets
Plant and equipment       1,272,356.94
Less reserve and depreciation     1,272,355.94
Total fixed assets  —   1.00
1,104,613.51
LIABILITIES
Queen's Printer Operating Account    1,104,613.51
Certified correct:
k. m. macdonald
Queen's Printer
I. R. COATES
Assistant to the Queen's Printer
 AA 62 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Queen's Printer Profit and Loss Statement
for 12 Months Ended March 31, 1975
Sales $ $
Gross sales     7,994,918.36
Less refunds     4,104.76
Net sales    7,990,813.60
Merchandise inventory, March 31, 1974      440,050.91
Labour in process, March 31, 1974      138,381.51
Material in process, March 31, 1974      111,115.69
Purchases
Printing and binding    3,991,089.25
Stationery      2,659,588.72
6,650,677.97
Total purchases   7,340,226.08
Factory Payroll   1,631,931.36
Less—
Current inventory, March 31, 1975   722,370.23
Current labour in process, March 31, 1975  112,114.01
Current materials in process, March 31, 1975 .. 91,150.93
8,972,157.44
925,635.17
Net cost of goods sold      8,046,522.27
Gross Profit (Loss)         (55,708.67)
Expenses
Salaries       166,949.75
Office expense   40,372.11
Travel expense     1,660.51
Factory expense    60,965.78
Depreciation   37,758.00
Total expenses         307,706.15
Net Profit (Loss)    .   (363,414.82)
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 63
APPENDIX B
Statistical Summary of Legislative Library Activities
Reference
Reference questions— 1975 1974
Directory and ready reference          1,124 (1,625)
Specific          3,333 (2,182)
Research (requiring considerable research time)   156 (518)
4,613 (4,3257
Newspaper index—
New items indexed          50,053 (54,695)
Entries in index         123,371 (123,354)
Magazine index—
Items indexed            1,645 (281)
Entries         (ca.)      3,290 (550)
Note—Approximately 100 British Columbia periodicals are
scanned for selective indexing.
Retroactive index project—news items indexed        18,415 (43,333)
Interlibrary Loans
Books lent to libraries other than the Library Development Commission       387 (302)
Microfilms lent       41 (20)
Requests met by photocopied material    194 (218)
Books lent to Library Development Commission for interlibrary
arrangement with British Columbia public libraries   186 (186)
Total interlibrary loan requests supplied     808 (726)
Books borrowed by Legislative Library     73 (87)
Photocopy received by Legislative Library from other libraries  100 (128)
Total interlibrary loans received     173 (215)
Cataloguing
Number of items processed1       10,323 (10,961)
Titles catalogued for departmental collections     6,188 (4,746)
Photocopying
Xerox supplied      pages 45,201 (37,746)
Photostats supplied    pages (2) (96)
Reader-Printer     3,327 (2,056)
Periodicals
Magazines—total received       681 (775)
Newspapers—
British Columbia daily     26 (17)
British Columbia weekly, semi-weekly, etc.   177 (176)
Total British Columbia     203 (193)
Canadian, foreign       42 (38)
Total newspapers   245 (231)
Binding (excluding Government documents and material processed by
the library staff)—
Newspapers  volumes 258 (174)
Periodicals   volumes 38 (47)
Total volumes     296 (221)
Government Documents
Documents received        42,007 (34,817)
Microfilming (Central Microfilm Bureau)
British Columbia newspapers filmed    137        (183,133)
(rolls)       (pages)
1 Includes  material  in  departmental libraries  catalogued by  the Legislative  Library  and  material in  the
Library Development Commission.
2 Camera in Lands Department no longer available for photostat work.
 AA 64 BRITISH  COLUMBIA
APPENDIX C
Members of the Legislative Assembly and Executive Council, 1945—72
Listed in Appendix C are members of the Legislative Assembly and the Executive Council
in the third 10 Parliaments elected in British Columbia.
In the 1945 General Election, Active Service electors, both intra-provincial and extra-
provincial, voted under the provisions of section 16a of the Provincial Elections Act. This
election was the last one held during World War II. ■ Also, in this election two types of absentee
voting were allowed under the Act:
(a) Section 113 allowed for voters to cast their ballots at any one polling division
within their electoral districts; and
(b) Section 114 allowed for voters to exercise their franchise while absent from their
electoral district for valid cause.
The 1949 General Election was the first to utilize advance polling. The Provincial Elections
Act was amended at this time to extend the franchise to minority groups, thus allowing Chinese,
East Indian, lapanese, and native Indian peoples the right to vote.
Subsequent to the election, British Columbia witnessed the appointment of the first woman
Speaker in the Commonwealth. The Honourable Nancy Hodges became Speaker on February
14, 1950, and held that august office until April 10, 1952.
The Coalition Government, with a majority of 30 after the 1949 election, divided again
along party lines to run as Liberal and Conservative candidates in the election called for June
12, 1952. A major upset occurred with the Social Credit Party, new to British Columbia
politics, electing a minority government of 19 members, only two having had previous experience in the Legislature.
There were two plebiscites held in conjunction with the 1952 election. The sale of spirituous
liquor and wines by the glass in licensed premises was approved, 315,533 to 205,736, and the
vote in favour of daylight saving was 290,353 to 231,008.
The new Premier, W. A. C. Bennett, who was to serve until August 1972, strengthened his
original Cabinet by appointing two members from outside the caucus. This resulted in resignations and two by-elections in November of 1952. After serving for a year, another election was
called and Social Credit elected 28 members, the combined opposition, 20.
The first election to use the alternative voting system was held in 1952. Under this system,
the candidate with the least votes in any riding was dropped from the ballot and the votes were
then credited to the remaining candidates in accordance with the alternative preferences of the
voters. This was done as many times as necessary to provide the ultimate winner with a clear
majority of the votes cast. It was subsequently discovered that alternative voting presented
several difficult administrative and political problems. It vastly complicated the administrative
process of accurately counting the ballots. Politically, it extrapolated the interregnum period,
which left the previous Executive in an awkward position regarding administrative decisionmaking. The alternative voting method was only used in the 1952 and 1953 Provincial General
Elections. It was abolished by repealing the old Provincial Elections Act in October of 1953.
The new Provincial Elections Act was passed at the second session of the Twenty-fourth Legislative Assembly, and it reinstated simple majority voting.
During this period the size of the Legislative Assembly changed noticeably. The House had
48 members between 1945 and 1955. During the Twenty-fourth Parliament the Constitution
Act was amended to provide for 52 members.
On August 5, 1965, the Government established an Electoral Boundaries Redefinition Commission under the provisions of the Public Inquiries Act. The Commission's report, presented by
Dr. Henry F. Angus to the 1966 Session of the Twenty-seventh Legislative Assembly, resulted
in an amendment to the Constitution Act which increased the number of electoral districts from
42 to 48, and the number of M.L.A.s from 52 to 55, bringing the Legislature to its present size.
The changes were implemented upon the dissolution of the Twenty-seventh Legislative Assembly.
This entire period also witnessed the continual structural and functional evolution of
Government in a determined effort to meet the changing needs of the citizens of British Columbia. Also, significant political party metamorphosis took place. For example, the Co-operative
Commonwealth Federation (CCF) emerged as the New Democratic Party (NDP) on January
26, 1962. The final significant socio-political development was the reduction in the age of
majority to 19 from 21 years on April 15, 1970, as provided for in the Age of Majority Act,
Statutes of British Columbia, 1970, chapter 2.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 65
TWENTY-FIRST PARLIAMENT
48 Members.
Election: October 25, 1945.
First Session: February 21 to April 11, 1946.
Second Session: February 11 to April 3, 1947.
Third Session: March 2 to April 28, 1948.
Fourth Session: July 7 to July 9, 1948.
Fifth Session: February 8 to March 24, 1949.
Electoral District Members
Alberni    Mowat, James (Coalition).
Atlin.-   Smith, William Duncan (Coalition).
Burnaby Winch, Ernest Edward (CCF).
Cariboo ...LeBourdais, Louis (Coalition) (died, September 27, 1947).
Hogg, Walter  (Coalition)   (by-election, February 23,  1948  [LeBourdais]).
Chilliwack   Eyres, Leslie Harvey (Coalition).
Columbia   King, Thomas (Coalition).
Comox  ...Welch, Herbert John (Coalition).
Cowichan-Newcastle  Guthrie, Samuel (CCF).
Cranbrook   Green, Frank William (Coalition).
Delta  Hope, Alexander Campbell (Coalition).
Dewdney MacDonald, Roderick Charles (Coalition).
Esquimalt ..„_  Beard, Charles Taschereau (Coalition).
Fernie  Uphill, Thomas (Labour).
Fort George   ...McInnis, John (CCF).
Grand Forks-Greenwood.. Love, Thomas Alfred (Coalition).
Kamloops  Carson, Robert Henry (Coalition).
Kaslo-Slocan Harding, Randolph (CCF).
Lillooet Carson, Ernest Crawford (Coalition).
Mackenzie  ...Gargrave, Herbert (CCF).
Nanaimo and The Islands Pearson, George Sharratt (Coalition).
Nelson-Creston   Putnam, Frank (Coalition).
New Westminster  .....Johnson, Byron Ingemar (Coalition).
North Okanagan MacDonald, Kenneth Cattanach (Coalition) (died, November 19,
1945).
Morrow, Charles William (Coalition) (by-election, December 19,
1945 [Macdonald]).
North Vancouver  Cates, John Henry (Coalition).
Oak Bay Anscomb, Herbert (Coalition).
Omineca   Rowland, Edward Fraser (CCF).
Peace River Corsbie, Joseph Hardcastle (CCF).
Prince Rupert Brett, William Henry (CCF).
Revelstoke Johnson, William James (Coalition).
Rossland-Trail  Webster, James Lockhart (Coalition).
Saanich    Whittaker,  Norman  William   (Coalition)   (resigned,  September
30, 1947, upon appointment to B.C. Supreme Court).
Ash, Arthur James Richard (Coalition) (by-election, February 23,
1948 [Whittaker]).
Salmon Arm Ritchie, Arthur Brown (Coalition).
Similkameen   Laird, Reginald Robert (Coalition).
Skeena    .....Kenney, Edward Tourtellotte (Coalition).
South Okanagan Bennett, William Andrew Cecil (Coalition)  (resigned, May 17,
1948, to run in Federal election).
Browne-Clayton, Robert Denis (Coalition) (by-election, November 29, 1948 [Bennett]).
Vancouver-Burrard (2) .Weir, George Moir (Coalition).
Brown, Donald Cameron (Coalition).
Vancouver Centre (2) ..McDonell, Allan James (Coalition).
Wismer, Gordon Sylvester (Coalition).
Vancouver East (2)  Winch, Harold Edward (CCF).
Turner, Arthur James (CCF).
 AA 66 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Electoral District Members
Vancouver-Point Grey (3)....Maitland, Royal Lethington (Coalition)  (died, March 18, 1946).
Paton, James Alexander (Coalition) (died, February 19, 1946).
Rolston, Tilly Jean (Coalition).
MacDougall, Albert Reginald (Coalition)  (by-election, June 24,
1946 [Maitland]).
Stevenson, Leigh Forbes (Coalition) (by-election, June 24, 1946
[Paton]).
Victoria City (3)  Hart, John (Coalition).
Hodges, Nancy (Coalition).
Straith, William Thomas (Coalition).
Yale   Gillis, John Joseph (Coalition).
Executive Council, Twenty-first Parliament, October 1945 to April 1949
Premier:
October 1945 to December 1947 lohn Hart.
December 1947 to  Byron Ingemar Johnson.
Provincial Secretary:
October 1945 to    George Sharratt Pearson.
Attorney-General:
October 1945 to March 1946 Royal Lethington Maitland, K.C.
April 1946 to  Gordon Sylvester Wismer, K.C.
Lands and Forests:
October 1945 to  Edward Tourtellotte Kenney.
Public Works:
October 1945 to April 1946 Herbert Anscomb.
April 1946 to   Ernest Crawford Carson.
Finance:
October 1945 to April 1946 John Hart.
April 1946 to   Herbert Anscomb.
Agriculture:
October 1945 to November 1945 Kenneth Cattanach MacDonald.
November 1945 to  Frank Putnam.
Mines:
October 1945 to April 1946  Ernest Crawford Carson.
April 1946 to   Roderick Charles MacDonald.
Education:
October 1945 to November 1945 Henry George Thomas Perry.
November 1945 to December 1947 George Moir Weir.
December 1947 to  William Thomas Straith, K.C.
Railways:
October 1945 to April 1946 Herbert Anscomb.
April 1946 to  Leslie Harvey Eyres.
Labour:
October 1945 to October 1947 George Sharratt Pearson.
October 1947 to  Gordon Sylvester Wismer, K.C.
Trade and Industry:
October 1945 to April 1946  Ernest Crawford Carson.
April 1946 to   Leslie Harvey Eyres.
Municipal Affairs:
October 1945 to April 1946 Herbert Anscomb.
April 1946 to    Roderick Charles MacDonald.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 67
Health and Welfare:
October 1946 to   George Sharratt Pearson.
(At the 1946 Session the Department of Health and Welfare was established:
Department of Health and Welfare Act, Statutes of British Columbia, 1946,
chap. 31.)
Fisheries:
April 1947 to    Leslie Harvey Eyres.
(At the 1947 Session the Department of Fisheries was established:
Department of Fisheries Act, Statutes of British Columbia, 1947, chap. 36.)
President of the Council:
October 1945 to December 1947 ..John Hart.
December 1947 to   Byron Ingemar Johnson.
Speaker:
February 21, 1946, to September 13,
1947   Norman William Whittaker, K.C.  (resigned
September 30,  1947, upon appointment to
the B.C. Supreme Court).
March 2, 1948, to July 9, 1948 Robert Henry Carson.
February 8, 1949, to April 16, 1949...John Hart.
 AA 68                                                BRITISH COLUMBIA
TWENTY-SECOND PARLIAMENT
48 Members.
Election: June 15, 1949.
First Session: February 14 to March 30, 1950.
Second Session: February 20 to April 18, 1951.
Third Session: October 25 to October 27, 1951.
Fourth Session: February 19 to March 26, 1952.
Electoral District                                                                        Members
Alberni   Mowat. James (IndeDendentL
November   21,
)ctober 23, 1951
(left   Coalition
Atlin  	
..Calder, Frank Arthur (CCF).
Burnaby  	
Winch, Ernest Edward (CCF).
MacLean, Angus (Coalition).
Cariboo  	
Chilliwack
Eyres, Leslie Harvey (Coalition).
Columbia 	
..King, Thomas (Coalition).
Comox	
Welch, Herbert John (Coalition).
Whisker, Andrew Mowatt (Coalition).
Nimsick, Leo Thomas (CCF).
Hope, Alexander Campbell (Coalition).
MacDonald, Roderick Charles (Coalition).
Beard,   Charles   Taschereau   (Coalition)    (died,
Cowichan-Newcastle.   	
Cranbrook	
Delta ...	
Dewdney  _
Esquimalt	
Fernie	
1950).
Mitchell, Franklin John (CCF)   (by-election, (
[Beard]).
..Uphill, Thomas (Lab.).
Fort George. ,	
Grand Forks-Greenwood
Kamloops       	
Bowman, Henry Robson (Coalition).
Haggen, Rupert Williams (CCF).
. Smith, Sydney John (Coalition).
Kaslo-Slocan	
Harding, Randolph (CCF).
Lillooet....    	
...Carson, Ernest Crawford (Coalition).
Mackenzie  	
..MacIntyre, Battleman Milton (Coalition).
Nanaimo and The Islands
Nelson-Creston   	
Pearson, George Sharratt (Coalition).
Hendricks, Walter (Coalition).
Johnson, Byron Ingemar (Coalition).
New Westminster	
North Okanagan.— 	
Morrow, Charles William (Coalition).
North Vancouver.. 	
..Cates, John Henry (Coalition).
Oak Bay  	
Anscomb, Herbert (Coalition).
Steele, Robert Cecil (Coalition).
Omineca  	
Peace River    	
Braden, Glen Everton (Coalition).
Prince Rupert
McRae, John Duncan (Coalition).
Revelstoke	
Rossland-Trail	
Lundell, Arvid Waldemar (Coalition).
Turnbull, Alexander Douglas (Coalition).
Ash, Arthur James Richard (Coalition).
Ritchie, Arthur Brown (Coalition).
Saanich  	
Salmon Arm      	
Similkameen.. 	
Finnerty, Maurice Patrick (Coalition).
Kenney, Edward Tourtellotte (Coalition).
Bennett,   William   Andrew   Cecil   (Coalition)
Party, March 15, 1951, to sit as Independent).
Brown, Donald Cameron (Coalition).
Gould, lohn Groves (Coalition).
Wismer, Gordon Sylvester (Coalition).
McDonell, Allan lames (Coalition).
Winch, Harold Edward (CCF).
Turner, Arthur James (CCF).
MacDougall, Albert Reginald (Coalition).
Rolston, Tilly Jean (Coalition).
Stevenson, Leigh Forbes (Coalition).
Hodges, Nancy (Coalition).
Proudfoot, Daniel John (Coalition).
Straith, William Thomas (Coalition).
Gillis, John Joseph (Coalition).
Skeena  	
South Okanagan  	
Vancouver-Burrard (2)
Vancouver Centre (2)	
Vancouver East (2)	
Vancouver-Point Grey (3).
Victoria City (3)        . 	
Yale 	
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 69
Executive Council, Twenty-second Parliament, June 1949 to August 1952
Premier:
 to August 1952     ..Byron Ingemar Johnson.
Provincial Secretary:
 to May  1950  George Sharratt Pearson.
May 1950 to August 1952 William Thomas Straith, K.C.
Attorney-General:
 to August 1952     ..Gordon Sylvester Wismer, K.C.
Lands and Forests:
 to August 1952  Edward Tourtellotte Kenney.
Public Works:
 to January 1952  Ernest Crawford Carson.
January 1952 to August 1952 Edward Tourtellotte Kenney.
Finance:
 to January 1952   Herbert Anscomb.
January 1952 to August 1952     .Byron Ingemar Johnson.
Agriculture:
 to July 1949 Frank Putnam.
July 1949 to August 1952 Henry Robson Bowman.
Mines:
 to January 1952   Roderick Charles MacDonald.
January 1952 to August 1952  John Henry Cates.
Education:
 to August 1952 William Thomas Straith, K.C.
Railways:
 to January 1952  Leslie Harvey Eyres.
January 1952 to August 1952  ..Henry Robson Bowman.
Labour:
 to July 1949   Gordon Sylvester Wismer, K.C.
July 1949 to August 1952 John Henry Cates.
Trade and Industry:
 to January 1952  Leslie Harvey Eyres.
January 1952 to August 1952 Alexander Douglas Turnbull.
Municipal Affairs:
 to January 1952  Roderick Charles MacDonald.
January 1952 to August 1952  Alexander Douglas Turnbull.
Health and Welfare:
 to May 1950   George Sharratt Pearson.
May 1950 to August 1952 .'...Alexander Douglas Turnbull.
Fisheries:
 to January 1952    Leslie Harvey Eyres.
January 1952 to August 1952..  Henry Robson Bowman.
President of the Council:
 to August 1952     .Byron Ingemar Johnson.
Speaker:
February 14, 1950, to April 10, 1952   -Nancy Hodges.
 AA 70 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TWENTY-THIRD PARLIAMENT
48 Members.
Election: June 12, 1952.
First Session: February 3 to March 27, 1953.
Electoral District Members
Alberni   Squire, Stanley John (CCF).
Atlin    Calder, Frank Arthur (CCF).
Burnaby Winch, Ernest Edward (CCF).
Cariboo   Chetwynd, William Ralph Talbot (Soc. Credit).
Chilliwack Kiernan, William Kenneth (Soc. Credit).
Columbia   Newton, Richard Orr (Soc. Credit)   (resigned, October 4, 1952,
to open seat for Robert Bonner).
Bonner,  Robert  William   (Soc.  Credit)   (by-election,  November
24, 1952 [Newton]).
Comox Moore, William Campbell (CCF).
Cowichan-Newcastle  ..Strachan, Robert Martin (CCF).
Cranbrook Nimsick, Leo Thomas (CCF).
Delta Irwin, Thomas lames (Soc. Credit).
Dewdney   Wicks, Lyle (Soc. Credit).
Esquimalt Mitchell, Franklin lohn (CCF).
Fernie Uphill, Thomas (Lab.).
Fort George King, Llewellyn Leslie (Soc. Credit).
Grand Forks-Greenwood Haggen, Rupert Williams (CCF).
Kamloops Gaglardi, Philip Arthur (Soc. Credit).
Kaslo-Slocan Harding, Randolph (CCF).
Lillooet   Carson, Ernest Crawford (Prog.-Cons.)  (died October 21, 1952).
Mackenzie   Gargrave, Anthony lohn (CCF).
Nanaimo and The Islands Giovando, Lorenzo (Prog.-Cons.).
Nelson-Creston Black, Wesley Drewett (Soc. Credit).
New Westminster.  Eddie, John McRae (CCF).
North Okanagan. —.Shantz, Lome Hugh (Soc. Credit).
North Vancouver  ..Sowden, Martin Elliott (Lib.).
Oak Bay , Gibbs, Philip Archibald (Lib.).
Omineca   Shelford, Cyril Morley (Soc. Credit).
Peace River Parker, Charles William (Soc. Credit).
Prince Rupert Hills, George Edwin (CCF).
Revelstoke Segur, Vincent (CCF).
Rossland-Trail   Sommers, Robert Edward (Soc. Credit).
Saanich   Snowsell, Frank (CCF).
Salmon Arm   Reid, James Allan (Soc. Credit).
Similkameen Francis, Harry Denyer (Soc. Credit)  (resigned, October 4, 1952,
to open seat for Einar Gunderson).
Gunderson,   Einar   Maynard   (by-election,   November  24,   1952
[Francis]).
Skeena  Kenney, Edward Tourtellotte (Lib.).
South Okanagan  Bennett, William Andrew Cecil (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver-Burrard (2) Martin, Eric Charles Fitzgerald (Soc. Credit).
Price, Bert (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver Centre (2) Bury, James Campbell (CCF).
Jamieson, Laura Emma (CCF).
Vancouver East (2) Winch, Harold Edward (CCF).
Turner, Arthur James (CCF).
Vancouver-Point Grey (3)....MacDougall, Albert Reginald (Prog.-Cons.)  (died, January 20,
1953).
Miller, George Clark (Prog.-Cons.).
Rolston, Tilly Jean (Soc. Credit).
Victoria City (3) Hodges, Nancy (Lib.).
Proudfoot, Daniel John (Lib.).
Straith, William Thomas (Lib.).
Yale     Corbett, Irvine Finlay (Soc. Credit).
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975
Executive Council, Twenty-third Parliament, August 1952 to March 1953
Premier:
August 1952 to    William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Provincial Secretary:
August 1952 to   Wesley Drewett Black.
Attorney-General:
August 1952 to  Robert William Bonner, Q.C.
Lands and Forests:
August 1952 to Robert Edward Sommers.
Public Works:
August 1952 to Philip Arthur Gaglardi.
Finance:
August 1952 to    Einar Maynard Gunderson.
Agriculture:
August 1952 to    William Kenneth Kiernan.
Mines:
August 1952 to  .   Robert Edward Sommers.
Education:
August 1952 to  Tilly Jean Rolston.
Railways:
August 1952 to  William Ralph Talbot Chetwynd.
Labour:
August 1952 to  Lyle Wicks.
Trade and Industry:
August 1952 to  William Ralph Talbot Chetwynd.
Municipal Affairs:
August 1952 to  Wesley Drewett Black.
Health and Welfare:
August 1952 to    Eric Charles Fitzgerald Martin.
Fisheries:
August 1952 to  William Ralph Talbot Chetwynd.
President of the Council:
August 1952 to  William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Speaker:
February 3 to March 27, 1953  Thomas James Irwin.
AA 71
 AA 72 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TWENTY-FOURTH  PARLIAMENT
48 Members.
Election: June 9, 1953.
First Session: September 15 to October 17, 1953.
Second Session: February 16 to April 14, 1954.
Third Session: January 25 to March 15, 1955.
Fourth Session: January 17 to March 2, 1956.
Electoral District Members
Alberni  — Squire, Stanley John (CCF).
Atlin  ....Calder, Frank Arthur (CCF).
Burnaby*   Winch, Ernest Edward (CCF).
Cariboo Chetwynd, William Ralph Talbot (Soc. Credit).
Chilliwack Kiernan, William Kenneth (Soc. Credit).
Columbia Newton, Richard Orr (Soc. Credit).
Comox  Moore, William Campbell (CCF).
Cowichan-Newcastle Strachan, Robert Martin (CCF).
Cranbrook Nimsick, Leo Thomas (CCF).
Delta* Irwin, Thomas James (Soc. Credit).
Dewdney   Wicks, Lyle (Soc. Credit).
Esquimalt  Bruch, Herbert Joseph (Soc. Credit).
Fernie   Uphill, Thomas (Lab.).
Fort George   Williston, Ray Gillis (Soc. Credit).
Grand Forks-Greenwood Haggen, Rupert William (CCF).
Kamloops Gaglardi, Philip Arthur (Soc. Credit).
Kaslo-Slocan  Harding, Randolph (CCF).
Lillooet Gibson, James Gordon (Lib.) (resigned, March 10, 1955).
Robinson, Donald Frederick (Soc. Credit)  (by-election, September 12, 1955 [Gibson]).
Mackenzie Gargrave, Anthony John (CCF).
Nanaimo and The Islands. Giovando, Lorenzo (Prog.-Cons.).
Nelson-Creston Black, Wesley Drewett (Soc. Credit).
New Westminster Eddie, John McRae (CCF).
North Okanagan...  Shantz, Lome Hugh (Soc. Credit).
North Vancouver*   Tomlinson, George Henry (Soc. Credit).
Oak Bay Gibbs, Philip Archibald (Lib.).
Omineca Shelford, Cyril Morley (Soc. Credit).
Peace River*  Parker, Charles William (Soc. Credit).
Prince Rupert Brown, Arthur Bruce (Lib.).
Revelstoke   Segur, Vincent (CCF).
Rossland-Trail.  Sommers, Robert Edward (Soc. Credit).
Saanich   Tisdalle, John Douglas (Soc. Credit).
Salmon Arm Reid, James Allan (Soc. Credit).
Similkameen   Richter, Francis Xavier (Soc. Credit).
Skeena Howard, Frank (CCF).
South Okanagan.  Bennett, William Andrew Cecil (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver-Burrard (2) Martin, Eric Charles Fitzgerald (Soc. Credit).
Price, Bert (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver Centre (2) Matthew, Alexander Small (Soc. Credit).
Moxham, George Churchill (Soc. Credit)   (died, November 10,
.1955).
Peterson, Leslie Raymond (Soc. Credit) (by-election, January 9,
1956 [Moxham]).
Vancouver East (2)..  Webster, Arnold Alexander (CCF).
Turner, Arthur James (CCF).
Vancouver-Point Grey (3)....Bate, Thomas Audley (Soc. Credit).
Bonner, Robert William (Soc. Credit).
Laing, Arthur (Lib.).
* Constitution Act Amendment Act, 1955, chap. 11, sections 8, 9, and 10, made the constituencies of
Burnaby, Delta, and North Vancouver into two-member constituencies (formerly one member). Schedule C
was amended to divide the Peace River constituency into the North Peace River Electoral District and the
South Peace River Electoral District. These amendments added four members to the Legislature, bringing the
total to 52 members as at August 13, 1956, the date of Proclamation.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 73
Electoral District Members
Victoria City (3)   Arsens, Lydia Augusta (Soc. Credit).
Chant, William Neelands (Soc. Credit).
Wright,  Walter  Percival   (Soc.  Credit)   (resigned,  October   19,
1953, to open seat for Einar Gunderson, defeated at election in
Oak Bay).
Gregory, George Frederick Thompson (Lib.) (by-election, November 24, 1953 [Wright]).
Yale  Corbett, Irvine Finlay (Soc. Credit).
Executive Council, Twenty-fourth Parliament, March 1953 to September 1956
Premier:
 to  William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Provincial Secretary:
 to    Wesley Drewett Black.
Attorney-General:
 to    Robert William Bonner, Q.C.
Lands and Forests:
 to February 1956  Robert Edward Sommers.
February 1956 to  ...Ray Gillis Williston.
Public Works:
 to March 1955   Philip Arthur Gaglardi.
March 1955 to  William Neelands Chant.
Finance:
 to February 1954 Einar Maynard Gunderson.
February 1954 to  William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Agriculture:
 to September 1956 ...William Kenneth Kiernan.
Mines:
 to February 1956  ...Robert Edward Sommers.
February 1956 to    William Kenneth Kiernan.
Education:
 to October 1953 Tilly Jean Rolston.
October 1953 to April 1954.. .Robert William Bonner, Q.C.
April 1954 to September 1956  Ray Gillis Williston.
Railways:
 to September 1956 William Ralph Talbot Chetwynd.
Labour:
 to     ..Lyle Wicks.
Trade and Industry:
 to September 1956 .....William Ralph Talbot Chetwynd.
Municipal Affairs:
 to ■  Wesley Drewett Black.
Health and Welfare:
 to   Eric Charles Fitzgerald Martin.
Fisheries:
 to   ..William Ralph Talbot Chetwynd.
Highways:
March 1955 to    Philip Arthur Gaglardi.
(At the 1955 Session the Department of Highways was established:
Department of Highways Act, Statutes of British Columbia, 1955, chap. 33.)
President of the Council:
 to     William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Speaker:
September 15, 1953, to March 2, 1956 .Thomas James Irwin.
 AA 74 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TWENTY-FIFTH PARLIAMENT
52 Members.
Election: September 19, 1956.
First Session: February 7 to. March 28, 1957.
Second Session: lanuary 23 to March 20, 1958.
Third Session: January 22 to March 20, 1959.
Fourth Session: January 28 to March 18, 1960.
Electoral District Members
Alberni Squire, Stanley John (CCF).
Atlin   Asselstine, William James (Soc. Credit).
Burnaby (2, formerly 1) Winch, Ernest Edward (CCF) (died, January 11, 1957).
Dowding, Gordon Hudson (CCF).
Cox, Cedric (CCF) (by-election, September 9, 1957 [Winch]).
Cariboo        Chetwynd, William Ralph Talbot (Soc. Credit)  (died, April 3,
1957).
Speare, William Collins (Soc. Credit)  (by-election, September 9,
1957 [Chetwynd]).
Chilliwack  ...Kiernan, William Kenneth (Soc. Credit).
Columbia   Newton, Richard Orr (Soc. Credit).
Comox  .Campbell, Daniel Robert John (Soc. Credit).
Cowichan-Newcastle Strachan, Robert Martin (CCF).
Cranbrook   Nimsick, Leo Thomas (CCF).
Delta (2, formerly 1) Irwin, Thomas James (Soc. Credit) (resigned, April 26, 1957, to
run in Federal election).
Massey, N. George (Soc. Credit).
Gibson, Gordon Lionel (Soc. Credit)  (by-election, September 9,
1957 [Irwin]).
Dewdney   Wicks, Lyle (Soc. Credit).
Esquimalt Bruch, Herbert Joseph (Soc. Credit).
Fernie   Uphill, Thomas (Lab.).
Fort George Williston, Ray Gillis (Soc. Credit).
Grand Forks-Greenwood Haggen, Lois Mabel (CCF).
Kamloops Gaglardi, Philip Arthur (Soc. Credit).
Kaslo-Slocan   Harding, Randolph (CCF).
Lillooet Robinson, Donald Frederick (Soc. Credit).
Mackenzie Gargrave, Anthony John (CCF).
Nanaimo and The Islands Westwood, Earle Cathers (Soc. Credit).
Nelson-Creston Black, Wesley Drewett (Soc. Credit).
New Westminster.....  Eddie, John McRae (CCF).
North Okanagan—  Shantz, Lome Hugh (Soc. Credit).
North Peace River (new).....Roche, Harold Earl (Soc. Credit).
North  Vancouver   (2,  for- Bryan, John Melvin (Soc. Credit),
merly 1) Steacy, Newton Phillips (Soc. Credit).
Oak Bay Gibbs, Philip Archibald (Lib.)  (died March 4, 1960, seat vacant
until 1960 Election).
Omineca  ..Shelford, Cyril Morley (Soc. Credit).
Prince Rupert  Murray, William Harvey (Soc. Credit).
Revelstoke  Lundell, Arvid W. (Soc. Credit).
Rossland-Trail Sommers, Robert Edward (Soc. Credit)  (resigned, November 7,
1958).
Brothers, Donald Leslie  (Soc. Credit)   (by-election, December
15, 1958 [Sommers]).
Saanich   Tisdalle, John Douglas (Soc. Credit).
Salmon Arm  Reid, James Allan (Soc. Credit).
Similkameen  ..Richter, Francis Xavier (Soc. Credit).
Skeena   Shirreff, Hugh Addison (Soc. Credit).
South Okanagan Bennett, William Andrew Cecil (Soc. Credit).
South Peace River (new) Carnell, Stanley (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver-Burrard (2)  -. Martin, Eric Charles Fitzgerald (Soc. Credit).
Price, Bert (Soc. Credit).
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 75
Electoral District Members
Vancouver Centre (2) Peterson, Leslie Raymond (Soc. Credit).
Matthew, Alexander Small (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver East (2) Turner, Arthur James (CCF).
Sharp, Frederick Morton (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver-Point Grey (3)... Bonner, Robert William (Soc. Credit).
Bate, Thomas Audley (Soc. Credit).
Brown, Buda Hosmer (Soc. Credit).
Victoria City (3) Chant, William Neelands (Soc. Credit).
Smith, John Donald (Soc. Credit).
Gregory, George Frederick Thompson (Lib.).
Yale     Corbett, Irvine Finlay (Soc. Credit).
Executive Council, Twenty-fifth Parliament, September 1956 to August 1960
Premier:
 to   ....William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Provincial Secretary:
 to   ..Wesley Drewett Black.
Attorney-General:
 to     .....Robert William Bonner, Q.C.
Lands and Forests:
 to      Ray Gillis Williston.
Public Works:
 to    William Neelands Chant.
Finance:
 to   ..William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Agriculture:
September 1956 to April 1957  --William Ralph Talbot Chetwynd (died April 3,
1957).
April 1957 to September 1957   -William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
September 1957 to   Newton Phillips Steacy.
Mines:
 to March 1960  ..William Kenneth Kiernan.
(At  1960  Session  the  Department of  Mines  and  Petroleum  Resources  was
established:
Department of Mines Act Amendment Act, 1960, Statutes of British Columbia, 1960, chap. 32.)
Mines and Petroleum Resources:
March 1960 to   ..William Kenneth Kiernan.
Education:
September 1956 to    Leslie Raymond Peterson.
Railways:
September 1956 to March 1959 Lyle Wicks.
(At 1959 Session the Department of Commerical Transport was established:
Department of Commercial Transport Act, Statutes of British Columbia,
1959, chap. 12.)
Commercial Transport:
March 1959 to   Lyle Wicks.
Labour:
 to  Lyle Wicks.
 AA 76 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Trade and Industry:
September 1956 to March 1957 Earle Cathers Westwood.
(At 1957 Session the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce was established:
Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce Act, Statutes
of British Columbia, 1957, chap. 29.)
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce:
March 1957 to  Robert William Bonner, Q.C.
Municipal Affairs:
 to    Wesley Drewett Black.
Health and Welfare:
 to March 1959   Eric Charles Fitzgerald Martin.
(At 1959 Session two departments were established:
Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance Act, 1959, chap. 38;
Department of Social Welfare Act, 1959, chap. 76.)
Health Services and Hospital Insurance:
March 1959 to    Eric Charles Fitzgerald Martin.
Social Welfare:
March 1959 to  Wesley Drewett Black.
Fisheries:
 to March 1957 William Ralph Talbot Chetwynd.
(Became part of new Department of Recreation and Conservation, March 28,
1957.)
Recreation and Conservation:
March 1957 to  Earle Cathers Westwood.
(At 1957 Session the Department of Recreation and Conservation was established:
Department of Recreation and Conservation Act, Statutes of British Columbia, 1957, chap. 53.)
Highways:
 to    Philip Arthur Gaglardi.
President of the Council:
 to   William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Speaker:
February 7, 1957, to April 24, 1957 Thomas James Irwin.
January 23, 1958, to August 3, I960..   Lome Hugh Shantz.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 77
TWENTY-SIXTH PARLIAMENT
52 Members.
Election: September 12, 1960.
First Session: January 26 to March 28, 1961.
Second Session (special): August 1 to August 3, 1961.
Third Session: January 25 to March 29, 1962.
Fourth Session: January 24 to March 27, 1963.
Electoral District Members
Alberni Squire, Stanley John (CCF).
Atlin  ...Calder, Frank Arthur (CCF).
Burnaby (2) Cox, Cedric (CCF).
Dowding, Gordon Hudson (CCF).
Cariboo... .Speare, William Collins (Soc. Credit).
Chilliwack   Kiernan, William Kenneth (Soc. Credit).
Columbia   Newton, Richard Orr (Soc. Credit)  (died February 14, 1963.)
Greenwood,  Frank   (Soc.  Credit)   (by-election,  July  31,   1963
[Newton]).
Comox   Campbell, Daniel Robert John (Soc. Credit).
Cowichan-Newcastle Strachan, Robert Martin (CCF).
Cranbrook Nimsick, Leo Thomas (CCF).
Delta (2)  ......Mather, Camille (CCF).
Rhodes, James Henry (CCF).
Dewdney    Barrett, David (CCF).
Esquimalt Bruch, Herbert Joseph (Soc. Credit).
Fernie  ...McKay, Harry Cartmell (Lib.).
Fort George   Williston, Ray Gillis (Soc. Credit).
Grand Forks-Greenwood .Haggen, Lois Mabel (CCF).
Kamloops    ..Gaglardi, Philip Arthur (Soc. Credit).
Kaslo-Slocan  .....Harding, Randolph (CCF).
Lillooet  ...Robinson, Donald Frederick (Soc. Credit).
Mackenzie Gargrave, Anthony John (CCF).
Nanaimo and The Islands. Westwood, Earle Cathers (Soc. Credit).
Nelson-Creston  Black, Wesley Drewett (Soc. Credit).
New Westminster  Eddie, John McRae (CCF).
North Okanagan Shantz, Lome Hugh (Soc. Credit).
North Peace River  ..Huhn, Jacob Francis (Soc. Credit).
North Vancouver (2)—.. ..Perrault, Raymond Joseph (Lib.).
Gibson, James Gordon (Lib.).
Oak Bay  Macfarlane, Alan Brock (Lib.).
Omineca  ...Shelford, Cyril Morley (Soc. Credit).
Prince Rupert Murray, William Harvey (Soc. Credit).
Revelstoke  Hobbs, George (CCF) (died, January 30, 1962).
Hobbs, Margaret Frances (NDP-CCF)*  (by-election, September
4, 1962 [Hobbs]).
Rossland-Trail.....  Brothers, Donald Leslie (Soc. Credit).
Saanich Tisdalle, John Douglas (Soc. Credit).
Salmon Arm   Jefcoat, Willis Franklin (Soc. Credit).
Similkameen   Richter, Francis Xavier (Soc. Credit).
Skeena  Little, Dudley George (Soc. Credit).
South Okanagan Bennett, William Andrew Cecil (Soc. Credit).
South Peace River Carnell, Stanley (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver-Burrard (2) Martin, Eric Charles Fitzgerald (Soc. Credit).
Price, Bert (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver Centre (2) Peterson, Leslie Raymond (Soc. Credit).
Matthew, Alexander Small (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver East (2)  Macdonald, Alex Barrett (CCF).
Turner, Arthur James (CCF).
* On January 26, 1962, R. M. Strachan, Leader of the Official Opposition, made a statement in the House
to the effect that, due to a party reorganization, the 16 M.L.A.s who in the past had been known as CCF
now wished to be known, during the life of this Parliament, as New Democratic Party-CCF members.
 AA 78 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Electoral District . Members
Vancouver-Point Grey (3)  .Bonner, Robert William (Soc. Credit).
Bate, Thomas Audley (Soc. Credit).
Brown, Buda Hosmer (Soc. Credit) (died, August 12, 1962).
McGeer, Patrick Lucey (Lib.)  (by-election, December 17, 1962
[Brown]).
Victoria City (3)...._  Chant, William Neelands (Soc. Credit).
Smith, I. Donald (Soc. Credit).
Skillings, Waldo McTavish (Soc. Credit).
Yale  .....Corbett, Irvine Finlay (Soc. Credit).
Executive Council, Twenty-sixth Parliament, August 1960 to August 1963
Premier:
 to    William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Provincial Secretary:
 to    Wesley Drewett Black.
Attorney-General:
 to    Robert William Bonner, Q.C.
Lands and Forests:
 to March 1962 Ray Gillis Williston.
(At 1962 Session the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources was
established:
Department of Lands and Forests Act Amendment Act, 1962, Statutes of
British Columbia,  1962, chap. 22.)
Lands, Forests, and Water Resources:
March 1962 to    Ray Gillis Williston.
Public Works:
 to     William Neelands Chant.
Finance:
 to ■  -  William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Agriculture:
 to November 1960  Newton Phillips Steacy (not re-elected).
November 1960 to  —Francis Xavier Richter.
Mines and Petroleum Resources:
 to    William Kenneth Kiernan.
Education:
 to    Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C.
Commerical Transport:
 to November 1960 Lyle Wicks.
November 1960 to   Earle Cathers Westwood.
Labour:
 to November I960... .....Lyle Wicks.
November 1960 to  Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C.
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce:
 ■ to     Robert William Bonner, Q.C.
Municipal Affairs:
 to    Wesley Drewett Black.
Health Services and Hospital Insurance:
 to  Eric Charles Fitzgerald Martin.
Social Welfare:
 to  Wesley Drewett Black.
Recreation and Conservation:
 to   ......—  Earle Cathers Westwood.
Highways:
 to    Philip Arthur Gaglardi.
Member of the Executive Council Without
Portfolio:
November 1960 to August 1962 Buda Hosmer Brown (died, August 12, 1962).
President of the Council:
 to     William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Speaker:
January 26, 1961, to August 21, 1963...Lorne Hugh Shantz.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 79
TWENTY-SEVENTH PARLIAMENT
52 Members.
Election: September 30, 1963.
First Session: January 23 to March 20, 1964.
Second Session: January 21 to March 26, 1965.
Third Session: January 27 to April 1, 1966.
Electoral District Members
Alberni  Squire, Stanley lohn (NDP).
Atlin   Calder, Frank Arthur (NDP).
Burnaby (2) Dowding, Gordon Hudson (NDP).
MacSorley, Charles W. (Soc. Credit).
Cariboo  Speare, William Collins (Soc. Credit).
Chilliwack  Kiernan, William Kenneth (Soc. Credit).
Columbia  Chabot, James Roland (Soc. Credit).
Comox...  Campbell, Daniel Robert John (Soc. Credit).
Cowichan-Newcastle Strachan, Robert Martin (NDP).
Cranbrook Nimsick, Leo Thomas (NDP).
Delta (2) Vogel, Hunter Bertram (Soc. Credit).
LeCours, Ernest A. (Soc. Credit).
Dewdney   Barrett, David (NDP).
Esquimalt  ...Bruch, Herbert J. (Soc. Credit).
Fernie   McKay, Harry Cartmell (Lib).
Fort George Williston, Ray Gillis (Soc. Credit).
Grand Forks-Greenwood Haggen, Lois Mabel (NDP).
Kamloops   Gaglardi, Philip Arthur (Soc. Credit).
Kaslo-Slocan   Harding, Randolph (NDP).
Lillooet Robinson, Donald Frederick (Soc. Credit).
Mackenzie Gargrave, Anthony John (NDP).
Nanaimo and The Islands Stupich, David  Daniel (NDP).
Nelson-Creston  ..Black, Wesley Drewett (Soc. Credit).
New Westminster  .....Eddie, John McRae (NDP).
North Okanagan...... McLeod, George William (Soc. Credit) (died, Dec. 19, 1965).
North Peace River Huhn, Jacob Francis (Soc. Credit).
North Vancouver (2) Perrault, Raymond Joseph (Lib.).
Gibson, James Gordon (Lib.).
Oak Bay Macfarlane, Alan Brock (Lib.).
Omineca  ...Shelford, Cyril Morley (Soc. Credit).
Prince Rupert Murray, William Harvey (Soc. Credit).
Revelstoke    Lundell, Arvid Waldemar (Soc. Credit).
Rossland-Trail Brothers, Donald Leslie (Soc. Credit).
Saanich Tisdalle, John Douglas (Soc. Credit).
Salmon Arm..    Jefcoat, Willis Franklin (Soc. Credit).
Similkameen...  Richter, Francis Xavier (Soc. Credit).
Skeena    ..Little, Dudley George (Soc. Credit).
South Okanagan Bennett, William Andrew Cecil (Soc. Credit).
South Peace River Carnell, Stanley (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver-Burrard (2)...  Martin, Eric Charles Fitzgerald (Soc. Credit).
Price, Bert (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver Centre (2).... Peterson, Leslie Raymond (Soc. Credit).
Matthew, Alexander Small (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver East (2) Macdonald, Alexander Barrett (NDP).
Turner, Arthur James (NDP).
Vancouver-Point Grey (3).._ McGeer, Patrick Lucey (Lib.).
Bonner, Robert William (Soc. Credit).
Loffmark, Ralph Raymond (Soc. Credit).
Victoria City (3) Chant, William Neelands (Soc. Credit).
Skillings, Waldo McTavish (Soc. Credit).
Smith, J. Donald (Soc. Credit).
 AA 80 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Electoral District Members
Yale   Hartley, William Leonard (Soc. Credit)   (election declared void
January 17, 1966.   Judgment set aside by Court of Appeal, February 16, 1966.)
Constitution Act Amendment Act, 1966, chap. 11, redefined the boundaries of
many of the electoral districts and created a number of new districts. The
Act also added three members to the Legislature, bringing the total to 55
members as at August 5, 1966, the date of dissolution of the Twenty-seventh
Parliament.
Executive Council, Twenty-seventh Parliament, August 1963 to August 1966
Premier:
 to  William Andrew Cecil Bennett.*
Provincial Secretary:
 to    Wesley Drewett Black.
Attorney-General:
 to      Robert William Bonner, Q.C.
Lands, Forests, and Water Resources:
 to  Ray Gillis Williston.
Public Works:
 to  William Neelands Chant.
Finance:
 to  William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Agriculture:
 to     ...Francis Xavier Richter.
Mines and Petroleum Resources:
 to March 1964  William Kenneth Kiernan.
March 1964 to   ..Donald Leslie Brothers.
Education:
 to    Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C.
Commercial Transport:
 to December 1963  Earle Cathers Westwood (not re-elected, September 30, 1963).
December 1963 to March 1964 William Kenneth Kiernan.
March 1964 to  ..Robert William Bonner, Q.C.
Labour:
 to   Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C.
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce:
 to March 1964   Robert William Bonner, Q.C.
March 1964 to    Ralph Raymond Loffmark.
Municipal Affairs:
 to March 1964..   Wesley Drewett Black.
March 1964 to  Daniel Robert John Campbell.
Health Services and Hospital Insurance:
 to  Eric Charles Fitzgerald Martin.
Social Welfare:
 to    ..Wesley Drewett Black.
Recreation and Conservation:
 to December 1963...  Earle Cathers Westwood (not re-elected, September 30, 1963).
December 1963 to   William Kenneth Kiernan.
Highways:
 to  Philip Arthur Gaglardi.
President of the Council:
 to  William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Speaker:
January 23, 1964, to  William Harvey Murray.
* On February 15, 1965, the Honourable W. A. C. Bennett attained a record of 4,582 days as Premier,
which was unequalled since the advent of responsible government in British Columbia.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 81
TWENTY-EIGHTH PARLIAMENT
55 Members.
Election: September 12, 1966.
First Session: January 24 to March 23, 1967.
Second Session: January 25 to April 6, 1968.
Third Session: January 23 to April 2, 1969.
Electoral District Members
Alberni   McDiarmid, Howard Richmond (Soc. Credit).
Atlin...    Calder, Frank Arthur (NDP).
Boundary-Similkameen
(new) Richter, Francis Xavier (Soc. Credit).
Burnaby-Edmonds (new) Dowding, Gordon Hudson (NDP).
Burnaby North (new) Dailly, Eileen Elizabeth (NDP).
Burnaby-Willingdon (new).VuLLiAMY, Frederick Justin (NDP) (died, October 20, 1968).
Lorimer, James Gibson (NDP)   (by-election, January 13,  1969
[Vulliamy]).
Cariboo Speare, William Collins (Soc. Credit) (resigned, October 26, 1966,
to open seat for Robert Bonner, defeated at election in Vancouver-Point Grey).
Bonner, Robert William (Soc. Credit) (by-election, November 28,
1966 [Speare]).
Chilliwack  Kiernan, William Kenneth (Soc. Credit).
Columbia River (new).. Chabot, James Roland (Soc. Credit).
Comox..  Campbell, Daniel Robert John (Soc. Credit).
Coquitlam (new)  ...Barrett, David (NDP).
Cowichan-Malahat (new) Strachan, Robert Martin (NDP).
Delta (formerly 2)....  Wenman, Robert (Soc. Credit).
Dewdney   Mussallem, George (Soc. Credit).
Esquimalt Bruch, Herbert J. (Soc. Credit).
Fort George Williston, Ray Gillis (Soc. Credit).
Kamloops Gaglardi, Philip Arthur (Soc. Credit).
Kootenay (new) Nimsick, Leo Thomas (NDP).
Langley (new)    Vogel, Hunter Bertram (Soc. Credit).
Mackenzie   Dawson, Isabel Pearl (Soc. Credit).
Nanaimo (new) Stupich, David Daniel (NDP).
Nelson-Creston  ...Black, Wesley Drewett (Soc. Credit).
New Westminster Eddie, John McRae (NDP).
North Okanagan  .....Jordan, Patricia Jane (Soc. Credit).
North Peace River Smith, Dean Edward (Soc. Credit).
North Vancouver-Capilano    Perrault, Raymond Joseph (Lib.) (resigned, June 5, 1968, to run
(new) in Federal election).
Brousson,   David   Maurice   (Lib.)   (by-election,   July   15,   1968
[Perrault]).
North Vancouver-Seymour
(new) Clark, Barrie Aird (Lib.).
Oak Bay......'  Macfarlane, Alan Brock (Lib.)  (resigned, April 25, 1968; appointed to B.C. Supreme Court).
Cox, Allan'Leslie (Lib.) (by-election, July 15, 1968 [Macfarlane]).
Omineca  Shelford, Cyril Morley (Soc. Credit).
Prince Rupert.... Murray, William Harvey (Soc. Credit).
Revelstoke-Slocan (new) Harding, Randolph  (NDP)   (resigned, June 5,  1968, to run in
Federal election).
King,   William   Stewart    (NDP)    (by-election,   July    15,    1968
[Harding]).
Richmond (new)... LeCours, Ernest A. (Soc. Credit).
Rossland-Trail... Brothers, Donald Leslie (Soc. Credit).
Saanich and The Islands
(new)  ....Tisdalle, John Douglas (Soc. Credit).
Shuswap (new)  Jefcoat, Willis Franklin (Soc. Credit).
Skeena    ....Little, Dudley George (Soc. Credit).
South Okanagan..  Bennett, William Andrew Cecil (Soc. Credit).
 AA 82 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Electoral District Members
South Peace River  Phillips, Donald McGray (Soc. Credit).
Surrey (new)  Hall, Ernest (NDP).
Vancouver-Burrard (2) Berger, Tom (NDP).
Parkinson, Ray (NDP).
Vancouver Centre (2) Capozzi, Harold Peter (Soc. Credit).
Wolfe, Evan Maurice (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver East (2). Macdonald, Alexander Barrett (NDP).
Williams, Robert Arthur (NDP).
Vancouver-Little Mountain
(2) (new)   Peterson, Leslie Raymond (Soc. Credit).
McCarthy, Grace Mary (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver-Point Grey (2,
formerly 3) McGeer, Patrick Lucey (Lib.).
Gardom, Garde Basil (Lib.).
Vancouver South (2) (new).Loffmark, Ralph Raymond (Soc. Credit).
Bate, Thomas Audley (Soc. Credit) (died, September 21, 1967).
Levi, Norman (NDP) (by-election, May 21, 1968 [Bate]).
Victoria (2, formerly 3)  Chant, William Neelands (Soc. Credit).
Skillings, Waldo McTavish (Soc. Credit).
West Vancouver-Howe
Sound (new).....  Williams, Allan (Lib.).
Yale-Lillooet (new)  Hartley, William Leonard (NDP).
Executive Council, Twenty-eighth Parliament, September 1966 to July 1969
Premier:
 to    William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Provincial Secretary:
  to   Wesley Drewett Black.
Attorney-General:
 -to May 1968 Robert William Bonner, Q.C.
May 1968 to     Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C.
Lands, Forests, and Water Resources:
 to  Ray Gillis Williston.
Public Works:
 to    William Neelands Chant.
Finance:
 to    William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Agriculture:
 ■ to May 1968   Francis Xavier Richter.
May 1968 to  . Cyril Morley Shelford.
Mines and Petroleum Resources:
 to May 1968  ...Donald Leslie Brothers, Q.C.
May 1968 to    Francis Xavier Richter.
Education:
 to May 1968   Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C.
May 1968 to   ...Donald Leslie Brothers, Q.C.
Commercial Transport:
 to May 1968   Robert William Bonner, Q.C.
May 1968 to    Francis Xavier Richter.
Labour:
 to    Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C.
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce:
 to April 1968 Ralph Raymond Loffmark.
April 1968 to ■ Waldo McTavish Skillings.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 83
Municipal Affairs:
 to     ..Daniel Robert John Campbell.
Health Services and Hospital Insurance:
 to December 1966...  Eric Charles Fitzgerald Martin.
December 1966 to April 1968  ..Wesley Drewett Black.
April 1968 to    Ralph Raymond Loffmark.
Travel Industry:
March 1967 to    William Kenneth Kiernan.
(At 1967 Session the Department of Travel Industry was established:
Department of Travel Industry Act,  1967, Statutes of British Columbia,
1967, chap. 18.)
Social Welfare:
 to December 1966   Wesley Drewett Black.
December 1966 to  Daniel Robert John Campbell.
Recreation and Conservation:
 to  William Kenneth Kiernan.
Highways:
 to March 1968  ..Philip Arthur Gaglardi.
March 1968 to April 1968  .....William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
April 1968 to   .....Wesley Drewett Black.
Member of the Executive Council Without Portfolio:
December 1966 to .__ Isabel Pearl Dawson.
December 1966 to  ...Patricia Jane Jordan.
December 1966 to ■ Grace Mary McCarthy.
March 1968 to  Philip Arthur Gaglardi.
President of the Council:
 to    William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Speaker:
 to  William Harvey Murray.
 AA 84 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TWENTY-NINTH PARLIAMENT
55 Members.
Election: August 27, 1969.
First Session: January 22 to April 3, 1970.
Second Session: January 21 to April 2, 1971.
Third Session: January 20 to March 30, 1972.
Electoral District Members
Alberni   ....McDiarmid, Howard Richmond (Soc. Credit).
Atlin     Calder, Frank Arthur (NDP).
Boundary-Similkameen ...Richter, Francis Xavier (Soc. Credit).
Burnaby-Edmonds Dowding, Gordon Hudson (NDP).
Burnaby North...  Dailly, Eileen Elizabeth (NDP).
Burnaby-Willingdon Lorimer, James Gibson (NDP).
Cariboo Fraser, Alexander Vaughan (Soc. Credit).
Chilliwack Kiernan, William Kenneth (Soc. Credit).
Columbia River   Chabot, James Roland (Soc. Credit).
Comox    Campbell, Daniel Robert John (Soc. Credit).
Coquitlam...   ..Barrett, David (NDP).
Cowichan-Malahat... ...Strachan, Robert Martin (NDP).
Delta  —— .Wenman, Robert (Soc. Credit).
Dewdney Mussallem, George (Soc. Credit).
Esquimalt Bruch, Herbert J. (Soc. Credit).
Fort George   Williston, Ray Gillis (Soc. Credit).
Kamloops  ...Gaglardi, Philip Arthur (Soc. Credit).
Kootenay   Nimsick, Leo Thomas (NDP).
Langley    ...Vogel, Hunter Bertram (Soc. Credit).
Mackenzie Dawson, Isabel Pearl (Soc. Credit).
Nanaimo Ney, Frank James (Soc. Credit).
Nelson-Creston ,..Black, Wesley Drewett (Soc. Credit).
New Westminster..  Cocke, Dennis Geoffrey (NDP).
North Okanagan  .....Jordan, Patricia Jane (Soc. Credit).
North Peace River Smith, Dean Edward (Soc. Credit).
NorthVancouver-Capilano—.Brousson, David Maurice (Lib.).
North Vancouver-Seymour.... Clark, Barrie Aird (Lib.).
Oak Bay Wallace, George Scott* (Soc. Credit).
Omineca Shelford, Cyril Morley (Soc. Credit).
Prince Rupert   Murray, William Harvey (Soc. Credit).
Revelstoke-Slocan  Campbell, Burton Peter (Soc. Credit).
Richmond   LeCours, Ernest A. (Soc. Credit).
Rossland-Trail..  Brothers, Donald Leslie (Soc. Credit).
Saanich and The Islands Tisdalle, John Douglas (Soc. Credit).
Shuswap   Jefcoat, Willis Franklin (Soc. Credit).
Skeena  Little, Dudley George (Soc. Credit).
South Okanagan..  Bennett, William Andrew Cecil (Soc. Credit).
South Peace River  Marshall, Donald Albertt (Soc. Credit).
Surrey   Hall, Ernest (NDP).
Vancouver-Burrard (2) Merilees, Harold James (Soc. Credit).
Price, Bert (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver Centre (2) Capozzi, Harold Peter (Soc. Credit).
Wolfe, Evan Maurice (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver East (2) Macdonald, Alexander Barrett (NDP).
Williams, Robert Arthur (NDP).
Vancouver-Little Mountain   Peterson, Leslie Raymond (Soc. Credit).
(2) McCarthy, Grace Mary (Soc. Credit).
Vancouver-Point Grey (2)....McGeer, Patrick Lucey (Lib.).
Gardom, Garde Basil (Lib.).
Vancouver South (2) Loffmark, Ralph Raymond (Soc. Credit).
Kripps, Agnes (Soc. Credit).
* Mr. Wallace resigned from the Social Credit party on August 17, 1971, and joined the Progressive-Conservative party on January 10, 1972.
t Mr. Marshall resigned from the Social Credit party on March 22, 1972, to sit as a Progressive-Conservative
member.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 85
Electoral District Members
Victoria (2)   Chant, William Neelands (Soc. Credit).
Skillings, Waldo McTavish (Soc. Credit).
West Vancouver-Howe
Sound . Williams, Louis Allan (Lib.).
Yale-Lillooet Hartley, William Leonard (NDP).
Executive Council, Twenty-ninth Parliament, August 1969 to August 1972
Premier:
 to August 1972 William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Provincial Secretary:
 to August 1972  .Wesley Drewett Black.
Attorney-General:
———• to August 1972  Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C.
Lands, Forests, and Water Resources:
 to August 1972   Ray Gillis Williston.
Public Works:
 to August 1972   William Neelands Chant.
Finance:
 to August 1972 William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Agriculture:
 to August 1972   Cyril Morley Shelford.
Mines and Petroleum Resources:
— to August 1972  ..Francis Xavier Richter.
Education:
 to August 1972  .Donald Leslie Brothers, Q.C.
Commercial Transport:
 to August 1972   Francis Xavier Richter.
Labour:
 to April 1971 Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C.
April 1971 to August 1972  ....James Roland Chabot.
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce:
 to August 1972... Waldo McTavish Skillings.
Municipal Affairs:
 to August 1972... Daniel Robert John Campbell.
Health Services and Hospital Insurance:
 to August 1972  Ralph Raymond Loffmark, Q.C.
Travel Industry:
 to August 1972  William Kenneth Kiernan.
Social Welfare:
 to October 1969 Daniel Robert John Campbell.
October 1969 to April 1970... r.. Philip Arthur Gaglardi.
(At 1970 Session the Department of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement was
established:
Statute Law Amendment Act, 1970, Statutes of British Columbia,  1970,
chap. 44, sec. 5.
Rehabilitation and Social Improvement:
April 1970 to August 1972 Philip Arthur Gaglardi.
Recreation and Conservation:
 to August 1972  William Kenneth Kiernan.
Highways:
 to August 1972 Wesley Drewett Black.
Member of the Executive Council Without Portfolio:
 to October 27, 1969 ..Philip Arthur Gaglardi.
 to August 1972  .Isabel Pearl Dawson.
 to August 1972  .Patricia Jane Jordan.
 to August 1972  Grace Mary McCarthy.
President of the Council:
 to August 1972  William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
Speaker:
 to July 24, 1972  ....William Harvey Murray.
 AA 86
BRITISH COLUMBIA
THIRTIETH PARLIAMENT
Election
August 30, 1972.
First Session: October 17 to October 27, 1972.
Second Session: January 25 to April 18, 1973.
Third Session: September 13 to November 7, 1973.
Fourth Session: January 31 to June 20; August 9; November 1 to 26; 1974;
and February 17,  1975.*
Fifth Session: February 18 to June 26, and October 7, 1975.
Electoral District
Members
Alberni  	
Skelly, Robert Evans (NDP).
Atlin	
Calder, Frank Arthur (NDP).
Boundary-Similkameen	
Richter, Francis Xavier (Soc. Credit).
Burnaby-Edmonds	
Dowding, Gordon Hudson (NDP).
Burnaby North
Dailly, Eileen Elizabeth (NDP).
Burnaby-Willingdon	
Lorimer, James (NDP).
Cariboo  	
Fraser, Alexander Vaughan (Soc. Credit).
Chilliwack	
Schroeder, Harvey Wilfred (Soc. Credit).
Chabot, James R. (Soc. Credit).
Columbia River	
Comox   	
Sanford, Karen (NDP).
Coquitlam
Barrett, David (NDP).
Cowichan-Malahat	
Strachan, Robert Martin (NDP)  (resigned, October 5, 1975; ap
pointed Agent-General in London).
Delta                •     —.   —
Liden, Carl (NDP).
Dewdney  ~.
Rolston, Peter Carson (NDP).
Esquimalt           	
Gorst, James Henry (NDP).
Fort George	
Nunweiler, Allan Alfred (NDP).
Kamloops       	
Anderson, Gerald Hamilton (NDP).
Kootenay.. 	
Nimsick, Leo Thomas (NDP).
Langley     	
McClelland, Robert H. (Soc. Credit).
Mackenzie »               	
Lockstead, Donald Frederick (NDP).
Nanaimo	
Stupich, David Daniel (NDP).
Nelson-Creston  	
Nicolson, Lome (NDP).
New Westminster	
Cocke, Dennis Geoffrey (NDP).
North Okanagan	
Jordan, Patricia Jane (Soc. Credit).
North Peace River... 	
Smith, Dean Edward (Soc. Credit).
North Vancouver-Capilano
Brousson, David Maurice (Lib.) (resigned, October 23, 1973).
Gibson, Gordon Fulerton (Lib.)   (by-election, February 5,  1974
[Brousson]).
North Vancouver-Seymour
Gabelmann, Colin Stuart (NDP).
Oak Bay	
Wallace, George Scott (Prog.-Cons.).
Kelly, Douglas Tynwald (NDP).
Omineca.—     	
Prince Rupert	
Lea, Graham Richard (NDP).
Revelstoke-Slocan	
Richmond  	
King, William Stewart (NDP).
Steves, Harold (NDP).
Rossland-Trail 	
D'Arcy, Christopher (NDP).
Saanich and The Islands
Curtis, Hugh Austin? (Prog.-Cons.).
Shuswap  	
Lewis, Donald Emerson (NDP).
Skeena	
Dent, Hartley Douglas (NDP).
South Okanagan 	
Bennett, William Andrew Cecil (Soc. Credit) (resigned, June 5,
1973).
Bennett, William Richards (Soc. Credit) (by-election, September
7, 1973 [Bennett]).
South Peace River	
Phillips, Donald McGray (Soc. Credit).
Surrey	
Hall, Ernest (NDP).
Vancouver-Burrard (2)
Brown, Rosemary (NDP).
Levi, Norman (NDP).
Vancouver Centre (2)	
Barnes, Emery Oakland (NDP).
Lauk, Gary Vernon (NDP).
Dvernment adjourned  the Legislative Sessions,  leaving prorogation to  the day
* In  1974 and  1975 the G
before the Fifth Session, and the calling of the general election.
t Mr. Curtis left the Progressive-Conservative Party on October 25, 1974 to join the Social Credit caucus.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 87
Electoral District Members
Vancouver East (2) -...Macdonald, Alexander Barrett (NDP).
Williams, Robert Arthur (NDP).
Vancouver-Little Mountain   Cummings, Roy Thomas (NDP).
(2) Young, Phyllis Florence (NDP).
Vancouver-Point Grey (2)....Gardom, Garde Basilt (Lib.).
McGeer, Patrick Luceyt (Lib.).
Vancouver Scuth (2) Radford, Jack (NDP).
Webster, Daisy (NDP).
Victoria (2)  Morrison, Newell R. (Soc. Credit).
Anderson, David Alexander (Lib.).
West Vancouver-Howe
Sound Williams, Louis Allant (Lib.).
Yale-Lillooet  Hartley, William Leonard (NDP).
Executive Council, Thirtieth Parliament, September 1972 to December 1975
Premier:
September 1972 to December 1975 David Barrett.
Provincial Secretary:
September 1972 to December 1975  Ernest Hall.
Attorney-General:
September 1972 to December 1975 Alexander Barrett Macdonald, Q.C.
Lands, Forests, and Water Resources:
September 1972 to December 1975 Robert Arthur Williams.
Public Works:
September 1972 to December 1975 William Leonard Hartley.
Finance:
September 1972 to October 1975 David Barrett.
October 1975 to December 1975.. ..David Daniel Stupich.
Agriculture:
September 1972 to December 1975 David Daniel Stupich.
Mines and Petroleum Resources:
September 1972 to October 1975 Leo Thomas Nimsick.
October 1975 to December 1975 Gary Vernon Lauk.
Education:
September 1972 to December 1975 Eileen Elizabeth Dailly.
Commercial Transport:
September 1972 to May 1973 James Gibson Lorimer.
(At 1973 Session the Department of Transport and Communications was established: '
Department of  Transport and  Communications Act,  Statutes  of  British
Columbia, 1973, chap. 112).
Transport and Communications:
May 1973 to October 1975 Robert Martin Strachan.
October 1975 to December 1975 Carl Liden.
Labour:
September 1972 to December 1975 William Stewart King.
t Messrs. Gardom, McGeer, and Williams left the Liberal Party on September 28, 1975, to join the Social
Credit caucus.
 AA 88 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce:
September 1972 to May 1973 ....Alexander Barrett Macdonald, Q.C.
May 1973 to June 1974  Gary Vernon Lauk.
(At 1974 Session the Department of Economic Development was established:
Department of Economic Development Act, Statutes of British Columbia,
1974, chap. 26.)
Economic Development:
June 1974 to December 1975 Gary Vernon Lauk.
Municipal Affairs:
September 1972 to December 1975.....: James Gibson Lorimer.
Travel Industry:
September 1972 to October 1975 Ernest Hall.
October 1975 to December 1975 Leo Thomas Nimsick.
Health Services and Hospital Insurance:
September 1972 to November 1973...... Dennis Geoffrey Cocke.
(At 1973 Session the Department of Health was established:
Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance Amendment Act,
Statutes of British Columbia, 1973 (2nd Sess.), chap. 109.)
Health:
November 1973 to December 1975 Dennis Geoffrey Cocke.
Rehabilitation and Social Improvement:
September 1972 to May 1973 Norman Levi.
(At 1973 Session the Department of Human Resources was established:
Statute Law Amendment Act, 1973, Statutes of British Columbia, 1973, chap.
84, sec. 6.)
Human Resources:
May 1973 to December 1975 Norman Levi.
Recreation and Conservation:
September 1972 to May 1973  Robert Arthur Williams.
May 1973 to December 1975  Jack Radford.
Highways:
September 1972 to May 1973  Robert Martin Strachan.
May 1973 to December 1975  Graham Richard Lea.
Consumer Services:
November 1973 to December 1975 Phyllis Florence Young.
(At 1973 (2nd Sess.) the Department of Consumer Services was established:
Department of Consumer Services Act, Statutes of British Columbia, 1973
(2nd Sess.), chap. 108.)
Housing:
November 1973 to December 1975 Lome Nicolson.
(At 1973 (2nd Sess.) the Department of Housing was established:
Department of Housing Act, Statutes of British Columbia, 1973 (2nd Sess.),
chap. 110.)
Member of the Executive Council Without Portfolio:
September 1972 to July 1973  Frank Calder.
May 1973 to November 1973 Lome Nicolson.
May 1973 to November 1973 Phyllis Florence Young.
June 1974 to December 1975 Allan Alfred Nunweiler.
President of the Council:
September 1972 to December 1975 ..David Barrett.
Speaker:
October   17,   1972,  to  November  3,
1975   Gordon Hudson Dowding.
 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY,  1975 AA 89
APPENDIX D
Reports to Be Tabled by the Department of the Provincial Secretary at the First
Session of the Thirty-first Legislative Assembly, Spring 1976
Capital Improvement District Commission, Year Ended
Statement of Receipts and Disbursements   March 31, 1975
College Pension    August 31, 1975
Department of the Provincial Secretary      December 31, 1975
Lotteries Branch          March 31, 1975
Members of the Legislative Assembly Superannuation     March 31, 1975
Municipal Superannuation      December 31, 1974
Public Service Commission        December 31, 1975
Public Service Group Insurance  June 30, 1975
Public Service Superannuation       March 31, 1975
Teachers' Pensions        December 31, 1974
Printed by K. M. MacDonald, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1976
1,030-676-9347
 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0377998/manifest

Comment

Related Items